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1

Lifting Practice: Teachers as Researchers in the Language Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

The collection of essays on classroom research for second language teachers includes: "Teachers as Researchers in the Language Classroom: An Overview" (Anthony J. Liddicoat, Louise M. Jansen); "A Visit to the Art Gallery: An Oral Exercise in a Second Language" (Meri Dragicevic); "Encouraging Class Cohesiveness in the LOTE Classroom" (Corine…

Jansen, Louise M., Ed.; Liddicoat, Anthony J., Ed.

2

Research in the Language Classroom: State of the Art. Research Papers  

Science.gov (United States)

New trends in language teaching have resulted in a move towards research in the language classroom. A brief overview of classroom research reveals three distinct but inter-related research paradigms: classroom-centered research, classroom process research, and qualitative research, respectively.

Salmani-Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

2006-01-01

3

Progress in Language Classroom Research: Evidence from "The Modern Language Journal," 1916-2000.  

Science.gov (United States)

Reviews topical and methodological trends in the past 85 years of research on language classrooms in "The Modern Language Journal." Focus is on empirical investigations into oral classroom instruction in post-secondary classes, which include comparisons of language teaching methodology, observational procedures in classrooms, examinations of…

Chaudron, Craig

2001-01-01

4

Understanding Classroom Language Assessment through Teacher Thinking Research  

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While research into classroom language assessment has expanded in recent years, the nature of thought processes used by teachers when conducting such assessment has received less attention. This article reports on research that explored these cognitions through case studies of two instructors teaching an EAP (English for Academic Purposes) course…

Yin, Muchun

2010-01-01

5

Second Language Writing: Research Insights for the Classroom. Second Language Writing: Research Insights for the Classroom.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The study of composition at the post-secondary level is a relatively new practice which has become widespread only during the past half-century. More recent is the emergence over the past two to three decades of composition studies as an academic discipline, and even more recent is the awareness that composition research and pedagogy must expand to meet the needs of the ESL population. As growing numbers of international students flood colleges and universities in the English-speaking world, and as English becomes increasingly important as a world language, ESL composition is a burgeoning field. The study of composition at the post-secondary level is a relatively new practice which has become widespread only during the past half-century. More recent is the emergence over the past two to three decades of composition studies as an academic discipline, and even more recent is the awareness that composition research and pedagogy must expand to meet the needs of the ESL population. As growing numbers of international students flood colleges and universities in the English-speaking world, and as English becomes increasingly important as a world language, ESL composition is a burgeoning field.

Madeleine Youmans

2008-04-01

6

Gender in Research on Language. Researching Gender-Related Patterns in Classroom Discourse.  

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Examines gender-related patterns of behavior in the second-language classroom and argues that these patterns dovetail with all the other dynamics of language behavior. The article concludes that drawing on the theoretical foundations of frames theory will ensure that research into gender-related patterns of classroom discourse will reflect the…

Tannen, Deborah

1996-01-01

7

The Interaction of Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches to Research: A View of the Second Language Classroom.  

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Considers both qualitative and quantitative research approaches on second language learning, with focus on second language classroom research. Concludes that both approaches are relevant to determining the important variables to investigate and the relationships those variables have to second language learning outcomes. (Author/CB)

Chaudron, Craig

1986-01-01

8

Picturebooks in foreign language classroom  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This thesis is concerned with the art form of picturebook and its potential in English language teaching. In its initial part it presents a theoretical overview of both the genre of picturebook and its potential role when used as a teaching aid in young learners’ foreign-language classroom. The research part is then anchored in a set of picturebook-centred teaching sequences devised and carried out by the author in several elementary ESL classrooms, and consequently analysed and evaluated a...

Martincova?, Kristy?na

2008-01-01

9

Classroom interaction and language learning Classroom interaction and language learning  

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Full Text Available In the field of second and foreign language learning, interaction has long been considered to play an important role. Studies taking a more traditional, formalist perspective on language and learning have focused on the role that interaction plays in helping learners to assimilate and internalize knowledge of linguistic forms in the target language. More recently, a group of scholars concerned with interaction and additional language learning, or the learning of languages other than the mother tongue, has begun to move away from this more traditional perspective and into areas outside of what has generally been considered the main focus of the applied linguistics field. Taking more of a sociocultural perspective on language and learning, this research is concerned with documenting the links between student participation in particular kinds of classroom interaction and their communicative development in the target language. In the field of second and foreign language learning, interaction has long been considered to play an important role. Studies taking a more traditional, formalist perspective on language and learning have focused on the role that interaction plays in helping learners to assimilate and internalize knowledge of linguistic forms in the target language. More recently, a group of scholars concerned with interaction and additional language learning, or the learning of languages other than the mother tongue, has begun to move away from this more traditional perspective and into areas outside of what has generally been considered the main focus of the applied linguistics field. Taking more of a sociocultural perspective on language and learning, this research is concerned with documenting the links between student participation in particular kinds of classroom interaction and their communicative development in the target language.

Joan Kelly Hall

2008-04-01

10

Language Diversity and Classroom Discourse.  

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This paper presents linguistic evidence for communication problems in everyday classroom interactions where children are dialect speakers. It also examines the problem of coding language functions for use in experiments. (RB)

Lucas, Ceil; Borders, Denise

1987-01-01

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Classroom interaction and language learning Classroom interaction and language learning  

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Full Text Available Há muito tempo, a área de aprendizagem de uma segunda língua ou língua estrangeira interessa-se pelo papel que a interação possui no aprendizado de língua. Recentemente, pesquisas sobre interação e aprendizado de línguas estão se voltando para uma perspectiva sociocultural, que incorpora percepções teóricas e descobertas de disciplinas tradicionalmente consideradas fora dos limites da área. O objetivo deste trabalho é informar sobre as mais recentes pesquisas nessa área. Após fornecer uma breve visão geral da mais tradicional perspectiva da função da interação no aprendizado de línguas, estudos recentes sobre interação entre professor-aluno e sobre o aprendizado de segunda língua e língua estrangeira que utilizam uma perspectiva sociocultural são revisados. O artigo finaliza com uma discussão sobre implicações para ensino de língua em salas-de-aula e sugestões para pesquisas futuras. The field of second and foreign language learning has long been interested in the role that interaction plays in language learning. Recently, research on interaction and language learning has begun to move toward a sociocultural perspective, which incorporates theoretical insights and findings from disciplines traditionally considered outside the field’s main purview. The aim of this paper is to report on some of these most recent undertakings in the field. After first providing a brief overview of the more traditional perspective of the role of interaction in language learning, several recent studies on teacher-student interaction and second and foreign language learning that take a sociocultural perspective are reviewed. The article concludes with a discussion on implications for language classrooms and suggestions for future research.

Joan Kelly Hall

2008-04-01

12

Redefining the Ojibwe Classroom: Indigenous Language Programs within Large Research Universities  

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Indigenous languages are powerful symbols of self-determination and sovereignty for tribal communities in the United States, and many community-based programs have been developed to support and maintain them. The successes of these programs, however, have been difficult to replicate at large research institutions. This article examines the issues…

Morgan, Mindy J.

2005-01-01

13

Language to Language: Nurturing Writing Development in Multilingual Classrooms  

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The author spent four years embedded in a multilingual kindergarten classroom in which children spoke six different languages and several more years observing multilingual Head Start classrooms. She shares numerous examples of young dual language learners actively figuring out the way written language works in their first and second languages.…

Shagoury, Ruth

2009-01-01

14

English in the Chinese foreign language classroom  

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Chinese is an ancient language, but the present scope of its global study is unprecedented. Comprehending the impacts of worldwide linguistic realities on 'Chinese as a Foreign Language' (CFL) teachers and students will be critical to its long-term success. The most important phenomenon has been the establishment of English as a lingua franca, especially in the expanding marketplaces of Asia. This book examines the role of English as a medium of instruction in CFL classrooms. It begins by integrating existing studies on the global spread of English with research on English as a medium of secon

Wang, Danping

2013-01-01

15

Researching classroom questioning  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The complexities of the modern society and interconnected world in which we live requires students who are able to problem solve and think critically. The research on which is article is based aims to explore how classroom questioning can help students guide their learning and model the spirit of inquiry to become lifelong learners. The research took place in an International Bilingual School of Madrid during sixth grade English lessons. It shows how developing effective questioning skills re...

Lores Gonza?lez, Adriana

2010-01-01

16

Classroom interaction and language learning Classroom interaction and language learning  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In the field of second and foreign language learning, interaction has long been considered to play an important role. Studies taking a more traditional, formalist perspective on language and learning have focused on the role that interaction plays in helping learners to assimilate and internalize knowledge of linguistic forms in the target language. More recently, a group of scholars concerned with interaction and additional language learning, or the learning of languages other than the ...

Joan Kelly Hall

2008-01-01

17

Body Language in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Ralph Waldo Emerson and Mae West would seem to have little in common, but there is one thing they both understood--the importance of body language. Educators, psychologists, anthropologists and sociologists define body language or nonverbal communication as communication without words. It includes overt behaviors such as facial expressions, eye…

Miller, Patrick W.

2005-01-01

18

The Interactional Architecture of the Language Classroom  

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Full Text Available This article provides a summary of some of the key ideas of Seedhouse (2004. The study applies Conversation Analysis (CA methodology to an extensive and varied database of language lessons from around the world and attempts to answer the question ‘How is L2 classroom interaction organised?’ The main thesis is that there is a reflexive relationship between pedagogy and interaction in the L2 classroom. This means that there is a two-way, mutually dependent relationship. Furthermore, this relationship is the foundation of the organisation of interaction in L2 classrooms. The omnipresent and unique feature of the L2 classroom is this reflexive relationship between pedagogy and interaction. So whoever is taking part in L2 classroom interaction and whatever the particular activity during which the interactants are speaking the L2, they are always displaying to one another their analyses of the current state of the evolving relationship between pedagogy and interaction and acting on the basis of these analyses. So interaction in the L2 classroom is based on the relationship between pedagogy and interaction. Interactants are constantly analysing this relationship and displaying their analyses in their talk. An example of data analysis is provided, including discussion of socially distributed cognition and learning.

Paul Seedhouse

2009-11-01

19

Classroom Instruction That Works with English Language Learners Book  

Science.gov (United States)

At last, the research-based strategies from ASCD's bestselling book "Classroom Instruction That Works" are applied to teaching English language learners to help you boost the achievement levels of these students to new heights. Find out how nine types of instructional strategies that maximize learning can be applied to ELL students in every grade…

Flynn, Kathleen, Hill, Jane D.

2006-01-01

20

English as a Second Language Students and English Language Anxiety: Issues in the Mainstream Classroom.  

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Addresses issues of English language anxiety in two settings: English as a second language and mainstream classrooms. Reveals that interaction with Chicano students raised anxiety levels and that such strategies as avoidance were used to reduce anxiety. Concludes with recommendations for teaching and research that recognize the complexity of…

Pappamihiel, N. Eleni

2002-01-01

 
 
 
 
21

Naturalistic acquisition in an early language classroom  

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Full Text Available This study investigated whether it is possible to provide naturalistic second language acquisition (SLA of vocabulary for young learners in a classroom situation without resorting to a classical immersion approach. Participants were 60 first-grade pupils in Norwegian two elementary schools in their first year. The control group followed regular instruction as prescribed by the school curriculum, while the experimental group received increased naturalistic target language input. This entailed extensive use of English by the teacher during English classes, and also during morning meetings and for simple instructions and classroom management throughout the day. Our hypothesis was that it is possible to facilitate naturalistic acquisition through better quality target language exposure within a normal curriculum. The students' English vocabulary knowledge was measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, version 4 (PPVT-IV, Dunn & Dunn, 2007, at the beginning and the end of the first year of school. Findings are that 1 early-start second-language (L2 programs in school do not in themselves guarantee vocabulary development in the first year, 2 a focus on increased exposure to the L2 can lead to a significant increase in receptive vocabulary comprehension in the course of only eight months, and 3 even with relatively modest input, learners in such an early-start L2 program can display vocabulary acquisition comparable in some respects to that of younger native children matched on vocabulary size. The overall conclusion is that naturalistic vocabulary acquisition is in fact possible in a classroom setting.

AnneDahl

2014-04-01

22

Naturalistic acquisition in an early language classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated whether it is possible to provide naturalistic second language acquisition (SLA) of vocabulary for young learners in a classroom situation without resorting to a classical immersion approach. Participants were 60 first-grade pupils in two Norwegian elementary schools in their first year. The control group followed regular instruction as prescribed by the school curriculum, while the experimental group received increased naturalistic target language input. This entailed extensive use of English by the teacher during English classes, and also during morning meetings and for simple instructions and classroom management throughout the day. Our hypothesis was that it is possible to facilitate naturalistic acquisition through better quality target language exposure within a normal curriculum. The students' English vocabulary knowledge was measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, version 4 (PPVT-IV, Dunn and Dunn, 2007a), at the beginning and the end of the first year of school. Findings are that (1) early-start second-language (L2) programs in school do not in themselves guarantee vocabulary development in the first year, (2) a focus on increased exposure to the L2 can lead to a significant increase in receptive vocabulary comprehension in the course of only 8 months, and (3) even with relatively modest input, learners in such an early-start L2 program can display vocabulary acquisition comparable in some respects to that of younger native children matched on vocabulary size. The overall conclusion is that naturalistic vocabulary acquisition is in fact possible in a classroom setting.

Dahl, Anne; Vulchanova, Mila D.

2014-01-01

23

FACEBOOK GROUPS AS A SUPPORTING TOOL FOR LANGUAGE CLASSROOMS  

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Full Text Available This paper attempts to present a review of Facebook group pages as an educational tool for language learning. One of the primary needs of foreign language learners is to gain the opportunity to use the target language outside the classroom practice. Social media communication provides occasions for learners to receive input and produce output while engaging in negotiation of meaning. In line with this point, teachers can instigate class group pages in the social media in an attempt to provide a space for practice and communication free of the traditional pedagogic concerns of a typical classroom. The distinctive discursive behaviour of Facebook group pages helps one to achieve that attempt. In light of these views, the researcher, in this study, formed a group page to understand the dynamics of social media environment as a supporting tool for language classrooms. This paper addresses various features which make social media a unique place to contribute to the sense of class community and collaboration outside the classroom. The face-to face classroom is a controlled communication event, that is, teachers and students are required to be in the classroom at the same time but a teacher’s use of Facebook is an attempt to communicate with students outside of that controlled environment where teachers can meet students in their territory. When compared to its disadvantages, the advantages of setting a class group page on the social media outweigh. Students can feel motivated to contribute to an online community if they subsequently receive support or help. It also leads students to feel that they are being supported by a whole portion of their class community and promotes students’ desire to maintain a valued relationship with others. Students continue developing and strengthening relationships with others.

Arzu Ekoç

2014-07-01

24

Naturalistic acquisition in an early language classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated whether it is possible to provide naturalistic second language acquisition (SLA) of vocabulary for young learners in a classroom situation without resorting to a classical immersion approach. Participants were 60 first-grade pupils in two Norwegian elementary schools in their first year. The control group followed regular instruction as prescribed by the school curriculum, while the experimental group received increased naturalistic target language input. This entailed extensive use of English by the teacher during English classes, and also during morning meetings and for simple instructions and classroom management throughout the day. Our hypothesis was that it is possible to facilitate naturalistic acquisition through better quality target language exposure within a normal curriculum. The students' English vocabulary knowledge was measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, version 4 (PPVT-IV, Dunn and Dunn, 2007a), at the beginning and the end of the first year of school. Findings are that (1) early-start second-language (L2) programs in school do not in themselves guarantee vocabulary development in the first year, (2) a focus on increased exposure to the L2 can lead to a significant increase in receptive vocabulary comprehension in the course of only 8 months, and (3) even with relatively modest input, learners in such an early-start L2 program can display vocabulary acquisition comparable in some respects to that of younger native children matched on vocabulary size. The overall conclusion is that naturalistic vocabulary acquisition is in fact possible in a classroom setting. PMID:24860518

Dahl, Anne; Vulchanova, Mila D

2014-01-01

25

Action Study of Teacher’s Language on EFL Classroom Interaction  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

From the perspective of the interactive theories and theories of second language acquisition, this paper explores the influence of the teachers’ language upon the EFL classroom interaction. The action research in this paper is based on a small-scale research, which served as a means to find the problems occurring in the teachers’ language in EFL classroom. We make a class observation 10 English teachers and 102 freshmen of non-English majors from HIT. The research results show tha...

Xuemei Meng; Xuesong Wang

2011-01-01

26

Implementing Language-in-Education Policy in Multilingual Mathematics Classrooms: Pedagogical Implications  

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In this paper, we examine selected literature on classroom-based research to understand how students and teachers (re)negotiate the language of interaction in a mathematics classroom when the official medium of instruction is different from the students' dominant language. We identify the tensions and dilemmas associated with the implementation of…

Halai, Anjum; Karuku, Simon

2013-01-01

27

Behavioral Problems in the Classroom and Underlying Language Difficulties  

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Full Text Available Dealing with the behavioral problems of students is one of many dimensions of most educators’ and schools’ requirements. While research has repeatedly shown that a large number of children with behavior problems have underlying, unrecognized language difficulties, few schools have implemented programs where children with problem behavior are evaluated in terms of these skills. This paper provides information to teachers about (1 the links between behavior and language, (2 the levels at which language can be impaired including phonology, grammar and pragmatics, (3 how language impairment can be recognized and (4 what can be done in the classroom to support the language skills of this group. Special attention is paid to the pragmatic level of language as impairment at this level may be misdiagnosed as behavior problems. The information provided is targeted towards pre-K and elementary school age, but can also be adapted for older children.

Jodi Tommerdahl

2013-04-01

28

TEACHING CREATIVE WRITING IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSROOM  

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Full Text Available Writing, like all other aspects of language, is communicative. In our real life we write e-mails, notes, covering letters, reports, curriculums, assignments, essays and so on. Some of us write articles or work on forums and websites. A few write stories and poems. All of these writing tasks have a communicative purpose and a target audience. In the English language classroom, however, writing often lacks this. There are many reasons, as there are lots of ways to make the writing, we do with learners more communicative. There are many areas in which language learners can benefit from creative writing. Students express themselves and their own ideas. Most teachers would agree that what we want to say, what comes from the heart, we are happier to work on. Creative Writing (CW can be very stimulating and a lot of fun. Creative writing involves playful but rigorous work with language. A lot of people seem to associate creative writing with an "anything goes" mentality. However, in order to produce a good text, poem, short story or dramatic scene, the language needs to be correct and it needs to work. Creative Writing requires greater precision in expression. In order to say precisely what they mean, students have to be very careful in their use of vocabulary and idioms. In this article, an effort is made to discuss the characteristics and difficulties of CW and similarly, a few ideas for CW writing, benefits of CW and solutions to simplify and make it interesting is presented.

MARKU MONIS AND . M. V. RODRIQUES

2012-11-01

29

Perceptions of Iranian English Language Teachers towards the Use of Discourse Markers in the EFL Classroom  

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This study attempts to examine Iranian English language teachers’ perception towards the use of discourse markers (DMs) in the English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classroom. It is the contention of this study that past research studies have not paid sufficient attention to how teachers perceive the use of discourse markers in the English language classroom. This research extends on Fung’s (2011) study and further includes the listening and speaking skills together with the role of...

Seyed Ali Rezvani Kalajahi; Ain Nadzimah Abdullah

2012-01-01

30

Classroom tandem – Outlining a Model for Language Learning and Instruction  

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The aim of this paper is to outline classroom tandem by comparing it with informal tandem learning contexts and other language instruction methods. Classroom tandem is used for second language instruction in mixed language groups in the subjects of Finnish and Swedish as L2. Tandem learning entails that two persons with different mother tongues learn each other’s native languages in reciprocal cooperation. The students function, in turns, as a second language learner and as a model in the n...

2013-01-01

31

Mobile Sign Language Learning Outside the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

The majority of deaf children in the United States are born to hearing parents with limited prior exposure to American Sign Language (ASL). Our research involves creating and validating a mobile language tool called SMARTSign. The goal is to help hearing parents learn ASL in a way that fits seamlessly into their daily routine. (Contains 3 figures.)

Weaver, Kimberly A.; Starner, Thad

2012-01-01

32

Humor as Safe House in the Foreign Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Analyses of second language (L2) classroom interaction often categorize joking and other humorous talk by students as disruptive, off-task behavior, thereby rendering it important only from a classroom management perspective. Studies of language play, however, have illustrated that such jocular talk not only allows students to construct a broader…

Pomerantz, Anne; Bell, Nancy D.

2011-01-01

33

Validation of the "Chinese Language Classroom Learning Environment Inventory" for Investigating the Nature of Chinese Language Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

The Chinese Language Classroom Environment Inventory (CLCEI) is a bilingual instrument developed for use in measuring students' and teachers' perceptions toward their Chinese Language classroom learning environments in Singapore secondary schools. The English version of the CLCEI was customised from the English version of the "What is happening in…

Lian, Chua Siew; Wong, Angela F. L.; Der-Thanq, Victor Chen

2006-01-01

34

Classroom Discourse Of Malay Language Lesson: A Critical Analysis  

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Full Text Available Research on the teaching and learning process of the Malay language in the classroom usually focuses on the method, content, strategy and teaching aids. Moving away from this norm, this research article examines the process from the discourse analysis perspective called pedagogic discourse analysis, with an adaptation of Fairclough’s Critical Discourse Analysis Framework (1992; 1995. The discussion is based on several hours of teaching-learning case study conducted in a secondary school classroom, which emphasizes integrated curriculum in an attempt to understand the unseen social processes, i.e. teacher dominance in discourse. The research findings indicate that teacher dominance is concealed in turn-taking system, types of questions posed by the teacher, discourse control and the overall structure of the discourse, which have their implications on the implementation of the National Education Philosophy. Contrary to the emphasis on student centredness and thinking skills as laid out by the Integrated Curriculum for Secondary School, it is found that the nature of the learning process in the classroom hardly focused on students’ thinking skills. This article argues that students should be given the opportunity to exercise their critical and creative potentials.

Idris Aman

2006-01-01

35

Research methods for English language teachers  

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This book offers a lively introduction to the research methods and techniques available to English language teachers who wish to investigate aspects of their own practice. It covers qualitative and quantitative methodology and includes sections on observation, introspection, diary studies, experiments, interviews, questionnaires, numerical techniques and case study research. Each method is illustrated with examples in language teaching contexts, and techniques of data collection and analysis are introduced. The authors focus particularly on research in the classroom, on tests, materials, the

McDonough, Jo

2014-01-01

36

"Tu Necesitas Preguntar en Espanol": Negotiating Good Language Learner Identity in a Spanish Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This article builds on Norton and Toohey's (2001) critique of good language learner (GLL) research to illustrate how college students in an advanced Spanish conversation course drew on particular ideologies of language and foreign language learning to construct and negotiate their classroom identities. I argue that these ideologies were implicated…

Pomerantz, Anne

2008-01-01

37

Achievement Motivational Characteristics of University Foreign Language Learners: From the Classroom to the Tutoring Table  

Science.gov (United States)

What influences who seeks foreign language tutoring? Using expectancy value theory, the present study researches the characteristics of university foreign language students in the language classroom (n = 258) and seeking tutoring (n = 29). Students' performance and mastery goal orientations, achievement task values, self-efficacy for foreign…

Matthews, Paul H.

2008-01-01

38

Assessing English Language Learners' Content Knowledge in Middle School Classrooms  

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The purpose of this article is to highlight ways in which middle school content area teachers can more effectively assess English Language Learners (ELLs) in their classrooms. This article poses five questions to guide middle school content teachers in making adaptations and accommodations when using traditional classroom tests. The objective of…

Pappamihiel, N. Eleni; Mihai, Florin

2006-01-01

39

Are Brief Contact Experiences and Classroom Language Learning Complementary?  

Science.gov (United States)

Presents the perspectives of a Grade 6 French immersion class from Ontario on a brief exchange experience with francophone peers from Quebec and describes how this experience complemented their classroom language studies. Examined immersion students' perceptions of the operation of both social and cognitive/linguistic processes in the classroom

MacFarlane, Alina

2001-01-01

40

Doing Being Playful in the Second Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Much work on classroom interaction has been devoted to the IRF or IRE structure as well as pair or group work. Relatively little is known about less "legitimate" moments such as humor or off-task talk, and existing studies on playful interaction have been limited to EFL or foreign language classrooms. Based on 16 hours of videotaped interactions…

Waring, Hansun Zhang

2013-01-01

 
 
 
 
41

Corrective Feedback in Second Language Classrooms  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: English Abstract in spanish En el presente trabajo procuro analizar el rol de la asesoría remedial o retroalimentación correctiva, precisamente Recasts (corrección implícita), en la interacción entre profesores y alumnos de una segunda lengua. De esta manera, analizo los efectos de la corrección implícita en la auto-corrección [...] de los alumnos para finalmente llegar a la siguiente conclusión: los alumnos avanzados son capaces de percibir este tipo de corrección implícita ya que sus habilidades cognitivas están más desarrolladas. Dos grupos de la Universidad RSH son estudiados. Cinco estudiantes pertenecientes a un nivel intermedio y cinco a nivel avanzado han sido categorizados de acuerdo al número de cursos tomados durante los semestres en la universidad. Mi planteamiento se relaciona a que la corrección implícita (recasts) serán sólo efectiva con estudiantes cognitivamente más avanzados ya que son capaces de hacer inferencias con mayor rapidez, auto-corregirse y así reformular las oraciones mal formuladas y estructuradas. Abstract in english In this paper I attempt to analyse and survey the role of corrective feedback -more specifically recasts- in the interaction between teachers and L2 students in a classroom. Thus, I explore the effects of recasts on students' self-correction in order to finally come to the conclusión whether or not [...] students are able to no tice this type of underlying correction and, therefore, reformulate their ill-formed utterances. Besides, I also undertake a comprehensive survey of the literature on the topic. Two different groups of students from the English Teaching Trainig Programme at Universidad Católica Raúl Silva Henrríquez are studied. Five students taking English courses at an intermedíate level and five taking advanced English courses. Intermedíate and advanced students have been categorised on the basis of their number of English language courses they have taken. Intermedíate students have taken four, whereas advanced have taken seven. In this paper the point at issue is whether harmful and ineffective or essential and rather effective, and whether recasts are noticeable for students to 'read between lines' and figure out the underlying correction. I take the stand that recasts are only effective when using them with advanced students as they are more cognitively advanced and, therefore, able to make inferences and interpret the implicit message to reformulate their mistakes.The results as well as the tests on the whole, clearly demónstrate that recasts as a corrective technique happen to be a bit more effective with advanced students than with intermedíate students, though the difference is not striking.

Véliz C, Leonardo.

42

Looking Backward and Forward at Classroom-Based Language Assessment  

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In the past few decades, approaches to language assessment and perspectives on learning have changed. This article highlights those developments with the greatest significance for teachers and classroom-based language assessment, including the emergence of new perspectives on the nature of language ability and learning, use of an expanded array of…

Stoynoff, Stephen

2012-01-01

43

Second Language Research Forum Colloquia 2009: Colloquium--Language Learning Abroad: Insights from the Missionary Experience  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent years have brought increasing attention to studies of language acquisition in a country where the language is spoken, as opposed to formal language study in classrooms. Research on language learners in immersion contexts is important, as the question of whether study abroad is valuable is still somewhat controversial among researchers

Hansen, Lynne

2011-01-01

44

Corrective Feedback in Second Language Classrooms  

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Full Text Available In this paper I attempt to analyse and survey the role of corrective feedback -more specifically recasts- in the interaction between teachers and L2 students in a classroom. Thus, I explore the effects of recasts on students' self-correction in order to finally come to the conclusión whether or not students are able to no tice this type of underlying correction and, therefore, reformulate their ill-formed utterances. Besides, I also undertake a comprehensive survey of the literature on the topic. Two different groups of students from the English Teaching Trainig Programme at Universidad Católica Raúl Silva Henrríquez are studied. Five students taking English courses at an intermedíate level and five taking advanced English courses. Intermedíate and advanced students have been categorised on the basis of their number of English language courses they have taken. Intermedíate students have taken four, whereas advanced have taken seven. In this paper the point at issue is whether harmful and ineffective or essential and rather effective, and whether recasts are noticeable for students to 'read between lines' and figure out the underlying correction. I take the stand that recasts are only effective when using them with advanced students as they are more cognitively advanced and, therefore, able to make inferences and interpret the implicit message to reformulate their mistakes.The results as well as the tests on the whole, clearly demónstrate that recasts as a corrective technique happen to be a bit more effective with advanced students than with intermedíate students, though the difference is not striking.En el presente trabajo procuro analizar el rol de la asesoría remedial o retroalimentación correctiva, precisamente Recasts (corrección implícita, en la interacción entre profesores y alumnos de una segunda lengua. De esta manera, analizo los efectos de la corrección implícita en la auto-corrección de los alumnos para finalmente llegar a la siguiente conclusión: los alumnos avanzados son capaces de percibir este tipo de corrección implícita ya que sus habilidades cognitivas están más desarrolladas. Dos grupos de la Universidad RSH son estudiados. Cinco estudiantes pertenecientes a un nivel intermedio y cinco a nivel avanzado han sido categorizados de acuerdo al número de cursos tomados durante los semestres en la universidad. Mi planteamiento se relaciona a que la corrección implícita (recasts serán sólo efectiva con estudiantes cognitivamente más avanzados ya que son capaces de hacer inferencias con mayor rapidez, auto-corregirse y así reformular las oraciones mal formuladas y estructuradas.

Leonardo Véliz C

2008-01-01

45

Games for the Foreign Language Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Two marketing games are described, "Le Marche Francais" and "El Mercado: The Mexican Market Comes to Life in the Spanish Classroom." Both are patterned after a published game entitled "Market: A Simulation Game." The adaptation in each instance relied on simplifying the original game and presenting it in a form understandable to middle school…

McMillan, Nancy; Madaras, Susan W.

46

Between the Lines: When Culture, Language and Poetry Meet in the Classroom  

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Teaching poetry in second language (L2) classrooms raises theoretical and practical questions about how best to treat literature when target language and culture is also being negotiated. Current pedagogy derives from disparate sources, including the experientially-driven practices of individual teachers, the quantitative and qualitative research

Melin, Charlotte

2010-01-01

47

Classroom tandem – Outlining a Model for Language Learning and Instruction  

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Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to outline classroom tandem by comparing it with informal tandem learning contexts and other language instruction methods. Classroom tandem is used for second language instruction in mixed language groups in the subjects of Finnish and Swedish as L2. Tandem learning entails that two persons with different mother tongues learn each other’s native languages in reciprocal cooperation. The students function, in turns, as a second language learner and as a model in the native language. We aim to give an overview description of the interaction in classroom tandem practice. The empirical data consists of longitudinal video recordings of meetings of one tandem dyad within a co-located Swedish-medium and Finnish-medium school. Focus in the analysis is on the language aspects the informants orient to and topicalize in their interaction. The language aspects vary depending on what classroom activities they are engaged in, text-based or oral activities.

Katri KARJALAINEN

2013-10-01

48

Sociolinguistics Inputs and English as Second Language Classrooms  

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Full Text Available Sociolinguistic inputs in language acquisition and use of English as Second Language in classrooms is the main focus of this study. A survey research design was adopted. The population consisted of all secondary school students in Akure Local Government of Ondo State, Nigeria. Two hundred and forty (240 students in senior secondary school classes were deliberately selected from six secondary schools randomly sampled. A fourteen-item questionnaire designated to elicit the required information on the sociolinguistic inputs was used for data collection. The face and content validity of the instrument was ensured. A trial test of the instrument was carried out with students in a community senior secondary school in Ekiti State. Split- half reliability was used and a reliability coefficient of 0.9 was obtained. One way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA, t-test and Pearson Product Moment correlation statistics were employed for the data analysis. Findings revealed that parents’ occupations have significant impact on secondary school students’ use of English. Results also revealed that gender, age and religion have insignificant input on secondary school students’ use of English. It was concluded that the family still remains a major source and most potent place for language learning; therefore, parents should give more attention to students language use at home and provide all the necessary impetus.

Ofodu Graceful Onovughe

2012-06-01

49

The link between Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety, Second Language Tolerance of Ambiguity and Self-rated English proficiency among Chinese learners  

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Previous research has suggested that high levels of Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety (FLCA) have a negative effect on foreign language learning (Horwitz, 2001; Lu & Liu, 2011) while moderate levels of Second Language Tolerance of Ambiguity (SLTA) are believed to boost foreign language learning (Ely, 1995). There is prima facie evidence that

Dewaele, Jean-marc; Ip, Tsui Shan

2013-01-01

50

Classroom noise and children learning in a second language  

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The presence of background noise affects children more negatively than adults. Understanding speech in noise is a skill that continues to develop well into a child's adolescent years. Childrens' experience with a specific language also may affect their ability to make sense of incoming speech. Research suggests that even for adults the presence of background noise negatively affects the ability to listen in a second language. Two studies were conducted to investigate the effects of classroom noise on attention and speech perception in native Spanish-speaking second graders learning English as their second language (L2), as compared to English-only speaking peers (EO). In Study 1 we measured childrens' on-task behavior during instructional activities with and without soundfield amplification. In Study 2 we measured the effects of noise (+10 dB signal-to-noise ratio) using an experimental English word-recognition task. Findings indicate although there were no effects of amplification on on-task behavior, word-recognition performance declined significantly for both EO and L2 groups in the noise condition. In particular, the impact of the noise was disproportionately greater for the L2 group. Children learning in their L2 appear to be at a distinct disadvantage when listening in rooms with typical noise and reverberation.

Nelson, Peggy; Kohnert, Kathryn; Sabur, Sabina; Shaw, Daniel

2005-04-01

51

Anxiety over EFL speaking and writing: A view from language classrooms  

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The assumption that foreign language learners experience a high level of anxiety mainly when faced with speaking activities implies that research should focus on those learners prone to anxiety over that skill. Despite not being widely investigated, foreign language writing anxiety also seems to be a concern for a large number of students. Drawing on questionnaire findings, the study reported in this article examined the nature of, and the connection between the English language classroom spe...

Gkonou, Christina

2011-01-01

52

Classroom Classics: Natural Language Stimulation for Language Delayed Children.  

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The paper describes methods of natural language enhancement which both teachers and parents can use with young children who have language delays. The importance of connecting language to meaningful, functional communication is stressed. The reinforcement for the child becomes the adult's natural and spontaneous response. Adults, then, must prove…

Lowenthal, Barbara

1984-01-01

53

Language Policy for the Multilingual Classroom: Pedagogy of the Possible  

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With contributions from leading scholars all around the world, this volume underlines the ever-pressing need for new language in education policies to include all learners' voices in the multilingual classroom and to empower teachers to develop responsive and transformative pedagogies. Using testimonies, narratives and examples from different…

Helot, Christine; Laoire, Muiris O.

2011-01-01

54

Listening Comprehension and Anxiety in the Arabic Language Classroom  

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Anxiety plays an important role in foreign language (FL) students' classroom performance. This study presents the results of the first empirical examination of the effect of general FL learning anxiety on students' achievement in an Arabic course and of listening anxiety on students' listening comprehension. The data came from 2 measures of…

Elkhafaifi, Hussein

2005-01-01

55

Language Learning through Tasks in a CLIL Science Classroom  

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This paper presents the results of a pre-experimental study into language learning in inclusive Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) classrooms at secondary school, in which Science content was taught in English. The pedagogical experience lasted four weeks. The main pedagogical approach followed was the use of learning tasks carried out by students working in dyads. Through the use different indicators extensively employed in the field, the study attempts to measure the gains that...

Escobar Urmeneta, Cristina

2009-01-01

56

Content-Based Instruction for English Language Learners: An Exploration across Multiple Classroom Settings  

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This study explored the content-based literacy instruction of English language learners (ELLs) across multiple classroom settings in U.S. elementary schools. The following research questions guided the study: (a) How are ELLs taught English in two types of instructional settings: regular content-area literacy instruction in the all-English…

Park, Seo Jung

2009-01-01

57

Associations between Chinese Language Classroom Environments and Students' Motivation to Learn the Language  

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Associations between the nature of Chinese Language Classroom Environments and Singapore secondary school students' motivation to learn the Chinese Language were investigated. A sample of 1,460 secondary three (grade 9) students from 50 express stream (above average academic ability) classes in Singapore government secondary schools was involved…

Chua, Siew Lian; Wong, Angela F. L.; Chen, Der-Thanq

2009-01-01

58

Using Two Languages When Learning Mathematics: How Can Research Help Us Understand Mathematics Learners Who Use Two Languages? Research Brief  

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This article summarizes research on how students who are bilingual or learning English use two languages and examines how this research is relevant to mathematics classrooms. It is easy to notice that bilingual students sometimes use two languages. It is more difficult to know whether this practice might be significant to learning mathematics.…

Moschkovich, Judit

2009-01-01

59

The Relationship between Iranian ELT Instructors’ Beliefs about Language Teaching and Their Practices in Real Classrooms  

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Full Text Available Teachers play different roles in multidimensional process of language teaching and their beliefs about language teaching might influence their practices. Donaghue (2003 stated that beliefs guide teachers in their practice. However, Argyris and Schon (1978 claimed that there is almost a discrepancy between teachers’ beliefs about language teaching and their practices in the classrooms. Therefore, the present study investigated the relationship between Iranian ELT instructors’ beliefs about language teaching and their real practices in classrooms. To achieve this goal, the researchers accidentally selected 369 Iranian ELT instructors and 512 Iranian students. To collect the required data, the researchers employed Teacher’s Beliefs Questionnaire (TBQ to elicit instructors’ beliefs about language teaching and Students’ Satisfaction Questionnaire (SSQ to elicit to what extent Iranian instructors applied their beliefs in their practices. Besides, to verify the results of questionnaires, the researchers interviewed nine instructors. The results revealed a positive significant relationship (p?0.05 between instructors’ beliefs about language teaching and their real practices in classrooms. The findings proposed some applicable implications that can be applied by policy makers and curriculum designers to provide facilities to support reflective teaching and to improve teacher education programs.

