WorldWideScience

Sample records for language classroom research

  1. Second Language Writing: Research Insights for the Classroom. Second Language Writing: Research Insights for the Classroom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Youmans

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of composition at the post-secondary level is a relatively new practice which has become widespread only during the past half-century. More recent is the emergence over the past two to three decades of composition studies as an academic discipline, and even more recent is the awareness that composition research and pedagogy must expand to meet the needs of the ESL population. As growing numbers of international students flood colleges and universities in the English-speaking world, and as English becomes increasingly important as a world language, ESL composition is a burgeoning field. The study of composition at the post-secondary level is a relatively new practice which has become widespread only during the past half-century. More recent is the emergence over the past two to three decades of composition studies as an academic discipline, and even more recent is the awareness that composition research and pedagogy must expand to meet the needs of the ESL population. As growing numbers of international students flood colleges and universities in the English-speaking world, and as English becomes increasingly important as a world language, ESL composition is a burgeoning field.

  2. Rasch Measurement in Language Research: Creating the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda J. Walker

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to construct a new scale for measuring foreign language classroom anxiety (FLCA. It begun with the creation of an extended item pool generated by qualitative methods. Subsequent Rasch and semantic analyses led to the final 18-item Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Inventory (FLCAI. In comparison with the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS, the FLCAI demonstrated more convincing evidence of unidimensionality and the optimal 5-point Likert scale functioned better. The FLCAI, while 55% the length of the FLCAS, thus more practical for classroom practitioners to administer and analyse, maintains its psychometric properties and covers a wider range on the construct continuum thus improving the degree of validity of the instrument. Finally, test anxiety was shown to be a component of FLCA.

  3. Research "Fitting" Practice: Firth and Wagner, Classroom Language Teaching, and Language Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article argues that Firth and Wagner's 1997 contribution gained influence in second/foreign language teaching partly owing to a loose group of conceptual and ideological preconditions that drew on classroom methodologies, debates over educating second language teachers, and new views of how teachers could document and analyze their own…

  4. Second Language Writing. Research Insights for the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Barbara, Ed.

    This book is addressed to those about to embark on the teaching of second language writing as well as to those already engaged in the field. Teachers are dedicated to postering growth in writing; researchers want to investigate the questions that shed the greatest light on the problem in the field. The concerns of both these groups are addressed…

  5. Classroom management in language education

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Tony, Dr

    2005-01-01

    A book that develops an understanding of practices at the very centre of language education - the classroom. It is written for postgraduate students in Applied Linguistics and Education, and practitioners, whether in TESOL or other language teaching, In Part 1 the author explores key concepts in unpacking the complexity of classroom life. In Part 2 existing research and practice are examined through a series of research case studies. Part 3 provides a template for research activity and suggestions for projects and methodologies, and Part 4 collects resources for readers keen to follow up the t

  6. Advantage Girls: A Look at Women's Language in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meliza, Evette

    2009-01-01

    While others have focused on gender-based language and the workplace, this research study explores gender-based language, in this case women's language, and the classroom. The study specifically examines examples of women's language and how this language affects student response in the classroom. Five variables have been identified as…

  7. A Probe into Classroom Teaching and Second Language Acquisition

    OpenAIRE

    Zhengdan Li

    2009-01-01

    Due to the popularization of foreign language study, more and more people from education filed further enhance their exploration and researches in how to apply second acquisition theories into classroom teaching. This paper probes into the orientation, research objects, age, language environment and classroom activities of second language acquisition.

  8. The praxis of English language teaching and learning (PELT) beyond the binaries researching critically in EFL classrooms

    CERN Document Server

    Vicars, Mark; McKenna, Tarquam; Cacciattolo, Marcelle

    2015-01-01

    This edition of Critical New Literacies: The Praxis of English Language Teaching and Learning (PELT) begins with an examination of bricolage as a way to engage in critical research in TEFL/TESOL teaching and research. The volume considers the quality of 'encounter' needed in the global and intercultural classroom. The authors address validity, reliability and an authentic need for research which has at its heart ethical practice. Disenfranchisement of the co-participants in research, which is usually not considered, is reviewed in the volume. The manner in which quantitative methods can be u

  9. Exploring the Utility of Action Research to Investigate Second-Language Classrooms as Complex Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian, Mohammad Javad; Tavakoli, Mansoor

    2011-01-01

    Action research is geared to changes for the better and has the potential to assist teachers to extend their teaching skills and develop a deeper understanding of themselves, their classroom and their learners. However, in the area of applied linguistics, the viability of action research has been seriously questioned. In this article, we argue…

  10. Preparing Palestinian Reflective English Language Teachers through Classroom Based Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajani, Majida "Mohammed Yousef "

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the implementation of individual action research projects among some forty English language teachers distributed in thirty Palestinian schools in Ramallah and Qabatya districts-Palestine. It aimed to analyze the outcomes of the teachers' action research as part of a broader participatory action research project that is…

  11. Classroom Interaction and Language Output

    OpenAIRE

    Qiaoying Wang; Carolyn D. Castro

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of classroom interactions between a) students and students and b) students and teachers on the learning of English passivization by L1 Chinese adult learners of English as a foreign language during the language input and output treatments. In phase 1, both groups were asked to read and underline the input material. After the materials were collected, the participants were required to produce the first reconstruction. After having been exposed to the same in...

  12. Journals in the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes some of the ways that journals can be used as teaching tools in the language classroom; in fact, the suggestions he makes could be applied to the use of journals in teaching just about any subject. He begins by describing the concept of writing to learn, which is the theoretical foundation that journals are…

  13. Changing Teacher Roles in the Foreign-Language Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Francis; Delarche, Marion; Marshall, Nicholas; Wurr, Adrian; Edwards, Jeffery

    This paper examines trends reflecting changes in the role of the classroom foreign language teacher, particularly as these trends affect English-as-a-Second-Language instruction. This study is based on relevant literature and research being carried out in the English Language Institute at Kanda University of International Studies (Japan). Past and…

  14. English in the Chinese foreign language classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Danping

    2013-01-01

    Chinese is an ancient language, but the present scope of its global study is unprecedented. Comprehending the impacts of worldwide linguistic realities on 'Chinese as a Foreign Language' (CFL) teachers and students will be critical to its long-term success. The most important phenomenon has been the establishment of English as a lingua franca, especially in the expanding marketplaces of Asia. This book examines the role of English as a medium of instruction in CFL classrooms. It begins by integrating existing studies on the global spread of English with research on English as a medium of secon

  15. The Implementation of A Flipped Classroom in Foreign Language Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet BASAL

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alongside the rise of educational technology, many teachers have been taking gradual but innovative steps to redesign their teaching methods. For example, in flipped learning or a flipped classroom, students watch instructional videos outside the classroom and do assignments or engage in activities inside the classroom. Language teachers are one group of educators exploring the flipped classroom. In foreign language classes, such an approach may offer great benefits for both the teachers and students since classroom time can be applied to more interactive tasks. By extending classroom hours in this way, language teachers can focus on successfully addressing all subjects in the curriculum. The aim of this study is (a to gain insights into the perceptions of prospective English language teachers at a state university in Turkey on flipped classrooms and (b to introduce the implementation of a flipped classroom into an English language class. A total of 47 prospective English teachers participated in the study. Qualitative research design was used and data were collected via an open-ended question. Findings of the study indicated that pre-service English teachers had positive perceptions towards the use of the flipped classroom as an integral part of face-to-face courses. It can be concluded that flipped classroom was beneficial in terms of 4 categories based on the content analysis of the responses: learning at one’s own pace, advance student preparation, overcoming the limitations of class time, increasing the participation in the classroom. The study also provides recommendations towards LMS integration into courses in other English language teaching departments and for implementing flipped classrooms in language teaching.

  16. Language Development: Understanding Language Diversity in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levey, Sandra; Polirstok, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Language Development: Understanding Language Diversity in the Classroom offers comprehensive coverage of the language development process for pre- and in-service teachers while emphasizing the factors that further academic success in the classroom, including literacy skills, phonological awareness, and narrative. With chapters written by respected…

  17. Identity Construction in Complex Second Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    In this study of an Indonesian language class in Australia, I propose that students are agentive in adopting, rejecting and deploying discursive positions within the classroom. There are a range of identities made available in the classroom, only some of which are taken up and privileged within specific moments in the classroom. I apply the…

  18. Developing Children's Language Awareness: Switching Codes in the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoll, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    This article examines how learning an additional language can positively affect children's opinions and feelings about languages and how this process can be enriched when different languages--namely, the additional language and the children's L1s--are present and used in the classroom in an informed way. It is hypothesised that this will benefit…

  19. Defining, Teaching, and Evaluating Cultural Proficiency in the Foreign Language Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storme, Julie A.; Derakhshani, Mana

    2002-01-01

    Examines recent research on teaching culture in the foreign language classroom. Proposes a model for culture teaching that responds to a clearer definition of cultural proficiency. Focuses on classroom testing and proficiency assessment. (Author/VWL)

  20. The Changing Face of Language Learning: Learning beyond the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jack C.

    2015-01-01

    There are two important dimensions to successful second language learning: what goes on inside the classroom and what goes on outside of the classroom. While language teaching has always been seen as a preparation for out-of-class uses of language, much of the focus in language teaching in the past has typically been on classroom-based language

  1. Experiential Learning in Second-Language Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Sonja

    2003-01-01

    Discusses issues surrounding experiential learning in the second language classroom. Experiential learning is defined by the inclusion of phases of reflection designed to help the learner relate current learning experience to past and future experience. (Author/VWL)

  2. Researching classroom questioning

    OpenAIRE

    Lores González, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    The complexities of the modern society and interconnected world in which we live requires students who are able to problem solve and think critically. The research on which is article is based aims to explore how classroom questioning can help students guide their learning and model the spirit of inquiry to become lifelong learners. The research took place in an International Bilingual School of Madrid during sixth grade English lessons. It shows how developing effective questioning skills re...

  3. Language of Peace in the Peaceful Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomfay-Stitz, Aline; Wheeler, Edyth

    2006-01-01

    For the past 30 years, peace educators have drawn attention to the vital role of language--the caring, creative words that describe and enhance peace. The language of peace has evolved through several stages of growth and complexity. It also offers a heritage of caring and acceptance for all children who enter through educators' classroom doors.…

  4. Teaching Culture in the Foreign Language Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Nelson

    2000-01-01

    This article was originally published in 1968 (Foreign Language Annals; v1 n3). It defines and describes culture in terms that will be meaningful to classroom teachers of foreign languages, especially in the earlier phases of instruction. Identifies a list of proposals that invite discussion and development of the meanings of culture leading to…

  5. Sociolinguistics Inputs and English as Second Language Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Ofodu Graceful Onovughe

    2012-01-01

    Sociolinguistic inputs in language acquisition and use of English as Second Language in classrooms is the main focus of this study. A survey research design was adopted. The population consisted of all secondary school students in Akure Local Government of Ondo State, Nigeria. Two hundred and forty (240) students in senior secondary school classes were deliberately selected from six secondary schools randomly sampled. A fourteen-item questionnaire designated to elicit the required information...

  6. TEACHING CREATIVE WRITING IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

    OpenAIRE

    MARKU MONIS AND . M. V. RODRIQUES

    2012-01-01

    Writing, like all other aspects of language, is communicative. In our real life we write e-mails, notes, covering letters, reports, curriculums, assignments, essays and so on. Some of us write articles or work on forums and websites. A few write stories and poems. All of these writing tasks have a communicative purpose and a target audience. In the English language classroom, however, writing often lacks this. There are many reasons, as there are lots of ways to make the writing...

  7. Naturalistic acquisition in an early language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    AnneDahl

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether it is possible to provide naturalistic second language acquisition (SLA) of vocabulary for young learners in a classroom situation without resorting to a classical immersion approach. Participants were 60 first-grade pupils in two Norwegian elementary schools in their first year. The control group followed regular instruction as prescribed by the school curriculum, while the experimental group received increased naturalistic target language input. This entailed...

  8. Developing Reflective and Investigative Skills in Teacher Preparation Programs: The design and implementation of the Classroom Research Component at the Foreign Language Program of Universidad del Valle

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Rosalba, Cárdenas Ramos; Carmen Cecilia, Faustino.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available En este articulo se describe el proceso y la experiencia de diseño, planificación e implementación del componente de investigación en el aula en los primeros cinco semestres de la Licenciatura en Lenguas Extranjeras de la Universidad del Valle. Queremos resaltar el papel de la investigación en el au [...] la en la formación inicial de nuestros estudiantes y en nuestro desarrollo profesional como docentes. Además queremos mostrar la importancia de preparar a los futuros profesores no solo en el desarrollo de competencia lingüística en las lenguas extranjeras sino también de competencias que les permitan reflexionar, analizar y encontrar maneras de mejorar su práctica profesional. La descripción de esta experiencia busca compartir nuestros logros, dificultades y planes de desarrollo futuro. Abstract in english In this article we want to describe our process and experience in studying, designing, planning and implementing the Classroom Research Component in the first five semesters of the Licenciatura program at the School of Language Science, Universidad del Valle. We want to stress the role of Classroom [...] Research in our students' initial training and in our own professional development. We also want to show the importance of preparing students and future teachers who possess not only linguistic competence in the foreign languages, but also competences that allow them to reflect, analyze and find ways of improving their professional practice. The description of this experience leads us to share our achievements, difficulties and plans for future development.

  9. Quality of Language and Literacy Instruction in Preschool Classrooms Serving At-Risk Pupils

    OpenAIRE

    Justice, Laura M.; Mashburn, Andrew; Hamre, Bridget; Pianta, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Policy-makers, administrators, researchers, and teachers are increasingly vested in ensuring the quality of preschool instruction, particularly in the areas of language and literacy. This research was conducted to characterize the quality of language and literacy instruction in 135 publicly-funded preschool classrooms serving at-risk pupils. As all teachers in these classrooms were implementing the same language and literacy curriculum, we also studied the interrelationships among procedural ...

  10. Task-Based Language Teaching in Online Ab Initio Foreign Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chun; Zhao, Yong; Wang, Jiawen

    2011-01-01

    Task-based language teaching (TBLT) has been attracting the attention of researchers for more than 2 decades. Research on various aspects of TBLT has been accumulating, including the evaluation studies on the implementation of TBLT in classrooms. The evaluation studies on students' and teachers' reactions to TBLT in the online courses are starting…

  11. Body Language in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Patrick W.

    2005-01-01

    Ralph Waldo Emerson and Mae West would seem to have little in common, but there is one thing they both understood--the importance of body language. Educators, psychologists, anthropologists and sociologists define body language or nonverbal communication as communication without words. It includes overt behaviors such as facial expressions, eye…

  12. The Interactional Architecture of the Language Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Seedhouse

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a summary of some of the key ideas of Seedhouse (2004. The study applies Conversation Analysis (CA methodology to an extensive and varied database of language lessons from around the world and attempts to answer the question ‘How is L2 classroom interaction organised?’ The main thesis is that there is a reflexive relationship between pedagogy and interaction in the L2 classroom. This means that there is a two-way, mutually dependent relationship. Furthermore, this relationship is the foundation of the organisation of interaction in L2 classrooms. The omnipresent and unique feature of the L2 classroom is this reflexive relationship between pedagogy and interaction. So whoever is taking part in L2 classroom interaction and whatever the particular activity during which the interactants are speaking the L2, they are always displaying to one another their analyses of the current state of the evolving relationship between pedagogy and interaction and acting on the basis of these analyses. So interaction in the L2 classroom is based on the relationship between pedagogy and interaction. Interactants are constantly analysing this relationship and displaying their analyses in their talk. An example of data analysis is provided, including discussion of socially distributed cognition and learning.

  13. Naturalistic acquisition in an early language classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnneDahl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether it is possible to provide naturalistic second language acquisition (SLA of vocabulary for young learners in a classroom situation without resorting to a classical immersion approach. Participants were 60 first-grade pupils in Norwegian two elementary schools in their first year. The control group followed regular instruction as prescribed by the school curriculum, while the experimental group received increased naturalistic target language input. This entailed extensive use of English by the teacher during English classes, and also during morning meetings and for simple instructions and classroom management throughout the day. Our hypothesis was that it is possible to facilitate naturalistic acquisition through better quality target language exposure within a normal curriculum. The students' English vocabulary knowledge was measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, version 4 (PPVT-IV, Dunn & Dunn, 2007, at the beginning and the end of the first year of school. Findings are that 1 early-start second-language (L2 programs in school do not in themselves guarantee vocabulary development in the first year, 2 a focus on increased exposure to the L2 can lead to a significant increase in receptive vocabulary comprehension in the course of only eight months, and 3 even with relatively modest input, learners in such an early-start L2 program can display vocabulary acquisition comparable in some respects to that of younger native children matched on vocabulary size. The overall conclusion is that naturalistic vocabulary acquisition is in fact possible in a classroom setting.

  14. FACEBOOK GROUPS AS A SUPPORTING TOOL FOR LANGUAGE CLASSROOMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Ekoç

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to present a review of Facebook group pages as an educational tool for language learning. One of the primary needs of foreign language learners is to gain the opportunity to use the target language outside the classroom practice. Social media communication provides occasions for learners to receive input and produce output while engaging in negotiation of meaning. In line with this point, teachers can instigate class group pages in the social media in an attempt to provide a space for practice and communication free of the traditional pedagogic concerns of a typical classroom. The distinctive discursive behaviour of Facebook group pages helps one to achieve that attempt. In light of these views, the researcher, in this study, formed a group page to understand the dynamics of social media environment as a supporting tool for language classrooms. This paper addresses various features which make social media a unique place to contribute to the sense of class community and collaboration outside the classroom. The face-to face classroom is a controlled communication event, that is, teachers and students are required to be in the classroom at the same time but a teacher’s use of Facebook is an attempt to communicate with students outside of that controlled environment where teachers can meet students in their territory. When compared to its disadvantages, the advantages of setting a class group page on the social media outweigh. Students can feel motivated to contribute to an online community if they subsequently receive support or help. It also leads students to feel that they are being supported by a whole portion of their class community and promotes students’ desire to maintain a valued relationship with others. Students continue developing and strengthening relationships with others.

  15. Role of Focus-on-Form Instruction, Corrective Feedback and Uptake in Second Language Classrooms: Some Insights from Recent Second Language Acquisition Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afitska, Oksana

    2015-01-01

    A considerable number of studies on focus-on-form instruction, corrective feedback and uptake have been carried out in the field of second language acquisition (SLA) research over the last two decades. These studies have investigated the above-mentioned concepts from different perspectives, in a number of different contexts and in a number of…

  16. Using Native Language in ESL Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Isa SPAHIU

    2013-01-01

    The debate over whether to use or not to use to learners’ L1 inside the classroom has always been the topic of discussion for various people for various reasons. The debate has also involved ESL/EFL teachers. Some argue that such use may lead to more dependence of an ESL/EFL on his/her L1 that may hinder the progress of mastering the target language. Whereas others believe that the use of an ESL/EFL learners’ L1 may ease the process of teaching and learning the target language as the teachers...

  17. Classroom tandem – Outlining a Model for Language Learning and Instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Karjalainen, Katri; Pörn, Michaela; Fredrik RUSK; Linda BJÖRKSKOG

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to outline classroom tandem by comparing it with informal tandem learning contexts and other language instruction methods. Classroom tandem is used for second language instruction in mixed language groups in the subjects of Finnish and Swedish as L2. Tandem learning entails that two persons with different mother tongues learn each other’s native languages in reciprocal cooperation. The students function, in turns, as a second language learner and as a model in the nat...

  18. · Attitude towards Computers and Classroom Management of Language School Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Jalali; Vahid Panahzade; Ali Firouzmand

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted language learning (CALL) is the realization of computers in schools and universities which has potentially enhanced the language learning experience inside the classrooms. The integration of the technologies into the classroom demands that the teachers adopt a number of classroom management procedures to maintain a more learner-centered and conducive language learning environment. The current study explored the relationship between computer attitudes and behavior and instruc...

  19. Achievement Motivational Characteristics of University Foreign Language Learners: From the Classroom to the Tutoring Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Paul H.

    2008-01-01

    What influences who seeks foreign language tutoring? Using expectancy value theory, the present study researches the characteristics of university foreign language students in the language classroom (n = 258) and seeking tutoring (n = 29). Students' performance and mastery goal orientations, achievement task values, self-efficacy for foreign…

  20. The Adult Heritage Spanish Speaker in the Foreign Language Classroom: A Phenomenography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Angela

    2009-01-01

    For heritage speakers, the Spanish classroom is not the first point of contact with their native language. Though such learners would benefit from an educational philosophy that affirms the heritage language as a springboard for learning and increased self-awareness, there has been little support for non-dominant language research in the USA. This…

  1. Growing Language Awareness in the Classroom Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paugh, Patricia; Moran, Mary

    2013-01-01

    For four years, Pat Paugh, a university teacher educator, and Mary Moran, a teacher researcher, collaborated on action research by systematically studying literacy development connected to the latter's third-grade community gardening and urban farming curriculum. Their goal was to support an existing classroom culture that valued…

  2. The Relationship between Gender and Iranian EFL Learners’ Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety (FLCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhri Mesri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Foreign language anxiety is widely used to describe the feeling of tension and apprehension, which is specifically associated with foreign language learning contexts, including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Foreign language classroom anxiety (FLCA is related to foreign language anxiety and language-skill-specific anxiety, and fairly recently identified as distinguished from other forms of anxiety. FLCA is a more general type of anxiety in learning a foreign language with a strong speaking anxiety element; and low self-confidence is identified as an important component of its construct. Research shows that FLCA is a complex, multi-dimensional phenomenon; it has many potential sources; and it interferes with the acquisition, retention, and production of a foreign language. It seems that in most of English classes in Iran little attention has been paid to the role of the gender on EFL learners' Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety (FLCA. Hence, this study attempted to investigate the relationship between EFL learners’ Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety (FLCA with regard to gender. The data were gathered through questionnaire: the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (Horwitz, Horwitz, & Cope, 1986.The participants were 52 students studying English at Salmas University. The findings revealed a significant relationship between FLCA and females. It was recommended that foreign language teachers should be aware of Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety (FLCA level, its causes and results. The study also offers some context-specific pedagogical implications for Iranian EFL teachers and practitioners.

