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Research in the Language Classroom: State of the Art  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available New trends in language teaching have resulted in a move towards research in thelanguage classroom. A brief overview of classroom research reveals three distinct but interrelatedresearch paradigms: classroom-centered research, classroom process research, andqualitative research, respectively.

Mohammad Ali SALMANI-NODOUSHAN

2006-10-01

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Research Currents: Does Classroom Drama Affect the Arts of Language?  

Science.gov (United States)

Presents an overview of research on classroom drama which shows that its use produces positive effects on children's reading, writing, and oral language. Suggests additional questions requiring exploration, and urges researchers to emphasize qualitative rather than quantitative analyses. (ARH)

Wagner, Betty Jane

1988-01-01

3

Second Language Writing: Research Insights for the Classroom. Second Language Writing: Research Insights for the Classroom.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The study of composition at the post-secondary level is a relatively new practice which has become widespread only during the past half-century. More recent is the emergence over the past two to three decades of composition studies as an academic discipline, and even more recent is the awareness that composition research and pedagogy must expand to meet the needs of the ESL population. As growing numbers of international students flood colleges and universities in the English-speaking world, and as English becomes increasingly important as a world language, ESL composition is a burgeoning field. The study of composition at the post-secondary level is a relatively new practice which has become widespread only during the past half-century. More recent is the emergence over the past two to three decades of composition studies as an academic discipline, and even more recent is the awareness that composition research and pedagogy must expand to meet the needs of the ESL population. As growing numbers of international students flood colleges and universities in the English-speaking world, and as English becomes increasingly important as a world language, ESL composition is a burgeoning field.

Madeleine Youmans

2008-04-01

4

Neurolinguistic and Psycholinguistic Research on Learning Modes of Older Language Learners: Classroom Implications.  

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Review of neurolinguistic and psycholinguistic research regarding older (over 40 years of age) second language learners suggests classroom implications for dealing with this population's pronunciation problems and ways to capitalize on their superiority to younger students in terms of higher order linguistic processing. (CB)

Homstad, Alice

1987-01-01

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Classroom interaction and language learning Classroom interaction and language learning  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In the field of second and foreign language learning, interaction has long been considered to play an important role. Studies taking a more traditional, formalist perspective on language and learning have focused on the role that interaction plays in helping learners to assimilate and internalize knowledge of linguistic forms in the target language. More recently, a group of scholars concerned with interaction and additional language learning, or the learning of languages other than the mother tongue, has begun to move away from this more traditional perspective and into areas outside of what has generally been considered the main focus of the applied linguistics field. Taking more of a sociocultural perspective on language and learning, this research is concerned with documenting the links between student participation in particular kinds of classroom interaction and their communicative development in the target language. In the field of second and foreign language learning, interaction has long been considered to play an important role. Studies taking a more traditional, formalist perspective on language and learning have focused on the role that interaction plays in helping learners to assimilate and internalize knowledge of linguistic forms in the target language. More recently, a group of scholars concerned with interaction and additional language learning, or the learning of languages other than the mother tongue, has begun to move away from this more traditional perspective and into areas outside of what has generally been considered the main focus of the applied linguistics field. Taking more of a sociocultural perspective on language and learning, this research is concerned with documenting the links between student participation in particular kinds of classroom interaction and their communicative development in the target language.

Joan Kelly Hall

2008-04-01

6

Plenary Speech: Researching Complex Dynamic Systems--"Retrodictive Qualitative Modelling" in the Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

While approaching second language acquisition from a complex dynamic systems perspective makes a lot of intuitive sense, it is difficult for a number of reasons to operationalise such a dynamic approach in research terms. For example, the most common research paradigms in the social sciences tend to examine variables in relative isolation rather…

Dörnyei, Zoltán

2014-01-01

7

Journals in the Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article, the author describes some of the ways that journals can be used as teaching tools in the language classroom; in fact, the suggestions he makes could be applied to the use of journals in teaching just about any subject. He begins by describing the concept of writing to learn, which is the theoretical foundation that journals are…

Baxter, Scott J.

2009-01-01

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A research program for foreign language teachers : building up investigation in classroom contexts  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

When researchers in the field of Applied Linguistics or L2 teachers try to carry out any kind of research, several problems arise. The first one is knowing how to start the process of ‘researching’. The second problem, perhaps more frustrating, arises when one finds out that one cannot grasp the complexities to be taken into account when getting started on the research task at hand. Third, one has to find out how to adapt the different steps of the research to one’s ow...

Luque Agullo?, Gloria; Ramos A?lvarez, Manuel Miguel

2004-01-01

9

Code Choice in the Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Code Choice in the Language Classroom argues that the foreign language classroom is and should be regarded as a multilingual community of practice rather than as a perpetually deficient imitator of an exclusive second-language environment. From a sociocultural and ecological perspective, Levine guides the reader through a theoretical, empirical,…

Levine, Glenn S.

2011-01-01

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English in the Chinese foreign language classroom  

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Chinese is an ancient language, but the present scope of its global study is unprecedented. Comprehending the impacts of worldwide linguistic realities on 'Chinese as a Foreign Language' (CFL) teachers and students will be critical to its long-term success. The most important phenomenon has been the establishment of English as a lingua franca, especially in the expanding marketplaces of Asia. This book examines the role of English as a medium of instruction in CFL classrooms. It begins by integrating existing studies on the global spread of English with research on English as a medium of secon

Wang, Danping

2013-01-01

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Research for the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Current research upholds the significance of formative assessments in the classroom. Formative assessments are relevant to theory and practice; they offer positive possibilities with respect to both policy and pedagogy. At the policy level, formative assessments offer a means to minimize the negative effects of highstakes testing. The culture of…

Gorlewski, Julie, Ed.

2008-01-01

12

Conquering Language Babel in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This article is an exploration of the available applications for speech to speech real-time translation software for use in the classroom. Three different types of machine language translation (MLT) software and devices are reviewed for their features and practical application in secondary education classrooms.

Minichino, Mario; Berson, Michael J.

2012-01-01

13

Classroom interaction and language learning Classroom interaction and language learning  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In the field of second and foreign language learning, interaction has long been considered to play an important role. Studies taking a more traditional, formalist perspective on language and learning have focused on the role that interaction plays in helping learners to assimilate and internalize knowledge of linguistic forms in the target language. More recently, a group of scholars concerned with interaction and additional language learning, or the learning of languages other than the ...

Joan Kelly Hall

2008-01-01

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Communicative Skill and the Multilevel Language Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Focuses on speech act theory and the demands of the multilevel language classroom, noting that special attention should be paid in language classes to what is meant, as distinct from what is said. Using the communicative approach to language teaching and crossing cultural boundaries, cross-cultural conversations are being developed that are…

Rado, Marta

1984-01-01

15

Language of Peace in the Peaceful Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

For the past 30 years, peace educators have drawn attention to the vital role of language--the caring, creative words that describe and enhance peace. The language of peace has evolved through several stages of growth and complexity. It also offers a heritage of caring and acceptance for all children who enter through educators' classroom doors.…

Stomfay-Stitz, Aline; Wheeler, Edyth

2006-01-01

16

Second Language Reading Research: A Critical Review  

Science.gov (United States)

Second language research and classroom practice have tended to sideline reading in favor of an emphasis on the oral language development of the English Language Learner (ELL). First-language (L1) reading research is well developed but has limited usefulness to the teacher or researcher interested in second-language (L2) reading. Developing L2…

Hazelrigg, Amy C.

2008-01-01

17

Body Language in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Ralph Waldo Emerson and Mae West would seem to have little in common, but there is one thing they both understood--the importance of body language. Educators, psychologists, anthropologists and sociologists define body language or nonverbal communication as communication without words. It includes overt behaviors such as facial expressions, eye…

Miller, Patrick W.

2005-01-01

18

Silent Language in the Classroom. Fastback 86.  

Science.gov (United States)

This booklet discusses four aspects of nonverbal communication: understanding silent language; nonverbal communication in the classroom; how the unspoken, unwritten curriculum operates; and measuring nonverbal behavior. The discussion focuses on the nature of nonverbal communication, nonverbal communication and involvement, humaneness and the…

Galloway, Charles

19

TEACHING CREATIVE WRITING IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSROOM  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Writing, like all other aspects of language, is communicative. In our real life we write e-mails, notes, covering letters, reports, curriculums, assignments, essays and so on. Some of us write articles or work on forums and websites. A few write stories and poems. All of these writing tasks have a communicative purpose and a target audience. In the English language classroom, however, writing often lacks this. There are many reasons, as there are lots of ways to make the writing...

Rodriques, Marku Monis And M. V.

2012-01-01

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Naturalistic acquisition in an early language classroom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study investigated whether it is possible to provide naturalistic second language acquisition (SLA of vocabulary for young learners in a classroom situation without resorting to a classical immersion approach. Participants were 60 first-grade pupils in Norwegian two elementary schools in their first year. The control group followed regular instruction as prescribed by the school curriculum, while the experimental group received increased naturalistic target language input. This entailed extensive use of English by the teacher during English classes, and also during morning meetings and for simple instructions and classroom management throughout the day. Our hypothesis was that it is possible to facilitate naturalistic acquisition through better quality target language exposure within a normal curriculum. The students' English vocabulary knowledge was measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, version 4 (PPVT-IV, Dunn & Dunn, 2007, at the beginning and the end of the first year of school. Findings are that 1 early-start second-language (L2 programs in school do not in themselves guarantee vocabulary development in the first year, 2 a focus on increased exposure to the L2 can lead to a significant increase in receptive vocabulary comprehension in the course of only eight months, and 3 even with relatively modest input, learners in such an early-start L2 program can display vocabulary acquisition comparable in some respects to that of younger native children matched on vocabulary size. The overall conclusion is that naturalistic vocabulary acquisition is in fact possible in a classroom setting.

AnneDahl

2014-04-01

 
 
 
 
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Mind the Gap: How a Project in Alberta Attempted to Narrow the Gap between Classroom Teachers and Language Education Research  

Science.gov (United States)

This article presents the development, rollout, and subsequent uptake of the Alberta Teachers of English as a Second Language (ATESL) document Best Practices for "Adult English as a Second Language (ESL)/Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (LINC) Programming" in the light of literature on teacher engagement with second-language

Light, Justine; Gnida, Sara

2012-01-01

22

Task-Based Language Teaching in Online Ab Initio Foreign Language Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

Task-based language teaching (TBLT) has been attracting the attention of researchers for more than 2 decades. Research on various aspects of TBLT has been accumulating, including the evaluation studies on the implementation of TBLT in classrooms. The evaluation studies on students' and teachers' reactions to TBLT in the online courses are starting…

Lai, Chun; Zhao, Yong; Wang, Jiawen

2011-01-01

23

Classroom Discourse Of Malay Language Lesson: A Critical Analysis  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Research on the teaching and learning process of the Malay language in the classroom usually focuses on the method, content, strategy and teaching aids. Moving away from this norm, this research article examines the process from the discourse analysis perspective called pedagogic discourse analysis, with an adaptation of Fairclough’s Critical Discourse Analysis Framework (1992; 1995). The discussion is based on several hours of teaching-learning case study conducted in a secondary school cl...

Idris Aman; Rosniah Mustaffa

2006-01-01

24

Naturalistic acquisition in an early language classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated whether it is possible to provide naturalistic second language acquisition (SLA) of vocabulary for young learners in a classroom situation without resorting to a classical immersion approach. Participants were 60 first-grade pupils in two Norwegian elementary schools in their first year. The control group followed regular instruction as prescribed by the school curriculum, while the experimental group received increased naturalistic target language input. This entailed extensive use of English by the teacher during English classes, and also during morning meetings and for simple instructions and classroom management throughout the day. Our hypothesis was that it is possible to facilitate naturalistic acquisition through better quality target language exposure within a normal curriculum. The students' English vocabulary knowledge was measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, version 4 (PPVT-IV, Dunn and Dunn, 2007a), at the beginning and the end of the first year of school. Findings are that (1) early-start second-language (L2) programs in school do not in themselves guarantee vocabulary development in the first year, (2) a focus on increased exposure to the L2 can lead to a significant increase in receptive vocabulary comprehension in the course of only 8 months, and (3) even with relatively modest input, learners in such an early-start L2 program can display vocabulary acquisition comparable in some respects to that of younger native children matched on vocabulary size. The overall conclusion is that naturalistic vocabulary acquisition is in fact possible in a classroom setting. PMID:24860518

Dahl, Anne; Vulchanova, Mila D

2014-01-01

25

FACEBOOK GROUPS AS A SUPPORTING TOOL FOR LANGUAGE CLASSROOMS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper attempts to present a review of Facebook group pages as an educational tool for language learning. One of the primary needs of foreign language learners is to gain the opportunity to use the target language outside the classroom practice. Social media communication provides occasions for learners to receive input and produce output while engaging in negotiation of meaning. In line with this point, teachers can instigate class group pages in the social media in an attempt to provide a space for practice and communication free of the traditional pedagogic concerns of a typical classroom. The distinctive discursive behaviour of Facebook group pages helps one to achieve that attempt. In light of these views, the researcher, in this study, formed a group page to understand the dynamics of social media environment as a supporting tool for language classrooms. This paper addresses various features which make social media a unique place to contribute to the sense of class community and collaboration outside the classroom. The face-to face classroom is a controlled communication event, that is, teachers and students are required to be in the classroom at the same time but a teacher’s use of Facebook is an attempt to communicate with students outside of that controlled environment where teachers can meet students in their territory. When compared to its disadvantages, the advantages of setting a class group page on the social media outweigh. Students can feel motivated to contribute to an online community if they subsequently receive support or help. It also leads students to feel that they are being supported by a whole portion of their class community and promotes students’ desire to maintain a valued relationship with others. Students continue developing and strengthening relationships with others.

Arzu Ekoç

2014-07-01

26

Social Obstacles to Intercultural Competence in America's Language Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

In contrast with debates over language pedagogy or aptitude, this paper examines seven societal obstacles which impact the success of classroom language learning and the development of intercultural competence in American language classrooms. These include expectations for teacher preparation, language proficiency and target language use;…

Fonseca-Greber, Bonnie

2010-01-01

27

Language Teacher Research Engagement  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this review is to provide a critical analysis of language teacher research engagement. The term "research engagement" here covers both engagement IN teacher research (i.e. by doing it) as well as engagement "with" research (i.e. by reading and using it). Research engagement is commonly recommended to language teachers as a potentially…

Borg, Simon

2010-01-01

28

The Language of Ideas and the Language of Display: Reconceptualizing "Academic Language" in Linguistically Diverse Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

Introducing a distinction between language of ideas and language of display as a means of reconceptualizing what counts as "academic" language, I examine one brief stretch of talk by a small group of linguistically diverse 7th grade students in a U.S. mainstream social studies classroom designed to maximize academic and language

Bunch, George C.

2014-01-01

29

Behavioral Problems in the Classroom and Underlying Language Difficulties  

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Full Text Available Dealing with the behavioral problems of students is one of many dimensions of most educators’ and schools’ requirements. While research has repeatedly shown that a large number of children with behavior problems have underlying, unrecognized language difficulties, few schools have implemented programs where children with problem behavior are evaluated in terms of these skills. This paper provides information to teachers about (1 the links between behavior and language, (2 the levels at which language can be impaired including phonology, grammar and pragmatics, (3 how language impairment can be recognized and (4 what can be done in the classroom to support the language skills of this group. Special attention is paid to the pragmatic level of language as impairment at this level may be misdiagnosed as behavior problems. The information provided is targeted towards pre-K and elementary school age, but can also be adapted for older children.

Jodi Tommerdahl

2013-04-01

30

Multimodality and Children's Participation in Classrooms: Instances of Research  

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This paper describes how language and literacy classrooms became more participatory, agentive spaces through addressing a central issue in teaching and learning: the forms of representation through which children make their meanings. It reconsiders pedagogic research in under-resourced Gauteng classrooms during the period 1994-2005, during the…

Newfield, Denise

2011-01-01

31

Classroom Management Skills of The Language Teachers  

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Full Text Available Teachers or educators, most of the time, concentrate on the theoretical aspects oflanguage teaching and study them as much as possible. However, in practice, we start thinkingthat we will have to keep a number of people together in the same place. These are often thepeople who come from many different backgrounds and whose expectations differ. In thiscase, it becomes more and more difficult to appeal to every individual in class. Therefore, asteachers we should initially be trained on how to manage our classrooms and how to providethe necessary environment to put into practice the things we have learned to teach a language.Obviously, we need management skills as well as the language teaching skill. Actually, it isnot as difficult as many people think. As teachers if we fulfill our duties properly, a wellmanagedclass will ensue. In this study, therefore, the definition of class management isregarded roughly “to keep people from different environments directed to one single goal”.When this is accomplished, we are unlikely to live discipline problems.

Arif Sar?çoban

2005-04-01

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Individual classroom experiences: a sociocultural comparison for understanding efl classroom language learning Individual classroom experiences: a sociocultural comparison for understanding efl classroom language learning  

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Full Text Available Este trabalho compara as experiências de sala de aula (ESA de duas universitárias na aprendizagem de língua inglesa. As ESA emergiram de entrevistas individuais, onde vídeos das aulas promoveram a reflexão. A análise revelou que experiências de natureza cognitiva, social ou afetiva influem diretamente no processo de aprendizagem e as que se referem ao contexto, à história, crenças e metas dos alunos influem indiretamente no mesmo. A singularidade de algumas experiências levou à sua categorização como ESA individuais (ESAI. Ao comparar as ESAI de duas informantes, a importância da análise sociocultural do processo de aprendizagem de sala de aula fica evidente. Concluiremos com uma defesa do valor da teoria sociocultural no estudo da aprendizagem de língua estrangeira em sala de aula e com a apresentação das implicações deste estudo para pesquisadores e professores. This paper compares the classroom experiences (CEs of two university students in their process of learning English as a foreign language (EFL. The CEs emerged from individual interviews, where classroom videos promoted reflection. The analysis revealed that cognitive, social and affective experiences directly influence the learning process and that those which refer to setting, learner’s personal background, beliefs and goal influence the learning process indirectly. The analysis also revealed the singularity of some of these CEs that led to their categorization as individual CEs (ICEs. When comparing the ICEs of the two participants, the importance of a sociocultural analysis of the classroom learning process becomes evident. We conclude with an analysis of the value of sociocultural theory in the study of classroom EFL learning and with the implications of this study for teachers and researchers.

Laura Miccoli

2008-04-01

33

Classroom tandem – Outlining a Model for Language Learning and Instruction  

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The aim of this paper is to outline classroom tandem by comparing it with informal tandem learning contexts and other language instruction methods. Classroom tandem is used for second language instruction in mixed language groups in the subjects of Finnish and Swedish as L2. Tandem learning entails that two persons with different mother tongues learn each other’s native languages in reciprocal cooperation. The students function, in turns, as a second language learner and as a model in the n...

Karjalainen, Katri; Po?rn, Michaela; Rusk, Fredrik; Bjo?rkskog, Linda

2013-01-01

34

Humor as Safe House in the Foreign Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Analyses of second language (L2) classroom interaction often categorize joking and other humorous talk by students as disruptive, off-task behavior, thereby rendering it important only from a classroom management perspective. Studies of language play, however, have illustrated that such jocular talk not only allows students to construct a broader…

Pomerantz, Anne; Bell, Nancy D.

2011-01-01

35

Preferred Learning Styles in the Second Language Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Outlines the preferred learning styles of students studying second languages, offering suggestions for their application in second-language classrooms. The paper describes the right-brain/left-brain theory and how the two brain hemispheres are involved in learning; presents four classroom strategies (diversification, contextualization,…

Cincotta, Madeline Strong

1998-01-01

36

Harmonious Learning: Yoga in the English Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This article looks at one way for teachers to make classrooms emotionally, mentally, and physically healthy places to learn--places where tensions and stresses are lessened and where teachers and students are concentrating, yet relaxed. "Harmonious language learning classroom" is the term the author coined to describe this kind of language

Morgan, Lisa

2011-01-01

37

Classroom Discourse Of Malay Language Lesson: A Critical Analysis  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Research on the teaching and learning process of the Malay language in the classroom usually focuses on the method, content, strategy and teaching aids. Moving away from this norm, this research article examines the process from the discourse analysis perspective called pedagogic discourse analysis, with an adaptation of Fairclough’s Critical Discourse Analysis Framework (1992; 1995. The discussion is based on several hours of teaching-learning case study conducted in a secondary school classroom, which emphasizes integrated curriculum in an attempt to understand the unseen social processes, i.e. teacher dominance in discourse. The research findings indicate that teacher dominance is concealed in turn-taking system, types of questions posed by the teacher, discourse control and the overall structure of the discourse, which have their implications on the implementation of the National Education Philosophy. Contrary to the emphasis on student centredness and thinking skills as laid out by the Integrated Curriculum for Secondary School, it is found that the nature of the learning process in the classroom hardly focused on students’ thinking skills. This article argues that students should be given the opportunity to exercise their critical and creative potentials.

Idris Aman

2006-01-01

38

Bodies and Language: Process Drama and Intercultural Language Learning in a Beginner Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article the author draws on classroom video recordings and student commentary to explore ways in which the kinaesthetic elements of a process drama provided the context and the space for beginner additional language learners to engage with intercultural language learning. In the light of student comments in interviews and questionnaires,…

Rothwell, Julia

2011-01-01

39

Communication Strategies Used by High School English Language Learners in Multilingual Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

In this study, twenty-five high school English language learners were observed in their classrooms in a New York City public school while they worked in small groups. All observations were video recorded or done by the researcher while in the classrooms. The videos were then transcribed. Communication strategies that the participants used were…

Spromberg, Sarah

2011-01-01

40

Corrective Feedback in Second Language Classrooms  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: English Abstract in spanish En el presente trabajo procuro analizar el rol de la asesoría remedial o retroalimentación correctiva, precisamente Recasts (corrección implícita), en la interacción entre profesores y alumnos de una segunda lengua. De esta manera, analizo los efectos de la corrección implícita en la auto-corrección [...] de los alumnos para finalmente llegar a la siguiente conclusión: los alumnos avanzados son capaces de percibir este tipo de corrección implícita ya que sus habilidades cognitivas están más desarrolladas. Dos grupos de la Universidad RSH son estudiados. Cinco estudiantes pertenecientes a un nivel intermedio y cinco a nivel avanzado han sido categorizados de acuerdo al número de cursos tomados durante los semestres en la universidad. Mi planteamiento se relaciona a que la corrección implícita (recasts) serán sólo efectiva con estudiantes cognitivamente más avanzados ya que son capaces de hacer inferencias con mayor rapidez, auto-corregirse y así reformular las oraciones mal formuladas y estructuradas. Abstract in english In this paper I attempt to analyse and survey the role of corrective feedback -more specifically recasts- in the interaction between teachers and L2 students in a classroom. Thus, I explore the effects of recasts on students' self-correction in order to finally come to the conclusión whether or not [...] students are able to no tice this type of underlying correction and, therefore, reformulate their ill-formed utterances. Besides, I also undertake a comprehensive survey of the literature on the topic. Two different groups of students from the English Teaching Trainig Programme at Universidad Católica Raúl Silva Henrríquez are studied. Five students taking English courses at an intermedíate level and five taking advanced English courses. Intermedíate and advanced students have been categorised on the basis of their number of English language courses they have taken. Intermedíate students have taken four, whereas advanced have taken seven. In this paper the point at issue is whether harmful and ineffective or essential and rather effective, and whether recasts are noticeable for students to 'read between lines' and figure out the underlying correction. I take the stand that recasts are only effective when using them with advanced students as they are more cognitively advanced and, therefore, able to make inferences and interpret the implicit message to reformulate their mistakes.The results as well as the tests on the whole, clearly demónstrate that recasts as a corrective technique happen to be a bit more effective with advanced students than with intermedíate students, though the difference is not striking.

Leonardo, Véliz C.

 
 
 
 
41

Corrective Feedback in Second Language Classrooms  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this paper I attempt to analyse and survey the role of corrective feedback -more specifically recasts- in the interaction between teachers and L2 students in a classroom. Thus, I explore the effects of recasts on students' self-correction in order to finally come to the conclusión whether or not students are able to no tice this type of underlying correction and, therefore, reformulate their ill-formed utterances. Besides, I also undertake a comprehensive survey of the literature on the topic. Two different groups of students from the English Teaching Trainig Programme at Universidad Católica Raúl Silva Henrríquez are studied. Five students taking English courses at an intermedíate level and five taking advanced English courses. Intermedíate and advanced students have been categorised on the basis of their number of English language courses they have taken. Intermedíate students have taken four, whereas advanced have taken seven. In this paper the point at issue is whether harmful and ineffective or essential and rather effective, and whether recasts are noticeable for students to 'read between lines' and figure out the underlying correction. I take the stand that recasts are only effective when using them with advanced students as they are more cognitively advanced and, therefore, able to make inferences and interpret the implicit message to reformulate their mistakes.The results as well as the tests on the whole, clearly demónstrate that recasts as a corrective technique happen to be a bit more effective with advanced students than with intermedíate students, though the difference is not striking.En el presente trabajo procuro analizar el rol de la asesoría remedial o retroalimentación correctiva, precisamente Recasts (corrección implícita, en la interacción entre profesores y alumnos de una segunda lengua. De esta manera, analizo los efectos de la corrección implícita en la auto-corrección de los alumnos para finalmente llegar a la siguiente conclusión: los alumnos avanzados son capaces de percibir este tipo de corrección implícita ya que sus habilidades cognitivas están más desarrolladas. Dos grupos de la Universidad RSH son estudiados. Cinco estudiantes pertenecientes a un nivel intermedio y cinco a nivel avanzado han sido categorizados de acuerdo al número de cursos tomados durante los semestres en la universidad. Mi planteamiento se relaciona a que la corrección implícita (recasts serán sólo efectiva con estudiantes cognitivamente más avanzados ya que son capaces de hacer inferencias con mayor rapidez, auto-corregirse y así reformular las oraciones mal formuladas y estructuradas.

Leonardo Véliz C

2008-01-01

42

Games for the Foreign Language Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Two marketing games are described, "Le Marche Francais" and "El Mercado: The Mexican Market Comes to Life in the Spanish Classroom." Both are patterned after a published game entitled "Market: A Simulation Game." The adaptation in each instance relied on simplifying the original game and presenting it in a form understandable to middle school…

McMillan, Nancy; Madaras, Susan W.

43

The Adult Heritage Spanish Speaker in the Foreign Language Classroom: A Phenomenography  

Science.gov (United States)

For heritage speakers, the Spanish classroom is not the first point of contact with their native language. Though such learners would benefit from an educational philosophy that affirms the heritage language as a springboard for learning and increased self-awareness, there has been little support for non-dominant language research in the USA. This…

Felix, Angela

2009-01-01

44

"Tu Necesitas Preguntar en Espanol": Negotiating Good Language Learner Identity in a Spanish Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This article builds on Norton and Toohey's (2001) critique of good language learner (GLL) research to illustrate how college students in an advanced Spanish conversation course drew on particular ideologies of language and foreign language learning to construct and negotiate their classroom identities. I argue that these ideologies were implicated…

Pomerantz, Anne

2008-01-01

45

Facebook Groups as a Supporting Tool for Language Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper attempts to present a review of Facebook group pages as an educational tool for language learning. One of the primary needs of foreign language learners is to gain the opportunity to use the target language outside the classroom practice. Social media communication provides occasions for learners to receive input and produce output…

Ekoc, Arzu

2014-01-01

46

Linguagem, NTIC e a sala de aula: o que propõem as pesquisas de intervenção / Language, ICT and the classroom: what interventional researches propose  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Desenvolveu-se uma análise de aspectos de linguagem e novas tecnologias de informação e comunicação (NTIC) nas teses e dissertações de caráter interventivo em sala de aula de Língua Portuguesa, produzidas entre 2000 e 2010 nos programas de pós-graduação nacionais de Letras e Linguística. Para este a [...] rtigo, foram abordadas as concepções de linguagem e de aprendizagem, os blogs de turma e o destaque dado a eles nos estudos, além do perfil e lugar dessas pesquisas de intervenção no âmbito da Linguística Aplicada. Ao final, com base nesses aspectos, procurou-se apresentar não só um balanço da produção no referido período, como também sinalizar desafios para as futuras ações e pesquisas em Linguística Aplicada nesse campo. Abstract in english We developed an analysis of linguistic aspects and of how information and communication technology (ICT) was treated in theses and dissertations that deal with interventional research in Portuguese language classes, produced between 2000 and 2012 in national post-graduation programs of Language and [...] Linguistics. We discuss here conceptions of language and learning adopted by the researches, the emphasis they give to class blogs and the features and place of these interventional researches in the scope of Applied Linguistics. Finally, based on these aspects, we tried to present not only a balance of the production in that period, but signaling as well challenges for future actions and research in Applied Linguistics in this field.

Núbio Delanne Ferraz, Mafra; Carla Viana, Coscarelli.

2013-09-01

47

Affect and the EFL Classroom: Language Contact in Addressing  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This study investigates affect or affective elements between the teacher and students in EFL classroom interaction. Affect is regarded as a linguistically significant phenomenon in interactions, which are analysed contextually. The focus is on addressing students, (who are native speakers of Japanese), by teachers (native speakers of English). This verbal act in EFL classroom designates students’ names that come from their native language and it indicates parts of their self-ide...

Taniguchi, Yuko

2005-01-01

48

Codeswitching in the Multilingual English First Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper focuses on the role of codeswitching (CS) by isiZulu (Zulu) native language (NL) junior secondary learners in English first language (EL1) multilingual classrooms in South Africa. In spite of the educational transformation in South Africa, and the recognition of CS (by education policy documents) as a means of fulfilling pedagogical…

Moodley, Visvaganthie

2007-01-01

49

Classroom tandem – Outlining a Model for Language Learning and Instruction  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to outline classroom tandem by comparing it with informal tandem learning contexts and other language instruction methods. Classroom tandem is used for second language instruction in mixed language groups in the subjects of Finnish and Swedish as L2. Tandem learning entails that two persons with different mother tongues learn each other’s native languages in reciprocal cooperation. The students function, in turns, as a second language learner and as a model in the native language. We aim to give an overview description of the interaction in classroom tandem practice. The empirical data consists of longitudinal video recordings of meetings of one tandem dyad within a co-located Swedish-medium and Finnish-medium school. Focus in the analysis is on the language aspects the informants orient to and topicalize in their interaction. The language aspects vary depending on what classroom activities they are engaged in, text-based or oral activities.

Katri KARJALAINEN

2013-10-01

50

Language Ideologies in Practice: Repair and Classroom Discourse  

Science.gov (United States)

This article seeks to explore the practice of repair in classroom discourse from an ideological perspective of language and literacy. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in an urban high school with a predominant English Language Learner (ELL) population, this paper outlines the theoretical foundations of repair from a "conversation…

Razfar, Aria

2005-01-01

51

The Function of Language Games in the Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

The role of instructional games in foreign language learning at the intermediate and advanced levels is discussed. Games can provide a framework for correct usage of language and can generate conversation. A classroom game involving conversation for shopping using the words "any" and "some" is described. (SW)

Arnold, Rosalind A.

1979-01-01

52

Sociolinguistics Inputs and English as Second Language Classrooms  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Sociolinguistic inputs in language acquisition and use of English as Second Language in classrooms is the main focus of this study. A survey research design was adopted. The population consisted of all secondary school students in Akure Local Government of Ondo State, Nigeria. Two hundred and forty (240 students in senior secondary school classes were deliberately selected from six secondary schools randomly sampled. A fourteen-item questionnaire designated to elicit the required information on the sociolinguistic inputs was used for data collection. The face and content validity of the instrument was ensured. A trial test of the instrument was carried out with students in a community senior secondary school in Ekiti State. Split- half reliability was used and a reliability coefficient of 0.9 was obtained. One way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA, t-test and Pearson Product Moment correlation statistics were employed for the data analysis. Findings revealed that parents’ occupations have significant impact on secondary school students’ use of English. Results also revealed that gender, age and religion have insignificant input on secondary school students’ use of English. It was concluded that the family still remains a major source and most potent place for language learning; therefore, parents should give more attention to students language use at home and provide all the necessary impetus.

Ofodu Graceful Onovughe

2012-06-01

53

Feeling the Difference in the Languages Classroom: Explorations of Teacher Understanding of Diversity  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article, the authors examine the fourth stage of their research into diversity in the languages classroom, focusing specifically on the teacher perspective in planning for and managing diversity in adult student groups. The article discusses findings from a day with experienced Open University language teachers working together on lesson…

Adams, Helga; Nicolson, Margaret

2014-01-01

54

A Look into the Local Pedagogy of an English Language Classroom in Nepal  

Science.gov (United States)

English language teaching (ELT) currently occurring in diverse social settings points to the need to locate ELT in its social context. Many researchers have highlighted the need to explore local vernacular practices, in particular ELT practices in peripheral contexts. The present study investigates events in an English language classroom at a…

Tin, Tan Bee

2014-01-01

55

Between the Lines: When Culture, Language and Poetry Meet in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Teaching poetry in second language (L2) classrooms raises theoretical and practical questions about how best to treat literature when target language and culture is also being negotiated. Current pedagogy derives from disparate sources, including the experientially-driven practices of individual teachers, the quantitative and qualitative research

Melin, Charlotte

2010-01-01

56

Creative classroom strategies for teaching nursing research.  

Science.gov (United States)

Faculty are constantly challenged to find interesting classroom activities to teach nursing content and engage students in learning. Nursing students and graduates need to use research skills and evidence-based practice as part of their professional care. Finding creative and engaging ways to teach this material in undergraduate nursing programs are essential. This article outlines several successful strategies to engage nursing students in research content in the time and space constraints of the classroom. PMID:24937301

Phillips, Regina Miecznikoski

2014-01-01

57

The Identity, Second Language, and the Classroom Dynamic: Participant Observation in a Beginning Korean as a Second Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

The goal of this qualitative study was to explore the nexus between second language acquisition, identity, and the beginning second language classroom. Using a social constructionist framework, the study utilizes ethnographic methodology incorporating both narrative and autoethnographic elements. Specifically the author acted as a participant…

Diamond, Joel S.

2010-01-01

58

Teacher Use of Learners' Native Language in the Foreign Language Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Reports the use of students' native language by teachers in the foreign language classroom. The project was undertaken by French teachers in Australia. The teachers' aim was to investigate the use of the native language in a context that actively promotes an immersion approach to foreign language teaching (Author/VWL)

Rolin-Ianziti, Jeanne; Brownlie, Siobhan

2002-01-01

59

Classroom noise and children learning in a second language  

Science.gov (United States)

The presence of background noise affects children more negatively than adults. Understanding speech in noise is a skill that continues to develop well into a child's adolescent years. Childrens' experience with a specific language also may affect their ability to make sense of incoming speech. Research suggests that even for adults the presence of background noise negatively affects the ability to listen in a second language. Two studies were conducted to investigate the effects of classroom noise on attention and speech perception in native Spanish-speaking second graders learning English as their second language (L2), as compared to English-only speaking peers (EO). In Study 1 we measured childrens' on-task behavior during instructional activities with and without soundfield amplification. In Study 2 we measured the effects of noise (+10 dB signal-to-noise ratio) using an experimental English word-recognition task. Findings indicate although there were no effects of amplification on on-task behavior, word-recognition performance declined significantly for both EO and L2 groups in the noise condition. In particular, the impact of the noise was disproportionately greater for the L2 group. Children learning in their L2 appear to be at a distinct disadvantage when listening in rooms with typical noise and reverberation.

Nelson, Peggy; Kohnert, Kathryn; Sabur, Sabina; Shaw, Daniel

2005-04-01

60

Language, Literacy, Literature: Using Storytelling in the Languages Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Stories and storytelling have been used for millennia to entertain, challenge and educate. As a shared form of language interaction, storytelling has engaged communities in developing and perpetuating common understandings of both language and culture, as critical foundations to harmonious societies. Stories and storytelling provide a rich source…

Morgan, Anne-Marie

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
61

Influencing Motivation in the Foreign Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Motivation is one of the main determining factors of success in developing a second or foreign language. However, motivation is a complex phenomenon and the more its constructs are understood the better we are able to understand the extent to which we can influence it. Teachers can cultivate student motivation to varying degrees and play a central…

Nicholson, Simon James

2013-01-01

62

Research in the FCS Secondary Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Much of what is taught in the family and consumer sciences (FCS) classroom is based on scientific research. The existing knowledge base is so broad that overlooking research as a teaching resource and tool happens often. Research enhances what is taught, thereby improving the effectiveness of teachers. Whether it be applying or translating…

McCord, Olivia Love; Brown, Lora Beth

2009-01-01

63

Learning about and through Humor in the Second Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Humorous communication is extremely complex in both its forms and functions (e.g. Norrick, 1993; 2003). Much of the previous work that has put forth suggestions for incorporating humor into the language classroom (e.g. Trachtenberg, 1979; Deneire, 1995; Schmitz, 2002) has not examined these complexities in the detail necessary for the target…

Bell, Nancy D.