Morteza Mellati

2013-03-01

60

Towards criterion validity in classroom language analysis: methodological constraints of metadiscourse and inter-rater agreement  

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Full Text Available

This paper reports on a process to validate a revised version of a system for coding classroom discourse in foreign language lessons, a context in which the dual role of language (as content and means of communication and the speakers' specific pedagogical aims lead to a certain degree of ambiguity in language analysis. The language used by teachers and students has been extensively studied, and a framework of concepts concerning classroom discourse well-established. Models for coding classroom language need, however, to be revised when they are applied to specific research contexts. The application and revision of an initial framework can lead to the development of earlier models, and to the re-definition of previously established categories of analysis that have to be validated. The procedures followed to validate a coding system are related here as guidelines for conducting research under similar circumstances. The advantages of using instruments that incorporate two types of data, that is, quantitative measures and qualitative information from raters' metadiscourse, are discussed, and it is suggested that such procedure can contribute to the process of validation itself, towards attaining reliability of research results, as well as indicate some constraints of the adopted research methodology.

Douglas Altamiro Consolo

2001-02-01

 
 
 
 
61

Research in the Teaching of the English Language Arts.  

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The 28 essays in this journal issue focus on methodology, interpretation, and classroom application of research in the language arts. Following a preface on the role of research in English instruction, the topics discussed include the following: (1) a research base for a large-scale evaluation of writing; (2) implications of teaching writing as…

Bergdahl, David, Ed.

1983-01-01

62

Classroom Authority: Theory, Research, and Practice  

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This book describes and analyzes authority relationships in classrooms through explorations of theory, prior research, and contemporary qualitative studies. The emphasis is on the social construction of authority and the crucial role authority plays in K-16 teachers' pedagogy and students' academic engagement and achievement. The introductory…

Pace, Judith L., Ed.; Hemmings, Annette B., Ed.

2006-01-01

63

The Chinese Bouyei College Students’ Classroom Anxiety in Foreign Language Learning: A Survey Study  

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Full Text Available This survey study aims to investigate the level of the Chinese Bouyei college students’ general foreign language (FL classroom anxiety, the relationships between their FL classroom anxiety and the four independent variables, gender, major field of study, level of academic year, and level of college, and possible causal factors contributive to their FL classroom anxiety. A previously published written questionnaire was administered to 320 1st- and 2nd-year Bouyei college learners in three main fields of study at five colleges of two levels in south and southwest areas of Guizhou Province, China. Ten interview questions were also conducted to 25 interviewees randomly selected from these colleges. The results of the analysis show that the Chinese Bouyei college learners experienced medium level of FL classroom anxiety; there were significant differences between their FL classroom anxiety and the first three independent variables, but not the last; and twelve main causal factors were found contributive to their FL classroom anxiety, among which some are new or different from the findings of the previous studies. Discussion was made on the research findings and what the interviewees expected from the teachers, followed by implications and suggestions for FL instructors that might help enhance and facilitate students’ FL learning.

Jianhua Wei

2012-03-01

64

The Nature of Chinese Language Classroom Learning Environments in Singapore Secondary Schools  

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This article reports findings from a classroom environment study which was designed to investigate the nature of Chinese Language classroom environments in Singapore secondary schools. We used a perceptual instrument, the Chinese Language Classroom Environment Inventory, to investigate teachers' and students' perceptions towards their Chinese…

Chua, Siew Lian; Wong, Angela F. L.; Chen, Der-Thanq V.

2011-01-01

65

Probing EFL Students’ Language Skill Development in Tertiary Classrooms  

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Research in second or foreign language learning indicates that for adult learners, the improvement of one language skill facilitates the development of other skills. The purpose of this study was to in...

Hong Wang

2008-01-01

66

Empowering the Language Learner: Language Learning Strategy Training and Self-Regulation in an EFL Classroom  

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The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how an understanding of the Good Language Learner models described in the SLA literature can be used to tailor and implement a program of learning strategy training and self-regulatory practices in the classroom to empower L2 learners in an EFL context. The paper begins by reviewing the various…

Torres, Gabriella

2013-01-01

67

Speaking Correctly: Error Correction as a Language Socialization Practice in a Ukrainian Classroom  

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This study uses a language socialization approach to explore the role of Ukrainian language instruction in the revitalization of Ukrainian as the national language. Based on 10 months ethnographic observation and videotaping of classroom interaction in two fifth-grade Ukrainian language and literature classrooms, it focuses on corrective feedback…

Friedman, Debra A.

2010-01-01

68

Competing Desires and Realities: Language Policies in the French-Language Classroom  

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Full Text Available French language policy has historically centred on ways French can be considered a dominant and influential language. It has done this since the Middle Ages, by allowing the French language to serve as a political tool. On an international level, language was a way of subjugating conquered peoples (former colonies. It promoted France’s international status (by the 18th century French was the diplomatic language of Europe. On a national level, the French language was one of the ways governments were able to centralise political power (suppression of regional languages. One of the ways French language authorities have promoted the use of language has been through education policies and the way language is taught in schools. For example, the French language was imposed on the colonised territories of France through teaching in missionary schools. Within France, stringent laws were adopted, in particular during the nineteenth century, allowing the French language to replace local languages in schools. In France today, language policies continue to exist and to have an influence on the way we view language and society. One of the main priorities of French language policy is to protect the status of the national language in particular with respect to the increasing use of English as a global dominant language in areas such as science, technology, tourism, entertainment and the media (Nunan: 2007, 178. Consequently, France has adopted policies to respond to this linguistic climate. This has implications on the way the French language is taught both within France as well as outside of France. This paper will examine some of the policies and agencies created over recent years that affect the French language. It will also identify some of the consequences these policies have on the teaching of language. Finally it will argue that a space has been created within the language classroom that attempts to find a compromise between the language policies of the French government and the realities of spoken French in society.

Angela Giovanangeli

2009-03-01

69

Competing Desires and Realities: Language Policies in the French-Language Classroom  

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Full Text Available French language policy has historically centred on ways French can be considered a dominant and influential language. It has done this since the Middle Ages, by allowing the French language to serve as a political tool. On an international level, language was a way of subjugating conquered peoples (former colonies. It promoted France’s international status (by the 18th century French was the diplomatic language of Europe. On a national level, the French language was one of the ways governments were able to centralise political power (suppression of regional languages. One of the ways French language authorities have promoted the use of language has been through education policies and the way language is taught in schools. For example, the French language was imposed on the colonised territories of France through teaching in missionary schools. Within France, stringent laws were adopted, in particular during the nineteenth century, allowing the French language to replace local languages in schools. In France today, language policies continue to exist and to have an influence on the way we view language and society. One of the main priorities of French language policy is to protect the status of the national language in particular with respect to the increasing use of English as a global dominant language in areas such as science, technology, tourism, entertainment and the media (Nunan: 2007, 178. Consequently, France has adopted policies to respond to this linguistic climate. This has implications on the way the French language is taught both within France as well as outside of France. This paper will examine some of the policies and agencies created over recent years that affect the French language. It will also identify some of the consequences these policies have on the teaching of language. Finally it will argue that a space has been created within the language classroom that attempts to find a compromise between the language policies of the French government and the realities of spoken French in society.

Angela Giovanangeli

2009-08-01

70

Heritage Learners in the Chinese Language Classroom: Home Background  

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Studies from information-processing and language comprehension research have reported that background knowledge facilitates reading and writing. By comparing Chinese language development of heritage students who had home background in Chinese language and culture with those who did not, this study found that heritage learners did significantly…

Xiao, Yun

2006-01-01

71

Learnables in Action : The Embodied Achievement of Opportunities for Teaching and Learning in Swedish as a Second Language Classrooms  

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This doctoral dissertation is an empirical qualitative research study on the emergence of learnables in classrooms of Swedish as a second language. It adopts a dialogical and praxeological approach, and analysis is based on video recorded teacher-student interactivities in classrooms. Learnables are taken to be linguistic items or constructs that are displayed as unknown by students, or problematized by students or teachers, and therefore oriented to as explainable, remediable, or improvable....

Majlesi, Ali Reza

2014-01-01

72

Making Culture Happen in the English Language Classroom  

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Full Text Available The issue of introducing the target culture into language classroom practice has long been an object of debates as well as the opinions of the learners towards it. Eventually, modern practitioners found a way of having the language learners acquainted with the target culture and introducing culture through culture-based textbook activities. However, the issue of additional culturally-oriented activities in improving students learning habits is questionable today. The purpose of this paper is to examine their effect and to investigate the attitudes of students towards language teaching and learning through culture-based activities (games, role plays, dialogues, video clips, discussions and comparisons of local and target cultures. The paper presents the results of the study conducted in one of the top universities of Kazakhstan throughout the spring semester of the 2012 academic year. Eighty students of different cultural backgrounds took part in the study. The activities for the experimental groups were modified according the tasks in each unit of one of the contemporary textbooks used in General English lessons. These activities varied from warm-ups to homework tasks in the units accordingly. The results suggest that practice of the various culture-based tasks and exercises helped the students to improve their communicative and linguistic competences in English. The results obtained from this study also offer insights into how culture-based activities can be used to develop and enhance not only students’ language skills but also their awareness of various culture-sensitive issues.

Yakup Doganay

2013-09-01

73

Supporting English Language Learners' Reading in the Science Classroom  

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It may seem obvious that students with limited reading skills also have limited educational opportunities. Students acquiring English as their second, non-native language--presently referred to as English Language Learners (ELLs)--face this obstacle. Fortunately, a body of research has emerged that provides specific techniques for supporting and…

Corder, Greg

2007-01-01

74

Language Choices in the Intercultural Classroom: Considering Possibilities for Communication and Learning  

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Intercultural language learning gives a place to the use of both the target language and the learners' first and/or other language(s). There is a need to develop a balance, however, as each language contributes differently to learning. The purpose of thinking about language use in the classroom is to develop an informed approach to using as much…

Liddicoat, Anthony J.

2008-01-01

75

Bridging discourses in the ESL classroom students, teachers and researchers  

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Bridging Discourses in the ESL Classroom examines the interactions between learners and teachers in the language classroom. It aims to identify patterns of discourse which enable second language development but also support the learning of curriculum knowledge. These patterns are 'bridging discourses' in that they combine the everyday language used by the student, with the specialised language of the academic register. This book puts forward an innovative new theory of classroom discourse analysis, influenced by the work of Halliday and Vygotsky. It is recommended for academics and postgraduat

Gibbons, Pauline

2006-01-01

76

Probing EFL Students’ Language Skill Development in Tertiary Classrooms  

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language: EN-CA; mso-fareast-language: EN-US;" lang="EN-CA">Research in second or foreign language learning indicates that for adult learners, the improvement of one language skill facilitates the development of other skills. The purpose of th...

Hong Wang

2009-01-01

77

English-Only Language-in-Education Policy in Multilingual Classrooms in Ghana  

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This paper, based on the findings of a qualitative study, discusses the influence of Ghana's recently introduced English-only language-in-education policy on pupils' classroom communicative practices and learning generally. It highlights how the use of English--an unfamiliar language--creates anxiety among students and stalls effective classroom

Opoku-Amankwa, Kwasi

2009-01-01

78

More Thoughts on the Usefulness of Tasks in the Multi-Level Language Classroom  

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The issue of multi-level classrooms and of the increasingly differentiated nature of students' learning experiences continues to be a major challenge for language teachers. It's safe to say that wherever two or more language teachers are gathered together, the "problem" of multi-level classrooms will figure somewhere in the conversation. Working…

Carr, Jo

2005-01-01

79

Metacognition Training in the Chinese University Classroom: An Action Research Study  

Science.gov (United States)

In the author's previous teaching English as a foreign language (TEFL) experience, he had found that Chinese university students were overdependent on teachers in EFL learning. Drawing on research on language learning strategies, he used metacognition training (MT) as a form of classroom intervention to promote learner autonomy. This article…

Jing, Huang

2005-01-01

80

Behavioral Problems in the Classroom and Underlying Language Difficulties  

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Dealing with the behavioral problems of students is one of many dimensions of most educators’ and schools’ requirements. While research has repeatedly shown that a large number of children with behavior problems have underlying, unrecognized language difficulties, few schools have implemented programs where children with problem behavior are evaluated in terms of these skills. This paper provides information to teachers about (1) the links between behavior and language, (2) the levels ...

Jodi Tommerdahl; Peggy Semingson

2013-01-01

 
 
 
 
81

When language policy and pedagogy conflict: pupils’ and educators’ ‘practiced language policies’ in an English-medium kindergarten classroom in Greece  

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An international school (BES) in Greece, overwhelmingly attended by Greek origin children, has adopted, as its language policy, English as the ‘official’ medium of interaction, including in the Reception classroom, the target of this research. That is, through its language policy, the school aims to promote the learning and use of English throughout school. At the same time, the school has adopted ‘free interaction’ in designated play areas as its pedagogical approach. ...

Papageorgiou, Ifigenia

2012-01-01

82

The benefits of management and organisation: a case study in young language learners’ classrooms  

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This study focuses on primary language education within a Greek region: specifically, on the positive effects of classroom management and organisation on a student-centred approach of teaching. In the case of the Greek education system, language teachers are encouraged to adopt student-centred approaches in their classroom but have not received any guidance on how to do so. Language educators are reluctant to abandon their teacher-centred ways, because they have not been trained to apply clas...

Giannikas, Christina Nicole

2013-01-01

83

Cooperation in the Classroom : Experimenting with Research Joint Ventures  

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This paper describes a classroom exercise that illustrates the investment incentives facing firms when technological spillovers are present. The game involves two stages in which student ?sellers? first make investment decisions then production decisions. The classroom game can be used to motivate discussions of research joint ventures, the free-rider problem, collusion, and antitrust policy regarding research and development.

Goeree, Michelle S.; Hinloopen, Jeroen

2004-01-01

84

Language Awareness in Language Learning and Teaching: A Research Agenda  

Science.gov (United States)

Following on from my state-of-the-art article on "Language Awareness and language learning" (Svalberg 2007), in this paper I will discuss specific research tasks which are centrally concerned with different aspects of language awareness (LA): "explicit knowledge about language, and conscious perception and sensitivity in language learning,…

Svalberg, Agneta M.-L.

2012-01-01

85

The Chinese Bouyei College Students’ Classroom Anxiety in Foreign Language Learning: A Survey Study  

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This survey study aims to investigate the level of the Chinese Bouyei college students’ general foreign language (FL) classroom anxiety, the relationships between their FL classroom anxiety and the four independent variables, gender, major field of study, level of academic year, and level of college, and possible causal factors contributive to their FL classroom anxiety. A previously published written questionnaire was administered to 320 1st- and 2nd-year Bouyei college learners in three m...

Jianhua Wei; Butsakorn Yodkamlue

2012-01-01

86

Research and Reflective Practice in the ESL Classroom: Voices from Sri Lanka  

Science.gov (United States)

Modern language education favours the model of a reflective teacher-researcher who is engaged in both individual and collaborative curriculum revision and teaching-learning environment improvement. The present paper addresses the issue of classroom research and reflective practice in current ESL pedagogy and teacher professional development. The…

Cirocki, Andrzej; Tennekoon, Sujeewa; Calvo, Alicia Pena

2014-01-01

87

Elementary English Language Instruction: Colombian Teachers’ Classroom Practices  

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Full Text Available An in-progress ethnographic research project about teachers who are facing the complex task of teaching English to children in 7 public elementary schools in the metropolitan area of Medellin is presented in this article. First, the need for this research is outlined by researchers; second, the methodology of the project is described; third, up-to-date findings which include a profile of the 12 teachers who are participating in this study, and an analysis of their class methodology in terms of activities, materials, teacher and student roles are reported. Lastly, implications of this research project related to early foreign language instruction are highlighted. Key words: Public Elementary-English-Language Instruction, English-Foreign Language, Ethnography-Research-Method, Teaching-Methodology Este artículo presenta los resultados preliminares de una investigación etnográfica acerca de las estrategias metodológicas utilizadas por profesores de básica primaria que enseñan inglés como lengua extranjera en 7 escuelas públicas del área metropolitana del municipio de Medellín. En la primera parte se resalta la importancia de esta investigación en nuestro medio y en la segunda, de los 12 profesores participantes y un análisis de la metodología empleada por ellos con respecto a las actividades de clase, los materiales y el rol del estudiante y del profesor. Finalmente, se discuten algunas de las implicaciones de este proyecto de investigación en la enseñanza de lenguas extranjeras a niños. Palabras claves: Inglés-Enseñanza-Básica Primaria, Lengua Extranjera-Inglés, Estudio Etnográfico-Investigación, Enseñanza-Metodología

Cadavid Múnera Isabel Cristina

2004-08-01

88

Students' Social Positioning in the Language Classroom: Implications for Interaction  

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This paper outlines some findings of a three-month investigation into the effects of students' interpersonal relationships on communication in two EFL classrooms in a Japanese university. Data was collected to identify and describe the various social subgroups that existed within the classes, and samples of classroom discourse were then analysed…

Stone, Paul; Kidd, Andrew

2011-01-01

89

Connecting Science and Literacy in the Classroom: Using Space and Earth Science to Support Language Arts  

Science.gov (United States)

The connections between science and literacy in the classroom have received increasing attention over the last two decades, as more and more evidence demonstrates that science provides an exciting vehicle in which to engage students on the path to literacy improvement. Combining literacy with science allows students to creatively explore the world or universe, and it. Combining science and literacy improves both reading and science scores, and increases students’ interest in science. At a time when over 40% of students beyond the 5th grade are reading two or more levels below grade level and are struggling with their current materials, finding ways to excite and engage them in the reading process is key. Literacy programs incorporating unique space science content can help prepare children for standardized language arts tests. It also engages our nation’s youngest learners and their teachers with the science, math, and technology of exploration in a language arts format. This session focuses on programs and products that bring the excitement of earth and space science into the literacy classroom, with a focus on research-based approached to combining science and language arts. Reading, Writing and Rings! Grades 1-2

Wessen, A. S.; Cobabe-Ammann, E. A.

2009-12-01

90

The Relationship between Language Learners’ Anxiety and Learning Strategy in the CLT Classrooms  

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Full Text Available This paper intends to explore how Taiwanese students perceive the relationship between their language learning strategy and anxiety in the foreign language classroom. Due to their previous learning experience, most of the participants hold an unfavorable attitude toward a grammar-translation teaching approach. Consequently, learner-centered instruction has been widely accepted and acknowledged as a welcome concept and feasible teaching approach in the English Foreign Language (EFL context. To improve the proficiency of language learners in EFL classrooms, it is very important to take into account the need of the learners. The present study utilizes Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS and Communicative Language Teaching Attitude Scale (COLTAS to examine the participants’ perceptions about learning English. The results indicate that most of the participants express a favorable attitude toward the Communicative Language Teaching (CLT approach; however, they also reveal their high level of anxiety in the language classroom. Language anxiety is usually reported to have adverse effects on the learning of a second language. It is the language instructors’ mission to accelerate the language learning of their students. One way is to teach students how to learn more effectively and efficiently. Language learning strategies (LLS are procedures that learners can use to facilitate learning. Both teachers and students should develop an awareness of the learning process and strategies that lead to success. The ultimate goal of this paper is to analyze the factors that affect the participants’ learning strategies and their language anxiety, and offer some pedagogical suggestions.

Kun-huei Wu

2010-01-01

91

Classroom Has a Heart: Teachers and Students Affective Alignment in a Persian Heritage Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This research study investigated how the teachers and students at a Persian heritage language class acknowledged and modified their affective behavior based on the affective feedback they received from one another. The notion that interactants can modify their affective output in such fashion is referred in the literature as affective alignment…

Atoofi, Saeid

2013-01-01

92

Classroom Dialogue: A Systematic Review across Four Decades of Research  

Science.gov (United States)

Recognizing that empirical research into classroom dialogue has been conducted for about 40?years, a review is reported of 225 studies published between 1972 and 2011. The studies were identified through systematic search of electronic databases and scrutiny of publication reference lists. They focus on classroom dialogue in primary and secondary…

Howe, Christine; Abedin, Manzoorul

2013-01-01

93

Assessment practices in the English language classroom of Greek Junior High School  

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Full Text Available The present study aimed to compare teacher and student perceptions concerning assessment in the English language classroom of Greek Junior High Schools. It focuses on exploring teacher assessment practices and students’ view of these. The degree of agreement between teacher and student views can affect the results of instruction and learning. The central finding of the study was that English language teachers follow an approach that keeps a balance between the requirements of the Cross-Thematic Curriculum (DEPPS for performance assessment and the official specifications which define final achievement tests. Students understand the purpose of assessment and the importance of attitudes towards learning and have a clear picture of methods and tasks used for their assessment. On the basis of these research findings, a series of suggestions about teachers and teacher trainers are put forward, focusing on teacher professional development, which, in turn, will promote student involvement and responsibility for learning.

Stavroula Vlanti

2012-02-01

94

Research for the Classroom: Analyzing Classroom Literacy Events--What Observing Classroom Conversations about Popular Culture Can Reveal about Reading  

Science.gov (United States)

Ms. Mayer, a recently retired English language arts teacher, frequently used strategies described in John Golden's book "Reading in the Dark: Using Film as a Tool in the English Classroom." In this book, Golden suggests that ELA teachers "reverse the order: use a film clip to practice the reading and analytical skills that we want our students to…

Garland, Kathy

2012-01-01

95

Classroom Currents: Interrupting the Single Story: LGBT Issues in the Language Arts Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Two literacy leaders acknowledge the challenges of teaching LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) issues in the classroom. While children come from a variety of family structures, it is necessary to acknowledge that a gay individual was once a child sitting in a classroom. An argument against marginalization and an advocacy for inclusion of…

Hermann-Wilmarth, Jill; Ryan, Caitlin L.

2013-01-01

96

Aida and Her Mainstream Classroom: A Case Study of a Young English Language Learner's Literacy Development  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This article reports a nine-month study of literacy development of Aida, a young English language learner from Indonesia, who was mainstreamed in a Grade 2 classroom in a primary school in the south-eastern part of Australia. This article initially reviews the literature concerning features of the mainstream classroom conducive for second language learning and for literacy development. Following the presentation of methodological issues, it examines English learning activities in Aida's class...

2003-01-01

97

A Case Study on the Influence of Organizational Culture on Language Classroom  

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Full Text Available This paper tries to probe the influence of the organizational culture on language classroom at a newly-established local college. It firstly reviews the knowledge of the organizational culture and finds out its features, and then discusses how the organizational culture was greatly influenced by the host educational environment. On the basis of this, the paper interprets how organizational culture in turn influences the classroom culture in terms of English language teaching and learning in China.

Zhihui Liu

2009-07-01

98

Meaning-Making as Dialogic Process: Official and Carnival Lives in the Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This article adopts a Bakhtinian analysis to understand the complexities of discourse in language-learning classrooms. Drawing on empirical data from two of four linked case studies in a larger, ESRC-funded project, we argue that students learning in complementary (also known as community language, supplementary, or heritage language) schools…

Blackledge, Adrian; Creese, Angela

2009-01-01

99

Aida and Her Mainstream Classroom: A Case Study of a Young English Language Learner's Literacy Development  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article reports a nine-month study of literacy development of Aida, a young English language learner from Indonesia, who was mainstreamed in a Grade 2 classroom in a primary school in the south-eastern part of Australia. This article initially reviews the literature concerning features of the mainstream classroom conducive for second language learning and for literacy development. Following the presentation of methodological issues, it examines English learning activities in Aida's classroom and highlights her literacy development with examples of her work. The results from this study show that Aida developed literacy skills considered important for her second language and learning development. The variety of English learning activities and the encouraging environment in her classroom contributed much to her literacy development.

Bambang Yudi Cahyono

2003-01-01

100

Networking Antarctic Research Discoveries to a Science Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

In 2006, a unique scenario transported eighth-grade Earth science students from the classroom into the cold, dry, pristine surroundings of Antarctica. The mission was to expose the students to hands-on science using satellite telephones, Contact 3.0 software, and some very creative improvisation. In addition, a detailed, well-illustrated blog allowed students to follow along interactively with a research team from the local university conducting research in the western Dry Valleys of the Transantarctic Mountains. Two explicit goals of the project were to (1) promote inquiry-based learning in the classroom and (2) enhance creative thinking and problem-solving skills in the classroom.

Podoll, Andrew; Olson, Barry; Comez, Dogan; Schwert, Donald; Mcvicar, Kim; Montplaisir, Lisa

2008-10-01

 
 
 
 
101

Language Use in Classrooms in Western Samoan Schools.  

Science.gov (United States)

To inform discussions of revising the curriculum of junior secondary schools in Western Samoa, a series of structured observations of classrooms was conducted. Data from 145 classes, covering Business/Commercial Studies, English Home Economics, Manual Arts, Mathematics, Samoan Studies, Science and Social Science, were analyzed. With the exception…

Lo Bianco, Joseph; Liddicoat, Anthony

1991-01-01

102

O processo de conscientização na sala de aula de língua espanhola = The awareness process in a Spanish language classroom  

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Full Text Available Este artigo trata do processo de conscientização desenvolvido pelos alunos em uma sala de aula de espanhol como língua estrangeira de um Centro de Estudos de Línguas do interior do Estado de São Paulo. Considerou-se como arcabouço teórico a pedagogia freireana (FREIRE, 1980, 1984, 1987, 1999, 2000 além de autoras que tiveram como referencial teórico Paulo Freire e relacionaram sua pedagogia ao ensino de línguas estrangeiras (WALLERSTEIN, 1983; SCHLEPPEGRELL, 1997. É uma pesquisa de natureza qualitativa, que focalizou uma prática de pesquisa-ação em uma sala de aula de espanhol, na qual se implementou um planejamento freireano, para verificar como se dava o uso da língua-alvo na sala de aula (MENEGHINI, 2001. Com a análise e a discussão dos dados, realizadas por meio da triangulação desses dados, considerando-se como dados primários as interações em sala de aula, constata-se que as tarefas problematizadoras são o meio para o desenvolvimento da conscientização por parte dos alunos sobre a realidade que os cerca.This article discusses the awareness process of students in a Spanish as a foreign language classroom, at a Centre of Language Studies in a city in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The frame of reference is Paulo Freire’s pedagogy (FREIRE, 1980, 1984, 1987, 1999, 2000, Wallerstein (1983 and Schleppegrell (1997’s investigations which are important to the comprehension of the relation between Freirean’s pedagogy and the language teaching. This is a qualitative research and it focuses on action research practice in a Spanish language classroom, in which a syllabus based on Paulo Freire’s pedagogy was implemented in order to verify how the target language was used in the classroom (MENEGHINI, 2001. Data analysis and discussion are based on data triangulation and classroom interactions are taken on primary data. The implementation of this research suggests that the problem posing tasks on themes chosen from the student's realities are the way which leads to the awareness.

Carla Mayumi Meneghini

2013-02-01

103

RESEARCH ON LANGUAGE AND LEARNING: IMPLICATIONS FOR LANGUAGE TEACHING  

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Full Text Available Taking into account severa1 limitations of communicative language teaching (CLT, this paper calls for the need to consider research on language use and learning through communication as a basis for language teaching. It will be argued that a reflective approach towards language teaching and learning might be generated, which is explained in terms of the need to develop a context-sensitive pedagogy and in terms of teachers' and learners' development.

Eva Alcón

2004-06-01

104

RESEARCH ON LANGUAGE AND LEARNING: IMPLICATIONS FOR LANGUAGE TEACHING  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Taking into account severa1 limitations of communicative language teaching (CLT), this paper calls for the need to consider research on language use and learning through communication as a basis for language teaching. It will be argued that a reflective approach towards language teaching and learning might be generated, which is explained in terms of the need to develop a context-sensitive pedagogy and in terms of teachers' and learners' development.

2004-01-01

105

"Ma Sha Allah!" Creating Community through Humor Practices in a Diverse Arabic Language Flagship Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Drawing on Lave and Wenger's (1991) and Wenger's (1998) "communities of practice" (CoP) framework, this study explores the shared repertoire of humor practices in the creation of community within the context of a culturally diverse and multilevel adult Arabic language classroom consisting of two native speakers, five heritage language learners…

Hillman, Sara Katherine

2011-01-01

106

Sign Language Use and the Appreciation of Diversity in Hearing Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

This article is the result of a year-long study into the effects of sign language use on participation in one mainstream preschool setting. Observations and interviews were the primary data-collection tools used during this investigation. This article focuses on how the use of sign language in the classroom affected the learning community's…

Brereton, Amy

2008-01-01

107

Preschool Classroom Conversations as Long-Term Resources for Second Language and Literacy Acquisition  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated relations between preschool talk exposure and immigrant first graders' second language literacy and oral skills outcomes. Participants in the study were 25 children with Turkish as their first language and Norwegian as their second, attending various multilingual and ethnically diverse preschool classrooms in Norway and…

Aukrust, Vibeke Grover; Rydland, Veslemoy

2011-01-01

108

"Rewind and Replay:" Changing Teachers' Heterosexist Language to Create an Inclusive Classroom Environment  

Science.gov (United States)

Objectives: By completing the "Rewind and Replay" activity, participants will: (1) identify heterosexist language in common classroom interactions, (2) discuss underlying heterosexist assumptions embedded in common teacher statements, (3) brainstorm inclusive terms and expressions for use in place of heterosexist language, and (4) verbally…

Klein, Nicole Aydt; Markowitz, Linda

2009-01-01

109

Valuing the Collaborative, Language-Centered Classroom: What Theorists and Teachers Tell Us.  

Science.gov (United States)

Educators at all levels are increasingly being told that classrooms should be places where students are guided through processes of critical inquiry, work collaboratively, and use both written and oral languages as tools for learning. The value of a collaborative, language-centered approach to teaching and learning can be demonstrated by drawing…

Rosen, Lois Matz

110

Seeing what we do : observation in the language classroom  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Two elements emerging from curriculum innovation at a national level in both Spain and the UK are quality assurance (accountability), and teacher development within schools. Both of these are linked in proposals for appraisal schemes, in which teachers' classroom performance is observed. On the one hand summative evaluation of teacher performance is necessary for management decisions to do with in-service training, accountability to ministries and parents, and on the other, format...

Gilpin, Arlene

1992-01-01

111

ELICITING AND LADDERING PROSPECTIVE LANGUAGE TEACHERS’ CLASSROOM-RELATED CONSTRUCTS  

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This article has a dual aim. First, the author reports on how two techniques were used from personal construct psychology, dyadic elicitation and laddering (Fransella, Bell & Bannister, 2004:27-34, 39-43) to raise a cohort of prospective teachers’ awareness of their classroom-related constructs (N = 21). Second, the process for elicitation of the constructs depended on the trainees’ ability to deal with the cognitive and the...

Wilfred Greyling

2012-01-01

112

Gender and Language Education Research: A Review  

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Gender and language education studies have multiplied in the past one decade. However, it does not appear that any state-of-the-art article has reviewed the various undertakings. This paper attempts to fill this gap by focusing on gender representation in learning materials and classroom interaction studies globally within gender and education literature. Selected studies from the 70s to date are reviewed under three phases and suggestions for further investigation are made with the antici...

Mustapha, Abolaji S.

2013-01-01

113

Communicative Language Teaching in the Yemeni EFL Classroom: Embraced or Merely Lip-serviced?  

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This study examines Yemeni EFL teachers’ knowledge of the major principles of Communicative Language Teaching (henceforth, CLT) and their classroom subscription to these principles. The findings reveal that although these teachers are fairly knowledgeable of the principles of CLT, their classroom behavior does not always reflect this knowledge, which is most evident in their tendency to resort to structure-based practices. The authors conclude with a number of recommendations and pedago...

Rula Fahmi Bataineh; Ruba Fahmi Bataineh; Samiha Saif Thabet

2011-01-01

114

Communicative Language Teaching in the Yemeni EFL Classroom: Embraced or Merely Lip-serviced?  

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Full Text Available This study examines Yemeni EFL teachers’ knowledge of the major principles of Communicative Language Teaching (henceforth, CLT and their classroom subscription to these principles. The findings reveal that although these teachers are fairly knowledgeable of the principles of CLT, their classroom behavior does not always reflect this knowledge, which is most evident in their tendency to resort to structure-based practices. The authors conclude with a number of recommendations and pedagogical implications.

Ruba Fahmi Bataineh

2011-07-01

115

Differences between Language and Linguistic in the ELT Classroom  

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Full Text Available This paper attempts to present differences between language and linguistic. Language and linguistic are two different words but there is relationship between them. ‘Language’ is a sign system of humankind in order to communicate one’s thoughts, Feelings, and opinions to someone else but linguistic is scientific study of language. In fact the goal of linguistic is to describe languages and to explain the unaware knowledge all speakers have about their language. Therefore, linguistics is a subject of study that is built on languages. Noam Chomsky (1957  argues that “Language is a set (finite or infinite of sentences, each finite in length, and constructed out of a finite set of elements” (p.13. According to Aronoff (2007 it is impossible to separate language from literature, or politics, or most of our everyday human interactions. "[Linguistics] has a twofold aim: to uncover general principles underlying human language, and to provide reliable descriptions of individual languages" (Aitchison, 1992. Also linguists, study individual human languages and linguistic behavior in order to discover the fundamental properties of this general human language.

Hajar Shahhoseiny

2013-12-01

116

"I've Got an Idea": A Social Semiotic Perspective on Agency in the Second Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper addresses the role of multimodal fluency in establishing agency in the second language classroom. The focus of the paper is on the semiotic resourcefulness of an English Language Learner in an English as a Second Language classroom in the United States. Framed from a social semiotic perspective, fine grained multimodal analysis of…

Pinnow, Rachel J.

2011-01-01

117

Sign Language: Meeting Diverse Needs in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

For a number of years, sign language has been used in special education settings for learners with disabilities. Children with hearing loss, autism, cognitive disabilities, and language disorders have demonstrated improved communication skills with the use of signs. Recently, however, teachers have begun to use sign language with typical learners…

Simpson, Cynthia G.; Lynch, Sharon A.

2007-01-01

118

Teaching and Learning Chinese: Heritage Language Classroom Discourse in Montreal  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper explores issues of teaching and learning Chinese as a heritage language in a Chinese heritage language school, the Zhonguo Saturday School, in Montreal, Quebec. With a student population of more than 1000, this school is the largest of the eight Chinese Heritage Language schools in Montreal. Students participating in this study were…

Curdt-Christiansen, Xiao Lan

2006-01-01

119

Classroom research in Environmental Engineering Courses- CREUPI: a feasible practice  

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Full Text Available Classroom research is a strategy that proposes linking teaching and research, thereby rendering teachers and students partners in the search for knowledge and combining theory and practice as allies in the educational process. This paper reports on classroom research experience in the subjects of Introduction to Environmental Engineering and Research Metodology, which are disciplines taught in CREUPI’s Environmental Engineering course. The conceptual and methological landmark achieved through this educational approach is discussed, analyzing the process involved in each discipline as well as the results derived from this practice.

Gerson Araújo de Medeiros

2004-06-01

120

Access to mathematics versus access to the language of power: the struggle in multilingual mathematics classrooms  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: English Abstract in english In this article I explore how teachers and learners position themselves in relation to use of language(s) in multilingual mathematics classrooms. I draw from two studies in multilingual mathematics classrooms in South Africa. The analysis presented shows that teachers and learners who position thems [...] elves in relation to English are concerned with access to social goods and positioned by the social and economic power of English. They do not focus on epistemological access but argue for English as the language of learning and teaching. In contrast, learners who position themselves in relation to mathematics and so epistemological access, reflect more contradictory discourses, including support for the use of the their home languages as languages of learning and teaching.

Mamokgethi, Setati.

 
 
 
 
121

The Relationship between Iranian ELT Instructors’ Beliefs about Language Teaching and Their Practices in Real Classrooms  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Teachers play different roles in multidimensional process of language teaching and their beliefs about language teaching might influence their practices. Donaghue (2003) stated that beliefs guide teachers in their practice. However, Argyris and Schon (1978) claimed that there is almost a discrepancy between teachers’ beliefs about language teaching and their practices in the classrooms. Therefore, the present study investigated the relationship between Iranian ELT instructors’ beliefs ...

Morteza Mellati; Mohammad Ali Fatemi; Khalil Motallebzadeh

2013-01-01

122

The role of background music in the English language classroom  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

According to the Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia, the interest in second language learning has been increasing in recent years. In the context of primary and secondary education in Slovenia, English language is prominent in the field of foreign languages. A quite similar picture can also be seen in the context of non-formal educational system for adults (http://www.stat.si).

Sorger, Anna

2014-01-01

123

Practical Techniques for Cultural-based Language Teaching in the EFL Classroom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present paper concerns itself with a study of the cultural-based language teaching issue, particularly with the issue of some practical techniques for teaching culture in the EFL classroom. We want to emphasize the importance of cultural acquisition in the study of language courses, and to present a range of practical techniques that have been found to be effective and successful in cultural-based courses and a few tips that can help to make the teaching of culture a better experience for both teachers and students. The purpose of this paper is to explore effective approaches of culture communication transmission in English classroom teaching.

Lili Dai

2011-09-01

124

Preparing Undergraduates for Research Careers: Using Astrobites in the Classroom  

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Because undergraduate participation in research is a longstanding and increasingly important aspect of the career path for future scientists, students can benefit from additional resources to introduce them to the culture and process of research. We suggest the adoption of the web resource Astrobites as a classroom tool to increase the preparation of undergraduate physics and astronomy students for careers in research. We describe the content and development of the website, discuss previous university courses that have made use of Astrobites, and suggest additional strategies for using Astrobites in the classroom.