  3. Naturalistic acquisition in an early language classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Anne; Vulchanova, Mila D

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether it is possible to provide naturalistic second language acquisition (SLA) of vocabulary for young learners in a classroom situation without resorting to a classical immersion approach. Participants were 60 first-grade pupils in two Norwegian elementary schools in their first year. The control group followed regular instruction as prescribed by the school curriculum, while the experimental group received increased naturalistic target language input. This entailed extensive use of English by the teacher during English classes, and also during morning meetings and for simple instructions and classroom management throughout the day. Our hypothesis was that it is possible to facilitate naturalistic acquisition through better quality target language exposure within a normal curriculum. The students' English vocabulary knowledge was measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, version 4 (PPVT-IV, Dunn and Dunn, 2007a), at the beginning and the end of the first year of school. Findings are that (1) early-start second-language (L2) programs in school do not in themselves guarantee vocabulary development in the first year, (2) a focus on increased exposure to the L2 can lead to a significant increase in receptive vocabulary comprehension in the course of only 8 months, and (3) even with relatively modest input, learners in such an early-start L2 program can display vocabulary acquisition comparable in some respects to that of younger native children matched on vocabulary size. The overall conclusion is that naturalistic vocabulary acquisition is in fact possible in a classroom setting. PMID:24860518

  4. Teachers’ approaches to language classroom assessment in Cameroon primary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achu Charles Tante

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Assessment has a huge impact on ESL primary pupils, in part, because on the curriculum English is both a subject and also a language of learning all the other subjects. For children still acquiring L1 it is daunting sometimes to be expected to understand concepts in L2. It may be difficult then to gather information to make an impartial judgement with regards to a pupil’s language level. This study is a preliminary inquiry that attempts to find out teachers’ approaches to classroom assessment in Cameroon primary schools. Using a qualitative open-ended question the researcher finds out three main categories of assessment approaches used by teachers. From the categories extrapolations on possible assumptions that guide teachers’ choices of assessment procedures are described and suggested for future study. Keywords Classroom assessment approach, Cameroon, scheme of work, ESL/EFL, Young Learners 

  5. Classroom Instruction that Works with English Language Learners Participant's Workbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jane D.; Bjork, Cynthia Linnea

    2008-01-01

    Everyone who participates in your workshop on "Classroom Instruction That Works with English Language Learners" needs this participant's workbook to gain expertise in strategies that are effective with ELL (English Language Learners) students.

  6. Strategy Training in a Task-Based Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chun; Lin, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Recent literature that examines the implementation of task-based language teaching (TBLT) in classroom settings has reported various challenges related to educational cultures, classroom management, teacher cognition and learner perceptions. To facilitate the smooth transition of TBLT from laboratory settings to classroom contexts, measures need…

  7. Teaching Sensitivity to Cultural Difference in the First-Year Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durocher, Dennis O., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This article summarizes teacher action research for the teaching of subjective culture in the foreign language classroom. It begins with a literature review, followed by a description of Milton J. Bennett's Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity (Bennett, 1993), the theoretical paradigm upon which classroom activities and experiments…

  8. Harmonious Learning: Yoga in the English Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This article looks at one way for teachers to make classrooms emotionally, mentally, and physically healthy places to learn--places where tensions and stresses are lessened and where teachers and students are concentrating, yet relaxed. "Harmonious language learning classroom" is the term the author coined to describe this kind of language

  9. Humor as Safe House in the Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantz, Anne; Bell, Nancy D.

    2011-01-01

    Analyses of second language (L2) classroom interaction often categorize joking and other humorous talk by students as disruptive, off-task behavior, thereby rendering it important only from a classroom management perspective. Studies of language play, however, have illustrated that such jocular talk not only allows students to construct a broader…

  10. Mobile Sign Language Learning Outside the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kimberly A.; Starner, Thad

    2012-01-01

    The majority of deaf children in the United States are born to hearing parents with limited prior exposure to American Sign Language (ASL). Our research involves creating and validating a mobile language tool called SMARTSign. The goal is to help hearing parents learn ASL in a way that fits seamlessly into their daily routine. (Contains 3 figures.)

  11. Bodies and Language: Process Drama and Intercultural Language Learning in a Beginner Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Julia

    2011-01-01

    In this article the author draws on classroom video recordings and student commentary to explore ways in which the kinaesthetic elements of a process drama provided the context and the space for beginner additional language learners to engage with intercultural language learning. In the light of student comments in interviews and questionnaires,…

  12. Individual classroom experiences: a sociocultural comparison for understanding efl classroom language learning Individual classroom experiences: a sociocultural comparison for understanding efl classroom language learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Miccoli

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho compara as experiências de sala de aula (ESA de duas universitárias na aprendizagem de língua inglesa. As ESA emergiram de entrevistas individuais, onde vídeos das aulas promoveram a reflexão. A análise revelou que experiências de natureza cognitiva, social ou afetiva influem diretamente no processo de aprendizagem e as que se referem ao contexto, à história, crenças e metas dos alunos influem indiretamente no mesmo. A singularidade de algumas experiências levou à sua categorização como ESA individuais (ESAI. Ao comparar as ESAI de duas informantes, a importância da análise sociocultural do processo de aprendizagem de sala de aula fica evidente. Concluiremos com uma defesa do valor da teoria sociocultural no estudo da aprendizagem de língua estrangeira em sala de aula e com a apresentação das implicações deste estudo para pesquisadores e professores. This paper compares the classroom experiences (CEs of two university students in their process of learning English as a foreign language (EFL. The CEs emerged from individual interviews, where classroom videos promoted reflection. The analysis revealed that cognitive, social and affective experiences directly influence the learning process and that those which refer to setting, learner’s personal background, beliefs and goal influence the learning process indirectly. The analysis also revealed the singularity of some of these CEs that led to their categorization as individual CEs (ICEs. When comparing the ICEs of the two participants, the importance of a sociocultural analysis of the classroom learning process becomes evident. We conclude with an analysis of the value of sociocultural theory in the study of classroom EFL learning and with the implications of this study for teachers and researchers.

  13. Understanding L2 French Teaching Strategies in a Non-Target Language Classroom Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peijian; Yuan, Rui; Teng, Lin

    2015-01-01

    This research explored the congruence and disparity between teachers' and students' attitudes towards French as a second language (L2) teaching strategies in a non-target language classroom context in the USA. The findings suggest students' and teachers' attitudes towards the direct and indirect teaching strategies were generally consistent, but…

  14. Between the Lines: When Culture, Language and Poetry Meet in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Teaching poetry in second language (L2) classrooms raises theoretical and practical questions about how best to treat literature when target language and culture is also being negotiated. Current pedagogy derives from disparate sources, including the experientially-driven practices of individual teachers, the quantitative and qualitative research

  15. Research methods for English language teachers

    CERN Document Server

    McDonough, Jo

    2014-01-01

    This book offers a lively introduction to the research methods and techniques available to English language teachers who wish to investigate aspects of their own practice. It covers qualitative and quantitative methodology and includes sections on observation, introspection, diary studies, experiments, interviews, questionnaires, numerical techniques and case study research. Each method is illustrated with examples in language teaching contexts, and techniques of data collection and analysis are introduced. The authors focus particularly on research in the classroom, on tests, materials, the

  16. Language Classroom Risk-Taking Behavior in a Performed Culture-Based Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D. Luft

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While several studies have investigated the role of risk-taking in language learning, the findings of these studies may not be generalizable to language learning where the performed culture approach (PCA is used. This study describes the relationship between language learning and risk-taking in PCA, and the relationship between risk-taking and personal study habits, teaching style, daily grading, and classroom dynamics. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire. This study finds that risk-taking behavior has a moderate positive relationship with student performance in PCA. While questionnaire items related to teaching style and classroom dynamics are not found to significantly correlate with students’ risk-taking behavior, some items related to daily grading and personal study habits are found to have a moderate positive relationship with risk-taking behavior. Based on these findings, it is recommended that further research investigate the relationship between assessment and risktaking in language learning. As second language acquisition researchers have investigated the role of affective variables in language learning, risk-taking has frequently been identified as a variable linked with success (Beebe, 1983; Ely, 1986; Naiman, Frolich, Stern, & Todesco, 1978; Rubin, 1975; Samimy & Pardin, 1994; Samimy & Tabuse, 1992. However, it is difficult to apply these findings to language classrooms that use the performed culture approach (PCA, an approach to the teaching of East Asian languages, for two reasons: (a PCA’s focus on the learning of a foreign culture could mean that greater risk is involved in 106 Luft language learning than in a typical language classroom; (b PCA creates a language learning experience for which the risks involved are different than those in language classrooms where other approaches are used.

  17. Classroom Management Skills of The Language Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Sar?çoban

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Teachers or educators, most of the time, concentrate on the theoretical aspects oflanguage teaching and study them as much as possible. However, in practice, we start thinkingthat we will have to keep a number of people together in the same place. These are often thepeople who come from many different backgrounds and whose expectations differ. In thiscase, it becomes more and more difficult to appeal to every individual in class. Therefore, asteachers we should initially be trained on how to manage our classrooms and how to providethe necessary environment to put into practice the things we have learned to teach a language.Obviously, we need management skills as well as the language teaching skill. Actually, it isnot as difficult as many people think. As teachers if we fulfill our duties properly, a wellmanagedclass will ensue. In this study, therefore, the definition of class management isregarded roughly “to keep people from different environments directed to one single goal”.When this is accomplished, we are unlikely to live discipline problems.

  18. Classroom Management for Teachers of Japanese and Other Foreign Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Elaine K.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the classroom management component of the Professional Development of Japanese Teachers of Texas (PDJT), a certification program for teachers of Japanese. In addition, it offers suggestions in classroom management for teachers of Japanese and other foreign languages as well as guidance for teacher trainers to help new…

  19. Firefighter or Fireman? Teachers’ attitudes towards gender neutrality in the foreign language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Wessman, Sofia

    2007-01-01

    This essay investigates the extent and significance of a gender decisive language in the foreign language classroom. Focus lies on teachers teaching English as a foreign language and their attitudes towards gender neutrality from a pure linguistic point of view. My starting point was previous research done concerning my topic and the survey was performed through questionnaires that were sent out with both qualitative and quantitative questions to thirty teachers.   My findings indicate that t...

  20. Anxiety over EFL speaking and writing: A view from language classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Gkonou, Christina

    2011-01-01

    The assumption that foreign language learners experience a high level of anxiety mainly when faced with speaking activities implies that research should focus on those learners prone to anxiety over that skill. Despite not being widely investigated, foreign language writing anxiety also seems to be a concern for a large number of students. Drawing on questionnaire findings, the study reported in this article examined the nature of, and the connection between the English language classroom spe...

  1. Group work in the English language curriculum sociocultural and ecological perspectives on second language classroom learning

    CERN Document Server

    Chappell, Philip

    2014-01-01

    This book explores how using small groups in second language classrooms supports language learning. Chappell's experience as a language teacher equips him to present a clear, evidence-based argument for the powerful influence group work has upon the opportunities for learning, and how it should therefore be an integral part of language lessons.

  2. Code-Switching in Japanese Language Classrooms: An Exploratory Investigation of Native vs. Non-Native Speaker Teacher Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Valerie; Matsuo, Ayumi; Payne, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Research on language classroom code-switching ranges from describing both teachers' and learners' first language and target language use to making connections between code-switching and student learning. However, few studies compare differences in practice between native and non-native speaker teachers and even fewer consider culture of learning…

  3. Language Development for the Classroom and Remedial Reading. Proceedings of the Fall 1972 Rutgers University Reading Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Martin, Ed.

    Papers collected in this booklet discuss various aspects of language development in the classroom and in the area of remedial reading. Titles include "Project II: Strategies and Milestones" by Martin Kling, which describes the outcomes of an investigation of research in language development and reading; "Language, Linguistics, and Learning to…

  4. Bilingual and Group Poetry in the Foreign Language Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brod, Evelyn F.

    1985-01-01

    This article suggests a variety of ancillary activities in which poetry may be introduced into the foreign language classroom to build confidence and have fun in the second language, while practicing and reinforcing important linguistic concepts. The use of topics and themes such as wishes, comparisons, dreams, colors, or metaphors, is…

  5. Foreign Films in the Classroom: Gateway to Language and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Lucia Guzzi

    2009-01-01

    The teaching of culture has become gradually more significant for all teachers involved in language education; it has been referred as the "hidden curriculum" of foreign language teaching. Because of limited time available in the classroom and curriculum constraints, the inclusion of cultural lessons often comes second to the teaching of the…

  6. Movies in the Language Classroom: Dealing with Problematic Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gareis, Elisabeth

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the use of film in the classroom as a tool for second-language instruction. Argues that controversial subject matter, such as sex, violence, and profane language, can enhance students' learning experience and deepen their critical thinking skills if treated sensitively and in a pedagogically sound manner. (12 references) (Author/CK)

  7. FACEBOOK GROUPS AS A SUPPORTING TOOL FOR LANGUAGE CLASSROOMS

    OpenAIRE

    Arzu Ekoç

    2014-01-01

    This paper attempts to present a review of Facebook group pages as an educational tool for language learning. One of the primary needs of foreign language learners is to gain the opportunity to use the target language outside the classroom practice. Social media communication provides occasions for learners to receive input and produce output while engaging in negotiation of meaning. In line with this point, teachers can instigate class group pages in the social media in an attempt to provide...

  8. The Relationship between Global Competence and Language Learning Motivation: An Empirical Study in Critical Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semaan, Gaby; Yamazaki, Kasumi

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between global competence and second language learning motivation in critical language classrooms. Data were collected from 137 participants who were studying critical languages (Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Persian) at two universities on the East and West Coasts of the United States, using a 30-item…

  9. Students' Language Learning Strategy Use and Achievement in the Korean as a Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Bokyung

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between student strategy use and the development of proficiency in a Korean as a Foreign Language classroom. A total of 66 English native speakers learning Korean as a Foreign Language were administered the Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL), Version 5.1. Findings indicated a low positive…

  10. Classroom noise and children learning in a second language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peggy; Kohnert, Kathryn; Sabur, Sabina; Shaw, Daniel

    2005-04-01

    The presence of background noise affects children more negatively than adults. Understanding speech in noise is a skill that continues to develop well into a child's adolescent years. Childrens' experience with a specific language also may affect their ability to make sense of incoming speech. Research suggests that even for adults the presence of background noise negatively affects the ability to listen in a second language. Two studies were conducted to investigate the effects of classroom noise on attention and speech perception in native Spanish-speaking second graders learning English as their second language (L2), as compared to English-only speaking peers (EO). In Study 1 we measured childrens' on-task behavior during instructional activities with and without soundfield amplification. In Study 2 we measured the effects of noise (+10 dB signal-to-noise ratio) using an experimental English word-recognition task. Findings indicate although there were no effects of amplification on on-task behavior, word-recognition performance declined significantly for both EO and L2 groups in the noise condition. In particular, the impact of the noise was disproportionately greater for the L2 group. Children learning in their L2 appear to be at a distinct disadvantage when listening in rooms with typical noise and reverberation.

  11. "Why in This Bilingual Classroom … Hablamos Más Español?" Language Choice by Bilingual Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Alma D.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative sociolinguistic research study examines Latino/a students' use of language in a science classroom and laboratory. This study was conducted in a school in the southwestern United States that serves an economically depressed, predominantly Latino population. The object of study was a 5th-grade bilingual (Spanish/English) class.…

  12. Teaching Sociolinguistic Variation in the Intermediate Language Classroom: "Voseo" in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenk, Elaine M.

    2014-01-01

    The acquisition of sociolinguistic variation by second language learners has gained increased attention. Some research highlights the value of naturalistic exposure through study abroad while other studies point out that classroom input can facilitate the acquisition of particular features of variation. Nevertheless, said attention to the…

  13. Effects of Problem-Based Learning on a Fifth Grade Language Arts Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this qualitative research was to discover the effects of problem-based learning on a fifth grade language arts classroom. The secondary purpose was to examine how receptive fifth grade students were to a new way of learning. In this descriptive study, a group of nine students created an alternate reality game as part of a…

  14. Appropriation of a Representational Tool in a Second-Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yun; Looi, Chee-Kit; Chen, Wenli

    2015-01-01

    While the affordances of face-to-face and online environments have been studied somewhat extensively, there is relatively less research on how technology-mediated learning takes place across multiple media in the networked classroom environment where face-to-face and online interactions are intertwined, especially in the context of language

  15. How a Therapy Dog May Inspire Student Literacy Engagement in the Elementary Language Arts Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Lori Friesen

    2009-01-01

    In this article, I discuss theoretical possibilities for the inclusion of therapy dogs in the elementary language arts classroom, particularly which may inspire students otherwise reluctant to engage in literacy activities. I incorporate Guthrie and colleagues’ work in engagement into research in Animal Assisted Therapy with children to posit a revised theory of engagement.

  16. How a Therapy Dog May Inspire Student Literacy Engagement in the Elementary Language Arts Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Friesen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I discuss theoretical possibilities for the inclusion of therapy dogs in the elementary language arts classroom, particularly which may inspire students otherwise reluctant to engage in literacy activities. I incorporate Guthrie and colleagues’ work in engagement into research in Animal Assisted Therapy with children to posit a revised theory of engagement.

  17. The Influence of Classroom Drama on Teachers' Language and Students' On-Task Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Alida; Berry, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Teacher language and students' on-task behavior were examined in language arts lessons with and without classroom drama in two self-contained third grade classrooms for students with learning disabilities and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Language arts lessons that integrated classroom drama were associated with significantly higher…

  18. The Use of English in the Chinese Language Classroom: Perspectives from American College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrietta Yang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available For a long time, whether learners' first language (L1 should be used in the foreign language classroom has been a controversial issue in the foreign language education field. The focus has been mostly on the use of L1 in the English language classroom (e.g.,Atkinson, 1987; Brooks-Lewis, 2009; Kieu, 2010; Krashen, 1981; Miles, 2004; Nazary, 2008; Prodromou, 2002; Schweers, 1999; Tang,2002. The debate centers on two diverse pedagogical approaches: the monolingual approach and the bilingual approach. The supporters of the monolingual approach contend that only the target language that learners are acquiring (i.e. English in most of the study should be allowed in the classroom, and Krashen (1981, 1985 was a pivotal supporter of this approach. However, other researchers and language teachers argue that the monolingual approach is not practical, particularly in lower-level classes (e.g., Atkinson, 1987; BrooksLewis, 2009; Schweers, 1999; Tang, 2002. They believe that using L1 in the classroom can be very effective when explaining difficult grammar points and linguistic elements that are language specific. The supporters of the bilingual approach do not deny the advantages of maximizing target language exposure and practice. However, they suggest that when learners' L1 is applied strategically, it can actually be a very important learning tool (e.g., Atkinson, 1987; Brooks-Lewis,2009; Schweers, 1999. Furthermore, both Schweers (1999 and Miles (2004 point out that the use of L1 provides students a more relaxed atmosphere and makes them less anxious and more confident in the classroom.

  19. The use of games in the language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Sigríður Dögg Sigurðardóttir 1985

    2010-01-01

    This essay focuses on the use of games inside the classroom and it argues that games can be a good teaching method when teaching foreign languages. It looks at why games should be used as a teaching method and how in order to maximize the positive result on language learning. Also this essay explains various game categories and it gives an example of at least one game from each category which can be especially good in language teaching. In addition this essay looks at the four language skill ...

  20. Making Culture Happen in the English Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Yakup Doganay; Madina Ashirimbetova; Brent Davis

    2013-01-01

    The issue of introducing the target culture into language classroom practice has long been an object of debates as well as the opinions of the learners towards it. Eventually, modern practitioners found a way of having the language learners acquainted with the target culture and introducing culture through culture-based textbook activities. However, the issue of additional culturally-oriented activities in improving students learning habits is questionable today. The purpose of this paper is ...

  1. Spoken Grammar and Its Role in the English Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses key issues and considerations for teachers wanting to incorporate spoken grammar activities into their own teaching and also focuses on six common features of spoken grammar, with practical activities and suggestions for teaching them in the language classroom. The hope is that this discussion of spoken grammar and its place…

  2. Meaningful Literacy: Writing Poetry in the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David I.

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops the concept of meaningful literacy and offers a classroom methodology--poetry writing--that manifests this approach to ESL/EFL literacy instruction. The paper is divided into three sections. The first deals with the concept of meaningful literacy learning in second and foreign language pedagogy; the second summarizes empirical…

  3. Twenty Ideas for Using Mobile Phones in the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinders, Hayo

    2010-01-01

    These days it seems mobile phones are used everywhere by everyone, which leads to the obvious question: How can mobile phone technology support learning in the second language classroom? The answer is "in a number of ways" because mobile phones come with ever-increasing functions that most students are adept at using. In this article the author…

  4. Negotiating Language, Culture and Pupil Agency in Complementary School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytra, Vally

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, I examine the teaching of language and culture and in particular the use of songs as curriculum in two London Turkish complementary schools. Drawing on a series of interconnected classroom vignettes, I look at how children weave together their semiotic resources to negotiate and transform two songs and the talk and action around…

  5. Learning about and through Humor in the Second Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Nancy D.

    2009-01-01

    Humorous communication is extremely complex in both its forms and functions (e.g. Norrick, 1993; 2003). Much of the previous work that has put forth suggestions for incorporating humor into the language classroom (e.g. Trachtenberg, 1979; Deneire, 1995; Schmitz, 2002) has not examined these complexities in the detail necessary for the target…

  6. Games for the Foreign Language Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Nancy; Madaras, Susan W.

    Two marketing games are described, "Le Marche Francais" and "El Mercado: The Mexican Market Comes to Life in the Spanish Classroom." Both are patterned after a published game entitled "Market: A Simulation Game." The adaptation in each instance relied on simplifying the original game and presenting it in a form understandable to middle school…

  7. Code-switching in the foreign language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Youkhana, Sana

    2010-01-01

    It is a frequently observed phenomenon that language learners often turn to their native language in the foreign language classroom, i.e. they code-switch, but why is it so? In order to investigate this, this study had two aims; the first aim was about trying to see if the frequency of code-switching differed depending on the questions’ levels of difficulty. This study was conducted on three different upper-secondary schools and involved 24 pupils. The pupils’ age varied from 16 to 19. The hy...

  8. Associations between Chinese Language Classroom Environments and Students' Motivation to Learn the Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Siew Lian; Wong, Angela F. L.; Chen, Der-Thanq

    2009-01-01

    Associations between the nature of Chinese Language Classroom Environments and Singapore secondary school students' motivation to learn the Chinese Language were investigated. A sample of 1,460 secondary three (grade 9) students from 50 express stream (above average academic ability) classes in Singapore government secondary schools was involved…

  9. Language and Identity : attitudes towards code-switching in the immigrant language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Blomquist, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Although many studies have been conducted on second language acquisition and bilingual education, little is known about the role of language in the formation of identity by adolescent immigrants in the language classroom. More specifically, this study aims to investigate the use of code-switching by immigrant and refugee students learning Swedish and English in a high school preparatory program. Furthermore, this study investigates the relationship between students’ and teachers’ attitudes to...