2009-01-01

64

Silence in the Second Language Classrooms of Japanese Universities  

Science.gov (United States)

Japanese language learners' proclivity for silence has been alluded to by various writers (e.g. Anderson 1993; Korst 1997; Greer 2000) and is supported by plenty of anecdotal evidence, but large-scale, empirical studies aimed at measuring the extent of macro-level silence within Japanese university L2 classrooms are notably lacking. This article…

King, Jim

2013-01-01

65

Twenty Ideas for Using Mobile Phones in the Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

These days it seems mobile phones are used everywhere by everyone, which leads to the obvious question: How can mobile phone technology support learning in the second language classroom? The answer is "in a number of ways" because mobile phones come with ever-increasing functions that most students are adept at using. In this article the author…

Reinders, Hayo

2010-01-01

66

Negotiating Language, Culture and Pupil Agency in Complementary School Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

In this paper, I examine the teaching of language and culture and in particular the use of songs as curriculum in two London Turkish complementary schools. Drawing on a series of interconnected classroom vignettes, I look at how children weave together their semiotic resources to negotiate and transform two songs and the talk and action around…

Lytra, Vally

2011-01-01

67

Meaningful Literacy: Writing Poetry in the Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper develops the concept of meaningful literacy and offers a classroom methodology--poetry writing--that manifests this approach to ESL/EFL literacy instruction. The paper is divided into three sections. The first deals with the concept of meaningful literacy learning in second and foreign language pedagogy; the second summarizes empirical…

Hanauer, David I.

2012-01-01

68

Students' Language Learning Strategy Use and Achievement in the Korean as a Foreign Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the relationship between student strategy use and the development of proficiency in a Korean as a Foreign Language classroom. A total of 66 English native speakers learning Korean as a Foreign Language were administered the Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL), Version 5.1. Findings indicated a low positive…

Murray, Bokyung

2010-01-01

69

· Attitude towards Computers and Classroom Management of Language School Teachers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Computer-assisted language learning (CALL is the realization of computers in schools and universities which has potentially enhanced the language learning experience inside the classrooms. The integration of the technologies into the classroom demands that the teachers adopt a number of classroom management procedures to maintain a more learner-centered and conducive language learning environment. The current study explored the relationship between computer attitudes and behavior and instructional classroom management approaches implemented by English institute teachers. In so doing, a total of 105 male (n = 27 and female (n = 78 EFL teachers participated in this study. A computer attitude questionnaire adapted from Albirini (2006 and a Behavior and Instructional Management Scale (BIMS adopted from Martin and Sass (2010 were benefitted from for the purpose of collecting the data. The results of the Pearson Correlation Coefficient revealed that there were no significant relationships between attitude and behavior and instructional management across gender. However, it was found that the more male teachers experience tendency toward using computers in their classes, the more teacher-centered their classes become. In addition, the more female teachers are prone to use computers in their classes, the more student-centered and lenient their classes become.

Sara Jalali

2014-07-01

70

How a Therapy Dog May Inspire Student Literacy Engagement in the Elementary Language Arts Classroom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this article, I discuss theoretical possibilities for the inclusion of therapy dogs in the elementary language arts classroom, particularly which may inspire students otherwise reluctant to engage in literacy activities. I incorporate Guthrie and colleagues’ work in engagement into research in Animal Assisted Therapy with children to posit a revised theory of engagement.

Lori Friesen

2009-12-01

71

Graphic Narratives: Cognitive and Pedagogical Choices for Implementation in the English Language Arts Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

There is little empirical research that investigates the implementation of graphic narratives into the English language arts classroom, subsequently leading to misperceptions and misconceptions about their educative uses. Despite sequential arts' long history, graphic narratives continue to experience a marginalized existence within the…

Dulaney, Margaret Anne

2012-01-01

72

First Language Composition Pedagogy in the Second Language Classroom: A Reassesment.  

Science.gov (United States)

Evaluated the effectiveness of using native language (Japanese) based writing methods in English as a second language (ESL) classrooms. The methods compared included sentence combining and structural grammar instruction with journal writing, controlled composition writing with feedback on surface error, and peer reformulation. Journal writing, but…

Ross, Steven; And Others

1988-01-01

73

Associations between Chinese Language Classroom Environments and Students' Motivation to Learn the Language  

Science.gov (United States)

Associations between the nature of Chinese Language Classroom Environments and Singapore secondary school students' motivation to learn the Chinese Language were investigated. A sample of 1,460 secondary three (grade 9) students from 50 express stream (above average academic ability) classes in Singapore government secondary schools was involved…

Chua, Siew Lian; Wong, Angela F. L.; Chen, Der-Thanq

2009-01-01

74

Pre-Service Teachers: An Analysis of Reading Instruction in High Needs Districts Dual Language Classrooms  

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Full Text Available Pre-service teachers need opportunities to apply theory and connect to best practices as they teach in classroom settings be it, whole or small group. For many pre-service teachers often times their experience is limited to simply watching instruction or working with small groups of students (Pryor & Kuhn, 2004. The student teaching experience is a critical component of the teacher preparation program. Through the use of the English Language Learner Classroom Observation Instrument (ELLCOI, and researcher observation the hope is that these will aid in bringing to light the instructional activities used by pre-service teachers during reading instruction with ELLs. This study explores how pre-service bilingual teachers connect theory into practice by examining their instruction in the following categories: Instructional Practices, Interactive Teaching, English-Language Development, and Content Specific to Reading as listed in The English Language Learner Classroom Observation Instrument (ELLCOI developed by Haager, Gersten, Baker, and Graves (2003. To capture these instructional events video tape recordings of eight South Texas pre-service teachers were taken during a reading language arts lesson in order to observe instruction in high need districts’ dual language/bilingual classrooms. Data were compiled to capture the nature and quality of instruction on key essential elements, as well as reading instructional practices specific to the teaching/learning process in the dual language classroom. The findings portray the results of the ELLCOI with bilingual/ESL pre- service teachers and how they make sense of their instructional practices as a means to instruction in one-way dual language public school classrooms.

Michael Whitacre

2013-01-01

75

Researchers Bring Local Science Into Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

The need to communicate scientific research beyond academia is increasing concurrently with a growing emphasis on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in K-12 education [Breiner et al., 2012]. Connecting scientists with K-12 educators who will share research with students in their classrooms is an effective method for broadening the audience for scientific research. However, establishing connections with teachers can be difficult, as there are few networking opportunities between these two groups without one directly contacting the other.

Theuerkauf, Ethan J.; Ridge, Justin T.

2014-02-01

76

The Value of Teachers Doing Classroom Research.  

Science.gov (United States)

Introduces two national studies designed for K-8 preservice and inservice teachers. The first study concerns students' views of science and scientists, while the second study examines students' ideas about animals. Points out the importance of having teachers conduct classroom research, which is a part of professional development. (YDS)

Barman, Charles R.

2000-01-01

77

Self-Contained Classrooms. Research Brief  

Science.gov (United States)

Determining the ideal academic setting in which students can be successful continues to be one of the primary goals of educators. Is there a best classroom structure in which students can be successful? Although there is research on the academic gains in the block schedule and in traditional departmentalized settings, both of which are common in…

Walker, Karen

2009-01-01

78

Helping students overcome foreign language speaking anxiety in the English classroom: theoretical issues and practical recommendations  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Despite the fact that foreign language speaking anxiety is a common phenomenon in the teaching of English as a foreign language in Greece, teachers do not always identify anxious students, and often attribute their unwillingness to participate in speaking tasks to factors such as lack of motivation, or low performance. This article aims to contribute to the literature on language anxiety and to provide teachers with strategies for reducing foreign language speaking anxiety stemming from students’ fear of negative evaluation from their peers and perception of low ability. Using qualitative research, it presents a classroom-based case study which aims at examining the characteristics of anxious students with a view to implementing classroom interventions to reduce foreign language speaking anxiety. The effectiveness of these interventions is also presented and evaluated, and the pedagogical implications of the findings are discussed.

Iakovos Tsiplakides

2009-10-01

79

Feeling the difference in the languages classroom: explorations of teacher understanding of diversity  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In this article, the authors examine the fourth stage of their research into diversity in the languages classroom, focusing specifically on the teacher perspective in planning for and managing diversity in adult student groups. The article discusses findings from a day with experienced Open University language teachers working together on lesson planning. It examines differentials in teacher approaches to diverse student needs. Some participants demonstrated this as instinctive to their pract...

Adams, Helga; Nicolson, Margaret

2012-01-01

80

Towards criterion validity in classroom language analysis: methodological constraints of metadiscourse and inter-rater agreement  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available

This paper reports on a process to validate a revised version of a system for coding classroom discourse in foreign language lessons, a context in which the dual role of language (as content and means of communication and the speakers' specific pedagogical aims lead to a certain degree of ambiguity in language analysis. The language used by teachers and students has been extensively studied, and a framework of concepts concerning classroom discourse well-established. Models for coding classroom language need, however, to be revised when they are applied to specific research contexts. The application and revision of an initial framework can lead to the development of earlier models, and to the re-definition of previously established categories of analysis that have to be validated. The procedures followed to validate a coding system are related here as guidelines for conducting research under similar circumstances. The advantages of using instruments that incorporate two types of data, that is, quantitative measures and qualitative information from raters' metadiscourse, are discussed, and it is suggested that such procedure can contribute to the process of validation itself, towards attaining reliability of research results, as well as indicate some constraints of the adopted research methodology.

Douglas Altamiro Consolo

2001-02-01

 
 
 
 
81

Children's Attendance Rates and Quality of Teacher-Child Interactions in At-Risk Preschool Classrooms: Contribution to Children's Expressive Language Growth  

Science.gov (United States)

The present research examines whether children's daily attendance rates would be predictive of gains in expressive language within the context of high-quality preschool classrooms. The quality of preschool classrooms was assessed by measuring the quality of the teacher's interactions with the children in his or her classroom. Hierarchical linear…

Logan, Jessica A. R.; Piasta, Shayne B.; Justice, Laura M.; Schatschneider, Christopher; Petrill, Stephen

2011-01-01

82

The Chinese Bouyei College Students’ Classroom Anxiety in Foreign Language Learning: A Survey Study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This survey study aims to investigate the level of the Chinese Bouyei college students’ general foreign language (FL classroom anxiety, the relationships between their FL classroom anxiety and the four independent variables, gender, major field of study, level of academic year, and level of college, and possible causal factors contributive to their FL classroom anxiety. A previously published written questionnaire was administered to 320 1st- and 2nd-year Bouyei college learners in three main fields of study at five colleges of two levels in south and southwest areas of Guizhou Province, China. Ten interview questions were also conducted to 25 interviewees randomly selected from these colleges. The results of the analysis show that the Chinese Bouyei college learners experienced medium level of FL classroom anxiety; there were significant differences between their FL classroom anxiety and the first three independent variables, but not the last; and twelve main causal factors were found contributive to their FL classroom anxiety, among which some are new or different from the findings of the previous studies. Discussion was made on the research findings and what the interviewees expected from the teachers, followed by implications and suggestions for FL instructors that might help enhance and facilitate students’ FL learning.

Jianhua Wei

2012-03-01

83

"Medium of Instruction" vs. "Medium of Classroom Interaction": Language Choice in a French Complementary School Classroom in Scotland  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this paper is to account for language choice and alternation phenomena we have observed in a French complementary school classroom in Scotland. In this classroom, talk can be conducted in French (the official medium of instruction), in English (the other language in contact) and in both French and English. A critical review of the…

Bonacina, Florence; Gafaranga, Joseph

2011-01-01

84

Code-Switching in Japanese Language Classrooms: An Exploratory Investigation of Native vs. Non-Native Speaker Teacher Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

Research on language classroom code-switching ranges from describing both teachers' and learners' first language and target language use to making connections between code-switching and student learning. However, few studies compare differences in practice between native and non-native speaker teachers and even fewer consider culture of learning…

Hobbs, Valerie; Matsuo, Ayumi; Payne, Mark

2010-01-01

85

Phonetics and Technology in the Classroom: A Practical Approach to Using Speech Analysis Software in Second-Language Pronunciation Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

While speech analysis technology has become an integral part of phonetic research, and to some degree is used in language instruction at the most advanced levels, it appears to be mostly absent from the beginning levels of language instruction. In part, the lack of incorporation into the language classroom can be attributed to both the lack of…

Olsen, Daniel J.

2014-01-01

86

Empowering the Language Learner: Language Learning Strategy Training and Self-Regulation in an EFL Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how an understanding of the Good Language Learner models described in the SLA literature can be used to tailor and implement a program of learning strategy training and self-regulatory practices in the classroom to empower L2 learners in an EFL context. The paper begins by reviewing the various…

Torres, Gabriella

2013-01-01

87

Beetles and Butterflies: Language and Learning in a Dual Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Welcome to the classroom of Jill Sontag and her 19 young bilingual collaborators. Join them as they simultaneously explore the world of insects and the world of language. These curious and energetic second graders are easily drawn into the realm of bugs. Encouraging them to speak in Spanish, however, is a bit more complicated. Jill uses her…

Reyes, Sharon Adelman

2007-01-01

88

The Role of Relational and Instructional Classroom Supports in the Language Development of At-Risk Preschoolers  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study is to contribute to the limited research base on the complex relationships between classroom supports and language development by addressing two research aims. The first aim is to determine the unique association between relational support and and instructional support and preschoolers' language development. The second…

Gosse, Carolyn S.; McGinty, Anita S.; Mashburn, Andrew J.; Invernizzi, Marcia

2012-01-01

89

Research for the Classroom: Teachers Practicing Research  

Science.gov (United States)

How can teachers merge research and daily practice? Where can they find the time, information, and resources? In exploring this issue, it is important to clarify the definition of "research". "Research" might mean (1) using best practices that are already research-based or (2) doing research on one's own students. For purposes of discussion in…

Gorlewski, Julie, Ed.; Roberts, Mike

2009-01-01

90

Reflections on Native Language Use in Adult ESL Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper explores the issue of native language (L1) use in adult English-as-a-second-language (ESL) classes, re-examining the belief that use of the students' L1 is detrimental to target language learning. We discuss research that (a) documents language use in several adult ESL classes in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands, and (b) presents survey…

Huerta-Macias, Ana; Kephart, Kerrie

2009-01-01

91

The Hidden and not-so Hidden Curriculum of Private Language Schools: Observations on Social Positioning in the Classroom  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper outlines the findings of three classroom observations at two private language institutes in Edinburgh, Scotland. The research was carried out in response to the shortage of studies looking at privileged students in social class and educational research. An analysis of both classroom observations and the institutional curriculum were conducted in an attempt to identify instances of social positioning by the texts, the teachers and the students themselves. The analysis suggests that ...

Demarco Berman, Stephanie

2012-01-01

92

TEACHER’S PERCEIVED CHARACTERISTICS AND PREFERENCES OF MOTIVATIONAL STRATEGIES IN THE LANGUAGE CLASSROOM  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Motivated language teachers play a crucial role in building and developing students’ motivation in the classroom. This study aims to investigate teachers’motivational strategies in relation to their characteristics and preferences in Indonesian context of EFL instruction, which is an area that receives scant attention with regard to empirical research. The empirical data were collected through survey questionnaires and interviews. Twenty-eightactive teachers volunteered to participate in the present study. Findings show that most of these English teachers perceive themselves as enthusiastic facilitators as they explore a variety of ways to motivate students in the classroom. The majority of participants prefer assigning various learning activities or tasks in order to energize a learning environment. By doing so, teachers can draw students’ attention and get them engaged in the classroom. The teachers also integrate teaching materials with engaging pedagogical techniquesthat involve student interaction and movement.

Winda Hapsari

2013-07-01

93

Foreign Students' Attitudes in Portuguese Language Classrooms: An Exploratory Study  

Science.gov (United States)

This exploratory study aims to investigate the attitudes and motivation of four English-speaking students in two Portuguese public schools towards their Portuguese and English language classes. Our research revealed that that the needs of these students were not met in their Portuguese language classes nor their English language classes. This can…

Cabral, Maria

2005-01-01

94

Heritage Learners in the Chinese Language Classroom: Home Background  

Science.gov (United States)

Studies from information-processing and language comprehension research have reported that background knowledge facilitates reading and writing. By comparing Chinese language development of heritage students who had home background in Chinese language and culture with those who did not, this study found that heritage learners did significantly…

Xiao, Yun

2006-01-01

95

Promoting the Development of Strategic Competence in the Language Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Language teachers often do not focus on developing strategic competence among their second-language learners, though research demonstrates that language-learning strategies vary in their usefulness and applicability dependent on many variables. Teachers must develop strategic competence to enhance learners' linguistic and communicative competence.…

Heffernan, Peter J.

1998-01-01

96

Competing Desires and Realities: Language Policies in the French-Language Classroom  

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Full Text Available French language policy has historically centred on ways French can be considered a dominant and influential language. It has done this since the Middle Ages, by allowing the French language to serve as a political tool. On an international level, language was a way of subjugating conquered peoples (former colonies. It promoted France’s international status (by the 18th century French was the diplomatic language of Europe. On a national level, the French language was one of the ways governments were able to centralise political power (suppression of regional languages. One of the ways French language authorities have promoted the use of language has been through education policies and the way language is taught in schools. For example, the French language was imposed on the colonised territories of France through teaching in missionary schools. Within France, stringent laws were adopted, in particular during the nineteenth century, allowing the French language to replace local languages in schools. In France today, language policies continue to exist and to have an influence on the way we view language and society. One of the main priorities of French language policy is to protect the status of the national language in particular with respect to the increasing use of English as a global dominant language in areas such as science, technology, tourism, entertainment and the media (Nunan: 2007, 178. Consequently, France has adopted policies to respond to this linguistic climate. This has implications on the way the French language is taught both within France as well as outside of France. This paper will examine some of the policies and agencies created over recent years that affect the French language. It will also identify some of the consequences these policies have on the teaching of language. Finally it will argue that a space has been created within the language classroom that attempts to find a compromise between the language policies of the French government and the realities of spoken French in society.

Angela Giovanangeli

2009-03-01

97

Competing Desires and Realities: Language Policies in the French-Language Classroom  

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Full Text Available French language policy has historically centred on ways French can be considered a dominant and influential language. It has done this since the Middle Ages, by allowing the French language to serve as a political tool. On an international level, language was a way of subjugating conquered peoples (former colonies. It promoted France’s international status (by the 18th century French was the diplomatic language of Europe. On a national level, the French language was one of the ways governments were able to centralise political power (suppression of regional languages. One of the ways French language authorities have promoted the use of language has been through education policies and the way language is taught in schools. For example, the French language was imposed on the colonised territories of France through teaching in missionary schools. Within France, stringent laws were adopted, in particular during the nineteenth century, allowing the French language to replace local languages in schools. In France today, language policies continue to exist and to have an influence on the way we view language and society. One of the main priorities of French language policy is to protect the status of the national language in particular with respect to the increasing use of English as a global dominant language in areas such as science, technology, tourism, entertainment and the media (Nunan: 2007, 178. Consequently, France has adopted policies to respond to this linguistic climate. This has implications on the way the French language is taught both within France as well as outside of France. This paper will examine some of the policies and agencies created over recent years that affect the French language. It will also identify some of the consequences these policies have on the teaching of language. Finally it will argue that a space has been created within the language classroom that attempts to find a compromise between the language policies of the French government and the realities of spoken French in society.

Angela Giovanangeli

2009-08-01

98

Classroom Management: What Does Research Tell Us?  

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The article reviews studies that focus on classroom management. The aim of classroom management is twofold. The first is to establish a quiet and calm environment in the classroom so that the pupils can take part in meaningful learning in a subject. The second aim is that classroom management contributes to the pupils' social and moral…

Postholm, May Britt

2013-01-01

99

Making Culture Happen in the English Language Classroom  

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Full Text Available The issue of introducing the target culture into language classroom practice has long been an object of debates as well as the opinions of the learners towards it. Eventually, modern practitioners found a way of having the language learners acquainted with the target culture and introducing culture through culture-based textbook activities. However, the issue of additional culturally-oriented activities in improving students learning habits is questionable today. The purpose of this paper is to examine their effect and to investigate the attitudes of students towards language teaching and learning through culture-based activities (games, role plays, dialogues, video clips, discussions and comparisons of local and target cultures. The paper presents the results of the study conducted in one of the top universities of Kazakhstan throughout the spring semester of the 2012 academic year. Eighty students of different cultural backgrounds took part in the study. The activities for the experimental groups were modified according the tasks in each unit of one of the contemporary textbooks used in General English lessons. These activities varied from warm-ups to homework tasks in the units accordingly. The results suggest that practice of the various culture-based tasks and exercises helped the students to improve their communicative and linguistic competences in English. The results obtained from this study also offer insights into how culture-based activities can be used to develop and enhance not only students’ language skills but also their awareness of various culture-sensitive issues.

Yakup Doganay

2013-09-01

100

Students and Teachers’ Reasons for Using the First Language Within the Foreign Language Classroom (French and English in Central Mexico  

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The present study explores the use of the first language in a context of foreign language teaching. This qualitative research presents the classroom practice and points of view of French and English teachers and students within a public educational institute in central Mexico using the techniques of questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. The results show that teachers and the majority of students perceive the use of the first language as positive and part of the teaching and learning process. A small number of students do not like the use of the first language in the classroom and prefer that their teachers use the target language only.

 

La presente investigación explora el uso de la lengua materna en un contexto de enseñanza de lenguas extranjeras. Esta investigación cualitativa presenta la práctica docente y los puntos de vista de maestros y alumnos de francés e inglés en el contexto de una universidad pública del centro de México, mediante el uso de las técnicas del cuestionario y la entrevista semiestructurada. Los resultados muestran que tanto los maestros como la mayoría de los alumnos perciben el uso de la lengua materna como algo positivo en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje. Un número reducido de estudiantes rechaza el uso de la lengua materna y prefiere que su clase de lengua extranjera sea dirigida exclusivamente en la lengua meta. Palabras clave: investigación cualitativa, puntos de vista de alumnos y maestros, uso de la lengua materna.

Mora Pablo Irasema

2011-11-01

 
 
 
 
101

(Re)placing Literary Texts in the Intercultural Foreign Language Classroom  

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In the history of language teaching, literary texts have gradually been reduced to a source for linguistic learning, as an informative representation of cultural traits or even dismissed from the foreign language classroom. This paper aims to add reasons that justify considering literary texts a vital presence in the foreign language classroom. One general aim is to promote the study of foreign literature as enjoyable and (inter)culturally significant.The classroom is inevitably a cultural...

Ana Gonçalves Matos

2011-01-01

102

The Modern Language Classroom: Individuality, Technology, and Context  

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This portfolio is a compilation of the author’s research-supported ideas on what good language teaching looks like. The central component is the teaching philosophy, in which the author explains that respect for individuality, use of technology, and use of culture as context for learning are the three elements seen as most important for successful language learning.The teaching philosophy is supported by artifacts about peer feedback in language learning, literacy in adult English as a Seco...

Sims, Eric

2013-01-01

103

Implementing Interventions to Increase Motivation in the English Language Classroom: from Theory to Practice  

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Full Text Available A growing body of empirical research shows a relationship between student motivation and learning outcomes in the teaching of English in ESL and EFL contexts. Despite a sound theoretical framework, however, there are few studies which implement strategies intended to increase motivation and report findings. Using qualitative research, this article attempts to link theory with practice and shed light into the factors which demotivate students and act as barriers to effective foreign language learning. Theoretical principles are applied in the classroom and the effectiveness of interventions to increase motivation is assessed. Thus, the article is pragmatic in focus and provides teachers with a tool for analyzing students’ motivation so that they implement effective motivation strategies in the English classroom. The strategies and interventions suggested can be adapted and used by teachers in various teaching situations after taking into consideration their own teaching context.

Iakovos Tsiplakides

2010-05-01

104

The School Classroom and the Radio Classroom. Radio Language Arts Project Implementation. Field Notes 3.  

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Notes are presented on classroom organization, discipline, motivation, and teacher concern for use with instructional radio. Attributes of a regular classroom and a good radio classroom are compared, including teacher/radio positioning, materials organization and presentation, the use of sound and silence, cueing and voice use, demonstrations,…

de Fossard, Esta

105

Conflicting Ideologies and Language Policy in Adult ESL: Complexities of Language Socialization in a Majority-L1 Classroom  

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This study looks at how language ideologies affect and are revealed in language socialization practices in a majority-L1 adult ESL classroom, particularly looking at language use and policy. It draws on recent theories and critiques of language socialization (Bayley & Langman, 2011; Bronson & Watson-Gegeo, 2008; Garrett &…

Mori, Miki

2014-01-01

106

Language Use in a Multilingual Mathematics Classroom in South Africa: A Different Perspective  

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This paper presents an argument that language-use in multilingual mathematics classrooms in South Africa is as much a function of politics as it is of cognition and communication. It draws from a wider study focusing on language practices in intermediate multilingual mathematics classrooms in South Africa. In the study the notion of cultural…

Setati, Mamokgethi

2003-01-01

107

Language Ideologies in English Learner Classrooms: Critical Reflections and the Role of Explicit Awareness  

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This paper draws on fieldwork conducted over the course of one academic year in two urban high-school English learner (EL) classrooms located in the south-western part of the United States. As part of a larger interest in how language ideologies mediate classroom discourse practices, this paper analyses the role of awareness in language

Razfar, Aria; Rumenapp, Joseph C.

2012-01-01

108

English-Only Language-in-Education Policy in Multilingual Classrooms in Ghana  

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This paper, based on the findings of a qualitative study, discusses the influence of Ghana's recently introduced English-only language-in-education policy on pupils' classroom communicative practices and learning generally. It highlights how the use of English--an unfamiliar language--creates anxiety among students and stalls effective classroom

Opoku-Amankwa, Kwasi

2009-01-01

109

Learning and researching in the classroom  

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A new method in the course "Carbonate rocks diagenesis" has been tested. This is an optional course in the year 4 of a four year degree in Geology (University of Barcelona, Spain). The number of students in the course is generally reduced (less than ten), and duration of the course is 3 one-hour lecture and 1 three-hour practical per week during 5 weeks. This course has been selected to test a new learning method because is given in the last year of the undergraduate degree and also because the number of students is low, thus achieving a great degree of motivation of the students and favouring the communication in the classroom. The new model implies a general change in the development of the course: students will be trained in scientific research, working in group and using available analytical techniques. Nevertheless, this method does not invalidate the pre-existing educational resources; both new and classic teaching materials coexist in the course. Traditionally, the course was divided in lectures and practical work. The practical work is done on rock specimens and on thin sections using the petrological microscope, which is essentially invariable every course, and which is related with the theoretical concepts explained in the corresponding lecture. The students describe and interpret the material in a "passive" way, only with minor student-teacher feed-back when specific questions are asked by the student. The real learning in Sciences is not learning of isolate subjects, but to understand the relationships between all these subjects. Therefore, the student must learn science and how to do science. In the new tested method, the students carry out by themselves a scientific research project from a basic material provided by the teacher. This research work, which is done along the 5 weeks course, consists on a single project developed from all the students as a single group, thus observing the evolution in the student's knowledge and opening a continuous feed-back in the student-student and student-teacher relationships. This proposal implies that the lectures and practicals of the course must be reorganized and adapted. The research work is presented during the first day of the course, including a general presentation of the geological setting and the main problem to solve. The research work is developed during the entire course in the classroom, and concluded at the end of the course. In the first part of the research (2-3 weeks), the students will describe a set of samples (hand rocks and thin sections) in order to define the petrographic characteristic (mainly focused in diagenetic processes affecting carbonate rocks and the stages of cementation and its relationships with the fracturation events). The samples are distributed among the students and the description of the samples is individual; students must reach and agreement about the common petrographic features of the rocks and establish a global diagenetic sequence for the studied material. The second part of the research consists on the application of advanced instrumentation and analytical techniques, available in the University of Barcelona, such as cathodoluminescence microscope, microprobe and carbona and oxygen isotope analyses. The obtained results must be processed and comparison with published data by means of bibliographic research should be done by the students out of the classroom. The last part of the research project includes a complete and collective analysis of the results, elaboration of an individual final report (which should take into account the conclusions arrived by the entire group) and an oral presentation of the main results in the classroom. During the development of the work, the teacher acts as a tutor and mediator in the discussions, not only as a transmissor of knowledge. The new proposal differs from the classical undergraduate research projects developed in other courses, which are carried out outside the classroom, and therefore, without the continuous support of the teacher. The degree of satisfaction o

Playa, E.; Travé, A.

2009-04-01

110

Effects of Teaching Literature on Culture Learning in the Language Classroom  

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Full Text Available Problem statement: The role of literature in enhancing readers cultural understanding in the language classroom was explored. It was a part of an extensive research which focused mainly on language learning and creativity. It is argued that the interface of language, literature and culture are at the forefront of present-day language and literature learning and this facilitates inter-racial, intra-racial and global understanding. Approach: As method, a quasi-experimental study was conducted on two intact groups; the control (n = 30 and experimental (n = 30 groups. Both groups underwent an eight week experiment whereby one short story, The Burden of Sin by S. Karthigesu was taught to both groups. The control group was taught using the routine and traditional reading and comprehension teaching approach while the experimental group was taught using the reader response approach adapting Ibsens the I Model text exploration and literary devices. Results: Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were conducted on the data collected using two non-parametric tests: The Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test to determine the significant difference between the experimental groups pretest and posttest scores and the Mann-Whitney U test to determine the significant difference between the scores of the experimental and control groups. Conclusion: The results proved to be substantially significant. The findings revealed that cultural understanding can be taught through literature in a language classroom and it is a valuable instructional medium in the learning of culture.

Chittra Muthusamy

2011-01-01

111

English language classroom practices: Bangladeshi primary school children’s perceptions  

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English language teaching (ELT) has been investigated from various angles including how English language teachers perceive what happens in an ELT classroom. How primary school English language learners perceive their experiences of ELT is rarely reported in the published literature, particularly from developing countries such as Bangladesh. This article reports on a study that examined Bangladeshi primary school learners’ experience of English language classroom practices in which technolog...

Shrestha, Prithvi

2013-01-01

112

Making Sense of Power Relations in a Malaysian English-as-a-Second-Language Academic Writing Classroom  

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The role of power in an English-as-a-second-language classroom has yet to be fully explored by an action research practitioner, especially in a Malaysian higher education setting. This study aims to contribute to this gap by working within an academic literacies perspective to teaching academic writing, which propagates the understanding of…

Abraham, Alison

2014-01-01

113

Language Development Subcontexts in Head Start Classrooms: Distinctive Patterns of Teacher Talk During Free Play, Mealtime, and Book Reading  

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Research findings: Language development subcontexts within 20 Head Start classrooms were studied by observing teachers' child-directed talk during free play, mealtime, and book reading. In each context, observers coded all child-directed statements, directives, and questions, noted instances of pretend talk and decontextualized talk, and rated the…

Gest, Scott D.; Holland-Coviello, Rebecca; Welsh, Janet A.; Eicher-Catt, Deborah L.; Gill, Sukhdeep

2006-01-01

114

Language Awareness in Language Learning and Teaching: A Research Agenda  

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Following on from my state-of-the-art article on "Language Awareness and language learning" (Svalberg 2007), in this paper I will discuss specific research tasks which are centrally concerned with different aspects of language awareness (LA): "explicit knowledge about language, and conscious perception and sensitivity in language learning,…

Svalberg, Agneta M.-L.

2012-01-01

115

Metacognition training in the Chinese university classroom: An action research study  

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In the author's previous teaching English as a foreign language (TEFL) experience, he had found that Chinese university students were overdependent on teachers in EFL learning. Drawing on research on language learning strategies, he used metacognition training (MT) as a form of classroom intervention to promote learner autonomy. This article reports on an action research study of MT integrated in two TEFL courses (EFL Reading and Language Teaching Methodology) at a Chinese teachers' universit...

Huang, J.

2005-01-01

116

Patterns of language use in a bilingual classroom at an international primary school in Hong Kong  

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?The main objective of this study was to investigate patterns of language use in a bilingual dual-taught classroom, and the impact of bilingual dual teaching on language development and language choice in young children (ages 7-8). The study was conducted in an immersion English/Putonghua classroom at an international primary school that adopts the International Baccalaureate Primary Years Program. English and Putonghua are the mediums of instruction although most students in the school ...

Shaw, Jennifer Feng

2010-01-01

117

The Role of Motivation and Controversial Conceptual Material in Foreign Language Classrooms  

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Full Text Available Spanish classrooms in the U.S. rarely teach students about the tumultuous relationship with natives of the target language, and this lack of material can leave the learner without certain linguistic knowledge. The novelty of exploring controversial relationships in the target language has the possibility of challenging students’ conceptions of the world which can open up different channels for motivation in the classroom, and ultimately, language learning.

Antonio R. Iaccarino

2012-05-01

118

Virtual Classrooms in Brazil: teachers' difficulties and anxieties towards technology in language learning  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in portuguese Atualmente, muitos pesquisadores têm promovido entusiasticamente as vantagens de se introduzir tecnologia na sala de aula de língua estrangeira (LE), mas poucos têm-se preocupado com os problemas e as ansiedades que resultam de mudanças numa cultura tão antiga quanto a da sala de aula de LE. Este tr [...] abalho visa a discutir os problemas enfrentados por professores que trabalham com tecnologia em suas salas de aula de língua. A pesquisa foi baseada em estudos teóricos e empíricos tanto na área de ensino mediado por computador quanto no campo de desenvolvimento de professores. O objetivo principal deste trabalho é, assim, obter um entendimento global das ansiedades do professor em relação ao ambiente virtual de aprendizagem de língua. Os dados foram coletados mediante entrevistas com os professores informantes, levando a uma análise qualitativa dos resultados. Abstract in english Many researchers, nowadays, have been enthusiastic in promoting the advantages of introducing technology in the language classroom, but few have been worried with the problems and anxieties that result from changes in a long-lasting culture such as the culture of language learning. This paper aims a [...] t discussing the problems faced by teachers who have been working with technology in their language classrooms. The research design was based on theoretical and empirical studies both in the areas of Computer Assisted Language Learning and Teacher Development. The main objective of this paper is, thus, to achieve a global understanding of the teachers' anxieties in relation to the virtual environment of language learning. Data was gathered through interviews with the teachers, leading to a qualitative analysis of the findings.

Andréa Machado de Almeida, Mattos.

119

The Benefits of Management and Organisation: A Case Study in Young Language Learners’ Classrooms  

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Full Text Available This study focuses on primary language education within a Greek region: specifically, on the positive effects of classroom management and organisation on a student-centred approach of teaching. In the case of the Greek education system, language teachers are encouraged to adopt student-centred approaches in their classroom but have not received any guidance on how to do so. Language educators are reluctant to abandon their teacher-centred ways, because they have not been trained to apply classroom management and organisation techniques that could support a student-centred environment.

Christina Nicole Giannikas

2013-01-01

120

Research and Reflective Practice in the ESL Classroom: Voices from Sri Lanka  

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Modern language education favours the model of a reflective teacher-researcher who is engaged in both individual and collaborative curriculum revision and teaching-learning environment improvement. The present paper addresses the issue of classroom research and reflective practice in current ESL pedagogy and teacher professional development. The…

Cirocki, Andrzej; Tennekoon, Sujeewa; Calvo, Alicia Pena

2014-01-01

 
 
 
 
121

Principles for Code Choice in the Foreign Language Classroom: A Focus on Grammaring  

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The social and cultural "turn" in language education of recent years has helped move language teaching and curriculum design away from many of the more rigid dogmas of earlier generations, but the issue of the roles of the learners' first language (L1) in language pedagogy and classroom interaction is far from settled. Some follow a…

Levine, Glenn S.

2014-01-01

122

French Cuisine in the Classroom: Using Culture to Enhance Language Proficiency.  

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French cuisine offers a valuable resource for creating culture-based contexts for language use in the classroom. Suggestions and ideas are presented for incorporating food-related activities in the French class. (VWL)

Abrate, Jane E.

1993-01-01

123

Book Review: Creating equitable classrooms through action research  

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Full Text Available Creating Equitable Classrooms through Action Research is compelling reading for a wide-ranging audience including professional development participants, preservice and inservice teachers, students of educational administration, and teacher educators.

Geoff Mills

2009-01-01

124

Promoting Creativity in the Middle Grades Language Arts Classroom  

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Middle level educators around the country aim to create a classroom environment and a way of teaching that is developmentally responsive, challenging, empowering, and equitable for every student. One way to ensure this is to include instruction that promotes creativity. This article offers guiding principles and shares instructional lessons that…

Batchelor, Katherine E.; Bintz, William P.

2013-01-01

125

Language Communication and Communicative Competence: A View from Contemporary Classrooms  

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In this paper, we examine some of the tenets of the current conceptualisations of communicative competence. Drawing on the empirical data collected in linguistically diverse university classrooms, we show that meaning-making in social interaction is considerably more complex and fluid than is envisaged in theoretical models of communicative…

Leung, Constant; Lewkowicz, Jo

2013-01-01

126

Research for the Classroom: Analyzing Classroom Literacy Events--What Observing Classroom Conversations about Popular Culture Can Reveal about Reading  

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Ms. Mayer, a recently retired English language arts teacher, frequently used strategies described in John Golden's book "Reading in the Dark: Using Film as a Tool in the English Classroom." In this book, Golden suggests that ELA teachers "reverse the order: use a film clip to practice the reading and analytical skills that we want our students to…

Garland, Kathy

2012-01-01

127

The Relationship between Language Learners’ Anxiety and Learning Strategy in the CLT Classrooms  

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Full Text Available This paper intends to explore how Taiwanese students perceive the relationship between their language learning strategy and anxiety in the foreign language classroom. Due to their previous learning experience, most of the participants hold an unfavorable attitude toward a grammar-translation teaching approach. Consequently, learner-centered instruction has been widely accepted and acknowledged as a welcome concept and feasible teaching approach in the English Foreign Language (EFL context. To improve the proficiency of language learners in EFL classrooms, it is very important to take into account the need of the learners. The present study utilizes Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS and Communicative Language Teaching Attitude Scale (COLTAS to examine the participants’ perceptions about learning English. The results indicate that most of the participants express a favorable attitude toward the Communicative Language Teaching (CLT approach; however, they also reveal their high level of anxiety in the language classroom. Language anxiety is usually reported to have adverse effects on the learning of a second language. It is the language instructors’ mission to accelerate the language learning of their students. One way is to teach students how to learn more effectively and efficiently. Language learning strategies (LLS are procedures that learners can use to facilitate learning. Both teachers and students should develop an awareness of the learning process and strategies that lead to success. The ultimate goal of this paper is to analyze the factors that affect the participants’ learning strategies and their language anxiety, and offer some pedagogical suggestions.