Sanders, Nathan E; Newton, Elisabeth

2012-01-01

125

Access to mathematics versus access to the language of power: the struggle in multilingual mathematics classrooms  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this article I explore how teachers and learners position themselves in relation to use of language(s in multilingual mathematics classrooms. I draw from two studies in multilingual mathematics classrooms in South Africa. The analysis presented shows that teachers and learners who position themselves in relation to English are concerned with access to social goods and positioned by the social and economic power of English. They do not focus on epistemological access but argue for English as the language of learning and teaching. In contrast, learners who position themselves in relation to mathematics and so epistemological access, reflect more contradictory discourses, including support for the use of the their home languages as languages of learning and teaching.

Mamokgethi Setati

2008-02-01

126

Recent Research on Troublesome Classroom Behaviour: A Review  

Science.gov (United States)

A review is provided of recent research literature on the topic of troublesome classroom behaviour, published over the past decade or so with particular reference to research carried out in Australian schools. Nine Australian studies are reviewed, as well as a further seven from the USA, Hong Kong, Jordan, Greece and Malta. Seven of the studies…

Beaman, Robyn; Wheldall, Kevin; Kemp, Coral

2007-01-01

127

Classroom Research and Program Accountability: A Match Made in Heaven?  

Science.gov (United States)

Winthrop University (South Carolina) has linked classroom research with program accountability in its Learning Research Project, which focuses on general education. The pilot and implementation phases of the project are described, noting problems, frustrations, and rewards in each. The experiment has convinced administration and faculty that…

Tebo-Messina, Margaret; Van Aller, Chris

1998-01-01

128

Modeling the multidimensional structure of students’ foreign language competence within and between classrooms  

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Full Text Available Combining multilevel (ML analysis and multidimensional item response theory (MIRT provides a valuable method for analyzing data of educational assessments, where clustered data (e.g., students in classes and multidimensional constructs frequently occur. It allows to model multiple ability dimensions while simultaneously taking the hierarchical structure into account. The dimensional structure of students’ foreign language competence within and between classrooms was investigated by applying a ML-MIRT measurement model to data of N = 9,410 students in 427 classes who had answered three different subtests of English as a foreign language. Results were compared to a MIRT model not taking into account the multilevel structure. A markedly more differentiated correlation structure is found within classrooms compared with the between-classroom level and compared with the model without multilevel structure. Results show that by modeling the latent multilevel structure, estimation and interpretation of ability profiles can be possible even with highly correlated ability dimensions.

Johannes Hartig

2010-09-01

129

Diverse Voices in a Second Language Classroom: Burlesque, Parody, and Mimicry.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examines how students in a second language classroom deploy linguistic and cultural resources to both resist and appropriate aspects of the teachers' voices. A key episode is analyzed to show the nuances of students' ventriloquation of diverse voices to construct a complex social order and shifting strategic identities. (Author/VWL)

Hirst, Elizabeth

2003-01-01

130

Language Factors Associated with Achievement Grouping in Math Classrooms: A Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Study  

Science.gov (United States)

The study examines the effects of classroom achievement grouping (AG) practices on the early mathematics performance of language-minority students and compares their mathematics achievement to that of English-speaking majority students. Using a nationally representative database of the USA, both cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were done.…

Chang, Mido; Singh, Kusum; Filer, Kimberly

2009-01-01

131

Multimodal Representations of Identity in the English-as-an-Additional-Language Classroom in South Africa  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper explores the multimodal engagement of English-as-an-additional-language (EAL) students in a classroom in Johannesburg. Within a social semiotic framework, and using constructions of design and identity to understand the students' multimodal engagement, the paper argues that multimodal representations offer EAL students from…

Kajee, Leila

2011-01-01

132

If I Had a Hammer: Technology in the Language Arts Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes the computer as a hammer, a tool with unique qualities that allows people to perceive, manipulate, and express language in ways quite different from traditional media. Explores the tool of the multimedia presentation, a common use of technology in classrooms today. Describes a simple project with sixth graders that incorporates reading,…

Jester, Richard

2002-01-01

133

Improving the Classroom Language Proficiency of Non-Native Teachers of English: What and How?  

Science.gov (United States)

The present paper attempts to examine the possibilities of the Classroom Language Assessment Benchmark (CLAB) as a professional development tool for EFL teachers in Japan. Two questionnaire surveys were carried out several months after the last day of the graduate course (both in 2006 and 2007) where CLAB was used as a self- and peer-assessment…

Nakata, Yoshiyuki

2010-01-01

134

ICT and an Exploratory Pedagogy for Classroom-Based Chinese Language Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper reports on a new pedagogy for Chinese language teaching and learning at elementary schools through exploratory classroom instruction using Information and Communication Technologies. The study used quantitative method to collect data from two elementary schools of China. The results showed that: (1) the three-in-one pedagogy of…

Zhao, XingLong; Wang, MinJuan; Wu, Juan; He, KeKang

2011-01-01

135

Techniques for Using Humor and Fun in the Language Arts Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

The authors, former middle and high school English teachers, review the rationale for using humor and fun in the classroom and provide detailed descriptions for teaching practices and activities that confer enjoyment and learning for language arts students. Although fun activities, these methods foster vocabulary development, grammar instruction,…

Minchew, Sue S.; Hopper, Peggy F.

2008-01-01

136

Investigating foreign language anxiety in Iranian classrooms: The effect of gender  

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Full Text Available In an attempt to delve into the issue of affective variables related to language learning, the present study focuses on the influence of gender on learners' foreign language anxiety in the Iranian context. The objective of this case study is first to determine the extent to which Iranian EFL learners perceive foreign language anxiety in matched-gender and mixed-gender classrooms and second to see if there is any significant difference between the two types of the investigated classrooms. To this end, a 16 items self-reporting questionnaire with a five Likert-type scale was designed. The developed questionnaire was then given to 96 Iranian lower intermediate EFL learners to complete it. After analyzing the collected data, the findings indicated that mixed-gender classrooms can be considered as an anxiety-provoking teaching context in Iran, since the presence of the opposite gender in EFL classrooms was found to cause statistically significant amount of language anxiety among Iranian learners. The study also offers some context-specific pedagogical implications for Iranian EFL teachers and practitioners.

Mahmoodzadeh, Masoud

2013-01-01

137

Classroom-based language efficiency assessment: a challenge for EFL teachers  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper attempts to highlight the significant multidimensional role of teachers of English as a foreign language in conducting language assessment in the process of teaching. The study presented in the article aimed to investigate school and university EFL teachers’ (n=87) beliefs about the place of assessment in their teaching practice and their role as assessors. The findings indicated that classroom assessment, though appreciated by the study participants, posed a major challenge to t...

Wach, Aleksandra

2012-01-01

138

Assessment practices in the English language classroom of Greek Junior High School  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The present study aimed to compare teacher and student perceptions concerning assessment in the English language classroom of Greek Junior High Schools. It focuses on exploring teacher assessment practices and students’ view of these. The degree of agreement between teacher and student views can affect the results of instruction and learning. The central finding of the study was that English language teachers follow an approach that keeps a balance between the requirements of the Cross-Them...

2012-01-01

139

The Intersection of Inquiry-Based Science and Language: Preparing Teachers for ELL Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

As teacher educators, we are tasked with preparing prospective teachers to enter a field that has undergone significant changes in student population and policy since we were K-12 teachers. With the emphasis placed on connections, mathematics integration, and communication by the New Generation Science Standards (NGSS) (Achieve in Next generation science standards, 2012), more research is needed on how teachers can accomplish this integration (Bunch in Rev Res Educ 37:298-341, 2013; Lee et al. in Educ Res 42(4):223-233, 2013). Science teacher educators, in response to the NGSS, recognize that it is necessary for pre-service and in-service teachers to know more about how instructional strategies in language and science can complement one another. Our purpose in this study was to explore a model of integration that can be used in classrooms. To do this, we examined the change in science content knowledge and academic vocabulary for English language learners (ELLs) as they engaged in inquiry-based science experience utilizing the 5R Instructional Model. Two units, erosion and wind turbines, were developed using the 5R Instructional Model and taught during two different years in a summer school program for ELLs. We analyzed data from interviews to assess change in conceptual understanding and science academic vocabulary over the 60 h of instruction. The statistics show a clear trend of growth supporting our claim that ELLs did construct more sophisticated understanding of the topics and use more language to communicate their knowledge. As science teacher educators seek ways to prepare elementary teachers to help preK-12 students to learn science and develop the language of science, the 5R Instructional Model is one pathway.

Weinburgh, Molly; Silva, Cecilia; Smith, Kathy Horak; Groulx, Judy; Nettles, Jenesta

2014-05-01

140

A Case Study on the Influence of Organizational Culture on Language Classroom  

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language: ZH-CN; mso-fareast-font-family: ??; mso-ansi-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA;" lang="EN-US">This paper tries to probe the influence of the organizational culture on language classroom at a newly-established local college. It firstly reviews the knowledge of the organizational culture and finds out its features, and then discusses how the organizational culture was gr...

Zhihui Liu

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
141

Suggestopedia and Memory Training in the Foreign Language Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Based on observations made in Bulgaria in the 1970s, it is proposed that the original version of Suggestopedia for second language training, used in Bulgaria and other Eastern European countries in the late 1960s and early 1970s, differs significantly from the techniques developed later, in particular in concentration on and memorization of…

Bancroft, W. Jane

142

SELF-POLICING IN THE ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM  

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Full Text Available The present study explores how classroom participants invoke a monolingual target-language policy in an English as a foreign language (EFL classroom, specifically focusing on one method of doing language policy through self-initiated language policing sequences, which I have called self-policing. Language policing refers to the mechanism deployed by the teacher and/or the pupils to (re-establish the normatively prescribed medium of classroom interaction (Amir & Musk, 2013; cf. Bonacina & Gafaranga, 2011. The data comes from sequential analyses of 20 hours of video recordings in grades 8 & 9 of an international compulsory school in Sweden between the years 2007-2010. Drawing on Auer (1984 and Gafaranga’s (1999 organisational code-switching framework, this study sheds light on how teachers and pupils self-initiate a switch to English in their interactions. As will be demonstrated, both teachers and pupils, while orienting to the English-only norm, use a three-step sequence for language policing.

Alia AMIR

2013-10-01

143

ELT Teacher Trainees' Attitudes towards Environmental Education and Their Tendency to Use It in the Language Classroom  

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With the change of focus in language teaching from grammar-based approaches to more communicative approaches, contextual language learning gained importance and found body in the English Language classroom. Global issues constitute one of the most popular contexts for purposeful language learning and meaningful language use. Increasing number of…

Gursoy, Esim; Saglam, Gulderen T.

2011-01-01

144

The relevance of body language to evolution of language research  

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The heterogeneous category of phenomena covered by the term body language (roughly equivalent to nonverbal communication, NVC), although essential to human day-to-day communication, is also largely dissociable from human verbal behaviour. As such, it has received little attention in the area of evolution of language research. In this paper we point to an important factor – signal reliability (honesty) as an elementary constraint on communication as an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) ?...

Wacewicz, S?awomir; Z?ywiczyn?ski, Przemys?aw

2010-01-01

145

Research Ethics in Sign Language Communities  

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Codes of ethics exist for most professional associations whose members do research on, for, or with sign language communities. However, these ethical codes are silent regarding the need to frame research ethics from a cultural standpoint, an issue of particular salience for sign language communities. Scholars who write from the perspective of…

Harris, Raychelle; Holmes, Heidi M.; Mertens, Donna M.

2009-01-01

146

``Science Talks'' in Kindergarten Classrooms: Improving Classroom Practice Through Collaborative Action Research  

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In this study we described an action research project enacted by a veteran Kindergarten teacher (Sarah) in the context of a professional development program. Over the course of a year, Sarah collaborated with other teachers in a small group to investigate how to use “Science Talks” to promote student learning in Kindergarten classrooms. A Problem-Based Learning approach was adopted to guide the collaborative action research. Based on a rich set of data sources, we concluded that Sarah’s action research improved student learning and led to her own professional growth. We also identified important conditions in support of action research.

Zhang, Meilan; Passalacqua, Susan; Lundeberg, Mary; Koehler, Matthew J.; Eberhardt, Jan; Parker, Joyce; Urban-Lurain, Mark; Zhang, Tianyi; Paik, Sunhee

2010-03-01

147

A Classroom Research Study on Oral Error Correction  

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This study has the main objective to present the findings of a small-scale classroom research carried out to collect data about my spoken error correction behaviors by means of self-observation. With this study, I aimed to analyze how and which spoken errors I corrected during a specific activity in a beginner's class. I used Lyster and Ranta's…

Coskun, Abdullah

2010-01-01

148

Competing Desires and Realities: Language Policies in the French-Language Classroom  

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French language policy has historically centred on ways French can be considered a dominant and influential language. It has done this since the Middle Ages, by allowing the French language to serve as a political tool. On an international level, language was a way of subjugating conquered peoples (former colonies). It promoted France’s international status (by the 18th century French was the diplomatic language of Europe). On a national level, the French language was one of the ways govern...

2009-01-01

149

Conceptualizing Humanistic Competence in the Language Classroom by TJP - A Chinese Case  

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Full Text Available As learning is seen to be a social process as well as an intellectual activity in which teachers work in active partnership with students, “Teaching by Joint Presentation” (TJP project sought to investigate what a humanistic concept of teacher-student joint presentation and critical inquiry can evoke in the language classroom within Chinese context. 289 college English literature learning students and 87 in-service secondary school teachers have participated in this study. The findings articulated a series of multifaceted differences concerning with students’ learning aspiration and competence, together with the complexities of teaching methods in a humanistic language classroom. The results indicate that humanistic ideal does increase students’ learning competence of critical insight, independent thought and reflective analysis. The study provides insights into humanistic competence growth of Chinese college language students based on empirical evidence.

Ling Zhang

2010-10-01

150

Human Subjects Research and the Physics Classroom  

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Physics Education Research is a form of social science research in that it uses human subjects. As physicists we need to be aware of the ethical and legal ramifications of performing this research, taking into account the fundamental differences between working with substances and working with people. For several decades, the federal government…

Kubitskey, Beth W.; Thomsen, Marshall

2012-01-01

151

How can I use Irish language e-portfolios in the assessment for learning approach in my primary classroom?  

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This paper investigates the process of assessment for learning (AfL) in the primary school Irish language classroom. Electronic portfolios (e-portfolios) are used as a tool in assessment for learning with eight of my second class pupils in an urban primary school in North Dublin. This research was carried out as part of the Master of Science in Education and Training Management (e-learning strand) at Dublin City University and was supervised by Dr. Margaret Farren. Some strategies from the li...

2009-01-01

152

The Relationship between Language Learners’ Anxiety and Learning Strategy in the CLT Classrooms  

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language: ZH-TW;" lang="EN-US">This paper intends to explore how Taiwanese students perceive the relationship between their language learning strategy and anxiety in the foreign language classroom. Due to their previous learning experience, most of the parti...

Kun-huei Wu

2010-01-01

153

Online Publication Enhances Integration of Current Research in the Classroom  

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Integrating current research materials and issues into graduate courses provides students with exposure to emerging concepts and methods. New online journal formats that allow authors to include raw data and model code provide a unique opportunity to bring current research into the classroom. We developed a graduate-level landscape ecology assignment using data and code provided as appendices to an article in Conservation Ecology. Our assignment required students to engage actively with the p...

Ashton Drew, C.; Hess, George R.

2003-01-01

154

Research on College Teachers’ Politeness Strategies in EFL Classrooms  

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Politeness is a common phenomenon in any society. Thus conventions of politeness vary from culture to culture. How people value politeness or show politeness is influenced by many factors such as age, gender, knowledge level, or social status or power. In this research, we deal with politeness in China EFL classrooms. Based on Brown and Levinson’s Face Theory and applying a series of research methods like class observation, survey questionnaires and semi-structured interviews in a case ...

Liu Peng; Lingling Cai; Xianjun Tan

2012-01-01

155

How to Ensure Ethicality of Action Research in the Classroom?  

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During the past few years, child research has increased both when it comes to various disciplines and various methods. The

purpose of this article is to discuss those common, special ethical viewpoints that the researcher has to take into

consideration when conducting action research in the classroom. The article is based on the teacher-researcher’s action

research which was carried out among 7-9-year-old pupils (N=21). The purp...

Eeva-Liisa Peltokorpi; Kaarina Määttä; Satu Uusiautti

2012-01-01

156

Children's Literature in Traditional Arab Classrooms for Teaching English as a Foreign Language  

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Full Text Available This research has shown that the use of authentic children’s literature is an effective and motivating ESL classroom strategy. However, this study investigated the use of children’s stories in EFL elementary classrooms where the teaching methods are very traditional and the resources are limited. This study was carried out in an elementary school in an Arab town in Israel. Approximately a hundred fifth and sixth grade pupils filled in a questionnaire expressing their attitudes towards being taught through stories. Teacher trainees taught the classes, wrote reflections, filled in questionnaires and were observed by the researchers. This information has been collected and served as the data for the study. Results suggest that the use of this strategy is very positive and should be carefully considered by EFL teachers, EFL trainees and teacher educators.Keywords: children's stories, EFL teacher trainees, EFL pupils, traditional classrooms

Ruwaida Abu Rass

2010-02-01

157

Repositioning of CLT from Curriculum to Classroom: A Review of the English Language Instructions at Bangladeshi Secondary Schools  

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This paper attempts a study of the present state of teaching and learning English at the secondary schools in Bangladesh. It offers an analysis of the current English curriculum and textbooks for the secondary grades and explores the current classroom practices through classroom observation and teachers’ interview. The classroom observations were conducted to identify the features of Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) approach prescribed by the curriculum and syllabus document o...

Md. Zulfeqar Haider; Takad Ahmed Chowdhury

2012-01-01

158

Communication, Culture, and Curiosity: Using Target-Culture and Student-Generated Art in the Second Language Classroom  

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Studying art from the target culture and student creation of original artwork in the second language (L2) classroom have many benefits. Both provide a springboard for discussion of the culture(s) under study as well as one's own. These activities also positively change the classroom atmosphere, generating student curiosity and lowering the…

Berho, Deborah L.; Defferding, Victoria

2005-01-01

159

Five Board Games for the Language Classroom: Uvas, Montana Rusa, El Futbol, La Corrida de Verbos, Paso a Paso.  

Science.gov (United States)

A collection of five board games for the Spanish language classroom contains gameboards, game markers, and directions for each game. It also contains general instructions for the teacher about the classroom use of board games. The games include: "Uvas," for use in vocabulary development and cultural awareness; "Montana Rusa," for general…

Snyder, Barbara

160

Formal and semantic dimensions of linguistic development: Implications for classroom English second language instruction in multilingual context  

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Full Text Available The study compares English Second Language (ESL learners' (Zambian primary, secondaryschool and tertiary students intuitions on a number of semantic and grammatical phenomena.Using the Semanticity & Grammatical Judgement Test, a modified version of the GrammaticalityJudgement Test often used by researchers within the Chomskyan tradition (cf Hyams, 1986;White, 1986; Schachter, 1989, this study investigates the possibility of an accessibility hierarchyranging from semantic dimensions to formal dimensions of language. The implications of such ahierarchy for the conceptualization of classroom ESL instruction in a multilingual context arediscussed. Although Zambia serves as the principal point of reference, there are many elementsof relevance to classroom second or third language instruction in South Africa.Hierdie studie vergelyk Engels Tweede Taal (E1T leerders (Zambiese primere, sekondere skool en tersiere studente se intuisies oor verskeie semantiese en grammatikale verskynsels. Deur gebruik te maak van die Semantiese en Grammatikale Oordeel Toets, 'n veranderde uitleg van die Grammatikale Oordeel Toets wat gereeld gebruik word deur navorsers in die Chomskyan tradisie (cf Hyams, 1986; White, 1986; Schachter, 1989. Die studie doen navorsing oor die moontlikheid van 'n toeganklike hierargie wat wissel van semantiese dimensies tot formele dimensies van taal. Die implikasies van so 'n hierargie vir die begrip van klaskamer Err onderrig in 'n meertalige konteks word sowel bespreek. Alhoewel Zambie as die vernaamste punt van verwysing dien. is daar elemente van relevansie tot die klaskamer tweede of derde taal instruksie in Suid-Afrika.

Felix Banda

2008-08-01

 
 
 
 
161

¿Duermes mucho Tony? Interpersonal and Transactional Uses of L1 in the Foreign-Language Classroom  

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Full Text Available Whilst communicative teaching approaches sanction, often grudgingly, the limited use of the students’ first language (l1 in English Language Teaching (elt , critical debate is now centred on a much more substantial and energetic role for the use of mother tongue in the language classroom. Justifications favouring the use of l1 currently range from ideological arguments to classroom teaching considerations. This paper contributes to this ongoing debate by examining how new generations of language teachers in Mexico are using the students’ mother tongue, Spanish, not only as a pedagogical tool but to develop and reinforce interpersonal relationships in the language classroom in order to enhance the learning of English. Key words: First language, critical pedagogy, phatic communion Mientras que los métodos comunicativos de enseñanza autorizan, muchas veces con poco entusiasmo, el uso de la lengua materna (l1 de los estudiantes del idioma inglés (ei, un gran debate propone un papel más sustancial y activo para el uso del español en el salón de clases. Actualmente, los argumentos que se muestran a favor del uso de la lengua materna (l1 parten desde motivos ideológicos hasta factores pedagógicos en la enseñanza en el salón de aprendizaje de idiomas. El presente artículo contribuye a este debate en curso examinando la forma en que las nuevas generaciones de profesores de inglés en México están utilizando la lengua materna de sus estudiantes, el español, no sólo como una herramienta pedagógica sino para desarrollar y reforzar las relaciones interpersonales en el salón de idiomas, de forma que el aprendizaje del inglés se vea favorecido. Palabras clave: Lengua materna, pedagogía crítica, comunión fática

Higareda Sandra

2009-11-01

162

Correlations between task complexity and measures og language development in the foreign language classroom  

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Does the Cognition Hypothesis predict the correlation between task complexity and language development? Robinson (2003) proposes that by increasing the cognitive demands in tasks, language learners will produce more fluent, accurate and structurally complex language. In a longitudinal study, a 10th grade class follows a syllabus designed to increase cognitive demands. The class ranks higher in fluency and structural complexity measurements in both the spoken and written data, but do not impro...

2011-01-01

163

Practical Techniques for Cultural-based Language Teaching in the EFL Classroom  

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The present paper concerns itself with a study of the cultural-based language teaching issue, particularly with the issue of some practical techniques for teaching culture in the EFL classroom. We want to emphasize the importance of cultural acquisition in the study of language courses, and to present a range of practical techniques that have been found to be effective and successful in cultural-based courses and a few tips that can help to make the teaching of culture a better experience for...

Lili Dai

2011-01-01

164

Sign language perception research for improving automatic sign language recognition  

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Current automatic sign language recognition (ASLR) seldom uses perceptual knowledge about the recognition of sign language. Using such knowledge can improve ASLR because it can give an indication which elements or phases of a sign are important for its meaning. Also, the current generation of data-driven ASLR methods has shortcomings which may not be solvable without the use of knowledge on human sign language processing. Handling variation in the precise execution of signs is an example of such shortcomings: data-driven methods (which include almost all current methods) have difficulty recognizing signs that deviate too much from the examples that were used to train the method. Insight into human sign processing is needed to solve these problems. Perceptual research on sign language can provide such insights. This paper discusses knowledge derived from a set of sign perception experiments, and the application of such knowledge in ASLR. Among the findings are the facts that not all phases and elements of a sign are equally informative, that defining the 'correct' form for a sign is not trivial, and that statistical ASLR methods do not necessarily arrive at sign representations that resemble those of human beings. Apparently, current ASLR methods are quite different from human observers: their method of learning gives them different sign definitions, they regard each moment and element of a sign as equally important and they employ a single definition of 'correct' for all circumstances. If the object is for an ASLR method to handle natural sign language, then the insights from sign perception research must be integrated into ASLR.

Ten Holt, Gineke A.; Arendsen, Jeroen; de Ridder, Huib; Koenderink-van Doorn, Andrea J.; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; Hendriks, Emile A.

2009-02-01

165

Understanding Influences of Play on Second Language Learning: A Microethnographic View in One Head Start Preschool Classroom  

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With dual language learners falling behind their same-age peers at the beginning of kindergarten, understanding how school experiences can enhance language learning is critical. This study demonstrates how play among preschool-aged children can foster English language learning. Using an ethnographic approach, one classroom composed of two teachers…

Piker, Ruth A.

2013-01-01

166

Teaching Practice and Cultural Difference of an English as Foreign Language Classroom in Taiwan  

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Full Text Available Uninterrupted interactions of merchants and travelers from different countries stress the significance of English. The purpose of the study was to investigate what cultures and teaching practices are different between native English-speaking teachers and Taiwanese senior high school students. Three native English-speaking teachers and six Taiwanese senior high school students in Taichung city participated in this study. Data were collected through native English-speaking teachers’ and Taiwanese senior high school students’ interviews and non-participant classroom observation. Results showed that American teachers lack of diversified cultures, not dealing with the complicated classroom situations. Students were accustomed to Grammar Translation Method “GTM” instead of the Communicative Language Teaching “CLT.” Scarcity of understanding diversified cultures and large classes were major difficulties for both teachers and students. The implications of the study were discussed and some recommendations were made to assist local English teachers and senior high school students in addressing their teaching or learning English.

Hsien-Chung Liao

2012-09-01

167

A Self-evaluation of Classroom Language Used When Teaching Grammar  

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Full Text Available In the attempt to evaluate the quality of teacher talk, recent communicative approaches have suggested that the modification of teacher classroom speech and the functional distribution of teacher talk in terms of pedagogical goals should be considered (Seedhouse: 1996. This study investigates the relationship between language use and pedagogic purpose from an analysis of a lesson transcript of a grammar lesson, and evaluates the quality of the teacher talk based on the Self-Evaluation of Teacher Talk (SETT Grid. The purpose is to examine whether the teacher talk is appropriate in the classroom context or mode and to bring about a more conscious and effective use of teacher talk in her teaching profession in the future.

Fang Huan

2011-10-01

168

Fostering Intercultural Communicative Competence in the Foreign Language Classroom: Pedagogical Implications  

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Full Text Available The development of learners' communicative competence has been regarded as the major goal of foreign and second language teaching. Several authors have advanced various communicative models in order to better explain how language teaching and learning work (e.g. Canale & Swain, 1980; Canale, 1983; Bachman, 1990; Celce-Murcia et al. 1995; Usó-Juan & Martínez-Flor 2006. One of the elements of the communicative model is that of intercultural competence (Byram, 1997; Usó-Juan & Martínez-Flor, 2008. This competence has been defined by Meyer (1991, p. 137 as "the ability of a person to behave adequately in a flexible manner when confronted with actions, attitudes and expectations of representatives of foreign cultures". Cultural dimensions play a paramount role in learners' learning process; however, there is not apparently a particular approach for its integration in the language classroom. Taken into account those aspects, in this paper, I attempt to provide an instructional approach for the integration of culture in the language classroom so as to foster learners' communicative competence. The present paper presents first a revision of different communicative models, then, a description of the notion intercultural competence is provided. Finally, an instructional approach for the teaching of this particular competence is proposed.

Vicente Beltrán-Palanques

2014-06-01

169

Educating educators about second language idiomaticity through action research  

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Full Text Available Idiomaticity is central to linguistic theory. Despite the pervasiveness of idioms in language, pedagogical articles in professional journals have yet to pay attention to the benefits of idiom instruction in the second language (SL classroom. Addressing this concern, this article reports the results of an exploratory qualitative research study conducted with sixteen SL university instructors and two Language Program Directors (LPDs at two large universities in the Southwest (United States of America that explored teachers’ own knowledge and theories about SL idiomaticity. Survey and interview data indicate that university instructors and LPDs share beliefs and assumptions about how best to teach idioms and assess students’ knowledge of SL idiomaticity. It was concluded that both university instructors and LPDs have an important role to play in the development of idiom pedagogy and that such pedagogy can be greatly enhanced through action research. Recommendations are included for further study of the issues surrounding SL idiomaticity, and teaching implications are considered for the development of meaningful pedagogical practices suitable for the promotion of idiomatic learning.

John I. Liontas

2013-07-01

170

Learning English as an International Language: EFL Learners' Perceptions of Cultural Knowledge Acquisition in the English Classroom  

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Full Text Available Culture is an important element in the foreign language classroom. Some scholars believe that culture is the fifth language skill along with the four traditional skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking of English. Traditionally, learning English required learners to acquire some target language cultural knowledge (e.g. British culture and/or American culture especially in the context of English as a foreign language. However, with the increasingly important status of English as an international language, the ownership of English has been extensively discussed. Scholars have argued that English is no longer in the custody of any particular country or community. Therefore, whether we should address target language culture in the English classroom or not has become a matter of debate. The study aims to explore EFL learners’ perceptions of the ownership of English and acquiring cultural knowledge in the classroom through in-depth interviews. In total, twenty undergraduates, including both English-major and non-English-major students, from three different universities in Central Taiwan participated in the study. The results show that the majority of the participants reject the notion that English belongs to particular countries in today’s world. In terms of acquiring cultural knowledge, they believe that it is necessary to have some target language cultural knowledge (e.g. British culture and/or American culture in the English classroom. However, apart from the target language cultural knowledge, they would also like to explore various cultures worldwide, using English as a communication tool to become global citizens. Therefore, rather than debate whether to teach a specific culture or language model in the English classroom, it is perhaps more meaningful and important to develop a language learner’s intercultural communicative competence. These findings provide some insightful implications for English language teaching professionals and educators in terms of teaching culture in the English classroom.

Hsuan-Yau Tony Lai

2013-12-01

171

Developing the language of thinking within a classroom community of inquiry: pre-service teachers' experiences  

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We argue that the "community of inquiry" approach, using reading materials modelled on Lipman's Philosophy for Children programme, is a theoretically justified and teacher-friendly means of promoting effective thinking skills. The stimulus materials, used by the pre-service teachers, consist ofshort stories ofclassroom life designed to elicit children's ideas for further discussion as a community of inquiry. Research has shown that the community of inquiry approach to classroom discussion is ...

Lena Green; Janet Condy; Agnes Chigona

2012-01-01

172

Positioning and Classroom Literacy Research: A Polyvocal Re-presentational Critical Re-view.  

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In an effort to create a polyphonic critical response to the roles of the researcher and the researched in classroom-based literacy research, this paper is formatted as a play--indented parts are direct quotes from others spoken by the speakers. It articulates questions of classroom literacy research as it considers the methods, goals, and…

Udell, Risa; Meyer, Richard

173

Motivation, language development, and lesson design in task-based lessons in two foreign language classrooms  

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The fieldwork for this study is conducted by two PPU students. Lessons are designed and implemented following principles of task-based learning in upper secondary school, one in German and one in Spanish. A pre- and post-survey is collected that maps affective variables and preferred types of language activities. Spoken pre- and post-tests are collected by the students using wordless comic strips. Transcript are analyzed using standardized measures for fluency, lexical complexity, structural ...

Waara, Renee

2010-01-01

174

Is Teaching Sign Language in Early Childhood Classrooms Feasible for Busy Teachers and Beneficial for Children?  

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Infants' hands are ready to construct words using sign language before their mouths are ready to speak. These research findings may explain the popularity of parents and caregivers teaching and using sign language with infants and toddlers, along with speech. The advantages of using sign language with young children go beyond the infant and…

Brereton, Amy Elizabeth

2010-01-01

175

California/Spain Visiting Teachers Program Participants' Opinions about the Use and Effects of Students' Primary Languages in the Classroom  

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This study examined opinions about some theoretical and practical tenets of bilingualism and bilingual education, as well as about the instructional use of English language learners' (ELLs) native languages in the classroom, of 77 teachers from Spain working in California as part of the California/Spain Visiting Teachers Program. In their…

Ramos, Francisco

2009-01-01

176

O desenvolvimento de uma metaconsciência, no professor, acerca da importância de vivenciar a linguagem como prática social na sala de aula de língua inglesa por meio da pesquisa colaborativa / The development of a teacher's meta-awareness on the importance of experiencing language as social practice in an EFL classroom through collaborative research  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Neste artigo, discutimos o processo reflexivo vivenciado por duas professoras de inglês ao problematizarem suas ações em sala de aula. Destacamos particularmente o processo de reconfiguração de suas atividades pedagógicas que inicialmente focalizam estruturas lexicogramaticais isoladas e, no decorre [...] r do processo reflexivo, são reconfiguradas em direção ao uso de gêneros textuais e à (des)construção dos contextos de situação e cultura nos quais esses textos são socialmente produzidos e vivenciados (MOTTA-ROTH, 2006). Essas reflexões foram desenvolvidas por meio de um processo de pesquisa colaborativo (MAGALHÃES, 2004). A análise do discurso dessas professoras indica que o processo reflexivo lhes permitiu desenvolver uma metaconsciência acerca de como a linguagem se organiza e se constitui ao mediar a atividade social. Abstract in english In this paper is discussed the thoughtful process experienced by two English teachers, as they problematize their procedures in the classroom. In the foreground is the process of reconfiguration of their pedagogical activities, which initially would focus on the isolated lexical-grammatical structur [...] es and which, along the reflective process, were reconfigured to focus more on textual genres and on the (de)construction of the situational and cultural contexts in which such texts are socially produced and experienced (MOTTA-ROTH, 2006). Such thoughts were developed by means of a collaborative research process (MAGALHÃES, 2004). The discourse analysis of those teachers indicate that the reflective process allowed them to develop a metaawareness about how language organizes itself and constitutes itself when it mediates the social activity.

Luciane Kirchhof, Ticks.

177

Questions in Time: Investigating the Structure and Dynamics of Unfolding Classroom Discourse. CELA Research Report.  

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In research on classroom discourses, case studies have been used to describe the dynamics of effective and ineffective instruction. In other research, quantitative studies have identified global features of such discourse. The research reported here combined the advantages of both methods, investigating how generally effective classroom discourse…

Nystrand, Martin; Wu, Lawrence L.; Gamoran, Adam; Zeiser, Susie; Long, Daniel

178

What Do We Know about Effective Fourth-Grade Teachers and Their Classrooms? CELA Research Report.  

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This research report summarizes the features associated with exemplary teaching at the upper elementary level drawn from available research. The report then compares the results from the author/researchers' own study of the nature of classroom talk, curriculum materials, organization of instruction, and evaluation in 30 fourth-grade classrooms in…

Allington, Richard L.; Johnston, Peter H.

179

A framework to build readers and writers in the second language classroom  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: English Abstract in spanish Este artículo propone un marco de referencia para crear lectoescritores en el aula donde se enseña una segunda lengua. Los componentes son el currículo, la enseñanza y la evaluación. El currículo establece los objetivos, y la filosofía del programa de lectura y también pretende el desarrollo de un l [...] ector crítico, que encuentra en la lectura en segunda lengua una fuente de información y entretenimiento. El currículo también tiene en cuenta el efecto de la lectura en primera lengua sobre la segunda, y el uso de materiales adecuados para el logro de los objetivos. La enseñanza está enmarcada en principios tales como la lectura y la escritura se enseñan simultáneamente, y la tecnología influye en el desarrollo de la lectoescritura. La evaluación de la lectura es el siguiente componente, y propone el uso de instrumentos auténticos tales como el portafolio y la observación. Se menciona, además, el uso de instrumentos tradicionales tales como los exámenes. Abstract in english This article proposes a framework to create readers and writers in the second language classroom. The components of the framework are curriculum, instruction and assessment. The curriculum states the goals and philosophy of the program that intends to create lifelong readers that find reading as a s [...] ource of entertainment and information. It will also include the kind of literacy that the curriculum wants to support, the effect of reading in the first language, and the use of appropriate materials to achieve the goals. Instruction is framed under principles like reading is thinking and learning, reading and writing are taught together, and technology influences reading and writing development. Assessing reading in the second language classroom is the next component of the framework discussed in the article and it proposes the use of authentic tools like portfolios and observations. Traditional tools like tests are also mentioned.

Zúñiga Camacho, Gilma.

180

Personality, Motivation and Communication Strategy Use: Individual Differences in the language classroom. A Study of Language Students and Language Teachers  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Individual differences have been of special interest in the field of second language acquisition for decades. Recent studies show special interest in the stability of various individual differences. The results, however, have not proven to be coherent. This thesis aimed to investigate individual differences of Swedish students enrolled in a German course in 2011 and addressed the issue of stability and correlation, in terms of personality, motivation/attitude and communication strategy use. F...

Guhlemann, Mareike

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
181

Sign language perception research for improving automatic sign language recognition:  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Current automatic sign language recognition (ASLR) seldom uses perceptual knowledge about the recognition of sign language. Using such knowledge can improve ASLR because it can give an indication which elements or phases of a sign are important for its meaning. Also, the current generation of data-driven ASLR methods has shortcomings which may not be solvable without the use of knowledge on human sign language processing. Handling variation in the precise execution of signs is an example o...

Ten Holt, G. A.; Arendsen, J.; Ridder, H.; Doorn, A. J.; Reinders, M. J. T.; Hendriks, E. A.

2009-01-01

182

Research on teaching of "Solar Eclipse" in primary classroom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available It has been realized that children have their own understanding of how the world works preceding formal education in schools. It is also found in research that the social-cultural views about specific scientific concepts have generated certain alternative concepts in pupils. A great number of western studies have been done to find out students' science understanding; less has been done to understand local children's understanding of science. This research attempts to explore children's understanding of a natural phenomenon "Solar Eclipse". The research also looks into the effectiveness of employing constructivist view in designing teaching and the feasibility of research on teaching in primary classrooms. All primary six pupils of a local school and their General Studies teachers were involved in the study. Research methods include interviews, questionnaires and analysis of lesson. The results showed that children's understanding are enhanced, at the same time, children chose their favorite effective teaching activities. Also, there were changes in teachers' conceptual understandings and use of teaching methods. There was evidence that research on teaching can enhance teachers' professional development.