  10. The Impact of a Professional Development Program on English Language Teachers’ Classroom Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Giraldo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the findings of an action research study on a professional development program and its impact on the classroom performance of in-service English teachers who worked at a language institute of a Colombian state university. Questionnaires, semi-structured interviews, class observations, and a researcher’s journal were used as data collection instruments. Findings suggest that these in-service teachers improved their classroom performance as their teaching became more communicative, organized, attentive to students’ needs, and principled. In addition, theory, practice, reflection, and the role of the tutor combined effectively to help the in-service teachers improve classroom performance. It was concluded that these programs must be based on teachers’ philosophies and needs and effectively articulate theory, practice, experience, and reflection.

  11. Early-Adolescents' Reading Comprehension and the Stability of the Middle School Classroom-Language Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámez, Perla B.; Lesaux, Nonie K.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined teachers' language use across the school year in 6th grade urban middle-school classrooms (n = 24) and investigated the influence of this classroom-based linguistic input on the reading comprehension skills of the students (n = 851; 599 language minority learners and 252 English-only) in the participating classrooms. Analysis…

  12. The Nature of Chinese Language Classroom Learning Environments in Singapore Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Siew Lian; Wong, Angela F. L.; Chen, Der-Thanq V.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports findings from a classroom environment study which was designed to investigate the nature of Chinese Language classroom environments in Singapore secondary schools. We used a perceptual instrument, the Chinese Language Classroom Environment Inventory, to investigate teachers' and students' perceptions towards their Chinese…

  13. Research in the FCS Secondary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Olivia Love; Brown, Lora Beth

    2009-01-01

    Much of what is taught in the family and consumer sciences (FCS) classroom is based on scientific research. The existing knowledge base is so broad that overlooking research as a teaching resource and tool happens often. Research enhances what is taught, thereby improving the effectiveness of teachers. Whether it be applying or translating…

  14. Research Making Its Way into Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Peter; Goatley, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Identifying researchers whose work has influenced classroom practice, raises questions about the nature of research and its relationship with practice, and the means through which knowledge is distributed. We argue that normally, influence arises through lines of research more than individuals, that knowing-in-practice distribution systems should…

  15. Language Practices in the Ci-Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourtou, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    Prelingually deafened children are nowadays likely to receive a cochlear implant (ci). As these children do their language acquisition with a cochlear implant they require a constant rehabilitation and support. Educational staff is instructed on how to work with children with ci in form of guidelines and workshops. This paper discusses language practices used in the setting of a school for cochlear-implanted children. These children encounter language and pronunciation problems that accompany prelingual deafness and hearing with a cochlear implant. I examine two practices, which are used during the storytelling activity: repeat requests and questions. Whereas repeat requests are used in ci-therapy, questions have been shown to be instrumentalized for educational purposes in the setting of a school. I will reveal the educational/rehabilitational issues that are linked to these practices.

  16. Inquiring into Culture in our Foreign-Language Classrooms

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Damaris, Castro.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo presenta algunas reflexiones teóricas y de aplicación pedagógica sobre el concepto de cultura y su trascendental importancia en las clases de lengua extranjera como base para examinar la idea de currículo como indagación, una herramienta facilitadora para incorporar cultura en cursos del [...] Bachillerato en Enseñanza del Inglés de la Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica (UNA). El artículo también analiza posibles soluciones a problemas comunes que los profesores enfrentan al tratar de incorporar cultura en sus clases. Abstract in english This article presents some theoretical reflections about the concept of culture and its paramount importance in foreign language classrooms, as a basis for examining curriculum as inquiry, a facilitative tool to incorporate culture in courses in the Bachelor's degree in the Teaching of English as a [...] Foreign Language at the National University of Costa Rica (UNA). Feasible solutions to common problems that teachers face when trying to incorporate culture in their classrooms, are also discussed.

  17. Language, Literacy, Literature: Using Storytelling in the Languages Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Stories and storytelling have been used for millennia to entertain, challenge and educate. As a shared form of language interaction, storytelling has engaged communities in developing and perpetuating common understandings of both language and culture, as critical foundations to harmonious societies. Stories and storytelling provide a rich source…

  18. Exploitation of Songs in Foreign Language Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil AYTEK?N

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Music holds a very important place in human life. People spend their days and free time listening to music. Music calms and relaxes the soul. Music is the best way to express one's feelings. Music is an important medium for teaching and educating as well. Music attracts the attention of students with its rhythm, singing style, emphasis on the target language and culture and provokes their desire to listen to it all the time. In the last few years music is basically a tool that many foreign language teachers have started to use. Music is used as a game to motivate students. This enables the class to remain energetic and lively. The song enables students to use the target language and learn about a new culture. Teachers must choose a song according to the objective of the class. These songs contribute to the student's oral and writing skills. Music also serves a special function of teaching student's the four basic language skills. Songs creates the opportunity to do many different types of activities in the class according to interest and age.

  19. Influencing Motivation in the Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Simon James

    2013-01-01

    Motivation is one of the main determining factors of success in developing a second or foreign language. However, motivation is a complex phenomenon and the more its constructs are understood the better we are able to understand the extent to which we can influence it. Teachers can cultivate student motivation to varying degrees and play a central…

  20. (Re)placing Literary Texts in the Intercultural Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Ana Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    In the history of language teaching, literary texts have gradually been reduced to a source for linguistic learning, as an informative representation of cultural traits or even dismissed from the foreign language classroom. This paper aims to add reasons that justify considering literary texts a vital presence in the foreign language classroom.…

  1. Educating educators about second language idiomaticity through action research

    OpenAIRE

    John I. Liontas

    2013-01-01

    Idiomaticity is central to linguistic theory. Despite the pervasiveness of idioms in language, pedagogical articles in professional journals have yet to pay attention to the benefits of idiom instruction in the second language (SL) classroom. Addressing this concern, this article reports the results of an exploratory qualitative research study conducted with sixteen SL university instructors and two Language Program Directors (LPDs) at two large universities in the Southwest (Unit...

  2. Computer assisted (language) learning (CA(L)L) for the inclusive classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Greene, Cara

    2013-01-01

    Post-Primary Schools in Ireland are inclusive with a mix of students with diverse abilities in the classroom, including students with learning and literacy difficulties, such as dyslexia. This poses a strong challenge: how to create inclusive curricula and materials that cater to the needs of diverse students? The objective of this research is to investigate whether integrating Computer Assisted (Language) Learning (CA(L)L) into the curriculum can produce inclusive curricula that cater to ...

  3. TEACHER’S PERCEIVED CHARACTERISTICS AND PREFERENCES OF MOTIVATIONAL STRATEGIES IN THE LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

    OpenAIRE

    Winda Hapsari

    2013-01-01

    Motivated language teachers play a crucial role in building and developing students’ motivation in the classroom. This study aims to investigate teachers’motivational strategies in relation to their characteristics and preferences in Indonesian context of EFL instruction, which is an area that receives scant attention with regard to empirical research. The empirical data were collected through survey questionnaires and interviews. Twenty-eightactive teachers volunteered to participate in the ...

  4. (Re)placing Literary Texts in the Intercultural Foreign Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Gonçalves Matos

    2011-01-01

    In the history of language teaching, literary texts have gradually been reduced to a source for linguistic learning, as an informative representation of cultural traits or even dismissed from the foreign language classroom. This paper aims to add reasons that justify considering literary texts a vital presence in the foreign language classroom. One general aim is to promote the study of foreign literature as enjoyable and (inter)culturally significant.The classroom is inevitably a culturally ...

  5. Language-as-resource and language-as-political: tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, Núria; Civil, Marta

    2013-09-01

    In this article we reflect on the learning of mathematics in bilingual settings from a social and a political perspective. In particular we highlight two concepts that are key to our work: language-as-resource and language-as-political. To do so, we draw on classroom data from students of Mexican origin in Tucson, USA, and students from Latin America in Barcelona, Spain. The language policies in our contexts share a message of privileging the language of instruction (English or Catalan) over other languages. Our analysis of the two sets of data points to differences in the mathematical participation of students on the basis of which language they use. We develop the argument that, even if languages other than Catalan and English are accepted and certain pedagogies may be close to a language-as-resource approach, the use of the students' languages is politically mediated in such a way that its pedagogical value (as a medium of communication and learning) is not always taken into account in the bilingual mathematics classroom.

  6. Language Form, Task-Based Language Teaching, and the Classroom Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batstone, Rob

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I examine some of the ideas about task-based language teaching (TBLT) which have emerged over the 17 years of the current editorship of ELTJ, focusing in particular on grammar and vocabulary, and enquiring to what degree these ideas take adequate account of classroom context. Over this period, TBLT scholars have built up a…

  7. Language of poverty strategies: Implemented in the urban elementary science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanpierre, Bobby Jo

    2000-08-01

    This research study reports the results of school-based staff development models used at three urban elementary schools that had liaison teachers assisting classroom teachers in implementing instructional strategies in science teaching from "Language of Poverty," a curriculum framework designed to address the academic needs of disadvantaged students. The case study of two urban elementary schools and six classroom teachers, and survey and interview data results of a third school, uncovered insights into several areas of science teaching in urban settings. One conclusion is that in spite of substantial allocation of resources and assistance, teachers did not translate instructional strategies from "Language of Poverty" curriculum into their classroom practices in a way that would foster urban disadvantaged students' understanding of "big science concepts." A second conclusion is that the school-based staff development models were limited in their ability to address the diverse professional needs of all of its staff. Third, as it relates to students, discipline issues occurred in these urban classrooms across ethnicity and gender. And in addition to teachers being knowledgeable of relevant social and cultural group norms' application of this knowledge in an appropriate and consistent manner is needed to effectively address discipline concerns.

  8. Making It Happen: Interaction in the Second Language Classroom, From Theory to Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard-Amato, Patricia A.

    A discussion linking theory and practice in second language instruction focuses on ways of providing opportunities for meaningful interaction in language classrooms. The first part lays a theoretical foundation, looking at: the variety and evolution of instructional approaches from grammar-based to communicative; the classroom as environment for…

  9. Motivation in Learning a Second Language: Exploring the Contributions of Family and Classroom Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Frank Wai-ming

    2009-01-01

    This study looks at how family and classroom factors influence second-language learning at the junior secondary level in schools in Hong Kong. It employed an ecological perspective to look at how family-level factors and classroom-level factors uniquely combine to influence students' learning motivations in second-language learning. Nineteen…

  10. EFL (English as a Foreign Language) Classroom Discourse Analysis of a Vocational College and Some Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Liu; Luzheng, Lou; Biru, Shi

    2011-01-01

    The application of classroom discourse analysis of foreign language teaching and learning can reveal much about how teachers perform in their teaching practice and how to make improvement. In this paper, the author tries to reveal the present state of EFL (English as a foreign language) classrooms in a vocational college from the angle of…

  11. Research and Reflective Practice in the ESL Classroom: Voices from Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirocki, Andrzej; Tennekoon, Sujeewa; Calvo, Alicia Pena

    2014-01-01

    Modern language education favours the model of a reflective teacher-researcher who is engaged in both individual and collaborative curriculum revision and teaching-learning environment improvement. The present paper addresses the issue of classroom research and reflective practice in current ESL pedagogy and teacher professional development. The…

  12. Teaching english through spanish: a secondary school EFL teachers`s language choices in the foreign language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Morata, Marisa; Coyle, Yvette

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines the language used by a Spanish secondary school teacher of English. Taking as a basic premise that exposure to the foreign language is conducive to language learning, transcripts of classroom discourse were analysed to identify the pedagogical functions present in the teacher’s speech and the language used to express them. The results show an overwhelming reliance by the teacher on the students’ first language for all of the most frequently occurring functions. Inst...

  13. The Relationship between Gender and Iranian EFL Learners’ Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety (FLCA)

    OpenAIRE

    Fakhri Mesri

    2012-01-01

    Foreign language anxiety is widely used to describe the feeling of tension and apprehension, which is specifically associated with foreign language learning contexts, including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Foreign language classroom anxiety (FLCA) is related to foreign language anxiety and language-skill-specific anxiety, and fairly recently identified as distinguished from other forms of anxiety. FLCA is a more general type of anxiety in learning a foreign language with a stron...

  14. New Proposals for Educational Development of Disciplines Taught in Foreign Languages in Multicultural Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Birch Gonçalves

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the current trend of offering courses in the undergraduate programs, taught in foreign languages, as a fundamental aspect for the formation of new global professionals who require different skills to work in multicultural markets. To do so, the research highlights some concepts of internationalization, academic mobility and curricula internationalization. A longitudinal case study was conducted over a period of three years (2010-2013, describing the trajectory of the Intercultural Communication discipline, taught in English in a multicultural classroom, in a Higher Education Institution. For the analysis, it was used the data provided by online assessment system. The results show the degree of satisfaction by students who attended this course and emphasizes the strong responsibility of professionals who teach courses in foreign languages where language proficiency is essential, however the content domain and the use of proper methodologies are no less important.

  15. Investigating foreign language anxiety in Iranian classrooms: The effect of gender

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoodzadeh, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to delve into the issue of affective variables related to language learning, the present study focuses on the influence of gender on learners' foreign language anxiety in the Iranian context. The objective of this case study is first to determine the extent to which Iranian EFL learners perceive foreign language anxiety in matched-gender and mixed-gender classrooms and second to see if there is any significant difference between the two types of the investigated classrooms. To t...

  16. ¿Duermes mucho Tony? Interpersonal and Transactional Uses of L1 in the Foreign-Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Higareda Sandra; López Georgina; Mugford Gerrard

    2009-01-01

    Whilst communicative teaching approaches sanction, often grudgingly, the limited use of the students’ first language (l1) in English Language Teaching (elt ), critical debate is now centred on a much more substantial and energetic role for the use of mother tongue in the language classroom. Justifications favouring the use of l1 currently range from ideological arguments to classroom teaching considerations. This paper contributes to this ongoing debate by examining how new generations o...

  17. The benefits of management and organisation: a case study in young language learners’ classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Christina Nicole Giannikas

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on primary language education within a Greek region: specifically, on the positive effects of classroom management and organisation on a student-centred approach of teaching. In the case of the Greek education system, language teachers are encouraged to adopt student-centred approaches in their classroom but have not received any guidance on how to do so. Language educators are reluctant to abandon their teacher-centred ways, because they have not been trained to apply clas...

  18. Transforming Language Ideologies through Action Research: A Case Study of Bilingual Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eunah

    This qualitative case study explored a third grade bilingual teacher's transformative language ideologies through participating in a collaborative action research project. By merging language ideologies theory, Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT), and action research, I was able to identify the analytic focus of this study. I analyzed how one teacher and I, the researcher, collaboratively reflected on classroom language practices during the video analysis meetings and focus groups. Further, I analyzed twelve videos that we coded together to see the changes in the teacher's language practices over time. My unit of analysis was the discourse practice mediated by additive language ideologies. Throughout the collaborative action research process, we both critically reflected on the classroom language use. We also developed a critical consciousness about the participatory shifts and learning of focal English Learner (EL) students. Finally, the teacher made changes to her classroom language practices. The results of this study will contribute to the literacy education research field for theoretical, methodological, and practical insights. The integration of language ideologies, CHAT, and action research can help educational practitioners, researchers, and policy makers understand the importance of transforming teachers' language ideologies in designing additive learning contexts for ELs. From a methodological perspective, the transformative language ideologies through researcher and teacher collaborated video analysis process provide a unique contribution to the language ideologies in education literature, with analytic triangulation. As a practical implication, this study suggests action research can be one of the teacher education tools to help the teachers transform language ideologies for EL education.

  19. Problem-Based Learning in the English Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Normala Othman; Mohamed Ismail Ahamad Shah

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the problem-based learning approach (PBL) on students in language classes in two areas: course content and language development. The study was conducted on 128 students, grouped into the experimental and control groups, and employed an experimental research design. The syllabus, textbook, and instructor were controlled for both groups. The findings of the study showed that in terms of course content, both groups improved but in terms...

  20. Researching classroom interactions: A methodology for teachers and researchers

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Sally; Sutherland, Rosamund

    2007-01-01

    Teaching and learning in schools is a complex social process which involves both the teacher and students in distributed knowledge-building activities. Research into this process includes researchers exploring from the outside and teachers exploring from the inside (Bassey, 1995). Jaworski (2003) draws on the work of Wagner (1997) to elaborate a form of research which she calls co-learning, in which research on classroom learning is “conducted jointly by outsiders and insiders” (p 250). The w...

  1. Classroom Management: What Does Research Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postholm, May Britt

    2013-01-01

    The article reviews studies that focus on classroom management. The aim of classroom management is twofold. The first is to establish a quiet and calm environment in the classroom so that the pupils can take part in meaningful learning in a subject. The second aim is that classroom management contributes to the pupils' social and moral…

  2. English Language Classroom Practices: Bangladeshi Primary School Children's Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Prithvi Narayan

    2013-01-01

    English language teaching (ELT) has been investigated from various angles including how English language teachers perceive what happens in an ELT classroom. How primary school English language learners perceive their experiences of ELT is rarely reported in the published literature, particularly from developing countries such as Bangladesh. This…

  3. Meaning-Making as Dialogic Process: Official and Carnival Lives in the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackledge, Adrian; Creese, Angela

    2009-01-01

    This article adopts a Bakhtinian analysis to understand the complexities of discourse in language-learning classrooms. Drawing on empirical data from two of four linked case studies in a larger, ESRC-funded project, we argue that students learning in complementary (also known as community language, supplementary, or heritage language) schools…

  4. The Oral Interview and Cross-Cultural Understanding in the Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rings, Lana

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses cross-cultural oral interviews and how they can be used in the foreign language classroom to help students understand the differing, often culture-specific perspectives of language use among people speaking another language. By conducting interviews, or by teaching students the interview process, instructors can provide…

  5. Language Awareness in Language Learning and Teaching: A Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalberg, Agneta M.-L.

    2012-01-01

    Following on from my state-of-the-art article on "Language Awareness and language learning" (Svalberg 2007), in this paper I will discuss specific research tasks which are centrally concerned with different aspects of language awareness (LA): "explicit knowledge about language, and conscious perception and sensitivity in language learning,…

  6. Research for the Classroom: Analyzing Classroom Literacy Events--What Observing Classroom Conversations about Popular Culture Can Reveal about Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Ms. Mayer, a recently retired English language arts teacher, frequently used strategies described in John Golden's book "Reading in the Dark: Using Film as a Tool in the English Classroom." In this book, Golden suggests that ELA teachers "reverse the order: use a film clip to practice the reading and analytical skills that we want our students to…

  7. The Chinese Bouyei College Students’ Classroom Anxiety in Foreign Language Learning: A Survey Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jianhua Wei; Butsakorn Yodkamlue

    2012-01-01

    This survey study aims to investigate the level of the Chinese Bouyei college students’ general foreign language (FL) classroom anxiety, the relationships between their FL classroom anxiety and the four independent variables, gender, major field of study, level of academic year, and level of college, and possible causal factors contributive to their FL classroom anxiety. A previously published written questionnaire was administered to 320 1st- and 2nd-year Bouyei college learners in three mai...

  8. French Cuisine in the Classroom: Using Culture to Enhance Language Proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrate, Jane E.

    1993-01-01

    French cuisine offers a valuable resource for creating culture-based contexts for language use in the classroom. Suggestions and ideas are presented for incorporating food-related activities in the French class. (VWL)

  9. Working for and with Latino/Latina Immigrant Newcomers in the English Language Arts Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musetti, Bernadette; Salas, Spencer; Perez, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    "Newcomers" are English learners who are new to the United States and arrive with limited or interrupted formal schooling. These students have below-grade-level literacy skills in their home language and do not speak English. Newcomers' arrivals to the middle school and high school classrooms often present a formidable "what to do" for classroom

  10. Aida and Her Mainstream Classroom: A Case Study of a Young English Language Learner's Literacy Development

    OpenAIRE

    Bambang Yudi Cahyono

    2003-01-01

    This article reports a nine-month study of literacy development of Aida, a young English language learner from Indonesia, who was mainstreamed in a Grade 2 classroom in a primary school in the south-eastern part of Australia. This article initially reviews the literature concerning features of the mainstream classroom conducive for second language learning and for literacy development. Following the presentation of methodological issues, it examines English learning activities in Aida's class...

  11. A Case Study on the Influence of Organizational Culture on Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Zhihui Liu

    2009-01-01

    This paper tries to probe the influence of the organizational culture on language classroom at a newly-established local college. It firstly reviews the knowledge of the organizational culture and finds out its features, and then discusses how the organizational culture was greatly influenced by the host educational environment. On the basis of this, the paper interprets how organizational culture in turn influences the classroom culture in terms of English language teaching and learning in C...

  12. Language use in the English classroom : the role of students' first language in grades 9 and 10 in English classrooms in Iceland

    OpenAIRE

    Arna Borg Snorradóttir 1990

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this paper was to gather insight into students’ attitudes and perceptions towards language use during English instruction. What are students’ opinions about the benefit of their own and the teacher’s use of English in the classroom? When should the teacher and the students use the first language in the English classroom? These are two of the main questions explored in this paper. A study was conducted in grades 9 and 10 in an Icelandic compulsory school. A total of 121 s...

  13. O processo de conscientização na sala de aula de língua espanhola = The awareness process in a Spanish language classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Mayumi Meneghini

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo trata do processo de conscientização desenvolvido pelos alunos em uma sala de aula de espanhol como língua estrangeira de um Centro de Estudos de Línguas do interior do Estado de São Paulo. Considerou-se como arcabouço teórico a pedagogia freireana (FREIRE, 1980, 1984, 1987, 1999, 2000 além de autoras que tiveram como referencial teórico Paulo Freire e relacionaram sua pedagogia ao ensino de línguas estrangeiras (WALLERSTEIN, 1983; SCHLEPPEGRELL, 1997. É uma pesquisa de natureza qualitativa, que focalizou uma prática de pesquisa-ação em uma sala de aula de espanhol, na qual se implementou um planejamento freireano, para verificar como se dava o uso da língua-alvo na sala de aula (MENEGHINI, 2001. Com a análise e a discussão dos dados, realizadas por meio da triangulação desses dados, considerando-se como dados primários as interações em sala de aula, constata-se que as tarefas problematizadoras são o meio para o desenvolvimento da conscientização por parte dos alunos sobre a realidade que os cerca.This article discusses the awareness process of students in a Spanish as a foreign language classroom, at a Centre of Language Studies in a city in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The frame of reference is Paulo Freire’s pedagogy (FREIRE, 1980, 1984, 1987, 1999, 2000, Wallerstein (1983 and Schleppegrell (1997’s investigations which are important to the comprehension of the relation between Freirean’s pedagogy and the language teaching. This is a qualitative research and it focuses on action research practice in a Spanish language classroom, in which a syllabus based on Paulo Freire’s pedagogy was implemented in order to verify how the target language was used in the classroom (MENEGHINI, 2001. Data analysis and discussion are based on data triangulation and classroom interactions are taken on primary data. The implementation of this research suggests that the problem posing tasks on themes chosen from the student's realities are the way which leads to the awareness.