Kun-huei Wu

2010-01-01

128

Assessment practices in the English language classroom of Greek Junior High School  

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Full Text Available The present study aimed to compare teacher and student perceptions concerning assessment in the English language classroom of Greek Junior High Schools. It focuses on exploring teacher assessment practices and students’ view of these. The degree of agreement between teacher and student views can affect the results of instruction and learning. The central finding of the study was that English language teachers follow an approach that keeps a balance between the requirements of the Cross-Thematic Curriculum (DEPPS for performance assessment and the official specifications which define final achievement tests. Students understand the purpose of assessment and the importance of attitudes towards learning and have a clear picture of methods and tasks used for their assessment. On the basis of these research findings, a series of suggestions about teachers and teacher trainers are put forward, focusing on teacher professional development, which, in turn, will promote student involvement and responsibility for learning.

Stavroula Vlanti

2012-02-01

129

The Relationship between Gender and Iranian EFL Learners’ Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety (FLCA)  

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Foreign language anxiety is widely used to describe the feeling of tension and apprehension, which is specifically associated with foreign language learning contexts, including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Foreign language classroom anxiety (FLCA) is related to foreign language anxiety and language-skill-specific anxiety, and fairly recently identified as distinguished from other forms of anxiety. FLCA is a more general type of anxiety in learning a foreign language with a stron...

Fakhri Mesri

2012-01-01

130

English Language Classroom Practices: Bangladeshi Primary School Children's Perceptions  

Science.gov (United States)

English language teaching (ELT) has been investigated from various angles including how English language teachers perceive what happens in an ELT classroom. How primary school English language learners perceive their experiences of ELT is rarely reported in the published literature, particularly from developing countries such as Bangladesh. This…

Shrestha, Prithvi Narayan

2013-01-01

131

The Application of Historical Linguistic Information to the Foreign Language Classroom.  

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Argues for the application of historical linguistic information in the college second language classroom, maintaining that such knowledge will help to enlighten and enrich second language study by forcing both students and teachers to examine and understand aspects of the language. (CB)

Rini, Joel

1990-01-01

132

Aida and Her Mainstream Classroom: A Case Study of a Young English Language Learner's Literacy Development  

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Full Text Available This article reports a nine-month study of literacy development of Aida, a young English language learner from Indonesia, who was mainstreamed in a Grade 2 classroom in a primary school in the south-eastern part of Australia. This article initially reviews the literature concerning features of the mainstream classroom conducive for second language learning and for literacy development. Following the presentation of methodological issues, it examines English learning activities in Aida's classroom and highlights her literacy development with examples of her work. The results from this study show that Aida developed literacy skills considered important for her second language and learning development. The variety of English learning activities and the encouraging environment in her classroom contributed much to her literacy development.

Bambang Yudi Cahyono

2003-01-01

133

Developing the language of thinking within a classroom community of inquiry: pre-service teachers' experiences  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: English Abstract in english We argue that the "community of inquiry" approach, using reading materials modelled on Lipman's Philosophy for Children programme, is a theoretically justified and teacher-friendly means of promoting effective thinking skills. The stimulus materials, used by the pre-service teachers, consist ofshort [...] stories ofclassroom life designed to elicit children's ideas for further discussion as a community of inquiry. Research has shown that the community of inquiry approach to classroom discussion is perceived positively by educators and teachers and makes a difference to learners. This study explored how the Intermediate and Senior Phase pre-service teachers experienced a classroom community of inquiry by using a qualitative research design with 47 final year pre-service teachers. Data consisted of written reflections from the whole class and recordings of two focus group interviews with selected individuals from the group. From the analysis of the data, the following themes became evident: personal and professional development, changes in learners, contextual concerns, and curriculum links. We conclude that this approach is a valuable addition to the pedagogical strategies of pre-service teachers.

Lena, Green; Janet, Condy; Agnes, Chigona.

134

Creating an Authentic Learning Environment in the Foreign Language Classroom  

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Theatrical activities are widely used by language educators to promote and facilitate language learning. Involving students in production of their own video or a short movie in the target language allows a seamless fusion of language learning, art, and popular culture. The activity is also conducive for creating an authentic learning situation…

Nikitina, Larisa

2011-01-01

135

Teaching and Learning in Two Languages in African Classrooms  

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In sub-Saharan Africa, education conducted through a European language is associated with low school achievement. Both teachers and learners may often not be fluent enough to use the language as a medium of instruction. In these circumstances, both also make use of a common African language. They switch between two languages in the plenary…

Clegg, John; Afitska, Oksana

2011-01-01

136

Classroom research in Environmental Engineering Courses- CREUPI: a feasible practice  

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Full Text Available Classroom research is a strategy that proposes linking teaching and research, thereby rendering teachers and students partners in the search for knowledge and combining theory and practice as allies in the educational process. This paper reports on classroom research experience in the subjects of Introduction to Environmental Engineering and Research Metodology, which are disciplines taught in CREUPI’s Environmental Engineering course. The conceptual and methological landmark achieved through this educational approach is discussed, analyzing the process involved in each discipline as well as the results derived from this practice.

Gerson Araújo de Medeiros

2004-06-01

137

The Evaluation of Classroom Teacher Candidates’ Attitudes Regarding Turkish Language I: Phonetics and Morphology Course  

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Full Text Available This study has been carried out to determine the attitudes of the classroom teacher candidates regarding Turkish language I: Phonetics and morphology courses. The attitude scale consists of 28 items. The scale has been applied for the total 255 teacher candidates attending the third and fourth grades in the department of the classroom teaching of the educational faculty at Onsekiz Mart University in the academic year 2009-2010. According to the results, the attitudes of classroom teacher candidates regarding Turkishlanguage I: Phonetics and morphology courses have been determined to have revealed significant differences according to gender, age and education type and success grade. On the other hand, the attitudes of the classroom teacher candidates regarding Turkish language I: Phonetics and morphology courses have been determined not to have revealed a significant difference according to the region where they are from, the high school and class type they attend.

Çavu? ?AH?N

2010-08-01

138

Boys and French as a Second Language: A Research Agenda for Greater Understanding  

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Following an extensive and federally funded analysis of literature related to boys learning French as a second language (FSL) in Canada, the authors propose a series of research questions to guide future research related to males in FSL classrooms. To better understand the need for this research agenda, the researchers provide an overview of the…

Kissau, Scott; Turnbull, Miles

2008-01-01

139

O processo de conscientização na sala de aula de língua espanhola = The awareness process in a Spanish language classroom  

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Full Text Available Este artigo trata do processo de conscientização desenvolvido pelos alunos em uma sala de aula de espanhol como língua estrangeira de um Centro de Estudos de Línguas do interior do Estado de São Paulo. Considerou-se como arcabouço teórico a pedagogia freireana (FREIRE, 1980, 1984, 1987, 1999, 2000 além de autoras que tiveram como referencial teórico Paulo Freire e relacionaram sua pedagogia ao ensino de línguas estrangeiras (WALLERSTEIN, 1983; SCHLEPPEGRELL, 1997. É uma pesquisa de natureza qualitativa, que focalizou uma prática de pesquisa-ação em uma sala de aula de espanhol, na qual se implementou um planejamento freireano, para verificar como se dava o uso da língua-alvo na sala de aula (MENEGHINI, 2001. Com a análise e a discussão dos dados, realizadas por meio da triangulação desses dados, considerando-se como dados primários as interações em sala de aula, constata-se que as tarefas problematizadoras são o meio para o desenvolvimento da conscientização por parte dos alunos sobre a realidade que os cerca.This article discusses the awareness process of students in a Spanish as a foreign language classroom, at a Centre of Language Studies in a city in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The frame of reference is Paulo Freire’s pedagogy (FREIRE, 1980, 1984, 1987, 1999, 2000, Wallerstein (1983 and Schleppegrell (1997’s investigations which are important to the comprehension of the relation between Freirean’s pedagogy and the language teaching. This is a qualitative research and it focuses on action research practice in a Spanish language classroom, in which a syllabus based on Paulo Freire’s pedagogy was implemented in order to verify how the target language was used in the classroom (MENEGHINI, 2001. Data analysis and discussion are based on data triangulation and classroom interactions are taken on primary data. The implementation of this research suggests that the problem posing tasks on themes chosen from the student's realities are the way which leads to the awareness.

Carla Mayumi Meneghini

2013-02-01

140

Differences between Language and Linguistic in the ELT Classroom  

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Full Text Available This paper attempts to present differences between language and linguistic. Language and linguistic are two different words but there is relationship between them. ‘Language’ is a sign system of humankind in order to communicate one’s thoughts, Feelings, and opinions to someone else but linguistic is scientific study of language. In fact the goal of linguistic is to describe languages and to explain the unaware knowledge all speakers have about their language. Therefore, linguistics is a subject of study that is built on languages. Noam Chomsky (1957  argues that “Language is a set (finite or infinite of sentences, each finite in length, and constructed out of a finite set of elements” (p.13. According to Aronoff (2007 it is impossible to separate language from literature, or politics, or most of our everyday human interactions. "[Linguistics] has a twofold aim: to uncover general principles underlying human language, and to provide reliable descriptions of individual languages" (Aitchison, 1992. Also linguists, study individual human languages and linguistic behavior in order to discover the fundamental properties of this general human language.

Hajar Shahhoseiny

2013-12-01

 
 
 
 
141

Developing Teaching in the "University Classroom": The Teacher as Researcher when Initiating and Researching Innovations  

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Full Text Available The teacher’s role in the university classroom has traditionally been to present the syllabus to listening students. In Norway new rules have been introduced for the activity in this classroom. The overarching goal for the teaching is to organize a learning situation that makes the students active learners. The article deals with the teacher as a researcher, and focuses on how innovative actions can be implemented by the teacher and studied from a researcher point of view. The text presents cultural historical activity theory (CHAT as both the theoretical framework for the organized actions in the classroom and as an approach for studying the classroom processes. The article gives an overview over a material that can be gathered in a classroom characterized by student activity. It ends by reflections on how development in one classroom can be transferred to other classrooms.   

May Britt Postholm

2011-03-01

142

Preparing Undergraduates for Research Careers: Using Astrobites in the Classroom  

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Because undergraduate participation in research is a longstanding and increasingly important aspect of the career path for future scientists, students can benefit from additional resources to introduce them to the culture and process of research. We suggest the adoption of the web resource Astrobites as a classroom tool to increase the preparation of undergraduate physics and astronomy students for careers in research. We describe the content and development of the website, discuss previous university courses that have made use of Astrobites, and suggest additional strategies for using Astrobites in the classroom.

Sanders, Nathan E; Newton, Elisabeth

2012-01-01

143

Creating an Authentic Learning Environment in the Foreign Language Classroom  

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Full Text Available Theatrical activities are widely used by language educators to promote and facilitate language learning. Involving students in production of their own video or a short movie in the target language allows a seamless fusion of language learning, art, and popular culture. The activity is also conducive for creating an authentic learning situation where the real world becomes a part of the educational experience and necessitates the use of an authentic language by the learners. This article describes a video project carried out by Russian language learners at Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS. It examines how the work on the project created and supported authenticity of the learning experience. Though the article focuses on the video project done in the context of language learning and teaching this activity could be successfully implemented in teaching various subjects at both secondary and tertiary levels.

Larisa Nikitina

2011-01-01

144

Preschool Classroom Conversations as Long-Term Resources for Second Language and Literacy Acquisition  

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This study investigated relations between preschool talk exposure and immigrant first graders' second language literacy and oral skills outcomes. Participants in the study were 25 children with Turkish as their first language and Norwegian as their second, attending various multilingual and ethnically diverse preschool classrooms in Norway and…

Aukrust, Vibeke Grover; Rydland, Veslemoy

2011-01-01

145

Social Positioning, Participation, and Second Language Learning: Talkative Students in an Academic ESL Classroom  

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Guided by positioning theory and poststructural views of second language learning, the two descriptive case studies presented in this article explored the links between social positioning and the language learning experiences of two talkative students in an academic ESL classroom. Focusing on the macro- and micro-level contexts of communication,…

Kayi-Aydar, Hayriye

2014-01-01

146

A Working Model for Videocamera Use in the Foreign Language Classroom.  

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Offers a working model of exercises and suggestions for integrating the videocamera into the foreign-language classroom. Although the video exercises described are intended to build on the various language skills being taught and acquired, the model is flexible, and the instructor can use as few or as many of the exercises to complement other…

Orban, Clara; McClean, Alice Musick

1990-01-01

147

The Native Speaker, the Student, and Woody Allen: Examining Traditional Roles in the Foreign Language Classroom.  

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This paper uses a language classroom role-playing scene from a Woody Allen movie to examine the language student who has traditionally been asked to emulate and copy the native speaker and to discuss roles that teachers ask students to play. It also presents the changing paradigm of the native speaker and his or her role inside and outside the…

Finger, Anke

148

Language Play in the Classroom: Encouraging Children's Intuitive Creativity with Words through Poetry  

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This article begins by identifying that children have a spontaneous predilection for playing with language, engaging in poetic discourse even before their first poetry lesson. Although children's language play is relatively unresearched in the classroom, in a case study of two groups of pupils aged between 10 and 11, it was observed that children…

Cumming, Rachel

2007-01-01

149

Languages in Primary Classrooms: A Study of New Teacher Capability and Practice  

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This study explored the language capability of two groups of new teachers in a multilingual city: the first in their initial teacher education year, and the second near the end of their induction year. Almost all teachers in the city face the challenge of teaching English as an additional language in classrooms characterised by super-diversity and…

Cajkler, Wasyl; Hall, Bernadette

2012-01-01

150

Research in Natural Language Understanding.  

Science.gov (United States)

This report contains an annual summary of BBN's ARPA-sponsored natural language understanding project and two Technical Notes: 'KLONE's Progress,' by R.J. Brachman, and 'Generalizations of ATN Grammars,' by W.A. Woods. The Annual summary includes a list o...

W. A. Woods, R. J. Brachman

1978-01-01

151

Science for English Language Learners K-12 Classroom Strategies  

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If you work with linguistically and culturally diverse students, you and your students will benefit from the foundation this book provides for teaching both science and language. Science for English Language Learners brings you the best practices from different but complementary fields of science education and English language teaching, integrating the two. The book is designed so you can easily dip in and out of the topics you want.

Fathman, Ann K

2006-01-01

152

Adapting a Cognitive Apprenticeship Method to Foreign Language Classrooms.  

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Reconceptualizes a cognitive apprenticeship method to provide foreign language teachers in charge of beginning language levels with the knowledge necessary to acquire the strategies of reciprocal teaching. The article gives teachers an example of a set of lesson plans that embeds the teaching of prerequisite declarative and procedural knowledge…

Hosenfeld, Carol; And Others

1996-01-01

153

Teaching Language through Science in a Primary Bilingual Classroom.  

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The purpose of this study was to develop and test the effectiveness of a program in which activity-based science was used as a conceptual basis for language instruction. A series of four instructional units were adapted for bilingual use. Students' written and oral observations were used in experience charts and other language development…

Korn, Caroline A.

154

INDICATORS OF THE PRACTICE OF POWER IN LANGUAGE CLASSROOMS  

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This paper attempts to reveal some strategies performed by teacher which indicate that s/he is exercising power in managing and con-ducting language teaching and learning process. Such power may be mani­fested in terms of the frequency of directives or of the holding of control over the interaction Process. Despite the fact that exercising power seems to impair justice, democracy, and humanity because it implies inequality, in a pedagogical context, especially in a language teaching and lear...

Ahmad Dzo'ul Milal

2011-01-01

155

Practical Techniques for Cultural-based Language Teaching in the EFL Classroom  

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Full Text Available The present paper concerns itself with a study of the cultural-based language teaching issue, particularly with the issue of some practical techniques for teaching culture in the EFL classroom. We want to emphasize the importance of cultural acquisition in the study of language courses, and to present a range of practical techniques that have been found to be effective and successful in cultural-based courses and a few tips that can help to make the teaching of culture a better experience for both teachers and students. The purpose of this paper is to explore effective approaches of culture communication transmission in English classroom teaching.

Lili Dai

2011-09-01

156

"I've Got an Idea": A Social Semiotic Perspective on Agency in the Second Language Classroom  

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This paper addresses the role of multimodal fluency in establishing agency in the second language classroom. The focus of the paper is on the semiotic resourcefulness of an English Language Learner in an English as a Second Language classroom in the United States. Framed from a social semiotic perspective, fine grained multimodal analysis of…

Pinnow, Rachel J.

2011-01-01

157

The relevance of body language to evolution of language research  

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The heterogeneous category of phenomena covered by the term body language (roughly equivalent to nonverbal communication, NVC), although essential to human day-to-day communication, is also largely dissociable from human verbal behaviour. As such, it has received little attention in the area of evolution of language research. In this paper we point to an important factor – signal reliability (honesty) as an elementary constraint on communication as an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) ?...

Wacewicz, S?awomir; Z?ywiczyn?ski, Przemys?aw

2010-01-01

158

Hypothesis in Language Learning Research  

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Full Text Available Hypothesis is very often inevitable in research activities. Hypothesis is of at least three kinds, each of which should not be confused. A study trying to measure the relationship between variables can predict the finding based on theory or logical common sense. This prediction is called theoretical hypothesis. In testing hypothesis quantitatively, the theoretical hypothesis should be transformed into statistical hypothesis, which takes the form of Null hypothesis and its alternatives. It is the Null hypothesis that is to be tested to justify its rejection or otherwise its acceptance. In qualitative study, the result of first data analysis is called temporal empirical hypothesis that should be validated with more data. This cycle of rechecking the result with more data is done again and again until the hypothesis becomes the final conclusion.

Mohammad Adnan Latief

2003-01-01

159

INDICATORS OF THE PRACTICE OF POWER IN LANGUAGE CLASSROOMS  

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Full Text Available This paper attempts to reveal some strategies performed by teacher which indicate that s/he is exercising power in managing and con-ducting language teaching and learning process. Such power may be mani­fested in terms of the frequency of directives or of the holding of control over the interaction Process. Despite the fact that exercising power seems to impair justice, democracy, and humanity because it implies inequality, in a pedagogical context, especially in a language teaching and learning process, such a practice may still be beneficial and justifiable. Among the benefits of the exercise of power are enumerated by the end of the paper.

Ahmad Dzo'ul Milal

2011-01-01

160

Student Perceptions of Oral Participation in the Foreign Language Classroom  

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This study attempts to determine which factors students find most influential in their oral participation in a foreign language class and their thoughts on what actions the teacher should take to encourage more oral participation in class. Participants were 38 students in Spanish 1 and 2 at a rural middle school and high school. Students completed…

Tepfenhart, Karen L.

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
161

Equity for English Language Learners in Mathematics Classrooms  

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Although English Language Learners (ELLs) quickly acquire basic interpersonal communication skills, most struggle for several years with reading and writing academic content in English. In particular, in English-only mathematics classes, children are likely to have difficulty reading and comprehending text, reading word problems, and giving…

Borgioli, Gina M.

2008-01-01

162

Online Synchronous Communication in the Second-Language Classroom  

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The study reported on in this paper used a framework of benefits, challenges and solutions to categorize data from a design experiment using synchronous online communication for learning French as a second language (FSL). Participants were 92 Grade 6, FSL students and four teachers from urban and rural areas of Newfoundland, Canada. Data…

Murphy, Elizabeth

2009-01-01

163

Extensive Writing in Foreign-Language Classrooms: A Blogging Approach  

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A weblog (blog or Web log) has recently become one of the most widely used Internet applications. The current study concerns developing a blog specifically designed for learners learning English as a foreign language. The study investigated the effects of extensive writing by comparing the writing performance in the first three and the last three…

Sun, Yu-Chih

2010-01-01

164

Moving from Informal to Formal Mathematical Language in Maltese Classrooms  

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In Malta, mathematics is often taught through code-switching between Maltese and English, mainly due to the use of textbooks published in the UK. The mixing of the languages has been a source of discussion for several years, with some educators accepting the mixed pattern, and others arguing in favour of using English alone. Furthermore, the…

Farrugia, Marie Therese

2013-01-01

165

Video Production in the English Language Arts Classroom.  

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Argues that teaching video production techniques in high-school English classes achieves the goals of language arts proficiency, media literacy, and student self-realization. Discusses preproduction; information search; script and storyboard; writing activities; oral communication activities; teamwork; aesthetic judgment; media literacy; affective…

Lund, Donna Joan

1998-01-01

166

Raising Cultural Awareness in the English Language Classroom  

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This article discusses how teachers can incorporate cultural knowledge into English language classes, exploring elements of culture, intercultural phenomena, and high-context and low-context cultures. Activities offered by the author to raise cultural awareness include web quests, role plays, cultural observations, and culture journals.

Frank, Jerrold

2013-01-01

167

Access to mathematics versus access to the language of power: the struggle in multilingual mathematics classrooms  

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Full Text Available In this article I explore how teachers and learners position themselves in relation to use of language(s in multilingual mathematics classrooms. I draw from two studies in multilingual mathematics classrooms in South Africa. The analysis presented shows that teachers and learners who position themselves in relation to English are concerned with access to social goods and positioned by the social and economic power of English. They do not focus on epistemological access but argue for English as the language of learning and teaching. In contrast, learners who position themselves in relation to mathematics and so epistemological access, reflect more contradictory discourses, including support for the use of the their home languages as languages of learning and teaching.

Mamokgethi Setati

2008-02-01

168

Modeling the multidimensional structure of students’ foreign language competence within and between classrooms  

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Full Text Available Combining multilevel (ML analysis and multidimensional item response theory (MIRT provides a valuable method for analyzing data of educational assessments, where clustered data (e.g., students in classes and multidimensional constructs frequently occur. It allows to model multiple ability dimensions while simultaneously taking the hierarchical structure into account. The dimensional structure of students’ foreign language competence within and between classrooms was investigated by applying a ML-MIRT measurement model to data of N = 9,410 students in 427 classes who had answered three different subtests of English as a foreign language. Results were compared to a MIRT model not taking into account the multilevel structure. A markedly more differentiated correlation structure is found within classrooms compared with the between-classroom level and compared with the model without multilevel structure. Results show that by modeling the latent multilevel structure, estimation and interpretation of ability profiles can be possible even with highly correlated ability dimensions.

Johannes Hartig

2010-09-01

169

A Classroom Research Study on Oral Error Correction  

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This study has the main objective to present the findings of a small-scale classroom research carried out to collect data about my spoken error correction behaviors by means of self-observation. With this study, I aimed to analyze how and which spoken errors I corrected during a specific activity in a beginner's class. I used Lyster and Ranta's…

Coskun, Abdullah

2010-01-01

170

Democracy, discourse and learner autonomy in the foreign language classroom  

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Full Text Available The first part of this article is concerned with learner autonomy in practice.It begins with a working definition of learner autonomy, goes on to describethe discursive practices of three language learning environments in which itsdevelopment is a central goal, and ends by proposing that autonomy inlanguage learning is underpinned by three general pedagogical principles:learner involvement, learner reflection, and appropriate target language use.The second part of the article considers John Dewey’s concept of democracyin education and its relation to learner autonomy, arguing that each conceptimplies the other and attributing their interdependence to the essentiallydialogic nature of communication and learning. The conclusion briefly re-states the importance of both concepts for education and society.

David Little

2004-01-01

171

Language-based Examples in the Statistics Classroom  

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Statistics pedagogy values using a variety of examples. Thanks to text resources on the Web, and since statistical packages have the ability to analyze string data, it is now easy to use language-based examples in a statistics class. Three such examples are discussed here. First, many types of wordplay (e.g., crosswords and hangman) involve finding words with letters that satisfy a certain pattern. Second, linguistics has shown that idiomatic pairs of words often appear toge...

Bilisoly, Roger

2014-01-01

172

Fostering Ecological Literacy: A Case Study of the Saint John Harbour in Two High School English Language Arts Classrooms  

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Integrating environmental education into curriculum in a way that tackles the holistic and complicated nature of multi-dimensional issues continues to be a challenge for educators and administrators. There is potential in using ecological literacy to introduce local environmental case studies into English Language Arts high school classrooms. This research examines the experiences of two ELA classrooms in one Saint John, NB, high school with a two-week unit based on stakeholder relationships within the Saint John Harbour. Through presentations by guest speakers and research sourced from local community groups, students learned about the highly complex environmental issues that inform management decisions for the Harbour. Using these materials as background, students participated in a mock stakeholders meeting. Case study methodology was used to explore student learning in both a higher-level and a lower-level grade 10 ELA class. Data for the analysis included: cognitive mapping exercises; oral and written classroom assignments and activities; a videotape of the mock stakeholder meetings; a focus group interview with selected students; and researcher field notes. Data demonstrated significant student learning about environmental issues including increased sophistication in describing links between and among environmental issues affecting the harbour, and much more complex understandings of the positions and roles of the various stakeholder groups. Some important areas of resistance to new learning were also evident. Implications for practice and policy and recommendations for future research are discussed.

Douglas, Velta

173

Human Subjects Research and the Physics Classroom  

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Physics Education Research is a form of social science research in that it uses human subjects. As physicists we need to be aware of the ethical and legal ramifications of performing this research, taking into account the fundamental differences between working with substances and working with people. For several decades, the federal government…

Kubitskey, Beth W.; Thomsen, Marshall

2012-01-01

174

Establishing Recipiency in Pre-Beginning Position in the Second Language Classroom  

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This article describes how students in the second language classroom claim incipient speakership and establish recipiency with a co-participant before the turn is properly initiated. The resources used by the incipient speaker include in-breaths and body movements. The article shows that when the teacher's turn is designed as not to pre-establish…

Mortensen, Kristian

2009-01-01

175

ICT and an Exploratory Pedagogy for Classroom-Based Chinese Language Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper reports on a new pedagogy for Chinese language teaching and learning at elementary schools through exploratory classroom instruction using Information and Communication Technologies. The study used quantitative method to collect data from two elementary schools of China. The results showed that: (1) the three-in-one pedagogy of…

Zhao, XingLong; Wang, MinJuan; Wu, Juan; He, KeKang

2011-01-01

176

The "Kulturpass": Strategies for Enhancing Cultural Engagement outside the German-Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Extracurricular events in foreign language programs are often treated either as extra credit or an afterthought. And yet if organized creatively and systematically, activities that promote cultural engagement outside the classroom can enhance and extend the curriculum, deepen exposure to the target culture, create a sense of community among…

Prager, Debra N.; Kramer, Daniel J.

2014-01-01

177

Exploring Daily Grading as a Form of Assessment in a College-Level Japanese Language Classroom.  

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To explore a daily grading system as a form of assessment, this study surveyed 16 teachers and 90 students in college-level Japanese language classrooms where daily grading is practiced. Results showed that both teachers and students had positive beliefs about daily grading. (Author/VWL)

Choi, Seonghee; Samimy, Keiko K.

2002-01-01

178

Digital Stories: A 21st-Century Communication Tool for the English Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Digital storytelling can motivate and engage students and create a community in the classroom. This article lays out a 12-week digital storytelling project, describing the process in detail, including assessment, and pinpointing issues and challenges as well as benefits the project affords English language students.

Brenner, Kathy

2014-01-01

179

Techniques for Using Humor and Fun in the Language Arts Classroom  

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The authors, former middle and high school English teachers, review the rationale for using humor and fun in the classroom and provide detailed descriptions for teaching practices and activities that confer enjoyment and learning for language arts students. Although fun activities, these methods foster vocabulary development, grammar instruction,…

Minchew, Sue S.; Hopper, Peggy F.

2008-01-01

180

Language Factors Associated with Achievement Grouping in Math Classrooms: A Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Study  

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The study examines the effects of classroom achievement grouping (AG) practices on the early mathematics performance of language-minority students and compares their mathematics achievement to that of English-speaking majority students. Using a nationally representative database of the USA, both cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were done.…

Chang, Mido; Singh, Kusum; Filer, Kimberly

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
181

Teaching and Learning Language Arts: From Campus to Classroom and Back Again  

Science.gov (United States)

Professional Development Schools (PDSs) can potentially affect the quality of teaching and learning of students in Grades K-16. The authors describe the collaborations among teacher education, arts and science, and K-12 classroom teacher faculties involved in a 5-year PDS partnership at Kansas State University. A 15-member language arts team…

Heller, Mary F.; Wood, Naomi J.; Shawgo, Mary

2007-01-01

182

Application of the Theory of Multiple Intelligences to Second Language Learners in Classroom Situations.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper argues for the "nurture" side of the "nature versus nurture" debate of the nature of intelligence. It argues for the theory of multiple intelligences in relation to sociocultural and cognitive perspectives of second language learning. A brief historical overview of intelligence is presented, and classroom practices that lead to…

Poole, Gloria T.

183

Developing Interactional Competence by Using TV Series in "English as an Additional Language" Classrooms  

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This paper uses a combined methodology to analyse the conversations in supplementary audio-visual materials to be implemented in language teaching classrooms in order to enhance the Interactional Competence (IC) of the learners. Based on a corpus of 90.000 words (Coupling Corpus), the author tries to reveal the potentials of using TV series in …

Sert, Olcay

2009-01-01

184

Negotiating Sequential Boundaries and Learning Opportunities: A Case from a Japanese Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Using the methodological framework of conversation analysis (CA) as a central tool for analysis, this study examines a peer interactive task that occurred in a Japanese as a foreign language classroom. During the short segment of interaction, the students shifted back and forth between the development of an assigned task and the management of…

Mori, Junko

2004-01-01

185

Investigating foreign language anxiety in Iranian classrooms: The effect of gender  

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Full Text Available In an attempt to delve into the issue of affective variables related to language learning, the present study focuses on the influence of gender on learners' foreign language anxiety in the Iranian context. The objective of this case study is first to determine the extent to which Iranian EFL learners perceive foreign language anxiety in matched-gender and mixed-gender classrooms and second to see if there is any significant difference between the two types of the investigated classrooms. To this end, a 16 items self-reporting questionnaire with a five Likert-type scale was designed. The developed questionnaire was then given to 96 Iranian lower intermediate EFL learners to complete it. After analyzing the collected data, the findings indicated that mixed-gender classrooms can be considered as an anxiety-provoking teaching context in Iran, since the presence of the opposite gender in EFL classrooms was found to cause statistically significant amount of language anxiety among Iranian learners. The study also offers some context-specific pedagogical implications for Iranian EFL teachers and practitioners.

Mahmoodzadeh, Masoud

2013-01-01

186

Motivational Strategies for the Language Classroom: Perceptions of Korean Secondary School English Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

Since Dornyei and Csizer's (1998) landmark study of the importance that Hungarian English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers attached to a selection of motivational strategies and the frequency they reported using them in their classrooms, there have been few published attempts to examine the cross-cultural validity of their findings. The study…

Guilloteaux, Marie-Jose

2013-01-01

187

Classroom Noise and Children Learning through a Second Language: Double Jeopardy?  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose: Two studies were conducted to investigate the effects of classroom noise on attention and speech perception in native Spanish-speaking second graders learning English as their second language (L2) as compared to English-only-speaking (EO) peers. Method: Study 1 measured children's on-task behavior during instructional activities with and…

Nelson, Peggy; Kohnert, Kathryn; Sabur, Sabina; Shaw, Daniel

2005-01-01

188

Teaching Language Arts: A Student- and Response-Centered Classroom. Second Edition.  

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Taking a consistent student- and response-centered approach to literature-based teaching in culturally and linguistically diverse classrooms, this book is designed for use as a main text in undergraduate and graduate language arts methods courses. The book is firmly grounded in current social constructivist learning theory combined with a…

Cox, Carole

189

Beyond the Language Classroom. A Guide for Language Teachers. Identifying and Using Language-Culture Resources for Developing Communicative Competence. International Exchange Series. Pre-Publication Edition.  

Science.gov (United States)

This guide explores three ways for teachers to increase speech and culture samples in the foreign language classroom: using foreign exchange students, using U.S. students returning from overseas experience, and identifying and using community resources. The guide includes six chapters, which cover the following topics: the value of bringing in…

Fantini, Alvino E., Ed.; And Others

190

Turkish Teachers’ Practices of Assessment for Learning in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom  

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Full Text Available Recently there has been a noticeable paradigm shift in educational assessment where assessment and student learning are viewed as inseparable and assessment is perceived as a tool for supporting student learning. This study was designed to investigate Turkish teachers’ preferences of common assessment methods in the English as a foreign language (EFL classroom, their Assessment for Learning (AFL practices, and determine whether they differed in their AFL practices according to some variables such as years of teaching experience, gender, and public vs. private school context. 120 EFL teachers completed the online self-report Assessment for Learning Questionnaire for Teachers (TAFL-Q consisting of 28 statements on a 5-point (ranging from strongly disagree to strongly agree Likert scale (? = .92. The findings revealed that most Turkish EFL teachers rely on conventional methods of assessment rather than formative assessment processes. While they generally reported high levels of perceived monitoring (82.86% and scaffolding practices (86.94% of AFL, they had significant differences in their assessments, especially monitoring in support of student learning, according to years of teaching experience, gender, and private vs. public schools variables (p<0.05. To practice AFL, teachers need to appraise their current assessment practices and develop AFL strategies and feedback procedures. Their perceptions of AFL cannot change overnight, nor do they can do it individually and independently. They need support from different sources to recognize the effect of their previous perspectives on their practices and weigh them against the insights offered by the new assessment culture. Through self-report and observational data from both teachers and students to get better insights into monitoring and scaffolding practices, further research could be conducted to explore probable mismatches between teacher and student perceptions of AFL in EFL classrooms.

Hüseyin Öz

2014-07-01

191

The Intersection of Inquiry-Based Science and Language: Preparing Teachers for ELL Classrooms  

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As teacher educators, we are tasked with preparing prospective teachers to enter a field that has undergone significant changes in student population and policy since we were K-12 teachers. With the emphasis placed on connections, mathematics integration, and communication by the New Generation Science Standards (NGSS) (Achieve in Next generation science standards, 2012), more research is needed on how teachers can accomplish this integration (Bunch in Rev Res Educ 37:298-341, 2013; Lee et al. in Educ Res 42(4):223-233, 2013). Science teacher educators, in response to the NGSS, recognize that it is necessary for pre-service and in-service teachers to know more about how instructional strategies in language and science can complement one another. Our purpose in this study was to explore a model of integration that can be used in classrooms. To do this, we examined the change in science content knowledge and academic vocabulary for English language learners (ELLs) as they engaged in inquiry-based science experience utilizing the 5R Instructional Model. Two units, erosion and wind turbines, were developed using the 5R Instructional Model and taught during two different years in a summer school program for ELLs. We analyzed data from interviews to assess change in conceptual understanding and science academic vocabulary over the 60 h of instruction. The statistics show a clear trend of growth supporting our claim that ELLs did construct more sophisticated understanding of the topics and use more language to communicate their knowledge. As science teacher educators seek ways to prepare elementary teachers to help preK-12 students to learn science and develop the language of science, the 5R Instructional Model is one pathway.

Weinburgh, Molly; Silva, Cecilia; Smith, Kathy Horak; Groulx, Judy; Nettles, Jenesta

2014-08-01

192

Walking a Mile in Their Shoes: Non-Native English Speakers' Difficulties in English Language Mathematics Classrooms  

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This autoethnographic investigation considers an English-speaking lecturer's observation and consideration of the predicament of non-native speakers of English in an English language mathematics classroom based on that same (non Spanish-speaking) lecturer's experience in a Spanish language mathematics classroom. Difficulties of understanding a…

Mallet, Dann G.

2011-01-01

193

Researching in Classrooms: Getting beyond "What Works"  

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The dominant approach to research in learning disabilities utilizes experimental and quasi-experimental designs to identify the most effective instructional strategies for students with learning disabilities. Research is always undertaken from a point of view, yet the discourse on "what works?" is generally silent on how theoretical frameworks…

Dudley-Marling, Curt

2011-01-01

194

SELF-POLICING IN THE ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM  

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Full Text Available The present study explores how classroom participants invoke a monolingual target-language policy in an English as a foreign language (EFL classroom, specifically focusing on one method of doing language policy through self-initiated language policing sequences, which I have called self-policing. Language policing refers to the mechanism deployed by the teacher and/or the pupils to (re-establish the normatively prescribed medium of classroom interaction (Amir & Musk, 2013; cf. Bonacina & Gafaranga, 2011. The data comes from sequential analyses of 20 hours of video recordings in grades 8 & 9 of an international compulsory school in Sweden between the years 2007-2010. Drawing on Auer (1984 and Gafaranga’s (1999 organisational code-switching framework, this study sheds light on how teachers and pupils self-initiate a switch to English in their interactions. As will be demonstrated, both teachers and pupils, while orienting to the English-only norm, use a three-step sequence for language policing.