Winnie Wing Mui SO

2003-12-01

183

Language learning impairment: integrating research and remediation.  

Science.gov (United States)

Timing cues present in the acoustic waveform of speech provide critical information for the recognition and segmentation of the ongoing speech signal. Research has demonstrated that deficient temporal perception rates, that have been shown to specifically disrupt acoustic processing of speech, are related to specific language-based learning impairments (LLI). Temporal processing deficits correlate highly with the phonological discrimination and processing deficits of these children. Electrophysiological single cell mapping studies of sensory cortex in brains of primates have shown that neural circuitry can be remapped after specific, temporally cohesive training regimens, demonstrating the dynamic plasticity of the brain. Recently, we combined these two lines of research in a series of studies that addressed whether the temporal processing deficits seen in LLIs can be significantly modified through adaptive training aimed at reducing temporal integration thresholds. Simultaneously, we developed a computer algorithm that expanded and enhanced the brief, rapidly changing acoustic segments within ongoing speech and used this to provide intensive speech and language training exercises to these children. Results to date from two independent laboratory experiments, as well as a large national clinical efficacy trial, demonstrate that dramatic improvements in temporal integration thresholds, together with speech and language comprehension abilities of LLI children, results from training with these new computer-based training procedures. PMID:9800537

Tallal, P; Merzenich, M; Miller, S; Jenkins, W

1998-09-01

184

Children's Literature in Traditional Arab Classrooms for Teaching English as a Foreign Language  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This research has shown that the use of authentic children’s literature is an effective and motivating ESL classroom strategy. However, this study investigated th...

Ruwaida Abu Rass; Susan Holzman

2010-01-01

185

Using Biological-Control Research in the Classroom to Promote Scientific Inquiry & Literacy  

Science.gov (United States)

Scientists researching biological control should engage in education because translating research programs into classroom activities is a pathway to increase scientific literacy among students. Classroom activities focused on biological control target all levels of biological organization and can be cross-disciplinary by drawing from subject areas…

Richardson, Matthew L.; Richardson, Scott L.; Hall, David G.

2012-01-01

186

Repositioning of CLT from Curriculum to Classroom: A Review of the English Language Instructions at Bangladeshi Secondary Schools  

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Full Text Available This paper attempts a study of the present state of teaching and learning English at the secondary schools in Bangladesh. It offers an analysis of the current English curriculum and textbooks for the secondary grades and explores the current classroom practices through classroom observation and teachers’ interview. The classroom observations were conducted to identify the features of Communicative Language Teaching (CLT approach prescribed by the curriculum and syllabus document of National Curriculum and Textbook Board (NCTB as the desired approach for teaching English at secondary level schools in Bangladesh. The paper also attempts to identify connections between the curriculum objectives and the classroom realities faced by the teachers and seeks suggestions for achieving the stated objectives. Some of the key recommendations include - strengthening of the teacher development initiatives, redefining the entry and exit levels of the learners, providing alternative and supplementary instructional materials and reforming the assessment system.

Md. Zulfeqar Haider

2012-06-01

187

Using Conversation Analysis in the Second Language Classroom to Teach Interactional Competence  

Science.gov (United States)

This article focuses on the use of conversation analysis (CA) to help teaching interactional competence in English to adult second language learners from lower to intermediate levels. To set the context, this article gives a brief overview on the use of CA in second language research as well as considering the construct of interactional competence…

Barraja-Rohan, Anne-Marie

2011-01-01

188

Investigation of the Application of Communicative Language Teaching in the English Language Classroom -- A Case Study on Teachers' Attitudes in Turkey  

Science.gov (United States)

This qualitative study aimed to reveal whether teachers' classroom practices overlap with their attitudes towards certain features of Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) such as pair and group-work activities, fluency and accuracy, error correction and the role of the teacher. Before conducting an open-ended questionnaire with two teachers of…

Coskun, Abdullah

2011-01-01

189

Building Teachers’ Understanding of Classroom Action Research: A Rural Case Study in Indonesia  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Indonesia Open University (UT: Universitas Terbuka is a large, open university delivering distance education to students throughout Indonesia. An important aspect of its mission is to provide opportunities for Indonesian teachers to improve their education in-service. This includes two courses on classroom action research. In order to assess the effectiveness of these courses and, if necessary, improve them, a team of lecturers from UT conducted an investigation of the challenges teachers were facing in learning to conduct classroom action research through the UT modules. The team found that the modules did not adequately reflect an understanding of the actual characteristics of the teachers they were serving and were thus less effective than they might be in teaching teachers to conduct classroom action research. Changes in both the content and scheduling of the modules are recommended in order to more effectively promote classroom action research in Indonesian schools. Key Words: Classroom Action Research, Distance Education, Indonesia, Teacher Development

Dodi Sukmayadi

2011-12-01

190

The relationship between conceptual metaphors and classroom management language: reactions by native and non-native speakers of English  

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Full Text Available The use of the target language to manage a class and organise its work represents one of the few genuinely communicative uses of the target language in many formal foreign-language or bilingual-education teaching situations. It is thus important that both teachers and learners understand and know how to use the key expressions involved. These tend to be highly metaphoric (Low, 2008 with one particularly productive conceptual metaphor involving the JOURNEY (or TRAVEL source domain seemingly standing out. There seems to have been little investigation to date into whether or not learners whose first language is not English actually understand the expressions involved in such classroom management language. Moreover, with the recent growing interest in the area of content-based learning, there is increasing pressure on language teachers, whose first language is not English, to use English as their classroom management language. Our first aim was to look at whether the acceptability judgements for classroom management expressions offered by non-native speaking teachers of English resembled those of native speakers, and whether these judgements reflected corpus findings regarding the frequency of usage in spoken English. To do this, we analysed native and non-native speaker responses to a short questionnaire. Our second aim was to look at how non-native speakers of English perceive the meanings of these expressions, comparing our findings to native speaker judgements and corpus results.

Graham Low

2009-04-01

191

Classroom Interaction Mediated by Gender and Technology: The Language Laboratory Course  

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Full Text Available This present study investigates classroom interaction with reference to gender and technology. The study data were gathered through partial ethnography by a non-participant observer; two sessions of the course Language Laboratory 1 were carefully observed, and notes were taken with a focus on the nature of interactions. Results of the study show that the interaction patterns are gender-related only to some extent. Also, the interaction pattern in the laboratory classes is similar to, but not the same as, the whole-class discussion patterns proposed in earlier literature. However, the main difference between the two is that the teacher's role in controlling and confirming the volunteer?s contribution to the discussion is markedly visible.

Nematullah SHOMOOSSI

2008-10-01

192

THE ROLE OF OUTPUT AND FEEDBACK IN SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION: A CLASSROOM-BASED STUDY OF GRAMMAR ACQUISITION BY ADULT ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Second language acquisition (SLA has been a concern of many teachers and researchers since the early 1960s.One of the issues related to SLA has been finding the techniques which effectively focus the learners’ attention on the target form.A number of theories and methods have been advocated for this purpose, ranging from implicit options to more explicit ones. Although each of the suggested methods has its own advantages,they have, so far, proved insufficient to get learners to be able to notice the gap between their own interlanguage forms and the target language forms. Swain (1995, 1998 has argued that apart from providing the learners with comprehensible input, comprehensible output also plays a beneficial role in L2 acquisition. By encouraging the learners to speak or write in the L2 and providing them with the opportunities to do so, the learners can notice that they are not able to say what they want to say in the target language. On the basis of Swain’s output hypothesis, we assumed that encouraging adult learners (university students to produce target-like output would promote their achievement of the grammatical competence necessary for producing academic tests. The purpose of this article is to present the evidence from a classroom-based, small-scale study of the effect of output on learner acquisition of L2 modal verbs, adjectives and adverbs conveying the meanings of uncertainty, all of which are parts of speech that are important metadiscourse items. The results of the present study suggest that an approach in which students are encouraged to produce comprehensible output, combined with their being provided with learning reinforcement ensured by appropriate feedback, can be an effective source of establishing long-lasting grammatical accuracy in the students’ target language.

Ewa Donesch-Jezo

2011-01-01

193

Research Agenda: Priorities for Future Research in Second Language Assessment  

Science.gov (United States)

In a recent state-of-the-art (SoA) article (Stoynoff 2009), I reviewed some of the trends in language assessment research and considered them in light of validation activities associated with four widely used international measures of L2 English ability. This Thinking Allowed article presents an opportunity to revisit the four broad areas of L2…

Stoynoff, Stephen

2012-01-01

194

A Case Study on Use of One-to-One Laptops in English as Second Language Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

One-to-one laptop programs, where each student has their own laptop to use in classroom, are becoming popular in schools especially in Australia and the United States. The purpose of the study was to contribute to the limited knowledge base explaining the implementation of laptop programs specifically with English language learners. Four ESL…

Turgut, Guliz

2012-01-01

195

Carnival in a Mainstream Kindergarten Classroom: A Bakhtinian Analysis of Second Language Learners' Off-Task Behaviors  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explored Mikhail Bakhtin's conceptualization of carnival as it applies to 2 second language (L2) learners in an American kindergarten classroom. Unwilling to engage in two story retelling tasks, the children nevertheless invoked the imaginative, playful, and dialogic world of carnival, creating meaningful, contingent contexts for…

Iddings, Ana Christina DaSilva; McCafferty, Steven G.

2007-01-01

196

Conceptualization of American English Native Speaker Norms: A Case Study of an English Language Classroom in South Korea  

Science.gov (United States)

This case study aims to reveal how conceptualization of native speakership was constructed and reinforced in a South Korean university classroom of English as a foreign language (EFL). In addition, it examines how this conceptualization positions native speakers, a non-native EFL teacher, and learners, and what learning opportunities were provided…

Ahn, Kyungja

2011-01-01

197

READING BASED-CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES: AN EFFORT TOWARD THE INTEGRATION OF LANGUAGE SKILLS IN TEACHING ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE IN INDONESIA  

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Full Text Available Abstract: This paper proposes the implementation of reading-based classroom activities for teaching English as a foreign language in Indonesia. Compared to other language skills, reading is viewed to provide a relatively stable foundation for Indonesian students to develop their communicative competence in English. It is argued that reading-focused activities stimulate confidence for Indonesian learners to get involved in listening, speaking, and writing related-activities in ways that are similar to normal daily life communication. The reasons for the proposed implementation of reading-based classroom activities in TEFLIN and the role of reading and its relation with other language skills are presented.

Hadi Hadi

2006-01-01

198

Paradigms in the teaching of medical research: a view from the classroom, to the classroom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The guidelines of the University of Cartagena for comprehensive professional training, provide for the inclusion of the research component. In the medical program, research is the cornerstone for the construction of new knowledge, that today, directs the medical act. However, to achieve these objectives educational work in the teaching of medical research, requires that teachers employ innovative strategies for education. An important step in the appropriation and application of these strategies is the identification and understanding of the barriers or “paradigms” that have the medical students during their training. It identifies three: the paradigm of the profession, clinical specialty and general physician, in which addresses the reason for the subjects considered “filler”, the reductionism of the specialties and the passivity of the general physician to the need for research. Knowledge of these paradigms leads to the identification of teachers’ barriers such as unidirectional conception of teaching-learning process, lack of feedback and research to enrich their classroom work. Once internalized these paradigms, is everyone’s, fight.RESUMENLos lineamientos de la Universidad de Cartagena para la formación de profesionales integrales, contempla la inclusión del componente de investigación. En el programa de medicina, la investigación es el pilar para la construcción del nuevo conocimiento, que hoy por hoy, direcciona el acto médico. Sin embargo para cumplir con estos objetivos, la labor docente en la enseñanza de la investigación médica, requiere que los profesores, empleen estrategias novedosas de educación. Un paso importante en la apropiación y aplicación de estas estrategias, constituye la identificación y comprensión de las barreras o “paradigmas” que poseen los estudiantes de medicina a lo largo de su formación. Se identifican tres de ellos: el paradigma de la profesión, de la especialidad clínica y del médico general, en los cuales se aborda la razón de ser de las asignaturas consideradas de “relleno”, el reduccionismo de las especialidades y la pasividad del médico general ante la necesidad de investigar. El conocimiento de estos paradigmas conlleva a la identificación de barreras propias del docente como la concepción unidireccional del proceso enseñanza aprendizaje, la falta de retroalimentación y de investigación de aulaque enriquezca su labor. Una vez asimilados estos paradigmas, es responsabilidad de todos combatirlos.

Ramos Clason Enrique Carlos

2010-12-01

199

Review Article: Second Language Acquisition of Bantu Languages--A (Mostly) Untapped Research Opportunity  

Science.gov (United States)

This review article presents a summary of research on the second language acquisition of Bantu languages, including Swahili, Zulu, Xhosa and Lingala. Although second language (L2) research on these languages is currently very limited, work in morphosyntax and phonology suggests promising directions for future study, particularly on noun class,…

Spinner, Patti

2011-01-01

200

On student engagement in whole-class oral interaction: from classroom discourse and sociocultural aspects to implications for language learning On student engagement in whole-class oral interaction: from classroom discourse and sociocultural aspects to implications for language learning  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article reports on a study on classroom interaction in an EFL context in Brazil. The study, of an ethnographic nature, analyses recorded lessons, interviews and questionnaires answered by the students. The social rules governing classroom interaction usually determine an asymmetrical relationship between the teacher and the students, though it may be possible, according to the data obtained, to create an atmosphere of co-operation in which interaction may occur within less asymmetrical verbal patterns. This atmosphere, determined by linguistic, pedagogical, psychological and social factors, favours student language production. The data suggest connections between the students’ views of classroom language learning, their engagement in classroom discourse, and possible implications for (foreign language development. Este artigo relata um estudo sobre interação em sala de aula em um contexto de inglês como língua estrangeira, no Brasil. O estudo, de natureza etnográfica, analisa aulas gravadas, entrevistas e questionários respondidos pelos alunos. As regras sociais que permeiam a interação em sala de aula geralmente determinam uma relação assimétrica entre professor e alunos, embora seja possível, com base nos dados obtidos, criar-se uma atmosfera de cooperação, na qual uma interação caracterizada por padrões verbais menos assimétricos possa ocorrer. Tal atmosfera, determinada por fatores lingüísticos, pedagógicos, psicológicos e sociais, favorece a produção verbal dos alunos. Os dados sugerem relações entre as visões dos alunos sobre aprendizagem de línguas, seu engajamento no discurso de sala de aula e possíveis implicações para o desenvolvimento da competência em língua estrangeira.

Douglas Altamiro Consolo

2008-04-01

 
 
 
 
201

Spanish as a Second Language when L1 Is Quechua: Endangered Languages and the SLA Researcher  

Science.gov (United States)

Spanish is one of the most widely spoken languages in the world. Quechua is the largest indigenous language family to constitute the first language (L1) of second language (L2) Spanish speakers. Despite sheer number of speakers and typologically interesting contrasts, Quechua-Spanish second language acquisition is a nearly untapped research area,…

Kalt, Susan E.

2012-01-01

202

Understanding Authority in Classrooms: A Review of Theory, Ideology, and Research  

Science.gov (United States)

Authority is a fundamental, problematic, and poorly understood component of classroom life. A better understanding of classroom authority can be achieved by reviewing writings on social theory, educational ideology, and qualitative research in schools. Social theories provide important analytical tools for examining the constitutive elements of…

Pace, Judith L.; Hemmings, Annette

2007-01-01

203

Conducting Original, Hands-On Astronomical Research in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Since 2007 I have been a Team Leader for the Tzec Maun Foundation, a non-profit foundation dedicated to providing free, research grade, Internet telescopes to students, teachers and researchers around the world. The name Tzec Maun (pronounced “Teh-Zeck-Moan”) comes from Mayan culture. Tzec Maun was the jovial messenger, laughed at adversity. Based on the challenges students, researchers and professional astronomers face with finances, equipment, and telescope access, the jovial mascot seems to fit. Hundreds of hours performing astronomical outreach as a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador and Astronomical League Master of outreach taught me that the best way to inspirationally teach astronomy and space science (and most subjects) is actually being at the eyepiece. I’m NOT a fan of the traditional planetarium experience as a teaching tool because it inhibits inspiration and the learning experience to a 2-D mat on a faux horizon with artificial representations. Once, a student at my dark sky observatory excitedly commented that the night sky was like a 3-D planetarium. I have hosted several classes at my own personal dark sky observatory, but this resource is impractical for all but a few lucky students. Experience has taught me that the next best thing to being at the eyepiece is to control a remote telescope via the Internet. Tzec Maun’s arsenal of telescopes is all research capable, linked to the Internet and positioned for round-the-clock dark skies. The final conditions described above, mean that I can enter an 8:30am science class, log onto the Tzec Maun telescope Portal and turn over control of an Australian system (where it is night) to a student or teacher. Working as a group, the class can either begin their investigations. My Tzec Maun science team (TARP) is engaged in searching for potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs). PHA work excites student and teacher alike. Teaching from telescopes can unleash powerful attention-getting tools that enable teachers to convey moderately complex computer science, optical, geographic, mathematical, informational and physical principles through hands-on telescope operations. In addition to the general studies aspects of classroom internet-based astronomy, Tzec Maun supports real science by enabling operators precisely point telescopes and acquire extremely faint, magnitude 19+ CCD images. Thanks to the creative Team of Photometrica (photometrica.org), my teams now have the ability to process and analyze images online and produce results in short order. Normally, astronomical data analysis packages cost greater than thousands of dollars for single license operations. Free to my team members, Photometrica allows students to upload their data to a cloud computing server and read precise photometric and/or astrometric results. I’m indebted to Michael and Geir for their support. The efficacy of student-based research is well documented. The Council on Undergraduate Research defines student research as, "an inquiry or investigation conducted by an undergraduate that makes an original intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline." (http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/studentresearch/What. Teaching from Tzec Maun in the classroom is the most original teaching research I can imagine. I very much look forward to presenting this program to the convened body.

Corneau, M. J.

2009-12-01

204

Effective Classroom Management  

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Full Text Available This paper attempts to explore and identify the characteristics of an effective teacher who teaches English as a second language to 10 year old students from different ethnics, various social economic background and multi-level language ability, at a private primary school in Malaysia. The study focused on classroom management using a case study methodology where data was collected using both interviews and classroom observations. The findings concur with previous literature reviews on effective teacher models whilst providing in-depth details on what transpires during classroom activities, thus clarifying further the meaning of effective classroom management. The implications of this study suggest the need to include six new classroom management behaviours of an effective teacher. Further research is warranted to help policy makers and school administrators in identifying the significance of these behaviours for the selection and training of future teachers.

Azlin Norhaini Mansor

2012-07-01

205

PDI: Science for English Language Learners (ELL): Integrating Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, and Thinking into the K-8 Classroom, New Orleans, Louisiana; March 18, 2009  

Science.gov (United States)

This Professional Development Institute (PDI) will focus on teaching strategies and methods that incorporate language acquisition with science instruction for English Language Learners (ELL) in the K-8 classroom. Specifically, this institute will begin with an overview of research on the ELL population, instruction, and programs available to teachers who have responsibilities for teaching science. The bulk of the 6 hours of instruction will provide guided inquiry activities that model integrated (Sheltered Instruction) strategies in science, reading, writing, listening, speaking, and thinking. The follow-up workshops will provide more in-depth research and instruction in each of the language skills (reading, writing, listening, speaking, and thinking) as they apply to science instruction as well as working with specific populations of ELL students and available programs. Classrooms in the United States are becoming more diverse thus requiring regular classroom teachers to develop new skills in working with students whose first language is not English. Recent census data show that over the past twenty five years the number of ELL students (ages 5-17) grew from 3.8 million to 9.9 million or approximately 10% of the entire U.S. school population (NCES, 2006). With this incredible growth, regular classroom teachers are in need of learning new teaching skills in language acquisition to integrate into everyday classroom content instruction. Sheltered Instructional strategies or Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) involve teaching strategies used in developing language skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking and incorporates them into content area (Science) planning, instruction and assessment. These strategies include clearly defined language and content objectives, creating instruction that relates to students' prior knowledge, tailoring teacher talk to students' English language proficiency levels, allowing students to process material in a variety of formats including guided inquiry, scaffolding content instruction, and using assessment methods that allow students to display learning in a variety of ways (Becijos,1997; Echevarria, Vogt, and Short, 2008). This is especially important to teachers at the elementary and middle school as the majority of ELL students are entering schools at these levels. Of all ELL students entering school, 44% are in grades K-3 and 35% in grades 4-8 (Kindler, 2002). This Professional Development Institute will be conducted by David Crowther, a Professor of Science Education at the University of Nevada, Reno. Dr. Crowther is the coauthor/editor of Science for English Language Learners by NSTA Press. He has written several chapters in books and articles about science for ELLs; presented at NSTA workshops and TESOL on the subject; and teaches science methods using Sheltered Instruction strategies at the University of Nevada, Reno. Joaquin Vil� is a Professor of English and Second Language Acquisition at Salisbury University in Maryland. In his numerous years of experience he has conducted many workshops on teaching EL students, written chapters / articles, and led departments and programs for ELL within the English departments at several universities. Dr. Vil� is also a NCATE evaluator of TESOL programs and is the Special Assistant to the Vice President of the University for Diversity. Presenters are recognized as top researchers, authors, and workshop facilitators in the field of science and language acquisition.

1900-01-01

206

Students and Teachers' Reasons for Using the First Language Within the Foreign Language Classroom (French and English) in Central Mexico Razones de alumnos y maestros sobre el uso de la primera lengua en el salón de lenguas extranjeras (francés e inglés) en el centro de México  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The present study explores the use of the first language in a context of foreign language teaching. This qualitative research presents the classroom practice and points of view of French and English teachers and students within a public educational institute in central Mexico using the techniques of questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. The results show that teachers and the majority of students perceive the use of the first language as positive and part of the teaching and learning ...

Irasema Mora Pablo; Martha Lengeling, M.; Buenaventura Rubio Zenil; Troy Crawford; Douglas Goodwin

2011-01-01

207

Implementing Interventions to Increase Motivation in the English Language Classroom: from Theory to Practice  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

A growing body of empirical research shows a relationship between student motivation and learning outcomes in the teaching of English in ESL and EFL contexts. Despite a sound theoretical framework, however, there are few studies which implement strategies intended to increase motivation and report findings. Using qualitative research, this article attempts to link theory with practice and shed light into the factors which demotivate students and act as barriers to effective foreign language l...

2010-01-01

208

The Language of Sustainability: From Basic Writing Classroom to Professional Discourse  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Understanding and describing professional practice, especially in Engineering and the Sciences,  has always been at the heart of research in Professional Communication. Several significant field  research projects have showed us that content knowledge alone is not sufficient to claim disciplinary expertise; a rhetorical understanding of the discipline and its ways of thinking is essential in achieving full participation in the field. Most professionals would expect that such a sophisticated approach can only be learned through on-the-job training or opportunities to interact with practitioners within authentic disciplinary contexts. Although this can certainly be the case in many instances, we argue that a rhetorical understanding can be enacted even within a freshman writing classroom. The results of our content and rhetorical analyses of student work from the beginning and the end of a course on academic writing with the theme of sustainability show that students were able in one semester to write in discipline-appropriate ways and understand the rhetorical strategies necessary to become part of a disciplinary conversation.  The implications of our findings can extend into the way we design courses in basic writing or professional communication and the ways we can use pre-assessment data to drive our course design decisions. 

Karatsolis, Andreas; Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.

209

The impact of Finno-Ugric languages in second language research: Looking back and setting goals  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This state of the art review aims at discussing the potential relevance of Finno-Ugric languages in the larger context of second language research. Key results received in the studies conducted in the field of Finno-Ugric languages as second languages are introduced, and some interim conclusions based on them are made. The main areas in focus are cross-linguistic influence, forms and constructions, second language interaction, and motivation, identities and integration. Furthermore, some futu...

Minna Suni

2012-01-01

210

BUILDING BLOCKS IN THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM (PILARES BÁSICOS EN EL AULA DE IDIOMAS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Resumen:Este artículo presenta las ventajas de la integración de tres áreas comúnmente estudiadas en la enseñanza de idiomas: Estilos de Aprendizaje, Inteligencias Múltiples y Estrategias para el Aprendizaje de Idiomas. Cada una de estas áreas tiene un papel fundamental en la enseñanza de idiomas y el aprendizaje, pero por lo general se utilizan por separado, o en el mejor de los casos, los y las docentes integran ya sea estilos e inteligencias o estrategias, pero no las tres al mismo tiempo. De hecho, la mayoría de la literatura presenta cada una por separado, dando la idea de que sólo una o dos se pueden utilizar en la clase de idiomas, por lo que en muchas oportunidades se ignoran aspectos fundamentales. La tesis principal del artículo es que, para ser más eficaz, Estilos de Aprendizaje, Inteligencias Múltiples y Estrategias de Aprendizaje deben entrelazarse a fin de crear un pilar sólido para el aprendizaje de idiomas. Primeramente, la autora ofrece una visión general de cada una de estas áreas. Luego en el referente teórico explica cómo estas deben usarse como una unidad, y posteriormente da un ejemplo de esto a través de un plan de clase sobre el tema de la conservación del medio ambiente para un curso de Comunicación Oral I de la carrera de inglés de la Escuela de Lenguas Modernas de la Universidad de Costa Rica. Por último, se ofrecen algunas recomendaciones a los y las instructores sobre la integración de estos pilares en el aula.Abstract: This article presents the advantages of integrating three areas commonly addressed in the teaching of languages: Learning Styles, Multiple Intelligences and Language Learning Strategies. Each of these areas plays a fundamental role when teaching and learning languages, but usually they are used separately or in the best of cases, instructors integrate either styles and intelligences or strategies, but not the three of them at the same time. Indeed, most of the literature presents each separately, giving the idea that only one or two can be used in the language classroom, thus missing some important matters. The point of this article is that in order to be more effective, Learning Styles, Multiple Intelligences and Language Learning Strategies must intertwine, so as to create a solid building block. The author first gives an overview of each of these areas. She then explains in the review of the literature how they should be used as a closely-knit unit. Next, she provides an example of this integration through a lesson plan on the topic of environmental conservation for an Oral Communication course for English majors at School of Modern Languages, University of Costa Rica. Finally, some advice is given to instructors on the incorporation of each of these building blocks.

Coto Keith Rossina

2010-12-01

211

The impact of Finno-Ugric languages in second language research: Looking back and setting goals  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This state of the art review aims at discussing the potential relevance of Finno-Ugric languages in the larger context of second language research. Key results received in the studies conducted in the field of Finno-Ugric languages as second languages are introduced, and some interim conclusions based on them are made. The main areas in focus are cross-linguistic influence, forms and constructions, second language interaction, and motivation, identities and integration. Furthermore, some future lines of investigation are suggested for the researchers of the field. The research activities are recommended to get more closely bound to the internationally established or emerging paradigms, and research activities involving several Finno-Ugric languages are strongly encouraged. To promote international co-operation, some existing gaps or obvious needs for research are pointed out, and preliminary research initiatives are made. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5128/LV22.14

Minna Suni

2012-10-01

212

A Research on Second Language Acquisition and College English Teaching  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available It was in 1970s that American linguist S.D. Krashen created the theory of “language acquisition”. And the theories on second language acquisition were proposed based on the study on the second language acquisition process and its rules. Here, the second language acquisition process refers to the process in which a learner with the mastery of his mother language learns another language without its social environment. Due to the close relationship between second language acquisition research and language teaching, the relevant acquisition theories are of great importance for college English teaching, during which teachers are expected to base their teaching on second language acquisition theories to study the rules of college English teaching, to reform the current teaching patterns and methods and to improve teaching quality. This is a significant project to study carefully for college English teachers as well as second language acquisition researchers.

Changyu Li

2009-11-01

213

Language diversity in the mathematics classroom: does a learner companion make a difference?  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: English Abstract in english Language and education are interrelated because all teaching is given through the medium of language. Language is considered to be both a precondition for thought and a bearer of thought and therefore influences the extent to which a child's intelligence is actualised. In the South African context l [...] inguistic diversity is a complex issue. It has increasingly become the task and responsibility of educators to develop strategies in an attempt to facilitate quality education for their learners. In this study, the researchers developed an 'aid' that would assist learners to relate mathematics terms and concepts in English with terms in their own languages. The study determined whether a visual multilingual learner companion brought change in learners' performance in mathematics. Also what the educators' views were about this. A combination of a quasiexperimental study and an interview schedule was conducted. The quasiexperimental study was conducted among learners while the interview schedule was with their educators. The sample comprised 2,348 learners in Grade 4, Grade 5 and Grade 6 from 20 schools as well as 20 educators from the treatment schools. The results indicated that the mathematics marks of the treatment group improved. Also, the educators were complimentary about the learner companion and indicated that they would utilise this going forward in their teaching. It is recommended that the multilingual visual explanatory mathematics learner companion be used and investigated on a larger scale to corroborate the efficacy reported here.

Hendrik, Botes; Andile, Mji.

214

Power relations in mathematics education: : Researching assessment discourses in day-to-day communication in mathematics classrooms.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In mathematics classrooms as well as in research in mathematics education it is possible to identify various power relations. Here we draw attention to power relations between researcher and teacher during classroom research and also power relations in implicit and explicit assessment acts in communications between teacher and student in the mathematics classroom. We describe a basis for a planned action research project within a critical mathematics education approach. We are drawing on a mo...

2013-01-01

215

Handbook of Classroom Management: Research, Practice, and Contemporary Issues  

Science.gov (United States)

Classroom management is a topic of enduring concern for teachers, administrators, and the public. It consistently ranks as the first or second most serious educational problem in the eyes of the general public, and beginning teachers consistently rank it as their most pressing concern during their early teaching years. Management problems continue…

Evertson, Carolyn M., Ed.; Weinstein, Carol S., Ed.

2006-01-01

216

Standard Modern Greek and Greek-Cypriot Dialect in Kindergarten Classroom Interaction: Teachers' and Learners' Language Attitudes and Language Use  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigates language use and language attitudes in state kindergarten education in Cyprus. Kindergarten education is the primary setting where Greek-Cypriots learn to employ the standard variety on a systematic basis. Consequently, the context of kindergarten education is a principal setting for examining language attitudes and…

Sophocleous, Andry; Wilks, Clarissa

2010-01-01

217

Fidelity of Implementation of Research Experience for Teachers in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

In this study, the Arizona State University Mathematics and Science Teaching Fellows 2010 program was analyzed qualitatively from start to finish to determine the impact of the research experience on teachers in the classroom. The sample for the study was the 2010 cohort of eight high school science teachers. Erickson’s (1986) interpretive, participant observational fieldwork method was used to report data by means of detailed descriptions of the research experience and classroom implementation. Data was collected from teacher documents, interviews, and observations. The findings revealed various factors that were responsible for an ineffective implementation of the research experience in the classroom such as research experience, curriculum support, availability of resources, and school curriculum. Implications and recommendations for future programs are discussed in the study.

Sen, Tapati

218

Exploring the Relationship between Language Awareness and Second Language Use  

Science.gov (United States)

Ever since the publication of Hawkins's (1984) "Awareness of Language," researchers have been investigating the language awareness of second language (L2) learners. Few studies, however, have targeted the relationship between classroom learners' language awareness and L2 production, with fewer still focusing on language awareness and L2…

Kennedy, Sara

2012-01-01

219

Natural Language Processing in Game Studies Research: An Overview  

Science.gov (United States)

Natural language processing (NLP) is a field of computer science and linguistics devoted to creating computer systems that use human (natural) language as input and/or output. The authors propose that NLP can also be used for game studies research. In this article, the authors provide an overview of NLP and describe some research possibilities…

Zagal, Jose P.; Tomuro, Noriko; Shepitsen, Andriy

2012-01-01

220

The Relationship between SLA Research and Language Pedagogy: Teachers' Perspectives  

Science.gov (United States)

There is currently a substantial body of research on second language (L2) learning and this body of knowledge is constantly growing. There are also many attempts in most teacher education programs around the world to inform practicing and prospective L2 teachers about second language acquisition (SLA) research and its findings. However, an…

Nassaji, Hossein

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
221

Early Heritage-Language Education and the Abrupt Shift to a Dominant-Language Classroom: Impact on the Personal and Collective Esteem of Inuit Children in Arctic Quebec  

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This research explored the impact of the abrupt shift from heritage-language to dominant-language education on Inuit children's personal and collective self-esteem. Specifically, the following question was addressed: will early heritage-language education serve as an inoculation against the potential negative impact of being submerged in a…

Bougie, Evelyne; Wright, Stephen C.; Taylor, Donald M.

2003-01-01

222

RESEARCH STUDIES IN SECOND LANGUAGE WRITING AND IN CONTRASTIVE RHETORIC  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The major aim of this article is to review studies of second language writing. The first part deals mainly with the process of writing in the second and first languages. The second part concerns contrastive rhetoric. In this second part, the findings of research studies on the relationship of first and second language rhetoric will be presented. Included in the discussion are research studies on contrastive rhetoric in the Indonesian context. The last section of this article concludes the dis...

Bambang Yudi Cahyono

2001-01-01

223

Bridging Research and Practice: Implementing and Sustaining Knowledge Building in Hong Kong Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

Despite major theoretical progress in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL), relatively less attention has been paid to the problem of how research advances may impact schools and classrooms. Given the global changes and educational policies for twenty-first century education, issues of how research in CSCL can be integrated with…

Chan, Carol K. K.

2011-01-01

224

The Singapore Experience: Synergy of National Policy, Classroom Practice and Design Research  

Science.gov (United States)

In recent years there has been a proliferation of research findings on CSCL at the micro and macro levels, but few compelling examples of how CSCL research has impacted actual classroom practices at the meso-level have emerged. This paper critically examines the impact of adopting a systemic approach to innovative education reforms at the macro,…

Looi, Chee-Kit; So, Hyo-Jeong; Toh, Yancy; Chen, Wenli

2011-01-01

225

Classroom Uses of Instructional Technology: Recommendations for Future Research and Related Activities.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper proposes four scenarios to guide future research investments by the federal Office of Special Education Programs in classroom uses of instructional technology for learners with disabilities. Sets of research and development activities to promote effective use of technology are proposed for: (1) reading instruction; (2) writing…

Okolo, Cynthia M.

226

Where's Your Partner? Pairing Bilingual Learners in Preschool and Primary Grade Dual Language Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

Children working alone is a common instructional strategy in some early childhood classrooms. According to foundational work by Johnson and Johnson (1986), however, cooperative teams employ higher levels of thought and retain information longer than children who work individually. Children engage in discussion, take responsibility for their…

Alanis, Iliana

2013-01-01

227

Bringing the Field into the Classroom: A Field Methods Course on Saudi Arabian Sign Language  

Science.gov (United States)

The methodology used in one graduate-level linguistics field methods classroom is examined through the lens of the students' experiences. Four male Deaf individuals from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia served as the consultants for the course. After a brief background information about their country and its practices surrounding deaf education, both…

Stephen, Anika; Mathur, Gaurav

2012-01-01

228

Instruction in Spanish in Pre-Kindergarten Classrooms and Child Outcomes for English Language Learners  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationships among proportion of instruction in Spanish, observed classroom quality, and preschool-aged children's academic skills. Study participants included 357 Spanish-speaking 4-year-old children who attended state-funded pre-kindergarten programs in 11 states that participated in one of…

Burchinal, Margaret; Field, Samuel; Lopez, Michael L.; Howes, Carollee; Pianta, Robert

2012-01-01

229

Finding a Place for Critical Thinking and Self-voice in College English as a Foreign Language Writing Classrooms  

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Full Text Available Although the concepts of critical thinking and self-voice have been extensively discussed in a second language writing, little attention has been given, on the pedagogical level, to critical thinking and self-voice in college EFL writing instruction. To fill such a void, this paper attempts to propose some pedagogical tasks namely:  persuasive writing tasks, draft workshops one-on-one mentoring approaches for finding a place for critical thinking and self-voice in EFL classrooms. In doing so, this paper provides the operational definitions of critical thinking and self-voice concepts. It then discusses how these two concepts are closely related to complement EFL writing learning. In what follows, it presents the rationale for finding a place for critical thinking and self-voice in EFL writing. It then touches on some pedagogical practices for developing critical thinking and self-voice in classrooms. Lastly, it addresses some challenges related to implementing critical thinking and self-voice tasks in EFL classrooms.

Osman Barnawi

2011-06-01

230

Speakers' comfort and voice level variation in classrooms: laboratory research.  

Science.gov (United States)

Teachers adjust their voice levels under different classroom acoustics conditions, even in the absence of background noise. Laboratory experiments have been conducted in order to understand further this relationship and to determine optimum room acoustic conditions for speaking. Under simulated acoustic environments, talkers do modify their voice levels linearly with the measure voice support, and the slope of this relationship is referred to as room effect. The magnitude of the room effect depends highly on the instruction used and on the individuals. Group-wise, the average room effect ranges from -0.93 dB/dB, with free speech, to -0.1 dB/dB with other less demanding communication tasks as reading and talking at short distances. The room effect for some individuals can be as strong as -1.7 dB/dB. A questionnaire investigation showed that the acoustic comfort for talking in classrooms, in the absence of background noise, is correlated to the decay times derived from an impulse response measured from the mouth to the ears of a talker, and that there is a maximum of preference for decay times between 0.4 and 0.5 s. Teachers with self-reported voice problems prefer higher decay times to speak in than their healthy colleagues. PMID:22779474

Pelegrín-García, David; Brunskog, Jonas

2012-07-01

231

Speakersâ?? comfort and voice level variation in classrooms: Laboratory research  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Teachers adjust their voice levels under different classroom acoustics conditions, even in the absence of background noise. Laboratory experiments have been conducted in order to understand further this relationship and to determine optimum room acoustic conditions for speaking. Under simulated acoustic environments, talkers do modify their voice levels linearly with the measure voice support, and the slope of this relationship is referred to as room effect. The magnitude of the room effect depends highly on the instruction used and on the individuals. Group-wise, the average room effect ranges from 0.93 dB/dB, with free speech, to 0.1 dB/dB with other less demanding communication tasks as reading and talking at short distances. The room effect for some individuals can be as strong as 1.7 dB/dB. A questionnaire investigation showed that the acoustic comfort for talking in classrooms, in the absence of background noise, is correlated to the decay times derived from an impulse response measured from the mouth to the ears of a talker, and that there is a maximum of preference for decay times between 0.4 and 0.5 s. Teachers with self-reported voice problems prefer higher decay times to speak in than their healthy colleagues.