  14. Increasing Academic Oral Language Development: Using English Language Learner Shadowing in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Hinman, Ivannia

    2011-01-01

    According to Diane August (2002), a senior research scientist at the Center for Applied Linguistics, English Language Learners (ELLs) spend less than two percent of their school day in oral language development. Worse yet, when ELLs are speaking in school, it is often not about academic topics or rigorous content. This lack of academic oral…

  15. Elementary English Language Instruction: Colombian Teachers’ Classroom Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cadavid Múnera Isabel Cristina

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available An in-progress ethnographic research project about teachers who are facing the complex task of teaching English to children in 7 public elementary schools in the metropolitan area of Medellin is presented in this article. First, the need for this research is outlined by researchers; second, the methodology of the project is described; third, up-to-date findings which include a profile of the 12 teachers who are participating in this study, and an analysis of their class methodology in terms of activities, materials, teacher and student roles are reported. Lastly, implications of this research project related to early foreign language instruction are highlighted. Key words: Public Elementary-English-Language Instruction, English-Foreign Language, Ethnography-Research-Method, Teaching-Methodology Este artículo presenta los resultados preliminares de una investigación etnográfica acerca de las estrategias metodológicas utilizadas por profesores de básica primaria que enseñan inglés como lengua extranjera en 7 escuelas públicas del área metropolitana del municipio de Medellín. En la primera parte se resalta la importancia de esta investigación en nuestro medio y en la segunda, de los 12 profesores participantes y un análisis de la metodología empleada por ellos con respecto a las actividades de clase, los materiales y el rol del estudiante y del profesor. Finalmente, se discuten algunas de las implicaciones de este proyecto de investigación en la enseñanza de lenguas extranjeras a niños. Palabras claves: Inglés-Enseñanza-Básica Primaria, Lengua Extranjera-Inglés, Estudio Etnográfico-Investigación, Enseñanza-Metodología

  16. The Role of Relational and Instructional Classroom Supports in the Language Development of At-Risk Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosse, Carolyn S.; McGinty, Anita S.; Mashburn, Andrew J.; Hoffman, LaVae M.; Pianta, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the extent to which preschool classroom supports--relational support (RS) and instructional support (IS)--are associated with children's language development and whether these associations vary as a function of children's language ability. The language skills of 360 children within 95 classrooms were assessed…

  17. L2 and L3 integrated learning – lingua franca use in learning an additional language in the classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazel, Spencer; Wagner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    This study offers an empirical account of the use of English in Danish-as-a-foreign-language classroom settings. We will refer to English as the lingua franca - which in itself is a second language for the majority of the participants in the data - and to Danish as the target language. We consider implications of lingua franca interaction in target language classroom interactions, and show how in sequences where participants orient to linguistic issues in the target language, for example grammat...

  18. Factors Influencing Student Nurses’ Perceptions of Success and Failure in Second Language Writing – A Classroom-based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hung-Cheng TAI

    2013-01-01

    This article applies attribution theory to identify the factors that influence nursing students’ perceptions of success and failure in learning English writing skills. The study took place in a language classroom in southern Taiwan involving fifty-one female nursing students, a writing teacher, and the researcher. Teaching activities included five writing cycles based on an online writing platform, process approach, and multiple revisions. Evidence data has been collected from learners’ quest...

  19. Second language writing anxiety, computer anxiety, and performance in a classroom versus a web-based environment

    OpenAIRE

    Dracopoulos, Effie

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the impact of writing anxiety and computer anxiety on language learning for 45 ESL adult learners enrolled in an English grammar and writing course. Two sections of the course were offered in a traditional classroom setting whereas two others were given in a hybrid form that in-volved distance learning. Contrary to previous research, writing anxiety showed no correlation with learning performance, whereas computer anxie-ty only yielded a positive correlation with performan...

  20. Aida and Her Mainstream Classroom: A Case Study of a Young English Language Learner's Literacy Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Yudi Cahyono

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports a nine-month study of literacy development of Aida, a young English language learner from Indonesia, who was mainstreamed in a Grade 2 classroom in a primary school in the south-eastern part of Australia. This article initially reviews the literature concerning features of the mainstream classroom conducive for second language learning and for literacy development. Following the presentation of methodological issues, it examines English learning activities in Aida's classroom and highlights her literacy development with examples of her work. The results from this study show that Aida developed literacy skills considered important for her second language and learning development. The variety of English learning activities and the encouraging environment in her classroom contributed much to her literacy development.

  1. Error Analysis in the Classroom. CAL-ERIC/CLL Series on Languages and Linguistics, No. 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Patricia B.

    This paper begins with a discussion of the meaning and importance of error analysis in language teaching and learning. The practical implications of what error analysis is for the classroom teacher are discussed, along with several possible systems for classifying learner errors. The need for the language teacher to establish certain priorities in…

  2. What Do Learners Make of Teachers' Gestures in the Language Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    This study explores the meanings that learners of English as a foreign language give to teachers' gestures. It is a qualitative, descriptive study of the perceived functions that gestures perform in the EFL classroom, viewed mainly from the language learners' perspective. The data for the study was collected through interviews with twenty-two…

  3. Sign Language Use and the Appreciation of Diversity in Hearing Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brereton, Amy

    2008-01-01

    This article is the result of a year-long study into the effects of sign language use on participation in one mainstream preschool setting. Observations and interviews were the primary data-collection tools used during this investigation. This article focuses on how the use of sign language in the classroom affected the learning community's…

  4. 20 Ways for Classroom Teachers to Collaborate with Speech-Language Pathologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Kellie L.; Iyer, Suneeti Nathani; Boon, Richard T.; Fore, Cecil, III

    2010-01-01

    Students with disabilities are increasingly receiving services in the general education classroom, and as a result, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are using a variety of flexible models to meet the needs of these students. Although some schools continue to provide pullout service delivery models for speech-language therapy, many are…

  5. Implementing Tasks with Interactive Technologies in Classroom Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL): Towards a Developmental Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Shona; Alexander, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Classroom foreign language teachers using technology in task-based language teaching (TBLT) may experience pedagogical regression during technological development (Fullan, 2001), and fail to transform pedagogy because tools like interactive whiteboards (IWBs) support traditional as well as newer approaches (Avvisati et al., 2013). IWB-supported…

  6. Teaching English Language Learners: 43 Strategies for Successful K-8 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Ideal as a supplementary text for a variety of courses and as a guide for in-service teachers and for professional development settings, "Teaching English Language Learners: 43 Strategies for Successful K-8 Classrooms" provides teachers of all content areas with a broad, practical approach to teaching English language learners in the regular…

  7. Social Positioning, Participation, and Second Language Learning: Talkative Students in an Academic ESL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayi-Aydar, Hayriye

    2014-01-01

    Guided by positioning theory and poststructural views of second language learning, the two descriptive case studies presented in this article explored the links between social positioning and the language learning experiences of two talkative students in an academic ESL classroom. Focusing on the macro- and micro-level contexts of communication,…

  8. Gesture, Meaning-Making, and Embodiment: Second Language Learning in an Elementary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosborough, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the mediational role of gesture and body movement/positioning between a teacher and an English language learner in a second-grade classroom. Responding to Thibault's (2011) call for understanding language through whole-body sense making, aspects of gesture and body positioning were analyzed…

  9. Preschool Classroom Conversations as Long-Term Resources for Second Language and Literacy Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aukrust, Vibeke Grover; Rydland, Veslemoy

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated relations between preschool talk exposure and immigrant first graders' second language literacy and oral skills outcomes. Participants in the study were 25 children with Turkish as their first language and Norwegian as their second, attending various multilingual and ethnically diverse preschool classrooms in Norway and…

  10. ELT Teacher Trainees' Attitudes towards Environmental Education and Their Tendency to Use It in the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursoy, Esim; Saglam, Gulderen T.

    2011-01-01

    With the change of focus in language teaching from grammar-based approaches to more communicative approaches, contextual language learning gained importance and found body in the English Language classroom. Global issues constitute one of the most popular contexts for purposeful language learning and meaningful language use. Increasing number of…

  11. Code-Switching in English as a Foreign Language Classroom: Teachers’ Attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Engku Haliza Engku Ibrahim; Mohamed Ismail Ahamad Shah; Najwa Tgk. Armia

    2013-01-01

    Code-switching has always been an intriguing phenomenon to sociolinguists. While the general attitude to it seems negative, people seem to code-switch quite frequently. Teachers of English as a foreign language too frequently claim that they do not like to code-switch in the language classroom for various reasons – many are of the opinion that only the target language should be used in the classroom. This study looks at the teachers’ attitudes towards code-switching in teaching English as a f...

  12. Classroom Dialogue: A Systematic Review across Four Decades of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Christine; Abedin, Manzoorul

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing that empirical research into classroom dialogue has been conducted for about 40?years, a review is reported of 225 studies published between 1972 and 2011. The studies were identified through systematic search of electronic databases and scrutiny of publication reference lists. They focus on classroom dialogue in primary and secondary…

  13. Non-native Teacher Talk as Lexical Input in the Foreign Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Eunice Tang

    2011-01-01

    Non-native or indigenous English teachers have provided the largest teaching and professional support in Asian countries where English is taught and learnt in school as an additional or international language. As the language environment outside classroom in these countries is generally poor, teachers become a major source of language input for learners. This article explores the Lexical Variation (LV) ratio of non-native teacher talk and the percentage of words teachers used at different voc...

  14. "Finding the key to the secret garden of reading" :extensive reading in the second language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Hauer, Elin Lævnæseth

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to communicate to those concerned with language teaching and to share some ideas on different reading approaches, especially with focus on extensive reading and the use of graded readers in the second language classroom. Furthermore I will make suggestions of how an extensive reading program might benefit language learning in general.Different approaches to reading and vocabulary learning will be presented and evaluated throughout this paper in an attempt to “pro...

  15. A University Level Linguistics Course Classroom Research: Vocabulary Retention and the Use of L2 and L1

    OpenAIRE

    UZUN, Levent

    2011-01-01

    This study is a classroom research carried out in the Linguistics course at university level. The present study aims at finding out to what degree the technical vocabulary of the course is retained by the individuals, while also investigating the effect of using L2 and L1 in the classroom during the lectures. Participants were second grade (N=70) and fourth grade (N=30) university students in the English Language Teaching Department. The data were conducted through a vocabulary and knowledg...

  16. Heritage Languages: In the 'Wild' and in the Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Polinsky, Maria; Kagan, Olga

    2007-01-01

    Heritage speakers are people raised in a home where one language is spoken who subsequently switch to another dominant language. The version of the home language that they have not completely acquired – heritage language – has only recently been given the attention it deserves from linguists and language instructors. Despite the appearance of great variation among heritage speakers, they fall along a continuum based upon the speakers' distance from the baseline language. Such a continuum-base...

  17. Jazyk komunikace ve výuce anglického jazyka v ?eské republice: míšení jazyk? / The language of communication in English classrooms in the Czech Republic: Mixing languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Najvar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with classroom communication. More specifically, it focuses on issues connected with the usage of English as the target language and Czech as the mother tongue in lessons of English as a foreign language in primary and lowersecondary schools in the Czech Republic. 89 English lessons were analysed and the proportion between English and Czech used in the sample lessons was established in order to show how the two languages are mixed in the lessons. The analysis of the number of words uttered in the lessons showed that teachers used Czech more than English but students said more English words than Czech words. When operationalized in terms of time, the use of language was equally balanced between the target language and the mother tongue. Another perspective described in the paper is one of opportunities that the teacher creates for the students to practice different language skills. Great differences in using the mother tongue and the target language were found between individual teachers, which is in line with the findings of a number of similar research studies. Towards the end of the paper, five typical situations of mixing languages are briefly presented.

  18. English Language Learning Inside and Outside the Classroom in Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Tonoian, Lilit

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the way of learning the English language in Portugal. First-year students of the faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities of New University of Lisbon were selected as participants in the case study. As data collection tools a questionnaire and focus-groups were used. 115 students completed the designed questionnaire and after that 12 students were selected for the more detailed focus-group discussions. Results of the research show that most part of the students´ E...

  19. Cross language information retrieval: a research roadmap

    OpenAIRE

    Gey, Fredric C.; Kando, Noriko; Peters, Carol

    2003-01-01

    Cross-Language Information Retrieval (CLIR) has been a research sub-field for more than a decade now. The field has sparked three major evaluation efforts: the TREC Cross Language Track which currently focuses on the Arabic language, the Cross-Language Evaluation Forum (CLEF) - a spinoff from TREC - covering many European languages, and the NTCIR Asian Language Evaluation (covering Chinese, Japanese and Korean). During this one-day workshop we reviewed and assessed the progress that has been ...

  20. Students' Social Positioning in the Language Classroom: Implications for Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Paul; Kidd, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines some findings of a three-month investigation into the effects of students' interpersonal relationships on communication in two EFL classrooms in a Japanese university. Data was collected to identify and describe the various social subgroups that existed within the classes, and samples of classroom discourse were then analysed…

  1. A sociolinguistics of the utopian and the use of language in classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Jesper

    1979-01-01

    The notion of the Utopian use of language in classrooms was developed and applied as a theoretical tool during the empirical study of language in classrooms. It is claimed that a notion like this may turn out to be particularly profitable when the purpose is to interpret and characterize the content and consequences of a certain use of language. It enables us to present the results of the interpretation in a form that facilitates the proposal of alternative ways of using language by the persons involved - in this case, by the teachers. A sample from the interpretations is presented, and the conclusion is ventured that it is necessary to anchor the sociolinguistic descriptions of actual language use in a sociological conception of the relevant social praxis - in our case taken from the sociology of education.

  2. Preparing pre-service teachers for multilingual classrooms - designing a multiple African language module

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Rinelle

    2011-01-01

    South African classrooms have become increasingly diverse and the shifting demographics of the instructional context have necessitated a change in the way preservice students are prepared for the linguistic and cultural diversity of their future classrooms. In response to this, undergraduates enrolled in the Faculty of Education at the University of Pretoria are now required to extend their personal language repertoire by acquiring a functional knowledge of words and appropr...

  3. Bilingual Lexical Interillumination in the Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. John, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Foreign language (FL) education has been marked by a monolingual principle that has favoured "intralingual" methodologies. Bakhtin's view of language interillumination--that languages throw light on each other--challenges such language teaching practices radically. Using conversation analysis methods, this article examines transcripts of…

  4. Book Review: Creating equitable classrooms through action research

    OpenAIRE

    Geoff Mills

    2009-01-01

    Creating Equitable Classrooms through Action Research is compelling reading for a wide-ranging audience including professional development participants, preservice and inservice teachers, students of educational administration, and teacher educators.

  5. Creating an Authentic Learning Environment in the Foreign Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Larisa Nikitina

    2011-01-01

    Theatrical activities are widely used by language educators to promote and facilitate language learning. Involving students in production of their own video or a short movie in the target language allows a seamless fusion of language learning, art, and popular culture. The activity is also conducive for creating an authentic learning situation where the real world becomes a part of the educational experience and necessitates the use of an authentic language by the learners. This article descr...

  6. Research on Language and Learning: implications for Language Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Alcón

    2004-01-01

    Taking into account severa1 limitations of communicative language teaching (CLT), this paper calls for the need to consider research on language use and learning through communication as a basis for language teaching. It will be argued that a reflective approach towards language teaching and learning might be generated, which is explained in terms of the need to develop a context-sensitive pedagogy and in terms of teachers' and learners' development.

  7. Classroom Currents: Interrupting the Single Story: LGBT Issues in the Language Arts Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann-Wilmarth, Jill; Ryan, Caitlin L.

    2013-01-01

    Two literacy leaders acknowledge the challenges of teaching LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) issues in the classroom. While children come from a variety of family structures, it is necessary to acknowledge that a gay individual was once a child sitting in a classroom. An argument against marginalization and an advocacy for inclusion of…

  8. Factors Influencing Student Nurses’ Perceptions of Success and Failure in Second Language Writing – A Classroom-based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Cheng TAI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article applies attribution theory to identify the factors that influence nursing students’ perceptions of success and failure in learning English writing skills. The study took place in a language classroom in southern Taiwan involving fifty-one female nursing students, a writing teacher, and the researcher. Teaching activities included five writing cycles based on an online writing platform, process approach, and multiple revisions. Evidence data has been collected from learners’ questionnaires and interviews, teacher’s interviews, classroom observations, teaching materials, and researcher’s diaries. The data has been analysed quantitatively using SPSS and qualitatively with the aid of QSR NVivo software. Results reveal the major factors given by learners involve the amount writing practice given and their perceptions of their competence in vocabulary and with grammar. The work is supported by observations made by the language teacher and the researcher on issues which have emerged on the students’ writing skills, psychology, language competence, and learning context. This article concludeswith the implications for teaching.

  9. Learning over Time: Uses of Intercontextuality, Collective Memories, and Classroom Chronotopes in the Construction of Learning Opportunities in a Ninth-Grade Language Arts Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloome, David; Beierle, Marlene; Grigorenko, Margaret; Goldman, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Framed within interactional sociolinguistics, microethnographic discourse analysis, and cognitive science, we examine how intercontextuality, collective memories, and classroom chronotopes were used in generating learning opportunities in a ninth-grade language arts classroom. Five consecutive videorecorded lessons were analyzed focusing on how…

  10. Sign Language: Meeting Diverse Needs in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Cynthia G.; Lynch, Sharon A.

    2007-01-01

    For a number of years, sign language has been used in special education settings for learners with disabilities. Children with hearing loss, autism, cognitive disabilities, and language disorders have demonstrated improved communication skills with the use of signs. Recently, however, teachers have begun to use sign language with typical learners…

  11. Facilitating Comprehension and Processing of Language in Classroom and Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, Elaine Z.

    A speech/language remediation-intervention model is proposed to enhance processing of auditory information in students with language or learning disabilities. Such children have difficulty attending to language signals (verbal and nonverbal responses ranging from facial expressions and gestures to those requiring the generation of complex…

  12. Federal Interagency Committee on Aviation Noise (FICAN) Position on Research into Effects of Aircraft Noise on Classroom Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This symposium report presents a summary of research on the affect of aircraft noise on the classroom environment revealing that aircraft noise can interfere with learning in the following areas: reading, motivation, language and speech acquisition, and memory. The strongest findings are in the area of reading, where more than 20 studies have…

  13. SELF-POLICING IN THE ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alia AMIR

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study explores how classroom participants invoke a monolingual target-language policy in an English as a foreign language (EFL classroom, specifically focusing on one method of doing language policy through self-initiated language policing sequences, which I have called self-policing. Language policing refers to the mechanism deployed by the teacher and/or the pupils to (re-establish the normatively prescribed medium of classroom interaction (Amir & Musk, 2013; cf. Bonacina & Gafaranga, 2011. The data comes from sequential analyses of 20 hours of video recordings in grades 8 & 9 of an international compulsory school in Sweden between the years 2007-2010. Drawing on Auer (1984 and Gafaranga’s (1999 organisational code-switching framework, this study sheds light on how teachers and pupils self-initiate a switch to English in their interactions. As will be demonstrated, both teachers and pupils, while orienting to the English-only norm, use a three-step sequence for language policing.

  14. Creating an Authentic Learning Environment in the Foreign Language Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Nikitina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Theatrical activities are widely used by language educators to promote and facilitate language learning. Involving students in production of their own video or a short movie in the target language allows a seamless fusion of language learning, art, and popular culture. The activity is also conducive for creating an authentic learning situation where the real world becomes a part of the educational experience and necessitates the use of an authentic language by the learners. This article describes a video project carried out by Russian language learners at Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS. It examines how the work on the project created and supported authenticity of the learning experience. Though the article focuses on the video project done in the context of language learning and teaching this activity could be successfully implemented in teaching various subjects at both secondary and tertiary levels.

  15. "We Don't Believe Media Anymore": Mapping Critical Literacies in an Adult Immigrant Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, Monica

    2012-01-01

    This article maps critical literacies conceptually and empirically in the context of adult immigrant language classrooms. It begins by describing Deleuze and Guattari's cartographic approach. Then it traces critical literacies situated conceptually within a Freirean paradigm before mapping them differently through the Deleuzian-informed Multiple…

  16. Learner Code-Switching in the Content-Based Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebscher, Grit; Dailey-O'Cain, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    Using a framework based on conversation analysis (Auer, 1984, 1995, 1998), this article presents an analysis of learner code-switching between L1 and L2 in an advanced foreign language (FL) classroom. It was found that students code-switch not only as a fallback method when their knowledge of the L2 fails them, or for other participant-related…

  17. Functions of Repetition in Learners' Private Speech in Japanese Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Reiko

    2008-01-01

    Studies investigating repetition in SL/FL learners' private speech have focused mainly on its cognitive and metacognitive functions. In the present study, the classroom observations, video-recordings of lessons, audio-recordings of six learners and two teachers and simulated recall interviews were conducted in Japanese language classes over two…

  18. The Use of Video as an Audio-visual Material in Foreign Language Teaching Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Ismail

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, a great tendency towards the use of technology and its integration into the curriculum has gained a great importance. Particularly, the use of video as an audio-visual material in foreign language teaching classrooms has grown rapidly because of the increasing emphasis on communicative techniques, and it is obvious that the use of…

  19. The "Kulturpass": Strategies for Enhancing Cultural Engagement outside the German-Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Debra N.; Kramer, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Extracurricular events in foreign language programs are often treated either as extra credit or an afterthought. And yet if organized creatively and systematically, activities that promote cultural engagement outside the classroom can enhance and extend the curriculum, deepen exposure to the target culture, create a sense of community among…

  20. Investigating foreign language anxiety in Iranian classrooms: The effect of gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoodzadeh, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to delve into the issue of affective variables related to language learning, the present study focuses on the influence of gender on learners' foreign language anxiety in the Iranian context. The objective of this case study is first to determine the extent to which Iranian EFL learners perceive foreign language anxiety in matched-gender and mixed-gender classrooms and second to see if there is any significant difference between the two types of the investigated classrooms. To this end, a 16 items self-reporting questionnaire with a five Likert-type scale was designed. The developed questionnaire was then given to 96 Iranian lower intermediate EFL learners to complete it. After analyzing the collected data, the findings indicated that mixed-gender classrooms can be considered as an anxiety-provoking teaching context in Iran, since the presence of the opposite gender in EFL classrooms was found to cause statistically significant amount of language anxiety among Iranian learners. The study also offers some context-specific pedagogical implications for Iranian EFL teachers and practitioners.