Alia AMIR

2013-10-01

195

Code-Switching in English as a Foreign Language Classroom: Teachers’ Attitudes  

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Full Text Available Code-switching has always been an intriguing phenomenon to sociolinguists. While the general attitude to it seems negative, people seem to code-switch quite frequently. Teachers of English as a foreign language too frequently claim that they do not like to code-switch in the language classroom for various reasons – many are of the opinion that only the target language should be used in the classroom. This study looks at the teachers’ attitudes towards code-switching in teaching English as a foreign language to Malay students at one of the local universities in Malaysia. Data was collected through observations, questionnaires and interviews. Each teacher was observed, their language use were recorded, transcribed and then analyzed using the functions proposed by Gumperz (1982. The results of the study showed that teachers do code-switch in the language classroom, despite their claim that they do not. Analysis of the data showed that, in most cases, code switching by teachers was done to serve pedagogical purposes.

Engku Haliza Engku Ibrahim

2013-06-01

196

Children's Literature in Traditional Arab Classrooms for Teaching English as a Foreign Language  

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Full Text Available This research has shown that the use of authentic children’s literature is an effective and motivating ESL classroom strategy. However, this study investigated the use of children’s stories in EFL elementary classrooms where the teaching methods are very traditional and the resources are limited. This study was carried out in an elementary school in an Arab town in Israel. Approximately a hundred fifth and sixth grade pupils filled in a questionnaire expressing their attitudes towards being taught through stories. Teacher trainees taught the classes, wrote reflections, filled in questionnaires and were observed by the researchers. This information has been collected and served as the data for the study. Results suggest that the use of this strategy is very positive and should be carefully considered by EFL teachers, EFL trainees and teacher educators.Keywords: children's stories, EFL teacher trainees, EFL pupils, traditional classrooms

Ruwaida Abu Rass

2010-02-01

197

Living Language and Culture: Concordia Language Villages--One Example of Learning outside the Classroom  

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At Concordia Language Villages, language and culture are inextricably intertwined, as they are in life. Participants "live" and "do" language and culture 16 hours per day. The experiential, residential setting immerses the participants in the culture of the country or countries where the target language is spoken through food, music, sports,…

Phillippe, Denise E.

2012-01-01

198

Conceptualizing Humanistic Competence in the Language Classroom by TJP - A Chinese Case  

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Full Text Available As learning is seen to be a social process as well as an intellectual activity in which teachers work in active partnership with students, “Teaching by Joint Presentation” (TJP project sought to investigate what a humanistic concept of teacher-student joint presentation and critical inquiry can evoke in the language classroom within Chinese context. 289 college English literature learning students and 87 in-service secondary school teachers have participated in this study. The findings articulated a series of multifaceted differences concerning with students’ learning aspiration and competence, together with the complexities of teaching methods in a humanistic language classroom. The results indicate that humanistic ideal does increase students’ learning competence of critical insight, independent thought and reflective analysis. The study provides insights into humanistic competence growth of Chinese college language students based on empirical evidence.

Ling Zhang

2010-10-01

199

Teacher Belief, Teacher Action: Connecting Research and the Classroom. Proceedings of the JALT International Conference on Language Teaching and Learning and Educational Materials Expo (25th, Maebashi City, Japan, October 1999).  

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Forty papers presented at the Japanese Association for Language Teaching (JALT) conference were selected for inclusion in this volume. JALT is a nonprofit professional organization of language teachers dedicated to the improvement of language learning and teaching in Japan. JALT's publications and events serve as vehicles for the exchange of new…

Brooks, David, Ed.; Robbins, Jill, Ed.; Long, Robert, Ed.

200

Computer Modeling and Research in the Classroom  

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We report on a computational chemistry course for undergraduate students that successfully incorporated a research project on the design of new contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and shift reagents for in vivo NMR. Course outcomes were positive: students were quite motivated during the whole year--they learned what was required of…

Ramos, Maria Joao; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino

2005-01-01

 
 
 
 
201

Experiential Learning: Dissolving Classroom and Research Borders  

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During a summer cruise to Mexico and Central America, students earned academic credit for doctoral-level coursework in qualitative research approaches and data collection and analysis. This study explored how participants, 16 doctoral students at a midwestern university, perceived experiential education and its effect upon their understanding of…

McClellan, Rhonda; Hyle, Adrienne E.

2012-01-01

202

When Commas Meet Kryptonite: Classroom Lessons from the Comic Book Project. Language and Literacy Series  

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This definitive book presents the newest research linking graphic narratives and literacy learning, as well as the tools teachers will need to make comic book projects a success in their classrooms. The Comic Book Project (www.comicbookproject.org) is an internationally celebrated initiative where children plan, write, design, and publish original…

Bitz, Michael

2010-01-01

203

A Reader Responds to Guilloteaux and Dornyei's "Motivating Language Learners: A Classroom-Oriented Investigation of the Effects of Motivational Strategies on Student Motivation"  

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There is a wealth of literature examining the role of motivation in second language (L2) learning but remarkably little research that has examined how teachers can foster motivation in the classroom. For this reason alone Guilloteaux and Dornyei's (2008) correlational study of the relationship between motivational strategies and student motivation…

Ellis, Rod

2009-01-01

204

Reframing the Debate on Language Separation: Toward a Vision for Translanguaging Pedagogies in the Dual Language Classroom  

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The policy of strict separation of languages for academic instruction dominates dual language bilingual education programming. This article explores the dynamic bilingual practices of two experienced bilingual teachers in a two-way dual language public school in Texas and contributes to current research problematizing language separation. Data…

Palmer, Deborah K.; Martínez, Ramón Antontio; Mateus, Suzanne G.; Henderson, Kathryn

2014-01-01

205

ELT Teacher Trainees' Attitudes towards Environmental Education and Their Tendency to Use It in the Language Classroom  

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With the change of focus in language teaching from grammar-based approaches to more communicative approaches, contextual language learning gained importance and found body in the English Language classroom. Global issues constitute one of the most popular contexts for purposeful language learning and meaningful language use. Increasing number of…

Gursoy, Esim; Saglam, Gulderen T.

2011-01-01

206

Jazyk komunikace ve výuce anglického jazyka v ?eské republice: míšení jazyk? / The language of communication in English classrooms in the Czech Republic: Mixing languages  

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Full Text Available The paper deals with classroom communication. More specifically, it focuses on issues connected with the usage of English as the target language and Czech as the mother tongue in lessons of English as a foreign language in primary and lowersecondary schools in the Czech Republic. 89 English lessons were analysed and the proportion between English and Czech used in the sample lessons was established in order to show how the two languages are mixed in the lessons. The analysis of the number of words uttered in the lessons showed that teachers used Czech more than English but students said more English words than Czech words. When operationalized in terms of time, the use of language was equally balanced between the target language and the mother tongue. Another perspective described in the paper is one of opportunities that the teacher creates for the students to practice different language skills. Great differences in using the mother tongue and the target language were found between individual teachers, which is in line with the findings of a number of similar research studies. Towards the end of the paper, five typical situations of mixing languages are briefly presented.

Petr Najvar

2013-12-01

207

Neuroimaging and Research into Second Language Acquisition  

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Neuroimaging techniques are becoming not only more and more sophisticated but are also coming to be increasingly accessible to researchers. One thing that one should take note of is the potential of neuroimaging research within second language acquisition (SLA) to contribute to issues pertaining to the plasticity of the adult brain and to general…

Sabourin, Laura

2009-01-01

208

Monitoring Anthropogenic Carbon, A Classroom Research Project  

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Over the past three years high school students have participated in an authentic inquiry based research project to explore the carbon cycle, including the influence of fossil fuel CO2 emissions in northern Central California. This collaborative venture is multi-disciplinary and has included students from Environmental Systems, Chemistry, Physics and Biology. Students were engaged to collect leaves from wild mustard (Brissica spp), a common annual easily identified by the students, which grows during the winter and early spring in Northern California. During photosynthesis plants fix carbon from the atmosphere and the leaves can be used as a novel means to integrate atmospheric constituents including isotopes of carbon. Our focus has been using the lack of radiocarbon in fossil fuel carbon as a negative tracer. One of the primary goals of this research project has been to articulate the real world application of science in the community. The students calculate the local ‘loading’ of fossil fuel CO2 relative to clean air (Mauna Loa, HI). In 2011, we will be scaling the project to include three additional schools in California. The concept of this project is quite simple and could be exported nationally providing a unique inquiry based project that students can participate in.

Reese, D.; Wedel, K.; Guilderson, T. P.

2010-12-01

209

The use of weblog in language learning: motivation of second language learners in reading classroom  

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Full Text Available The age of technology has enabled learners to interact with other users outside the four wallsof the classroom. Weblogs, in particular, provide a channel for asynchronous computermediatedcommunication to take place in the learning process. Motivation is one of thelearning aspects that is greatly enhanced by the use of technology. Questionnaires andobservations were carried out to 108 undergraduate engineering students taking ReadingCourse to determine the level of the learners’ motivation to participate in online discussionsand to find out whether interactions through the blog have in any way influenced the level ofmotivation to participate in face-to-face discussions. Findings indicate that students werehighly motivated to participate in discussions through the use of blog, and to use it as alearning tool. However, motivation to participate in class discussions was not affected by thetendency of learners to participate in discussion via the weblog.

Ahmad Nasaruddin Sulaiman

2010-01-01

210

Narrowing the gap : using aided language stimulation (ALS) in the inclusive classroom  

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This article presents a description of a training programme designed to increase teachers’ knowledge and skill regarding the use of aided language stimulation (ALS) in the inclusive classroom. The development of the two-phase training programme is discussed in terms of the content and presentation method utilised. Phase 1 focused on increasing knowledge related to inclusive teaching practices and Phase 2 focused on increasing skills in using ALS as an adapted teaching strategy. Phase 2 e...

Uys, Catharina Jacoba Elizabeth; Harty, Michal

2007-01-01

211

Examining the Structures that Impact English Language Learners' Agency in Urban High Schools: Resources and Roadblocks in the Classroom  

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This qualitative study focused on the classroom experiences of 14 English Language Learners (ELL) students in urban high schools. The authors argue that specific structures within classrooms and schools affect ELL students' agency, or their ability to access and appropriate resources to meet their learning and social needs. Using a narrative…

Wassell, Beth A.; Hawrylak, Maria Fernandez; LaVan, Sarah-Kate

2010-01-01

212

Incorporating Competency-Based Blended Learning in a Chinese Language Classroom: A Web 2.0 Drupal Module Design  

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This study aims to create a blended learning environment, based on the concept of competency-based training, in a Chinese as a Foreign Language (CFL) classroom at an American university. Drupal platform and web 2.0 tools were used as supplements to traditional face-to-face classroom instruction. Students completed various selective tasks and…

Huang, Chung-Kai; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chiang, Yueh-Hui

2010-01-01

213

Students on the Beamline: classroom, research, and discovery  

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High level research is mainly the focus of trained scientists who possess a science specific background. The Canadian Light Source outreach service has developed a two stage research immersion approach which brings together students, teachers, and renowned scientists: Students on the Beamline. The first stage offers a training session for teachers to develop their professional competencies in regards to authentic science research and the synchrotron facility. During the second stage, students from classrooms apply a research protocol of their own design with the help of their teacher and synchrotron scientists. During this presentation, we will first explain the professional approach of the training. In the second part, two experiments designed by students will be presented which are geophysically based so to speak: Study of the Meteoritic Melt Sheet of the Manicouagan Basin and Effects of Olivine on the capture of NOx. Results have shown that teachers bring in the classroom a more authentic and new experience in research application. As for the students, their unique research has contributed to the increase of our knowledge and a better understanding of the scientific inquiry process.Scientist and teacher working together on the synchrotron

Patry, J.; Walker, T.

2012-12-01

214

Online Publication Enhances Integration of Current Research in the Classroom  

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Full Text Available Integrating current research materials and issues into graduate courses provides students with exposure to emerging concepts and methods. New online journal formats that allow authors to include raw data and model code provide a unique opportunity to bring current research into the classroom. We developed a graduate-level landscape ecology assignment using data and code provided as appendices to an article in Conservation Ecology. Our assignment required students to engage actively with the published material, was positively reviewed by the students, and prompted valuable discussion.

George R. Hess

2003-07-01

215

Hearing the voices of alternatively certified teachers in Texas: Narratives of teaching English language learners in urban secondary mainstream classrooms  

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In Texas, nearly half of all new teachers are alternatively certified (AC) whilst English language learners (ELL) are over one-third of the public school population in some districts. As this trend continues, the likelihood that AC teachers will teach ELLs increases and alters what Texas teachers must know upon entering the classroom. This research explores teacher knowledge and beliefs about teaching ELLs through constructivist and narrative lenses. Four AC science teachers in two diverse school districts participated in in-depth interviews and reflective interviews following classroom observations to answer the research questions: (1) how do AC teachers describe and interpret their acts of teaching ELLs in mainstream classrooms; and (2) how do AC teachers describe and interpret their learning to teach ELLs in mainstream classrooms. Data were transcribed and analyzed using thematic narrative methods. This study found that participants saw ELL instruction as: (1) "just good teaching" strategies, (2) consisting primarily of cultural awareness and consideration for student comfort, and (3) less necessary in science where all students must learn the language. The most experienced teacher was the only participant to reference specific linguistic knowledge in describing ELL instruction. Many of the teachers described their work with ELL students as giving them an opportunity to improve their lives, which was consistent with their overall teaching philosophy and reason for entering the profession. Participant narratives about learning to teach ELLs described personal experience and person-to-person discussions as primary resources of knowledge. District support was generally described as unhelpful or incomplete. Participants portrayed their AC program as helpful in preparing them to work with ELL students, but everyone desired more relevant information from the program and more grade-appropriate strategies from the district. Participant narratives reveal AC teachers needed a pragmatic and less theoretical understanding of diversity during pre-service training. Participant tendency to draw upon "common sense", affective, and practical strategies in teaching ELL students in lieu of the state-mandated English language proficiency standards (ELPS) suggests AC programs should have teachers articulate and discuss their beliefs about ELL instruction in order to provide training targeted towards misconceptions about language development, particularly in science.

Zannou, Yetunde Mobola

216

Predicting Language Teachers’ Classroom Management Orientations on the Basis of Their Computer Attitude and Demographic Characteristics  

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Full Text Available The advent of modern technologies has had a remarkable role in revolutionizing the classroom setting. It is, therefore, incumbent on teachers to utilize strategies for effective managing of the change. The aim of the present study was to find out English as a Foreign Language (EFL teachers’ beliefs regarding classroom management. In so doing, the relationship between EFL teachers’ demographic variables (age and years of teaching experience, computer attitude, and their classroom instructional and behavior management orientations was explored. The participants of the study comprised a total of 105 male and female EFL language school teachers in Iran. The data for the current study were collected through two questionnaires. The results of the multiple linear regression analyses revealed that the independent variables of participants’ computer attitude, age, and teaching experience are not suitable predictors of both behavioral and instructional management. The results also showed that as the age and teaching experience of the participants increased their attitudes towards computers became more negative

Sara Jalali

2014-07-01

217

A Self-evaluation of Classroom Language Used When Teaching Grammar  

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Full Text Available In the attempt to evaluate the quality of teacher talk, recent communicative approaches have suggested that the modification of teacher classroom speech and the functional distribution of teacher talk in terms of pedagogical goals should be considered (Seedhouse: 1996. This study investigates the relationship between language use and pedagogic purpose from an analysis of a lesson transcript of a grammar lesson, and evaluates the quality of the teacher talk based on the Self-Evaluation of Teacher Talk (SETT Grid. The purpose is to examine whether the teacher talk is appropriate in the classroom context or mode and to bring about a more conscious and effective use of teacher talk in her teaching profession in the future.

Fang Huan

2011-10-01

218

Getting real in the language classroom: developing Japanese students' communicative competence with authentic materials  

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The research described in this thesis reports on a 10-month quantitative/qualitative classroom-based study, carried out at a Japanese university, investigating the potential of authentic materials to develop learners’ communicative competence. It was hypothesised that the ‘richer’ input provided by authentic materials, combined with appropriate awareness-raising activities, would be better able to develop a range of communicative competencies in learners (linguistic, pragmalinguistic, s...

Gilmore, Alexander

2008-01-01

219

The education of English language learners research to practice  

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This comprehensive volume describes evidence-based strategies for supporting English language learners (ELLs) by promoting meaningful communication and language use across the curriculum. Leading experts explain how and why learning is different for ELLs and pinpoint specific best practices for the classroom, illustrated with vivid examples. Particular attention is given to ways in which learning English is intertwined with learning the student's home language. The book addresses both assessment and instruction for typically developing ELLs and those with language disabilities and

Shatz, Marilyn

2010-01-01

220

Fostering Intercultural Communicative Competence in the Foreign Language Classroom: Pedagogical Implications  

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Full Text Available The development of learners' communicative competence has been regarded as the major goal of foreign and second language teaching. Several authors have advanced various communicative models in order to better explain how language teaching and learning work (e.g. Canale & Swain, 1980; Canale, 1983; Bachman, 1990; Celce-Murcia et al. 1995; Usó-Juan & Martínez-Flor 2006. One of the elements of the communicative model is that of intercultural competence (Byram, 1997; Usó-Juan & Martínez-Flor, 2008. This competence has been defined by Meyer (1991, p. 137 as "the ability of a person to behave adequately in a flexible manner when confronted with actions, attitudes and expectations of representatives of foreign cultures". Cultural dimensions play a paramount role in learners' learning process; however, there is not apparently a particular approach for its integration in the language classroom. Taken into account those aspects, in this paper, I attempt to provide an instructional approach for the integration of culture in the language classroom so as to foster learners' communicative competence. The present paper presents first a revision of different communicative models, then, a description of the notion intercultural competence is provided. Finally, an instructional approach for the teaching of this particular competence is proposed.

Vicente Beltrán-Palanques

2014-06-01

 
 
 
 
221

Changes in science classrooms resulting from collaborative action research initiatives  

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Collaborative action research was undertaken over two years between a Korean science teacher and science education researchers at the University of Iowa. For the purpose of realizing science learning as envisioned by constructivist principles, Group-Investigations were implemented three or five times per project year. In addition, the second year project enacted Peer Assessments among students. Student perceptions of their science classrooms, as measured by the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES), provided evidence that the collaborative action research was successful in creating constructivist learning environments. Student attitudes toward science lessons, as examined by the Enjoyment of Science Lessons Scale (ESLS), indicated that the action research also contributed to developing more positive attitudes of students about science learning. Discourse analysis was conducted on video-recordings of in-class presentations and discussions. The results indicated that students in science classrooms which were moving toward constructivist learning environments engaged in such discursive practices as: (1) Communicating their inquiries to others, (2) Seeking and providing information through dialogues, and (3) Negotiating conflicts in their knowledge and beliefs. Based on these practices, science learning was viewed as the process of constructing knowledge and understanding of science as well as the process of engaging in scientific inquiry and discourse. The teacher's discursive practices included: (1) Wrapping up student presentations, (2) Addressing misconceptions, (3) Answering student queries, (4) Coaching, (5) Assessing and advising, (6) Guiding students discursively into new knowledge, and (7) Scaffolding. Science teaching was defined as situated acts of the teacher to facilitate the learning process. In particular, when the classrooms became more constructivist, the teacher intervened more frequently and carefully in student activities to fulfill a variety of pedagogical functions. Students perceived Group-Investigations and Peer Assessments as positive in that they contributed to realizing constructivist features in their classrooms. The students also reported that they gained several learning outcomes through Group-Investigations, including more positive attitudes, new knowledge, greater learning capabilities, and improved self-esteem. However, the Group-Investigation and Peer Assessment methods were perceived as negative and problematic by those who had rarely been exposed to such inquiry-based, student-centered approaches.

Oh, Phil Seok

222

Research on College Teachers’ Politeness Strategies in EFL Classrooms  

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Full Text Available Politeness is a common phenomenon in any society. Thus conventions of politeness vary from culture to culture. How people value politeness or show politeness is influenced by many factors such as age, gender, knowledge level, or social status or power. In this research, we deal with politeness in China EFL classrooms. Based on Brown and Levinson’s Face Theory and applying a series of research methods like class observation, survey questionnaires and semi-structured interviews in a case study, the researcher tries to find out: how students’ gender and level of English proficiency influence their understanding of teachers’ politeness strategies, what attitudes they have towards the application of teachers’ PS, and how students value politeness strategies in EFL classrooms. In conclusion, on one hand, teachers should increase their own politeness awareness as well as students’; on the other hand, it is very important to improve students’ English proficiency, which can help them understand situational contexts in English and interpret teachers’ well meaning in the term of politeness.

Liu Peng

2012-09-01

223

Understanding Influences of Play on Second Language Learning: A Microethnographic View in One Head Start Preschool Classroom  

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With dual language learners falling behind their same-age peers at the beginning of kindergarten, understanding how school experiences can enhance language learning is critical. This study demonstrates how play among preschool-aged children can foster English language learning. Using an ethnographic approach, one classroom composed of two teachers…

Piker, Ruth A.

2013-01-01

224

It’s good to talk. An investigation into target language use in the modern languages classroom.  

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Although there is a considerable body of research into various aspects of the teaching and learning of English as a foreign language, there appear to be few studies into the teaching of modern foreign languages (ML) to adolescents in the context of a secondary school setting. This thesis reports the findings of research aimed at identifying the strategies that ML teachers, considered examples of good practice, used to engage secondary school learners in interaction in the targe...

Crichton, Hazel

2011-01-01

225

A relational view of learning an additional language: An analysis of classroom talk  

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To date, most research in Second Language Acquisition (SLA) has proceeded from either a predominantly social or a cognitive point of view. Most researchers who subscribe to a social view rely on the tenets of Vygotsky and on a sociocultural approach. Broadly speaking, any social perspective leads to a focus on language use, that is, on the ways learners jointly construct meanings. Cognitive researchers, on the other hand, tend to concentrate on the way language is internalized and individu...

Atwood, Sherrie Lynn Heather

2010-01-01

226

Learning English as an International Language: EFL Learners' Perceptions of Cultural Knowledge Acquisition in the English Classroom  

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Full Text Available Culture is an important element in the foreign language classroom. Some scholars believe that culture is the fifth language skill along with the four traditional skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking of English. Traditionally, learning English required learners to acquire some target language cultural knowledge (e.g. British culture and/or American culture especially in the context of English as a foreign language. However, with the increasingly important status of English as an international language, the ownership of English has been extensively discussed. Scholars have argued that English is no longer in the custody of any particular country or community. Therefore, whether we should address target language culture in the English classroom or not has become a matter of debate. The study aims to explore EFL learners’ perceptions of the ownership of English and acquiring cultural knowledge in the classroom through in-depth interviews. In total, twenty undergraduates, including both English-major and non-English-major students, from three different universities in Central Taiwan participated in the study. The results show that the majority of the participants reject the notion that English belongs to particular countries in today’s world. In terms of acquiring cultural knowledge, they believe that it is necessary to have some target language cultural knowledge (e.g. British culture and/or American culture in the English classroom. However, apart from the target language cultural knowledge, they would also like to explore various cultures worldwide, using English as a communication tool to become global citizens. Therefore, rather than debate whether to teach a specific culture or language model in the English classroom, it is perhaps more meaningful and important to develop a language learner’s intercultural communicative competence. These findings provide some insightful implications for English language teaching professionals and educators in terms of teaching culture in the English classroom.

Hsuan-Yau Tony Lai

2013-12-01

227

Fostering autonomy in intercultural language learning in the foreign language classroom: A case study of international students learning English at a higher education institution in Ireland  

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This study is concerned with the concept of autonomy in intercultural language learning, understood here as the capacity to take responsibility for one’s own language and intercultural development. It examines how such autonomy can be developed among international students in the foreign language classroom as a means of helping this student group to maximise the potential for language and intercultural development that study abroad offers. To investigate this issue, a qualitative case s...

Sudhershan, Aleksandra

2012-01-01

228

Teaching culture in the Japanese language classroom: A NSW case study  

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Full Text Available This study examines, through a qualitative case study approach, how non-native-speaking (NNS Japanese language teachers in New South Wales (NSW teach culture and why. The study seeks to understand the pedagogy used to teach culture, teachers’ attitudes and beliefs on teaching culture and how these attitudes and beliefs have been influenced by past experiences. This study also explores how the NSW K-10 Japanese syllabus and concepts of Intercultural Language Learning (IcLL are being implemented in teachers’ classrooms.Two non-native-speaking (NNS Japanese language teachers from a selective secondary school in NSW were interviewed and their classes observed over three days. Analysis of interview and observation data shows that these teachers teach culture as determined by language content, integrate language and culture teaching and teach culture as observable and factual. The study shows that both teachers view culture teaching as easier than language teaching, however their views on the influence of the syllabus differ. The study explores the teachers’ past experiences and how these affect how they feel towards, and teach culture. Finally, this study looks at how the teachers’ practices reflect concepts of IcLL such as integrating language and culture, student-centred learning and how their status as NNS teachers affects their culture teaching.

Caroline Mahoney

2009-12-01

229

Questioning Techniques for Promoting Language Learning with Students of Limited L2 Oral Proficiency in a Drama-Oriented Language Classroom  

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In drama-oriented English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classrooms, teachers often ask questions to shape the story, unveil the details, sequence the scenes, create a beneficial linguistic environment to elicit student output and promote meaning negotiation in the target language. This study investigates how instructional goals were achieved in an…

Kao, Shin-Mei; Carkin, Gary; Hsu, Liang-Fong

2011-01-01

230

O desenvolvimento de uma metaconsciência, no professor, acerca da importância de vivenciar a linguagem como prática social na sala de aula de língua inglesa por meio da pesquisa colaborativa / The development of a teacher's meta-awareness on the importance of experiencing language as social practice in an EFL classroom through collaborative research  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Neste artigo, discutimos o processo reflexivo vivenciado por duas professoras de inglês ao problematizarem suas ações em sala de aula. Destacamos particularmente o processo de reconfiguração de suas atividades pedagógicas que inicialmente focalizam estruturas lexicogramaticais isoladas e, no decorre [...] r do processo reflexivo, são reconfiguradas em direção ao uso de gêneros textuais e à (des)construção dos contextos de situação e cultura nos quais esses textos são socialmente produzidos e vivenciados (MOTTA-ROTH, 2006). Essas reflexões foram desenvolvidas por meio de um processo de pesquisa colaborativo (MAGALHÃES, 2004). A análise do discurso dessas professoras indica que o processo reflexivo lhes permitiu desenvolver uma metaconsciência acerca de como a linguagem se organiza e se constitui ao mediar a atividade social. Abstract in english In this paper is discussed the thoughtful process experienced by two English teachers, as they problematize their procedures in the classroom. In the foreground is the process of reconfiguration of their pedagogical activities, which initially would focus on the isolated lexical-grammatical structur [...] es and which, along the reflective process, were reconfigured to focus more on textual genres and on the (de)construction of the situational and cultural contexts in which such texts are socially produced and experienced (MOTTA-ROTH, 2006). Such thoughts were developed by means of a collaborative research process (MAGALHÃES, 2004). The discourse analysis of those teachers indicate that the reflective process allowed them to develop a metaawareness about how language organizes itself and constitutes itself when it mediates the social activity.

Luciane Kirchhof, Ticks.

2010-08-01

231

Research on teaching of "Solar Eclipse" in primary classroom  

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Full Text Available It has been realized that children have their own understanding of how the world works preceding formal education in schools. It is also found in research that the social-cultural views about specific scientific concepts have generated certain alternative concepts in pupils. A great number of western studies have been done to find out students' science understanding; less has been done to understand local children's understanding of science. This research attempts to explore children's understanding of a natural phenomenon "Solar Eclipse". The research also looks into the effectiveness of employing constructivist view in designing teaching and the feasibility of research on teaching in primary classrooms. All primary six pupils of a local school and their General Studies teachers were involved in the study. Research methods include interviews, questionnaires and analysis of lesson. The results showed that children's understanding are enhanced, at the same time, children chose their favorite effective teaching activities. Also, there were changes in teachers' conceptual understandings and use of teaching methods. There was evidence that research on teaching can enhance teachers' professional development.

Winnie Wing Mui SO

2003-12-01

232

Understanding and Facing Discipline-Related Challenges in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom at Public Schools  

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Complying with school regulations and teachers’ instructions is a basic principle of an excellent class; both novice and experienced teachers face challenging situations when getting into real classrooms, especially those related to classroom management. There are various reasons that explain discipline problems in public schools, as well as varied strategies beginning teachers create and try when coping with those challenges. This article reports an action research study on how this methodology helped a group of teacher-trainees overcome indiscipline in English as a foreign language classrooms at public schools, and align with professional development initiatives which focus on reflection and decision-making processes that the new Colombian policies demand from new teachers seeking a higher quality 
of education.


Responder a las normas escolares y a las instrucciones de los profesores es un principio básico de una clase excelente. Tanto los profesores novatos como los experimentados enfrentan situaciones problemáticas en las aulas de clase reales, especialmente en relación con la disciplina. Hay varias razones que explican la indisciplina en los colegios públicos y también estrategias variadas que los profesores principiantes crean y ensayan para superar tal reto. Este artículo reporta un estudio de investigación acción que ayudó a un grupo de profesores principiantes a superar la indisciplina en el aula de inglés en colegios públicos y a responder a iniciativas de desarrollo profesional con base en procesos de reflexión y toma de decisiones que las nuevas políticas educativas colombianas demandan de las nuevas generaciones de profesores para mejorar la calidad de la educación.

Quintero Corzo Josefina

2011-11-01

233

Practitioner Research or Descriptions of Classroom Practice? A Discussion of Teachers Investigating Their Classrooms  

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This article outlines how a group of primary school teachers from a cluster of nine schools in a networked learning community enquired into their classroom teaching. The teachers each identified an area of practice that they were developing in their classroom and wanted to evaluate, such as the benefits of pupils working in teams, or the creation…

Bartlett, Steve; Burton, Diana

2006-01-01

234

La photographie, un outil pour communiquer en classe de langue Photography as a Tool to Communicate in the Language Classroom  

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Full Text Available Cette contribution, qui relève de la didactique des langues, s’appuie sur l’analyse des interactions verbales et de la communication en classe de langue. Elle repose sur la capacité de l’image à susciter des productions verbales. La photographie d’auteur est ici considérée comme un déclencheur d’interactions orales permettant de communiquer. Nous avons mis en œuvre une tâche dans des cours de français langue étrangère en contexte pluriculturel à Paris avec des apprenants de niveaux A1 à B2. Le projet mené en groupe consiste à commenter des photographies d’auteur sans objectifs langagiers prédéterminés. L’analyse d’une séquence recueillie devant la photographie Rue Mouffetard d’H. Cartier-Bresson révèle l’importance de la communication entre les apprenants. La photographie suscite des enjeux communicatifs qui favorisent l implication des étudiants. Ces derniers prennent position sur l’image et sont amenés à confronter leurs points de vue avec leurs pairs. Les apprenants peuvent également avoir recours à l’humour et modifier leur rôle conversationnel habituel.The article, in the field of foreign language classroom research, deals with verbal interaction analysis. It is based on the capacity of images to trigger verbal expression. Photography is here considered as a means to induce oral interaction, thus enabling students to communicate. We have implemented a task in a “French as a foreign languageclassroom in a multicultural context in Paris, learners’ levels ranging from A1 to B2. In this group project, students were invited to comment on artistic and documentary photographs. We had no predetermined language objectives. The analysis of interactions triggered by the photograph Rue Mouffetard by H. Cartier-Bresson highlights learners’ interactions. The photograph creates communicative needs and induces students to get involved in the activity. They express their views on the image and confront their opinions with their peers. They also use humour, thus modifying their usual interactional role.

Catherine Muller

2012-04-01

235

Learning English as an International Language: EFL Learners' Perceptions of Cultural Knowledge Acquisition in the English Classroom  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Culture is an important element in the foreign language classroom. Some scholars believe that culture is the fifth language skill along with the four traditional skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) of English. Traditionally, learning English required learners to acquire some target language cultural knowledge (e.g. British culture and/or American culture) especially in the context of English as a foreign language. However, with the increasingly important status of English as an ...

Hsuan-Yau Tony Lai

2013-01-01

236

New Ways in Using Communicative Games in Language Teaching. New Ways in TESOL Series II: Innovative Classroom Techniques.  

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This guide describes 94 classroom games designed to teach communicative skills in English as a second language, allowing students to use communication strategies in English in realistic situations similar to those in which they would use their native language. An introductory section outlines the rationale for the use of games in communicative…

Shameem, Nikhat, Ed.; Tickoo, Makhan, Ed.

237

Microgenesis, "Method" and "Object": A Study of Collaborative Activity in a Spanish as a Foreign Language Classroom  

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This paper draws on the Vygotskian methodological construct of microgenesis to study collaborative activity in an intermediate Spanish as a foreign language classroom. In this study, the construct of "microgenesis" is drawn upon to refer to both, the methodological "tool" to investigate language learning instances as observed in short periods of…

Gutierrez, Adela Ganem

2008-01-01

238

Communicative Aspects of Definitions in Classroom Interaction: Learning to Define in Class for First and Second Language Learners  

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This paper studies the interactive structure and the interactive meaning of definitions in primary school classroom interaction. The classes that were chosen are classes which consisted solely or for a large part of second language learners, as definitions might have a special importance for them in their second language acquisition. Three…

Temmerman, Martina

2009-01-01

239

Students As Researchers In An Inquiry Based Classroom  

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A teacher who participated in the National Science Foundation supported ARMADA Project through the University of Rhode Island Office of Marine Programs will share a series of lessons based on her experiences working with marine researchers. All of the activities are hands-on, inquiry based for use in elementary and secondary classrooms. The primary objective of these lessons is to give students a better understanding of what real scientist do and why. This enables students to make a real world connection with the scientific community. The emphasis on environmental monitoring will help develop an understanding of the positive and negative consequences of human action on the Earth's oceans. It will enhance the student's observation skills and increase their ability to record and analyze data.

Quintero, D. L.

2010-12-01

240

Research Informing Practice--Practice Informing Research: Innovative Teaching Methologies for World Language Teachers. Research in Second Language Learning  

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"Research Informing Practice--Practice Informing Research: Innovative Teaching Methodologies for World Language Educators" is an edited volume that focuses on innovative, nontraditional methods of teaching and learning world languages. Using teacher-research projects, each author in the volume guides readers through their own personal journey and…

Schwarzer, David, Ed.; Petron, Mary, Ed.; Luke, Christopher, Ed.

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
241

Building Teachers’ Understanding of Classroom Action Research: A Rural Case Study in Indonesia  

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Full Text Available Indonesia Open University (UT: Universitas Terbuka is a large, open university delivering distance education to students throughout Indonesia. An important aspect of its mission is to provide opportunities for Indonesian teachers to improve their education in-service. This includes two courses on classroom action research. In order to assess the effectiveness of these courses and, if necessary, improve them, a team of lecturers from UT conducted an investigation of the challenges teachers were facing in learning to conduct classroom action research through the UT modules. The team found that the modules did not adequately reflect an understanding of the actual characteristics of the teachers they were serving and were thus less effective than they might be in teaching teachers to conduct classroom action research. Changes in both the content and scheduling of the modules are recommended in order to more effectively promote classroom action research in Indonesian schools. Key Words: Classroom Action Research, Distance Education, Indonesia, Teacher Development

Dodi Sukmayadi

2011-12-01

242

Classroom Interaction Mediated by Gender and Technology: The Language Laboratory Course  

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Full Text Available This present study investigates classroom interaction with reference to gender and technology. The study data were gathered through partial ethnography by a non-participant observer; two sessions of the course Language Laboratory 1 were carefully observed, and notes were taken with a focus on the nature of interactions. Results of the study show that the interaction patterns are gender-related only to some extent. Also, the interaction pattern in the laboratory classes is similar to, but not the same as, the whole-class discussion patterns proposed in earlier literature. However, the main difference between the two is that the teacher's role in controlling and confirming the volunteer?s contribution to the discussion is markedly visible.

Nematullah SHOMOOSSI

2008-10-01

243

Handling of Morpho-syntactic Learners Errors in Tanzanian English Language Classrooms  

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Full Text Available This paper examines issues related to morpho-syntactic errors among secondary school students in Tanzanian English Language Classrooms (ELCs. Specifically, the study assesses the corrective feedback techniques that teachers use to handle their students’ morpho-syntactic errors (both written and spoken errors. The data reveal that a total of four Corrective Feedback techniques are commonly used in Tanzanian ELCs. These techniques include focused Corrective Feedback, direct Corrective Feedback, indirect Corrective Feedback and metalinguistic Corrective Feedback. On top of that, it was discovered that teachers prefer the use of indirect Corrective Feedback when they mark written assignments while explicit and recast are the most applied techniques in handling students’ oral errors.