Brunskog, Jonas

2012-01-01

232

Engaging Learner Attribute Research in Dialogue with Classroom Practice: Predictors of Success in the Accelerated, Online Classroom  

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Full Text Available Research examining student success in online education has focused extensively on internal learner attributes with little emphasis on external, controllable factors that may mediate a student’s ability to perform within the distinctive environment of the virtual classroom. The purpose of this study is to balance student characteristic research with external, direct data from the perspective of online instructors in order to provide a practice-oriented understanding of the unique factors predictive of student success in accelerated, online courses. Experienced online educators were surveyed to identify practical skills, strategies or factors most likely to lead to success for students enrolled in online courses. A content-analysis of open-ended responses revealed 23 relevant factors that clustered into six broad themes. Within these themes, four issues emerge as the most predictive of online learner success: time, technology, initiative, and competence. Discussion examines the practical, deliberate application of this information to facilitate students’ successful completion of online courses.

B. Jean Mandernach

2006-07-01

233

Modes of Governmentality in an Online Space: A Case Study of Blog Activities in an Advanced Level Japanese-as-a-Foreign-Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This article discusses the validity of the incorporation of online communication in language education classes as a practice free of power politics. By examining blog activities in an advanced-level Japanese-as-a-Foreign-Language classroom at a university in the USA, we show that the blog's postings and readers' comments evoke certain modes of…

Doerr, Neriko M.; Sato, Shinji

2011-01-01

234

Research and training of teachers in the classroom: Development of proto-mentalist skills in kindergarten pupils with special educational needs  

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Full Text Available An example of research and training of kindergarten’s teachers in the classroom is introduced. Recent research in developmental psychology relate to early childhood skills acquisition proto-mentalist to the development of skills for interacting with objects and people. The results of this study, conducted with 13 children from 15 to 38 months indicated a significant association of social reference (expression skills, identification and recognition of emotions with the pathology (developmental delay, West syndrome, psychomotor impairment, PDD, language delay. Likewise, the data indicate significant correlations between cognitive development and symbolic play, as well as between different areas of development (psychomotor, cognitive, language and socialization.

María Consuelo Sáiz

2012-04-01

235

The Use of L1 in the Foreign Language Classroom / El uso de la lengua materna en el salón de inglés como lengua extranjera  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: English Abstract in spanish El uso de la lengua materna es una ocurrencia común en los contextos de la enseñanza de la lengua extranjera, a pesar de que a veces reciba críticas por su interferencia en la adquisición de la Lengua meta. Mientras que los docentes deben maximizar el uso de la Lengua meta, sin duda, hay espacios pa [...] ra que el profesor utilice la lengua materna de los estudiantes en su pedagogía. En este trabajo se presenta un argumento basado en las perspectivas teóricas y la investigación empírica dentro de la literatura existente, apoyando el uso apropiado de la Lengua materna en el salón de inglés como lengua extranjera. El argumento se centra en tres cuestiones fundamentales-racionales para el uso de la lengua materna: Los efectos positivos que la lengua materna tiene tanto en el aprendizaje y la instrucción de una lengua extranjera, como en las formas en las que la lengua materna ayuda a los docentes de idiomas extranjeros. Abstract in english L1 use is a common occurrence in foreign language teaching contexts despite the fact that it often receives criticism for its interference with target language (TL) acquisition. While foreign language teachers should maximize their use of the TL, there is indeed a place for the teacher to use the st [...] udents' L1 in their pedagogy. In this paper, an argument derived from theoretical perspectives and empirical research within existing literature supporting the appropriate use of L1 in foreign language classrooms is presented. The argument addresses three key issues-rationales for L1 use, positive effects L1 has on both foreign language learning and instruction, and ways that L1 assists instructors on foreign languages.

Yi-chun, Pan; Yi-ching, Pan.

236

MEDIA ART AND LANGUAGE TRIANGLE: A RESEARCH ON THE LANGUAGE OF TURKEY IN EUROVISION SONG CONTEST  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Eurovision song contest with its fifty years history which is the biggest music- art organization of the world has gone down in history. The contest which is also one the most viewed television program has been an example of globalization and language standardization. ?n this article there has been a research on the language of the songs participated to Eurovision song contest from 1975 till today. There has been also a research on the question of “should the song of Turkey be in Turkish or English?” There has been a research and an analysis on the language of the Turkish entry songs for the contest which has the discussion of language and art. There has been a point of how the countries defeated by the globalization by using the English language and not their native language. There has been a discussion for the use of Turkish language and the concept of Turkish which has a big historical background. There has been a discussion of the role of the concept of language in Eurovision Song contest.

Mihalis KUYUCU

2013-06-01

237

Educating Students with Disabilities in General Education Classrooms: A Summary of the Research.  

Science.gov (United States)

This document reviews the research on achievement and successful practices related to educating students with disabilities in inclusive general education classrooms. First, it examines the meaning of "inclusion" and distinguishes inclusion from mainstreaming and integration. The following section explains legal requirements under the Individuals…

Moore, Caroline; Gilbreath, Debra; Maiuri, Fran

238

Using Treatment Integrity in the Classroom to Bring Research and Practice Together  

Science.gov (United States)

Legislation such as No Child Left Behind (NCLB), the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and its reauthorization, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, mandate that evidence-based practices be used in schools. In fact, NCLB requires that "scientifically-based research" be the basis for classroom practices (Smith,…

De Fazio, Carina M.; Fain, A. Christi; Duchaine, Ellen L.

2011-01-01

239

Science for English Language Learners: K-12 Classroom Strategies (e-book)  

Science.gov (United States)

If you work with linguistically and culturally diverse students, you and your students will benefit from the foundation this book provides for teaching both science and language. Science for English Language Learners brings you the best

2009-06-30

240

A Comparative Study of Developmental Outcomes in Web-Based and Classroom-Based German Language Education at the Post-Secondary Level: Vocabulary, Grammar, Language Processing, and Oral Proficiency Development  

Science.gov (United States)

A number of universities offer fully web-based language courses. Many others are considering this option. Yet it remains unclear whether web-based courses can be as comprehensively effective as classroom-based courses. And, if so, what might an effective web-based language course look like? This dissertation considers the German Online at PSU…

Isenberg, Noelle Ariane

2010-01-01

 
 
 
 
241

Interaction in the FL Classroom: From Reactive to Proactive Experience of Language.  

Science.gov (United States)

A review of literature regarding the communicative approach to language teaching discusses achievements and problems with this approach, language learning and the social self, speech and cognition, and reactive and proactive initiative. The need to develop language learning environments which will enhance proactive initiative and self-reliance in…

Cortese, Giuseppina

1987-01-01

242

Opera in the Foreign Language Classroom: Learning German with Mozart, Wagner, Weber, and Johann Strauss  

Science.gov (United States)

Content-based instruction (CBI) has been part of the foreign language curriculum for many years at US colleges, leading to courses that combine language instruction with specific content domains, such as film, literature, politics, sports and many others. This article presents a rather unusual choice of content domain for a second-year language

Heinz, Solveig M.

2010-01-01

243

Using language as a transparent resource in the teaching and learning of mathematics in a Grade 11 multilingual classroom   

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this paper, we draw on a study conducted in Grade 11 classrooms to explore how the learners’ home languages can be used for teaching and learning mathematics in multilingual classrooms in South Africa. This report is part of a wider study that is still in progress. Based on an analysis of data collected through lesson observations in a Grade 11 class and learner interviews we argue for the deliberate, proactive and strategic use of the learners’ home languages as a transparent resource in the teaching and learning of mathematics in multilingual classrooms. Such use of the languages will ensure that learners gain access to mathematical knowledge without losing access to English, which many parents, teachers and learners presently see as a necessary condition for gaining access to social goods such as higher education and employment.

Mamokgethi Setati

2011-10-01

244

The Competency Based Approach to English Language Education and the Walls between the Classroom and the Society in Cameroon: Pulling Down the Walls  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper contends that English as a foreign language teaching in the classrooms at all the levels of education is not adapted to the everyday communication needs of the Cameroonian learners and that an English language pedagogy of integration; otherwise known as the outcomes approach or the competency based approach can solve the problem. This approach seeks for linguistic and sociolinguistic competence in the language. In fact, walls seem to exist between the knowledge these learners get i...

Carlous Muluh Nkwetisama

2012-01-01

245

Solving Ethical Dilemmas with Children: Empowering Classroom Research  

Science.gov (United States)

This article identifies and discusses ethical dilemmas inherent when undertaking research with children or other vulnerable populations: power relations, risks and benefits, and informed consent and confidentiality (Maguire, 2005). Ethical dilemmas often arise when researchers attempt to merge the interests of their research and the interests of…

Parr, Michelann

2010-01-01

246

Brain Matters: Translating Research into Classroom Practice. 2nd Edition  

Science.gov (United States)

While you don't need to be a scientist to understand brain-compatible teaching, you'll be far more effective when you base your teaching practices on the very best scientific information. This expanded and updated ASCD best-seller delivers that essential information in clear, everyday language that any teacher can immediately incorporate into…

Wolfe, Patricia

2010-01-01

247

Translating From Research Into Mathematics Classrooms: Mathematics and Special Needs Students  

Science.gov (United States)

In this short research-based article, Douglas H. Clements, provides ten strategies for classroom practice that are recommended for teaching all students, especially those with learning disabilities. Clements believes research shows educators need to keep expectations reasonable but high and have students practice skills at the problem solving level. While building on studentsâ strengths and their informal strategies, teachers can help students develop conceptual understanding and reasoning skills using manipulatives, technology and patience.

Clements, Douglas H.

2000-01-01

248

Facilitating Research in Pathology using Natural Language Processing  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Clinical research projects frequently rely on manual extraction of information from pathology reports, which is a costly and time-consuming process. This paper describes use of a natural language processing (NLP) system to automatically extract and structure information in textual pathology reports that is needed for clinical research.

Xu, Hua; Friedman, Carol

2003-01-01

249

Raising the Bar on Technology Research in English Language Arts  

Science.gov (United States)

This article represents an attempt to begin a dialogue among the research community to identify what is known about using technology in various content areas. Although it does not present new empirical data, it does offer the reader one researcher's perspective on technology in literacy and language arts. The author discusses the effects of…

McNabb, M. L.

2005-01-01

250

Spoken Language Research and ELT: Where Are We Now?  

Science.gov (United States)

This article examines the relationship between spoken language research and ELT practice over the last 20 years. The first part is retrospective. It seeks first to capture the general tenor of recent spoken research findings through illustrative examples. The article then considers the sociocultural issues that arose when the relevance of these…

Timmis, Ivor

2012-01-01

251

Center for the Study of Language and Information Research Program on Situated Language  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Founded early in 1983, the center for the Study of Language and Information (CSLI) at Stanford University grew out of a long-standing collaboration between scientists at research laboratories in the Palo Alto area and the faculty and students of several Stanford University departments and out of a need for an institutional focus for this work on natural and computer languages. At present, CSLI has 17 senior members and about as many associate members, from SRI International, Xerox PARC, Fairc...

Macken, Elizabeth

1984-01-01

252

The Multigrade Classroom: A Resource Handbook for Small, Rural Schools. Book 1: Review of the Research on Multigrade Instruction.  

Science.gov (United States)

In multigrade instruction, children of at least a 2-year grade span and diverse ability levels are grouped in a single classroom and share experiences involving intellectual, academic, and social skills. "The Multigrade Classroom" is a seven-book series that provides an overview of current research on multigrade instruction, identifies key issues…

Vincent, Susan, Ed.

253

Language Learning Strategy Research: Where do we go from here?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Language learning strategy (LLS research has been on the decline since the mid-1990s, when there was a boom in strategy research. This decline is, in part, due to growing criticisms of categorizations of learning strategies (Dörnyei, 2005, the data collection instruments used (Dörnyei, 2005; Woodrow, 2005, and contradictory and questionable results (Hadwin & Winne, 1996. In more recent years some research has been conducted under the umbrella of terms such as strategic learning and self-regulation, which aim to distance themselves from the past problems of LLS research. This article uses a recent study of strategic learning to illustrate how strategy research can be conducted in the current academic environment. The study shows that research frameworks need to be context-specific rather than generalized across languages and learning tasks. The study also illustrates the usefulness of qualitative data collection instruments over previously and widely applied questionnaires.

Heath Rose

2012-06-01

254

Using a Native American Language as a Classroom Teaching Tool: Teaching Shoshoni Poetry.  

Science.gov (United States)

Children responded enthusiastically to a program that used Shoshoni poetry songs to teach some concepts about human languages in general. Twelve children (four Caucasian, eight Native American) in grades 1-3 and their parents met for four 1-hour sessions. The lessons focused on the sound, meaning, and word order of the Shoshoni language; Shoshoni…

Crum, Beverly Lorene

255

Ukrainian Language and Culture: 9-Year Program Classroom Assessment Materials, Grade 4  

Science.gov (United States)

This document is designed to provide assessment materials for specific Grade 4 outcomes in the Ukrainian Language and Culture Nine-year Program, Grades 4-5-6. The assessment materials are designed for the beginner level in the context of teaching for communicative competence. Grade 4 learning outcomes from the Ukrainian Language and Culture…

Alberta Education, 2008

2008-01-01

256

Language Learning in Cyberspace: Teleporting the Classroom into the Target Culture.  

Science.gov (United States)

Reports a study that tested the possibility of language instruction in a MOO (Multiple-User Domain, Object-Oriented). The experiment consisted of two groups: adult evening-school participants in Germany learning English-as-a-Second-Language and American college students in their fourth semester of college German. Partnerships were formed with one…

Donaldson, Randall P.; Kotter, Markus

1999-01-01

257

Language, Interaction, and Inequality: A Teaching Exercise for the Sociological Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this paper is to describe an original active learning exercise that incorporates both referential and constructivist perspectives on the role of language in the social world. The exercise encourages students to view language as both a vehicle for transmitting sociologically-relevant content (e.g., attitudes, perspectives,…

Mallinson, Christine

2009-01-01

258

Chinese Language and Culture: 9-Year Program Classroom Assessment Materials, Grade 4  

Science.gov (United States)

This document is designed to provide assessment materials for specific Grade 4 outcomes in the Chinese Language and Culture Nine-year Program, Grades 4-5-6. The assessment materials are designed for the beginner level in the context of teaching for communicative competence. Grade 4 learning outcomes from the Chinese Language and Culture Nine-year…

Alberta Education, 2008

2008-01-01

259

The Emergence of U.S. French Language Learners' Intercultural Competence in Online Classroom Discussions  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study is to further the understanding of foreign language (FL) learners' development of intercultural competence in an instructed learning environment. In this study, second-semester U.S. French language learners enrolled in a Midwestern two-year technical school were directed to access explicit cultural instruction, authentic…

Garrett-Rucks, Paula

2010-01-01

260

Developing Classroom Assessment Tasks Based on a Language Arts Curriculum: An In-service Approach.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was twofold: to develop teachers' assessment skills and to enable teachers to apply this knowledge to the creation of assessment tasks for the language arts curriculum thereby linking curriculum to assessment. Using a newly developed language arts curriculum, 79 urban Connecticut teachers were asked to develop the…

Patelis, Thanos; Singer, Judith

 
 
 
 
261

Literature Reading and Research in a Middle School Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examines a literature and reading research project involving an English education professor, a middle-school teacher, and her gifted seventh-grade students. Suggests that the class's homogeneity was a deterrent in the learning process and that students need more opportunities for independent and group research that requires extensive problem…

Carroll, Pamela Sissi; Corder, Kathy

1997-01-01

262

Teachers and Teacher Trainees as Classroom Researchers: Beyond Utopia?  

Science.gov (United States)

In Flanders, action research as a means of enhancing quality in initial teacher training and in teaching practice is not as widespread as in some of the neighbouring countries. In this article the authors argue for trainees and qualified teachers setting up and conducting research in their teaching practice. Rather than perceiving this as an…

Van Looy, Linda; Goegebeur, Werner

2007-01-01

263

MEDIA ART AND LANGUAGE TRIANGLE: A RESEARCH ON THE LANGUAGE OF TURKEY IN EUROVISION SONG CONTEST  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Eurovision song contest with its fifty years history which is the biggest music- art organization of the world has gone down in history. The contest which is also one the most viewed television program has been an example of globalization and language standardization. ?n this article there has been a research on the language of the songs participated to Eurovision song contest from 1975 till today. There has been also a research on the question of “should the song of Turkey be in Turkish o...

2013-01-01

264

Research in Knowledge Representation for Natural Language Understanding  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This ARPA project in Knowledge Representation for Natural Language Understanding is aimed at developing techniques for computer assistance to a decision maker in understanding a complex system or situation using natural language control of an intelligent graphics display. The work in progress falls into three classes: fluent natural language understanding in a graphics context - including helpful systems that go beyond mere passive execution of literal instructions, fundamental problems of knowledge representation and use, and abstract parallel algorithms for knowledge base inferential operations. This report gives a brief summary of the activities of this research project during the past year. In addition, publications and presentations during the past year are documented.

Woods, W.A.; Bates, M.; Bobrow, R.; Goodman, B.; Israel, D.

1982-09-01

265

Focus on the use of language in the multicultural mathematics classroom  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Learning mathematics can be seen as learning a foreign language or learning a particular mathematical discourse.  Nolte (2004) calls mathematics the students' first second language. The use of language in mathematics teaching, hence the way we talk and the way we write, differ from the way the same words and concepts are used in everyday language or in teaching and learning other subjects. Looking through material for mathematics teaching shows that the students are expected to have a certain level of mathematical ability (ex. being able to count to ten) and a certain level of language ability (ex. understanding the meaning of the words "in front of") when they enter first grade in primary school (Nyborg and Nyborg, 1990). Students who lack these abilities either with regard to mathematics or language are from the beginning of schooling limited in their mathematical performance and in a "risk zone" of developing learning difficulties in mathematics. Teaching the teachers a consciousness for the use of language in mathematics teaching as well as educating them to have a special focus on developing the vocabulary of the students can render the mathematics teaching more inclusive. Furthermore, it may help students with different ethnical background to succeed in mathematics (Johansen; 2007).

Johansen, Lene Ã?stergaard

266

Discussing Animal Rights and Animal Research in the Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Reviews two prominent philosophical justifications for animal liberation and describes a simulation that facilitates class discussion of animal research issues. Students reported that the exercise increased their awareness of the issues and of the complexity of making ethical decisions. (DB)

Herzog, Harold A.

1990-01-01

267

Teaching English language learners in mainstream science classrooms: Teacher practice and educational opportunity  

Science.gov (United States)

Equal educational opportunity for English language learners (ELLs) has been a goal of the public educational system in the United States. Language policy reforms have increasedaccountability in order for schools to improve student achievement and measure the progress of ELLs. The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) requires assessment and accountability. In this study, the number of ELLs has increased significantly at the high school level and school district as a whole. Along with the changing demographics, the findings reveal a district-wide policy of equalizing educational opportunity through equal treatment. Language policies provide critical decisions about how to measure what students know in all subjects. The assimilation model limited access to mainstream course content, produced inaccurate assessment results and grades. The science curriculum was only accessible through English and the use of the students' native languages was discouraged. The voices of the students were silenced and their academic achievement continues to lag behind their English-speaking peers.

Schroeder, Carlotta Dorothy

268

Research into Sexism in Language Testing & Its Implications to Language Testing in China  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper reviews foreign and domestic sexism research and practice in language testing and reveals that China lags behind in this sociolinguistics perspective in both theoretical study and practice. The paper indicates that sexism is represented in the listening comprehension section in National Matriculation English Test (NMET) after a case…

Tao, Baiqiang

2007-01-01

269

Noncognitive Skills in the Classroom: New Perspectives on Educational Research  

Science.gov (United States)

This book provides an overview of recent research on the relationship between noncognitive attributes (motivation, self efficacy, resilience) and academic outcomes (such as grades or test scores). The authors focus primarily on how these sets of attributes are measured and how they relate to important academic outcomes. Noncognitive attributes are…

Rosen, Jeffrey A.; Glennie, Elizabeth J.; Dalton, Ben W.; Lennon, Jean M.; Bozick, Robert N.

2010-01-01

270

Gender Equity and Classroom Experiences: A Review of Research.  

Science.gov (United States)

This report reviews research that demonstrates how gender inequity is not only learned and accepted in the socialization process that starts at home, but is also present in the school environment from the very early years, consciously or unconsciously, reinforcing sex stereotypes. Findings are examined in three areas: (1) interactions in the…

Olivares, Rafael A.; Rosenthal, Nancy

271

Becoming Teachers: Examining How Preservice Elementary Teachers Use Language to Construct Professional Identities, Learn within Relationships, and Take Risks in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This longitudinal qualitative study examined how four preservice elementary teachers used language to construct professional identities, learn within relationships, and take risks in the classroom during their final three semesters in teacher education coursework and field experiences. My female participants were former students of mine in the…

Ticknor, Anne Swenson

2010-01-01

272

Conceptualizing Humanistic Competence in the Language Classroom by TJP - A Chinese Case  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

language: AR-SA; mso-ansi-language: EN-GB;" lang="EN-GB">As learning is seen to be a social process as well as an intellectual activity in which teachers work in active partnership with students, “Teaching by Joint Presentation” (TJP) project s...

Ling Zhang; Chris Atkin

2010-01-01

273

An introduction to crowdsourcing for language and multimedia technology research  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Language and multimedia technology research often relies on large manually constructed datasets for training or evaluation of algorithms and systems. Constructing these datasets is often expensive with significant challenges in terms of recruitment of personnel to carry out the work. Crowdsourcing methods using scalable pools of workers available on-demand offers a flexible means of rapid low-cost construction of many of these datasets to support existing research requirements and potentia...

Jones, Gareth J. F.

2013-01-01

274

What's the Story? Using the Narrative Approach in Beginning Language Classrooms.  

Science.gov (United States)

Introduces the narrative approach to language teaching, which incorporates existing comprehension-based methods, but rather than focusing the syllabus on grammatical structures or thematically organized vocabulary, focuses on interesting and comprehensible stories. Students' natural interest in and familiarity with narratives makes storytelling a…

McQuillan, Jeff; Tse, Lucy

1998-01-01

275

Sexual Identity as Linguistic Failure: Trajectories of Interaction in the Heteronormative Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This article examines interactions from tertiary-level foreign languages classes in which students challenge the heteronormative construction of their sexual identity. These interactions are triggered by questions that potentially reference students' real-world identities but which attribute a heteronormative identity to the questions' recipients.…

Liddicoat, Anthony J.

2009-01-01

276

PRACTICAL VALUE OF UNDERSTANDING THE MINDSET OF SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS AND STUDENTS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSROOM  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Understanding the mind set of students and teachers seeks much more importance in the present scenario. The present study is intended to find the type of mindset of secondary school students in learning English language on the select areas and also made an attempt to find out the effect of fixed mindset of students on the attitude of students towards English language. Understanding the mind set of secondary school English teachers regarding the performance and attitude of students in learning English language on select areas revealed the result that most of the teachers are having fixed mind set and there is an urgent necessity to change the situation. A sample of 100 secondary school students and 20 secondary school English teachers were selected randomly from the state of Kerala. Majority of students are having fixed mindset in select areas and they believe that it is talent which is worthwhile and their effort won’t do anything in learning English language. A shift in this situation is the need of the hour. For that the teachers should change their mindset and motivate the learners to assure themselves that their intelligence is not static.

Noora Abdul Kader

2013-07-01

277

Reaching English Language Learners in Every Classroom: Energizers for Teaching and Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

Reach all of your English language learners with the effective and engaging approaches in this book. It's filled with practical tools, strategies, and real-world vignettes that will help you teach reading and writing to a diverse student population. The book features "Mental Energizers," aptitudes that will help sustain your commitment as you work…

Arechiga, Debbie

2012-01-01

278

Learning to Watch Cinema in the Classroom: Production and Investigation for the Teaching of Cinematographic Language  

Science.gov (United States)

This article synthesises an investigation of the making of a didactic programme as a consequence of the excess of consumption of audiovisual messages and the non critical and non-thoughtful attitude the youngsters have towards it. As an answer to this problem, the authors have produced a didactical programme about cinema and its language, the main…

Goncalves, Ana Luisa; Fandos, Manuel; Aguaded, Jose-Ignacio

2011-01-01

279

Linking Geography to Reading and English Language Learners' Achievement in US Elementary and Middle School Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

The "GeoLiteracy for English language learners" (ELLs) program is a curriculum that enhances reading and writing skills while teaching geography content for US students in kindergarten through eighth grades. The program includes 85 lesson plans that address all US national geography standards, a quarter of which address environmental issues. The…

Hinde, Elizabeth R.; Osborn Popp, Sharon E.; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Dorn, Ronald I.

2011-01-01

280

Listening with Your Eyes: The Importance of Speech-Related Gestures in the Language Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Argues nonverbal communication (NVC) forms an important part of everyday speech transmission and should occupy a more central position in second and foreign language teaching than it currently does. Examines the role played by NVC in a three-turn conversational exchange and the literature supporting the notion that speech-related gestures have a…

Harris, Tony

2003-01-01

 
 
 
 
281

Teacher Talking Time in the EFL Classroom Tiempo de participación oral del profesor en el aula de inglés como lengua extranjera  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Classroom Research may be simply defined as ongoing and cumulative intellectual inquiry by classroom teachers into the nature of teaching and learning in their own classrooms (Cross and Steadman, 1996, p.2). This paper reports on a piece of classroom research, aiming to support the hypothesis that most of the talk in my English-as-a-foreign-language elementary and intermediate classrooms was done by the teacher, presumably implying a more teacher-centred approach. In terms of the percentage o...

Nilton Hitotuzi

2005-01-01

282

The Competency Based Approach to English Language Education and the Walls between the Classroom and the Society in Cameroon: Pulling Down the Walls  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper contends that English as a foreign language teaching in the classrooms at all the levels of education is not adapted to the everyday communication needs of the Cameroonian learners and that an English language pedagogy of integration; otherwise known as the outcomes approach or the competency based approach can solve the problem. This approach seeks for linguistic and sociolinguistic competence in the language. In fact, walls seem to exist between the knowledge these learners get in the classrooms and the implementation of the knowledge in the real world society for which that knowledge is destined. Literature in the domain of attitudes and motivation shows that they are affectively predisposed to learn the language. A critical examination of the syllabus revealed that it spells out laudable learning outcomes or expectations and that it has adequate communicative approach recommendations for a post-methods era English language teacher. But recent literature on classroom teaching holds that English language teaching in Cameroon is a matter of teacher talk and chalk and course books; some of which are not adapted to the learners’ needs and interests

Carlous Muluh Nkwetisama

2012-03-01

283

Re-Examine the Use of the Student's First Language in the English as a Foreign Language Classrooms: A Cross-Case Analysis from Undergraduate Engineering Students in Bangkok, Thailand  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to examine how the use of the student's first language (L1) by a non-native English-speaking EFL teacher affects the students' experiences in learning English compared to those in the classrooms where only English is used as a means of teaching. This study also investigates the role of the teacher in providing…

Vanichakorn, Neelawan

2009-01-01

284

The Combine Project: An Experience in a Dual-Language Classroom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article describes what happened when a bilingual kindergarten class in West Liberty, Iowa, investigated a combine. The dual-language program supports content area instruction in both Spanish and English. The first part of the article tells the story of the Combine Project, this class's first project work. The story begins with a typical kindergarten field trip to a farm and ends with a parent night to show a combine constructed by the kindergartners. The second part of the article discusses the teacher's reflections on learning how to guide projects. Reflections by the teacher include relating kindergarten goals to projects, supporting second-language learners, involving parents, and including children with special needs.

Rebecca Wilson

2001-01-01

285

Natural Conversation Reconstruction Tasks: The Language Classroom as a Meeting Place  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper, drawing on Pratt’s notion of ‘transculturation’ and Bhabha’s ‘third space’, presents an example of language learning tasks that empower learners’ agency and promote their cross-cultural awareness and sensitivities to a different set of cultural expectations, using a naturally occurred Japanese thanking episodes. The paper discusses the merits of Natural Conversation Reconstruction Tasks (NCRTs) as a practical method for helping L2 learners develop this ‘intercultur...

2009-01-01

286

Critical literacy in the english language classroom O letramento crítico na aula de língua inglesa  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper reports the experience of developing teaching materials for public school teachers and students in southern Brazil in a project funded by the Education Department of Paraná State. The materials were intended as resources to be used by teachers according to their needs and those of their local communities, rather than as a textbook per se. The theory underlying this project is based on critical literacy and the idea that language is discourse, i.e. embedded in cultural and ideologi...

2012-01-01

287

Natural Conversation Reconstruction Tasks: The Language Classroom as a Meeting Place  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper, drawing on Pratt’s notion of ‘transculturation’ and Bhabha’s ‘third space’, presents an example of language learning tasks that empower learners’ agency and promote their cross-cultural awareness and sensitivities to a different set of cultural expectations, using a naturally occurred Japanese thanking episodes. The paper discusses the merits of Natural Conversation Reconstruction Tasks (NCRTs as a practical method for helping L2 learners develop this ‘intercultural competence’. It is based on a qualitative study of the results of one NCRT created for use in the context of teaching Japanese as a L2 in a multicultural society. It suggests the NCRT encourages the learners to explore the intersection where language use, speaker intention and L1 and L2 cultural norms meet. Such a process helps the learners become aware of socially expected patterns of communication in L1 and L2 in terms of the choices of speech act, formulaic expressions, sequential organization and politeness orientation. The learners’ comments suggest that the NCRT helps learners transcend their cultural boundaries by overcoming their narrow understanding of ‘thanking’ as ‘expressions of gratitude and appreciation’ and by cross-culturally widening their views of what counts as thanking. The NCRT with rich contextual information promotes the learners’ intercultural awareness, sensitivity to context and intercultural exploration in the space between L1 and L2, where they have authority and freedom of making sense of conversations, and pragmatics is fully integrated into language pedagogy.

Jun Ohashi

2009-03-01

288

Natural Conversation Reconstruction Tasks: The Language Classroom as a Meeting Place  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper, drawing on Pratt’s notion of ‘transculturation’ and Bhabha’s ‘third space’, presents an example of language learning tasks that empower learners’ agency and promote their cross-cultural awareness and sensitivities to a different set of cultural expectations, using a naturally occurred Japanese thanking episodes. The paper discusses the merits of Natural Conversation Reconstruction Tasks (NCRTs as a practical method for helping L2 learners develop this ‘intercultural competence’. It is based on a qualitative study of the results of one NCRT created for use in the context of teaching Japanese as a L2 in a multicultural society. It suggests the NCRT encourages the learners to explore the intersection where language use, speaker intention and L1 and L2 cultural norms meet. Such a process helps the learners become aware of socially expected patterns of communication in L1 and L2 in terms of the choices of speech act, formulaic expressions, sequential organization and politeness orientation. The learners’ comments suggest that the NCRT helps learners transcend their cultural boundaries by overcoming their narrow understanding of ‘thanking’ as ‘expressions of gratitude and appreciation’ and by cross-culturally widening their views of what counts as thanking. The NCRT with rich contextual information promotes the learners’ intercultural awareness, sensitivity to context and intercultural exploration in the space between L1 and L2, where they have authority and freedom of making sense of conversations, and pragmatics is fully integrated into language pedagogy.

Jun Ohashi

2009-08-01

289

Evaluating the Psychometric Properties of the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale for Cypriot Senior High School EFL Students: The Rasch Measurement Approach  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS for Cypriot senior high school EFL students, through Rasch measurement. In doing so, the researchers clarified two discrepancies found in the literature: first the factor structure of the scale and second whether test anxiety is a component of FLCA. The Greek version of the FLCAS was administered to a sample of 304 senior high school EFL students. Results showed that after removing five items which fitted the Rasch Rating Scale model poorly, the remaining 28 items formed a unidimensional scale, one component of which is test anxiety. The degree of reliability was high. Semantic analysis of the items revealed that one of the reasons was the inclusion of many parallel items. The Rasch person-item map showed that a second reason was the narrow coverage of the construct by the items. Finally the 5-point Likert scale was shown to be marginally optimal. Suggestions are proposed for future research into the refinement of the scale.

Panayiotis Panayides

2013-08-01

290

Une approche discursive de la classe de langue étrangère en tant que lieu de travail / A discoursive approach of foreign language classroom as a place of work  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: French Abstract in portuguese O presente artigo centra-se na análise dos discursos da aula de língua estrangeira em uma situação particular: o ensino da língua francesa como língua profissional. Nosso objetivo consistirá em depreender marcas enunciativas por intermédio das quais se inscreve a natureza do trabalho realizado em sa [...] la de aula, tendo em vista a construção coletiva de um texto cuja autoria é responsabilidade dos atores da cena didática, professor e alunos. Para tal, interrogamos esses discursos da sala de aula sob uma tríplice ótica: em primeiro lugar, a oposição que se verifica entre trabalho coletivo e trabalho individual; a seguir, a dupla função exercida pela linguagem no referido contexto, a saber, a linguagem enquanto trabalho e a linguagem sobre o trabalho; finalmente, a distância que se verifica entre o trabalho prescrito e o trabalho real da sala de aula. Abstract in english This paper focuses the analysis of speech in foreign language classroom in a particular situation: the teaching of French as a professional language. Our purpose will be to explore enunciative marks that contribute to determine the nature of the work carried out in classroom throughout the collectiv [...] e construction of a text which is built by the actors of the didactic scene, the teacher and the students. In order to achieve our goal, we will interrogate these discourses from a triple point of view: first of all, the opposition between collective work and individual work in classroom; afterwards, the double function of language - language as work and language about work - in such a context; finally, the distance verified between prescribed work and real work in classroom.

Rocha, Décio.

291

Some Observations on Japanese Senior High School Learners' Language Transfer 1.  

Science.gov (United States)

Observes and analyzes Japanese senior high school students' errors due to language transfer. The study focuses on written language, is based on classroom research, and provides possible ways of explaining second-language acquisition. (Author/VWL)

Koizumi, Mitsuhiro

1998-01-01

292

The language of intersectionality: researching ‘lesbian’ identity in urban Russia  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The relationship between identity, lived experience, sexual practices and the language through which these are conveyed has been widely debated in sexuality literature. For example, ‘coming out’ has famously been conceptualised as a ‘speech act’ (Sedgwick 1990) and as a collective narrative (Plummer 1995), while a growing concern for individuals’ diverse identifications in relations to their sexual and gender practices has produced interesting research focusing on linguistic practi...

Stella, Francesca

2010-01-01

293

The Teaching and Learning of Arabic Post 9/11: Late Modernity and Possibilities for Change in Language Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

In this current era of postmodernity, globalization, and new technological and social conditions, new approaches to literacy teaching are being introduced and examined. Studies that explore complexities of language teaching and learning in discourses of postmodernity as they relate to college contexts are significant for educators, researchers,…

Abbadi, Sawsan Omar

2011-01-01

294

Critical literacy in the english language classroom / O letramento crítico na aula de língua inglesa  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in portuguese Este artigo relata uma experiência de desenvolvimento de materiais didáticos para alunos de escolas públicas no sul do Brasil, em um projeto financiado pela SEED - Secretaria de Estado da Educação do Paraná. Os materiais foram pensados como recursos a serem utilizados pelos professores de acordo com [...] suas necessidades locais, ao invés de constituírem-se simplesmente em um livro didático. A teoria subjacente ao projeto está baseada no letramento crítico e na concepção da língua como discurso, ou seja, uma língua repleta de valores culturais e ideológicos, os quais determinam significados e estabelecem relações de poder entre textos, entre leitores e entre textos e seus leitores, em sintonia com o conceito freiriano de palavramundo - "wor(l)d". Os alunos leitores são, nesse sentido, coprodutores de significados e responsáveis por dar sentido à realidade. Esperamos que alunos e professores, que venham a utilizar os materiais que elaboramos, se tornem mais cientes de suas possibilidades como agentes e, desse modo, pretendemos estimular um sentido de cidadania ativa tanto em alunos quanto em professores. Abstract in english This paper reports the experience of developing teaching materials for public school teachers and students in southern Brazil in a project funded by the Education Department of Paraná State. The materials were intended as resources to be used by teachers according to their needs and those of their l [...] ocal communities, rather than as a textbook per se. The theory underlying this project is based on critical literacy and the idea that language is discourse, i.e. embedded in cultural and ideological values which determine its meaning and establish power relations among texts, among readers and among texts and their readers - Freirean "readers of the wor(l)d". Student-readers are, in this sense, co-constructors of meanings and responsible for making sense of reality. We expect students and teachers who use the materials we designed to become more aware of their possibilities as agents and this way we intend to foster a sense of active citizenship.

Clarissa Menezes, Jordão; Francisco Carlos, Fogaça.