  1. Mobile Technology in Second Language Classrooms: Insights into Its Uses, Pedagogical Implications, and Teacher Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praag, Benjamin; Sanchez, Hugo Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Adopting a multiple-case, multiple-method design, this study investigates mobile technology use in the practices of three experienced second language teachers. The findings, based on an analysis of the teachers' rationales, stated beliefs and classroom actions, show that the teachers tend to prohibit or reluctantly tolerate mobile device usage,…

  2. Diverse Voices in a Second Language Classroom: Burlesque, Parody, and Mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Examines how students in a second language classroom deploy linguistic and cultural resources to both resist and appropriate aspects of the teachers' voices. A key episode is analyzed to show the nuances of students' ventriloquation of diverse voices to construct a complex social order and shifting strategic identities. (Author/VWL)

  3. A Case Study on the Influence of Organizational Culture on Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihui

    2009-01-01

    This paper tries to probe the influence of the organizational culture on language classroom at a newly-established local college. It firstly reviews the knowledge of the organizational culture and finds out its features, and then discusses how the organizational culture was greatly influenced by the host educational environment. On the basis of…

  4. Digital Stories: A 21st-Century Communication Tool for the English Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Digital storytelling can motivate and engage students and create a community in the classroom. This article lays out a 12-week digital storytelling project, describing the process in detail, including assessment, and pinpointing issues and challenges as well as benefits the project affords English language students.

  5. The role of background music in the English language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Sorger, Anna

    2014-01-01

    According to the Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia, the interest in second language learning has been increasing in recent years. In the context of primary and secondary education in Slovenia, English language is prominent in the field of foreign languages. A quite similar picture can also be seen in the context of non-formal educational system for adults (http://www.stat.si). Throughout recent years, more and more attention has been given to the importance of a learning env...

  6. Transfronterizo Literacies and Content in a Dual Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Piedra, Maria Teresa; Araujo, Blanca

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the ways in which young transfronterizo students who live between the two worlds of El Paso (USA) and Ciudad Juarez (Mexico) bring their literacy practices and content to the classroom. Drawing on the data gathered during a 3-year ethnographic study, we illustrate how transfronterizo texts and content are…

  7. Promoting Creativity in the Middle Grades Language Arts Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Katherine E.; Bintz, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Middle level educators around the country aim to create a classroom environment and a way of teaching that is developmentally responsive, challenging, empowering, and equitable for every student. One way to ensure this is to include instruction that promotes creativity. This article offers guiding principles and shares instructional lessons that…

  8. Preparing Undergraduates for Research Careers: Using Astrobites in the Classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, Nathan E; Newton, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Because undergraduate participation in research is a longstanding and increasingly important aspect of the career path for future scientists, students can benefit from additional resources to introduce them to the culture and process of research. We suggest the adoption of the web resource Astrobites as a classroom tool to increase the preparation of undergraduate physics and astronomy students for careers in research. We describe the content and development of the website, discuss previous university courses that have made use of Astrobites, and suggest additional strategies for using Astrobites in the classroom.

  9. L2 and L3 integrated learning – lingua franca use in learning an additional language in the classroom.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazel, Spencer; Wagner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    This study offers an empirical account of the use of English in Danish-as-a-foreign-language classroom settings. We will refer to English as the lingua franca - which in itself is a second language for the majority of the participants in the data - and to Danish as the target language. We consider implications of lingua franca interaction in target language classroom interactions, and show how in sequences where participants orient to linguistic issues in the target language, for example grammatical forms or lexical items, they often do this with reference to the lingua franca.

  10. Language, Literature, and Learning in the ESL Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooy, Mary; Chiu, Annette

    1998-01-01

    Argues that English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) teaching should begin with meaning through immersion in literature and incorporate language study. Describes offering an inclusive sampling of North American literature. Notes specific picture book, drama, short story, novel, and poetry titles. Discusses ways to meaningfully engage ESL students in…

  11. Understanding Influences of Play on Second Language Learning: A Microethnographic View in One Head Start Preschool Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piker, Ruth A.

    2013-01-01

    With dual language learners falling behind their same-age peers at the beginning of kindergarten, understanding how school experiences can enhance language learning is critical. This study demonstrates how play among preschool-aged children can foster English language learning. Using an ethnographic approach, one classroom composed of two teachers…

  12. Biography, policy and language teaching practices in a multilingual context: Early childhood classrooms in Mauritius

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Aruna, Ankiah-Gangadeen; Michael Anthony, Samuel.

    Full Text Available Language policies in education in multilingual postcolonial contexts are often driven by ideological considerations more veered towards socio-economic and political viability for the country than towards the practicality at implementation level. Centuries after the advent of colonisation, when cultu [...] rally and linguistically homogenous countries helped to maintain the dominion of colonisers, the English language still has a stronghold in numerous countries due to the material rewards it offers. How then are the diversity of languages - often with different statuses and functions in society - reconciled in the teaching and learning process? How do teachers deal with the intricacies that are generated within a situation where children are taught in a language that is foreign to them? This paper is based on a study involving pre-primary teachers in Mauritius, a developing multilingual African country. The aim was to understand how their approach to the teaching of English was shaped by their biographical experiences of learning the language. The narrative inquiry methodology offered rich possibilities to foray into these experiences, including the manifestations of negotiating their classroom pedagogy in relation to their own personal historical biographies of language teaching and learning, the policy environment, and the pragmatic classroom specificities of diverse, multilingual learners. These insights become resources for early childhood education and teacher development in multilingual contexts caught within the tensions between language policy and pedagogy.

  13. Hearing the voices of alternatively certified teachers in Texas: Narratives of teaching English language learners in urban secondary mainstream classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannou, Yetunde Mobola

    In Texas, nearly half of all new teachers are alternatively certified (AC) whilst English language learners (ELL) are over one-third of the public school population in some districts. As this trend continues, the likelihood that AC teachers will teach ELLs increases and alters what Texas teachers must know upon entering the classroom. This research explores teacher knowledge and beliefs about teaching ELLs through constructivist and narrative lenses. Four AC science teachers in two diverse school districts participated in in-depth interviews and reflective interviews following classroom observations to answer the research questions: (1) how do AC teachers describe and interpret their acts of teaching ELLs in mainstream classrooms; and (2) how do AC teachers describe and interpret their learning to teach ELLs in mainstream classrooms. Data were transcribed and analyzed using thematic narrative methods. This study found that participants saw ELL instruction as: (1) "just good teaching" strategies, (2) consisting primarily of cultural awareness and consideration for student comfort, and (3) less necessary in science where all students must learn the language. The most experienced teacher was the only participant to reference specific linguistic knowledge in describing ELL instruction. Many of the teachers described their work with ELL students as giving them an opportunity to improve their lives, which was consistent with their overall teaching philosophy and reason for entering the profession. Participant narratives about learning to teach ELLs described personal experience and person-to-person discussions as primary resources of knowledge. District support was generally described as unhelpful or incomplete. Participants portrayed their AC program as helpful in preparing them to work with ELL students, but everyone desired more relevant information from the program and more grade-appropriate strategies from the district. Participant narratives reveal AC teachers needed a pragmatic and less theoretical understanding of diversity during pre-service training. Participant tendency to draw upon "common sense", affective, and practical strategies in teaching ELL students in lieu of the state-mandated English language proficiency standards (ELPS) suggests AC programs should have teachers articulate and discuss their beliefs about ELL instruction in order to provide training targeted towards misconceptions about language development, particularly in science.

  14. Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Among China Chinese Students Undergoing The Laureate English Programme in INTI International University, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghavaani d/o Ampalagan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between foreign language classroom anxiety (communication apprehension, test anxiety and fear of negative evaluation among  Mainland Chinese students undergoing the Laureate English Programme

  15. Competing Desires and Realities: Language Policies in the French-Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Angela Giovanangeli

    2009-01-01

    French language policy has historically centred on ways French can be considered a dominant and influential language. It has done this since the Middle Ages, by allowing the French language to serve as a political tool. On an international level, language was a way of subjugating conquered peoples (former colonies). It promoted France’s international status (by the 18th century French was the diplomatic language of Europe). On a national level, the French language was one of the ways governme...

  16. Five Board Games for the Language Classroom: Uvas, Montana Rusa, El Futbol, La Corrida de Verbos, Paso a Paso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Barbara

    A collection of five board games for the Spanish language classroom contains gameboards, game markers, and directions for each game. It also contains general instructions for the teacher about the classroom use of board games. The games include: "Uvas," for use in vocabulary development and cultural awareness; "Montana Rusa," for general…

  17. A Constructive Teaching Model in Learning Research Concept for English Language Teaching Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Khoirul

    2015-01-01

    This is a study to focus on analyzing the use of constructive teaching method toward the students' motivation in learning content subject of Introduction to Research of English Language Teaching. By using a mix-method of qualitative and quantitative analysis, the data are collected by using questionnaire and classroom observation. The…

  18. Language Teacher Research in the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombe, Christine, Ed.; Barlow, Lisa, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    An openness to new ways of teaching and learning is vital for growth among English language teachers, teacher educators, teachers in training, and students. This volume in the Language Teacher Research Series (Thomas S. C. Farrell, series editor) shares the studies and reflections of teacher researchers working in Middle Eastern countries with…

  19. Research Ethics in Sign Language Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Raychelle; Holmes, Heidi M.; Mertens, Donna M.

    2009-01-01

    Codes of ethics exist for most professional associations whose members do research on, for, or with sign language communities. However, these ethical codes are silent regarding the need to frame research ethics from a cultural standpoint, an issue of particular salience for sign language communities. Scholars who write from the perspective of…

  20. Learning English as an International Language: EFL Learners' Perceptions of Cultural Knowledge Acquisition in the English Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Hsuan-Yau Tony Lai

    2013-01-01

    Culture is an important element in the foreign language classroom. Some scholars believe that culture is the fifth language skill along with the four traditional skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) of English. Traditionally, learning English required learners to acquire some target language cultural knowledge (e.g. British culture and/or American culture) especially in the context of English as a foreign language. However, with the increasingly important status of English as an ...

  1. An ORACLE Chronicle: A Decade of Classroom Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galton, Maurice

    1987-01-01

    This article describes Project ORACLE which was research carried out at the University of Leicester begun in 1975 concerning (1) a longitudinal process-product study of teaching and learning in elementary schools; and (2) a study which concentrated on collaborative group work in the same classrooms. Results and implications are discussed.…

  2. Factor analysis of the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale in Korean learners of English as a foreign language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gi-Pyo

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the latent constructs of the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS) using two different groups of Korean English as a foreign language (EFL) university students. Maximum likelihood exploratory factor analysis with direct oblimin rotation was performed among the first group of 217 participants and produced two meaningful latent components in the FLCAS. The two components of the FLCAS were closely examined among the second group of 244 participants to find the extent to which the two components of the FLCAS fit the data. The model fit indexes showed that the two-factor model in general adequately fit the data. Findings of this study were discussed with the focus on the two components of the FLCAS, followed by future study areas to be undertaken to shed further light on the role of foreign language anxiety in L2 acquisition. PMID:25153961

  3. Encouraging Empirical Research: Findings from the Music Appreciation Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Dirkse

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirical research can be a very useful tool for the music history pedagogue, as a collection of studies relating to the teaching of collegiate-level music appreciation classes has shown. Although the body of literature is small, the existing empirical research involving collegiate-level music appreciation classrooms provides important pedagogical findings. Studies have investigated how students’ backgrounds influence their music appreciation experience, the success of courses in increasing students’ levels of appreciation for music, and the effectiveness of particular curricular and teaching strategies in the music appreciation classroom. Findings from these studies can help music appreciation teachers make informed, research-supported choices when deciding how to structure and teach their courses. Examining these studies may also stimulate ideas for further areas of empirical research. A willingness to accept and engage in empirical research will lead to a better understanding of our students and an increased quality of teaching.

  4. Non-Native English Language Teachers' Perspective on Culture in English as a Foreign Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayyurt, Yasemin

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the importance of raising non-native English language teachers' awareness of different dimensions of culture in the teaching of English as an international language. The author believes that the more critical English language teachers become about the involvement of culture in their English language teaching, the more they…

  5. Bringing Mexican Culture to the Spanish Language Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Lili A.

    This curriculum project offers ways to teach students about Mexico to make the country come alive for them. The curriculum is designed to create avenues for third-year Spanish students to practice the following language skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. The lessons included can be adapted for other-level students. There are four…

  6. Teaching Culture in the Classroom to Arabic Language Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldin, Ahmad Abdel Tawwab Sharaf

    2015-01-01

    Arabic language learning comprises of certain elements, including syntactic ability, oral capability, dialect proficiency, and a change in state of mind towards different culture or society. For teachers and laymen alike, cultural competence, i.e., the knowledge of the customs, beliefs, and systems of another country, is indisputably an integral…

  7. Equity for English Language Learners in Mathematics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgioli, Gina M.

    2008-01-01

    Although English Language Learners (ELLs) quickly acquire basic interpersonal communication skills, most struggle for several years with reading and writing academic content in English. In particular, in English-only mathematics classes, children are likely to have difficulty reading and comprehending text, reading word problems, and giving…

  8. Raising Cultural Awareness in the English Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jerrold

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses how teachers can incorporate cultural knowledge into English language classes, exploring elements of culture, intercultural phenomena, and high-context and low-context cultures. Activities offered by the author to raise cultural awareness include web quests, role plays, cultural observations, and culture journals.

  9. Never Fear; Scaffolding is Here: Solar Research in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.; DeMuth, N.; Isbell, D.; Pompea, S. M.; Garmany, K.

    2006-12-01

    Astronomy Research Based Science Education (A-RBSE) has been a multi-year teacher professional development program sponsored by NSF and administered through the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). Previously TLRBSE, the program reaches the formal education community through a national audience of well-trained and supported middleand high-school teachers. Every year, a new cohort of teachers prepare for research through an on-line course in the spring. In the summer they conduct astronomy research at NOAO, working with astronomer-mentors to gather and analyze their data. They then return to their classrooms and engage their students in inquiry-based astronomy research using the data. A-RBSE has much to offer teachers both inside and outside the program who wish to initiate research in the classroom. However, the activation energy to conduct authentic research is high. To address the needs of a wider audience of teachers and students, steps have been taken to supply web-based resources for the solar research program. Teachers can use this solar scaffolding to support the implementation of authentic solar research in the classroom. The scaffolding files will serve as a template for other A-RBSE research strands, as well as enable non-A-RBSE middle and high school teachers to download and use A-RBSE data in their own classrooms. These scaffolding resources and future directions will be described in this session. NOAO is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation. For further information, visit http://www.noao.edu/outreach/tlrbse/.

  10. Creative use of Twitter for Dynamic Assessment in Language Learning classroom at the university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Cacchione

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This contribution describes an experimentation involving two classes of basic Italian as L2 during the A. Y. 2014-15 I term at the University Complutense of Madrid. Within a general MALL and BYOD approach, Twitter was adopted as in-classroom tool for language learning Dynamic and Authentic Assessment, aiming at boosting the learning success and overall language proficiency. Students’ satisfaction, engagement factors and levels have been measured via a post-intervention questionnaire, showing general positive outcomes. Final formal summative assessment also showed very positive general results and opened the way for further investigations.

  11. The Application of Task-based Language Teaching to English Reading Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Zan Mao

    2012-01-01

    Task-based approach is a new approach in education practice. In task-based classroom, the chief focus is the performance of tasks. The task, rather than being a unit of grammar to be digested or a collection of lexical items to be remembered, is a means of learning the language by doing tasks. It requires exposure to comprehensive input and opportunities to interact in the language. The task has to be negotiated by the learners with the help of the teacher, whose job is to facilitate learning...

  12. Repetition and joking in children’s second language conversations : playful recyclings in an immersion classroom

    OpenAIRE

    ?ekait?, Asta; Aronsson, Karin

    2004-01-01

    Repetition is often associated with traditional teaching drills.However, it has been documented how repetitionsare exploited by learners themselves (Duff, 2000). In a study of immersion classroom conversations, it wasfound that playful recyclings were recurrentfeatures of young learners’ second language repertoires.Such joking events were identified on the basisof the participants’ displayed amusement,and they often involved activity-based jokes (Lampert, 1996)and meta pragmatic play, that is...

  13. Learners Involvement in Materials Selection for Teaching English in Language Classroom at Aligarh Muslim University

    OpenAIRE

    Sheema Fatima

    2014-01-01

    The onset of the present paper throws light on materials selection and traditional outlook. Then the paper discusses four types of materials, more specifically, instructional, experiential, exploratory and elicitative materials and their use in language classroom. It discusses the role relationship between teachers, learners and materials in the present scenario at Aligarh Muslim University, keeping in consideration the requirements of the changing times. The paper aims to highlight the posit...

  14. Turkish Teachers’ Practices of Assessment for Learning in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Hüseyin Öz

    2014-01-01

    Recently there has been a noticeable paradigm shift in educational assessment where assessment and student learning are viewed as inseparable and assessment is perceived as a tool for supporting student learning. This study was designed to investigate Turkish teachers’ preferences of common assessment methods in the English as a foreign language (EFL) classroom, their Assessment for Learning (AFL) practices, and determine whether they differed in their AFL practices according to some va...

  15. Using Original Methods in Teaching English Language to Foreign Students (Chinese) in Indian Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Devimeenakshi. K.; C. N. Baby Maheswari

    2012-01-01

    The article gives information on English language teaching schemes in Indian classrooms for foreign students. The teacher monitors as facilitator and instructor. The trainees were trained in the four macro skills, LSRW. I taught some topics in three skills, namely, writing, listening and reading (just three, not speaking skills) to Chinese students in VIT University. The other skill speaking was trained by other teachers among the four. Students were trained to listen to English words and pa...

  16. The relevance of body language to evolution of language research

    OpenAIRE

    Wacewicz, S?awomir; ?ywiczy?ski, Przemys?aw

    2010-01-01

    The heterogeneous category of phenomena covered by the term body language (roughly equivalent to nonverbal communication, NVC), although essential to human day-to-day communication, is also largely dissociable from human verbal behaviour. As such, it has received little attention in the area of evolution of language research. In this paper we point to an important factor – signal reliability (honesty) as an elementary constraint on communication as an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) – wh...

  17. Is Teaching Sign Language in Early Childhood Classrooms Feasible for Busy Teachers and Beneficial for Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brereton, Amy Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Infants' hands are ready to construct words using sign language before their mouths are ready to speak. These research findings may explain the popularity of parents and caregivers teaching and using sign language with infants and toddlers, along with speech. The advantages of using sign language with young children go beyond the infant and…

  18. Living Linguistic Diversity in the Classroom: A Teacher Inductee Explores Dual Language Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Rahat; Pfitscher, Christina

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses strategies for promoting culturally responsive pedagogy through the implementation of a language awareness curriculum that includes a structured reading intervention program using dual language books. The research builds on the premise that resources such as dual language books can give teachers the opportunity to…

  19. The Development of Speaking and Writing Proficiencies in the Spanish Language Classroom: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    An important task for foreign language (FL) instructors and researchers is to understand how the development of each language skill affects other aspects of language acquisition. This case study seeks to determine if speaking and writing proficiencies develop at similar rates among FL learners. Seventeen students enrolled in beginning,…

  20. Encouraging Empirical Research: Findings from the Music Appreciation Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Scott Dirkse

    2011-01-01

    Empirical research can be a very useful tool for the music history pedagogue, as a collection of studies relating to the teaching of collegiate-level music appreciation classes has shown. Although the body of literature is small, the existing empirical research involving collegiate-level music appreciation classrooms provides important pedagogical findings. Studies have investigated how students’ backgrounds influence their music appreciation experience, the success of courses in increasing s...

  1. Research on College Teachers’ Politeness Strategies in EFL Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Peng; Lingling Cai; Xianjun Tan

    2012-01-01

    Politeness is a common phenomenon in any society. Thus conventions of politeness vary from culture to culture. How people value politeness or show politeness is influenced by many factors such as age, gender, knowledge level, or social status or power. In this research, we deal with politeness in China EFL classrooms. Based on Brown and Levinson’s Face Theory and applying a series of research methods like class observation, survey questionnaires and semi-structured interviews in a case ...

  2. Teacher Belief, Teacher Action: Connecting Research and the Classroom. Proceedings of the JALT International Conference on Language Teaching and Learning and Educational Materials Expo (25th, Maebashi City, Japan, October 1999).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David, Ed.; Robbins, Jill, Ed.; Long, Robert, Ed.

    Forty papers presented at the Japanese Association for Language Teaching (JALT) conference were selected for inclusion in this volume. JALT is a nonprofit professional organization of language teachers dedicated to the improvement of language learning and teaching in Japan. JALT's publications and events serve as vehicles for the exchange of new…

  3. Marrying Form and Function: A Place for Grammar and Total Target Language in the Secondary Modern Foreign Languages Classroom. Occasional Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Ivy

    This paper examines the possible role of grammar throughout Key Stages 3 and 4 in the modern language curriculum where communication is the central tenet. It also discusses how total or virtually total use of target language (German) in the classroom can help deal with the dichotomy of grammar versus communication and bring about an integrated…

  4. Evaluating the Psychometric Properties of the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale for Cypriot Senior High School EFL Students: The Rasch Measurement Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Panayiotis Panayides; Miranda Jane Walker

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS) for Cypriot senior high school EFL students, through Rasch measurement. In doing so, the researchers clarified two discrepancies found in the literature: first the factor structure of the scale and second whether test anxiety is a component of FLCA. The Greek version of the FLCAS was administered to a sample of 304 senior high school EFL students. Results showed that af...