Rafiki Yohana Sebonde

2013-11-01

244

Process Drama: The Use of Affective Space to Reduce Language Anxiety in the Additional Language Learning Classroom  

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This paper describes a research project designed to find out what happens when process drama strategies are applied to an advanced level of additional language learning. In order to answer this question, the author designed and facilitated six process drama workshops as part of a third-year course of Italian at a university in Brisbane, Australia.…

Piazzoli, Erika

2011-01-01

245

Facilitating Research and Learning in Petrology and Geochemistry through Classroom Applications of Remotely Operable Research Instrumentation  

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Bringing the use of cutting-edge research tools into student classroom experiences has long been a popular educational strategy in the geosciences and other STEM disciplines. The NSF CCLI and TUES programs have funded a large number of projects that placed research-grade instrumentation at educational institutions for instructional use and use in supporting undergraduate research activities. While student and faculty response to these activities has largely been positive, a range of challenges exist related to their educational effectiveness. Many of the obstacles these approaches have faced relate to "scaling up" of research mentoring experiences (e.g., providing training and time for use for an entire classroom of students, as opposed to one or two), and to time tradeoffs associated with providing technical training for effective instrument use versus course content coverage. The biggest challenge has often been simple logistics: a single instrument, housed in a different space, is difficult to integrate effectively into instructional activities. My CCLI-funded project sought primarily to knock down the logistical obstacles to research instrument use by taking advantage of remote instrument operation technologies, which allow the in-classroom use of networked analytical tools. Remote use of electron microprobe and SEM instruments of the Florida Center for Analytical Electron Microscopy (FCAEM) in Miami, FL was integrated into two geoscience courses at USF in Tampa, FL. Remote operation permitted the development of whole-class laboratory exercises to familiarize students with the tools, their function, and their capabilities; and it allowed students to collect high-quality chemical and image data on their own prepared samples in the classroom during laboratory periods. These activities improve student engagement in the course, appear to improve learning of key concepts in mineralogy and petrology, and have led to students pursuing independent research projects, as well as requesting additional Geology elective courses offering similar kinds of experiences. I have sustained these activities post-project via student lab fees to pay for in-class microprobe time.

Ryan, J. G.

2012-12-01

246

Exploring Content Teachers' Knowledge of Language Pedagogy: A Report on a Small-Scale Research Project in a Dutch CLIL Context  

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The relationship between language pedagogy and the content and language integrated learning (CLIL) classroom is a key issue for research into CLIL. In the Netherlands, as in other European contexts, non-native speakers of a target language with a non-language teaching background teach CLIL content lessons. Whilst CLIL teachers teaching their…

Koopman, Gerrit Jan; Skeet, Jason; de Graaff, Rick

2014-01-01

247

Implications for Language Diversity in Instruction in the Context of Target Language Classrooms: Development of a Preliminary Model of the Effectiveness of Teacher Code-Switching  

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This paper concerns the conceptual and pedagogical issues that revolve around target language (TL) only instruction and teacher code-switching in the context of TL classrooms. To this end, I first examine four intertwined ideas (that is, monolingualism, naturalism, native-speakerism, and absolutism) that run through the monolingual approach to TL…

Lee, Jang Ho

2012-01-01

248

Paradigms in the teaching of medical research: a view from the classroom, to the classroom  

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Full Text Available The guidelines of the University of Cartagena for comprehensive professional training, provide for the inclusion of the research component. In the medical program, research is the cornerstone for the construction of new knowledge, that today, directs the medical act. However, to achieve these objectives educational work in the teaching of medical research, requires that teachers employ innovative strategies for education. An important step in the appropriation and application of these strategies is the identification and understanding of the barriers or “paradigms” that have the medical students during their training. It identifies three: the paradigm of the profession, clinical specialty and general physician, in which addresses the reason for the subjects considered “filler”, the reductionism of the specialties and the passivity of the general physician to the need for research. Knowledge of these paradigms leads to the identification of teachers’ barriers such as unidirectional conception of teaching-learning process, lack of feedback and research to enrich their classroom work. Once internalized these paradigms, is everyone’s, fight.RESUMENLos lineamientos de la Universidad de Cartagena para la formación de profesionales integrales, contempla la inclusión del componente de investigación. En el programa de medicina, la investigación es el pilar para la construcción del nuevo conocimiento, que hoy por hoy, direcciona el acto médico. Sin embargo para cumplir con estos objetivos, la labor docente en la enseñanza de la investigación médica, requiere que los profesores, empleen estrategias novedosas de educación. Un paso importante en la apropiación y aplicación de estas estrategias, constituye la identificación y comprensión de las barreras o “paradigmas” que poseen los estudiantes de medicina a lo largo de su formación. Se identifican tres de ellos: el paradigma de la profesión, de la especialidad clínica y del médico general, en los cuales se aborda la razón de ser de las asignaturas consideradas de “relleno”, el reduccionismo de las especialidades y la pasividad del médico general ante la necesidad de investigar. El conocimiento de estos paradigmas conlleva a la identificación de barreras propias del docente como la concepción unidireccional del proceso enseñanza aprendizaje, la falta de retroalimentación y de investigación de aulaque enriquezca su labor. Una vez asimilados estos paradigmas, es responsabilidad de todos combatirlos.

Ramos Clason Enrique Carlos

2010-12-01

249

MALL Technology: Use of Academic Podcasting in the Foreign Language Classroom  

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Integrating Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL) technology (personal multimedia players, cell phones, and handheld devices) into the foreign language curriculum is becoming commonplace in many secondary and higher education institutions. Current research has identified both pedagogically sound applications and important benefits to students.…

Abdous, M'hammed; Camarena, Margaret M.; Facer, Betty Rose

2009-01-01

250

Conducting Original, Hands-On Astronomical Research in the Classroom  

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Since 2007 I have been a Team Leader for the Tzec Maun Foundation, a non-profit foundation dedicated to providing free, research grade, Internet telescopes to students, teachers and researchers around the world. The name Tzec Maun (pronounced “Teh-Zeck-Moan”) comes from Mayan culture. Tzec Maun was the jovial messenger, laughed at adversity. Based on the challenges students, researchers and professional astronomers face with finances, equipment, and telescope access, the jovial mascot seems to fit. Hundreds of hours performing astronomical outreach as a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador and Astronomical League Master of outreach taught me that the best way to inspirationally teach astronomy and space science (and most subjects) is actually being at the eyepiece. I’m NOT a fan of the traditional planetarium experience as a teaching tool because it inhibits inspiration and the learning experience to a 2-D mat on a faux horizon with artificial representations. Once, a student at my dark sky observatory excitedly commented that the night sky was like a 3-D planetarium. I have hosted several classes at my own personal dark sky observatory, but this resource is impractical for all but a few lucky students. Experience has taught me that the next best thing to being at the eyepiece is to control a remote telescope via the Internet. Tzec Maun’s arsenal of telescopes is all research capable, linked to the Internet and positioned for round-the-clock dark skies. The final conditions described above, mean that I can enter an 8:30am science class, log onto the Tzec Maun telescope Portal and turn over control of an Australian system (where it is night) to a student or teacher. Working as a group, the class can either begin their investigations. My Tzec Maun science team (TARP) is engaged in searching for potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs). PHA work excites student and teacher alike. Teaching from telescopes can unleash powerful attention-getting tools that enable teachers to convey moderately complex computer science, optical, geographic, mathematical, informational and physical principles through hands-on telescope operations. In addition to the general studies aspects of classroom internet-based astronomy, Tzec Maun supports real science by enabling operators precisely point telescopes and acquire extremely faint, magnitude 19+ CCD images. Thanks to the creative Team of Photometrica (photometrica.org), my teams now have the ability to process and analyze images online and produce results in short order. Normally, astronomical data analysis packages cost greater than thousands of dollars for single license operations. Free to my team members, Photometrica allows students to upload their data to a cloud computing server and read precise photometric and/or astrometric results. I’m indebted to Michael and Geir for their support. The efficacy of student-based research is well documented. The Council on Undergraduate Research defines student research as, "an inquiry or investigation conducted by an undergraduate that makes an original intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline." (http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/studentresearch/What. Teaching from Tzec Maun in the classroom is the most original teaching research I can imagine. I very much look forward to presenting this program to the convened body.

Corneau, M. J.

2009-12-01

251

Classroom Research in a General Education Course: Exploring Implications through an Investigation of the Sophomore Slump  

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General education classrooms provide a common milieu for understanding and appropriating results of classroom research projects, which are typically viewed as having little application outside their original contexts. Here, results of an investigation into the "sophomore slump," where grades and class attendance rates typically suffer, are…

Gump, Steven E.

2007-01-01

252

A Review of Foreign Researches on Influential Factors Affecting Students' Engagement in English Classroom  

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Students' active engagement constitutes the core of the process of learning and teaching in the student-oriented classroom. The paper centers on a review of foreign researches on influential factors affecting students' engagement in English classroom. It is expected to figure out the relevant factors in order to promote students' active engagement.

Zhou, Chun-hong

2010-01-01

253

The Pedagogical Mediation of a Developmental Learner Corpus for Classroom-Based Language Instruction  

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Full Text Available Although corpora have been used in language teaching for some time, few empirical studies explore their impact on learning outcomes. We provide a microgenetic account of learners’ responses to corpus-driven instructional units for German modal particles and pronominal da-compounds. The units are based on developmental corpus data produced by native speakers during interactions with the very learners for whom the units are designed. Thus, we address the issue of authentication in corpus-driven language pedagogy. Finally, we illustrate how an ethnographically supplemented developmental learner corpus may contribute to second language acquisition research via dense documentation of micro-changes in learners’ language use over time.

Julie A. Belz

2008-10-01

254

The relationship between writing and speaking in the U.S. university Spanish language classroom  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

One of the most important tasks of SLA researchers is to describe the effect(s) that activity in one or more of the four language usage categories (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) may have on the overall acquisition of the target language by each learner population. Where this type of research is fairly plentiful, it is much less common for SLA researchers to compare learner development in one of these categories with concurrent development in any of the others. The present study i...

Hubert, Michael David

2008-01-01

255

The Digital Learning Classroom: Improving English Language Learners' Academic Success in Mathematics and Reading Using Interactive Whiteboard Technology  

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This study presents the findings from the first-year evaluation of the Round Rock Independent School District's (ISD) Digital Learning Classroom project, an initiative focused on the improvement of English Language Learners' (ELL) learning using interactive whiteboard (IWB) technology. An objective of the evaluation was to determine the extent IWB…

Lopez, Omar S.

2010-01-01

256

Constructivist Pedagogy in Strategic Reading Instruction: Exploring Pathways to Learner Development in the English as a Second Language (ESL) Classroom  

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The study explored English as a Second Language (ESL) learner development. In particular, it focused on investigating learners' understanding of reading and their willingness to be engaged in strategic reading in participatory classroom activities. It also examined possible effects of such pedagogy on reading performance. The context was a…

Zhang, Lawrence Jun

2008-01-01

257

Why an Investigative Stance Matters in Intercultural Language Teaching and Learning: An Orientation to Classroom-Based Investigation  

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This paper develops the idea that classroom investigation can be an integral part of teaching and learning, an ongoing "stance" that enables us to gather valuable information about teaching and learning that may otherwise go unnoticed. This information can in turn inform how teachers understand and develop intercultural language teaching and…

Crichton, Jonathan

2008-01-01

258

Teaching and Learning Classroom Action Research at a Distance in an Indonesian Urban Community  

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Full Text Available This action research project aims to understand whether teachers are mastering the knowledge and skills necessary to conduct classroom action research through two courses, Classroom Action Research (CAR and Enhancing Teaching Professional Skills (PKP: Pemantapan Kemampuan Profesional, offered via distance education to Indonesian teachers and to identify areas for possible improvement of both courses. The research was conducted in two urban study centers located in the cities of Bogor and Tangerang in the Indonesian provinces of West Java and Banten. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews, classroom observations, questionnaires, and focus group discussions. All data were analyzed for patterns that might offer insight into the problems tutors and teacher-learners were facing as they worked through the Classroom Action Research (PTK: Penelitian Tindakan Kelas module and tutorial. The research team from Indonesia Open University (UT: Universitas Terbuka identified several problematic aspects of each course, including excessive lag time between the first and second courses, insufficient examples of model classroom action research projects, a lack of supervised practice of action research techniques, variability of tutorial quality, and a mismatch between course assessments and the content and purpose of the courses. While the findings of this study focus primarily on two distance courses offered by UT, they offer insight into the challenges of providing in-service teacher development via distance education in the Indonesian context. Key Words: Distance Learning, Classroom Action Research, Teacher Professional Skill

[None] Sandra S.A.

2011-12-01

259

Review Article: Second Language Acquisition of Bantu Languages--A (Mostly) Untapped Research Opportunity  

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This review article presents a summary of research on the second language acquisition of Bantu languages, including Swahili, Zulu, Xhosa and Lingala. Although second language (L2) research on these languages is currently very limited, work in morphosyntax and phonology suggests promising directions for future study, particularly on noun class,…

Spinner, Patti

2011-01-01

260

Research Based Science Education: Bringing Authentic Scientific Research into the Secondary Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Teachers and students at Northview High School in Brazil, Indiana have the opportunity to engage in authentic scientific research through our participation in two national projects, TLRBSE and PEPP. Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science Education (TLRBSE) is a teacher professional development and retention program coupled with authentic scientific research projects in astronomy. Teacher-Leaders are trained in research-based pedagogy and serve as mentors to less experienced colleagues and work with students to develop science research methods and research projects for the classroom. Astronomical data collected at Kitt Peak by astronomers and teachers is made available on CD for classroom use. Northview is in its second year as a TLRBSE school. The Princeton Earth Physics Project (PEPP) trains mentor teachers in fundamentals of research in seismology. Teachers and students then gain hands on experience in science research through operation of a research quality seismic station sited at the high school. Data from the Northview seismometer are stored locally and also transmitted over the Internet to a database at Indiana University. Students have access to local data as well as seismic databases accessible through the Internet to use for research projects. The Northview Seismic Station has been in operation since 1998. In this presentation, I will describe how these projects have been incorporated into the physics and earth science programs at Northview High School. I will discus how our teachers and students have benefited from the opportunity to take part in hands-on scientific research under the guidance of university faculty. In particular, I will describe our participation in a regional seismic network through seismic data acquisition, data analysis using seismological software, and students' experiences in a university-based student research symposium. I reflect on the some of the successes and barriers to high-school teachers' and students' involvement in scientific research programs. I conclude with a discussion of a successful student seismology project that was a finalist in the 2003 INTEL International Science and Engineering Fair

Sayers, J.

2003-12-01

 
 
 
 
261

Spanish as a Second Language when L1 Is Quechua: Endangered Languages and the SLA Researcher  

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Spanish is one of the most widely spoken languages in the world. Quechua is the largest indigenous language family to constitute the first language (L1) of second language (L2) Spanish speakers. Despite sheer number of speakers and typologically interesting contrasts, Quechua-Spanish second language acquisition is a nearly untapped research area,…

Kalt, Susan E.

2012-01-01

262

Three Heresies of Language Testing Research.  

Science.gov (United States)

Provides a personal view of the history of Anglo-American language testing over the last half-century. Argues that major developments in the field have tended to be embraced too enthusiastically so that they have led to unbalanced views concerning the construct definition of language, the scope of test impact, and the value of new methods of test…

Davies, Alan

2003-01-01

263

Teachers' perceptions of formative assessment practices in the English language classroom within the Hong Kong context  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The research was an intrinsic case study, which investigated the teachers’ perceptions and usage of formative assessment practices among English language teachers within the Hong Kong context. The sample was drawn from thirteen in-service English language teachers working within a primary school that is working collaboratively with a Non Government Organization (NGO) called “Batelle for kids”, which provides strategies and frameworks for the implementation of formative assessment. This ...

Ho, Civen; ???

2014-01-01

264

The Distance Learning of Foreign Languages: A Research Agenda  

Science.gov (United States)

Research into the distance learning of languages is now established as a significant avenue of enquiry in language teaching, with evident research trajectories in several domains. This article selects and analyses significant areas of investigation in distance language learning and teaching to identify new and emerging gaps, along with research

White, Cynthia

2014-01-01

265

English Language Teachers’ Conceptions of Research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article was conducted on 150 EFL teachers investigating the conceptions of research. An understanding of this issue is very important to the development of conditions for encouraging teachers to be research engaged in order not to be subservient and take a much more pioneering role in curriculum development. Questionnaire responses were analyzed to determine the teachers’ view of research. The findings of this research present that the teachers’ conceptions of research are very close to conventional scientific theories and findings. Teachers also reported lack of time, knowledge, and institutional support as influential factors which restrict their abilities to be research engaged. On the whole, this research points to a number of attitudinal, conceptual, and external obstacles to teachers’ research engagement. Understanding these is a necessary part of trying to make teachers’ research engagement a more possible and doable activity in ELT.

Omid Tabatabaei

2013-03-01

266

Identity Revealed through Talk among Young Language-Minority Children in Norwegian Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

The study investigated the ethnic identity development of Turkish-speaking children in Norwegian preschool and first-grade classrooms, examining how they made their ethnicity interactionally relevant in everyday talk. Classroom conversations and interviews revealed their interest in ethnic diversity. The manner in which the children talked about…

Rydland, Veslemoy; Aukrust, Vibeke Grover

2008-01-01

267

Relations among Preschool Teachers' Self-Efficacy, Classroom Quality, and Children's Language and Literacy Gains  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the relations among preschool teachers' self-efficacy (n = 67), classroom quality (instructional and emotional support), and children's (n = 328) gains in print awareness and vocabulary knowledge over an academic year in the US. Results indicated that teachers' self-efficacy and classroom quality served as significant and…

Guo, Ying; Piasta, Shayne B.; Justice, Laura M.; Kaderavek, Joan N.

2010-01-01

268

The Language of Sustainability: From Basic Writing Classroom to Professional Discourse  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Understanding and describing professional practice, especially in Engineering and the Sciences,  has always been at the heart of research in Professional Communication. Several significant field  research projects have showed us that content knowledge alone is not sufficient to claim disciplinary expertise; a rhetorical understanding of the discipline and its ways of thinking is essential in achieving full participation in the field. Most professionals would expect that such a sophisticated approach can only be learned through on-the-job training or opportunities to interact with practitioners within authentic disciplinary contexts. Although this can certainly be the case in many instances, we argue that a rhetorical understanding can be enacted even within a freshman writing classroom. The results of our content and rhetorical analyses of student work from the beginning and the end of a course on academic writing with the theme of sustainability show that students were able in one semester to write in discipline-appropriate ways and understand the rhetorical strategies necessary to become part of a disciplinary conversation.  The implications of our findings can extend into the way we design courses in basic writing or professional communication and the ways we can use pre-assessment data to drive our course design decisions. 

Karatsolis, Andreas; Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.

269

Principles and Practices for Building Academic Self-Efficacy in Middle Grades Language Arts Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

Academic self-efficacy contributes to students' motivation and persistence for learning. However, motivation for reading and learning, and students' self-efficacy in school often declines in adolescence. This manuscript presents research-based strategies for facilitating students' motivations within the context of language arts classes.

McTigue, Erin; Liew, Jeffrey

2011-01-01

270

Bidialectal African American Adolescents' Beliefs about Spoken Language Expectations in English Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes the perspectives of bidialectal African American adolescents--adolescents who speak both African American Vernacular English (AAVE) and Standard English--on spoken language expectations in their English classes. Previous research has demonstrated that many teachers hold negative views of AAVE, but existing scholarship has…

Godley, Amanda; Escher, Allison

2012-01-01

271

Frequency versus Importance: Language Learning Strategy Use in the EFL Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

In recent decades, there has been a plethora of studies on language learning strategies (LLS hereafter). However, the research to date has mostly examined students' views on LLS, and there are few studies reflecting teachers' views. In contrast, this study surveyed 257 EFL students and 12 teachers to explore their views on the frequency…

Agazade, Ali Sidki; Vefali, Gülsen Musayeva

2014-01-01

272

"Deja Vu"? A Decade of Research on Language Laboratories, Television and Video in Language Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

The developments in the last ten years in the form of DVD, streaming video, video on demand, interactive television and digital language laboratories call for an assessment of the research into language teaching and learning making use of these technologies and the learning paradigms underpinning them. This paper surveys research on language

Vanderplank, Robert

2010-01-01

273

PDI: Science for English Language Learners (ELL): Integrating Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, and Thinking into the K-8 Classroom, New Orleans, Louisiana; March 18, 2009  

Science.gov (United States)

This Professional Development Institute (PDI) will focus on teaching strategies and methods that incorporate language acquisition with science instruction for English Language Learners (ELL) in the K-8 classroom. Specifically, this institute will begin with an overview of research on the ELL population, instruction, and programs available to teachers who have responsibilities for teaching science. The bulk of the 6 hours of instruction will provide guided inquiry activities that model integrated (Sheltered Instruction) strategies in science, reading, writing, listening, speaking, and thinking. The follow-up workshops will provide more in-depth research and instruction in each of the language skills (reading, writing, listening, speaking, and thinking) as they apply to science instruction as well as working with specific populations of ELL students and available programs. Classrooms in the United States are becoming more diverse thus requiring regular classroom teachers to develop new skills in working with students whose first language is not English. Recent census data show that over the past twenty five years the number of ELL students (ages 5-17) grew from 3.8 million to 9.9 million or approximately 10% of the entire U.S. school population (NCES, 2006). With this incredible growth, regular classroom teachers are in need of learning new teaching skills in language acquisition to integrate into everyday classroom content instruction. Sheltered Instructional strategies or Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) involve teaching strategies used in developing language skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking and incorporates them into content area (Science) planning, instruction and assessment. These strategies include clearly defined language and content objectives, creating instruction that relates to students' prior knowledge, tailoring teacher talk to students' English language proficiency levels, allowing students to process material in a variety of formats including guided inquiry, scaffolding content instruction, and using assessment methods that allow students to display learning in a variety of ways (Becijos,1997; Echevarria, Vogt, and Short, 2008). This is especially important to teachers at the elementary and middle school as the majority of ELL students are entering schools at these levels. Of all ELL students entering school, 44% are in grades K-3 and 35% in grades 4-8 (Kindler, 2002). This Professional Development Institute will be conducted by David Crowther, a Professor of Science Education at the University of Nevada, Reno. Dr. Crowther is the coauthor/editor of Science for English Language Learners by NSTA Press. He has written several chapters in books and articles about science for ELLs; presented at NSTA workshops and TESOL on the subject; and teaches science methods using Sheltered Instruction strategies at the University of Nevada, Reno. Joaquin Vil� is a Professor of English and Second Language Acquisition at Salisbury University in Maryland. In his numerous years of experience he has conducted many workshops on teaching EL students, written chapters / articles, and led departments and programs for ELL within the English departments at several universities. Dr. Vil� is also a NCATE evaluator of TESOL programs and is the Special Assistant to the Vice President of the University for Diversity. Presenters are recognized as top researchers, authors, and workshop facilitators in the field of science and language acquisition.

1900-01-01

274

Effective Classroom Management  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper attempts to explore and identify the characteristics of an effective teacher who teaches English as a second language to 10 year old students from different ethnics, various social economic background and multi-level language ability, at a private primary school in Malaysia. The study focused on classroom management using a case study methodology where data was collected using both interviews and classroom observations. The findings concur with previous literature reviews on effective teacher models whilst providing in-depth details on what transpires during classroom activities, thus clarifying further the meaning of effective classroom management. The implications of this study suggest the need to include six new classroom management behaviours of an effective teacher. Further research is warranted to help policy makers and school administrators in identifying the significance of these behaviours for the selection and training of future teachers.

Azlin Norhaini Mansor

2012-07-01

275

The impact of Finno-Ugric languages in second language research: Looking back and setting goals  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This state of the art review aims at discussing the potential relevance of Finno-Ugric languages in the larger context of second language research. Key results received in the studies conducted in the field of Finno-Ugric languages as second languages are introduced, and some interim conclusions based on them are made. The main areas in focus are cross-linguistic influence, forms and constructions, second language interaction, and motivation, identities and integration. Furthermore, some future lines of investigation are suggested for the researchers of the field. The research activities are recommended to get more closely bound to the internationally established or emerging paradigms, and research activities involving several Finno-Ugric languages are strongly encouraged. To promote international co-operation, some existing gaps or obvious needs for research are pointed out, and preliminary research initiatives are made. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5128/LV22.14

Minna Suni

2012-10-01

276

BUILDING BLOCKS IN THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM (PILARES BÁSICOS EN EL AULA DE IDIOMAS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Resumen:Este artículo presenta las ventajas de la integración de tres áreas comúnmente estudiadas en la enseñanza de idiomas: Estilos de Aprendizaje, Inteligencias Múltiples y Estrategias para el Aprendizaje de Idiomas. Cada una de estas áreas tiene un papel fundamental en la enseñanza de idiomas y el aprendizaje, pero por lo general se utilizan por separado, o en el mejor de los casos, los y las docentes integran ya sea estilos e inteligencias o estrategias, pero no las tres al mismo tiempo. De hecho, la mayoría de la literatura presenta cada una por separado, dando la idea de que sólo una o dos se pueden utilizar en la clase de idiomas, por lo que en muchas oportunidades se ignoran aspectos fundamentales. La tesis principal del artículo es que, para ser más eficaz, Estilos de Aprendizaje, Inteligencias Múltiples y Estrategias de Aprendizaje deben entrelazarse a fin de crear un pilar sólido para el aprendizaje de idiomas. Primeramente, la autora ofrece una visión general de cada una de estas áreas. Luego en el referente teórico explica cómo estas deben usarse como una unidad, y posteriormente da un ejemplo de esto a través de un plan de clase sobre el tema de la conservación del medio ambiente para un curso de Comunicación Oral I de la carrera de inglés de la Escuela de Lenguas Modernas de la Universidad de Costa Rica. Por último, se ofrecen algunas recomendaciones a los y las instructores sobre la integración de estos pilares en el aula.Abstract: This article presents the advantages of integrating three areas commonly addressed in the teaching of languages: Learning Styles, Multiple Intelligences and Language Learning Strategies. Each of these areas plays a fundamental role when teaching and learning languages, but usually they are used separately or in the best of cases, instructors integrate either styles and intelligences or strategies, but not the three of them at the same time. Indeed, most of the literature presents each separately, giving the idea that only one or two can be used in the language classroom, thus missing some important matters. The point of this article is that in order to be more effective, Learning Styles, Multiple Intelligences and Language Learning Strategies must intertwine, so as to create a solid building block. The author first gives an overview of each of these areas. She then explains in the review of the literature how they should be used as a closely-knit unit. Next, she provides an example of this integration through a lesson plan on the topic of environmental conservation for an Oral Communication course for English majors at School of Modern Languages, University of Costa Rica. Finally, some advice is given to instructors on the incorporation of each of these building blocks.

Coto Keith Rossina

2010-12-01

277

Cognitive Research and Elementary Science Instruction: From the Laboratory, to the Classroom, and Back  

Science.gov (United States)

Can cognitive research generate usable knowledge for elementary science instruction? Can issues raised by classroom practice drive the agenda of laboratory cognitive research? Answering yes to both questions, we advocate building a reciprocal interface between basic and applied research. We discuss five studies of the teaching, learning, and…

Klahr, David; Li, Junlei

2005-01-01

278

Language diversity in the mathematics classroom: does a learner companion make a difference?  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: English Abstract in english Language and education are interrelated because all teaching is given through the medium of language. Language is considered to be both a precondition for thought and a bearer of thought and therefore influences the extent to which a child's intelligence is actualised. In the South African context l [...] inguistic diversity is a complex issue. It has increasingly become the task and responsibility of educators to develop strategies in an attempt to facilitate quality education for their learners. In this study, the researchers developed an 'aid' that would assist learners to relate mathematics terms and concepts in English with terms in their own languages. The study determined whether a visual multilingual learner companion brought change in learners' performance in mathematics. Also what the educators' views were about this. A combination of a quasiexperimental study and an interview schedule was conducted. The quasiexperimental study was conducted among learners while the interview schedule was with their educators. The sample comprised 2,348 learners in Grade 4, Grade 5 and Grade 6 from 20 schools as well as 20 educators from the treatment schools. The results indicated that the mathematics marks of the treatment group improved. Also, the educators were complimentary about the learner companion and indicated that they would utilise this going forward in their teaching. It is recommended that the multilingual visual explanatory mathematics learner companion be used and investigated on a larger scale to corroborate the efficacy reported here.

Hendrik, Botes; Andile, Mji.

279

A Research on Second Language Acquisition and College English Teaching  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available It was in 1970s that American linguist S.D. Krashen created the theory of “language acquisition”. And the theories on second language acquisition were proposed based on the study on the second language acquisition process and its rules. Here, the second language acquisition process refers to the process in which a learner with the mastery of his mother language learns another language without its social environment. Due to the close relationship between second language acquisition research and language teaching, the relevant acquisition theories are of great importance for college English teaching, during which teachers are expected to base their teaching on second language acquisition theories to study the rules of college English teaching, to reform the current teaching patterns and methods and to improve teaching quality. This is a significant project to study carefully for college English teachers as well as second language acquisition researchers.

Changyu Li

2009-11-01

280

"Value Added" Modern Languages Teaching in the Classroom: An Investigation into How Teachers' Use of Classroom Target Language Can Aid Pupils' Communication Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper presents some of the preliminary findings of a study into modern languages (ML) learning in five Scottish secondary schools. Five ML teachers were observed and audio-recorded over a period of several weeks while teaching their third-year classes (pupils aged 14-15 years). All the teachers used the target language extensively in their…

Crichton, Hazel

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
281

Students and Teachers' Reasons for Using the First Language Within the Foreign Language Classroom (French and English) in Central Mexico Razones de alumnos y maestros sobre el uso de la primera lengua en el salón de lenguas extranjeras (francés e inglés) en el centro de México  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The present study explores the use of the first language in a context of foreign language teaching. This qualitative research presents the classroom practice and points of view of French and English teachers and students within a public educational institute in central Mexico using the techniques of questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. The results show that teachers and the majority of students perceive the use of the first language as positive and part of the teaching and learning ...

Irasema Mora Pablo; Martha Lengeling, M.; Buenaventura Rubio Zenil; Troy Crawford; Douglas Goodwin

2011-01-01

282

Language diversity in the mathematics classroom: does a learner companion make a difference?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Language and education are interrelated because all teaching is given through the medium of language. Language is considered to be both a precondition for thought and a bearer of thought and therefore influences the extent to which a child's intelligence is actualised. In the South African context linguistic diversity is a complex issue. It has increasingly become the task and responsibility of educators to develop strategies in an attempt to facilitate quality education for their learners. In this study, the researchers developed an 'aid' that would assist learners to relate mathematics terms and concepts in English with terms in their own languages. The study determined whether a visual multilingual learner companion brought change in learners' performance in mathematics. Also what the educators' views were about this. A combination of a quasiexperimental study and an interview schedule was conducted. The quasiexperimental study was conducted among learners while the interview schedule was with their educators. The sample comprised 2,348 learners in Grade 4, Grade 5 and Grade 6 from 20 schools as well as 20 educators from the treatment schools. The results indicated that the mathematics marks of the treatment group improved. Also, the educators were complimentary about the learner companion and indicated that they would utilise this going forward in their teaching. It is recommended that the multilingual visual explanatory mathematics learner companion be used and investigated on a larger scale to corroborate the efficacy reported here.

Hendrik Botes

2010-01-01

283

How Latino/a bilingual students use their language in a fifth grade classroom and in the science laboratory during science instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

This qualitative research study examines how Latino/a bilingual students use their linguistic resources in their homeroom classroom and in the science laboratory during science instruction. This study was conducted in a school district located in the southwestern part of the United States. The school was chosen based on the criterion that the school is located in an area considered economically depressed, with a predominantly Latino student, school, and neighborhood population. The object of study was a fifth grade bilingual (Spanish/English) classroom where English was the means of instruction. Classroom interaction was examined from a sociolinguistics perspective. The study was descriptive in nature with the objective of analyzing the students' use of their linguistic resources while participating in science learning. The results of this study suggest that the students used their linguistic resources purposefully in order to facilitate their participation in science leaning. In the same manner, it was observed the students' reliance on Spanish as a foundation to enhance their comprehension of the scientific concepts and the dynamics involved in the science lessons, with the purpose of making sense, and thus, to express their understanding (orally and in writing) using their linguistic resources, especially their English language, as it was expected from them. Further, the findings disclose the students' awareness of their own bilingualism, preference for speaking Spanish, and their conceptualization of English as the language to achieve academic success. It has also been observed how the pressure put upon the teacher and the students by the accountability system brings about an implicit bias against Spanish, causing the teacher to assume a paradoxical stance regarding the students' use of Spanish, and thereby, placing the students in an ambivalent position, that might affect, to a certain extent, how students use their Spanish language as a resource to participate in science learning.

Stevenson, Alma R.

284

Immediate Dissemination of Student Discoveries to a Model Organism Database Enhances Classroom-Based Research Experiences  

Science.gov (United States)

Use of inquiry-based research modules in the classroom has soared over recent years, largely in response to national calls for teaching that provides experience with scientific processes and methodologies. To increase the visibility of in-class studies among interested researchers and to strengthen their impact on student learning, we have…

Wiley, Emily A.; Stover, Nicholas A.

2014-01-01

285

The Relationship between SLA Research and Language Pedagogy: Teachers' Perspectives  

Science.gov (United States)

There is currently a substantial body of research on second language (L2) learning and this body of knowledge is constantly growing. There are also many attempts in most teacher education programs around the world to inform practicing and prospective L2 teachers about second language acquisition (SLA) research and its findings. However, an…

Nassaji, Hossein

2012-01-01

286

The Use of Foreign Languages in Tourism: Research Needs.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examines the research needs relative to the use of foreign languages in tourism activities in Australia and New Zealand. Findings indicate a lack of precise information on the ways in which the tourism industry in these countries provides appropriate language assistance to non-English speaking inbound visitors. Suggestions for future research are…

Watts, Noel

1994-01-01

287

Trends in Qualitative Research in Language Teaching since 2000  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper reviews developments in qualitative research in language teaching since the year 2000, focusing on its contributions to the field and identifying issues that emerge. Its aims are to identify those areas in language teaching where qualitative research has the greatest potential and indicate what needs to be done to further improve the…

Richards, Keith

2009-01-01

288

Research on Affective Teaching Strategy in China's College English Classroom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Affective teaching plays an increasing significant role in the teaching process; it not only attaches great importance to the teaching of knowledge and skills, but also pays specific attention to students' attitude and emotional needs in the process of teaching, so as to promote students' overall development as well as improving their comprehensive qualities. In this paper, the author first put forward the current problems of English teaching in China, and then introduced some relevant studies of affective teaching. Finally the author tries to explain the strategies of applying emotional factors to the college English classroom from both the students’ and the teachers’ perspective.

Qiang Zhang

2014-06-01

289

Literacy and Justice through Photography: A Classroom Guide. Language & Literacy Series  

Science.gov (United States)

This practical guide will help teachers to use the acclaimed "Literacy Through Photography" method developed by Wendy Ewald to promote critical thinking, self-expression, and respect in the classroom. The authors share their perspectives as an artist, a sociologist, and a teacher to show educators how to integrate four new "Literacy Through…

Ewald, Wendy; Hyde, Katherine; Lord, Lisa

2011-01-01

290

Classroom Language Use in Hong Kong's Reformed English-Medium Stream  

Science.gov (United States)

During the last two decades of colonial rule, a wide gulf existed between policy and practice in Hong Kong's English-medium secondary schools: while English was the medium of textbooks, assignments and examinations, Cantonese and Cantonese-English mixed code were the dominant media of classroom communication. Although mixed-mode instruction was…

Evans, Stephen

2008-01-01

291

Bringing the Field into the Classroom: A Field Methods Course on Saudi Arabian Sign Language  

Science.gov (United States)

The methodology used in one graduate-level linguistics field methods classroom is examined through the lens of the students' experiences. Four male Deaf individuals from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia served as the consultants for the course. After a brief background information about their country and its practices surrounding deaf education, both…

Stephen, Anika; Mathur, Gaurav

2012-01-01

292

Student Thought and Classroom Language: Examining the Mechanisms of Change in Dialogic Teaching  

Science.gov (United States)

Dialogue, as a communication form characterized by its commitment to inclusiveness and rationality, has long been advocated by educators as a mechanism for helping students become better thinkers. Unfortunately, numerous claims about the educational potential of participating in dialogue have not resulted in substantial changes in classroom

Reznitskaya, Alina; Gregory, Maughn

2013-01-01

293

Instruction in Spanish in Pre-Kindergarten Classrooms and Child Outcomes for English Language Learners  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationships among proportion of instruction in Spanish, observed classroom quality, and preschool-aged children's academic skills. Study participants included 357 Spanish-speaking 4-year-old children who attended state-funded pre-kindergarten programs in 11 states that participated in one of…

Burchinal, Margaret; Field, Samuel; Lopez, Michael L.; Howes, Carollee; Pianta, Robert

2012-01-01

294

Speakers’ comfort and voice level variation in classrooms: Laboratory research  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Teachers adjust their voice levels under different classroom acoustics conditions, even in the absence of background noise. Laboratory experiments have been conducted in order to understand further this relationship and to determine optimum room acoustic conditions for speaking. Under simulated acoustic environments, talkers do modify their voice levels linearly with the measure voice support, and the slope of this relationship is referred to as room effect. The magnitude of the room effect depends highly on the instruction used and on the individuals. Group-wise, the average room effect ranges from 0.93 dB/dB, with free speech, to 0.1 dB/dB with other less demanding communication tasks as reading and talking at short distances. The room effect for some individuals can be as strong as 1.7 dB/dB. A questionnaire investigation showed that the acoustic comfort for talking in classrooms, in the absence of background noise, is correlated to the decay times derived from an impulse response measured from the mouth to the ears of a talker, and that there is a maximum of preference for decay times between 0.4 and 0.5 s. Teachers with self-reported voice problems prefer higher decay times to speak in than their healthy colleagues.