295

Teacher-Researcher Collaboration in a Grade Four Mathematics Classroom: Restoring Equality to Students' Usage of the "=" Sign  

Science.gov (United States)

This article portrays action research conducted in relation to students' faulty use of the equality sign in a Grade Four mathematics classroom in Sweden. Substantial background on teacher-researcher collaboration that prepares ground for the action research is offered. Drawing on cultural-historical and activity theory perspectives, the conduct of…

Gade, Sharada

2012-01-01

296

A Research-Informed Approach to Teaching About Exoplanet Detection in STEM Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

JPL’s NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program’s (ExEP) Public Engagement Program, in collaboration with the Center for Astronomy Education (CAE), is engaged in a research and curriculum development program to bring the science of exoplanet detection into STEM classrooms. In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of astronomers pursuing research related to exoplanets, along with a significant increase in interest amongst students and the general public regarding the topic of exoplanets. CAE has previously developed a curriculum unit (including Think-Pair-Share questions and a Lecture-Tutorial) to help students develop a deeper understanding of the Doppler method for detecting extrasolar planets. To date, there is a nearly nonexistent research base on students’ conceptual and reasoning difficulties related to the science of the transit and gravitational microlensing methods for detecting extrasolar planets. Appropriate for physical science classrooms from middle school to the introductory college level, the learner-centered active engagement activities we are developing are going through an iterative research and assessment process to ensure that they enable students to achieve increased conceptual understandings and reasoning skills in these areas. In this talk, we will report on our development process for two new Lecture-Tutorials that help students learn about the transit and gravitational microlensing methods for finding exoplanets.

Brissenden, Gina; Wallace, C. S.; Prather, E. E.; Traub, W. A.; Greene, W. M.; Biferno, A. A.

2014-01-01

297

“COMING TO KNOW”: WEAVING ABORIGINAL AND WESTERN SCIENCE KNOWLEDGE, LANGUAGE, AND LITERACY INTO THE SCIENCE CLASSROOM  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Following the work of contemporary thinkers, we propose that every culture has its own science and that both indigenous and western science knowledge systems are valuable and have been useful to the cultures developing them. Because a valid interpretation of scientific literacy must be consistent with a prevailing image of science and rapid changes taking place in society, we propose more inclusive definitions and metaphors of science literacy. Science literacy for Aboriginal people must reflect a broad cultural approach that recognizes the unique way Aboriginal people live and present their experience and knowledge. Literacy programs from an Aboriginal perspective must go beyond reading, writing, and numeracy to include oracy – stories, songs, dances, symbols, ceremonies. Science literacy from an Aboriginal perspective involves being knowledgeable about the extensive examples and applications of Aboriginal science knowledge, as well as western science knowledge, and science discourse about the nature of science. Literacy also includes the wisdom component of Aboriginal science, which brings the discussion of values and ethics to science and technology and requires sustaining both community and environment. Aboriginal languages serve as storehouses of experience and perspectives that help main-tain cultural identity, resist assimilation, and interpret the relationship between society and environment.

GLORIA J. SNIVELY

2008-03-01

298

Helping English Language Learners Succeed in Middle and High Schools. Collaborative Partnerships between ESL and Classroom Teachers Series  

Science.gov (United States)

This volume of Collaborative Partnerships between ESL and Classroom Teachers gives emphasis to collaborative partnerships in the middle and high school levels. Editors Faridah Pawan and Ginger Sietman gather expert authors who present us with models of classroom-based and school-based collaborative partnerships from middle and high schools across…

Pawan, Faridah, Ed.; Sietman, Ginger, Ed.

2007-01-01

299

Critical literacy in the english language classroom O letramento crítico na aula de língua inglesa  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper reports the experience of developing teaching materials for public school teachers and students in southern Brazil in a project funded by the Education Department of Paraná State. The materials were intended as resources to be used by teachers according to their needs and those of their local communities, rather than as a textbook per se. The theory underlying this project is based on critical literacy and the idea that language is discourse, i.e. embedded in cultural and ideological values which determine its meaning and establish power relations among texts, among readers and among texts and their readers - Freirean "readers of the wor(ld". Student-readers are, in this sense, co-constructors of meanings and responsible for making sense of reality. We expect students and teachers who use the materials we designed to become more aware of their possibilities as agents and this way we intend to foster a sense of active citizenship.Este artigo relata uma experiência de desenvolvimento de materiais didáticos para alunos de escolas públicas no sul do Brasil, em um projeto financiado pela SEED - Secretaria de Estado da Educação do Paraná. Os materiais foram pensados como recursos a serem utilizados pelos professores de acordo com suas necessidades locais, ao invés de constituírem-se simplesmente em um livro didático. A teoria subjacente ao projeto está baseada no letramento crítico e na concepção da língua como discurso, ou seja, uma língua repleta de valores culturais e ideológicos, os quais determinam significados e estabelecem relações de poder entre textos, entre leitores e entre textos e seus leitores, em sintonia com o conceito freiriano de palavramundo - "wor(ld". Os alunos leitores são, nesse sentido, coprodutores de significados e responsáveis por dar sentido à realidade. Esperamos que alunos e professores, que venham a utilizar os materiais que elaboramos, se tornem mais cientes de suas possibilidades como agentes e, desse modo, pretendemos estimular um sentido de cidadania ativa tanto em alunos quanto em professores.

Clarissa Menezes Jordão

2012-01-01

300

Factors Influencing Chinese Language Learners' Strategy Use  

Science.gov (United States)

This survey study, which involved 134 language learners enrolled in first-year Chinese as a foreign language classrooms in the US universities, intended to address the research question, "Do learners' strategy use differ based on the following learner differences: (1) gender; (2) home language/culture; and (3) number of other foreign languages

Sung, Ko-Yin

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
301

IMPROVING TEACHERS’ PROFESSIONALISM THROUGH MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND CLASSROOM ACTION RESEARCH  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract: One of the ways to promote the International standard schools’ teacher professionalism was to carry out weekly workshops on material development based on curriculum pathways of the National Plus High Schools using the Information Technology (IT facilities. This research developed teacher-made materials for the X grade. The materials were graded: narrative, recount, news item, descriptive, ranging from 250 to 500 words. The materials were then tried out in a Classroom Action Research (CAR at eight classes of X grades. Based on previous research, teachers’ preferences are made in line with the students’ choice of issues to be discussed. It aimed at knowing the feasibility of the materials, the students’ preference of exercises and students’ level of competencies of each class related to the understanding of the units. Results of the questionnaires showed that most of the materials were understood and liked by the students. Thus, professionalism was seen during the process of the CAR.

Emalia Iragiliati Sukarni

2009-01-01

302

On student engagement in whole-class oral interaction: from classroom discourse and sociocultural aspects to implications for language learning On student engagement in whole-class oral interaction: from classroom discourse and sociocultural aspects to implications for language learning  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This article reports on a study on classroom interaction in an EFL context in Brazil. The study, of an ethnographic nature, analyses recorded lessons, interviews and questionnaires answered by the students. The social rules governing classroom interaction usually determine an asymmetrical relationship between the teacher and the students, though it may be possible, according to the data obtained, to create an atmosphere of co-operation in which interaction may occur within less asymmetri...

Douglas Altamiro Consolo

2008-01-01

303

The Application of Syntactic Priming in Second Language Research  

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Full Text Available In this report, we provide a brief discussion of syntactic priming and how this methodology has provided insight into issues of syntactic representation, specifically in terms of the autonomy of syntax and the relationship between production and perception in syntactic representation. We present results from studies related to syntactic priming in bilinguals and second/foreign language learners that focus on the ways in which syntactic priming can illuminate the representation of syntax in acquisition and bilingual grammar. Finally, we suggest further paths of research using this methodology.

Ahmad Ameri-Golestan

2012-09-01

304

A Research-Informed Approach to Teaching About Light & Matter in STEM Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

In collaboration with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), we have engaged in a research and curriculum development program to bring the detailed science of light and matter into STEM classrooms. Typical Astro 101 classes often discuss emission/absorption spectra with reference to the Bohr model only and teach radiation as produced/absorbed only by electron transitions. We present here curricula developed to highlight other emission/absorption phenomena (specifically those produced by rotational/vibrational molecular transitions as well as synchrotron radiation.) Appropriate for physical science classrooms from middle school to the introductory college level, the learner-centered active engagement activities we are developing are going through an iterative research and assessment process to ensure that they enable students to achieve increased conceptual understandings and reasoning skills. In this talk, we will report on our development process for a suite of activities, including lecture slides, Think-Pair-Share questions, assessment questions and a new Lecture-Tutorial that help students learn about these other important emission models.

Hornstein, Seth D.; Wallace, C. S.; Schlingman, W. M.; Prather, E. E.

2014-01-01

305

Encouraging Teachers to Build Collaborations with Researchers; Examples From the Classroom (Invited)  

Science.gov (United States)

Bringing experts into our schools allows for highly engaging lessons, encourages career thinking, adds authenticity to the topic, and allows student's questions to be answered by experts. Researchers can physically visit classrooms or appear through presentation technologies, such as Skype, or Google Hangouts. Virtual visits allow students to see laboratories and field sites. Collaborating with scientists builds the connective tissue that helps all educators and our students learn more deeply. When K-12 teachers collaborate with scientists and graduate students, teachers learn more science, and scientists learn more teaching. This growth of background knowledge is a win-win situation and helps us meet the expectations of the Common Core State Standards. Teachers need to feel encouraged to contact their local or regional scientists for support. Reaching out into the universities to make contact with polar scientists or graduate students is a good place to start. Building professional networks allows PI's to address the 'broader impact' requirement on many grant applications, and helps spread the university's work in the polar regions out to the general public. These collaborations also give teachers expert insights and current data to build authentic lessons, and excite their students to seek careers in the sciences. This presentation will focus on three completed interactive opportunities I have built with researchers in my classroom. Students adding daily sediment to their sediment core, after communications from the field with scientist Heidi Roop in Alaska.

Kane, M.

2013-12-01

306

WormClassroom.org: An Inquiry-Rich Educational Web Portal for Research Resources of "Caenorhabditis elegans"  

Science.gov (United States)

The utilization of biology research resources, coupled with a "learning by inquiry" approach, has great potential to aid students in gaining an understanding of fundamental biological principles. To help realize this potential, we have developed a Web portal for undergraduate biology education, WormClassroom.org, based on current research

Lu, Fong-Mei; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Stewart, James; White, John G.

2007-01-01

307

The Impact of a Professional Development Program on English Language Teachers' Classroom Performance / El impacto de un programa de desarrollo profesional en el desempeño en clase de profesores de lengua inglesa  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: English Abstract in spanish En este artículo se presentan los resultados de una investigación-acción en un programa de desarrollo profesional y su impacto en el desempeño de clase de profesores de inglés de un instituto de lenguas de una universidad pública colombiana. Para recoger los datos se utilizaron cuestionarios, entrev [...] istas, observaciones de clase y el diario del investigador. Los resultados sugieren mejorías en el desempeño de los docentes, ya que la enseñanza fue más comunicativa, organizada, atenta a las necesidades de los estudiantes y basada en principios. La teoría, la práctica, la reflexión y el papel desempeñado por el tutor se combinaron de manera efectiva para ayudar a los profesores a mejorar. Se concluye que los programas de desarrollo profesional deben planearse con base en las filosofías y necesidades de los profesores y articular la teoría, la práctica, la experiencia y la reflexión de manera más efectiva. Abstract in english This article reports the findings of an action research study on a professional development program and its impact on the classroom performance of in-service English teachers who worked at a language institute of a Colombian state university. Questionnaires, semi-structured interviews, class observa [...] tions, and a researcher's journal were used as data collection instruments. Findings suggest that these in-service teachers improved their classroom performance as their teaching became more communicative, organized, attentive to students' needs, and principled. In addition, theory, practice, reflection, and the role of the tutor combined effectively to help the in-service teachers improve classroom performance. It was concluded that these programs must be based on teachers' philosophies and needs and effectively articulate theory, practice, experience, and reflection.

Frank, Giraldo.

308

CRITICAL READING OF RESEARCH ARTICLES AS ORAL ACTIVATOR IN THE LANGUAGE  

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Full Text Available This paper reports on an experience carried out with second course students of the School of Aeronautical Engineers at the Polytechnic University of Madrid in the subject class Modern Technical Language. In the previous years the problem in that class had been the scarce participation of the students in the oral practices. They seemed to be lead and exclusively represented by a few students when it came to oral participation. The students proposed tackling recent research articles in which opinions could be discussed. The reading of these articles has risen new elements that work as language activators in the language classroom: critical reading and thinking have developed participation in the oral activities and produced a noticeable influence on their scientific and humanist thinking and behavior.From this, we may extract the consequence that the experience is not only related to scientific knowledge, since it has made them better speakers or speaking-counterparts and more class-participating and collaborative, which implies that the human, scientific and linguistic factors progress at the same time through the critical experience. This way, the exposition of their critical ideas has developed both their humanism and scientific mind. These two facets which seem to belong to far away fields become a bond in our experience: the process is scientific since it tries to be a systematic study of the knowledge fleshed in written texts and it is also humanist because it fulfils the students need to grow up as persons, that is absorbing knowledge and processing it in order to produce a new personal approach to the world.

Veronica VIVANCO

2012-07-01

309

Distance Learning as a Successful Means to Enable Research in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science Education (TLRBSE) is an NSF-funded Teacher Enhancement Program hosted by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) in Tucson, AZ. Consistent with national priorities in education, TLRBSE seeks to retain and renew middle and high school science teachers. Within the exciting context of astronomy, TLRBSE integrates the best pedagogical practices of Research Based Science Education with the process of mentoring. The main means by which participants are provided training in astronomy content, research pedagogy, image processing and leadership skills is through a 15-week distance-learning course and an in-residence, two-week summer institute at Kitt Peak National Observatory and the National Solar Observatory. At the observatories, teachers are the researchers on one of four research projects. In preparation for the research experience on Kitt Peak, the distance-learning course addresses the transition of the educational environment into an authentic research center and describes how best to prepare teachers to become part of scientific research teams. The DL course achieves this by successfully modeling best practices in research-based science education in three investigations. Subsequently the teachers' experience and knowledge gained through the distance-learning course and the summer institute are transferred to the classroom, where students learn science by doing science and mentees are mentored. Staff support by astronomers and education specialists continues with efforts to sustain a professional learning community that outlives the research experience. Further observing experience is available during the academic year. Students submit research papers to the RBSE on-line journal. Teachers and their mentees present at national NSTA meetings. During the AGU presentation, the focus will be on aspects of the distance-learning course, outcomes, lessons learned and future directions.

Walker, C. E.; Pompea, S. M.; Croft, S. K.; NOAO Education Outreach Team

2004-12-01

310

Constructing and Using Multimodal Narratives to Research in Science Education: Contributions Based on Practical Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This study deals with the problem of how to collect genuine and useful data about science classroom practices, and preserving the complex and holistic nature of teaching and learning. Additionally, we were looking for an instrument that would allow comparability and verifiability for teaching and research purposes. Given the multimodality of teaching and learning processes, we developed the multimodal narrative (MN), which describes what happens during a task and incorporates data such as examples of students' work, photos, diagrams, etc. Also, it describes teachers' intentions, preserving the nature of teaching practice in natural settings and it is verifiable and comparable. In this paper, we show how the MN was developed and present the protocol that was used for its construction. We identify the main characteristics of the MN and place it in the context of international research. We explore the potential of the MN for research purposes, illustrating its use in a research study that we carried out. We find that the MN provides a way to gather, organize and transform data, avoiding confusing and time-consuming manipulation of data, while minimizing the natural subjectivity of the narrator. The same MN can be used by the same or by different researchers for different purposes. Furthermore, the same MN can be used with different analysis techniques. It is also possible to study research practices on a large scale using MNs from different teachers and lessons. We propose that MNs can also be useful for teachers' professional development.

Lopes, J. B.; Silva, A. A.; Cravino, J. P.; Santos, C. A.; Cunha, A.; Pinto, A.; Silva, A.; Viegas, C.; Saraiva, E.; Branco, M. J.

2014-06-01

311

Talking the Talk: Library Classroom Communication and International Students  

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Language is a primary barrier for international students in library instruction classes. This article reviews the literature on classroom communication from both the second language acquisition and library fields, and suggests ways in which second language acquisition research can be applied to communication with international students in library…

Amsberry, Dawn

2008-01-01

312

Teacher Talking Time in the EFL Classroom  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper reports on a piece of classroom research, aiming to support the hypothesis that most of the talk in my English-as-a-foreign-language elementary and intermediate classrooms was done by the teacher, presumably implying a more teacher-centred approach. In terms of the percentage of teacher talk, the results indicate that the discrepancy between the amount of teacher talk actually done in these classrooms and that which was hypothesized as being in conflict with a learner-centred appro...

Hitotuzi Nilton

2005-01-01

313

WormClassroom.org: An Inquiry-rich Educational Web Portal for Research Resources of Caenorhabditis elegans  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The utilization of biology research resources, coupled with a “learning by inquiry” approach, has great potential to aid students in gaining an understanding of fundamental biological principles. To help realize this potential, we have developed a Web portal for undergraduate biology education, WormClassroom.org, based on current research resources of a model research organism, Caenorhabditis elegans. This portal is intended to serve as a resource gateway for students to learn biological ...

Lu, Fong-mei; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Stewart, James; White, John G.

2007-01-01

314

Mathematics Education and Language Diversity: A Dialogue across Settings  

Science.gov (United States)

This article shares the authors' views on language-diversity issues in research in mathematics education. Described are tensions, questions, and myths that they have regularly faced as researchers. They use similarities and differences in two settings (multilingual classrooms in South Africa and U.S. mathematics classrooms with Latino/a…

Phakeng, Mamokgethi Setati; Moschkovich, Judit N.

2013-01-01

315

Expedition Earth and Beyond: Using NASA Data Resources and Integrated Educational Strategies to Promote Authentic Research in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Teachers in today s classrooms are bound by state required skills, education standards, and high stakes testing. How can they gain skills and confidence to replace units or individual activities with curriculum that incorporates project and inquiry-based learning and promotes authentic research in the classroom? The key to promoting classroom authentic research experiences lies in educator professional development that is structured around teacher needs. The Expedition Earth and Beyond Program is a new geosciences program based at the NASA Johnson Space Center designed to engage, inspire and educate teachers and students in grades 5-14. The program promotes authentic research experiences for classrooms and uses strategies that will help NASA reach its education goals while still allowing educators to teach required standards. Teachers will have access to experts in terrestrial and planetary remote sensing and geoscience; this will enhance their use of content, structure, and relevant experiences to gain the confidence and skills they need to actively engage students in authentic research experiences. Integrated and powerful educational strategies are used to build skills and confidence in teachers. The strategies are as follows: 1) creating Standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources as ready-to-use materials that can be modified by teachers to fit their unique classroom situation; 2) providing ongoing professional development opportunities that focus on active experiences using curricular materials, inquiry-based techniques and expanding content knowledge; 3) connecting science experts to classrooms to deepen content knowledge and provide relevance to classroom activities and real world applications; 4) facilitating students sharing research with their peers and scientists reinforcing their active participation and contributions to research. These components of the Expedition Earth and Beyond Education Program will be enhanced by providing exciting and diverse research opportunities that are inspired by views of Earth from space taken by astronauts on board the International Space Station. The interest and connection to viewing our home planet from space will inevitably spark questions that will drive students to pursue their research investigations, as well as forming a basis for comparisons to the exploration of other planetary bodies in our solar system.

Graffi, Paige Valderrama; Stefanov, William; Willis, Kim; Runco, Sue

2009-01-01

316

Classroom Research and Professional Development Investigación en el aula y desarrollo profesional  

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Full Text Available This article intends to share the experience of a group of teachers in the Classroom Research Seminar of the Teacher Development Program in English carried out at Universidad del Valle, Cali , from January to June, 2007. The seminar was part of a high-level in-service program for teachers of English of a network of private educational institutions. We would like to share the highlights and difficulties of the experience. We will start with the general framework of the program and the concept of professional development that underlies it. Next we will focus on the classroom research seminar, its objectives, methodology and results. Finally we share the voices of some of the participants, who talk about the influence this seminar had on their professional development and daily work.Este artículo recoge la experiencia de un grupo de profesores universitarios que tuvieron a su cargo el seminario de investigación en el aula con un grupo de docentes inscritos en el programa de formación y desarrollo profesional docente de la Universidad del Valle y pertenecientes a una misma red de instituciones. Nuestro objetivo es compartir los logros y dificultades encontradas en el proceso de trabajar con los docentes, desde el aula universitaria, problemáticas de sus propias aulas a partir de objetivos e intereses diversos. Primeramente presentaremos el marco general del programa y el concepto de formación que lo sustenta; posteriormente nos centraremos en el contexto específico del seminario, sus objetivos metodología y procesos de desarrollo; finalmente exploraremos la incidencia del trabajo desarrollado en el aula universitaria en práctica profesional de los docentes participantes.

Rosalba Cárdenas Ramos

2009-04-01

317

CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT  

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Full Text Available This paper is aiming to discover the paths that enable teachers to manage their work with students in the classroom. To be an efficient teacher means to know with what and how to motivate students to learn. Teacher as an efficient classroom manager needs to have skills to plan and prepare the education process, know how to organize the teaching and how to guide the class. An efficient teacher moreover needs o establish positive classroom climate and working discipline. Also, teacher should be able to evaluate the progress of the students and self-evaluate his own work.In order to examine classroom management skills of teachers in Republic of Macedonia, a research has been made for teachers in primary schools in Republic of Macedonia. Instruments which will be used in order to complete the research and analyses are the following: questionnaire for teachers and educational policy analyses in our country in order to discover whether there is concrete strategy for promotion and implementation of classroom management on local and national level.Analyses of results show that there is a deficit of classroom management skills among teachers, which is due moreover to some lapses in initial education of teachers.

Jasmina Delceva – Dizdarevik

2014-06-01

318

Enhancing Math Instruction for Korean Special Education Classroom Students Using Design Research to Implement Enhanced Anchored Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to introduce Enhanced Anchored Instruction (EAI) into Korean special education classrooms, research its effectiveness in student achievement and motivation, to find out what kind of adjustment is needed for successful implementation, and analyze the students' and teachers' experiences of using EAI. Enhanced anchored…

Kwon, Jungmin

2009-01-01

319

Social and Individual Aspects of Classroom Learning in Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Action Research Pilot Study on Assessment  

Science.gov (United States)

The current paper reports on the outcome of an ongoing action research project at a school for higher-functioning students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in Sweden. The overall aim of the study was to develop and evaluate a questionnaire that captures social and individual aspects of classroom learning suitable for use with students with ASD.…

Asberg, Jakob; Zander, Ulla; Zander, Eric; Sandberg, Annika Dahlgren

2012-01-01

320

The Value of Applied Research: Retrieval Practice Improves Classroom Learning and Recommendations from a Teacher, a Principal, and a Scientist  

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Over the course of a 5-year applied research project with more than 1,400 middle school students, evidence from a number of studies revealed that retrieval practice in authentic classroom settings improves long-term learning (Agarwal et al. 2009; McDaniel et al., "Journal of Educational Psychology" 103:399-414, 2011; McDaniel et al. 2012; Roediger…

Agarwal, Pooja K.; Bain, Patrice M.; Chamberlain, Roger W.

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
321

Research among Learners of Chinese as a Foreign Language. Chinese Language Teachers Association Monograph Series. Volume IV  

Science.gov (United States)

Cutting-edge in its approach and international in its authorship, this fourth monograph in a series sponsored by the Chinese Language Teachers Association features eight research studies that explore a variety of themes, topics, and perspectives important to a variety of stakeholders in the Chinese language learning community. Employing a wide…

Everson, Michael E., Ed.; Shen, Helen H., Ed.

2010-01-01

322

Code-Switching to English in the German as a Second Foreign Language Classroom: The Case of Turkish Learners  

Science.gov (United States)

This study is built upon an understanding of a wide range of variables including foreign language education in Turkey, the sociolinguistic profile of English, the phenomena of code-switching, language transfer (in particular second language transfer in third language production), teaching of a second foreign language after English, plurilingualism…

Sert, Olcay

2007-01-01

323

Scottish Classroom Voices: A Case Study of Teaching and Learning Scots  

Science.gov (United States)

Research in multilingual classrooms demonstrates education as a key site within which social and linguistic values are shaped. This study extends such research by investigating language use in a Scottish primary classroom. Scots is widely spoken throughout Scotland, figuring in a 2003 Scottish Parliament report as one of two indigenous heritage…

Shoba, Jo Arthur

2010-01-01

324

Multilingual Communication and Language Acquisition: New Research Directions  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article, we outline the differences between a monolingual and multilingual orientation to language and language acquisition. The increasing contact between languages in the context of globalization motivates such a shift of paradigms. Multilingual communicative practices have remained vibrant in non-western communities for a long time. We…

Canagarajah, A. Suresh; Wurr, Adrian J.

2011-01-01

325

Applying Research Findings to Instruction for Adult English Language Students  

Science.gov (United States)

This brief is written for the practitioners: teachers, teacher trainers, curriculum writers, and program administrators who work with adult English language students in English as a second language (ESL) classes or in mixed adult basic education ABE classes (with native English speakers and English language learners). If educators are not…

Smith, Cristine; Harris, Kathryn; Reder, Stephen

2005-01-01

326

Dialogic Strategies in Read-Alouds of English-Language Information Books in a Second-Grade Bilingual Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This article shows how various dialogic discourse strategies were used in read-alouds of English science information books in a 2nd-grade bilingual classroom. Using a variety of discursive strategies, Ibett encouraged her Spanish-speaking students to provide explanations and reasoning related to science ideas. Similarly, she used intertextual…

Pappas, Christine C.; Varelas, Maria; Patton, Sofia Kokkino; Ye, Li; Ortiz, Ibett

2012-01-01

327

DIY Media in the Classroom: New Literacies Across Content Areas (Middle Through High School). Language & Literacy Series (Practitioner's Bookshelf)  

Science.gov (United States)

This book shows teachers how to bring students' Do-It-Yourself media practices into the classroom (Grades 6-12). In one accessible resource, the authors explain DIY media, identify their appealing features for content area instruction, and describe the literacy skills and strategies they promote. Chapters address: Adolescents' DIY Media as New…

Guzzetti, Barbara; Elliot, Kate; Welsch, Diana

2010-01-01

328

Literacy Tools in the Classroom: Teaching through Critical Inquiry, Grades 5-12. Language and Literacy Series  

Science.gov (United States)

This innovative resource describes how teachers can help students employ "literacy tools" across the curriculum to foster learning. The authors demonstrate how literacy tools such as narratives, question-asking, spoken-word poetry, drama, writing, digital communication, images, and video encourage critical inquiry in the 5-12 classroom. The book…

Beach, Richard; Campano, Gerald; Edmiston, Brian; Borgmann, Melissa

2010-01-01

329

Breen, M (Ed. (2001. Learner contributions to language learning: New directions in research Breen, M (Ed. (2001. Learner contributions to language learning: New directions in research.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The advances in the field of second (L2 and foreign (FL language teaching and learning in the past two decades have been manifold, among these: acquisition theories that have emerged as a consequence of refinements in experimental and methodological tools; the shift of focus to approaches rather than methods in L2 and FL teaching; socio- interactionist studies’ emphasis on the ecology of the classroom, geared towards community building; and the questioning of teacher training paradigms by teacher development and education programs. The advances in the field of second (L2 and foreign (FL language teaching and learning in the past two decades have been manifold, among these: acquisition theories that have emerged as a consequence of refinements in experimental and methodological tools; the shift of focus to approaches rather than methods in L2 and FL teaching; socio- interactionist studies’ emphasis on the ecology of the classroom, geared towards community building; and the questioning of teacher training paradigms by teacher development and education programs.

Heliana Mello

2008-04-01

330

Sentence-Combining in the Secondary ESL Classroom--A Review of the Research Literature.  

Science.gov (United States)

An overview of the research literature reviews studies on the effectiveness of sentence-combining (SC) exercises in helping English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students integrate their knowledge of grammar into their writing. In the 1960s, Kellog Hunt published a series of articles that explored the relationship between SC and writing skills.…

Brant, Jeffrey K.

331

Original research in the classroom: why do zebrafish spawn in the morning?  

Science.gov (United States)

As part of an upper level undergraduate developmental biology course at the University of Minnesota Duluth, we developed a unit in which students carried out original research as part of a cooperative class project. Students had the opportunity to gain experience in the scientific method from experimental design all of the way through to the preparation of publication on their research that included text, figures, and tables. This kind of inquiry-based learning has been shown to have many benefits for students, including increased long-term learning and a better understanding of the process of scientific discovery. In our project, students designed experiments to explore why zebrafish typically spawn in the first few hours after the lights come on in the morning. The results of our experiments suggest that spawning still occurs when the dark-to-light transition is altered or absent. This is consistent with the work of others that demonstrates that rhythmic spawning behavior is regulated by an endogenous circadian clock. Our successes and failures carrying out original research as part of an undergraduate course should contribute to the growing approaches for using zebrafish to bring the excitement of experimental science to the classroom. PMID:22181662

Liang, Jennifer O; Abata, Katie; Bachelder, Eric; Bartley, Becca; Bozadjieva, Nadejda; Caskey, Victoria; Christianson, Benjamin; Detienne, Shannon; Dillon, Cassandra; Ecklund, Derek; Eckwright, David; Erickson, Raymond; Fadness, Tyler; Fealey, Michael; Fetter, Nicholas; Flatten, Michael; Fulton, Joshua; Galloway, Ryan; Gauer, Jacob; Hagler, Michael; Hammer, Andrea; Hasbargen, David; Heckmann, Brandon; Hildebrandt, Anne; Hillesheim, Jaclyn; Hoffman, Meghan; Hovey, Jonathan; Iverson, Sonja; Joyal, Matthew; Jubran, Rami; Keller, Stephanie; Kent, Derek; Kiefer, Brendan; King, Jacob; Kuefler, Aaron; Larson, Alex; Lewis, Nathan; Lu, Po-nien; Malone, Jessica; Mickolichek, Chelsey; Mitchell, Sean; Nelson, Pamela; Nemec, Michelle; Olsen, Shayna; Olson, Kendelle; Pautz, Kelsey; Pieper, Kelsey; Remackel, Michelle; Rengo, Cody; Sekenski, Jaime; Sievers, Tyson; Slavik, Brittney; Sloan, Jami; Smrekar, Candice; Stromquist, Emily; Tandberg, Patrick; Taurinskas, Nicholas; Thiele, Mark; Timinski, Peter; Tusa, Barite; Tuthill, Andrew; Uher, Bradley; Ward, Amy; Wilson, Luke; Young, Nathan

2011-12-01

332

Some Implications of Research in Second Language Acquisition for Foreign Language Teaching.  

Science.gov (United States)

On the continuum along which theories of first and second language acquisition are located, the two extremes represent the classic controversy of nature (nativist) vs. nurture (environmentalist), while those in the middle view language acquisition as a result of a more or less balanced interaction between innate capacities and linguistic…

Lombardo, Linda

333

Improving the speech intelligibility in classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

One of the major acoustical concerns in classrooms is the establishment of effective verbal communication between teachers and students. Non-optimal acoustical conditions, resulting in reduced verbal communication, can cause two main problems. First, they can lead to reduce learning efficiency. Second, they can also cause fatigue, stress, vocal strain and health problems, such as headaches and sore throats, among teachers who are forced to compensate for poor acoustical conditions by raising their voices. Besides, inadequate acoustical conditions can induce the usage of public address system. Improper usage of such amplifiers or loudspeakers can lead to impairment of students' hearing systems. The social costs of poor classroom acoustics will be large to impair the learning of children. This invisible problem has far reaching implications for learning, but is easily solved. Many researches have been carried out that they have accurately and concisely summarized the research findings on classrooms acoustics. Though, there is still a number of challenging questions remaining unanswered. Most objective indices for speech intelligibility are essentially based on studies of western languages. Even several studies of tonal languages as Mandarin have been conducted, there is much less on Cantonese. In this research, measurements have been done in unoccupied rooms to investigate the acoustical parameters and characteristics of the classrooms. The speech intelligibility tests, which based on English, Mandarin and Cantonese, and the survey were carried out on students aged from 5 years old to 22 years old. It aims to investigate the differences in intelligibility between English, Mandarin and Cantonese of the classrooms in Hong Kong. The significance on speech transmission index (STI) related to Phonetically Balanced (PB) word scores will further be developed. Together with developed empirical relationship between the speech intelligibility in classrooms with the variations of the reverberation time, the indoor ambient noise (or background noise level), the signal-to-noise ratio, and the speech transmission index, it aims to establish a guideline for improving the speech intelligibility in classrooms for any countries and any environmental conditions. The study showed that the acoustical conditions of most of the measured classrooms in Hong Kong are unsatisfactory. The selection of materials inside a classroom is important for improving speech intelligibility at design stage, especially the acoustics ceiling, to shorten the reverberation time inside the classroom. The signal-to-noise should be higher than 11dB(A) for over 70% of speech perception, either tonal or non-tonal languages, without the usage of address system. The unexpected results bring out a call to revise the standard design and to devise acceptable standards for classrooms in Hong Kong. It is also demonstrated a method for assessment on the classroom in other cities with similar environmental conditions.

Lam, Choi Ling Coriolanus

334

Non-native EFL Teacher Trainees’ Attitude towards the Recruitment of NESTs and Teacher Collaboration in Language Classrooms  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Teacher collaboration is a key feature of effective professional development and is a necessary element for improved student achievement and ongoing school success. This study investigated pre-service Non-Native English Speaking Teachers (NNESTs)’ attitude towards the recruitment of Native English Speaking Teachers (NESTs) and the collaboration with NESTs in EFL classrooms. The results show that most participants are not against the presence of NESTs as their teaching partners, but see ...

2013-01-01

335

Bringing Languages and Cultures into Contact: Why Lexical Phrases May Build Bridges between Native and Foreign/Second Languages in the Classroom, and between Native/Heritage and Other Cultures  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper explores the role of lexical phrases in language education in general (native language or L1; and second/foreign language or L2) and more specifically, in the education of English learners in US and European contexts as well as in other English-speaking countries worldwide. Even though this topic has been addressed by researchers and…

Porto, Melina

2011-01-01

336

Educational Technology for Second Language Acquisition: A Review of Research.  

Science.gov (United States)

A review of literature on technology and second language (L2) instruction focused on the use of seven different technologies: television/videotapes/tape recordings; hand computers; computer conferencing; electronic mail (e-mail); multimedia and hypermedia; computer-assisted language learning; and machine translation. A secondary purpose of the…

Inoue, Yukiko

337

Using Children's Literature in the Literacy Classroom: Research from the National Reading Research Center.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes research projects conducted in a first-grade literature-based reading program; a second-grade fluency-oriented reading instructional program that uses both children's literature and a basal reader; and a second-grade literature/strategy-based program. (RS)

Duffy, Ann M.

1997-01-01

338

Observed Classroom Quality Profiles of Kindergarten Classrooms in Finland  

Science.gov (United States)

Research Findings: The aim of the present study was to examine classroom quality profiles of kindergarten classrooms using a person-centered approach and to analyze these patterns in regard to teacher and classroom characteristics. Observations of the domains of Emotional Support, Classroom Organization, and Instructional Support were conducted in…

Salminen, Jenni; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Pakarinen, Eija; Siekkinen, Martti; Hannikainen, Maritta; Poikonen, Pirjo-Liisa; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena

2012-01-01

339

Transforming Spatial Reasoning Skills in the Undergraduate Geoscience Classroom Through Interventions Based on Cognitive Science Research  

Science.gov (United States)

Spatial visualization is an essential skill in many, if not all, STEM disciplines. It is a prerequisite for understanding subjects as diverse as fluid flow through 3D fault systems, magnetic and gravitational fields, atmospheric and oceanic circulation patterns, cellular and molecular structures, engineering design, topology, and much, much more. Undergraduate geoscience students, in both introductory and upper-level courses, bring a wide range of spatial skill levels to the classroom. However, spatial thinking improves with practice, and can improve more rapidly with intentional training. As a group of geoscience faculty members and cognitive psychologists, we are collaborating to apply the results of cognitive science research to the development of teaching materials to improve undergraduate geology majors' spatial thinking skills. This approach has the potential to transform undergraduate STEM education by removing one significant barrier to success in the STEM disciplines. Two promising teaching strategies have emerged from recent cognitive science research into spatial thinking: gesturing and predictive sketching. Studies show that students who gesture about spatial relationships perform better on spatial tasks than students who don't gesture, perhaps because gesture provides a mechanism for cognitive offloading. Similarly, students who sketch their predictions about the interiors of geologic block diagrams perform better on penetrative thinking tasks than students who make predictions without sketching. We are developing new teaching materials for Mineralogy, Structural Geology, and Sedimentology & Stratigraphy courses using these two strategies. Our data suggest that the research-based teaching materials we are developing may boost students' spatial thinking skills beyond the baseline gains we have measured in the same courses without the new curricular materials.

Ormand, C. J.; Shipley, T. F.; Tikoff, B.; Manduca, C. A.; Dutrow, B. L.; Goodwin, L. B.; Hickson, T.; Atit, K.; Gagnier, K. M.; Resnick, I.

2013-12-01

340

Quizzes on tap: exporting a test generation system from one less resourced language to another  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

It is difficult to develop and deploy Language Technology and applications for minority languages for many reasons. These include the lack of Natural Language Processing (NLP) resources for the language, a scarcity of NLP researchers who speak the language and the communication gap between teachers in the classroom and researchers working in universities and other centres of research. One approach to overcoming these obstacles is for researchers interested in Less-Resourced Languages (LRLs...

Maritxalar, Montse; Ui Dhonnchadha, Elaine; Foster, Jennifer; Ward, Monica

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
341

Divergent Perceptions of Telecollaborative Language Learning Tasks: Task-as-Workplan vs. Task-as-Process  

Science.gov (United States)

The use of computer-supported collaborative learning is more and more commonplace in language learning classrooms; this has given rise to the need for more research on roles and processes of telecollaboration in language teaching and learning and how online interactions are integrated with face-to-face classroom activities. Using a data-driven,…

Dooly, Melinda

2011-01-01

342

A. D. Edwards and V. J. Furlong's "The Language of Teaching."  

Science.gov (United States)

This review of "The Language of Teaching" (Edwards and Furlong, 1978) suggests that its most valuable contribution is to the further development of sociolinguistic research in classrooms and to the advancement of sociological analysis of education. The book reports the author's investigation of patterns of classroom communication and language

Walker, S. A.