  5. The application of language-game theory to the analysis of science learning: Developing an interpretive classroom-level learning framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadibasir, Mohammad

    In this study an interpretive learning framework that aims to measure learning on the classroom level is introduced. In order to develop and evaluate the value of the framework, a theoretical/empirical study is designed. The researcher attempted to illustrate how the proposed framework provides insights on the problem of classroom-level learning. The framework is developed by construction of connections between the current literature on science learning and Wittgenstein's language-game theory. In this framework learning is defined as change of classroom language-game or discourse. In the proposed framework, learning is measured by analysis of classroom discourse. The empirical explanation power of the framework is evaluated by applying the framework in the analysis of learning in a fifth-grade science classroom. The researcher attempted to analyze how students' colloquial discourse changed to a discourse that bears more resemblance to science discourse. The results of the empirical part of the investigation are presented in three parts: first, the gap between what students did and what they were supposed to do was reported. The gap showed that students during the classroom inquiry wanted to do simple comparisons by direct observation, while they were supposed to do tool-assisted observation and procedural manipulation for a complete comparison. Second, it was illustrated that the first attempt to connect the colloquial to science discourse was done by what was immediately intelligible for students and then the teacher negotiated with students in order to help them to connect the old to the new language-game more purposefully. The researcher suggested that these two events in the science classroom are critical in discourse change. Third, it was illustrated that through the academic year, the way that students did the act of comparison was improved and by the end of the year more accurate causal inferences were observable in classroom communication. At the end of the study, the researcher illustrates that the application of the proposed framework resulted in an improved version of the framework. The improved version of the proposed framework is more connected to the topic of science learning, and is able to measure the change of discourse in higher resolution.

  6. Researcher Identity, Narrative Inquiry, and Language Teaching Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Bonny; Early, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Whereas there has been much research on language and identity with respect to learners, teachers, and teacher educators, there has been little focus on the identity of the researcher, an important stakeholder in language education. Our research therefore addresses the following question: To what extent can narrative inquiry illuminate the ways in…

  7. An Experience of Social Rising of Logical Tools in a Primary School Classroom: The Role of Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Cristina; Mollo, Monica; Pacelli, Tiziana

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we explore the relationship between language and developmental processes of logical tools through the analysis at different levels of some "linguistic-manipulative" activities in a primary school classroom. We believe that this kind of activities can spur in the children a reflection and a change in their language representation.…

  8. California/Spain Visiting Teachers Program Participants' Opinions about the Use and Effects of Students' Primary Languages in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    This study examined opinions about some theoretical and practical tenets of bilingualism and bilingual education, as well as about the instructional use of English language learners' (ELLs) native languages in the classroom, of 77 teachers from Spain working in California as part of the California/Spain Visiting Teachers Program. In their…

  9. Microgenesis, "Method" and "Object": A Study of Collaborative Activity in a Spanish as a Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Adela Ganem

    2008-01-01

    This paper draws on the Vygotskian methodological construct of microgenesis to study collaborative activity in an intermediate Spanish as a foreign language classroom. In this study, the construct of "microgenesis" is drawn upon to refer to both, the methodological "tool" to investigate language learning instances as observed in short periods of…

  10. Doing Culture, Doing Race: Everyday Discourses of "Culture" and "Cultural Difference" in the English as a Second Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ena

    2015-01-01

    While current conceptualisations of the inextricable connection between language and culture in English language education are largely informed by complex sociocultural theories that view culture as constructed in and through social practices among people, classroom practices continue to be influenced by mainstream discourses of culture that…

  11. Teaching English as an Additional Language In The Global Classroom: A Transnational Study In The United States and United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail McEachron

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Global research has shown the persistence of inequality with regard to accessing curriculum with a view to obtaining suitable work and making useful contributions to society. The intersection of race, gender, language and low socio-economic levels creates situations which often marginalize ethnic minorities in school settings (Freire, 1968; Nieto & Turner, 2012. The graduation rates in the United States for Native American, African American and Hispanic students are lower than the graduation rates of Whites and Asian Americans. In addition, Bangladeshis and African Caribbeans currently living in the UK are under-represented in higher education, particularly young men in those communities. The research questions that guide this inquiry are: (1 According to databases, how does the academic performance of language minority groups compare to the academic performance of non-linguistic minority groups at the elementary and secondary levels of education? (2 According to language support teachers and university students, what are the strengths and weaknesses of the instructional practices for language minorities who are learning English in the United Kingdom (UK (Bristol and the United States (US (Henrico? Participants were: five UK teachers, four UK university students, five US teachers, four US university students. Data collection supervised by lead researchers included interviews, focus groups, classroom observation, and performance documents. Data analysis utilized a mixed-methods approach. Overall, linguistic minority groups performed lower than their English proficient peers. Culturally, UK teachers provided a greater emphasis on religious instruction, whereas US teachers addressed patriotic topics more frequently. Teachers in the United States and the United Kingdom were culturally supportive with slight variation in the encouraged use of the students’ heritage languages.

  12. Bringing Language to Life: Science Exploration and Inquiry in the Early Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seewald, Amanda

    2007-01-01

    Preschool and early elementary science provides engaging opportunities for integrated content-based language learning. This instruction uses the concepts of other content areas as a springboard for language acquisition and self-expression. It is through the active interpretation of content standards by foreign language teachers that the ideas and…

  13. The Impact of a Professional Development Program on English Language Teachers' Classroom Performance (El impacto de un programa de desarrollo profesional en el desempeño en clase de profesores de lengua inglesa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the findings of an action research study on a professional development program and its impact on the classroom performance of in-service English teachers who worked at a language institute of a Colombian state university. Questionnaires, semi-structured interviews, class observations, and a researcher's journal were used as…

  14. Educators Experiencing Research - Benefits for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, J.

    2003-12-01

    I have been involved with two Planetary Society geology expeditions looking for evidence of asteroid impacts. We worked in Belize and Italy with teams of international scientists from various scientific fields. Through the REVEL program, I spent two weeks onboard the RV Atlantis studying hydrothermal vents off the coast of Washington. I worked with an interdisciplinary team of scientists and graduate students and was involved in designing my own research project. As an educator I have designed activities for my students which were based on these research experiences. My students became aware of the type of science taking place in this "cutting-edge" research. I have learned to work in a team and have encouraged my students to work in that manner as well. The contacts that I have made have provided sources of information, borrowing equipment and other research opportunities. This research experience also supports my high school research science program.

  15. The Power of Story in the ESL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Bonnie J.; Rossiter, Marian J.; Abbott, Marilyn L.

    2011-01-01

    Although considerable research has examined the use of literature in the second language (L2) classroom, there has been less investigation into the integration of learners' personal stories in the English as a second language (ESL) classroom. Following Wajnryb's (2003) categorizations of story as language learning, genre, and the creation of what…

  16. Researching in Classrooms: Getting beyond "What Works"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley-Marling, Curt

    2011-01-01

    The dominant approach to research in learning disabilities utilizes experimental and quasi-experimental designs to identify the most effective instructional strategies for students with learning disabilities. Research is always undertaken from a point of view, yet the discourse on "what works?" is generally silent on how theoretical frameworks…

  17. Predicting Acceptance of Diversity in Pre-Kindergarten Classrooms. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kay; Downer, Jason T.

    2013-01-01

    Given the increasing ethnic and language diversity within the United States, this study examined practices that acknowledge and promote diversity in pre-Kindergarten classrooms. Findings indicate that acceptance of diversity is a component of positive environments for young children, particularly in classrooms with high poverty levels where there…

  18. Enhancing student schematic knowledge of culture through literature circles in a foreign language classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham-Marr Alastair

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving student understanding of a foreign language culture is anything but a peripheral issue in the teaching of a foreign language. This pilot study reports on a second year required English course in a university in Japan that took a Literature Circles approach, where students were asked to read short stories out of class and then discuss these stories in class. Although students reported that they did not gain any special insights into the target language culture presented, they did report that reading fiction as source material for classroom activity helps with the acquisition of a vocabulary set that is more closely associated with lifestyle and culture. The results suggest that further study is warranted. Procedures of this pilot study are described and interpreted in the context of the English education system in Japan.

  19. The Application of Task-based Language Teaching to English Reading Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zan Mao

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Task-based approach is a new approach in education practice. In task-based classroom, the chief focus is the performance of tasks. The task, rather than being a unit of grammar to be digested or a collection of lexical items to be remembered, is a means of learning the language by doing tasks. It requires exposure to comprehensive input and opportunities to interact in the language. The task has to be negotiated by the learners with the help of the teacher, whose job is to facilitate learning opportunities in class. The task probably needs the cooperation of learners. This paper is intended to explore TBLT in teaching reading on the basis of the notion of task-based language teaching (TBLT.

  20. Elementary English Language Instruction: Colombian Teachers’ Classroom Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Cadavid Múnera Isabel Cristina; McNulty María; Quinchía Ortiz Diana Isabel

    2004-01-01

    An in-progress ethnographic research project about teachers who are facing the complex task of teaching English to children in 7 public elementary schools in the metropolitan area of Medellin is presented in this article. First, the need for this research is outlined by researchers; second, the methodology of the project is described; third, up-to-date findings which include a profile of the 12 teachers who are participating in this study, and an analysis of their class methodology in te...

  1. Experiential Learning: Dissolving Classroom and Research Borders

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Rhonda; Hyle, Adrienne E.

    2012-01-01

    During a summer cruise to Mexico and Central America, students earned academic credit for doctoral-level coursework in qualitative research approaches and data collection and analysis. This study explored how participants, 16 doctoral students at a midwestern university, perceived experiential education and its effect upon their understanding of…

  2. La photographie, un outil pour communiquer en classe de langue Photography as a Tool to Communicate in the Language Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Muller

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cette contribution, qui relève de la didactique des langues, s’appuie sur l’analyse des interactions verbales et de la communication en classe de langue. Elle repose sur la capacité de l’image à susciter des productions verbales. La photographie d’auteur est ici considérée comme un déclencheur d’interactions orales permettant de communiquer. Nous avons mis en œuvre une tâche dans des cours de français langue étrangère en contexte pluriculturel à Paris avec des apprenants de niveaux A1 à B2. Le projet mené en groupe consiste à commenter des photographies d’auteur sans objectifs langagiers prédéterminés. L’analyse d’une séquence recueillie devant la photographie Rue Mouffetard d’H. Cartier-Bresson révèle l’importance de la communication entre les apprenants. La photographie suscite des enjeux communicatifs qui favorisent l’implication des étudiants. Ces derniers prennent position sur l’image et sont amenés à confronter leurs points de vue avec leurs pairs. Les apprenants peuvent également avoir recours à l’humour et modifier leur rôle conversationnel habituel.The article, in the field of foreign language classroom research, deals with verbal interaction analysis. It is based on the capacity of images to trigger verbal expression. Photography is here considered as a means to induce oral interaction, thus enabling students to communicate. We have implemented a task in a “French as a foreign languageclassroom in a multicultural context in Paris, learners’ levels ranging from A1 to B2. In this group project, students were invited to comment on artistic and documentary photographs. We had no predetermined language objectives. The analysis of interactions triggered by the photograph Rue Mouffetard by H. Cartier-Bresson highlights learners’ interactions. The photograph creates communicative needs and induces students to get involved in the activity. They express their views on the image and confront their opinions with their peers. They also use humour, thus modifying their usual interactional role.

  3. Language in the Classroom: Studies of the Pygmalion Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Frederick; Whitehead, Jack L.

    1971-01-01

    Research is reported on the degree to which the speaker characteristics of children can be related to the attitudes of teachers, in the absence, and in the presence of additional visual information about the speaker. (JM)

  4. Educating educators about second language idiomaticity through action research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John I. Liontas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Idiomaticity is central to linguistic theory. Despite the pervasiveness of idioms in language, pedagogical articles in professional journals have yet to pay attention to the benefits of idiom instruction in the second language (SL classroom. Addressing this concern, this article reports the results of an exploratory qualitative research study conducted with sixteen SL university instructors and two Language Program Directors (LPDs at two large universities in the Southwest (United States of America that explored teachers’ own knowledge and theories about SL idiomaticity. Survey and interview data indicate that university instructors and LPDs share beliefs and assumptions about how best to teach idioms and assess students’ knowledge of SL idiomaticity. It was concluded that both university instructors and LPDs have an important role to play in the development of idiom pedagogy and that such pedagogy can be greatly enhanced through action research. Recommendations are included for further study of the issues surrounding SL idiomaticity, and teaching implications are considered for the development of meaningful pedagogical practices suitable for the promotion of idiomatic learning.

  5. Reporting Qualitative Data Quantitatively: Code-Switching in Mathematics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, Kian-Sen; Heng, Buai-Chin

    2012-01-01

    This article is based on a research investigating the communication in primary mathematics classrooms. One of the research's objectives was to determine what languages were used in the primary mathematics classrooms, and to what extent, do teachers and students resort to code-switching in teaching and learning mathematics. A total of 16 classroom

  6. The Distribution of Instructional Time and Its Effect on Group Cohesion in the Foreign Language Classroom: A Comparison of Intensive and Standard Format Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinger, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    This paper argues for the influence of the distribution of instructional time on group cohesion in the foreign language classroom and postulates that concentrating classroom time enhances group cohesion. To test the hypothesis, a comparative classroom study of two groups of Spanish learners in their second year of learning, one following an…

  7. When Commas Meet Kryptonite: Classroom Lessons from the Comic Book Project. Language and Literacy Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This definitive book presents the newest research linking graphic narratives and literacy learning, as well as the tools teachers will need to make comic book projects a success in their classrooms. The Comic Book Project (www.comicbookproject.org) is an internationally celebrated initiative where children plan, write, design, and publish original…

  8. Korean as a Heritage Language in the U.S. University Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Sook Kang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the less-commonly-taught foreign languages in U.S. universities, Korean-language classes are often taken by students of Korean descent. Many Korean Americans with long-term exposure to the target language in a combination of naturalistic and instructional settings have developed proficiency in their heritage language through parental and community support, such as Saturday schools (Lee, 2002. However, upon closer examination, the bilingualism that many Korean-American learners achieve is unbalanced. These heritage learners often lack grammatical accuracy and precision despite high fluency, as the moniker "kitchen Korean" implies. As a way to facilitate the accuracy aspect of the heritage learners' language, this article suggests the benefits of corrective feedback, explicit and implicit, in the forms of metalinguistic comments, provision of an alternative correct form contingent on the learner's ill-formed utterance, and partial or full repetitions or reformulations of the learner's output when interacting with them in the classroom and beyond.

  9. WHY CORRUPTION MAY HAPPEN?: A CLASSROOM ACTION RESEARCH

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Maharani

    2014-01-01

    The Anti Corruption course is one of several ways of anti-corruption’s campaign in Indonesia’s higher education system. In terms of education, the Anti Corruption’s curriculum were prepared and developed by Indonesia’s ministry of education, but in practice it is possible for lecturers to creatively modify the way of delivering subjects to students. The purpose of this study is to explore student perspectives on what causes corruption. The researches itself is a classroom action research, and...

  10. The use of weblog in language learning: motivation of second language learners in reading classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Nasaruddin Sulaiman; Asiah Kassim

    2010-01-01

    The age of technology has enabled learners to interact with other users outside the four wallsof the classroom. Weblogs, in particular, provide a channel for asynchronous computermediatedcommunication to take place in the learning process. Motivation is one of thelearning aspects that is greatly enhanced by the use of technology. Questionnaires andobservations were carried out to 108 undergraduate engineering students taking ReadingCourse to determine the level of the learners’ motivation to ...

  11. The Articulation of Formative Research and Classrooms Projects in the Language and Culture Class in an Undergraduate English Teaching Program (Articulación de Prácticas de Investigación Formativa con los Proyectos de Aula de las Clases de Lengua y Cultura Anglófona en un Programa de Licenciatura en Lengua Extranjera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroquín, Paula Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    This article shows the results of a research project which searched to answer how to articulate formative research with classroom projects in an undergraduate English teaching program. To accomplish the purpose of this paper, the document will focus on the two specific objectives of this qualitative research: document revision, and knowing about…

  12. Reenvisioning Language Anxiety in the Globalized Classroom through a Social Imaginary Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Costa, Peter I.

    2015-01-01

    The last three decades have witnessed a notable growth in research on affect. Among the various affective variables, foreign language anxiety has been heavily studied. This interest in foreign language anxiety is consistent with increased attention to emotions in the neurosciences, cognitive psychology, and the social sciences. Instead of…

  13. MALL Technology: Use of Academic Podcasting in the Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdous, M'hammed; Camarena, Margaret M.; Facer, Betty Rose

    2009-01-01

    Integrating Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL) technology (personal multimedia players, cell phones, and handheld devices) into the foreign language curriculum is becoming commonplace in many secondary and higher education institutions. Current research has identified both pedagogically sound applications and important benefits to students.…

  14. Who's Holding El Marcador? Peer Linguistic Mediation Gone Awry in a Dual Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Within dual language education programs, well-structured peer interactions can facilitate the learning of language and curricular content simultaneously. Research has found that even very young bilingual students can engage in peer linguistic mediation to help less proficient classmates participate in small group work. In this article, I analyze…

  15. O desenvolvimento de uma metaconsciência, no professor, acerca da importância de vivenciar a linguagem como prática social na sala de aula de língua inglesa por meio da pesquisa colaborativa / The development of a teacher's meta-awareness on the importance of experiencing language as social practice in an EFL classroom through collaborative research

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Luciane Kirchhof, Ticks.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, discutimos o processo reflexivo vivenciado por duas professoras de inglês ao problematizarem suas ações em sala de aula. Destacamos particularmente o processo de reconfiguração de suas atividades pedagógicas que inicialmente focalizam estruturas lexicogramaticais isoladas e, no decorre [...] r do processo reflexivo, são reconfiguradas em direção ao uso de gêneros textuais e à (des)construção dos contextos de situação e cultura nos quais esses textos são socialmente produzidos e vivenciados (MOTTA-ROTH, 2006). Essas reflexões foram desenvolvidas por meio de um processo de pesquisa colaborativo (MAGALHÃES, 2004). A análise do discurso dessas professoras indica que o processo reflexivo lhes permitiu desenvolver uma metaconsciência acerca de como a linguagem se organiza e se constitui ao mediar a atividade social. Abstract in english In this paper is discussed the thoughtful process experienced by two English teachers, as they problematize their procedures in the classroom. In the foreground is the process of reconfiguration of their pedagogical activities, which initially would focus on the isolated lexical-grammatical structur [...] es and which, along the reflective process, were reconfigured to focus more on textual genres and on the (de)construction of the situational and cultural contexts in which such texts are socially produced and experienced (MOTTA-ROTH, 2006). Such thoughts were developed by means of a collaborative research process (MAGALHÃES, 2004). The discourse analysis of those teachers indicate that the reflective process allowed them to develop a metaawareness about how language organizes itself and constitutes itself when it mediates the social activity.

  16. The Pedagogical Mediation of a Developmental Learner Corpus for Classroom-Based Language Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A. Belz

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Although corpora have been used in language teaching for some time, few empirical studies explore their impact on learning outcomes. We provide a microgenetic account of learners’ responses to corpus-driven instructional units for German modal particles and pronominal da-compounds. The units are based on developmental corpus data produced by native speakers during interactions with the very learners for whom the units are designed. Thus, we address the issue of authentication in corpus-driven language pedagogy. Finally, we illustrate how an ethnographically supplemented developmental learner corpus may contribute to second language acquisition research via dense documentation of micro-changes in learners’ language use over time.

  17. English as a scientific and research language debates and discourses

    CERN Document Server

    Plo Alastrué, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    This volume examines the role of English in academic and research settings in Europe and provides recommendations on the challenges posed by the dominance of English over national languages as languages of science and research dissemination; the need for language support for academics that need to disseminate their research in English; and the effect of past and present language policies.

  18. THE ROLE OF OUTPUT AND FEEDBACK IN SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION: A CLASSROOM-BASED STUDY OF GRAMMAR ACQUISITION BY ADULT ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Donesch-Jezo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Second language acquisition (SLA has been a concern of many teachers and researchers since the early 1960s.One of the issues related to SLA has been finding the techniques which effectively focus the learners’ attention on the target form.A number of theories and methods have been advocated for this purpose, ranging from implicit options to more explicit ones. Although each of the suggested methods has its own advantages,they have, so far, proved insufficient to get learners to be able to notice the gap between their own interlanguage forms and the target language forms. Swain (1995, 1998 has argued that apart from providing the learners with comprehensible input, comprehensible output also plays a beneficial role in L2 acquisition. By encouraging the learners to speak or write in the L2 and providing them with the opportunities to do so, the learners can notice that they are not able to say what they want to say in the target language. On the basis of Swain’s output hypothesis, we assumed that encouraging adult learners (university students to produce target-like output would promote their achievement of the grammatical competence necessary for producing academic tests. The purpose of this article is to present the evidence from a classroom-based, small-scale study of the effect of output on learner acquisition of L2 modal verbs, adjectives and adverbs conveying the meanings of uncertainty, all of which are parts of speech that are important metadiscourse items. The results of the present study suggest that an approach in which students are encouraged to produce comprehensible output, combined with their being provided with learning reinforcement ensured by appropriate feedback, can be an effective source of establishing long-lasting grammatical accuracy in the students’ target language.

  19. A Research on Second Language Acquisition and College English Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Changyu Li

    2009-01-01

    It was in 1970s that American linguist S.D. Krashen created the theory of “language acquisition”. And the theories on second language acquisition were proposed based on the study on the second language acquisition process and its rules. Here, the second language acquisition process refers to the process in which a learner with the mastery of his mother language learns another language without its social environment. Due to the close relationship between second language acquisition research an...

  20. Changes in science classrooms resulting from collaborative action research initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Phil Seok

    Collaborative action research was undertaken over two years between a Korean science teacher and science education researchers at the University of Iowa. For the purpose of realizing science learning as envisioned by constructivist principles, Group-Investigations were implemented three or five times per project year. In addition, the second year project enacted Peer Assessments among students. Student perceptions of their science classrooms, as measured by the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES), provided evidence that the collaborative action research was successful in creating constructivist learning environments. Student attitudes toward science lessons, as examined by the Enjoyment of Science Lessons Scale (ESLS), indicated that the action research also contributed to developing more positive attitudes of students about science learning. Discourse analysis was conducted on video-recordings of in-class presentations and discussions. The results indicated that students in science classrooms which were moving toward constructivist learning environments engaged in such discursive practices as: (1) Communicating their inquiries to others, (2) Seeking and providing information through dialogues, and (3) Negotiating conflicts in their knowledge and beliefs. Based on these practices, science learning was viewed as the process of constructing knowledge and understanding of science as well as the process of engaging in scientific inquiry and discourse. The teacher's discursive practices included: (1) Wrapping up student presentations, (2) Addressing misconceptions, (3) Answering student queries, (4) Coaching, (5) Assessing and advising, (6) Guiding students discursively into new knowledge, and (7) Scaffolding. Science teaching was defined as situated acts of the teacher to facilitate the learning process. In particular, when the classrooms became more constructivist, the teacher intervened more frequently and carefully in student activities to fulfill a variety of pedagogical functions. Students perceived Group-Investigations and Peer Assessments as positive in that they contributed to realizing constructivist features in their classrooms. The students also reported that they gained several learning outcomes through Group-Investigations, including more positive attitudes, new knowledge, greater learning capabilities, and improved self-esteem. However, the Group-Investigation and Peer Assessment methods were perceived as negative and problematic by those who had rarely been exposed to such inquiry-based, student-centered approaches.