Brunskog, Jonas

2012-01-01

295

Automated Writing Evaluation: Defining the Classroom Research Agenda  

Science.gov (United States)

With the advent of English as a global language, the ability to write well in English across diverse settings and for different audiences has become an imperative in second language education programmes throughout the world. Yet the teaching of second language writing is often hindered by the great amount of time and skill needed to evaluate…

Warschauer, Mark; Ware, Paige

2006-01-01

296

Engaging Learner Attribute Research in Dialogue with Classroom Practice: Predictors of Success in the Accelerated, Online Classroom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Research examining student success in online education has focused extensively on internal learner attributes with little emphasis on external, controllable factors that may mediate a student’s ability to perform within the distinctive environment of the virtual classroom. The purpose of this study is to balance student characteristic research with external, direct data from the perspective of online instructors in order to provide a practice-oriented understanding of the unique factors predictive of student success in accelerated, online courses. Experienced online educators were surveyed to identify practical skills, strategies or factors most likely to lead to success for students enrolled in online courses. A content-analysis of open-ended responses revealed 23 relevant factors that clustered into six broad themes. Within these themes, four issues emerge as the most predictive of online learner success: time, technology, initiative, and competence. Discussion examines the practical, deliberate application of this information to facilitate students’ successful completion of online courses.

B. Jean Mandernach

2006-07-01

297

Being Bilingual: Issues for Cross-Language Research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The current political debates in England highlight the role of language in citizenship, social exclusion, and discrimination. Similar debates can also be found around the world. Correspondingly, research addressing different language communities is burgeoning. Service providers and academics are increasingly employing bilingual community researchers or interpreters to carry out research. However, there is very little written about the effect of working with bilingual researchers. What it means to be bilingual is often essentialised and rarely problematised. Bilingual researchers are seen as unproblematically acting as bridges between communities just because they are bilingual. Their ties to communities, their use of language, and their perspectives on the research are rarely investigated. Language is tied in an unproblematic way to meaning, values, and beliefs. In this article, I use examples from my own research to question what it means to be bilingual and to do cross-language research. I argue that there is no straightforward way in which meanings can be read off from researchers’ ties to language and that being bilingual is not the same for everyone.

Bogusia Temple

2006-01-01

298

PolarTREC-Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating: Bringing Polar Research to the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

PolarTREC-Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating is a three-year (2007-2009) teacher professional development program that pairs K-12 teachers with researchers to improve science education through authentic polar research experience. PolarTREC builds on the strengths of the existing TREC program in the Arctic, an NSF supported program managed by the Arctic Research Consortium of the US (ARCUS), to embrace a wider range of research activities in the Arctic and Antarctic. PolarTREC uses a Teacher Research Experience (TRE) model to foster the integration of research and education to produce a legacy of long-term teacher-researcher collaborations, improved teacher content knowledge through experiences in scientific inquiry, and broad public interest and engagement in polar science. PolarTREC will enable thirty-six teachers to spend two to six weeks in the Arctic or Antarctic, working closely with researchers investigating a wide range of topics such as sea-ice dynamics, terrestrial ecology, marine biology, atmospheric chemistry, and long-term climate change. With the help of their host researcher and the research team, teachers will develop the experience and tools necessary to teach science through scientific inquiry and investigation based on real-world experiences. While in the field, teachers and researchers will communicate extensively with their colleagues, communities, and hundreds of students of all ages across the globe, using a variety of tools including satellite phones, online journals, podcasts and interactive "Live from IPY" calls and web-based seminars. The online outreach elements of the project convey these experiences to a broad audience far beyond the classrooms of the PolarTREC teachers. In addition to field research experiences, PolarTREC will support teacher professional development and a sustained community of teachers, scientists, and the public through workshops, Internet seminars, an e-mail listserve, and ongoing teacher/researcher networks. For further information on PolarTREC, contact Wendy Warnick, ARCUS Executive Director at warnick@arcus.org or 907-474-1600. The PolarTREC website will be accessible in 2007 through the ARCUS web site at www.arcus.org.

Warnick, W. K.; Warburton, J.; Breen, K.; Wiggins, H. V.; Larson, A.; Behr, S.

2006-12-01

299

Finding a Place for Critical Thinking and Self-voice in College English as a Foreign Language Writing Classrooms  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Although the concepts of critical thinking and self-voice have been extensively discussed in a second language writing, little attention has been given, on the pedagogical level, to critical thinking and self-voice in college EFL writing instruction. To fill such a void, this paper attempts to propose some pedagogical tasks namely:  persuasive writing tasks, draft workshops one-on-one mentoring approaches for finding a place for critical thinking and self-voice in EFL classrooms. In doing so, this paper provides the operational definitions of critical thinking and self-voice concepts. It then discusses how these two concepts are closely related to complement EFL writing learning. In what follows, it presents the rationale for finding a place for critical thinking and self-voice in EFL writing. It then touches on some pedagogical practices for developing critical thinking and self-voice in classrooms. Lastly, it addresses some challenges related to implementing critical thinking and self-voice tasks in EFL classrooms.

Osman Barnawi

2011-06-01

300

Research and the Classroom: Mahomet and the Mountain Revisited  

Science.gov (United States)

The article discusses the relationship between research and educational practice, and suggests that the lag between research and implementation be remedied by making the progress of the individual handicapped child the target of research. (GW)

Blackman, Leonard S.

1972-01-01

 
 
 
 
301

Second Language Acquisition Studies. Series on Issues in Second Language Research.  

Science.gov (United States)

This collection of 16 papers covers theoretical issues and research on interlanguage development and second language acquisition variables. Among the specific topics addressed are: morpheme group interactions, acquisition of complex sentences in English as a second language, uniformity in interlanguage development, Spanish-English basilang,…

Bailey, Kathleen M., Ed.; And Others

302

Research for the Classroom: To Read or Not to Read--Five Approaches to Teaching Shakespeare  

Science.gov (United States)

How teachers can use such materials as parallel-text editions, graphic novels, and film adaptations to increase students' understanding of and interest in Shakespeare was the impetus for a classroom action research project that examined the effects of teaching methods on student comprehension and engagement. The author of this article…

Shoemaker, Brandon

2013-01-01

303

Towards a Model of Strategic Actions in the Classroom: Games Theory as a Research Heuristic.  

Science.gov (United States)

Discusses how the conceptual apparatus and modus operandi of games theory provides a research heuristic for understanding the strategic possibilities inherent in typical classroom situations in which the interests of students and teachers are partially concurrent and partly in conflict. Also discusses the preconditions for contracts between…

Elstad, Eyvind

2002-01-01

304

Extending the Concept and Practice of Classroom Based Research to California Community Colleges. Final Report.  

Science.gov (United States)

With support from the California Community College Fund for Instructional Improvement, 14 classroom-based research studies were conducted in fall 1991 at American River College (ARC), Consumnes River College (CRC), Sacramento City College (SCC), San Joaquin Delta College (SJDC), Solano Community College (SoCC), and Yuba Community College (YCC).…

Sacramento City Coll., CA. Learning Resources Div.

305

Using Qualitative Research to Assess Teaching and Learning in Technology-Infused TILE Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

This chapter describes the results of an assessment project whose purpose was to improve the faculty-development program for instructors who teach in technology-infused TILE (Transform, Interact, Learn, Engage) classrooms at the University of Iowa. Qualitative research methods were critical for (1) learning about how students and instructors…

Van Horne, Sam; Murniati, Cecilia Titiek; Saichaie, Kem; Jesse, Maggie; Florman, Jean C.; Ingram, Beth F.

2014-01-01

306

Minority Language Researchers and Their Role in Policy Development  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper deals with the role of researchers in the development of language policies for European minority languages. This question is placed in the context of a long-standing debate in sociology to which several authors have contributed; among them are Max Weber, Howard Becker and Alvin Gouldner. This article also briefly refers to the European…

Gorter, Durk

2012-01-01

307

Changing Reasons as Reasoning Changes: A Narrative Interview on Second Language Classroom Motivation, Telecollaboration, and the Learning of Foreign Languages  

Science.gov (United States)

This narrative interview study of a Spanish learner documents and explains apparent contradictions in a student's story when reporting on why she continues to take Spanish even when she does not like it or perform well in foreign language courses. A dialectical approach to human activity based on sociocultural theory is used to make sense of her…

Negueruela-Azarola, Eduardo

2011-01-01

308

MEDIA ART AND LANGUAGE TRIANGLE: A RESEARCH ON THE LANGUAGE OF TURKEY IN EUROVISION SONG CONTEST  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Eurovision song contest with its fifty years history which is the biggest music- art organization of the world has gone down in history. The contest which is also one the most viewed television program has been an example of globalization and language standardization. ?n this article there has been a research on the language of the songs participated to Eurovision song contest from 1975 till today. There has been also a research on the question of “should the song of Turkey be in Turkish or English?” There has been a research and an analysis on the language of the Turkish entry songs for the contest which has the discussion of language and art. There has been a point of how the countries defeated by the globalization by using the English language and not their native language. There has been a discussion for the use of Turkish language and the concept of Turkish which has a big historical background. There has been a discussion of the role of the concept of language in Eurovision Song contest.

Mihalis KUYUCU

2013-06-01

309

The Complex Relationship between Reading Research and Classroom Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

Dudley-Marling discusses the nature of research in the teaching of reading and the possible connections between such research to teaching and to policy. He questions what he calls the "leitmotif" of federal education policy, specifically, the call for "scientifically based research" to determine reading teaching practices, arguing how such…

Dudley-Marling, Curt

2005-01-01

310

Classroom Acoustics  

Science.gov (United States)

... build up of middle ear fluid) learning disabilities auditory processing disorders speakers of another language speech and language delay attention problems Poor classroom acoustics can also affect the teacher. ...

311

Professional Development of Mexican Secondary EFL Teachers: Views and Willingness to Engage in Classroom Research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The effective implementation of any educational reform is largely dependent on the preparation of teachers. In the case of the National English Program in Basic Education, (NEPBE implemented in public schools in Mexico in 2009, teacher preparation options have been designed by both public and private higher education institutions in several states of the country. Most options have been based on the needs of teacher trainers and educational administrators, rather than on teachers’ needs. This paper presents the partial results of a professional development needs analysis carried out with secondary English language teachers in northeast Mexico. The study examined the teachers’ previous professional development experiences; their views on professional development contents and formats; and disposition to engage in inquiry-based professional development. Results indicated that stand-alone and degree courses were the only professional development activities the participants had experienced. Other practices such as mentoring, peer observation, attending conferences, or networking, were unfamiliar to the majority of them. Although most of the teachers considered that training courses had a high impact on teaching, some of them valued the impact of professional development practices that involve autonomy, reflection and collaboration. A high percentage of teachers reported disposition to learn about and engage in classroom research.

Ruth Roux

2014-08-01

312

Spoken Language Research and ELT: Where Are We Now?  

Science.gov (United States)

This article examines the relationship between spoken language research and ELT practice over the last 20 years. The first part is retrospective. It seeks first to capture the general tenor of recent spoken research findings through illustrative examples. The article then considers the sociocultural issues that arose when the relevance of these…

Timmis, Ivor

2012-01-01

313

Second Language Listening Strategy Research: Methodological Challenges and Perspectives  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper explores methodological issues related to research into second language listening strategies. We argue that a number of central questions regarding research methodology in this line of enquiry are underexamined, and we engage in the discussion of three key methodological questions: (1) To what extent is a verbal report a valid and…

Santos, Denise; Graham, Suzanne; Vanderplank, Robert

2008-01-01

314

Experimental research on thermal comfort in the university classroom of regular semesters in Korea  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This research has investigated physical variables affecting indoor thermal comfort and subjective responses of thermal comfort of students in a university in Korea in which the weather is oceanic temperate climate, and has been performed to contribute to the research fields of Sustainable Thermal Standard and Adaptive Thermal Comfort (ATC). This research is based on the ISO 7730-2005 standard and the ATC theories and 4 main variables of PMV such as dry bulb temperature (Ta), relative humidity (RH), black bulb temperature (Tg), and air velocity (Va) are measured once a week during two regular semesters. A clothing insulation, a thermal sensation vote (TSV), an acceptability of thermal environment, and a preference for cooling and heating are investigated at the same time using a questionnaire. This study was carried out for 26 weeks during the spring season, from March to June 2009, and the autumn season, from September to December 2009. The main achievements of this study are as follows. Monthly Mean Outdoor Temperature (MMOT) and Operative Temperature (OT) in the classroom during research periods are 7.4?23.3 .deg. C and 17.5?29.0 .deg. C, respectively. The acceptability ratio of thermal environment shows over 80% when the range of OT in the classroom is 17?25 .deg. C, and the range can be applicable to operative index of heating and cooling of classroom. The mean TSV of respondents is almost 'neutral (0)' when the PMV in the classroom moves to 'neutral (0)' an classroom moves to 'neutral (0)' and 'slightly cool (-1)', and the TSV is almost '+1.5' when the PMV moves to 'slightly warm (+1)'. The acceptability ratio of thermal environment is slightly different from ASHRAE Standard 55-2004. So it is necessary to more investigate standard range of acceptability of thermal environment in oceanic temperate climate region using much more databases

315

The Ecology of Language in Classrooms at a University in Eastern Ukraine  

Science.gov (United States)

Using an ecology of language framework, the purpose of this study was to examine the degree to which English as a medium of instruction (EMI) at a private university in eastern Ukraine allows for the use of Ukrainian, the state language, or Russian, the predominantly spoken language, in large cities in eastern Ukraine. Uses of English and Russian…

Tarnopolsky, Oleg B.; Goodman, Bridget A.

2014-01-01

316

The Impact of Integrating Technology and Social Experience in the College Foreign Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Technology has been used widely in the field of education for a long period of time. It is a useful tool which could be a mediation to help language learners to learn the target language. In order to investigate how technology and social experience can be integrated into courses to promote language learners' desire to learn English, the…

Chen, Yulin

2013-01-01

317

The Role of the African Languages Research Institute in Addressing Language of Instruction Dilemmas in Zimbabwe  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available

Abstract: The lexicographic work of the African Languages Research Institute (ALRI has played a significant role in attempting to avoid some of the dilemmas associated with using African languages as media of instruction in the Zimbabwean education system. Monolingual Shona and Ndebele dictionaries, biomedical reference works, dictionaries of musical, literary and linguistic terms as well as children's dictionaries constitute part of ALRI's contribution towards the goal of mainstreaming African languages in the education system. This article is an evaluation of the research activities taking place at ALRI. The aim of the article is to demonstrate that if they receive adequate attention through corpus planning, African languages possess the capacity to play an important role as media of instruction across the entire spectrum of the education curricula in Zimbabwe and elsewhere. The article concludes by observing that, if the efforts of ALRI are to succeed, there is need for the co-operation of all stakeholders in language practice.

Keywords: DICTIONARIES, LEXICOGRAPHY, LEXICOGRAPHER, LEXICOGRAPHIC RESEARCH, INDIGENOUS AFRICAN LANGUAGES, AFRICAN LANGUAGES RESEARCH INSTITUTE (ALRI, EDUCATION, CURRICULUM, MEDIUM OF INSTRUCTION, SHONA, NDEBELE, ZIMBABWE

Opsomming: Die rol van die African Languages Research Institute by die hantering van onderrigtaaldilemmas in Zimbabwe. Die leksikografiese werk van die African Languages Research Institute (ALRI het 'n betekenisvolle rol gespeel om sommige van die dilemmas te probeer vermy wat gepaard gaan met die gebruik van Afrikatale as onderrigmedia in die Zimbabwiese opvoedingstelsel. Eentalige Sjona- en Ndebelewoordeboeke, biomediese naslaanwerke, woordeboeke van musiek-, letterkunde- en taalkundeterme sowel as woordeboeke vir kinders maak deel uit van ALRI se bydrae tot die doelwit om Afrikatale in die hoofstroom van die opvoedingstelsel te plaas. Hierdie artikel is 'n beoordeling van die navorsingsaktiwiteite wat by ALRI plaasvind. Die doel van die artikel is om te toon dat, indien hulle voldoende aandag deur korpusbeplanning ontvang, Afrikatale die vermoë besit om 'n belangrike rol as onderrigmedia oor die hele spektrum van die opvoedingsleerplanne in Zimbabwe en elders te speel. Die artikel sluit met die waarneming dat, indien die pogings van ALRI wil slaag, daar behoefte is aan die same-werking van alle belanghebbendes in die taalpraktyk.

Sleutelwoorde: WOORDEBOEKE, LEKSIKOGRAFIE, LEKSIKOGRAAF, LEKSIKO-GRAFIESE NAVORSING, INHEEMSE AFRIKATALE, AFRICAN LANGUAGES RESEARCH INSTITUTE (ALRI, OPVOEDING, LEERPLAN, ONDERRIGMEDIUM, SJONA, NDEBELE, ZIMBABWE

Jesta Masuku

2011-10-01

318

Application of Research and Theory in the Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

The collection of 15 teaching ideas from teachers of limited English proficient students focus on language skills and include such suggestions as having older students prepare a slide show to illustrate irregular English verbs for younger students and interviewing parents about their traditions. (DB)

Miramontes, Ofelia

1983-01-01

319

Brain Matters: Translating Research into Classroom Practice. 2nd Edition  

Science.gov (United States)

While you don't need to be a scientist to understand brain-compatible teaching, you'll be far more effective when you base your teaching practices on the very best scientific information. This expanded and updated ASCD best-seller delivers that essential information in clear, everyday language that any teacher can immediately incorporate into…

Wolfe, Patricia

2010-01-01

320

First language transfer in second language writing: An examination of current research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available First language (L1 transfer has been a key issue in the field of applied linguistics, second language acquisition (SLA, and language pedagogy for almost a century. Its importance, however, has been re-evaluated several times within the last few decades. The aim of this paper is to examine current research that has investigated the role of L1 transfer in second language (L2 writing. The paper begins by discussing the different views of L1 transfer and how they have changed over time and then reviews some of the major studies that have examined the role of L1 transfer both as a learning tool and as a communicative strategy in L2 writing. The paper concludes with a number of suggestions for L2 writing instruction and future research.

Khaled Karim

2013-01-01

 
 
 
 
321

ERPs show that classroom-instructed late second language learners rely on the same prosodic cues in syntactic parsing as native speakers.  

Science.gov (United States)

The loss of brain plasticity after a 'critical period' in childhood has often been argued to prevent late language learners from using the same neurocognitive mechanisms as native speakers and, therefore, from attaining a high level of second language (L2) proficiency [7,11]. However, more recent behavioral and electrophysiological research has challenged this 'Critical Period Hypothesis', demonstrating that even late L2 learners can display native-like performance and brain activation patterns [17], especially after longer periods of immersion in an L2 environment. Here we use event-related potentials (ERPs) to show that native-like processing can also be observed in the largely under-researched domain of speech prosody - even when L2 learners are exposed to their second language almost exclusively in a classroom setting. Participants listened to spoken sentences whose prosodic boundaries would either cooperate or conflict with the syntactic structure. Previous work had shown that this paradigm is difficult for elderly native speakers, however, German L2 learners of English showed very similar ERP components for on-line prosodic phrasing as well as for prosody-syntax mismatches (garden path effects) as the control group of native speakers. These data suggest that L2 immersion is not always necessary to master complex L2 speech processing in a native-like way. PMID:24141083

Nickels, Stefanie; Opitz, Bertram; Steinhauer, Karsten

2013-12-17

322

Overcoming Constraints of Building Successful Partnerships Incorporating STEM Research Into K-12 Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

The Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education (INSPIRE) program at Mississippi State University (MSU), funded by the NSF Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK12) program, focuses on the advancement of Earth and Space science education in K-12 classrooms. INSPIRE is currently in its second year of partnering ten graduate students from the STEM fields of Geosciences, Engineering and Chemistry at MSU with five teachers from local, rural school districts. The five year project serves to increase inquiry and technology experiences in science and math while enhancing graduate student's communication skills as they create interactive lessons linking their STEM research focus to the state and national standards covered in the classrooms. Each graduate student is responsible for the development of two lessons each month of the school year that are then published on the INSPIRE project webpage, www.gk12.msstate.edu, where they are a free resource for any K-12 classroom teacher seeking innovative activities for their classrooms. Many of the participating teachers and graduate students share activities developed with non-participating teachers, expanding INSPIRE's outreach throughout the local community. Numerous challenges were met during the formation of the program as well as throughout the first year in which the project management team worked together to find solutions ensuring that INSPIRE maintained successful partnerships for all involved. Proposed solutions of the following key components were identified by INSPIRE through the development, implementation, and continuous evaluation (internal and external) of the first year of the program as areas that can pose challenges to the construction of strong relationships between STEM research and K-12 classrooms: initializing the partnerships with the K-12 classrooms and STEM graduate fields at the university; maintaining strong partnerships; providing appropriate training and support; developing sound resources involving STEM research, inquiry, and technology; implementing STEM graduate research into the classroom; clarifying potential benefits for all involved partners (school districts, teacher, university departments, graduate students and K-12 students); improving management methods; and planning for sustainability of partnerships and resources developed including synergy with other university outreach projects.

Radencic, S.; McNeal, K. S.; Pierce, D.; Hare, D.

2011-12-01

323

Comparing students' performance on research-based conceptual assessments and traditional classroom assessments  

Science.gov (United States)

The use of concept inventories to investigate students' learning gains is common in physics education research. However, comparatively little research has compared students' learning gains on concept inventories with other more traditional assessments in the classroom. We present a study comparing second semester calculus-based physics students' performance on traditional classroom assessments including exams and homework with learning gains on SEMCO (Survey of Electricity, Magnetism, Circuits and Optics), which was previously created by combining questions on other conceptual surveys such as CSEM and DIRECT. We report on students' performance on specific items on SEMCO and corresponding traditional classroom assessments that are based on the same topic. Our results indicate that while the overall performance on SEMCO might correlate with aggregate performance on class exams, the performance on clusters of SEMCO items that assess conceptual understanding in various topical areas does not correlate as strongly with performance on corresponding traditional exams. These results raise some potentially interesting issues on the validity and usefulness of traditional classroom assessments and conceptual assessments that are often used to measure student learning in introductory physics.

Rebello, N. Sanjay

2012-02-01

324

Efficacy of Supplemental Phonics-Based Instruction for Low-Skilled Kindergarteners in the Context of Language Minority Status and Classroom Phonics Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

This study tested the efficacy of supplemental phonics instruction for 84 low-skilled language minority (LM) kindergarteners and 64 non-LM kindergarteners at 10 urban public schools. Paraeducators were trained to provide the 18-week (January-May) intervention. Students performing in the bottom half of their classroom language group (LM and non-LM)…

Vadasy, Patricia F.; Sanders, Elizabeth A.

2010-01-01

325

Classroom Video on Researching Microorganisms That Live on Greenhouse Gases  

Science.gov (United States)

In this short video produced by Teachers' Domain, HHMI Professor and Investigator Catherine Drennan of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology explains her research into microorganisms that survive on greenhouse gases, which are widely believed to accelerate global warming.

Catherine Drennan (MIT;)

2010-05-11

326

The Multigrade Classroom: A Resource Handbook for Small, Rural Schools. Book 1: Review of the Research on Multigrade Instruction.  

Science.gov (United States)

In multigrade instruction, children of at least a 2-year grade span and diverse ability levels are grouped in a single classroom and share experiences involving intellectual, academic, and social skills. "The Multigrade Classroom" is a seven-book series that provides an overview of current research on multigrade instruction, identifies key issues…

Vincent, Susan, Ed.

327

Research and training of teachers in the classroom: Development of proto-mentalist skills in kindergarten pupils with special educational needs  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available An example of research and training of kindergarten’s teachers in the classroom is introduced. Recent research in developmental psychology relate to early childhood skills acquisition proto-mentalist to the development of skills for interacting with objects and people. The results of this study, conducted with 13 children from 15 to 38 months indicated a significant association of social reference (expression skills, identification and recognition of emotions with the pathology (developmental delay, West syndrome, psychomotor impairment, PDD, language delay. Likewise, the data indicate significant correlations between cognitive development and symbolic play, as well as between different areas of development (psychomotor, cognitive, language and socialization.

María Consuelo Sáiz

2012-04-01

328

Language diversity in the mathematics classroom: does a learner companion make a difference?  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Language and education are interrelated because all teaching is given through the medium of language. Language is considered to be both a precondition for thought and a bearer of thought and therefore influences the extent to which a child's intelligence is actualised. In the South African context linguistic diversity is a complex issue. It has increasingly become the task and responsibility of educators to develop strategies in an attempt to facilitate quality education for their learners. I...

Hendrik Botes; Andile Mji

2010-01-01

329

The Use of L1 in the Foreign Language Classroom / El uso de la lengua materna en el salón de inglés como lengua extranjera  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: English Abstract in spanish El uso de la lengua materna es una ocurrencia común en los contextos de la enseñanza de la lengua extranjera, a pesar de que a veces reciba críticas por su interferencia en la adquisición de la Lengua meta. Mientras que los docentes deben maximizar el uso de la Lengua meta, sin duda, hay espacios pa [...] ra que el profesor utilice la lengua materna de los estudiantes en su pedagogía. En este trabajo se presenta un argumento basado en las perspectivas teóricas y la investigación empírica dentro de la literatura existente, apoyando el uso apropiado de la Lengua materna en el salón de inglés como lengua extranjera. El argumento se centra en tres cuestiones fundamentales-racionales para el uso de la lengua materna: Los efectos positivos que la lengua materna tiene tanto en el aprendizaje y la instrucción de una lengua extranjera, como en las formas en las que la lengua materna ayuda a los docentes de idiomas extranjeros. Abstract in english L1 use is a common occurrence in foreign language teaching contexts despite the fact that it often receives criticism for its interference with target language (TL) acquisition. While foreign language teachers should maximize their use of the TL, there is indeed a place for the teacher to use the st [...] udents' L1 in their pedagogy. In this paper, an argument derived from theoretical perspectives and empirical research within existing literature supporting the appropriate use of L1 in foreign language classrooms is presented. The argument addresses three key issues-rationales for L1 use, positive effects L1 has on both foreign language learning and instruction, and ways that L1 assists instructors on foreign languages.

Yi-chun, Pan; Yi-ching, Pan.

2010-07-01

330

Chinese Language and Culture: 9-Year Program Classroom Assessment Materials, Grade 4  

Science.gov (United States)

This document is designed to provide assessment materials for specific Grade 4 outcomes in the Chinese Language and Culture Nine-year Program, Grades 4-5-6. The assessment materials are designed for the beginner level in the context of teaching for communicative competence. Grade 4 learning outcomes from the Chinese Language and Culture Nine-year…

Alberta Education, 2008

2008-01-01

331

Punjabi Language and Culture: 9-Year Program Classroom Assessment Materials, Grade 4  

Science.gov (United States)

This document is designed to provide assessment materials for specific Grade 4 outcomes in the Punjabi Language and Culture Nine-year Program, Grades 4-5-6. The assessment materials are designed for the beginner level in the context of teaching for communicative competence. Grade 4 learning outcomes from the Punjabi Language and Culture Nine-year…

Alberta Education, 2008

2008-01-01

332

The Emergence of U.S. French Language Learners' Intercultural Competence in Online Classroom Discussions  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study is to further the understanding of foreign language (FL) learners' development of intercultural competence in an instructed learning environment. In this study, second-semester U.S. French language learners enrolled in a Midwestern two-year technical school were directed to access explicit cultural instruction, authentic…

Garrett-Rucks, Paula

2010-01-01

333

Transmediation in the Language Arts Classroom: Creating Contexts for Analysis and Ambiguity  

Science.gov (United States)

When a language arts curriculum provided students with the opportunity to translate meaning across sign systems (that is, from poetry to dance), numerous benefits were noted. Transmediation, the translation of meaning from one sign system to another, led students to analyze compositional structures and to enhance their use of academic language

McCormick, Jennifer

2011-01-01

334

Effects of Narrative Script Advance Organizer Strategies Used to Introduce Video in the Foreign Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

The study compared participant comprehension of foreign language video content using two advance organizer (AO) strategies while exploring the benefits of AOs as proficiency increases. Participants were 50 advanced-beginner Spanish college students in three sections. Collaborative reading condition participants read a target language narrative…

Ambard, Philip D.; Ambard, Linda K.

2012-01-01

335

Setting the Foundation for Working with English Language Learners in the Secondary Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

In many schools, an increasing number of students are learning English as their second language. Secondary teachers are faced with the challenge of teaching English Language Learners (ELLs) with little or no training. This article highlights ideas and strategies that teachers can incorporate to make their instruction more effective in meeting the…

Berg, Helen; Petron, Mary; Greybeck, Barbara

2012-01-01

336

Promoting Learner Autonomy: Student Perceptions of Responsibilities in a Language Classroom in East Asia  

Science.gov (United States)

With the advent of communicative language teaching in East Asia, the idea of learner autonomy has become a topic of discussion and a goal among language teachers. The idea of autonomy raises important questions that need to be further explored, particularly in terms of students taking responsibility for learning. While examining the English…

Sakai, Shien; Takagi, Akiko; Chu, Man-Ping

2010-01-01

337

Success with ELLs: We Are All Writers! Building Second Language Writing Skills in the ELA Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Writing effectively in a second language can be one of the most challenging tasks second language learners must undertake and master. English teachers are in a good position to implement the types of supports that can move ELLs toward success in academic writing by providing exposure to and practice with different genres of academic writing,…

DelliCarpini, Margo

2012-01-01

338

Long-Term Effects of Gestures on Memory for Foreign Language Words Trained in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Language and gesture are viewed as highly interdependent systems. Besides supporting communication, gestures also have an impact on memory for verbal information compared to pure verbal encoding in native but also in foreign language learning. This article presents a within-subject longitudinal study lasting 14 months that tested the use of…

Macedonia, Manuela; Klimesch, Wolfgang

2014-01-01

339

Promoting Humor with Prekindergarten Children with and without Language Impairments in Classroom Settings  

Science.gov (United States)

The promotion of language and social skill development for young children occurs in multiple contexts with a range of empirically validated methods. One specific intervention strategy used to promote language and communication would be to arrange the environment so that it is structured to elicit a range of communicative functions, such as…

Fitzgerald, Karen L.; Craig-Unkefer, Lesley

2008-01-01

340

Doing Being a Foreign Language Learner in a Classroom: Embodiment of Cognitive States as Social Events  

Science.gov (United States)

Encountering trouble producing a word in the midst of a turn at talk is an everyday experience for foreign language learners. By employing conversation analysis (CA) as a central tool for analysis, the current study explores how students undertake a range of word searches while they organize a pair work session designed for the purpose of language

Mori, Junko; Hasegawa, Atsushi

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
341

The Cultural Dimensions of Language Teaching and Learning : Research Timeline  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Language teaching and learning has many different cultural dimensions, and over the years more and more of these have been the subject of research. The first dimension to be explored was that of content: the images of target language countries and the world that were offered in textbooks and presented in class. The next dimension was that of the learner: the (inter)cultural learning, competence and identity of the learner or subject. The next dimension was context: the situation and role of language teaching and learning in society and in the world.

Risager, Karen

2011-01-01

342

Research of Original Geometric Concepts: Some Episodes from the Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Presents a learning experience based on students' mathematical research into original geometric concepts with the help of dynamic geometry software. Makes the case that mathematical definitions have an arbitrary character and that proof plays the role not only of verification, but of discovery and explanation. (Author/MM)

Winicki-Landman, Greisy

2001-01-01

343

Bridging the Gap between Classrooms and Research Laboratories  

Science.gov (United States)

In the ever-expanding realm of science, educators struggle to share new discoveries and techniques with their students. Keeping abreast of recent advances can be daunting, even for the most motivated teacher. Fortunately, the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) program helps educators keep up with the…

Dempsey, Brian; Hibbett, David; Binder, Manfred

2007-01-01

344

The embodied turn in research on language and social interaction  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

I use the term the embodied turn to mean the point when interest in the body became established among researchers on language and social interaction, exploiting the greater ease of video-recording. This review paper tracks the growth of "embodiment" in over 400 papers published in Research on Language and Social Interaction from 1987-2013. I consider closely two areas where analysts have confronted challenges, and how they have responded: settling on precise and analytically helpful terminology for the body; and transcribing and representing the body, particularly its temporality and manner.

Nevile, Maurice

2015-01-01

345

Using language as a transparent resource in the teaching and learning of mathematics in a Grade 11 multilingual classroom   

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this paper, we draw on a study conducted in Grade 11 classrooms to explore how the learners’ home languages can be used for teaching and learning mathematics in multilingual classrooms in South Africa. This report is part of a wider study that is still in progress. Based on an analysis of data collected through lesson observations in a Grade 11 class and learner interviews we argue for the deliberate, proactive and strategic use of the learners’ home languages as a transparent resource in the teaching and learning of mathematics in multilingual classrooms. Such use of the languages will ensure that learners gain access to mathematical knowledge without losing access to English, which many parents, teachers and learners presently see as a necessary condition for gaining access to social goods such as higher education and employment.

Mamokgethi Setati

2011-10-01

346

Research into Sexism in Language Testing & Its Implications to Language Testing in China  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper reviews foreign and domestic sexism research and practice in language testing and reveals that China lags behind in this sociolinguistics perspective in both theoretical study and practice. The paper indicates that sexism is represented in the listening comprehension section in National Matriculation English Test (NMET) after a case…

Tao, Baiqiang

2007-01-01

347

Language Socialization Research and French Language Education in Africa: A Cameroonian Case Study.  

Science.gov (United States)

Reports on exploratory ethnographic research on language acquisition and use in a village located in the Mandara Mountains, Cameroon. Indicates that members of the community share several beliefs and practices related to multilingual communicative competence and its development. (Author/VWL)

Moore, Leslie C.

1999-01-01

348

Focus on the use of language in the multicultural mathematics classroom  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Learning mathematics can be seen as learning a foreign language or learning a particular mathematical discourse.  Nolte (2004) calls mathematics the students' first second language. The use of language in mathematics teaching, hence the way we talk and the way we write, differ from the way the same words and concepts are used in everyday language or in teaching and learning other subjects. Looking through material for mathematics teaching shows that the students are expected to have a certain level of mathematical ability (ex. being able to count to ten) and a certain level of language ability (ex. understanding the meaning of the words "in front of") when they enter first grade in primary school (Nyborg and Nyborg, 1990). Students who lack these abilities either with regard to mathematics or language are from the beginning of schooling limited in their mathematical performance and in a "risk zone" of developing learning difficulties in mathematics. Teaching the teachers a consciousness for the use of language in mathematics teaching as well as educating them to have a special focus on developing the vocabulary of the students can render the mathematics teaching more inclusive. Furthermore, it may help students with different ethnical background to succeed in mathematics (Johansen; 2007).

Johansen, Lene Østergaard

349

Family Literacy and Second Language Literacy Research: Focus on Language Minority Children  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Problem Statement: Countries like the U. S. A. or Canada have citizens from various ethnic backgrounds. Although English is the dominant language in many parts of these countries, immigrants generally prefer speaking their native language when they are in their homes. Whatever the reason for using native language at home is, when we consider the children in these families, we can say that being exposed to different languages at home and at school may be a problem for their language development.Purpose of Study: There are many studies conducted in order to better understand the problems of language minority children. A great deal of literature on language minority students focuses on the ties between these children?s literacy development and their literacy practices at home. In other words, these studies aim to see how the literacy events these children are exposed to at home affect their literacy learning in the second language.Methods: This paper is an attempt to put together and discuss various theoretical and empirical studies conducted on the literacy development of language minority children in English speaking countries.Findings: Literacy education of language minority students is not an easy task. It is very complicated and difficult to achieve as it requires a complete collaboration among all the responsible parties (teachers, families, researchers, education policy makers, school administrators. Conclusion and Recommendations: Successful collaboration among all the involved parties would bring successful outcomes in terms of children?s healthy literacy development. The collaboration between teachers and families is the most vital one because these two parties are the ones that have one-to-one interaction with children.

Özgür Y?ld?r?m

2013-04-01

350

Teaching English language learners in mainstream science classrooms: Teacher practice and educational opportunity  

Science.gov (United States)

Equal educational opportunity for English language learners (ELLs) has been a goal of the public educational system in the United States. Language policy reforms have increasedaccountability in order for schools to improve student achievement and measure the progress of ELLs. The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) requires assessment and accountability. In this study, the number of ELLs has increased significantly at the high school level and school district as a whole. Along with the changing demographics, the findings reveal a district-wide policy of equalizing educational opportunity through equal treatment. Language policies provide critical decisions about how to measure what students know in all subjects. The assimilation model limited access to mainstream course content, produced inaccurate assessment results and grades. The science curriculum was only accessible through English and the use of the students' native languages was discouraged. The voices of the students were silenced and their academic achievement continues to lag behind their English-speaking peers.

Schroeder, Carlotta Dorothy

351

The Effects of Global Education in the English Language Conversation Classroom  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Global education is the backbone of balanced teaching. This is also applicable in the second language teaching domain where its application could result in enhancing global awareness and the linguistic competence of learners. It is, however, important to consider the platform of teaching English to speakers of other languages where the participant’s content as well as task plays an important role in enhancing the learning curve. With the above as a theoretical background, this stu...

Reza Omidvar; Benjamin Sukumar

2013-01-01

352

The Effects of Global Education in the English Language Conversation Classroom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Global education is the backbone of balanced teaching. This is also applicable in the second language teaching domain where its application could result in enhancing global awareness and the linguistic competence of learners. It is, however, important to consider the platform of teaching English to speakers of other languages where the participant’s content as well as task plays an important role in enhancing the learning curve. With the above as a theoretical background, this study puts global issues into practice within the content of a syllabus of English language teaching in an intermediate, multilingual and multi- cultural conversation class at the Institute Of Language Studies (IOLS, India, producing competent students. The effect of integrated global education in teaching English as a second language has been qualitatively evaluated throughout the course of the experiment. Global education issues are investigated, amalgamating the content-based and task-based language teaching methods as offshoots of the communicative approach. At the same time, the learners were also encouraged to think critically. After the instruction of the intended syllabus, participants basically showed a higher degree of awareness of global issues and the ability to analyze problems and apply critical thinking in their environment. They were also more effective and coherent in their class participation than in other classes.