1980-01-01

343

The Medium of Instruction and Classroom Interaction: Evidence from Hong Kong Secondary Schools  

Science.gov (United States)

Teacher-student interaction in classrooms is perceived to be crucial for learning. Previous research has compared the interaction in classrooms where a second language is used as the medium of instruction (MoI) with those where the mother tongue is used. This has been done mainly via qualitative impressions. The current study adopted a mixed…

Lo, Yuen Yi; Macaro, Ernesto

2012-01-01

344

Disassembling the Classroom--An Ethnographic Approach to the Materiality of Education  

Science.gov (United States)

The ethnography of education is challenged by the materiality of the classroom. Ethnographic accounts of school lessons mostly highlight language and interaction and offer no suitable methodology for researching objects and their role in the classroom. Moreover, objects are part of complex and interwoven assemblages involving human actors,…

Roehl, Tobias

2012-01-01

345

Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: Politics, Languages and Responsibilities  

Science.gov (United States)

How can educational research have more impact? What processes of knowledge exchange are most effective for increasing the uses of research results? How can research-produced knowledge be better "mobilized" among users such as practicing educators, policy makers, and the public communities? These sorts of questions are commanding urgent attention…

Fenwick, Tara, Ed.; Farrell, Lesley, Ed.

2011-01-01

346

"Multiculturalism" - a dead end in conceptualizing difference, or an open-ended approach to facilitating democratic experiences in the foreign language classroom?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The focus of this text is on the multicultural condition, related to the foreignlanguage classroom as a possible arena for democratic experiences. However,due to the increasing ambiguity, to say the least, of the conceptions of “culture”and “multiculturalism” today, I will argue that, depending on how “multicul-turalism” is conceived, this focus may indeed either lead to a cultural andcommunicative closure, or open up the possibility of multi-vocal dialogue andcommunication. If, on the one hand, “multiculturalism” is understood asdifference, mainly constituted by a variety of categorized cultural groupings,you may end up essentializing culture to something that people “have”, andthat is imposed on them collectively from an outside position. If, on the otherhand, cultural differences are seen as constructed within human practices ofongoing narratives and negotiations between individuals and groups – acrossand beyond all kinds of cultural borders – then the hybrid, pluralistic condi-tion of a society, or even of a foreign language classroom, may offer at least anopportunity for cultural identities to co-construct a social space, where nor-mative conflicts and different viewpoints could be dealt with through multi-vocal deliberative communication.

Ulrika Tornberg

2004-01-01

347

Ways of talking Halkomelem: interaction in classroom procedural talk  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The dissertation is an empirical report of the language used in four different types of classrooms (language review, language immersion, linguistics, mentoring) in which one dialect of the endangered Salish language Halkomelem was being taught and learned. A conversation analysis approach was used to examine the interactional patterns of turn-taking and repair by the different participants (elders, instructors, students, researcher) while they were engaged in two types of procedural talk: set...

2009-01-01

348

Qualitative Assessment across Language Barriers: An Action Research Study  

Science.gov (United States)

If students cannot express themselves in the language of the assessor, and if the assessor is not familiar with the cultural constraints within which students operate, it is difficult for the assessor to collect evidence of adequate performance. This article describes the assessment of three digital artefacts where the assessor strove to…

Cronje, Johannes C.

2009-01-01

349

Finding a Voice in the Digital Classroom: The Effects of Asynchronous Discussion on Language Acquisition and Communication Apprehension among Secondary ESOL Students in South Texas  

Science.gov (United States)

Students who are classified as ESOL at the secondary level may face various factors that prevent participation in class thus inhibiting second language acquisition. The purpose of the study was to determine if asynchronous discussions (ASD) affected the second language acquisition of secondary ESOL students. The researcher examined the effects of…

Hill, Laura A.

2010-01-01

350

Research for Practice: A Look at Issues in Technology for Second Language Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

Over the past fourteen years, the pages of "Language Learning & Technology" have been filled with examples of research that take up the challenge of investigating second language learning through technology. It has been a period of expansion and growth in many ways. The expansion of technologies as well as their acceptance and use in language

Chapelle, Carol A.

2010-01-01

351

Does Field Independence Relate to Performance on Communicative Language Tests? Research Papers  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent language testing research investigates factors other than language proficiency that may be responsible for systematic variance in language test performance. One such factor is the test takers' cognitive styles. The present study was carried out with the aim of finding the probable effects of Iranian EFL learners' cognitive styles on their…

Salmani-Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

2006-01-01

352

Java Language for Numerical Control Simulation System Research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Java language is very good in a variety of development platforms to develop all kinds of application software for its simple and efficient, widely used. The programming language owning platform independent is adopted to solve the image flicker, sound loading and other issues by the threading technology, multimedia technology, graphics and point by point comparison techniques.Dynamic real-time simulation process simulation is implemented and a two-dimensional network of CNC machining simulation system is developed while Java Applet application is as a carrier. The simulation results show that the system has a friendly interface and fast calculation speed and platform portability has a certain practicality and application value.

Li Hongmei

2013-12-01

353

Language.  

Science.gov (United States)

Noninvasive focal brain stimulation by means of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used extensively in the past 20 years to investigate normal language functions. The picture emerging from this collection of empirical works is that of several independent modular functions mapped on left-lateralized temporofrontal circuits originating dorsally or ventrally to the auditory cortex. The identification of sounds as language (i.e., phonological transformations) is modulated by TMS applied over the posterior-superior temporal cortex and over the caudal inferior frontal gyrus/ventral premotor cortex complex. Conversely, attribution of semantics to words is modulated successfully by applying TMS to the rostral part of the inferior frontal gyrus. Speech production is typically interfered with by TMS applied to the left inferior frontal gyrus, onto the same cortical areas that also contain phonological representations. The cortical mapping of grammatical functions has been investigated with TMS mainly regarding the category of verbs, which seem to be represented in the left middle frontal gyrus. Most TMS studies have investigated the cortical processing of single words or sublexical elements. Conversely, complex elements of language such as syntax have not been investigated extensively, although a few studies have indicated a left temporal, frontal, and parietal system also involving the neocerebellar cortex. Finally, both the perception and production of nonlinguistic communicative properties of speech, such as prosody, have been mapped by TMS in the peri-Silvian region of the right hemisphere. PMID:24112933

Cattaneo, Luigi

2013-01-01

354

"I Never Really Knew the History behind African American Language": Critical Language Pedagogy in an Advanced Placement English Language Arts Class  

Science.gov (United States)

This article responds to two long-standing dilemmas that limit the effectiveness of language education for students who speak and write in African American Language (AAL): (1) the gap between theory and research on AAL and classroom practice, and (2) the need for critical language pedagogies. This article presents the effectiveness of a critical…

Baker-Bell, April

2013-01-01

355

Expedition Earth and Beyond: Engaging Classrooms in Student-Led Research Using NASA Data, Access to Scientists, and Integrated Educational Strategies  

Science.gov (United States)

Classroom teachers are challenged with engaging and preparing today s students for the future. Activities are driven by state required skills, education standards, and high-stakes testing. Providing educators with standards-aligned, inquiry-based activities that will help them engage their students in student-led research in the classroom will help them teach required standards, essential skills, and help inspire their students to become motivated learners. The Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Education Program, classroom educators, and ARES scientists at the NASA Johnson Space Center created the Expedition Earth and Beyond education program to help teachers promote student-led research in their classrooms (grades 5-14) by using NASA data, providing access to scientists, and using integrated educational strategies.

Graff, P. V.; Stefanov, W. L.; Willis, K. J.; Runco, S.; McCollum, T.; Baker, M.; Lindgren, C.; Mailhot, M.

2011-01-01

356

Why Do Care Workers Withdraw From Elderly Care? Researcher’s Language as a Hermeneutical Key  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Care workers frequently withdraw from elderly people in their care; this has resulted in a number of scandals in the media. Here I analyze an empirical scene observed at an old people’s home in Denmark, which contains behavioral patterns among the care workers which could be seen as withdrawal. At the same time it illustrates the care workers’ commitment to the elderly. A paradoxical “empathy at a distance” is characteristic of the scene. When analyzing my written observations in an interpretation group, my use of language was a point of discussion. What did it mean when I described the interactions between care workers and elderly residents in words commonly used to describe mother-child interactions? My use of language became a “hermeneutical key” which enabled a psychoanalytically inspired interpretation. This focuses on the care relationship as activating our earliest memories of our own care relations, independently of whether we are in the role of care providers or care receivers. Through collusion theory, the interpretation accepts both the anxiety which the helpless elderly people arouse in the care workers and their motivation for care work as two sides of a subjectively important theme. The article illustrates how working consciously with the researcher’s subjectivity makes it possible to understand apparently irrational patterns. The insights thus gained may be used to prevent withdrawals in care work as an argument for care workers’ need for emotional supervision.

Anne Liveng

2012-11-01

357

Focus Article: Replication in Second Language Writing Research  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper discusses the meaning and range of replication in L2 research from both quantitative and qualitative perspectives. In the first half of the paper, it will be argued that key quantitative studies need to be replicated to have their robustness and generalizability tested and that this is a requirement of scientific inquiry. Such research

Porte, Graeme; Richards, Keith

2012-01-01

358

The “Blakkat” Software for Tagging Online Language Learner Corpora: Issues in SLA Assessment and Research  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper aims at showing, through a case study, one possible application of Computer Learner Corpus (CLC) to Network Based Language Teaching (NBLT). Research has shown how CLC can be used both for Second Language Acquisiton (SLA) research and Foreign Language Teaching (FLT), especially if they are tagged, that is, if interpretative annotations are added to the corpus (e.g. error annotations). Online learning generally takes place inside virtual environments where learners exchange mainly wr...

Torsani, Simone

2007-01-01

359

Connecting Long Term Ecological Research to the Classroom: A Partnership Between ScienceLIVE and Niwot Ridge LTER  

Science.gov (United States)

Graduate students and researchers at Niwot Ridge LTER are working with a newly developed web-based program, ScienceLIVE, to create cutting edge curriculum that utilizes more than 60 years of publicly available climate data and 30 years of hydrologic and ecological data. The recently released Next Generation Science Standards focus on incorporating the scientific practices of developing and using models, analyzing and interpreting data, and obtaining, evaluating and communicating information. Teachers in Colorado have expressed difficulty in accessing datasets for classroom use, and lack the relationships and connections to university researchers needed to obtain such datasets. ScienceLIVE (www.science-live.org) serves as a bridge between scientists and the public by offering K-12 students and teachers the ability to interact with active field-science through live research updates, interactive web resources, and the use of lesson plans developed with the scientists, using their actual data. As students work through these exercises, the PIs and their field assistants will directly interact with classrooms via webinars to field questions from students. Evaluation and assessment tools are being developed to monitor the success of ScienceLIVE in the classroom after the initial launch in fall of 2013. The collaboration between researchers and outreach efforts faces challenges of sustainability due to turnover in graduate student and project PI involvement, and lack of training in curriculum development. We believe that creating an accessible platform for public outreach and streamlining researcher involvement will encourage a sustainable education and outreach program for Niwot Ridge LTER.

Hafich, K. A.; Erb, P.; Ray, C.; Williams, M. W.

2013-12-01

360

A Groundwater project for K-12 schools: Bringing research into the classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Simple water quality test kits were used in a series of K-12 classrooms to demonstrate scientific processes and to motivate learning in K-12 students. While focused on student learning, this project also allowed collection of regional data on groundwater quality (primarily nitrate) in the study area. The project consisted of development and administration of a weeklong groundwater quality unit introduced to K-12 schools in northern Indiana and taught by a graduate student in an engineering discipline. The structure of the week started with an introduction to basic groundwater concepts modified for the specific grade level; for this project the students ranged from grades 4-12. In addition to groundwater basics, the purpose of the collection of the water quality data, as well as relevance to the research of the graduate student, were outlined. The students were then: (i) introduced to two simple water quality testing methods for nitrates, (ii) required to hypothesize as to which method will likely be "better" in application, and (iii) asked to practice using these two methods under laboratory conditions. Following practice, the students were asked to discuss their hypotheses relative to what was observed during the practice focusing on which testing method was more accurate and/or precise. The students were then encouraged to bring water samples from their home water system (many of which are on private wells) to analyze within groups. At the end of the week, the students shared their experience in this educational effort, as well as the resulting nitrate data from numerous groundwater wells (as collected by the students). Following these discussions the data were added to an online database housed on a wiki sponsored by the Notre Dame Extended Research Community (http://wellhead.michianastem.org/home). These data were plotted using the free service MapAList to visually demonstrate to the students the spatial distribution of the data and how their results have contributed to the community's data set as a whole. After one year, the project has been applied at 7 local schools, allowing interaction with over 800 students and 9 teachers. This experiment resulted in collection of approximately 150 spatially distributed data points on nitrate concentration. Initial assessment of the educational experience has shown an overwhelmingly positive response from both the teachers and the students at all levels of application. Of particular interest to the students and teachers was the opportunity to contribute to scientific study of their community's water supply.

Rodak, C. M.; Walsh, M.; Gensic, J.

2011-12-01

 
 
 
 
361

Chinese Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) Academics' Perceptions about Research in a Transitional Culture  

Science.gov (United States)

Research capacity building has become a prominent theme in higher education institutions in China and across the world. However, Chinese Teaching English as a Foreign Language academics' research output has been quite limited. In order to build their research capacity, it is necessary to understand their perceptions about research. This case study…

Bai, Li; Millwater, Jan; Hudson, Peter

2012-01-01

362

Effective Classroom Management  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper attempts to explore and identify the characteristics of an effective teacher who teaches English as a second language to 10 year old students from different ethnics, various social economic background and multi-level language ability, at a private primary school in Malaysia. The study focused on classroom management using a case study methodology where data was collected using both interviews and classroom observations. The findings concur with previous literature reviews ...

Azlin Norhaini Mansor; Kim Eng Wong; Mohamad Sattar Rasul; Mohd Izham Mohd Hamzah; Hamid, Aida Hanim A.

2012-01-01

363

Classroom Communication Climate and Communicative Linguistic Competence of EFL Learners  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the classroom communication climate and communicative linguistic competence of EFL students who are in their senior years in a university. This is a descriptive method of research which intended to find out the correlation between classroom communication climate and communicative linguistic competence. A validated questionnaire on the perceived classroom communication climate was used. To measure the students’ proficiency in the English language, a validated 100-item communicative linguistic assessment was given. The data gathered from the study were subjected to descriptive statistics such as means and standard deviations; and inferential statistics which included t-test, ANOVA, and Pearson r Correlation, all set at .05 alpha. The findings revealed that the students perceived the classroom communication climate as supportive. This supportive communication climate means that the communication atmosphere in the classroom allows students’ flexibility, experimentation, and creativity. Understanding and listening to the students, respecting their feelings and acknowledging their individual differences, making them feel secure, and avoiding control in the classroom are the teacher attributes that corroborate a supportive communication climate in the classroom. Moreover, the teacher is also a free of hidden motives and honest but with a few limitations. The students’ communicative linguistic competence was proficient. Programme enrolled and sex were not significant correlates of the perceived type of classroom communication climate and students’ communicative linguistic competence. There was a significant relationship between classroom communication climate and communicative linguistic competence.

Danebeth Tristeza Glomo-Narzoles

2013-03-01

364

Graphing in the Classroom for Improving Instruction: From Lesson Plans to Research  

Science.gov (United States)

An approach to improving classroom instruction is offered that advances a longitudinal, cyclical presentation of instruction, its evaluation, and revision over time. This approach is distinguished by student self-graphing of student performances, a teacher's log of changes made in instruction, and a class graph kept by the teacher or students. The…

Moxley, Roy A.

2007-01-01

365

Technology in the Lab; Part I: What Research Says about Using Probeware in the Science Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Many varieties of data acquisition systems are now available for science classrooms. Most systems consist of a range of sensors--typically called probeware--connected to an interface unit usually described as a datalogger due to its capacity to record data from these sensors. Although some systems operate independently, most units connect to a…

Millar, Mark

2005-01-01

366

Using Geospatial Information Technologies and Field Research to Enhance Classroom Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

A focus of grazing management courses is the cause-effect relationships between grazing livestock distribution and environmental and management variables. A learning module for the classroom was developed to enable students to actively study livestock distribution by analyzing recently collected data from an on-ranch situation. Data were collected…

Schacht, Walter H.; Guru, Ashu; Reece, Patrick E.; Volesky, Jerry D.; Cotton, Dan

2005-01-01

367

Language of Instruction vs. Instructed Language. : A Systematic Review of Research of What Language to Use in the Teaching of English as a Second/Foreign Language.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The aim of the current thesis is to investigate the role of the students’ first language in English as a second language teaching by means of a review of articles written on the topic between 1990 and 2013. It will identify the importance of using the L1 during the L2/FL learning and teaching process from both students’ and teachers’ perspective and it will then compare them. It will outline the reasons, the strategies and the advantages coming from using students’ mother tongue as a ...

Serone, Luisiana

2013-01-01

368

Issues of Language Assessment: Foundations and Research. Proceedings of the Annual Language Assessment Institute (1st, Evanston, Illinois, June 17-20, 1981).  

Science.gov (United States)

The following papers are included in this volume dealing with issues and research in language assessment: (1) "Sociolinguistic Foundations of Language Assessment," by J. L. Ornstein-Galicia; (2) "Language Proficiency Assessment: Research Findings and Their Application," by C. Rivera and C. Simich; (3) "The Role of Grammar in a Communicative…

Seidner, Stanley S., Ed.

369

Developing Principles for Practitioner Research: The Case of Exploratory Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

Exploratory Practice (EP) has been developed over the last 15 or so years as an approach to practitioner research that is devoted to understanding the quality of language classroom life. It started in reaction both to academic classroom research and to Action Research, the practitioner research model most in vogue at that time in our field. At…

Allwright, Dick

2005-01-01

370

High Cognitive Questions in NNS Group Classroom Discussion: Do They Facilitate Comprehension and Production of the Foreign Language?  

Science.gov (United States)

Two groups of nonnative Spanish students and four nonnative English teachers participated in a study of the effect of high cognitive questions on foreign language learning. Results indicate that the use of high cognitive questions can promote the kind of verbal interaction that facilitates comprehension and written production of the foreign…

Alcon, Eva Guzman

1993-01-01

371

Exploring Non-Native English Speaker Teachers' Classroom Language Use in South Korean Elementary Schools  

Science.gov (United States)

The teaching of English as a foreign language in South Korean public schools has seen the implementation of a number of new innovations. One such innovation, the teaching of English through English, dubbed TETE, is a government-initiated policy that requires public schools to teach English by only using English. Nevertheless, studies reveal that…

Rabbidge, Michael; Chappell, Philip

2014-01-01

372

A Study of the Extent and Effect of English Language Training for Refugees. Phase II: Classroom Observation and Community Survey.  

Science.gov (United States)

The second phase of a study of the impact of English language training programs on adult Southeast Asian refugees involved on-site visits to 22 intensive programs in eight metropolitan areas: San Diego, Seattle, Minneapolis/St. Paul, New Orleans, Oklahoma City, Northern Virginia/Washington, DC, and Stockton, California. Programs represented a wide…

Reder, Stephen; Cohn, Mary

373

Planning Instruction in a Whole Language Classroom: The Wedding of Cucarachita Martina and Raton Perez. Teacher Insights.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes how a first-grade bilingual teacher plans a thematic unit using a whole language approach. Discusses how the teacher plans her instruction to cover the maximum number of state-mandated objectives while drawing upon the cultural background, experiences, and interests of her students. (SV)

Bhattacharjee, Maria P.

1993-01-01

374

Social interactive entropy and interaction in the language teacher education classroom / Entropia sociointerativa e interação na sala de aula de formação de professores de línguas  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in portuguese Este trabalho tem como ideias centrais o pressuposto de que a interação é essencial para a construção do conhecimento e a afirmação de que grupos de indivíduos em contextos de aprendizagem podem ser vistos como sistemas adaptativos complexos (SAC). Alguns pontos de vista diferentes, mas congruentes [...] sobre a sala de aula como um SAC são apresentados, e o fenômeno que está constantemente em ação e afetando todo e qualquer SAC - a entropia - é trazido à discussão. Um tipo específico de entropia para grupos sociais, definido como entropia socio-interativa, também é apresentado com o objetivo de promover a reflexão sobre como tal fenômeno afeta o comportamento de uma sala de aula, sob a perspectiva complexa, e influencia tal SAC social, quando propicia ou restringe condições para que a interação ocorra e, consequentemente, para que a aprendizagem emerja. Abstract in english This paper has as core ideas the assumption that interaction is essential for knowledge construction and the claim that groups of individuals in learning contexts can be seen as complex adaptive systems (CAS). Some different, but congruous views on the classroom as a complex adaptive system are pres [...] ented and the phenomenon which is constantly at work and affecting each and every CAS - the entropy - is brought to discussion. A specific type of entropy for social groups, defined as social interactive entropy, is also introduced as an attempt to promote reflection on how this phenomenon affects the behavior of a classroom under a complex perspective and how it influences such a social CAS by providing or restricting conditions for interaction and, hence, learning to emerge.

Vetromille-Castro, Rafael.

375

A sala de aula como campo de pesquisa: aproximações e a utilização de equipamentos digitais / The classroom as a research field: approximations and the use of digital equipment  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Este artigo apresenta considerações de ordem metodológica sobre pesquisas de observação de sala de aula realizadas na cidade de São Paulo, em 2002 e 2005, e em duas cidades francesas, no ano letivo 2006-2007. Com base na metodologia utilizada nessas pesquisas e no diálogo com a bibliografia sobre pe [...] squisas de campo, inclusive de outras áreas, os autores analisam as dificuldades enfrentadas nesse contexto e propõem a utilização de equipamentos digitais em campo como contribuição ao rigor e à validade desse tipo de pesquisa. Na primeira parte do artigo, são discutidos problemas fundamentais da pesquisa de observação de sala de aula, como o estranhamento do familiar, a conquista da " solidariedade" e da " camaradagem" dos atores de campo e o estabelecimento de certa diferença entre observação e interpretação. Na segunda parte, são apresentados equipamentos digitais utilizados nas pesquisas citadas que não apenas agilizam ou facilitam o ofício do pesquisador. O uso desses equipamentos, orientado por uma metodologia que lhes dê sentido, pode auxiliar os pesquisadores de sala de aula a ampliar significativamente o rigor e a validade de seu trabalho ao multiplicar as possibilidades de criação de tipos de fonte de dados. Nessa parte do artigo, é discutido o uso de palmtops, gravadores de áudio e câmeras fotográficas digitais, smartphones, microcâmeras sem fio, notebooks e editores de áudio e vídeo em pesquisas de observação de sala de aula. Abstract in english This article offers considerations of a methodological order about classroom observation studies carried out in 2002 and 2005 in the city of São Paulo and in the 2006/2007 academic year in two French cities. Based on the methodology employed in these studies, and on a dialogue with the literature on [...] fieldworks, including those from other areas, the authors analyze the difficulties faced within this context and propose the use of digital equipment in the field as a contribution to the rigor and validity of this kind of research. In the first part of the article, fundamental problems of the research involving classroom observation are discussed, such as the perplexity with the familiar, the conquest of the " solidarity" and " camaraderie" of the field agents, and the establishment of a difference between observation and interpretation. The second part of the text describes digital equipment used in the above-mentioned studies which do more than just speed up or facilitate the task of the researcher. The use of these equipments, guided by a methodology that gives them meaning, can help researchers in the classrooms to expand significantly the rigor and validity of their work by multiplying the possibilities of creating types of data sources. This part of the article discusses the use of palmtops, audio recorders and digital cameras, smartphones, wireless micro-cameras, notebooks, and audio and video editors in researches involving classroom observation.

Oldimar, Cardoso; Sonia Teresinha de Sousa, Penin.

376

Research Notes ~ Second Language Acquisition Theories as a Framework for Creating Distance Learning Courses  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Moore and Kearsley (1996 maintain distance educators should provide for three types of interaction: a learner-content; b learner-instructor; and c learner-learner. According to interactionist second language acquisition (SLA theories that reflect Krashen’s theory (1994 that comprehensible input is critical for second language acquisition, interaction can enhance second language acquisition and fluency. Effective output is necessary as well. We reviewed the research on distance learning for second language learners and concluded that SLA theories can, and should, be the framework that drives the development of courses for students seeking to learn languages by distance technology. This article delineates issues to consider in support of combining SLA theories and research literature as a guide in creating distance language learning courses.

Eileen N. Ariza

2003-10-01

377

A Study on the Functions of Western Cultural Non-Verbal Behavior in English Classroom in China  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In China, English classroom is the main place of English language acquisition. Therefore, how to improve English classroom teaching effectively has become the scholars’ concern. This paper reports a study conducted at North China Electric Power University on the functions of western cultural nonverbal behaviors in English classroom in China. Questionnaires with both close-ended and open-ended questions were distributed to the students. By means of quantitative and qualitative research me...

Yuehong Wei

2013-01-01

378

Second Language Writing Research and Written Corrective Feedback in SLA: Intersections and Practical Applications  

Science.gov (United States)

For more than a decade now, a great deal of research has been done on the topic of written corrective feedback (CF) in SLA and second language (L2) writing. Nonetheless, what those research efforts really have shown as well as the possible implications for practice remain in dispute. Although L2 writing and SLA researchers often examine similar…

Ferris, Dana R.

2010-01-01

379

Clickers in the Large Classroom: Current Research and Best-Practice Tips  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Audience response systems (ARS) or clickers, as they are commonly called, offer a management tool for engaging students in the large classroom. Basic elements of the technology are discussed. These systems have been used in a variety of fields and at all levels of education. Typical goals of ARS questions are discussed, as well as methods of compensating for the reduction in lecture time that typically results from their use. Examples of ARS use occur throughout the literature and often detai...

Caldwell, Jane E.

2007-01-01

380

Developments in History teaching at secondary school level in Swaziland: lessons from classroom research.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

History is a complex subject and teaching history is even much more complex than people think. It is more propositional than procedural in nature and involves adductive reasoning, where historical evidence and facts are reconstructed through speculation, imagination and empathy (Nichol, 1984; Booth, 1983). The effective teaching of history is more than the transmission of knowledge, but rather it is a process where students and teachers interact in the classroom as they share ideas, reflect a...

2008-01-01

 
 
 
 
381

Implementation Practices of Differentiated Instruction in the Upper Elementary and Middle School Math Classroom: A Discovery through Grounded Theory  

Science.gov (United States)

The goal in differentiating instruction in mixed-ability classrooms is to maximize each student's learning potential. The mixed ability classroom serves learners with a wide range of academic abilities, learning styles, background knowledge, home support, and English language skills. This grounded theory research study examines the dynamics of the…

Bloom, Rachel Marie

2010-01-01

382

Language Learning Careers as an Object of Narrative Research in TESOL  

Science.gov (United States)

One of the strengths of narrative research in TESOL is its potential to provide insight into long-term language learning experiences that cannot be investigated in real time. Reliance on retrospection, however, brings two problems that are addressed in this article through the concept of "language learning careers". The first problem is…

Benson, Phil

2011-01-01

383

From Phonemic Differences to Constraint Rankings: Research on Second Language Phonology  

Science.gov (United States)

This article surveys the development of second language (L2) phonology over the last 40-50 years. Research in this area has grown from analyzing learners' errors in terms of Contrastive Analysis to proposals explaining L2 sound patterns in terms of constraints on interlanguage grammar. Although native language transfer has endured as one source of…

Eckman, Fred R.

2004-01-01

384

An Analysis of College English Classroom Discourse  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

English classroom teaching and learning is an important aspect of English teaching and learning. The analysis of classroom discourse is a very important form which classroom process research has taken. The present study focuses on college English classroom discourse. Through a detailed description and analysis of the collected data by referring to Sinclair and Coulthard’s classroom discourse analysis model, the problem of patterns of the classroom discourse is made clear and on the basis of...

Weihua Yu

2009-01-01

385

Grounding the Translation: Intertwining analysis and translation in cross-language grounded theory research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Grounded theory research in cross-language, cross-cultural context is associated with the challenges of linguistic sensitivity of conceptualization. The author, a bilingual researcher, offers reflection on her experience of doing grounded theory research, assuming a dual role of a theorist and a translator. The reflection is based on self-observations. Grounding the translation is shown to be acheived through the strategy of intertwining the activities of translation and conceptual analysis, performed by one person. The two activities are inseparable in time and take place along with constant comparison across language boundaries. Intertwining requires that theoretical sensitivity of the researcher be enriched with the sensitivity to linguistic and cultural meanings. Intertwining, through revealing differences between linguistic meanings or language structures, facilitates the emergence of concepts and theoretical categories from the very act of translation. Combining the functions of translation and analysis and using the strategy of intertwining worked effectively for this researcher.

Svetlana Shklarov, MD, RSW, PhD Candidate

2009-03-01

386

Research and Teaching: An Analysis of Calibrated Peer Review (CPR) in a Science Lecture Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Calibrated Peer Review (CPR) is an online tool being used to integrate a writing component in classrooms. In an introductory zoology lecture class, the authors found that CPR-assigned scores were significantly higher than instructor-assigned scores on two of three essay assignments. They also found that neither students' technical-writing skills nor their abilities to convey scientific understanding of articles through summary essays improved during the semester. However, the CPR system offered fairly simple setup and submission for students and decreased grading time for instructors.

Long, David A.; Gaffin, Douglas D.; Hoefnagels, Mari�lle H.; Walvoord, Mark E.; Chumchal, Matthew M.

2008-03-01

387

Intertextuality in Read-Alouds of Integrated Science-Literacy Units in Urban Primary Classrooms: Opportunities for the Development of Thought and Language  

Science.gov (United States)

The nature and evolution of intertextuality was studied in 2 urban primary-grade classrooms, focusing on read-alouds of an integrated science-literacy unit. The study provides evidence that both debunks deficit theories for urban children by highlighting funds of knowledge that these children bring to the classroom and the sense they make of them…

Varelas, Maria; Pappas, Christine C.

2006-01-01

388

The History of Winter Thermochron Mission: Utilizing An Innovative Technology to Promote Science Research in the Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

The goal of the Thermochron Mission, an embedded strand of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center History of Winter (HOW) Program, is to engage participants actively in research methods while focusing on the observation and analysis of changes in ambient temperature. Through experiential learning opportunities, peer coaching, and expert instruction sessions, participants including in-service teachers, pre-service teachers, and ultimately their K-12 students, enhance their understanding of the processes and methods of science research. The initial engagement and exploration training has been provided to participants in the History of Winter (HOW) workshop since 2004. Supportive web-based multimedia resources utilized through modeling within the training program are available to participants online for continued later use within a classroom setting. The Thermochron Mission echoes the learning cycle embedded within the History of Winter Program. Emphasized are critical aspects of inquiry investigation including active and immersive experiences, opportunities for comparison and analysis of data, application of findings to new situations, and the communication of information in an appropriate forum. As a result, past HOW participants have utilized the Thermochron in settings as different as environmental studies through an outdoor education center and the study of acid mine drainage and its effect on local stream. In 2007, we collaborated with the FINNMARK 2007 and the GO NORTH expeditions, providing snow collection information and Thermochrons to gather a continual temperature record during these remote expeditions to the Arctic region. Both FINNMARK2007 and the POLAR Husky GoNorth 2007 dog sled expeditions took a complement of Thermochrons with multimedia instructions and the tools and protocols of the Global Snowflake Network (GSN), an International Polar Year project of the History of Winter Program, to measure temperature and the shape and characteristics of snow falling to the ground. The thermochron enables continuous temperature measurement for the record and for information to accompany the snowflake data acquisition. Professor Svein Mathiesen of EALÁT (Reindeer Herders Vulnerability Network Study), and reindeer herder and Ph.D. student, Inger Marie G. Eira, are incorporating the HOW and GSN thermochrons, snow pit observations, and snowflake identification protocols into Inger Marie's work for her Ph.D. dissertation on snow changes and reindeer pastures in Northern Norway. The HOW program introduced the Global Snowflake Network and Thermochrons to them as a part of the Indigenous Peoples" Opening Ceremonies for the International Polar Year. Now launching is a new opportunity for teachers to engage in the Thermochron Mission, an online collaborative environment to develop and refine solid science research projects based on temperature studies prior to launching them in the classroom. The goal is to enhance the quality of science research projects for the secondary school classroom and to increase the comfort level of teachers in facilitating research opportunities for students. Interested teachers are invited to participate by submitting a proposal for a research project employing Thermochrons. Select entrants will receive a set of Thermochrons and participate in a peer-coached and scientifically reviewed online forum to guide the implementation of the research project and its refinement prior to classroom use. All projects will then be made available through the History of Winter web site.

Bender, K. J.

2007-12-01

389

Data Recycling: Using Existing Databases to Increase Research Capacity in Speech-Language Development and Disorders  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose: This clinical forum was organized to provide a means for informing the research and clinical communities of one mechanism through which research capacity might be enhanced within the field of speech-language pathology. Specifically, forum authors describe the process of conducting secondary analyses of extant databases to answer questions…

Justice, Laura M.; Breit-Smith, Allison; Rogers, Margaret

2010-01-01

390

Beyond Learning Styles: Brain-Based Research and English Language Learners  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article, the author discusses ways in which teachers can implement brain-based research in teaching English language learners (ELLs). Teachers of ELLs can draw on recently developed brain-based research applied to other learners, in addition to their considerations of multicultural strategies, learning styles, and diverse needs. Equipped…

Lombardi, Judy

2008-01-01

391

On Power Relation in the Design of Language Research Project and the Analysis of Data  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

language: EN-GB;" lang="EN-GB">How to deal with the relationship between the researcher and the ‘researched’ is crucial thing in design of language research project and the analysis of data. The paper mainly focuses the influence of power relations bet...

Wei Zhang

2009-01-01

392

Up to date Assessment of the results of the research on the Dahalik language (December 1996 - December 2005).  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

A brief history of the French research on some languages spoken in Eritrea and the discovery that the islanders of the Dahlak Archipelago have their own language, never listed. Main linguistic features, allowing classification. Linguistic situation and languages in contact. Oral literature in Dahalik. Research perspectives and collaboration with Eritrean researchers.

Simeone-senelle, Marie-claude

2005-01-01

393

Teachers' Reactions to Foreign Language Learner Output  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

OF THE DISSERTATION:"Teachers' Reactions to Foreign Language Learner Output"BY: Leticia Vicente-RasoamalalaTEXT:A series of theoretical and practical educational studies have suggested that learners need teacher assistance to progress in their learning. Therefore, a considerable amount of language classroom research has been concerned with the study of teacher activities, especially those focusing on their instructional methods.In an attempt to contribute to this research area, the general ob...

Vicente-rasoamalala, Leticia

2009-01-01

394

Teachers' Reactions to Foreign Language Learner Output  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

[eng] "Teachers' Reactions to Foreign Language Learner Output" BY: Leticia Vicente-Rasoamalala TEXT: A series of theoretical and practical educational studies have suggested that learners need teacher assistance to progress in their learning. Therefore, a considerable amount of language classroom research has been concerned with the study of teacher activities, especially those focusing on their instructional methods. In an attempt to contribute to this research area, the general obje...

Vicente-rasoamalala, Leticia

2009-01-01

395

Meaning: lost, found or 'made' in translation? : A hermeneutical approach to cross-language interview research.  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Qualitative research that includes interviews in languages foreign to the researcher(s) has become increasingly common. However, there is surprisingly little reflection on the methodological implications of such research practices. Furthermore, strategies on how to analyse cross- and multi-language interview material are lacking. The aim of this article is to present possible ways of handling these challenges, focusing mainly on analysis. I propose a hermeneutical approach to the issue. First, I will discuss the epistemological/methodological foundations of the approach before proposing some 'tools' to help practically tackle the 'problem' of analysis using the chosen methodological perspective. Rather than ignoring or trying to circumvent the question of foreign language and/or translation, in the proposed approach linguistic questions and questions of translation are the central focus.

Fersch, Barbara

2013-01-01

396

CONVERGING LINES: TOWARDS THE INTEGRATION OF SECOND LANGUAGE RESEARCH AND TEACHING  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Despite the increasing research in second language acquisition, a gap seems to exist between researchers' technical knowledge and teachers' practical knowledge. This is evident from a review of research studies in form-focused instruction summarized in this article. Additional review of articles in the teaching of writing also leads to a similar conclusion. The theoretical development of the writing process does not seem to provide many insights for teachers to apply the process approach to t...

Bambang Yudi Cahyono

1999-01-01

397

The Language of People with Mild Intellectual Disability – the research written tasks  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The research showed that intellectualy disabled children are ablo to use a wide variety of parts of speech. During the research, the analysts observed huge discrepancies in the ability to use language including its rules and system. The discrepancies are a result of individual abilities and social impact. During the research five children refused to do the task ( despite receiving motivational support). This may be a consequence of their limited psychophysical capabilities or the reluctunce ...

2013-01-01

398

ANALISIS DE LA CONVERSACION: UNA PROPUESTA PARA EL ESTUDIO DE LA INTERACCION DIDACTICA EN SALA DE CLASE / Conversation analysis: A proposal for didactical interaction research in the classroom  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish El artículo ofrece una metodología de análisis de la conversación aplicado al estudio de la interacción didáctica en sala de clase. La propuesta metodológica articula los aportes de la etnografía de la comunicación, la lingüística interaccional y la pragmática de la comunicación en el estudio de la [...] relación profesor-alumnos. La metodología de análisis de la conversación aquí desarrollada es caracterizada por procesos secuenciales e interrelacionados de fases y secuencias temáticas, intercambios verbales, intervenciones y actos de habla, que configuran la estructura de significados que distinguen un contexto educativo determinado. Ofrece elementos para comprender las prácticas pedagógicas del docente y sus posibilidades de innovación. Abstract in english The article offers a conversation analysis methodology applied to the research of didactical interaction in the classroom. The methodological proposal articulates the contributions of the communication ethnography, the interactional linguistic and the pragmatic of communication, in the study of the [...] teacher-student's relationship. The conversation analysis methodology here developed, is characterized by sequential processes and interrelated stages and thematic sequences, verbal exchange, interventions and speech acts that form the meaning structure that distinguishes a specific educative context. It offers elements to understand the teaching practices and its possibilities of innovation.