  1. Reading anxiety, classroom anxiety, language motivation, reader self-perception, and arabic achievement of Arab-American students learning arabic as a second language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Haitham M

    2014-12-01

    The present study assessed the relations between reading anxiety, classroom anxiety, language motivation, and readers' self-perception for a sample of Arab-American students in Arabic classes. The effects of sex, grade, and years studying Arabic on academic achievement were examined as well. Measures were administered to 118 middle school students (56 boys, 62 girls; M age = 13.0 yr., SD = 0.8), and teachers reported academic grades in Arabic. Reading anxiety was significantly correlated with classroom anxiety and reader self-perception. Classroom anxiety scores were significantly correlated with motivation and reader self-perception. Significant positive correlations were found between language motivation and reader self-perception scores, and between years studying Arabic and reader self-perception scores. Boys in the second year of Arabic had significantly lower classroom anxiety than girls, and students in Grade 7 had higher reader self-perception than those in Grade 8. Classroom anxiety, language motivation, and reader self-perception significantly predicted Arabic achievement. Pedagogical implications are discussed. PMID:25457094

  2. Research on College Teachers’ Politeness Strategies in EFL Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Peng

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Politeness is a common phenomenon in any society. Thus conventions of politeness vary from culture to culture. How people value politeness or show politeness is influenced by many factors such as age, gender, knowledge level, or social status or power. In this research, we deal with politeness in China EFL classrooms. Based on Brown and Levinson’s Face Theory and applying a series of research methods like class observation, survey questionnaires and semi-structured interviews in a case study, the researcher tries to find out: how students’ gender and level of English proficiency influence their understanding of teachers’ politeness strategies, what attitudes they have towards the application of teachers’ PS, and how students value politeness strategies in EFL classrooms. In conclusion, on one hand, teachers should increase their own politeness awareness as well as students’; on the other hand, it is very important to improve students’ English proficiency, which can help them understand situational contexts in English and interpret teachers’ well meaning in the term of politeness.

  3. An exploratory case study: The impact of constructivist-based teaching on English language learners understanding of science in a middle school classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seimears, C. Matt

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this exploratory case study was to explore the middle school science classroom of a constructivist teacher and examine how constructivist-based teaching influences ELL students and their learning of science. The researcher's purpose was to discover patterns which emerged after close observations, careful documentation, and thoughtful analysis of the research topic. What was discovered by this exploratory case study was not sweeping generalizations but contextual findings. This case study was conducted in the spring of 2006. The researcher sought to answer the question, "How does constructivist teaching help middle school English Language Learners understand science?" Two variable clusters were examined: (1) the independent variable cluster of the constructivist teaching practices of the one selected teacher; and (2) the dependent variable cluster of the middle school English Language Learners understanding of the science concepts being taught. Four broad categories of data were collected: (1) observations of teaching and learning (including teaching plans and other teaching materials); (2) interviews related to teaching and learning; (3) inventories of teaching and learning; and (4) artifacts of learning. Steve Loos, an eighth grade middle school science teacher, is an expert constructivist-based teacher. His teaching influences English Language Learners understanding of the science concepts being taught. Steve's teaching influenced the English Language Learners through a variety of pedagogical strategies. The researcher concluded in this study that, "Constructivist teaching helps middle school English Language Learners understand science."

  4. Syntax mentioned seven times in the CEFR – and how many times at school, in foreign language classrooms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darja Mertelj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the teaching of foreign languages, complex-clause syntax does not seem to have had an established role over the last 20 years, especially within the communicative approach and, of course, the CEFR. It was previously part of methods which stressed formal approaches to foreign languages and their being taught, but not of natural, acquisition-based methods. With the communicative approach, two important premises were introduced: authentic texts and grammar as a tool when necessary. This is one probable reason why explicit, complex-clause syntax is hardly mentioned in the CEFR, even though it is implicitly present in descriptors, even though it is particularly recognisable in those for writing skills, and even though we know that it can be used for all four skills, as well as to guide learners towards some self-directed learning about language features.To date, in the era of the communicative approach, not much is known about the role of complex-clause syntax in foreign/second language classrooms, in particular from the learners’ viewpoint. In order to bridge this research gap, the paper analyses a questionnaire among learners in secondary schools that looked at their perspectives regarding the (possible role of syntax. The examined aspects consider its role for the four skills, and the benefits of knowing syntax; implicitly, the paper touches on some affective factors and related methodological approaches, along with problems concerning the teaching of syntax. The findings are based on quantitative data; an evaluation of the need for complex-clause syntax is included, and some pedagogical implications are presented.

  5. Implications for Language Diversity in Instruction in the Context of Target Language Classrooms: Development of a Preliminary Model of the Effectiveness of Teacher Code-Switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jang Ho

    2012-01-01

    This paper concerns the conceptual and pedagogical issues that revolve around target language (TL) only instruction and teacher code-switching in the context of TL classrooms. To this end, I first examine four intertwined ideas (that is, monolingualism, naturalism, native-speakerism, and absolutism) that run through the monolingual approach to TL…

  6. Language in Science Classrooms: An Analysis of Physics Teachers' Use of and Beliefs about Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyoo, Samuel Ouma

    2012-01-01

    The world over, secondary school science is viewed mainly as a practical subject. This may be one reason why effectiveness of teaching approaches in science education has often been judged on the kinds of practical activity with which teachers and students engage. In addition to practical work, language--often written (as in science texts) or oral…

  7. A framework to build readers and writers in the second language classroom

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Gilma, Zúñiga Camacho.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo propone un marco de referencia para crear lectoescritores en el aula donde se enseña una segunda lengua. Los componentes son el currículo, la enseñanza y la evaluación. El currículo establece los objetivos, y la filosofía del programa de lectura y también pretende el desarrollo de un l [...] ector crítico, que encuentra en la lectura en segunda lengua una fuente de información y entretenimiento. El currículo también tiene en cuenta el efecto de la lectura en primera lengua sobre la segunda, y el uso de materiales adecuados para el logro de los objetivos. La enseñanza está enmarcada en principios tales como la lectura y la escritura se enseñan simultáneamente, y la tecnología influye en el desarrollo de la lectoescritura. La evaluación de la lectura es el siguiente componente, y propone el uso de instrumentos auténticos tales como el portafolio y la observación. Se menciona, además, el uso de instrumentos tradicionales tales como los exámenes. Abstract in english This article proposes a framework to create readers and writers in the second language classroom. The components of the framework are curriculum, instruction and assessment. The curriculum states the goals and philosophy of the program that intends to create lifelong readers that find reading as a s [...] ource of entertainment and information. It will also include the kind of literacy that the curriculum wants to support, the effect of reading in the first language, and the use of appropriate materials to achieve the goals. Instruction is framed under principles like reading is thinking and learning, reading and writing are taught together, and technology influences reading and writing development. Assessing reading in the second language classroom is the next component of the framework discussed in the article and it proposes the use of authentic tools like portfolios and observations. Traditional tools like tests are also mentioned.

  8. The use of weblog in language learning: motivation of second language learners in reading classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Nasaruddin Sulaiman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The age of technology has enabled learners to interact with other users outside the four wallsof the classroom. Weblogs, in particular, provide a channel for asynchronous computermediatedcommunication to take place in the learning process. Motivation is one of thelearning aspects that is greatly enhanced by the use of technology. Questionnaires andobservations were carried out to 108 undergraduate engineering students taking ReadingCourse to determine the level of the learners’ motivation to participate in online discussionsand to find out whether interactions through the blog have in any way influenced the level ofmotivation to participate in face-to-face discussions. Findings indicate that students werehighly motivated to participate in discussions through the use of blog, and to use it as alearning tool. However, motivation to participate in class discussions was not affected by thetendency of learners to participate in discussion via the weblog.

  9. Getting real in the language classroom: developing Japanese students' communicative competence with authentic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Gilmore, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The research described in this thesis reports on a 10-month quantitative/qualitative classroom-based study, carried out at a Japanese university, investigating the potential of authentic materials to develop learners’ communicative competence. It was hypothesised that the ‘richer’ input provided by authentic materials, combined with appropriate awareness-raising activities, would be better able to develop a range of communicative competencies in learners (linguistic, pragmalinguistic, sociopr...

  10. Teachers’ motivation, classroom strategy use, students’ motivation and second language achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Bernaus, Mercè; Wilson, Annie; Gardner, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate student motivation and achievement in English and their relation to teacher motivation and strategy use in the classroom. Research participants were 31 teachers in Catalonia (Spain) and the 694 students in their classes. The unit of analysis was the English class. The results of our study suggest that teacher motivation is related to teacher use of motivating strategies, which in turn are related to student motivation and English ...

  11. Validation of A Learning Environment Instrument in Tertiary Foreign Language Classrooms in China

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Li

    2014-01-01

    This study validated the College and University Classroom Environment Inventory (CUCEI) in the context of Chinese tertiary education, which has not been investigated before. The research sample included 4617 first-year undergraduate students (116 classes) in two Chinese universities. Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) were conducted. Data analysis shows that the CUCEI has robust validity and reliability after six items being deleted. The final solution of...

  12. The Effectiveness of a Model of Language-Focused Classroom Instruction on the Vocabulary and Narrative Development of Kindergarten Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Diane Corcoran; Friesen, Lisa Dinner; Fink, Judy

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a model of language-focused instruction, delivered by the classroom teacher, on the vocabulary and narrative development of kindergarten children living in high-poverty conditions. There were 22 participants, the majority significantly behind their peers on standardized measures of vocabulary and narrative…

  13. The Podcasting Playbook: A Typology of Evidence-Based Podagogy for PreK-12 Classrooms with English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Sandra; Garza, Tiberio

    2011-01-01

    Podagogy, a fusion of podcasting and pedagogy, is evidence-based educational podcasting for teaching and learning. The purpose of our article was to compile a playbook of evidence-based strategies, the plays, for integrating podcasting into PreK-12 classrooms with English language learners (ELLs). Data for developing the playbook were drawn from…

  14. Newcomers Navigating Language Choice and Seeking Voice: Peer Talk in a Multilingual Primary School Classroom in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokkonen, Alicia Copp

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates how two young newcomers navigate an institutional policy of "English only" in a Finnish primary school and how this policy impacts opportunities for voice. From a discourse analytic and sociolinguistic perspective, the analysis takes an ethnographic path to a focal event of language conflict in the classroom. The analysis…

  15. READING BASED-CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES: AN EFFORT TOWARD THE INTEGRATION OF LANGUAGE SKILLS IN TEACHING ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Hadi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This paper proposes the implementation of reading-based classroom activities for teaching English as a foreign language in Indonesia. Compared to other language skills, reading is viewed to provide a relatively stable foundation for Indonesian students to develop their communicative competence in English. It is argued that reading-focused activities stimulate confidence for Indonesian learners to get involved in listening, speaking, and writing related-activities in ways that are similar to normal daily life communication. The reasons for the proposed implementation of reading-based classroom activities in TEFLIN and the role of reading and its relation with other language skills are presented.

  16. Moving Research into the Classroom with the Electron Microscopy Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyles, Paul

    2008-03-01

    Due to the strongly interdisciplinary nature of research in nanotechnology and materials, a course on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) must often serve student from a very broad range academic disciplines, level of background, and research interests. Someone in the class will want to learn about all the possible capabilities of the TEM, which span diffraction, spectroscopy, and imaging. Research students learn best from real-world examples, which are usually drawn from the research of the instructor, but very few instructors have the breadth of research and instrumentation needed to obtain high-quality examples of all the possible combinations of techniques and materials. I have therefore developed the Electron Microscopy Database (EMdb, http://tem.msae.wisc.edu/emdb/) as part of the education plan of my NSF CAREER project. The goal of the EMdb it to enable TEM teachers to easily exchange high-quality TEM example data and associated homework problems. This serves the NSF education goals of promoting excellence in research training and of bringing cutting-edge research into the classroom, and has significantly improved my own teaching.

  17. New notions in a classic classroom : Applying late modern sociolinguistics and socially informed SLA to foreign language learner data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritzau, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    The dissertation investigates learner beliefs, language ideologies, self-positioning, and language use among a group of Swiss university students of Danish as a foreign language. The theoretical framework of the study draws on socially informed second language acquisition (SLA) research and on late modern sociolinguistics. The main research questions are: What do Swiss university students of Danish as a foreign language believe about language and language learning, why do they hold these beliefs, and how do the beliefs relate to language ideologies? How do the participants present themselves in terms of beliefs, ideologies, and selfpositioning? In what ways do the participants use linguistic features generally thought to belong to different languages, to what degree can their language use be compared with polylingual behaviour, and how does their language use relate to the beliefs and ideologies expressed by the participants?

  18. The Application of Virtual Simulations using Second Life in a Foreign Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Tecnam Yoon

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of virtual simulation-based language learning in a foreign language class in Korea. Total 35 1st-year university students in Korea participated in this research to figure out the effect of simulations. A virtual English learning community, ‘Cypris Chat’ in Second Life was selected as a learning tool. For the data collection, a survey questionnaire was distributed and analysed quantitatively. The result shows that the majority of the ...

  19. Using Biological-Control Research in the Classroom to Promote Scientific Inquiry & Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Matthew L.; Richardson, Scott L.; Hall, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Scientists researching biological control should engage in education because translating research programs into classroom activities is a pathway to increase scientific literacy among students. Classroom activities focused on biological control target all levels of biological organization and can be cross-disciplinary by drawing from subject areas…

  20. Reading Dual Language Books: Improving Early Literacy Skills in Linguistically Diverse Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Rahat; Thorne, Keoma J; Pfitscher, Christina M; Nordstokke, David W; McKeough, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Research has determined that dual language books have a positive effect on literacy achievement, motivation, and family involvement in children’s schooling. In this study we used quantitative methods to complement the largely qualitative extant research. We analyzed the early literacy skills of 105 kindergarten children (45 comparison, 60…

  1. Research on teaching of "Solar Eclipse" in primary classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winnie Wing Mui SO

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been realized that children have their own understanding of how the world works preceding formal education in schools. It is also found in research that the social-cultural views about specific scientific concepts have generated certain alternative concepts in pupils. A great number of western studies have been done to find out students' science understanding; less has been done to understand local children's understanding of science. This research attempts to explore children's understanding of a natural phenomenon "Solar Eclipse". The research also looks into the effectiveness of employing constructivist view in designing teaching and the feasibility of research on teaching in primary classrooms. All primary six pupils of a local school and their General Studies teachers were involved in the study. Research methods include interviews, questionnaires and analysis of lesson. The results showed that children's understanding are enhanced, at the same time, children chose their favorite effective teaching activities. Also, there were changes in teachers' conceptual understandings and use of teaching methods. There was evidence that research on teaching can enhance teachers' professional development.

  2. Building Teachers’ Understanding of Classroom Action Research: A Rural Case Study in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dodi Sukmayadi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia Open University (UT: Universitas Terbuka is a large, open university delivering distance education to students throughout Indonesia. An important aspect of its mission is to provide opportunities for Indonesian teachers to improve their education in-service. This includes two courses on classroom action research. In order to assess the effectiveness of these courses and, if necessary, improve them, a team of lecturers from UT conducted an investigation of the challenges teachers were facing in learning to conduct classroom action research through the UT modules. The team found that the modules did not adequately reflect an understanding of the actual characteristics of the teachers they were serving and were thus less effective than they might be in teaching teachers to conduct classroom action research. Changes in both the content and scheduling of the modules are recommended in order to more effectively promote classroom action research in Indonesian schools. Key Words: Classroom Action Research, Distance Education, Indonesia, Teacher Development

  3. Co-Constructing Representations of Culture in ESL and EFL Classrooms: Discursive Faultlines in Chile and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard-Warwick, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Based on qualitative research conducted in 3 university English as a foreign language classrooms in Chile and 3 community college English as a second language classrooms in California, this article examines the approaches used in teaching culture in these classrooms, the differences in how particular cultures (usually national cultures) were…

  4. The Distance Learning of Foreign Languages: A Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Research into the distance learning of languages is now established as a significant avenue of enquiry in language teaching, with evident research trajectories in several domains. This article selects and analyses significant areas of investigation in distance language learning and teaching to identify new and emerging gaps, along with research

  5. Corpus in Foreign Language Teaching and Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-ping ZHOU

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Corpus-based language research has been long prospered since the middle of last century. Corpus is therefore frequently used in foreign language (mostly English teaching and research due to the fundamental principles of modern Corpus Linguistics along with the colorful resources of word-banks and the corresponding tools, especially in western countries. In China, the related literature found its way from introducing the foreign researches to our own practice into this field. As a conclusion, corpus and Corpus Linguistics can be closely connected with and widely applied in foreign language teaching and research with a predictable bright future.
    Keywords: corpus, Corpus Linguistics, foreign language teaching and research
    Résumé Le moyen de recherches sur le corpus a connu un développement rapide depuis le milieu du siècle précédent et a atteint la maturité aujourd’hui. En raison de l’importance de la linguistique de corpus et de la méthode de recherches sur le corppus, et étant donné ses ressources riches ainsi que les facilités apportées par les outils de recherche, le corpus est appliquée amplement dans les recherches linguistiques notamment dans celles de l’anglais. A l’étranger, l’étude de la linguistique de corpus a débuté tôt et a donné beaucoup de fruits ; le travail du milieu des langues étrangères chinois dans ce domaine a commencé par la présentation du corpus étranger et sa situation d’étude, et puis procède à des applications pratiques. En somme, il existe des relations étroites et diverses entre le corpus et les recherches de l’enseignement-apprentissage des langues étrangères, et les recherches de l’enseignement-apprentissage des langues étrangères basant sur le corpus présente une bonne perspective.
    Mots-clés: corpus, linguistique de corpus, recherches de l’enseignement-apprentissage des langues étrangères
    ? ? ??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????
    ?????????????????????

  6. Query Language for Research in Phonetics

    OpenAIRE

    Heid, Ulrich; Mengel, Andreas

    1999-01-01

    With the growing availability of spoken language corpora more and more data driven research in phonetics is possible. The downside of having huge speech corpora is that they have to be segmented and labeled, before they can be exploited. As labeling and annotation are time-consuming and costly, there is an interest in standardization which would support the exchange and reuse of labeled data. The MATE project proposes standards for an integrated and consistent multi-level...

  7. Examining the literacy component of science literacy: 25 years of language arts and science research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yore, Larry D.; Bisanz, Gay L.; Hand, Brian M.

    2003-06-01

    This review, written to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the International Journal of Science Education, revealed a period of changes in the theoretical views of the language arts, the perceived roles of language in science education, and the research approaches used to investigate oral and written language in science, science teaching, and learning. The early years were dominated by behavioralist and logico-mathematical interpretations of human learning and by reductionist research approaches, while the later years reflected an applied cognitive science and constructivist interpretations of learning and a wider array of research approaches that recognizes the holistic nature of teaching and learning. The early years focus on coding oral language into categories reflecting source of speech, functional purpose, level of question and response, reading research focused on the readability of textbooks using formulae and the reader's decoding skills, and writing research was not well documented since the advocates for writing in service of learning were grass roots practitioners and many science teachers were using writing as an evaluation technique. The advent of applied cognitive science and the constructivist perspectives ushered in interactive-constructive models of discourse, reading and writing that more clearly revealed the role of language in science and in science teaching and learning. A review of recent research revealed that the quantity and quality of oral interactions were low and unfocused in science classrooms; reading has expanded to consider comprehension strategies, metacognition, sources other than textbooks, and the design of inquiry environments for classrooms; and writing-to-learn science has focused on sequential writing tasks requiring transformation of ideas to enhance science learning. Several promising trends and future research directions flow from the synthesis of this 25-year period of examining the literacy component of science literacy - among them are critical listening and reading of various sources, multi-media presentations and representations, effective debate and argument, quality explanation and the role of information and communication technologies/environments.

  8. Classroom Management: A Persistent Challenge for Pre-Service Foreign Language Teachers (Manejo del salón de clase: un reto persistente para docentes practicantes de lenguas extranjeras)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, Diego Fernando; Sánchez, Jesús Ariel

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative descriptive study aimed to ascertain the extent to which classroom management constituted a problem among pre-service foreign language teachers in a teacher education program at a public university in Colombia. The study also sought to identify classroom management challenges, the approaches to confronting them, and the…

  9. What Will Classroom Teachers Do With Shared Research Results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, M. J.; Weissel, J. K.; Cormier, M.; Newman, K. R.

    2005-12-01

    Scientists are passionate about the research problems they investigate, and wish to share their discoveries as widely as possible. Similarly, classroom teachers who are passionate about their subject can better foster student learning. One way to enhance such passions involves bringing teachers and scientists together to discuss cutting-edge discoveries and develop curricular materials based on the respective strengths of educators and investigators. Our presentation describes one example of this approach based on research about gas blowout structures offshore Virginia and North Carolina. Methane venting processes along continental margins may have important climatic, geotechnical, hazard, and resource implications. In 2000, shipboard surveys documented that large structures offshore VA-NC resulted from massive gas expulsion. Gas appears to be trapped in shelf edge deltas and stresses resulting from downslope creep is favoring its release. Scientists undertook a new expedition in 2004 to determine if there is present-day discharge of methane-rich fluids through the floors or walls of the blowouts or whether these seepage sites are relict features, and to gain insight into the origin of the vented methane. In July 2005, 12 teachers from New York and New Jersey met with the co-PIs (Weissel and Cormier), graduate student (Newman), and educational specialist (Passow) over a 2-day workshop to learn about how scientific problems are identified, how a research cruise is organized, what was learned through the measurements and analysis, and what might be possible significant impacts from such understandings. Based on what they learned, participants began development of classroom activities, Internet-based investigations, and constructed-response assessment items utilizing data and concepts from the project and other sources. The resulting curriculum units are designed for use in middle and high school chemistry, physics, earth science, and technology courses. Curricular units include "Using Real-Life Problems to Learn Scientific Principles," "Mapping the Unseen Floors," "Landslide or Not," and a board game based on conducting a scientific research cruise. Materials are available through www.earth2class.org. Over the following academic year, participants will continue to develop instructional materials, field-test them, and provide peer training through in-district and regional professional development opportunities. The scientists and educational specialist will provide support to ensure scientific accuracy and pedagogical soundness. The project will utilize DLESE as an additional effective dissemination and evaluation mechanism. In these ways, the scientists and core of educators may be able to share these discoveries with hundreds of teachers and thousands of students.