Reza Omidvar

2013-06-01

353

Dyslexia in Chinese Language: An Overview of Research and Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

Dyslexia appears to be the most prevalent disability of students with special educational needs in many mainstream classes, affecting around 9.7% of the school population in Hong Kong. The education of these students is therefore of great concern to the community. In the present paper research into dyslexia in the Chinese language is briefly…

Chung, Kevin K. H.; Ho, Connie S. H.

2010-01-01

354

Research Methodology on Language Development from a Complex Systems Perspective  

Science.gov (United States)

Changes to research methodology motivated by the adoption of a complexity theory perspective on language development are considered. The dynamic, nonlinear, and open nature of complex systems, together with their tendency toward self-organization and interaction across levels and timescales, requires changes in traditional views of the functions…

Larsen-Freeman, Diane; Cameron, Lynne

2008-01-01

355

Statistical Literacy among Applied Linguists and Second Language Acquisition Researchers  

Science.gov (United States)

The importance of statistical knowledge in applied linguistics and second language acquisition (SLA) research has been emphasized in recent publications. However, the last investigation of the statistical literacy of applied linguists occurred more than 25 years ago (Lazaraton, Riggenbach, & Ediger, 1987). The current study undertook a partial…

Loewen, Shawn; Lavolette, Elizabeth; Spino, Le Anne; Papi, Mostafa; Schmidtke, Jens; Sterling, Scott; Wolff, Dominik

2014-01-01

356

Promoting Science Among English Language Learners: Professional Development for Today's Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

We describe a model professional development intervention currently being implemented to support 3rd- through 5th-grade teachers’ science instruction in 9 urban elementary schools with high numbers of English language learners. The intervention consists of curriculum materials for students and teachers, as well as teacher workshops throughout the school year. The curriculum materials and workshops are designed to complement and reinforce each other in improving teachers’ knowledge, beliefs, and practices in science instruction and English language development for ELL students. In addition to these primary goals, secondary goals of the intervention included supporting mathematical understanding, improving scientific reasoning, capitalizing on students’ home language and culture, and preparing students for high-stakes science testing and accountability through hands-on, inquiry-based learning experiences.

Buxton, Cory; Lee, Okhee; Santau, Alexandra

2008-10-01

357

Exploring Classroom Assessment Practices: The Case of Teachers of English as a Foreign Language  

Science.gov (United States)

The research investigated the factors which underlie the perceptions and usage of alternative assessment procedures among EFL teachers in Israel. The research was conducted within the framework of an earlier model by Hargreaves and colleagues comprising four perspectives--technological, cultural, political and postmodern--to account for teachers'…

Inbar-Lourie, Ofra; Donitsa-Schmidt, Smadar

2009-01-01

358

Beyond the Pages of a Book: Interactive Book Reading and Language Development in Preschool Classrooms.  

Science.gov (United States)

The effects of a book reading technique called interactive book reading on the language and literacy development of 4-year-olds from low-income families were evaluated. Teachers read books to children and reinforced vocabulary in the books by presenting objects that represented the words and providing opportunities to use the words. (BF)

Wasik, Barbara A.; Bond, Mary Alice

2001-01-01

359

Shakespeare as a Second Language: Playfulness, Power and Pedagogy in the ESL Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This article presents an argument for the inclusion of Shakespeare in the senior high school ESL (English as a Second Language) curriculum in Taiwan, to be taught through a physical, participatory pedagogy in line with the approaches of drama education in general and those currently being promoted by the education department of the UK-based Royal…

Cheng, Astrid Yi-Mei; Winston, Joe

2011-01-01

360

Observations of Real-Time Captioning in the Elementary English Language Learner Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This qualitative study reviews the effects of real-time captioning on vocabulary acquisition of a novice elementary English language learner (ELL). Triangulation of data was completed through review of teacher journaling, captioning transcripts, and student pretest and posttest assessments. Results illuminate improved retention and usage of…

Ingraham, Nissa

2014-01-01

 
 
 
 
361

Linguistic Perspectives on African American Vernacular English and Implications for the Language Arts Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article outlines some basic linguistic principles that provide a foundation for the recognition of African American Vernacular English (AAVE) as a legitimate language system that is not only an asset to its speakers, but has also made valuable contributions to American society in terms of artistic expression of identity and community. The way…

Orr, J. Evelyn

362

English Language Learners' Perceptions of Autonomy Support in a Literacy Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

In this study, we explored 3 Grade 4 English Language Learners' (ELLs) perceptions of teacher autonomy-supporting practices in literacy instruction in science. The support of autonomy in literacy classes is central to students' internal motivation for reading. Given that many ELLs are at risk for reading failure, understanding autonomous learning…

Taboada, A.; Kidd, J. K.; Tonks, S. M.

2010-01-01

363

School-Readiness Profiles of Children with Language Impairment: Linkages to Home and Classroom Experiences  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: This study represents an effort to advance our understanding of the nature of school readiness among children with language impairment (LI), a population of children acknowledged to be at risk of poor academic achievement. The academic, social-emotional, and behavioural competencies with which children arrive at kindergarten affect the…

Pentimonti, Jill M.; Justice, Laura M.; Kaderavek, Joan N.

2014-01-01

364

Resilient and Nonresilient Hispanic English Language Learners' Attitudes toward Their Classroom Learning Environment in Mathematics  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examines resilient and nonresilient characteristics in mathematics among Hispanic students in a major metropolitan city located in the south central region of the United States. The study examined data from semistructure interviews of 118 resilient and nonresilient English language learners (ELLs) in 4th and 5th grade. The interviews…

Rivera, Hector H.; Waxman, Hersh C.

2011-01-01

365

Language and Space in a Multilingual Undergraduate Physics Classroom in Rwanda  

Science.gov (United States)

This case study examines how a lecturer and a group of students adjust to a request for English-only medium of instruction in tertiary education. The study draws on sociocultural theories considering context and language use as tools for meaning making. Goffman's theories of stage setting and footing are used to analyse how the lecturer positions…

Andersson, Ingrid; Rusanganwa, Joseph

2011-01-01

366

Choice of Classroom Language in Bidialectal Communities: To Include or to Exclude the Dialect?  

Science.gov (United States)

The issue of dialect and education and, in particular, the issue of which code to use as the medium of instruction has generated much heated debate in bidialectal societies. This debate is reflected in the literature on language policy in education which is divided into three main areas: (i) the use of the standard variety as medium of…

Yiakoumetti, Androula

2007-01-01

367

What Can We Learn from the Common Core Standards in the Early Language Learning Classroom?  

Science.gov (United States)

The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and the National Standards for Foreign Language Education have several areas of commonality: (1) both standards have the goal that all students, by the end of 12th grade, will have the skills they need to be successful world citizens; (2) the literacy skills that are found in the Common Core are the same…

Curtain, Helena

2013-01-01

368

Formatively Evaluating the Reading Progress of First-Grade English Learners in Multiple-Language Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

This study provides descriptive data on first-grade reading proficiency of English learners in multiple-language settings. Using curriculum-based measurement of reading (CBM-R) to measure oral reading fluency (ORF) and a nonsense word-reading fluency (NWF) measure, weekly scores during the final 6 weeks of the first-grade school year indicated…

Graves, Anne W.; Plasencia-Peinado, Judith; Deno, Stanley L.; Johnson, John R.

2005-01-01

369

Aboriginal Education as Cultural Brokerage: New Aboriginal Teachers Reflect on Language and Culture in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper reports on a Talking Circle of six beginning Aboriginal teachers who discussed their roles as teachers. Participants criticized teacher education programs for not preparing them to teach in ways that are respectful of Aboriginal languages and culture. They discussed the importance of coming to know themselves and their culture. The…

Kitchen, Julian; Cherubini, Lorenzo; Trudeau, Lyn; Hodson, Janie M.

2009-01-01

370

A Toolkit of Strategies: Building Literacy in the World Languages Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

In elementary schools around the United States, children learn in text-rich environments with literacy a primary goal of instruction, whether the instruction is in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, or Spanish. Nonetheless, second language instruction is often overlooked as a vehicle for building students' reading, writing, speaking,…

Zeppieri, Rosanne; Russel, Priscilla

2013-01-01

371

PRACTICAL VALUE OF UNDERSTANDING THE MINDSET OF SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS AND STUDENTS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSROOM  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Understanding the mind set of students and teachers seeks much more importance in the present scenario. The present study is intended to find the type of mindset of secondary school students in learning English language on the select areas and also made an attempt to find out the effect of fixed mindset of students on the attitude of students towards English language. Understanding the mind set of secondary school English teachers regarding the performance and attitude of students in learning English language on select areas revealed the result that most of the teachers are having fixed mind set and there is an urgent necessity to change the situation. A sample of 100 secondary school students and 20 secondary school English teachers were selected randomly from the state of Kerala. Majority of students are having fixed mindset in select areas and they believe that it is talent which is worthwhile and their effort won’t do anything in learning English language. A shift in this situation is the need of the hour. For that the teachers should change their mindset and motivate the learners to assure themselves that their intelligence is not static.

Noora Abdul Kader

2013-07-01

372

Using Explicit Positive Assessment in the Language Classroom: IRF, Feedback, and Learning Opportunities  

Science.gov (United States)

Within the framework of sociocultural theory, learning is conceptualized as participation rather than acquisition (Donato, 2000). Given the governing metaphor of changing participation as learning (Young & Miller, 2004), an important contribution conversation analysis can make to the study of second language acquisition is to detail the…

Waring, Hansun Zhang

2008-01-01

373

Sometimes Less Is More: Educational Effectiveness of English as a Foreign Language Instruction in German Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper evaluates the effect of differing amounts of schooling on outcomes of lower secondary education. Two groups of German academic track students are compared who chose English as either their first (EFFL; "n" = 2,771) or second (ESFL; "n" = 345) foreign language throughout secondary school. While EFFL students receive…

Leucht, Michael; Prieß-Buchheit, Julia; Pant, Hans Anand; Köller, Olaf

2013-01-01

374

A Framework for Successful Research Experiences in the Classroom: Combining the Power of Technology and Mentors  

Science.gov (United States)

Authentic research opportunities in the classroom are most impactful when they are student-driven and inquiry-based. These experiences are even more powerful when they involve technology and meaningful connections with scientists. In today's classrooms, activities are driven by state required skills, education standards, and state mandated testing. Therefore, programs that incorporate authentic research must address the needs of teachers. NASA's Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program has developed a framework that addresses teacher needs and incorporates the use of technology and access to mentors to promote and enhance authentic research in the classroom. EEAB is a student involvement program that facilitates student investigations of Earth or planetary comparisons using NASA data. To promote student-led research, EEAB provides standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources, an implementation structure to facilitate research, educator professional development, and ongoing support. This framework also provides teachers with the option to incorporate the use of technology and connect students with a mentor, both of which can enrich student research experiences. The framework is structured by a modeled 9-step process of science which helps students organize their research. With more schools gaining increased access to technology, EEAB has created an option to help schools take advantage of students' interest and comfort with technology by leveraging the use of available technologies to enhance student research. The use of technology not only allows students to collaborate and share their research, it also provides a mechanism for them to work with a mentor. This framework was tested during the 2010/2011 school year. Team workspaces hosted on Wikispaces for Educators allow students to initiate their research and refine their research question initially without external input. This allows teams to work independently and rely on the skills and interests of team members. Once teams finalize their research question, they are assigned a mentor. The mentor introduces himself/herself, acknowledges the initial work the team has conducted, and asks a focused question to help open the lines of communication. Students continue to communicate with their mentor throughout their research. As research is completed, teams can share their investigation during a virtual presentation. These live presentations allow students to share their research with their mentor, other scientists, other students, parents, and school administrators. After the initial year of testing this authentic research process, EEAB is working to address the many lessons learned. This will allow the program to refine and improve the overall process in an effort to maximize the benefits. Combined, these powerful strategies provide a successful framework to help teachers enhance the skills and motivation of their students, preparing them to become the next generation of scientists, explorers, and STEM-literate citizens of our nation.

Graff, Paige Valderrama; Stefanov, William L.; Willis, Kim; Runco, Susan; McCollum, Tim; Lindgren, Charles F.; Baker, Marshalyn; Mailhot, Michele

2011-01-01

375

A Framework for Successful Research Experiences in the Classroom: Combining the Power of Technology and Mentors  

Science.gov (United States)

Authentic research opportunities in the classroom are most impactful when they are student-driven and inquiry-based. These experiences are even more powerful when they involve technology and meaningful connections with scientists. In today's classrooms, activities are driven by state required skills, education standards, and state mandated testing. Therefore, programs that incorporate authentic research must address the needs of teachers. NASA's Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program has developed a framework that addresses teacher needs and incorporates the use of technology and access to mentors to promote and enhance authentic research in the classroom. EEAB is a student involvement program that facilitates student investigations of Earth or planetary comparisons using NASA data. To promote student-led research, EEAB provides standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources, an implementation structure to facilitate research, educator professional development, and ongoing support. This framework also provides teachers with the option to incorporate the use of technology and connect students with a mentor, both of which can enrich student research experiences. The framework is structured by a modeled 9-step process of science which helps students organize their research. With more schools gaining increased access to technology, EEAB has created an option to help schools take advantage of students' interest and comfort with technology by leveraging the use of available technologies to enhance student research. The use of technology not only allows students to collaborate and share their research, it also provides a mechanism for them to work with a mentor. This framework was tested during the 2010/2011 school year. Team workspaces hosted on Wikispaces for Educators allow students to initiate their research and refine their research question initially without external input. This allows teams to work independently and rely on the skills and interests of team members. Once teams finalize their research question, they are assigned a mentor. The mentor introduces himself/herself, acknowledges the initial work the team has conducted, and asks a focused question to help open the lines of communication. Students continue to communicate with their mentor throughout their research. As research is completed, teams can share their investigation during a virtual presentation. These live presentations allow students to share their research with their mentor, other scientists, other students, parents, and school administrators. After the initial year of testing this authentic research process, EEAB is working to address the many lessons learned. This will allow the program to refine and improve the overall process in an effort to maximize the benefits. Combined, these powerful strategies provide a successful framework to help teachers enhance the skills and motivation of their students, preparing them to become the next generation of scientists, explorers, and STEM-literate citizens of our nation.

Graff, P. V.; Stefanov, W. L.; Willis, K.; Runco, S.; McCollum, T.; Lindgren, C. F.; Baker, M.; Mailhot, M.

2011-12-01

376

Generalizability and decision studies to inform observational and experimental research in classroom settings.  

Science.gov (United States)

Attaining reliable estimates of observational measures can be challenging in school and classroom settings, as behavior can be influenced by multiple contextual factors. Generalizability (G) studies can enable researchers to estimate the reliability of observational data, and decision (D) studies can inform how many observation sessions are necessary to achieve a criterion level of reliability. We conducted G and D studies using observational data from a randomized control trial focusing on social and academic participation of students with severe disabilities in inclusive secondary classrooms. Results highlight the importance of anchoring observational decisions to reliability estimates from existing or pilot data sets. We outline steps for conducting G and D studies and address options when reliability estimates are lower than desired. PMID:25354126

Bottema-Beutel, Kristen; Lloyd, Blair; Carter, Erik W; Asmus, Jennifer M

2014-11-01

377

Research on Fostering Intercultural Communication Competence of Foreign Language Learners  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Globalization has made cross-cultural communication a necessity. The mobility of people and the contact between countries have greatly increased cross-cultural communication. Intercultural awareness has become a prerequisite for successful cross-cultural communication. Intercultural awareness is required if a foreign language learner is to achieve the intercultural communication competence, which is now considered to be the major goal of foreign language learning. Intercultural communication competence is multi-dimensional in nature, implicating not only the linguistic competence, but also the power of perceiving and interpreting socio-cultural events, and the behavioral ability of coping independently with cross-cultural encounters. The objective of this paper is to present an overview of how language and culture are dealt with from a cross-cultural perspective, to discuss concerns with defining norms and standards for foreign language learning raised by this perspective, and to consider how to foster the intercultural communication competence by pedagogical approaches that integrate current understandings and researches of language, culture and learning into their curricular and instructional designs.Key words: Intercultural awareness; Intercultural communication competence; Language and culture; Socio-cultural perspective; Curriculum design

Yueqin HAN

2013-03-01

378

Cross-Language Poetics: Proposal for an Interdisciplinary Research Program  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available For creative writers and for readers, opportunities to work with language in ways that engage two linguistic systems and/or two writing systems continue to expand with the growing influence of international and regional lingua francas. At the same time, we have witnessed the continuing development of literary creation in languages with fewer speakers, even in communities facing the outright erosion and replacement of their language. Alongside the tendencies of globalization, literature has also become more diverse, a new recognition of multilingualism and multiculturalism emerging among writers and readers alike. The special circumstances of composition and understanding that the different kinds of language and cultural interaction highlight also present us with an opportunity to study what it is that is fundamental in verbal art. After reviewing three historical examples of European origin (in Section 2 we will turn our attention to problems of language, writing system and poetry in East Asia (in Section 3. The examples from history will help us to put the current situation of multilingual and multicultural contexts for literature into a broader perspective. This is will allow us to return to consider a proposal for research on cross-language poetics.

Francis, Norbert

2014-02-01

379

The dynamic nature of motivation in language learning: A classroom perspective  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

When we examine the empirical investigations of motivation in second and foreign language learning, even those drawing upon the latest theoretical paradigms, such as the L2 motivational self system (Dörnyei, 2009), it becomes clear that many of them still fail to take account of its dynamic character and temporal variation. This may be surprising in view of the fact that the need to adopt such a process- oriented approach has been emphasized by a number of theorists and resear...

Pawlak, Miros?aw

2012-01-01

380

"Listen and click": Enhancing Listening Comprehension Skills in the Language Classroom through the Use of Clickers  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The following article relates to an experiment with a group of second year students learning an applied language as a minor subject of their degree. Personal Response Devices were introduced to improve the students’ listening skills by creating more engagement with the course material. It led to 100% participation in class activities run through clickers, facilitated the students in self-evaluating their performance at the tasks and was fun, despite some technical issues occasionally. The e...

Hascoet, Valerie

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
381

Natural Conversation Reconstruction Tasks: The Language Classroom as a Meeting Place  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper, drawing on Pratt’s notion of ‘transculturation’ and Bhabha’s ‘third space’, presents an example of language learning tasks that empower learners’ agency and promote their cross-cultural awareness and sensitivities to a different set of cultural expectations, using a naturally occurred Japanese thanking episodes. The paper discusses the merits of Natural Conversation Reconstruction Tasks (NCRTs as a practical method for helping L2 learners develop this ‘intercultural competence’. It is based on a qualitative study of the results of one NCRT created for use in the context of teaching Japanese as a L2 in a multicultural society. It suggests the NCRT encourages the learners to explore the intersection where language use, speaker intention and L1 and L2 cultural norms meet. Such a process helps the learners become aware of socially expected patterns of communication in L1 and L2 in terms of the choices of speech act, formulaic expressions, sequential organization and politeness orientation. The learners’ comments suggest that the NCRT helps learners transcend their cultural boundaries by overcoming their narrow understanding of ‘thanking’ as ‘expressions of gratitude and appreciation’ and by cross-culturally widening their views of what counts as thanking. The NCRT with rich contextual information promotes the learners’ intercultural awareness, sensitivity to context and intercultural exploration in the space between L1 and L2, where they have authority and freedom of making sense of conversations, and pragmatics is fully integrated into language pedagogy.

Jun Ohashi

2009-03-01

382

Natural Conversation Reconstruction Tasks: The Language Classroom as a Meeting Place  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper, drawing on Pratt’s notion of ‘transculturation’ and Bhabha’s ‘third space’, presents an example of language learning tasks that empower learners’ agency and promote their cross-cultural awareness and sensitivities to a different set of cultural expectations, using a naturally occurred Japanese thanking episodes. The paper discusses the merits of Natural Conversation Reconstruction Tasks (NCRTs as a practical method for helping L2 learners develop this ‘intercultural competence’. It is based on a qualitative study of the results of one NCRT created for use in the context of teaching Japanese as a L2 in a multicultural society. It suggests the NCRT encourages the learners to explore the intersection where language use, speaker intention and L1 and L2 cultural norms meet. Such a process helps the learners become aware of socially expected patterns of communication in L1 and L2 in terms of the choices of speech act, formulaic expressions, sequential organization and politeness orientation. The learners’ comments suggest that the NCRT helps learners transcend their cultural boundaries by overcoming their narrow understanding of ‘thanking’ as ‘expressions of gratitude and appreciation’ and by cross-culturally widening their views of what counts as thanking. The NCRT with rich contextual information promotes the learners’ intercultural awareness, sensitivity to context and intercultural exploration in the space between L1 and L2, where they have authority and freedom of making sense of conversations, and pragmatics is fully integrated into language pedagogy.

Jun Ohashi

2009-08-01

383

Code-Switching in the Primary Classroom: One Response to the Planned and the Unplanned Language Environment in Brunei [and] A Response.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examines how the teacher incorporates elements of both "Bahasa Melayu" and Brunei Malay into content lessons and views code switching in the primary classroom within the wider framework of community language norms and the linguistic pressures on students and teachers. Espiritu shares Martin's concern regarding the quantity and quality of verbal…

Martin, Peter W.; Espiritu, Clemencia C

1996-01-01

384

Task Design, Plan, and Development of Talk-in-Interaction: An Analysis of a Small Group Activity in a Japanese Language Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Using conversation analysis as a central tool of analysis, examines the sequential development of talk-in-interaction observed in a small group activity in a Japanese language classroom. Explores the relationship among task instruction, students' reaction to the instruction during their pre-task planning, and the actual development of talk with…

Mori, Junko

2002-01-01

385

How Do You Say "Twos" in Spanish, if "Two" Is "Dos"? Language as Means and Object in a Bilingual Kindergarten Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

In this essay Naomi Mulvihill uses vignettes from her bilingual kindergarten classroom to explore the dynamic processes by which young children make sense of language, focusing on instances in which she asks her students to compare texts presented in English and Spanish. Using Piaget's concept of disequilibrium as a guiding framework,…

Mulvihill, Naomi

2014-01-01

386

"Do They Even Know That They Do It?": Exploring Awareness of Spanish-English Code-Switching in a Sixth-Grade English Language Arts Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This article draws on scholarship in educational and linguistic anthropology to explore awareness of Spanish-English code-switching among bilingual Chicana/o and Latina/o students in a sixth-grade English Language Arts classroom. Analysis of qualitative data gathered via participant observation, video/audio recording, and semistructured interviews…

Martínez, Ramón Antonio

2014-01-01

387

Earth2Class Overview: An Innovative Program Linking Classroom Educators and Research Scientists  

Science.gov (United States)

The Earth2Class (E2C) workshops, held at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO), provide an effective model for improving knowledge, teaching, and technology skills of middle and high school science educators through ongoing interactions with research scientists and educational technology. With support from an NSF GeoEd grant, E2C has developed monthly workshops, web-based resources, and summer institutes in which classroom teachers and research scientists have produced exemplar curriculum materials about a wide variety of cutting-edge geoscience investigations suitable for dissemination to teachers and students. Some of the goals of this program are focused to address questions such as: (1) What aspects of the E2C format and educational technology most effectively connect research discoveries with classroom teachers and their students? (2) What benefits result through interactions among teachers from highly diverse districts and backgrounds with research scientists, and what benefits do the scientists gain from participation? (3) How can the E2C format serve as a model for other research institution-school district partnerships as a mechanism for broader dissemination of scientific discoveries? E2C workshops have linked LDEO scientists from diverse research specialties-seismology, marine geology, paleoclimatology, ocean drilling, dendrochronology, remote sensing, impact craters, and others-with teachers from schools in the New York metropolitan area. Through the workshops, we have trained teachers to enhance content knowledge in the Earth Sciences and develop skills to incorporate new technologies. We have made a special effort to increase the teaching competency of K-12 Earth Sciences educators serving in schools with high numbers of students from underrepresented groups, thereby providing greater role models to attract students into science and math careers. E2C sponsored Earth Science Teachers Conferences, bringing together educators from New York and New Jersey to consider challenges facing classroom teachers trying to incorporate recent research discoveries into the curriculum. Their efforts led to creating web-based resources that provide succinct statements of core concepts, essential vocabulary lists, selected labs, activities, and links to Internet sites providing scientific information that may not be incorporated into textbooks for years. The E2C web site (www.earth2class.org), has become an important resource for Earth Science educators. It provides an effective format for disseminating results of scientific research to teachers and students through a workshop section that includes an introduction, links to scientific discoveries, and suggestions for classroom applications. The educational resources section provides extensive curricular materials, including lesson plans, classroom activities, and links to state and national Science Education Standards. Overall, E2C seeks to make significant contributions to national efforts for creating networks of science researchers working with classroom teachers and teacher-trainers seeking effective methods for innovative instructional techniques, problem-solving strategies, and professional development, as well as meeting the challenges of state and national mandates.

Passow, M.; Iturrino, G. J.; Baggio, F. D.; Assumpcao, C. M.

2005-12-01

388

The ALEP platform for language research and engineering  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper describes some of the aspects of the Advanced Linguistic Engineering Platform (ALEP) prototype system (ALEP-0) [SIM-93a]. ALEP is an initiative of the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) to provide the natural language research and engineering community in Europe with a versatile and flexible general purpose development environment. The lingustic formalism and tools of the current prototype, and development of a full more extensive and open environment are outlined. Th...

Simpkins, N. K.; Groenendijk, M.; Meylemans, P.

1993-01-01

389

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WEB-BASED LEARNING TIME OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT IN GERMAN AS A TERTIARY LANGUAGE BY THE STUDENTS ON VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this empirical research is to investigate the relationship between web-based learning time and academic achievement in German. 36 learners of L3 German with L1 Turkish and L2 English from Vocational High School of Kahta at Adiyaman University were the participants of this study. The empirical process of the study continued 6 weeks in 2011-2012 fall semesters. During this time, the German, as tertiary language, course was lectured by traditional face-to-face method in the classroom. But the students studied outside the course the same subjects in interactive form via web page, specifically designed for this study. At the end of the empirical process, the data about the study were obtained. The Pearson product-moment correlation was used to find out the relationship between web-based learning time and academic achievements in German. As a result of this study it is found out that there is a significant relationship between web-based learning time and academic achievement in German as a tertiary language.

Orhan HANBAY

2013-01-01

390

Teaching materials: a critical position about the role they play in the language classroom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Resumen: Este artículo se propone esclarecer la importancia y la función que juegan los materiales didácticos –desde los planteamientos de la pedagogía crítica– en la conformación y desarrollo del proceso de la enseñanza-aprendizaje de una lengua. Más allá de la función instrumentalista que suele asignarse a los materiales didácticos, en el presente trabajo éstos se visualizan como construcciones discursivas que pueden facultar la apropiación del pensamiento basada en el desarrollo de habilidades lingüísticas que reflejen un discurso crítico ante los diferentes reclamos (problemas históricos a los que estudiantes se ven expuestos dentro y fuera del aula. Para tal propósito, se realiza una revisión conceptual-teórica sobre la importancia y la función que los materiales tienen en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje de una lengua. Bajo una perspectiva crítica, se aborda el tema de los materiales didácticos y la construcción de la motivación así como el tema de ideología y materiales didácticos. Finalmente, se concluye que en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje de una lengua, los materiales didácticos son reproductores y reproducciones discursivas e ideológicas de ciertas realidades que pueden ofrecer visiones de mundo basadas en los intereses de clases dominantes si no se abordan desde posturas críticas.Abstract: The aim of this article is to state the importance teaching materials have in developing a language teaching-learning process based on the principles of the critical thinking pedagogy. From this perspective, this work questions the traditional conceptions and notions related to instruments of access assigned to materials. They are conceived as discursive constructions that can, or cannot, help to empower students with a critical discourse in order to promote a significant change in their attitudes towards the social, political and economical problems they face every day. To support this position, a conceptual study about theoretical assumptions related to the importance and the role teaching materials have in the language teaching-learning process has been carried out. Also, there is a general analysis regarding the relationship among teaching materials, motivation and ideology. Finally, it can be concluded that materials are reproductions and constructors of certain discursive and ideological realities that usually favor the interests of the dominant classes. That is why a critical position about the role teaching materials have is necessary to prevent the reproduction of prejudices and common sense assumptions about language and society.

Araya Araya, Karla

2007-12-01

391

The Formeaning Response Approach: Poetry in the EFL Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

In English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classrooms, where acquisition of English is the ultimate goal, one of the main tasks for the teacher is to provide students with language input and activities that best aid them in their learning process. As different researchers have reported, including poetry-based activities in the EFL classroom is…

Kellem, Harlan

2009-01-01

392

Does Equal Access Mean Treat the Same? From Theory to Practice in the Classroom of English as an Additional Language Learner in Ireland--Towards a Transformative Agenda  

Science.gov (United States)

While a substantial body of research exists on First- and Second-Language Acquisition (SLA), research on the language acquisition process that a language minority student goes through when they are acquiring a second language has been largely unexplored. Pedagogical practices that espouse language learning theories facilitate both the language

Kelly, Niamh

2014-01-01

393

Re-Examine the Use of the Student's First Language in the English as a Foreign Language Classrooms: A Cross-Case Analysis from Undergraduate Engineering Students in Bangkok, Thailand  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to examine how the use of the student's first language (L1) by a non-native English-speaking EFL teacher affects the students' experiences in learning English compared to those in the classrooms where only English is used as a means of teaching. This study also investigates the role of the teacher in providing…

Vanichakorn, Neelawan

2009-01-01

394

Evaluating the Psychometric Properties of the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale for Cypriot Senior High School EFL Students: The Rasch Measurement Approach  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS for Cypriot senior high school EFL students, through Rasch measurement. In doing so, the researchers clarified two discrepancies found in the literature: first the factor structure of the scale and second whether test anxiety is a component of FLCA. The Greek version of the FLCAS was administered to a sample of 304 senior high school EFL students. Results showed that after removing five items which fitted the Rasch Rating Scale model poorly, the remaining 28 items formed a unidimensional scale, one component of which is test anxiety. The degree of reliability was high. Semantic analysis of the items revealed that one of the reasons was the inclusion of many parallel items. The Rasch person-item map showed that a second reason was the narrow coverage of the construct by the items. Finally the 5-point Likert scale was shown to be marginally optimal. Suggestions are proposed for future research into the refinement of the scale.

Panayiotis Panayides

2013-08-01

395

A Research-Informed Approach to Teaching About Exoplanet Detection in STEM Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

JPL’s NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program’s (ExEP) Public Engagement Program, in collaboration with the Center for Astronomy Education (CAE), is engaged in a research and curriculum development program to bring the science of exoplanet detection into STEM classrooms. In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of astronomers pursuing research related to exoplanets, along with a significant increase in interest amongst students and the general public regarding the topic of exoplanets. CAE has previously developed a curriculum unit (including Think-Pair-Share questions and a Lecture-Tutorial) to help students develop a deeper understanding of the Doppler method for detecting extrasolar planets. To date, there is a nearly nonexistent research base on students’ conceptual and reasoning difficulties related to the science of the transit and gravitational microlensing methods for detecting extrasolar planets. Appropriate for physical science classrooms from middle school to the introductory college level, the learner-centered active engagement activities we are developing are going through an iterative research and assessment process to ensure that they enable students to achieve increased conceptual understandings and reasoning skills in these areas. In this talk, we will report on our development process for two new Lecture-Tutorials that help students learn about the transit and gravitational microlensing methods for finding exoplanets.

Brissenden, Gina; Wallace, C. S.; Prather, E. E.; Traub, W. A.; Greene, W. M.; Biferno, A. A.

2014-01-01

396

“COMING TO KNOW”: WEAVING ABORIGINAL AND WESTERN SCIENCE KNOWLEDGE, LANGUAGE, AND LITERACY INTO THE SCIENCE CLASSROOM  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Following the work of contemporary thinkers, we propose that every culture has its own science and that both indigenous and western science knowledge systems are valuable and have been useful to the cultures developing them. Because a valid interpretation of scientific literacy must be consistent with a prevailing image of science and rapid changes taking place in society, we propose more inclusive definitions and metaphors of science literacy. Science literacy for Aboriginal people must reflect a broad cultural approach that recognizes the unique way Aboriginal people live and present their experience and knowledge. Literacy programs from an Aboriginal perspective must go beyond reading, writing, and numeracy to include oracy – stories, songs, dances, symbols, ceremonies. Science literacy from an Aboriginal perspective involves being knowledgeable about the extensive examples and applications of Aboriginal science knowledge, as well as western science knowledge, and science discourse about the nature of science. Literacy also includes the wisdom component of Aboriginal science, which brings the discussion of values and ethics to science and technology and requires sustaining both community and environment. Aboriginal languages serve as storehouses of experience and perspectives that help main-tain cultural identity, resist assimilation, and interpret the relationship between society and environment.

GLORIA J. SNIVELY

2008-03-01

397

Investigating the Efficacy of a Professional Development Program in Formative Classroom Assessment in Middle School English Language Arts and Mathematics  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Teachers who engage in formative classroom assessment using practices that accurately measure student learning should be better positioned to diagnose the instructional needs of their students and to act on that information. For this reason, there has been increased interest in formative classroom assessment in recent years. Although…

Schneider, M. Christina; Meyer, J. Patrick

2012-01-01

398

An Ecological Reading of Mathematical Language in a Grade 3 Classroom: A Case of Learning and Teaching Measurement Estimation  

Science.gov (United States)

In our work in teacher education and professional development, we aim to help teachers to learn to participate in, and create, classroom ecologies that support students' learning. In this article we focus on the challenges of developing a classroom ecology that provides mathematical sustenance for students. We pay particular attention to the ways…

Towers, Jo; Hunter, Kim

2010-01-01

399

How can we carry out an action-research to improve practice in the science classroom?  

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Full Text Available The work describes a program of action-research carried out with secondary education science teachers. The program persues the professional development through the curricular innovation, taking as promotional agent the action-oriented reflection, lending itself special attention to the socialization of the teachers. Throughout two school years actions directed to such effects were taken, organizing themselves through pedagogical content knowledge. The results show that the teachers, in a slow and gradual form, are incorporating new practical theories to their reflections and work in the classroom.

Bartolomé Vázquez Bernal

2008-01-01

400

Une approche discursive de la classe de langue étrangère en tant que lieu de travail / A discoursive approach of foreign language classroom as a place of work  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: French Abstract in portuguese O presente artigo centra-se na análise dos discursos da aula de língua estrangeira em uma situação particular: o ensino da língua francesa como língua profissional. Nosso objetivo consistirá em depreender marcas enunciativas por intermédio das quais se inscreve a natureza do trabalho realizado em sa [...] la de aula, tendo em vista a construção coletiva de um texto cuja autoria é responsabilidade dos atores da cena didática, professor e alunos. Para tal, interrogamos esses discursos da sala de aula sob uma tríplice ótica: em primeiro lugar, a oposição que se verifica entre trabalho coletivo e trabalho individual; a seguir, a dupla função exercida pela linguagem no referido contexto, a saber, a linguagem enquanto trabalho e a linguagem sobre o trabalho; finalmente, a distância que se verifica entre o trabalho prescrito e o trabalho real da sala de aula. Abstract in english This paper focuses the analysis of speech in foreign language classroom in a particular situation: the teaching of French as a professional language. Our purpose will be to explore enunciative marks that contribute to determine the nature of the work carried out in classroom throughout the collectiv [...] e construction of a text which is built by the actors of the didactic scene, the teacher and the students. In order to achieve our goal, we will interrogate these discourses from a triple point of view: first of all, the opposition between collective work and individual work in classroom; afterwards, the double function of language - language as work and language about work - in such a context; finally, the distance verified between prescribed work and real work in classroom.

Décio, Rocha.

 
 
 
 
401

Natural Language Processing techniques for researching and improving peer feedback  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Peer review has been viewed as a promising solution for improving students' writing, which still remains a great challenge for educators. However, one core problem with peer review of writing is that potentially useful feedback from peers is not always presented in ways that lead to revision. Our prior investigations found that whether students implement feedback is significantly correlated with two feedback features: localization information and concrete solutions. But focusing on feedback features is time-intensive for researchers and instructors. We apply data mining and Natural Language Processing techniques to automatically code reviews for these feedback features. Our results show that it is feasible to provide intelligent support to peer review systems to automatically assess students' reviewing performance with respect to problem localization and solution. We also show that similar research conclusions about helpfulness perceptions of feedback across students and different expert types can be drawn from automatically coded data and from hand-coded data.

Wenting Xiong, Diane Litman & Christian Schunn

2012-11-01

402

Researching multicultural mathematics classroom through the lens of landscapes of learning : NORMA 2008  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Students' motives for learning mathematics cannot be understood by looking solely at mathematical classroom activities. We discuss this claim in a multicultural context using the notion of 'landscapes of learning'. This notion serves as a theoretical and methodological tool that both defines a research perspective and sketches a field of empirical research. In this paper we want to focus on the notion and illustrate its usefulness when researching mathematical learning in multicultural contexts. We draw on data and results of an empirical study on student’s foregrounds with 45 teenage students in two 8th grade multicultural classes in Denmark. We show the dialectical relationship between each dimension of the landscape and the whole of it; and how, as a whole, it can help us coming closer to better theorisations.