Marco Antonio, Villalta Páuca.

399

¿Duermes mucho Tony?: Interpersonal and Transactional Uses of L1 in the Foreign-Language Classroom / ¿Duermes mucho Tony?: Usos interpersonales y transaccionales de la lengua materna en el aula de clase de lengua extranjera  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: English Abstract in spanish Mientras que los métodos comunicativos de enseñanza autorizan, muchas veces con poco entusiasmo, el uso de la lengua materna (L1) de los estudiantes del idioma inglés (EI ), un gran debate propone un papel más sustancial y activo para el uso del español en el salón de clases. Actualmente, los argume [...] ntos que se muestran a favor del uso de la lengua materna (L1) parten desde motivos ideológicos hasta factores pedagógicos en la enseñanza en el salón de aprendizaje de idiomas. El presente artículo contribuye a este debate en curso examinando la forma en que las nuevas generaciones de profesores de inglés en México están utilizando la lengua materna de sus estudiantes, el español, no sólo como una herramienta pedagógica sino para desarrollar y reforzar las relaciones interpersonales en el salón de idiomas, de forma que el aprendizaje del inglés se vea favorecido. Abstract in english Whilst communicative teaching approaches sanction, often grudgingly, the limited use of the students' first language (L1) in English Language Teaching (ELT), critical debate is now centred on a much more substantial and energetic role for the use of mother tongue in the language classroom. Justifica [...] tions favouring the use of L1 currently range from ideological arguments to classroom teaching considerations. This paper contributes to this ongoing debate by examining how new generations of language teachers in Mexico are using the students' mother tongue, Spanish, not only as a pedagogical tool but to develop and reinforce interpersonal relationships in the language classroom in order to enhance the learning of English.

Sandra, Higareda; Georgina, López; Gerrard, Mugford.

400

First language development: a usage-based perspective on past and current research.  

Science.gov (United States)

ABSTRACT I first outline three major developments in child language research over the past forty years: the use of computational modelling to reveal the structure of information in the input; the focus on quantifying productivity and abstraction; and developments in the explanation of systematic errors. Next, I turn to what I consider to be major outstanding issues: how the network of constructions builds up and the relationship between social and cognitive development and language learning. Finally, I briefly consider a number of other areas of importance to a psychologically realistic understanding of children's language development. PMID:25023496

Lieven, Elena

2014-07-01

 
 
 
 
401

Climatic Conditions in Classrooms.  

Science.gov (United States)

Presents an overview of research on the ways in which classroom thermal environment, lighting conditions, ion state, and electromagnetic and air pollution affect learning and the performance of students and teachers. (SJL)

Kevan, Simon M.; Howes, John D.

1980-01-01

402

The Benefits of Using Educational Videos in American Sign Language in Early Childhood Settings  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available With the growing acceptance of American Sign Language (ASL as a true language comes increasing possibility for incorporating it into the classroom, especially for visual learners. While children in general may benefit from ASL, early exposure to ASL is particularly important for Deaf and Hard of Hearing children (D/HH. In this article, we summarize research on the impact of an educational media series in ASL on early language and literacy development, provide research-based strategies for utilizing visual language and visual strategies during literacy activities, and offer recommendations for teachers about incorporating research-tested educational media in the classroom.

Debbie B. Golos

2013-06-01

403

Language Learning Podcasts and Learners' Belief Change  

Science.gov (United States)

The ubiquitous use of Internet-based mobile devices in educational contexts means that mobile learning has become a plausible alternative to or a good complement for conventional classroom-based teaching. However, there is a lack of research that explores and defines the characteristics and effects of mobile language learning (LL) through language

Basaran, Süleyman; Cabaroglu, Nese

2014-01-01

404

Literacy Instruction for English Language Learners Pre-K-2  

Science.gov (United States)

Summarizing current research and weaving it into practical instructional strategies that teachers can immediately use with young English language learners (ELLs), this book addresses a major priority for today's primary-grade classrooms. All aspects of effective instruction for ELLs are explored: oral language development and instruction,…

Barone, Diane M.; Xu, Shelley Hong

2007-01-01

405

Engagement, Alignment, and Rigor as Vital Signs of High-Quality Instruction: A Classroom Visit Protocol for Instructional Improvement and Research  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper investigates engagement (E), alignment (A), and rigor (R) as vital signs of high-quality teacher instruction as measured by the EAR Classroom Visit Protocol, designed by the Institute for Research and Reform in Education (IRRE). Findings indicated that both school leaders and outside raters could learn to score the protocol with…

Early, Diane M.; Rogge, Ronald D.; Deci, Edward L.

2014-01-01

406

English-Language Learners: Implications of Limited Vocabulary for Cross-Language Transfer of Phonemic Awareness with Kindergartners  

Science.gov (United States)

Research examined the influence of native vocabulary development on cross-language transfer of phonemic awareness. Participants were Spanish-speaking kindergartners learning English in immersion classrooms. Results indicated that limited Spanish vocabulary development negatively influenced cross-language transfer of phonemic awareness to English.…

Atwill, Kim; Blanchard, Jay; Christie, James; Gorin, Joanna S.; Garcia, Herman S.

2010-01-01

407

The Brain in Singing and Language  

Science.gov (United States)

This article summarizes currently available brain research concerning relationships between singing and language development. Although this is a new field of investigation, there are findings that are applicable to general music teaching classroom. These findings are presented along with suggestions about how to apply them to teaching music.

Trollinger, Valerie L.

2010-01-01

408

The TOEFL Trump Card: An Investigation of Test Impact in an ESL Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Much of the research on the effects of tests on foreign and second-language classrooms has examined the impact or washback effect that commercial/institutional language tests, such as the TOEFL, have on teachers' instructional practices (Hughes, 1998; Wall & Alderson, 1993). Using a case study methodology, this study uncovered the ways in which…

Johnson, Karen E.; Jordan, Stefanie Rehn; Poehner, Matthew E.

2005-01-01

409

Eliciting and activating funds of knowledge in an environmental science community college classroom: An action research study  

Science.gov (United States)

Many non-traditional students are currently underperforming in college and yet may have untapped knowledge and skills that could support their academic success if appropriately utilized. Previous practices that students experience as a part of their lives are what Gonzales and other researchers call "funds of knowledge" (FOK). There is ample evidence to show that utilization of students' FOK in K-12 instructional contexts can be beneficial. In contrast, little formal FOK research has been done with higher education students. To address this gap, this study explores how environmental college courses could be designed so as to better elicit and capitalize on students' FOK, with the ultimate goal of increasing student engagement and learning. More specifically, using an action research paradigm, I designed, implemented and studied an intervention in two sections of the required environmental science course I taught in Fall 2009 at the community college where I am employed. The intervention consisted of two phases: (1) eliciting FOK from the students enrolled in one section of the course through a draft survey, and (2) refining that survey tool in order to better elicit FOK, development of other methods of elicitation of FOK and activating (or incorporating) the FOK thus identified as relevant to enhance the learning experience of the students in both sections of the course. The designs of the intervention as well as data collection and analysis were informed by the following research questions: Q1. What are effective strategies for eliciting FOK that may be generalized to the practices of other college instructors? Q2. What relevant FOK do students bring to this class? Q3. What were instances where FOK were activated in the course? Q4. What are effective strategies for activating FOK that may be generalized to the practices of other college instructors? Q5. What evidence was there that students took up new practices due to the intervention? Data were collected from a variety of sources including an audio recorded small-group session where FOK were elicited, surveys compiled by all students to point to potentially relevant life experiences and practices, audio recorded classroom lessons where FOK were utilized, audio recorded final class reflections on the experience, and my own teacher log. Data were qualitatively analyzed first to identify the range and frequency of students' relevant FOK, then to identify and characterize effective activation of these funds in a classroom setting. Findings highlight the breadth of relevant FOK present in a given class as well as strategies shown to be effective for both elicitation and activation of these funds. Implications are drawn for future research into FOK as well as for other instructors wishing to explicitly draw on students' FOK to enrich their learning experiences.

van Niel, John J.

410

¿Duermes mucho Tony?: Interpersonal and Transactional Uses of L1 in the Foreign-Language Classroom ¿Duermes mucho Tony?: Usos interpersonales y transaccionales de la lengua materna en el aula de clase de lengua extranjera  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Whilst communicative teaching approaches sanction, often grudgingly, the limited use of the students' first language (L1 in English Language Teaching (ELT, critical debate is now centred on a much more substantial and energetic role for the use of mother tongue in the language classroom. Justifications favouring the use of L1 currently range from ideological arguments to classroom teaching considerations. This paper contributes to this ongoing debate by examining how new generations of language teachers in Mexico are using the students' mother tongue, Spanish, not only as a pedagogical tool but to develop and reinforce interpersonal relationships in the language classroom in order to enhance the learning of English.Mientras que los métodos comunicativos de enseñanza autorizan, muchas veces con poco entusiasmo, el uso de la lengua materna (L1 de los estudiantes del idioma inglés (EI , un gran debate propone un papel más sustancial y activo para el uso del español en el salón de clases. Actualmente, los argumentos que se muestran a favor del uso de la lengua materna (L1 parten desde motivos ideológicos hasta factores pedagógicos en la enseñanza en el salón de aprendizaje de idiomas. El presente artículo contribuye a este debate en curso examinando la forma en que las nuevas generaciones de profesores de inglés en México están utilizando la lengua materna de sus estudiantes, el español, no sólo como una herramienta pedagógica sino para desarrollar y reforzar las relaciones interpersonales en el salón de idiomas, de forma que el aprendizaje del inglés se vea favorecido.

Sandra Higareda

2009-10-01

411

Paris in London, or the major research journals in foreign languages  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The author discusses possible criteria for assessing foreign-language journals and comments on the difficulties which arise. He dedicates the article to John Trim, former Director of the Centre for Information on Language and Research (CILT, and pays tribute to their quarterly abstracting journal, LANGUAGE TEACHING, which over the past 18 years has been assessing international foreign-language journals. He makes a critical assessment of the method used by CILT and by means of a number of tables he elucidates the criteria used in ranking the journals, their authors, and their countries of origin. Die skrywer bespreek moontlike kriteria wat gebruik kan word vir die evaluering van vreemde taal-joernale en !ewer kommentaar op probleme wat opduik Hy dra die artikel op aan John Trim, voormalige Direkteur van die Centre for Information on Language and Research (CILT en bring hulde aan hulle kwartaallikse abstrakte-joernaal, LANGUAGE TEACHING, wat die afgelope 18 jaar reeds internasionale vreemde taal-joernale evalueer. Hy bespreek metodes wat CILT gebruik krities en met behulp van 'n aantal tabelle verklaar hy die kriteria wat gebruik word om joernale, hulle outeurs en die lande van oorsprong te rangskik

Udo Jung

2013-02-01

412

Evaluating Earth and Space Sciences STEM Research Communication in 7th-12th Grade Rural Mississippi Classrooms and Resulting Student Attitudinal Impacts  

Science.gov (United States)

Observation and evaluation of STEM graduate students from Mississippi State University communicating their research of the Earth and Space Sciences in rural 7th-12th grade classrooms participating in the Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education (INSPIRE) NSF GK-12 project. The methods they utilize to communicate their STEM research includes introducing new technologies and inquiry based learning experiences. These communication experiences have been observed and evaluated using two observational systems, the Mathematics Science Classroom Observational Profile System (M-SCOPS) and the Presentation Skills Protocol (PSP). M-SCOPS has been used over the first three years of the project to evaluate what Earth and Space research the STEM graduate students communicate in classroom activities along with how they are introducing STEM research through a variety of communication methods and levels of understanding. PSP, which INSPIRE began using this year, evaluates and provides feedback to the STEM graduate students on their communication during these classroom experiences using a rubric covering a range of skills for successful communication. PSP also allows the participating INSPIRE teacher partners to provide feedback to the STEM graduate students about development of their communication skills over the course of the year. In addition to feedback from the INSPIRE project and participating teachers, the STEM graduate students have the opportunity to evaluate their personal communication skills through video documentation to determine specific skills they would like to improve. Another area of research to be discussed is how the STEM graduate students communicating Earth and Space sciences research in the participating classrooms is impacting student attitudes about science and mathematics over the last three years. Student Attitudinal Surveys (SAS) are administered as a pre-evaluation tool in the fall when the STEM graduate students first enter into their partner classrooms and again each spring for post-evaluation before the STEM graduate students depart from the classrooms. An evaluation of graduate communication effectiveness will be related to the 7th-12th grade student attitudes about science and mathematics.

Radencic, S.; McNeal, K. S.

2013-05-01

413

Language, Culture, Idioms, and Their Relationship with the Foreign Language  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study explores the close relationship between language and culture. Nowadays, the issue of human communication is one of the most important subjects occupying the minds of linguists, anthropologists, psychologists, and philosophers. .Since it is the most important means for communication among human beings, the relation between language, culture, and their mutual interactions have high significance. The inextricable connection highlights various manifestations of conventionalized language including the idiomatic expressions as one of the important and pervasive language uses reflecting culture in real life. Like other types of figurative language, idioms appear to be the natural decoders of customs, cultural beliefs, social conventions, and norms. Idioms, as a major component of native-like communication, enable a language learner to understand the thoughts, emotions and views of the speakers of target language. For this reason, learning idioms provides learners with a significant chance to acquire information about the underlying parameters of a language. Awareness of figurative language particularly idioms will improve teaching and assist learners to have better communication strategies. Otherwise, accurate and appropriate target language use and understanding will be at risk and the learners will tend to transfer their native language conceptual structure which will most probably be inappropriate. The strong relationship among the language, culture, and the figurative branch of the language especially idioms need particular attention in language learning since it appears to have inadequate research. Therefore, a systematic knowledge of language and culture integration inside and beyond the classroom setting can be built up.

Oktay Ya?iz

2013-09-01

414

A Comparison of Innovative Training Techniques at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center. Research Report 1426.  

Science.gov (United States)

A study evaluated the comparative training effectiveness of three language instruction methods: (1) suggestopedia, (2) the standard methodology used at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, a functional skill-building approach, and (3) a flexible-scheduling version of the standard methodology, with pacing based on group…

Bush, Brian J.

415

A glimpse into classroom interaction  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

How does classroom interaction contribute to language learning? This study aims at identifying and interpreting some patterns of teacher-student interaction within an EFL classroom. Different interactional patterns and strategies are examined through the self-observation of the teacher's own performance as a student-teacher during her practicum period in a secondary school

Raga Preston, Liz

2010-01-01

416

Future directions in feedback on second language writing: Overview and research agenda  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This article provides an overview of the contributions made to this special issue on feedback by the seven papers, examining how they reflect both the growing interest in different areas of research into feedback on writing and the continuing search by teachers for more effective feedback practices. Focusing first on the papers by Van Beuningen, Storch, Evans, Hartshorn and Allen, it discusses how these papers situate written corrective feedback research in the wider area of second language a...

2010-01-01

417

Engaging the Deaf American Sign Language Community: Lessons From a Community-Based Participatory Research Center  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Numerous publications demonstrate the importance of community-based participatory research (CBPR) in community health research, but few target the Deaf community. The Deaf community is understudied and underrepresented in health research despite suspected health disparities and communication barriers. Objectives The goal of this paper is to share the lessons learned from the implementation of CBPR in an understudied community of Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users in the greater Rochester, New York, area. Methods We review the process of CBPR in a Deaf ASL community and identify the lessons learned. Results Key CBPR lessons include the importance of engaging and educating the community about research, ensuring that research benefits the community, using peer-based recruitment strategies, and sustaining community partnerships. These lessons informed subsequent research activities. Conclusions This report focuses on the use of CBPR principles in a Deaf ASL population; lessons learned can be applied to research with other challenging-to-reach populations.

McKee, Michael; Thew, Denise; Starr, Matthew; Kushalnagar, Poorna; Reid, John T.; Graybill, Patrick; Velasquez, Julia; Pearson, Thomas

2013-01-01

418

Cognitive Abilities in Children with Specific Language Impairment: Consideration of Visuo-Spatial Skills. Research Report  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: The study is concerned with the cognitive abilities of children with specific language impairment (SLI). Previous research has indicated that children with SLI demonstrate difficulties with certain cognitive tasks despite normal non-verbal IQ scores. It has been suggested that a general processing limitation might account for the…

Hick, Rachel; Botting, Nicola; Conti-Ramsden, Gina

2005-01-01

419

The Psycholinguistic Dimension in Second Language Writing: Opportunities for Research and Pedagogy Using Computer Keystroke Logging  

Science.gov (United States)

This article discusses the use of computer logging as a means of investigating aspects of the second language (L2) writing process as writers are engaged in producing text at the keyboard. The observation of writing by means of this method provides researchers with detailed information concerning aspects of the planning, formulation, and revision…

Miller, Kristyan Spelman; Lindgren, Eva; Sullivan, Kirk P. H.

2008-01-01

420

Web 2.0 and Second Language Learning: What Does the Research Tell Us?  

Science.gov (United States)

This article reviews current research on the use of Web 2.0 technologies in second language (L2) learning. Its purpose is to investigate the theoretical perspectives framing it, to identify some of the benefits of using Web 2.0 technologies in L2 learning, and to discuss some of the limitations. The review reveals that blogs and wikis have been…

Wang, Shenggao; Vasquez, Camilla

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
421

Researching the Effects of Frame-Focused Instruction on Second Language Acquisition  

Science.gov (United States)

In the context of globalization, the research of innovative teaching methods and techniques becomes relevant. The traditional teaching approach where the training of practice material is preceded by rule-presentation (explanation + mechanical form-oriented practice) does not meet the requirements of constantly developing rational language

Sokolova, Elena; Burmistrova, Anna

2012-01-01

422

Review of Doctoral Research on Second Language Teaching and Learning in Spain (2008-2010)  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper reviews a selection of doctoral theses on language learning and teaching completed in Spain between 2008 and 2010. A total of 16 theses have been identified as representative--in terms of the topics under investigation and the methodology employed--of the doctoral research undertaken in Spain. Current topics include the development of…

Serrano, Raquel; Miralpeix, Imma

2013-01-01

423

Asian American Education: Identities, Racial Issues, and Languages. Research on the Education of Asian Pacific Americans  

Science.gov (United States)

Asian American Education--Asian American Identities, Racial Issues, and Languages presents groundbreaking research that critically challenges the invisibility, stereotyping, and common misunderstandings of Asian Americans by disrupting "customary" discourse and disputing "familiar" knowledge. The chapters in this anthology provide rich, detailed…

Rong, Xue Lan, Ed.; Endo, Russell, Ed.

2011-01-01

424

Are Language Learning Websites Special? Towards a Research Agenda for Discipline-Specific Usability  

Science.gov (United States)

With the intention of defining an initial research agenda for discipline-specific factors in the usability of e-learning websites, this article focuses on the example of foreign language learning. First, general notions and concepts of usability are analyzed, and the term "pedagogical usability" is proposed as a means of focusing on the close…

Shield, Lesley; Kukulska-Hulme, Agnes

2006-01-01

425

Recent Research in Math, Science, Language Arts, Social Studies and the Arts.  

Science.gov (United States)

There is consensus in the United States that schools are not succeeding. This paper presents recent research in mathematics, science, language arts, social studies, and the arts to discuss ways in which to improve instruction and learning in these areas. Featured topics include cooperative learning, problem solving, use of technology, whole…

Novello, Mary K.

426

Thinking Allowed: Managing Innovation in English Language Education--A Research Agenda  

Science.gov (United States)

In Waters (2009), the author attempted to capture the "state of the art" in theorising, practice, and research activity about the management of innovation in English language education (ELE). In this article, he reprises a number of areas in that review, to identify where the field would benefit from further enquiry about how to…

Waters, Alan

2014-01-01

427

Classrooms Where Children Learn to Care.  

Science.gov (United States)

Discusses whole-language classrooms as ones that create and nurture a morality of caring. Lists ways in which teachers can facilitate growth of the ethic of caring in the classroom-- helping children to become "other centered"--whereby a community of responsible, concerned, and empathetic children emerges, and the classroom models the essence of…

Medda, Marilyn E.

1996-01-01

428

Research and training of teachers in the classroom: Development of proto-mentalist skills in kindergarten pupils with special educational needs  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

An example of research and training of kindergarten’s teachers in the classroom is introduced. Recent research in developmental psychology relate to early childhood skills acquisition proto-mentalist to the development of skills for interacting with objects and people. The results of this study, conducted with 13 children from 15 to 38 months indicated a significant association of social reference (expression skills, identification and recognition of emotions) with the pathology (developmen...

2012-01-01

429

LA HIPÓTESIS ABDUCTIVA COMO ESTRATEGIA DIDÁCTICA DE INVESTIGACIÓN EN EL AULA / THE ABDUCTIVE HYPOTHESIS AS A TEACHING STRATEGY FOR RESEARCH IN THE CLASSROOM  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Este texto aborda la pregunta acerca de cómo traducir la hipótesis abductiva en una estrategia didáctica para la investigación en el aula. Su comprensión e interpretación se apoyan en procedimientos metodológicos del discurso peirceano aplicados en la educación y en la literatura, y de la lógica del [...] razonamiento científico basada en la abducción, la deducción y la inducción. Se expone un caso didáctico en el que se aplican los procedimientos de la hipótesis abductiva y que arroja como resultado las ventajas que representa para la educación el impulso de una libertad racional en el aula, respetando las diferencias individuales de los estudiantes, su bienestar físico y su gusto estético. Finalmente, se concluye que la aplicación de la hipótesis abductiva en educación exige de un uso creativo del conocimiento fundado en la lógica del razonamiento científico, que rompe con la visión racionalista de la inducción y la deducción, y en la concepción de los métodos de la ciencia como actos liberadores que estimulan la capacidad de investigar, juzgar y actuar en medio de lo diverso, en oposición a una visión homogénea de la sociedad. Abstract in english This text addresses the question of how to translate abductive hypothesis in a teaching strategy for classroom research. Its understanding and interpretation is based on methodological procedures of the Peircean speech applied in education and literature, and of the logic of scientific reasoning bas [...] ed on abduction, deduction and induction. A teaching case is presented in which procedures of the abductive hypothesis are applied, which indicates as a result, the advantages of education for the promotion of rational freedom in the classroom, respecting the individual differences of students, their physical welfare and aesthetic taste. Finally, it was concluded that the application of abductive hypothesis in education requires creative use of knowledge, founded on the logic of scientific reasoning, which breaks with the rationalist view of induction and deduction, and in conception of methods of science as liberating acts to stimulate the ability to investigate, judge and act in the midst of diversity, in opposition to a homogeneous view of society.

Mónica, Moreno Torres; Edwin, Carvajal Córdoba; Yeimy, Arango Escobar.

430

Connecting Brain Research to Classroom Learning: A Mixed-Method Study on How Teachers Apply Brain Research to Their Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose. The purpose of this study was to examine how knowledgeable teachers are in utilizing brain-researched instructional strategies. The research focused on determining which brain-researched strategies are implemented, the accuracy with which they are employed, and the degree to which they are utilized. A literature review revealed the most…

McAteer, Todd C.

2010-01-01

431

Blending research methods: Qualitative and quantitative approaches to researching computer corpora for language learning.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper outlines how corpora (in printed, electronic or multi-modal form) can be used in language learning, an area often referred to as "data-driven learning" or DDL (Johns 1991). The alleged advantages are numerous, but are in need of empirical support which is frequently claimed to be lacking in the field. However, over 80 studies have so far attempted to evaluate some aspect of corpus use by non-native speakers (Boulton 2010): these are briefly reviewed as a whole, highlighting the gen...

Boulton, Alex

2011-01-01

432

Review of Doctoral Research in Second Language Acquisition, Language Learning and Teaching in Poland (2006-2010)  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper reviews 25 doctoral dissertations on second language acquisition (SLA), English language learning and teaching submitted in Poland in the years 2006-2010. The theses were selected for review on the basis of the recommendations of Ph.D. supervisors from leading Polish universities and they are divided into six groups: learner autonomy,…

Drozdzial-Szelest, Krystyna; Pawlak, Miroslaw

2012-01-01

433

Classroom Research: GC Studies of Linoleic and Linolenic Fatty Acids Found in French Fries  

Science.gov (United States)

A study of fatty-acid ratios in French fries has proved to be an excellent choice for an entry-level research class. This research develops reasoning skills and involves the subject of breast cancer, a major concern of American society. Analysis of tumor samples removed from women with breast cancer revealed high ratios of linoleic to linolenic acid, suggesting a link between the accelerated growth of breast tumors and the combination of these two fatty acids. When the ratio of linoleic to linolenic acid was approximately 9 to 1, accelerated growth was observed. Since these fatty acids are found in cooking oils, Wichita Collegiate students, under the guidance of their chemistry teacher, decided that an investigation of the ratios of these two fatty acids should be conducted. A research class was structured using a gas chromatograph for the analysis. Separation of linoleic from linolenic acid was successfully accomplished. The students experienced inductive experimental research chemistry as it applies to everyday life. The structure of this research class can serve as a model for high school and undergraduate college research curricula.

Crowley, Janice P.; Deboise, Kristen L.; Marshall, Megan R.; Shaffer, Hannah M.; Zafar, Sara; Jones, Kevin A.; Palko, Nick R.; Mitsch, Stephen M.; Sutton, Lindsay A.; Chang, Margaret; Fromer, Ilana; Kraft, Jake; Meister, Jessica; Shah, Amar; Tan, Priscilla; Whitchurch, James

2002-07-01

434

Classrooms as Complex Adaptive Systems: A Relational Model  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article, we describe and model the language classroom as a complex adaptive system (see Logan & Schumann, 2005). We argue that linear, categorical descriptions of classroom processes and interactions do not sufficiently explain the complex nature of classrooms, and cannot account for how classroom change occurs (or does not occur), over…

Burns, Anne; Knox, John S.

2011-01-01

435

Vocabulary and language teaching  

CERN Document Server

The material in this book reviews work dating back to the vocabulary control movement in the 1930s and also refers to more recent work on the role of lexis in language learning. Two chapters describe the main foundations of lexical semantics and relevant research and pedagogical studies in vocabulary and lexicography; and a further chapter discusses recent advances in the field of lexis and discourse analysis. There is also a series of specially commissioned articles which investigate the structure and functions of the modern English lexicon in relation to its exploitation for classroom vocabu

Carter, Ronald

2014-01-01

436

Coffee Shops, Classrooms and Conversations: public engagement and outreach in a large interdisciplinary research Hub  

Science.gov (United States)

Public engagement and outreach activities are increasingly using specialist staff for co-ordination, training and support for researchers, they are also becoming expected for large investments. Here, the experience of public engagement and outreach a large, interdisciplinary Research Hub is described. dot.rural, based at the University of Aberdeen UK, is a £11.8 million Research Councils UK Rural Digital Economy Hub, funded as part of the RCUK Digital Economy Theme (2009-2015). Digital Economy research aims to realise the transformational impact of digital technologies on aspects of the environment, community life, cultural experiences, future society, and the economy. The dot.rural Hub involves 92 researchers from 12 different disciplines, including Geography, Hydrology and Ecology. Public Engagement and Outreach is embedded in the dot.rural Digital Economy Hub via an Outreach Officer. Alongside this position, public engagement and outreach activities are compulsory part of PhD student contracts. Public Engagement and Outreach activities at the dot.rural Hub involve individuals and groups in both formal and informal settings organised by dot.rural and other organisations. Activities in the realms of Education, Public Engagement, Traditional and Social Media are determined by a set of Underlying Principles designed for the Hub by the Outreach Officer. The underlying Engagement and Outreach principles match funding agency requirements and expectations alongside researcher demands and the user-led nature of Digital Economy Research. All activities include researchers alongside the Outreach Officer are research informed and embedded into specific projects that form the Hub. Successful public engagement activities have included participation in Café Scientifique series, workshops in primary and secondary schools, and online activities such as I'm a Scientist Get Me Out of Here. From how to engage 8 year olds with making hydrographs more understandable to members of the public to blogging birds and engaging with remote, rural communities to Spiegeltents. This presentation will share successful public engagement and outreach events alongside some less successful experiences and lessons learnt along the way.

Holden, Jennifer A.

2014-05-01

437

Developing my theory of practice as a teacher-researcher through a case-study of CLIL classroom interaction  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Research by the Nuffield Foundation (2000) suggests that the teaching and learning of Modern Foreign Languages (MFL) in English secondary schools is in crisis. At the same time, some schools are implementing initiatives intended to raise the status and the quality of MFL learning. One such school is the College du Pare [fictitious name] where in September 1998 the Bilingual Foundation Course (BFC) was introduced. In the BFC, non-linguistic subjects (English, History, Geography, Religious ...

Wiesemes, Rolf

2002-01-01

438

Poetry in the EFL Classroom  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This thesis explores the benefits of using literature, in particular poetry in the EFL classroom. Most present-day texts on the methodology of English language teaching promote the integration of literature into the language teaching programme. It is generally held that literature can provide a basis for enhancing students’ language competence, however, foreign language teachers are averse to integrating literature into the language teaching syllabi. My investigation is based on the teachin...

Bede, A?gota

2012-01-01

439

Factors influencing research engagement: research interest, confidence and experience in an Australian speech-language pathology workforce  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Recent initiatives within an Australia public healthcare service have seen a focus on increasing the research capacity of their workforce. One of the key initiatives involves encouraging clinicians to be research generators rather than solely research consumers. As a result, baseline data of current research capacity are essential to determine whether initiatives encouraging clinicians to undertake research have been effective. Speech pathologists have previously been shown to be interested in conducting research within their clinical role; therefore they are well positioned to benefit from such initiatives. The present study examined the current research interest, confidence and experience of speech language pathologists (SLPs) in a public healthcare workforce, as well as factors that predicted clinician research engagement. Methods Data were collected via an online survey emailed to an estimated 330 SLPs working within Queensland, Australia. The survey consisted of 30 questions relating to current levels of interest, confidence and experience performing specific research tasks, as well as how frequently SLPs had performed these tasks in the last 5 years. Results Although 158 SLPs responded to the survey, complete data were available for only 137. Respondents were more confident and experienced with basic research tasks (e.g., finding literature) and less confident and experienced with complex research tasks (e.g., analysing and interpreting results, publishing results). For most tasks, SLPs displayed higher levels of interest in the task than confidence and experience. Research engagement was predicted by highest qualification obtained, current job classification level and overall interest in research. Conclusions Respondents generally reported levels of interest in research higher than their confidence and experience, with many respondents reporting limited experience in most research tasks. Therefore SLPs have potential to benefit from research capacity building activities to increase their research skills in order to meet organisational research engagement objectives. However, these findings must be interpreted with the caveats that a relatively low response rate occurred and participants were recruited from a single state-wide health service, and therefore may not be representative of the wider SLP workforce.

2013-01-01

440

Community Participatory Research With Deaf Sign Language Users to Identify Health Inequities  

Science.gov (United States)

Deaf people who use American Sign Language (ASL) are medically underserved and often excluded from health research and surveillance. We used a community participatory approach to develop and administer an ASL-accessible health survey. We identified deaf community strengths (e.g., a low prevalence of current smokers) and 3 glaring health inequities: obesity, partner violence, and suicide. This collaborative work represents the first time a deaf community has used its own data to identify health priorities.

Barnett, Steven; Klein, Jonathan D.; Pollard, Robert Q.; Samar, Vincent; Schlehofer, Deirdre; Starr, Matthew; Sutter, Erika; Yang, Hongmei

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
441

Fostering Intercultural Communicative Competence Through Reading Authentic Literary Texts in an Advanced Colombian EFL Classroom: A Constructivist Perspective Desarrollo de la competencia comunicativa intercultural mediante la lectura de textos literarios auténticos: una perspectiva constructivista  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This article describes an action research experience carried out in an advanced English as a foreign language classroom of the language program at a university in Bogotá, Colombia, in 2010. The study proposes the inclusion of authentic literary texts in the English as a foreign language classroom through the implementation of four constructivist approaches as a means to develop intercultural communicative competence. Data were collected to show how those approaches engaged learners to read a...

Luis Fernando Gómez R

2012-01-01

442

From the Classroom to the Boardroom: The Impact of Information Literacy Instruction on Workplace Research Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

Since the wide-scale adoption of the ACRL "Information Literacy Standards" (2000), there have been numerous students who have graduated from universities that have formal library instruction programs. Currently there has been very little assessment of their post-graduate research skills or what role information literacy plays on workplace…

Travis, Tiffini

2011-01-01

443

Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education (INSPIRE) Brining STEM Research to 7th-12th Grade Science and Math Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

The Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education (INSPIRE) program at Mississippi State University (MSU), funded by the NSF Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK12) program, focuses on the advancement of Earth and Space science education in K-12 classrooms. INSPIRE currently in its third year of partnering ten graduate students each year from the STEM fields of Geosciences, Engineering, Physics and Chemistry at MSU with five teachers from local, rural school districts. The five year project serves to enhance graduate student's communication skills as they create interactive lessons linking their STEM research focus to the state and national standards covered in science and math classrooms for grades 7-12 through inquiry experiences. Each graduate student is responsible for the development of two lessons each month of the school year that include an aspect of their STEM research, including the technologies that they may utilize to conduct their STEM research. The plans are then published on the INSPIRE project webpage, www.gk12.msstate.edu, where they are a free resource for any K-12 classroom teacher seeking innovative activities for their classrooms and total over 300 lesson activities to date. Many of the participating teachers and graduate students share activities developed with non-participating teachers, expanding INSPIRE's outreach of incorporating STEM research into activities for K-12 students throughout the local community. Examples of STEM research connections to classroom topics related to earth and ocean science include activities using GPS with GIS for triangulation and measurement of area in geometry; biogeochemical response to oil spills compared to organism digestive system; hydrogeology water quality monitoring and GIS images used as a determinant for habitat suitability in area water; interactions of acids and bases in the Earth's environments and surfaces; and the importance of electrical circuitry in an electrode used in sediment analysis. INSPIRE is striving to create synergy with other education focused grants at MSU, including those that focus on climate literacy and Earth hazards. Graduate students create at least one lesson plan that links their STEM research to climate related topics to share in their assigned K-12 classrooms. They also assist with a science day sponsored at MSU centered on Earth hazards where local middle school students participate. In addition to the development of interactive experiences that bring current STEM research into the classroom, INSPIRE also creates and organizes inquiry activities for National GIS Day each year. Graduate students not only design the GIS explorations focused on hazards, but they also guide middle school students through these explorations. Additionally, all graduate students involved with INSPIRE are required to participate in at least one Science Fair event either at the local school level or at the regional competitions. Participating teachers have noted that several students had science fair projects that included some aspect of the STEM research topics they had learned about from the graduate students in the classroom.

Radencic, S.; McNeal, K. S.; Pierce, D.

2012-12-01

444

Experiences in adapting post-byzantine chant into foreign languages: Research and praxis  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article presents the current state of the research and practical methodology of the adaptation of Byzantine melodies written in the “New Method” into foreign languages, with Romanian, English and Finnish serving as examples. The adaptation of independent, “fixed” melodies as well as metrical liturgical texts (prosomoia and canons are examined. The challenges emerging in adapting Byzantine chant into Finnish are also discussed. The author also suggests some future subjects for research, which include the synthesis of examining arrangements in both “Old” and “New Method”.

Olkinuora Jaakko

2011-01-01

445

Real Research Projects in the Classroom for Undergraduate Non-Majors  

Science.gov (United States)

Research-Based Science Education (RBSE) is a method of instruction that models the processes of scientific inquiry and exploration used by scientists to discover new knowledge. It is "research-based" in the sense that students work together in self-guided, cooperative groups on a real astronomical research project. In other words, in order to learn science, students are given the opportunity to actually do science. We present new RBSE curricula that are part of an NSF-funded effort to develop and test such curricula in an undergraduate course setting. The goals of this curricula are fourfold: (1) To teach that science is a process, not just a body of knowledge; (2) To improve retention of science content by using it in a research project; (3) to improve attitudes towards STEM careers, particularly among first-year students; and (4) to develop task-driven skills, such as critical thinking and teamwork skills, that are useful in any career path. The research projects include projects that use astronomical imaging and spectroscopic data. The projects include: a spectroscopic study of semi-regular variable stars, a spectroscopic study of AGN, a photometric search for high-redshift galaxies in the NDWFS, a search for variable stars in open clusters, and a photometric and astrometric study of minor planets. In the projects using imaging data, students complete astrometric and photometric measurements. In the spectroscopy projects, students measure properties such continuum shape and the positions of emission and absorption lines. These curricula are currently being developed and tested at the University of Alaska Anchorage, Indiana University Bloomington, and Kenai Peninsula College.

Rector, Travis A.; Puckett, A.; Pilachowski, C.; Young, M.

2007-12-01

446

Want to Inspire Science Students to Consider a Research Career? Host a Scientist in Your Classroom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Most biology students have limited exposure to research since this is not a public activity and the pace of science does not lend itself to television dramatization. In contrast, medicine is the subject of numerous TV shows, and students’ experience visiting doctors may lead them to think they want to become physicians. One effective way to encourage these students to consider a research career is to invite engaging scientists to speak about their career paths and lives during class. Students are most likely to be influenced by people they consider to be like themselves. While this method is well-suited to a lecture format where the scientist can address a larger audience, the laboratory would also be appropriate.

Patricia J. Baynham

2010-05-01

447