AlrØ, Helle; Skovsmose, Ole

403

Research in Progress: Invited Colloquium--Foreign Languages in an Age of Globalization  

Science.gov (United States)

With the advent of globalization and the increasingly multilingual and multicultural nature of nations, institutions and classrooms, the fundamental nature of foreign language instruction is changing. Such traditional notions as: "native speaker", "target culture", "standard L2" are becoming problematic with the…

Kramsch, Claire

2013-01-01

404

Student Voices: The Missing Link in the Spanish Heritage Language Debate  

Science.gov (United States)

Though much of the research looking at the issue of language in the Spanish heritage language field is intended to guide the Spanish heritage language teacher in the classroom, students' voices are often stifled. This article fills this gap by giving voice to students' opinions on language use in the Spanish heritage language classroom. Survey…

Ducar, Cynthia M.

2008-01-01

405

Encouraging Teachers to Build Collaborations with Researchers; Examples From the Classroom (Invited)  

Science.gov (United States)

Bringing experts into our schools allows for highly engaging lessons, encourages career thinking, adds authenticity to the topic, and allows student's questions to be answered by experts. Researchers can physically visit classrooms or appear through presentation technologies, such as Skype, or Google Hangouts. Virtual visits allow students to see laboratories and field sites. Collaborating with scientists builds the connective tissue that helps all educators and our students learn more deeply. When K-12 teachers collaborate with scientists and graduate students, teachers learn more science, and scientists learn more teaching. This growth of background knowledge is a win-win situation and helps us meet the expectations of the Common Core State Standards. Teachers need to feel encouraged to contact their local or regional scientists for support. Reaching out into the universities to make contact with polar scientists or graduate students is a good place to start. Building professional networks allows PI's to address the 'broader impact' requirement on many grant applications, and helps spread the university's work in the polar regions out to the general public. These collaborations also give teachers expert insights and current data to build authentic lessons, and excite their students to seek careers in the sciences. This presentation will focus on three completed interactive opportunities I have built with researchers in my classroom. Students adding daily sediment to their sediment core, after communications from the field with scientist Heidi Roop in Alaska.

Kane, M.

2013-12-01

406

A Research-Informed Approach to Teaching About Light & Matter in STEM Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

In collaboration with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), we have engaged in a research and curriculum development program to bring the detailed science of light and matter into STEM classrooms. Typical Astro 101 classes often discuss emission/absorption spectra with reference to the Bohr model only and teach radiation as produced/absorbed only by electron transitions. We present here curricula developed to highlight other emission/absorption phenomena (specifically those produced by rotational/vibrational molecular transitions as well as synchrotron radiation.) Appropriate for physical science classrooms from middle school to the introductory college level, the learner-centered active engagement activities we are developing are going through an iterative research and assessment process to ensure that they enable students to achieve increased conceptual understandings and reasoning skills. In this talk, we will report on our development process for a suite of activities, including lecture slides, Think-Pair-Share questions, assessment questions and a new Lecture-Tutorial that help students learn about these other important emission models.

Hornstein, Seth D.; Wallace, C. S.; Schlingman, W. M.; Prather, E. E.

2014-01-01

407

Safety and science at sea: connecting science research settings to the classroom through live video  

Science.gov (United States)

Many science teachers start the year off with classroom safety topics. Annual repetition helps with mastery of this important and basic knowledge, while helping schools to meet their legal obligations for safe lab science. Although these lessons are necessary, they are often topical, rarely authentic and relatively dull. Interesting connections can, however, be drawn between the importance of safety in science classrooms and the importance of safety in academic laboratories, fieldwork, shipboard research, and commercial research. Teachers can leverage these connections through live video interactions with scientists in the field, thereby creating an authentic learning environment. During the School of Rock 2009, a professional teacher research experience aboard the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program's research vessel JOIDES Resolution, safety and nature-of-science curricula were created to help address this need. By experimenting with various topics and locations on the ship that were accessible and applicable to middle school learning, 43 highly visual "safety signs" and activities were identified and presented "live" by graduate students, teachers, scientists; the ship's mates, doctor and technical staff. Students were exposed to realistic science process skills along with safety content from the world's only riserless, deep-sea drilling research vessel. The once-in-a-lifetime experience caused the students' eyes to brighten behind their safety glasses, especially as they recognized the same eye wash station and safety gear they have to wear and attended a ship's fire and safety drill along side scientists in hard hats and personal floatation devices. This collaborative and replicable live vide approach will connect basic safety content and nature-of-science process skills for a memorable and authentic learning experience for students.

Cohen, E.; Peart, L. W.

2011-12-01

408

WormClassroom.org: An Inquiry-Rich Educational Web Portal for Research Resources of "Caenorhabditis elegans"  

Science.gov (United States)

The utilization of biology research resources, coupled with a "learning by inquiry" approach, has great potential to aid students in gaining an understanding of fundamental biological principles. To help realize this potential, we have developed a Web portal for undergraduate biology education, WormClassroom.org, based on current research

Lu, Fong-Mei; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Stewart, James; White, John G.

2007-01-01

409

Culturally Competent Social Work Research: Methodological Considerations for Research with Language Minorities  

Science.gov (United States)

Despite the growing number of language minorities, foreign-born individuals with limited English proficiency, this population has been largely left out of social work research, often due to methodological challenges involved in conducting research with this population. Whereas the professional standard calls for cultural competence, a discussion…

Casado, Banghwa Lee; Negi, Nalini Junko; Hong, Michin

2012-01-01

410

Students and Teachers' Reasons for Using the First Language Within the Foreign Language Classroom (French and English) in Central Mexico / Razones de alumnos y maestros sobre el uso de la primera lengua en el salón de lenguas extranjeras (francés e inglés) en el centro de México  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: English Abstract in spanish La presente investigación explora el uso de la lengua materna en un contexto de enseñanza de lenguas extranjeras. Esta investigación cualitativa presenta la práctica docente y los puntos de vista de maestros y alumnos de francés e inglés en el contexto de una universidad pública del centro de México [...] , mediante el uso de las técnicas del cuestionario y la entrevista semiestructurada. Los resultados muestran que tanto los maestros como la mayoría de los alumnos perciben el uso de la lengua materna como algo positivo en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje. Un número reducido de estudiantes rechaza el uso de la lengua materna y prefiere que su clase de lengua extranjera sea dirigida exclusivamente en la lengua meta. Abstract in english The present study explores the use of the first language in a context of foreign language teaching. This qualitative research presents the classroom practice and points of view of French and English teachers and students within a public educational institute in central Mexico using the techniques of [...] questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. The results show that teachers and the majority of students perceive the use of the first language as positive and part of the teaching and learning process. A small number of students do not like the use of the first language in the classroom and prefer that their teachers use the target language only.

Irasema, Mora Pablo; M. Martha, Lengeling; Buenaventura, Rubio Zenil; Troy, Crawford; Douglas, Goodwin.

2011-10-01

411

Classroom Instruction That Works: Research-Based Strategies for Increasing Student Achievement. Second Edition  

Science.gov (United States)

First published in 2001, "Classroom Instruction That Works" revolutionized teaching by linking classroom strategies to evidence of increased student learning. Now this landmark guide has been reenergized and reorganized for today's classroom with new evidence-based insights and a refined framework that strengthens instructional planning. Whether…

Dean, Ceri B.; Stone, BJ; Hubbell, Elizabeth; Pitler, Howard

2012-01-01

412

Connecting Content and Language for English Language Learners  

CERN Document Server

Bridge the gap between content and language and put research into practice to instruct English language learners with strategies that meet their needs in language development and literacy. This must-have book reviews the author's experiences as a teacher in a diverse instructional setting and discusses the challenges and successes teachers experience in the ELL classroom. 200pp.

Smith, Jodene

2011-01-01

413

Exploring the Determinants of Language Barriers in Health Care (LBHC): Toward a Research Agenda for the Language Sciences  

Science.gov (United States)

There is growing interest in language barriers in health care (LBHC)--interest, that is, in how the quality of health care service delivery might be compromised when patients and health care providers do not share the same first language. This article discusses LBHC as an emerging research area that provides valuable opportunities for researchers

Segalowitz, Norman; Kehayia, Eva

2011-01-01

414

Assessment and Outcomes of Teacher Professional Development Programs That Promote the Use of Authentic Science Research in Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent education research and national policy documents actively promote the use of authentic science research in the classroom as an effective way to help students to learn first-hand how science is done. One strategy for increasing the use of authentic science research in classrooms is engaging science teachers in authentic research experiences. These experiences occur at universities, labs, and field-sites across the United States funded by government grants and private organizations. Assessments of program outcomes often target increases in teachers' knowledge and intention to use inquiry methods. Many programs also aim to engage students in authentic science research experiences of these teachers. This paper will present assessment strategies used to research and evaluate several research experiences for teachers that have been completed in the last five years at various sites across the United States for both pre-service and in-service teachers. The discussion will include benefits and challenges of different quantitative and qualitative strategies for assessing program outcomes. Research and evaluation outcomes of these programs include many personal and professional values for teachers, increases in implementation of reformed teaching methods including engaging students in scientific inquiry, and best practices that lead to increased student engagement in research in the classroom. Recent research has followed teachers for several years after their research internships to understand how their research experiences have led to changes in their teaching practice.

Buxner, S.

2012-12-01

415

Introducing History (and Philosophy) of Science in the Classroom: A Field Research Experience in Italy  

Science.gov (United States)

For quite some time, many EU and Italian Ministry of Education official documents have warmly suggested the introduction of the history and the philosophy of science in the teaching of science disciplines at school. Accordingly, there is a shared agreement between pedagogists and science historians about the efficacy of this approach towards an understanding of the current curriculum content and the Nature of Science. What is missing, at least in Italy, is a concrete fieldwork in the classroom to show the validity of these declarations. This essay is a report of the experience of introducing history and philosophy of science into junior and senior high school classrooms in Apulia (Italy). The aims of this project are: (a) to build a model of research involving high school teachers and university lecturers in the design and construction of teaching units that use the story of science and epistemology for teaching science and (b) produce evidence that this approach is effective in getting more interest from students in science. We relied on many schools for carrying out the historical-scientific teaching modules. The modules were carried out through the case study approach. In the first phase, the participating teachers were trained by University tutors on the modalities of this particular teaching approach. In the second phase, the teachers carried out the modules in their classes and finally these modules were presented in a conclusive conference. Moreover, we evaluated the efficacy of the intervention through specifically created agreement questionnaires.

Dibattista, Liborio; Morgese, Francesca

2013-03-01

416

Immediate dissemination of student discoveries to a model organism database enhances classroom-based research experiences.  

Science.gov (United States)

Use of inquiry-based research modules in the classroom has soared over recent years, largely in response to national calls for teaching that provides experience with scientific processes and methodologies. To increase the visibility of in-class studies among interested researchers and to strengthen their impact on student learning, we have extended the typical model of inquiry-based labs to include a means for targeted dissemination of student-generated discoveries. This initiative required: 1) creating a set of research-based lab activities with the potential to yield results that a particular scientific community would find useful and 2) developing a means for immediate sharing of student-generated results. Working toward these goals, we designed guides for course-based research aimed to fulfill the need for functional annotation of the Tetrahymena thermophila genome, and developed an interactive Web database that links directly to the official Tetrahymena Genome Database for immediate, targeted dissemination of student discoveries. This combination of research via the course modules and the opportunity for students to immediately "publish" their novel results on a Web database actively used by outside scientists culminated in a motivational tool that enhanced students' efforts to engage the scientific process and pursue additional research opportunities beyond the course. PMID:24591511

Wiley, Emily A; Stover, Nicholas A

2014-01-01

417

Investment and Second Language Acquisition  

Science.gov (United States)

The article argues that Norton Peirce's (1995) concept of a language learner's investment should figure centrally in how instructors address the needs of adult learners in ESL classrooms. Investment is discussed in relation to second language acquisition research that addresses the role of social factors in second language acquisition. The article…

Pittaway, Daniel S.

2004-01-01

418

Research on the Translation Language Features of Application Technology  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The writing and translation of application technology literatures have played a very important role in the international process for enterprises. The scientific technologies of our country are developing rapidly, which cannot be realized without international exchange of advanced technologies. This article takes the features of operating instructions for industrial products and specialized literatures of architecture in application technology literatures as the research subject, and respectively summarizes five stylistic features of product instructions and four stylistic features of specialized literatures of architecture, expecting to provide a basis for translation work of these two kinds of application technology literatures. This article initially summarizes the writing features of operating instructions for industrial products and specialized literatures of architecture, analyzes the content points of these two kinds of application technology literatures, and then summarizes the translation standard of application technology features, interprets the technique flow of translation that has guiding significance for translation, and at last focuses on the research of translation language features of product instructions and specialized literatures of architecture, as well as provides what shall be paid attention to during the translation process of instructions and bilingual transformation technology of collocation in specialized literatures of architecture, expecting to improve the international technical exchange level for our country through the analytic process and conclusion of this article.

Xiaoshu Liu

2014-05-01

419

Student Microtransformations in English Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

The objective of this paper is to use psychoanalytic theory to examine how attempts at critical teaching in two English as a Second Language (ESL) classrooms related to changes in student subjectivity. The research critiques critical pedagogical assumptions regarding transformation and empowerment through a Lacanian perspective. More specifically,…

Wolfe, Paula

2010-01-01

420

The Impact of a Professional Development Program on English Language Teachers' Classroom Performance / El impacto de un programa de desarrollo profesional en el desempeño en clase de profesores de lengua inglesa  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: English Abstract in spanish En este artículo se presentan los resultados de una investigación-acción en un programa de desarrollo profesional y su impacto en el desempeño de clase de profesores de inglés de un instituto de lenguas de una universidad pública colombiana. Para recoger los datos se utilizaron cuestionarios, entrev [...] istas, observaciones de clase y el diario del investigador. Los resultados sugieren mejorías en el desempeño de los docentes, ya que la enseñanza fue más comunicativa, organizada, atenta a las necesidades de los estudiantes y basada en principios. La teoría, la práctica, la reflexión y el papel desempeñado por el tutor se combinaron de manera efectiva para ayudar a los profesores a mejorar. Se concluye que los programas de desarrollo profesional deben planearse con base en las filosofías y necesidades de los profesores y articular la teoría, la práctica, la experiencia y la reflexión de manera más efectiva. Abstract in english This article reports the findings of an action research study on a professional development program and its impact on the classroom performance of in-service English teachers who worked at a language institute of a Colombian state university. Questionnaires, semi-structured interviews, class observa [...] tions, and a researcher's journal were used as data collection instruments. Findings suggest that these in-service teachers improved their classroom performance as their teaching became more communicative, organized, attentive to students' needs, and principled. In addition, theory, practice, reflection, and the role of the tutor combined effectively to help the in-service teachers improve classroom performance. It was concluded that these programs must be based on teachers' philosophies and needs and effectively articulate theory, practice, experience, and reflection.

Frank, Giraldo.

2014-06-01

 
 
 
 
421

Analysing Students’ Drawings of their Classroom: A Child-Friendly Research Method  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Including students’ voices in research directly affecting their life and development has been emphasised in a wide range of studies. Children's rights movement and childhood sociology have argued that young students are active participants in investigations and not merely passive recipients or objects to be studied; when adequate participatory strategies are used, children have the ability to report competently and meaningfully on issues relevant to them. However, despite this re-conceptualization of children as social actors, their opinions have not often found their way into research. Concerns about children communicative and cognitive abilities, about appropriateness and desirability of involving them directly in research have restricted their participation. The study “School as it is – research on students’ and teachers’ profiles and interactions”, conducted by UNICEF and Centre Education 2000+, Romania, demonstrates that children are nor overlooked exactly when specialists reflect on educational matters. Child inclusive methodologies have been added for this purpose to a multi-method, multi-site research project focused mainly on depicting the real portrait of Romanian school. The present paper explores the use of students’ drawings of their classroom as a child friendly research method, utilized – together with other approaches involving adults – to present “school as it is”. Drawings are considered an open-ended, familiar activity for children, one of their preferred means of communication and, therefore, an effective strategy for engaging them in research. As a concrete proof of the efficiency and reliability of the method, the interpretation of students’ drawings is selectively presented. The findings fully demonstrate children capacity of contributing to research, as their drawings revealed a powerful, convincing image of their learning environment.

Anca NEDELCU

2013-08-01

422

Expedition Earth and Beyond: Using NASA data resources and integrated educational strategies to promote authentic research in the classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Teachers in today’s classrooms are bound by state required skills, education standards, and high stakes testing. How can they gain skills and confidence to replace units or individual activities with curriculum that incorporates project and inquiry-based learning and promotes authentic research in the classroom? The key to promoting classroom authentic research experiences lies in educator professional development that is structured around teacher needs. The Expedition Earth and Beyond Program is a new geosciences program based at the NASA Johnson Space Center designed to engage, inspire and educate teachers and students in grades 5-14. The program promotes authentic research experiences for classrooms and uses strategies that will help NASA reach its education goals while still allowing educators to teach required standards. Teachers will have access to experts in terrestrial and planetary remote sensing and geoscience; this will enhance their use of content, structure, and relevant experiences to gain the confidence and skills they need to actively engage students in authentic research experiences. Integrated and powerful educational strategies are used to build skills and confidence in teachers. The strategies are as follows: 1) creating Standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources as ready-to-use materials that can be modified by teachers to fit their unique classroom situation; 2) providing ongoing professional development opportunities that focus on active experiences using curricular materials, inquiry-based techniques and expanding content knowledge; 3) connecting science experts to classrooms to deepen content knowledge and provide relevance to classroom activities and real world applications; 4) facilitating students sharing research with their peers and scientists reinforcing their active participation and contributions to research. These components of the Expedition Earth and Beyond Education Program will be enhanced by providing exciting and diverse research opportunities that are inspired by views of Earth from space taken by astronauts on board the International Space Station. The interest and connection to viewing our home planet from space will inevitably spark questions that will drive students to pursue their research investigations, as well as forming a basis for comparisons to the exploration of other planetary bodies in our solar system.

Graff, P. V.; Stefanov, W.; Willis, K.; Runco, S.

2009-12-01

423

Expedition Earth and Beyond: Using NASA Data Resources and Integrated Educational Strategies to Promote Authentic Research in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Teachers in today s classrooms are bound by state required skills, education standards, and high stakes testing. How can they gain skills and confidence to replace units or individual activities with curriculum that incorporates project and inquiry-based learning and promotes authentic research in the classroom? The key to promoting classroom authentic research experiences lies in educator professional development that is structured around teacher needs. The Expedition Earth and Beyond Program is a new geosciences program based at the NASA Johnson Space Center designed to engage, inspire and educate teachers and students in grades 5-14. The program promotes authentic research experiences for classrooms and uses strategies that will help NASA reach its education goals while still allowing educators to teach required standards. Teachers will have access to experts in terrestrial and planetary remote sensing and geoscience; this will enhance their use of content, structure, and relevant experiences to gain the confidence and skills they need to actively engage students in authentic research experiences. Integrated and powerful educational strategies are used to build skills and confidence in teachers. The strategies are as follows: 1) creating Standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources as ready-to-use materials that can be modified by teachers to fit their unique classroom situation; 2) providing ongoing professional development opportunities that focus on active experiences using curricular materials, inquiry-based techniques and expanding content knowledge; 3) connecting science experts to classrooms to deepen content knowledge and provide relevance to classroom activities and real world applications; 4) facilitating students sharing research with their peers and scientists reinforcing their active participation and contributions to research. These components of the Expedition Earth and Beyond Education Program will be enhanced by providing exciting and diverse research opportunities that are inspired by views of Earth from space taken by astronauts on board the International Space Station. The interest and connection to viewing our home planet from space will inevitably spark questions that will drive students to pursue their research investigations, as well as forming a basis for comparisons to the exploration of other planetary bodies in our solar system.

Graffi, Paige Valderrama; Stefanov, William; Willis, Kim; Runco, Sue

2009-01-01

424

The Evolution of Neuroimaging Research and Developmental Language Disorders.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article reviews current neuroimaging literature, including computer tomography, positron emission tomography, single photon emission spectroscopy, and magnetic resonance imaging, on individuals with developmental language disorders. The review suggests a complicated relationship between cortical morphometry and language development that is…

Lane, Angela B.; Foundas, Anne L.; Leonard, Christiana M.

2001-01-01

425

Conceptual Issues in Second Language Research in Africa  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper is an overview of some of the complications associated with conceptualizing second language in African societies, particularly with reference to European languages. Most popular opinions and many scholarly insights appear to define second language mainly in terms of sequence of acquisition. From this perspective, the term second language refers to a language learnt in addition to a previously acquired one. While this view of second language actually applies to many African situations, there are complex bilingual and multilingual situations in Africa that pose serious conceptual problems when viewed from the standpoint of this dominant view. This paper raises the need for scholars to be conscious of these situations, and the variations in the conception of second language that consequently exist, so that divergent perspectives of second language can be better accommodated in the emerging global academic community

Olushola Bamidele Are

2013-01-01

426

Some Recommendations for Integrating Literature into EFL/ESL Classrooms  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Many EFL/ESL learners find English language classrooms boring, partly because of the fact that learners are engaged in those activities they consider unrelated to the requirements of out-of-class communication in the L2. One solution offered to this problem is to introduce literature and literary texts into language classrooms. Many researchers support the proposal that literature needs to be incorporated into language teaching curricula, both for children and adults. However, researchers and ELT practitioners do not agree as to what are the most effective procedures for integrating literature into language classrooms. It is the purpose of the present paper to offer some recommendations that would help language teachers maximize the efficacy of their literary materials. Ten recommendations will be proposed with a specific focus on short stories and novels along with the rationales as to why it is thought that the recommendations would be helpful for literature-based language classrooms.

Mohammad Khatib

2011-08-01

427

The Value of Applied Research: Retrieval Practice Improves Classroom Learning and Recommendations from a Teacher, a Principal, and a Scientist  

Science.gov (United States)

Over the course of a 5-year applied research project with more than 1,400 middle school students, evidence from a number of studies revealed that retrieval practice in authentic classroom settings improves long-term learning (Agarwal et al. 2009; McDaniel et al., "Journal of Educational Psychology" 103:399-414, 2011; McDaniel et al. 2012; Roediger…

Agarwal, Pooja K.; Bain, Patrice M.; Chamberlain, Roger W.

2012-01-01

428

The influence of constructivism on nature of Science as an area of research and as a classroom subject  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper is an general article about the influence of constructivism on nature of science Constructivism has influenced research on the teaching and learning of nature of science, as well as actual teaching of the nature of science ideas. In the area of research, a constructivist learning theory perspective has influenced researchers to shift from using quantitative research techniques to using qualitative research methods in investigating the nature of science in the science classrooms. In the area of promoting the teaching of the nature of science, a constructivist learning theory perspective has influenced science educators to shift from merely emphasizing the teaching of the history of science in science classrooms to sequencing in instruction in science lessons and promotion of better teacher preparation programs in the universities.

Mehmet KARAKAS

2007-12-01

429

LANGUAGES AND LANGUAGE VARIETIES: COMPARATIVE RESEARCH ON THE LINGUISTIC ATTITUDES IN FOUR BILINGUAL MINORITY COMMUNITIES IN HUNGARY  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A central issue of this paper is to study the patterns in variation of attitudes toward minority language varieties in four minority communities from Hungary: German, Slovak, Serb and Romanian. This study takes part from the research which focuses on how to obtain significant information about the mechanism of the language shift process concerning autochthonous minorities in Hungary. The results demonstrate that in the course of language shift communities at an advanced stage of language shift have less positive attitudes toward their minority languages than individuals from communities where language shift is in a less advanced stage.In Hungarian minority groups speakers attitudes toward minority language varieties (dialect vs. standard are the symptoms of language shift.

Anna Borbely

2011-01-01

430

Helping English Language Learners Succeed in Pre-K-Elementary Schools. Collaborative Partnerships between ESL and Classroom Teachers Series  

Science.gov (United States)

There is a nationwide call to better provide schools with a teaching force equipped with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to effectively teach the diversifying U.S. student population. This series, Collaborative Partnerships Between ESL and Classroom Teachers, edited by Debra Suarez, aims to contribute to the field's responses to this…

Lacina, Jan; Levine, Linda New; Sowa, Patience

2006-01-01

431

Motivating Language Learners: A Classroom-Oriented Investigation of the Effects of Motivational Strategies on Student Motivation  

Science.gov (United States)

The teacher's use of motivational strategies is generally believed to enhance student motivation, yet the literature has little empirical evidence to support this claim. Based on a large-scale investigation of 40 ESOL classrooms in South Korea involving 27 teachers and more than 1,300 learners, this study examined the link between the teachers'…

Guilloteaux, Marie J.; Dornyei, Zoltan

2008-01-01

432

Dialogic Strategies in Read-Alouds of English-Language Information Books in a Second-Grade Bilingual Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This article shows how various dialogic discourse strategies were used in read-alouds of English science information books in a 2nd-grade bilingual classroom. Using a variety of discursive strategies, Ibett encouraged her Spanish-speaking students to provide explanations and reasoning related to science ideas. Similarly, she used intertextual…

Pappas, Christine C.; Varelas, Maria; Patton, Sofia Kokkino; Ye, Li; Ortiz, Ibett

2012-01-01

433

DIY Media in the Classroom: New Literacies Across Content Areas (Middle Through High School). Language & Literacy Series (Practitioner's Bookshelf)  

Science.gov (United States)

This book shows teachers how to bring students' Do-It-Yourself media practices into the classroom (Grades 6-12). In one accessible resource, the authors explain DIY media, identify their appealing features for content area instruction, and describe the literacy skills and strategies they promote. Chapters address: Adolescents' DIY Media as New…

Guzzetti, Barbara; Elliot, Kate; Welsch, Diana

2010-01-01

434

Teacher-Student Talk in Singapore Chinese Language Classrooms: A Case Study of Initiation/Response/Follow-Up (IRF)  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article, I analyse the initiation/response/follow-up (IRF) exchanges between teachers and students in teacher-fronted instruction by using transcribed classroom data. Adopting a social constructivist position, I examine ways in which teachers construct or reduce students' learning opportunities in these communications. Furthermore, I…

Liu, Yongbing

2008-01-01

435

An Examination of the Applications of Constitutional Concepts as an Approach to Classroom Management: Four Studies of Judicious Discipline in Various Classroom Settings.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper presents a composite of four separate research studies conducted to assess the impact of constitutional language on classroom environments. The studies were designed to examine the uses of "Judicious Discipline" in a variety of classrooms and how the use of a common language based on rights and responsibilities affected the behavior of…

McEwan, Barbara; Gathercoal, Paul; Nimmo, Virginia

436

Ready, Set, Science! Putting Research To Work In K-8 Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

What types of instructional experiences help students learn and understand science? What do professional development providers and curriculum designers need to know to create and support such experiences? Ready, Set, Science! is a book that provides a practical and accessible account of current research about teaching and learning science. Based on the groundbreaking National Research Council report "Taking Science to School: Learning and Teaching Science in Grades K-8” (2006), the book reviews principles derived from the latest educational research and applies them to effective teaching practice. Ready, Set, Science! is a MUST READ for everyone involved in K-12 education, or creating products intended for K-12 use. We will review Ready, Set, Science!'s new vision of science in education, its most important recommendations, and its implications for the place of astronomy in K-12 classrooms. We will review some useful suggestions on how to make student thinking visible and report on how we have put this into practice with teachers. We will engage the audience in a brief interactive demonstration of specific questioning techniques described in the book that help to make student thinking visible.

van der Veen, Wil E.; Moody, T.

2008-05-01

437

Some Implications of Research in Second Language Acquisition for Foreign Language Teaching.  

Science.gov (United States)

On the continuum along which theories of first and second language acquisition are located, the two extremes represent the classic controversy of nature (nativist) vs. nurture (environmentalist), while those in the middle view language acquisition as a result of a more or less balanced interaction between innate capacities and linguistic…

Lombardo, Linda

438

CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper is aiming to discover the paths that enable teachers to manage their work with students in the classroom. To be an efficient teacher means to know with what and how to motivate students to learn. Teacher as an efficient classroom manager needs to have skills to plan and prepare the education process, know how to organize the teaching and how to guide the class. An efficient teacher moreover needs o establish positive classroom climate and working discipline. Also, teacher should be able to evaluate the progress of the students and self-evaluate his own work.In order to examine classroom management skills of teachers in Republic of Macedonia, a research has been made for teachers in primary schools in Republic of Macedonia. Instruments which will be used in order to complete the research and analyses are the following: questionnaire for teachers and educational policy analyses in our country in order to discover whether there is concrete strategy for promotion and implementation of classroom management on local and national level.Analyses of results show that there is a deficit of classroom management skills among teachers, which is due moreover to some lapses in initial education of teachers.

Jasmina Delceva – Dizdarevik

2014-06-01

439

Research on Analysis of Hindi language Graphical user Interface  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The interface between humans and computers is an ever critical issue due to the increased complexity of computerized systems and the wide variety of problems they solve. Controlled natural languages might prove a promising medium between humans and computers, however, they are not easy to design, and humans need time to adapt to them. Authors propose to solve these issues by using a controlled user interface which is powered by an automatically constructed application-oriented natural language. Therefore, any interface in Hindi language will be an asset to these people. This paper discusses the architecture of mapping the Hindi language query entered by the user into SQL query.

Ms. Nikita Bhati

2014-08-01

440

Factors Influencing Chinese Language Learners' Strategy Use  

Science.gov (United States)

This survey study, which involved 134 language learners enrolled in first-year Chinese as a foreign language classrooms in the US universities, intended to address the research question, "Do learners' strategy use differ based on the following learner differences: (1) gender; (2) home language/culture; and (3) number of other foreign languages

Sung, Ko-Yin

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
441

Hmong Language, Culture and Learning: A Course for Teachers.  

Science.gov (United States)

"Hmong Language, Culture, and Learning" is a new required course for ESL and bilingual education minors at University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. Course elements include ethnographic research within the Hmong community; classroom discussion of Hmong language, culture, and learning issues; observing/volunteering in bilingual Hmong/English classrooms; and…

Hones, Donald F.

2001-01-01

442

A critical analysis of foreign language learning tasks  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Our research project examines the critical analysis of learning tasks used in the foreign language classroom. The main objective of the project is to develop a critical attitude towards foreign language learning tasks on the part of the foreign language teacher. To this end, the project seeks to improve the ability of (trainee) foreign language teachers to analyse the effectiveness of printed classroom learning tasks in the acquisition of foreign language communicative competence. The paper i...

Driessen, C.; Haenen, J. P. P.; Westhoff, G. J.

2002-01-01

443

Understanding and Facing Discipline-Related Challenges in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom at Public Schools / Comprensión y tratamiento de los retos asociados a la disciplina en el aula de lengua extranjera en escuelas públicas  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: English Abstract in spanish Responder a las normas escolares y a las instrucciones de los profesores es un principio básico de una clase excelente. Tanto los profesores novatos como los experimentados enfrentan situaciones problemáticas en las aulas de clase reales, especialmente en relación con la disciplina. Hay varias razon [...] es que explican la indisciplina en los colegios públicos y también estrategias variadas que los profesores principiantes crean y ensayan para superar tal reto. Este artículo reporta un estudio de investigación acción que ayudó a un grupo de profesores principiantes a superar la indisciplina en el aula de inglés en colegios públicos y a responder a iniciativas de desarrollo profesional con base en procesos de reflexión y toma de decisiones que las nuevas políticas educativas colombianas demandan de las nuevas generaciones de profesores para mejorar la calidad de la educación. Abstract in english Complying with school regulations and teachers' instructions is a basic principle of an excellent class; both novice and experienced teachers face challenging situations when getting into real classrooms, especially those related to classroom management. There are various reasons that explain discip [...] line problems in public schools, as well as varied strategies beginning teachers create and try when coping with those challenges. This article reports an action research study on how this methodology helped a group of teacher-trainees overcome indiscipline in English as a foreign language classrooms at public schools, and align with professional development initiatives which focus on reflection and decision-making processes that the new Colombian policies demand from new teachers seeking a higher quality of education.

Josefina, Quintero Corzo; Odilia, Ramírez Contreras.

444

Language Phenotypes and Intervention Planning: Bridging Research and Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper focuses on the communication and language phenotypes associated with three genetic disorders: Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, and fragile X syndrome. It is argued that there is empirical evidence that these disorders predispose children to specific profiles of strength and weakness in some areas of speech, language, and communication,…

Fidler, Deborah J.; Philofsky, Amy; Hepburn, Susan L.

2007-01-01

445

Research in Foreign Language Education in Hungary (2006-2012)  

Science.gov (United States)

In the past quarter century, Hungary has offered fertile ground for innovative developments in foreign language (FL) education. The appropriate, albeit disparaging, label applied to Hungary in the mid-1970s--"a land of foreign language illiterates" (Köllo 1978: 6)--no longer applies. In the wake of the dramatic changes of 1989, the…

Medgyes, Péter; Nikolov, Marianne

2014-01-01

446

Educational Technology and the Restructuring Movement: Lessons from Research on Computers in Classrooms.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper presents findings from a recently completed study of the use of computers in primary classrooms as one source of evidence concerning the role technology can play in school restructuring efforts. The sites for the study were selected by Apple Computer, Inc. in the spring of 1988 and included 43 classrooms in 10 schools in 6 large, mostly…

Kell, Diane; And Others

447

Language Tasks Using Touch Screen and Mobile Technologies: Reconceptualizing Task-Based CALL for Young Language Learners  

Science.gov (United States)

This article examines how the use of mobile technologies (iPods and tablets) in language classrooms contributes to redesigning task-based approaches for young language learners. The article is based on a collaborative action research (CAR) project in Early French Immersion classrooms in the province of Alberta, Canada. The data collection included…

Pellerin, Martine

2014-01-01

448

Classroom management of situated group learning: A research study of two teaching strategies  

Science.gov (United States)

Although peer-based work is encouraged by theories in developmental psychology and although classroom interventions suggest it is effective, there are grounds for recognising that young pupils find collaborative learning hard to sustain. Discontinuities in collaborative skill during development have been suggested as one interpretation. Theory and research have neglected situational continuities that the teacher may provide in management of formal and informal collaborations. This experimental study, with the collaboration of the science faculty in one urban secondary college, investigated the effect of two role attribution strategies on communication in peer groups of different gender composition in three parallel Year 8 science classes. The group were set a problem that required them to design an experiment to compare the thermal insulating properties of two different materials. This presents the data collected and key findings, and reviews the findings from previous parallel studies that have employed the same research design in different school settings. The results confirm the effectiveness of social role attribution strategies in teacher management of communication in peer-based work.

Smeh, Kathy; Fawns, Rod

2000-06-01

449

C-IMAGE Teachers at Sea Maiden Voyages: Promoting Authentic Scientific Research in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

The Center for Integrated Modeling & Analysis of Gulf Ecosystems (C-IMAGE) is one of eight consortia participating in the BP/Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative. C-IMAGE is a comprehensive research consortium of 13 national and international universities tasked with evaluating the environmental impacts of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (DWH) on coastal ecosystems, the water column and the sea floor. The associated C-IMAGE research cruises provide a unique opportunity for Florida's K12 science educators to participate in the data collection and collaboration process alongside marine scientists as a member of the scientific crew. The mission of the C-IMAGE cruises is to help to answer several fundamental questions about the DWH event and subsequent impacts on the plankton population, reef and fish communities and the microbial communities. Deep sea sediment samples, plankton and fishes collected during these expeditions are the data sources. Sampling activities include the use of the SIPPER plankton sampler, multi-core sediment system and long line surveys to assess fish health. While at sea teachers participate in the at sea research and serve as the ship to shore communicator via social media (FB, Twitter, daily blogs) and LIVE video conferencing with formal and informal classrooms. Marine scientists, post-docs and graduate students participating in the C-IMAGE cruises collaborate with the teacher on board to communicate the science, technology and life at sea experiences to educational and general audiences. Upon return to shore, teachers will translate their At Sea learning experience to understandable inquiry-based lessons about the science and technology encompassing the northern Gulf of Mexico ecology, the DWH event and subsequent impacts. Lessons developed from the cruises will inform a future series of C-IMAGE Teacher Professional Developments during Phase 2 of Outreach activities. The results from three Gulf of Mexico expeditions (Aug-Nov) will be presented: related to teachers' working knowledge of research and sampling procedures as well as metrics for the potential value-added of social media as a mechanism for communicating research with formal and informal audiences. C-IMAGE teachers will engage in research with experts in biological and chemical modeling, marine resource assessment, sedimentary geochemistry and toxicology. This research is made possible by a grant from BP/The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative. Contract #SA 12-10/GoMRI-007;

Hine, A. C.; Greely, T.; Lodge, A.

2012-12-01

450

Education Outside the Classroom: Research to Identify What Training Is Offered by Initial Teacher Training Institutions. Research Report RR802  

Science.gov (United States)

Education outside the classroom can be defined, in its broadest sense, as any structured learning experience that takes place beyond the classroom environment during the school day, after school or during the holidays. It can include, among other activities, cultural trips, science and geography fieldwork, environmental and countryside education,…

Kendall, Sally; Murfield, Jenny; Dillon, Justin; Wilkin, Anne

2008-01-01

451

Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: Politics, Languages and Responsibilities  

Science.gov (United States)

How can educational research have more impact? What processes of knowledge exchange are most effective for increasing the uses of research results? How can research-produced knowledge be better "mobilized" among users such as practicing educators, policy makers, and the public communities? These sorts of questions are commanding urgent attention…

Fenwick, Tara, Ed.; Farrell, Lesley, Ed.

2011-01-01