  10. Exploring South African Grade 11 Learners' Perceptions of Classroom Inquiry: Validation of a Research Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudu, Washington T.; Vhurumuku, Elaosi

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the adoption and validation of a research instrument, on determining learners' levels of perception of classroom inquiry based on data collected from South African Grade 11 learners. The Learners' Perception of Classroom Inquiry (LPCI) instrument consists only of Likert-type items which rank activities according to how often…

  11. The Applied Research of Code-Switching in Building Ecological English Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang SHI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Studying the educational problems from the perspective of ecology, educational ecology has important implications in second language acquisition. Advocating people first and dynamic balance, ecological English classroom is one of the new progresses in the application of educational ecology to teach practice. There are many ways to build ecological English classroom. Based on such educational ecology theories as the law of tolerance and the optimum principle, the flowerpot effect and the law of educational ecology niche, this paper explores the application of code-switching in building ecological English classroom and arrives at the conclusion that code-switching has the following functions as the function to adapt to linguistic reality, the function to strengthen the language teaching effects, the function of affinity, the regulatory function, the function of implication and the support function.

  12. How Latino/a bilingual students use their language in a fifth grade classroom and in the science laboratory during science instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Alma R.

    This qualitative research study examines how Latino/a bilingual students use their linguistic resources in their homeroom classroom and in the science laboratory during science instruction. This study was conducted in a school district located in the southwestern part of the United States. The school was chosen based on the criterion that the school is located in an area considered economically depressed, with a predominantly Latino student, school, and neighborhood population. The object of study was a fifth grade bilingual (Spanish/English) classroom where English was the means of instruction. Classroom interaction was examined from a sociolinguistics perspective. The study was descriptive in nature with the objective of analyzing the students' use of their linguistic resources while participating in science learning. The results of this study suggest that the students used their linguistic resources purposefully in order to facilitate their participation in science leaning. In the same manner, it was observed the students' reliance on Spanish as a foundation to enhance their comprehension of the scientific concepts and the dynamics involved in the science lessons, with the purpose of making sense, and thus, to express their understanding (orally and in writing) using their linguistic resources, especially their English language, as it was expected from them. Further, the findings disclose the students' awareness of their own bilingualism, preference for speaking Spanish, and their conceptualization of English as the language to achieve academic success. It has also been observed how the pressure put upon the teacher and the students by the accountability system brings about an implicit bias against Spanish, causing the teacher to assume a paradoxical stance regarding the students' use of Spanish, and thereby, placing the students in an ambivalent position, that might affect, to a certain extent, how students use their Spanish language as a resource to participate in science learning.

  13. Extending the Flipped Classroom Model: Developing Second Language Writing Skills through Student-Created Digital Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engin, Marion

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a project that aimed to leverage the students' interest and experience of technology and multimodal environments to develop their academic writing skills and second language learning. Students were expected to follow a model, research a topic, and craft a digital video tutorial on an aspect of academic writing which would…

  14. "Deja Vu"? A Decade of Research on Language Laboratories, Television and Video in Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderplank, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The developments in the last ten years in the form of DVD, streaming video, video on demand, interactive television and digital language laboratories call for an assessment of the research into language teaching and learning making use of these technologies and the learning paradigms underpinning them. This paper surveys research on language

  15. Beyond the Classroom: The Role of Self-Guided Learning in Second Language Listening and Speaking Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Davis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a significant difference in most language instruction pro­­grams concerning the number of hours students spend practicing reading/writing skills versus listening/speaking skills. The primary cause for this is most likely due to the lack of class time that can be feasibly spent on meaningful conversation exchanges. Thus, the most logical answer is to have students practice outside the classroom. However, the transition from in-class learning to out-of-class practice is often not a very successful one. To address this deficiency and present possible options for creating successful learning environments beyond the classroom, this literature review offers an in-depth analysis of the role that guided learning plays in providing learning experiences for students beyond the classroom.

  16. An Historical Overview of Second Language Acquistion Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Evelyn

    An historical overview of research on second language acquisition considers research topics examined in observational/longitudinal studies and experimental studies. The questions that have reappeared across both observational and experimental studies concern: (1) whether second language learning is the same or different from first language

  17. Language Proficiency Assessment: Research Findings and Their Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Charlene; Simich, Carmen

    Current research is reviewed for implications for language proficiency assessment practices. Research is discussed concerning adult language proficiency testing, cognitive studies which attempt to conceptualize the construct of language proficiency, development of theoretical models of communicative competence, studies investigating the validity…

  18. Implementing Interventions to Increase Motivation in the English Language Classroom: from Theory to Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Iakovos Tsiplakides; Areti Keramida

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of empirical research shows a relationship between student motivation and learning outcomes in the teaching of English in ESL and EFL contexts. Despite a sound theoretical framework, however, there are few studies which implement strategies intended to increase motivation and report findings. Using qualitative research, this article attempts to link theory with practice and shed light into the factors which demotivate students and act as barriers to effective foreign language l...

  19. How Static Is the Statics Classroom? An Investigation into How Innovations, Specifically Research-Based Instructional Strategies, Are Adopted into the Statics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Stephanie Leigh

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate how educational research, specifically Research-Based Instructional Strategies (RBIS), is adopted by education practice, specifically within the engineering Statics classroom. Using a systematic approach, changes in classroom teaching practices were investigated from the instructors' perspective.…

  20. Conducting Original, Hands-On Astronomical Research in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneau, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    Since 2007 I have been a Team Leader for the Tzec Maun Foundation, a non-profit foundation dedicated to providing free, research grade, Internet telescopes to students, teachers and researchers around the world. The name Tzec Maun (pronounced “Teh-Zeck-Moan”) comes from Mayan culture. Tzec Maun was the jovial messenger, laughed at adversity. Based on the challenges students, researchers and professional astronomers face with finances, equipment, and telescope access, the jovial mascot seems to fit. Hundreds of hours performing astronomical outreach as a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador and Astronomical League Master of outreach taught me that the best way to inspirationally teach astronomy and space science (and most subjects) is actually being at the eyepiece. I’m NOT a fan of the traditional planetarium experience as a teaching tool because it inhibits inspiration and the learning experience to a 2-D mat on a faux horizon with artificial representations. Once, a student at my dark sky observatory excitedly commented that the night sky was like a 3-D planetarium. I have hosted several classes at my own personal dark sky observatory, but this resource is impractical for all but a few lucky students. Experience has taught me that the next best thing to being at the eyepiece is to control a remote telescope via the Internet. Tzec Maun’s arsenal of telescopes is all research capable, linked to the Internet and positioned for round-the-clock dark skies. The final conditions described above, mean that I can enter an 8:30am science class, log onto the Tzec Maun telescope Portal and turn over control of an Australian system (where it is night) to a student or teacher. Working as a group, the class can either begin their investigations. My Tzec Maun science team (TARP) is engaged in searching for potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs). PHA work excites student and teacher alike. Teaching from telescopes can unleash powerful attention-getting tools that enable teachers to convey moderately complex computer science, optical, geographic, mathematical, informational and physical principles through hands-on telescope operations. In addition to the general studies aspects of classroom internet-based astronomy, Tzec Maun supports real science by enabling operators precisely point telescopes and acquire extremely faint, magnitude 19+ CCD images. Thanks to the creative Team of Photometrica (photometrica.org), my teams now have the ability to process and analyze images online and produce results in short order. Normally, astronomical data analysis packages cost greater than thousands of dollars for single license operations. Free to my team members, Photometrica allows students to upload their data to a cloud computing server and read precise photometric and/or astrometric results. I’m indebted to Michael and Geir for their support. The efficacy of student-based research is well documented. The Council on Undergraduate Research defines student research as, "an inquiry or investigation conducted by an undergraduate that makes an original intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline." (http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/studentresearch/What. Teaching from Tzec Maun in the classroom is the most original teaching research I can imagine. I very much look forward to presenting this program to the convened body.

  1. Finding a Place for Critical Thinking and Self-voice in College English as a Foreign Language Writing Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Osman Barnawi

    2011-01-01

    Although the concepts of critical thinking and self-voice have been extensively discussed in a second language writing, little attention has been given, on the pedagogical level, to critical thinking and self-voice in college EFL writing instruction. To fill such a void, this paper attempts to propose some pedagogical tasks namely:  persuasive writing tasks, draft workshops one-on-one mentoring approaches for finding a place for critical thinking and self-voice in EFL classrooms. In doing so,...

  2. Teaching and Learning Classroom Action Research at a Distance in an Indonesian Urban Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    [None] Sandra S.A.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This action research project aims to understand whether teachers are mastering the knowledge and skills necessary to conduct classroom action research through two courses, Classroom Action Research (CAR and Enhancing Teaching Professional Skills (PKP: Pemantapan Kemampuan Profesional, offered via distance education to Indonesian teachers and to identify areas for possible improvement of both courses. The research was conducted in two urban study centers located in the cities of Bogor and Tangerang in the Indonesian provinces of West Java and Banten. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews, classroom observations, questionnaires, and focus group discussions. All data were analyzed for patterns that might offer insight into the problems tutors and teacher-learners were facing as they worked through the Classroom Action Research (PTK: Penelitian Tindakan Kelas module and tutorial. The research team from Indonesia Open University (UT: Universitas Terbuka identified several problematic aspects of each course, including excessive lag time between the first and second courses, insufficient examples of model classroom action research projects, a lack of supervised practice of action research techniques, variability of tutorial quality, and a mismatch between course assessments and the content and purpose of the courses. While the findings of this study focus primarily on two distance courses offered by UT, they offer insight into the challenges of providing in-service teacher development via distance education in the Indonesian context. Key Words: Distance Learning, Classroom Action Research, Teacher Professional Skill

  3. Developing the language of thinking within a classroom community of inquiry: pre-service teachers' experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Green

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We argue that the "community of inquiry" approach, using reading materials modelled on Lipman's Philosophy for Children programme, is a theoretically justified and teacher-friendly means of promoting effective thinking skills. The stimulus materials, used by the pre-service teachers, consist ofshort stories ofclassroom life designed to elicit children's ideas for further discussion as a community of inquiry. Research has shown that the community of inquiry approach to classroom discussion is perceived positively by educators and teachers and makes a difference to learners. This study explored how the Intermediate and Senior Phase pre-service teachers experienced a classroom community of inquiry by using a qualitative research design with 47 final year pre-service teachers. Data consisted of written reflections from the whole class and recordings of two focus group interviews with selected individuals from the group. From the analysis of the data, the following themes became evident: personal and professional development, changes in learners, contextual concerns, and curriculum links. We conclude that this approach is a valuable addition to the pedagogical strategies of pre-service teachers.

  4. Developing the language of thinking within a classroom community of inquiry: pre-service teachers' experiences

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Lena, Green; Janet, Condy; Agnes, Chigona.

    Full Text Available We argue that the "community of inquiry" approach, using reading materials modelled on Lipman's Philosophy for Children programme, is a theoretically justified and teacher-friendly means of promoting effective thinking skills. The stimulus materials, used by the pre-service teachers, consist ofshort [...] stories ofclassroom life designed to elicit children's ideas for further discussion as a community of inquiry. Research has shown that the community of inquiry approach to classroom discussion is perceived positively by educators and teachers and makes a difference to learners. This study explored how the Intermediate and Senior Phase pre-service teachers experienced a classroom community of inquiry by using a qualitative research design with 47 final year pre-service teachers. Data consisted of written reflections from the whole class and recordings of two focus group interviews with selected individuals from the group. From the analysis of the data, the following themes became evident: personal and professional development, changes in learners, contextual concerns, and curriculum links. We conclude that this approach is a valuable addition to the pedagogical strategies of pre-service teachers.

  5. A Critical Appraisal of Foreign Language Research in Content and Language Integrated Learning, Young Language Learners, and Technology-Enhanced Language Learning Published in Spain (2003-2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooly, Melinda; Masats, Dolors

    2015-01-01

    This state-of-the-art review provides a critical overview of research publications in Spain in the last ten years in three areas of teaching and learning foreign languages (especially English): context and language integrated learning (CLIL), young language learners (YLL), and technology-enhanced language learning (TELL). These three domains have…

  6. Results of a research project carried out in the primary classroom using two units of work based on the task-based approach

    OpenAIRE

    Durán Fernández, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    This research proposes a new model of a Task-Based Didactic Unit while at the same time attempting to demonstrate its effectiveness in the Primary Classroom. The main objective is to find out whether more effective English Language Learning is brought about when we apply Task-Based Didactic Units than when we apply Didactic Units based on the Traditional Approach: Presentation, Practice and Production. In the Post-test, significant differences between the Control Group and the ...

  7. Research in the Classroom: Using Peer Group Instruction to Teach Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Ginger; Kirby, Dan

    1988-01-01

    Suggests that peer group instruction is one of the most significant benefits to have emerged from the process approach to writing instruction. Presents a teacher's classroom research on the peer group response method. (ARH)

  8. Arctic research in the classroom: A teacher's experiences translated into data driven lesson plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, E. O.; Deegan, L.

    2011-12-01

    Incorporating research into high school science classrooms can promote critical thinking skills and provide a link between students and the scientific community. Basic science concepts become more relevant to students when taught in the context of research. A vital component of incorporating current research into classroom lessons is involving high school teachers in authentic research. The National Science Foundation sponsored Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program has inspired me to bring research to my classroom, communicate the importance of research in the classroom to other teachers and create lasting connections between students and the research community. Through my experiences as an RET at Toolik Field Station in Alaska, I have created several hands-on lessons and laboratory activities that are based on current arctic research and climate change. Each lesson uses arctic research as a theme for exemplifying basic biology concepts as well as increasing awareness of current topics such as climate change. For instance, data collected on the Kuparuk River will be incorporated into classroom activities that teach concepts such as primary production, trophic levels in a food chain and nutrient cycling within an ecosystem. Students will not only understand the biological concepts but also recognize the ecological implications of the research being conducted in the arctic. By using my experience in arctic research as a template, my students will gain a deeper understanding of the scientific process. I hope to create a crucial link of information between the science community and science education in public schools.

  9. Classroom Discipline Problems and Reality Therapy: Research Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Jean T.; Gang, Mark J.

    1976-01-01

    Reports the methods and results of two studies on the successful application of reality therapy (RT) to classroom discipline problems. Results indicate RT is an effective humanizing approach for solving problems. (Author)

  10. Swearing and how to deal with it in the classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Fiona Elizabeth Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Swearing is a phenomenon that has been overlooked in EFL/ESL classrooms in Iceland and little has been published on the subject. EFL teachers should help pupils learn the use of appropriate language in the appropriate context. This study aimed to investigate teachers’ attitudes and approaches to teaching about swearing and appropriate language use in EFL classrooms in Iceland. In this research paper I examined the sociolinguistics of swearing by discussing taboo language, recalling taboo l...

  11. Hit or Miss, or Missing: The Role of Second Language Acquisition Research in Language Teacher Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Jamie

    1994-01-01

    This article discusses how the syllabus for language teacher training in German has evolved and considers what direction foreign language teacher training might take if it were to follow the cue of "Deutsch als Fremdsprache" and appropriate the research agenda of second-language acquisition studies. (Contains 51 references.) (JL)

  12. Second-Language-Acquisition Research and Foreign Language Teaching, Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanPatten, Bill

    1992-01-01

    Details six major research findings regarding second-language acquisition, including transitional stages for acquiring syntax; fixed-order emergence of grammatical morphemes; language acquisition progress from unmarked to marked elements; first-language influence; rule-governed learner output; and learner access to input. (27 references) (CB)

  13. Connecting Content and Language for English Language Learners

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Jodene

    2011-01-01

    Bridge the gap between content and language and put research into practice to instruct English language learners with strategies that meet their needs in language development and literacy. This must-have book reviews the author's experiences as a teacher in a diverse instructional setting and discusses the challenges and successes teachers experience in the ELL classroom. 200pp.

  14. Researching "Practiced Language Policies": Insights from Conversation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacina-Pugh, Florence

    2012-01-01

    In language policy research, "policy" has traditionally been conceptualised as a notion separate from that of "practice". In fact, language practices were usually analysed with a view to evaluate whether a policy is being implemented or resisted to. Recently, however, Spolsky in ("Language policy". Cambridge University press, Cambridge, 2004;…

  15. Research Based Science Education: Bringing Authentic Scientific Research into the Secondary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, J.

    2003-12-01

    Teachers and students at Northview High School in Brazil, Indiana have the opportunity to engage in authentic scientific research through our participation in two national projects, TLRBSE and PEPP. Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science Education (TLRBSE) is a teacher professional development and retention program coupled with authentic scientific research projects in astronomy. Teacher-Leaders are trained in research-based pedagogy and serve as mentors to less experienced colleagues and work with students to develop science research methods and research projects for the classroom. Astronomical data collected at Kitt Peak by astronomers and teachers is made available on CD for classroom use. Northview is in its second year as a TLRBSE school. The Princeton Earth Physics Project (PEPP) trains mentor teachers in fundamentals of research in seismology. Teachers and students then gain hands on experience in science research through operation of a research quality seismic station sited at the high school. Data from the Northview seismometer are stored locally and also transmitted over the Internet to a database at Indiana University. Students have access to local data as well as seismic databases accessible through the Internet to use for research projects. The Northview Seismic Station has been in operation since 1998. In this presentation, I will describe how these projects have been incorporated into the physics and earth science programs at Northview High School. I will discus how our teachers and students have benefited from the opportunity to take part in hands-on scientific research under the guidance of university faculty. In particular, I will describe our participation in a regional seismic network through seismic data acquisition, data analysis using seismological software, and students' experiences in a university-based student research symposium. I reflect on the some of the successes and barriers to high-school teachers' and students' involvement in scientific research programs. I conclude with a discussion of a successful student seismology project that was a finalist in the 2003 INTEL International Science and Engineering Fair

  16. Ape language research: A review and behavioral perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hixson, Michael D.

    1998-01-01

    The ape language research of the Gardners, Fouts, Terrace, Rumbaugh, and Savage-Rumbaugh is reviewed. This research involved the raising of chimpanzees (and a bonobo) in human-like environments over extended time periods. The results indicate that apes are capable of learning small verbal repertoires in a fashion similar to that of human infants. The writings of the ape language researchers show an opposition to behavioral approaches to language. Although they characterize each other's work a...

  17. The Use of L1 in the Foreign Language Classroom / El uso de la lengua materna en el salón de inglés como lengua extranjera

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Yi-chun, Pan; Yi-ching, Pan.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available El uso de la lengua materna es una ocurrencia común en los contextos de la enseñanza de la lengua extranjera, a pesar de que a veces reciba críticas por su interferencia en la adquisición de la Lengua meta. Mientras que los docentes deben maximizar el uso de la Lengua meta, sin duda, hay espacios pa [...] ra que el profesor utilice la lengua materna de los estudiantes en su pedagogía. En este trabajo se presenta un argumento basado en las perspectivas teóricas y la investigación empírica dentro de la literatura existente, apoyando el uso apropiado de la Lengua materna en el salón de inglés como lengua extranjera. El argumento se centra en tres cuestiones fundamentales-racionales para el uso de la lengua materna: Los efectos positivos que la lengua materna tiene tanto en el aprendizaje y la instrucción de una lengua extranjera, como en las formas en las que la lengua materna ayuda a los docentes de idiomas extranjeros. Abstract in english L1 use is a common occurrence in foreign language teaching contexts despite the fact that it often receives criticism for its interference with target language (TL) acquisition. While foreign language teachers should maximize their use of the TL, there is indeed a place for the teacher to use the st [...] udents' L1 in their pedagogy. In this paper, an argument derived from theoretical perspectives and empirical research within existing literature supporting the appropriate use of L1 in foreign language classrooms is presented. The argument addresses three key issues-rationales for L1 use, positive effects L1 has on both foreign language learning and instruction, and ways that L1 assists instructors on foreign languages.

  18. The Competency Based Approach to English Language Education and the Walls between the Classroom and the Society in Cameroon: Pulling Down the Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Carlous Muluh Nkwetisama

    2012-01-01

    This paper contends that English as a foreign language teaching in the classrooms at all the levels of education is not adapted to the everyday communication needs of the Cameroonian learners and that an English language pedagogy of integration; otherwise known as the outcomes approach or the competency based approach can solve the problem. This approach seeks for linguistic and sociolinguistic competence in the language. In fact, walls seem to exist between the knowledge these learners get i...

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF INTERCULTURAL COMPETENCE IN CONTEMPORARY FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM BY INCORPORATING INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Danilovi?, Mirjam

    2011-01-01

    The idea for the diploma thesis arouse from the fact that technology and the Internet are still not widely used in the English classroom. When thinking about how to integrate technology in the classroom I was inspired by different web sites which offer a vast variety of authentic as well as ELT-specific materials that can be used in the English classroom. I decided to focus on developing intercultural competence with information and communication technology by extending the intercultural topi...

  20. The Role of Culture in Second or Foreign Language Teaching: Moving Beyond the Classroom Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleet, Marilyn

    2006-01-01

    Second Language (L2) and Foreign Language (FL) curricula have a cultural component intricately woven into the fabric of the language syllabus. To teach language, one must also teach the culture inherent in the language, including the verbal as well as the non-verbal aspects. A review of the literature will show that studying the target culture…

  1. The dilemma of dialect in the classroom: A case forXhosa

    OpenAIRE

    D.S. Gxilishe

    2013-01-01

    One of the most controversial issues in language learning is whether or not to use the pupils' non-standard variety in the classroom. It would seem that more colleagues oppose than favour it. Since language research has particularly come to appreciate the importance of multilingual competence it is opportune to review the issue of dialect in the classroom. Public opinion is too firmly entrenched in the factor of standard language to allow dialect as a language of instruction. Some teachers ma...

  2. Research on Chinese College English Teachers’ Classroom Code-switching: Beliefs and Attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoli Cheng

    2013-01-01

    This article documents the beliefs and attitudes of Chinese college English teachers towards classroom code-switching. The findings suggest that teachers’ code-switching is commonplace in class, although most of them still hold negative attitude toward it. Besides, students’ ability is regarded as the most significant factor affecting teachers’ code-switching, and the first language (L1) is mainly used to teach grammar and abstract words. The conclusion is that, in Chinese E...

  3. Factors Affecting Learners' Attention to Teacher Talk in Nine ESL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiqing

    2015-01-01

    With classroom observation and stimulated recall interviews as research instruments, the present study investigated some of the factors that affected learners' attention to teacher talk in nine English as a Second Language (ESL) classrooms. The results revealed five such factors, namely, learners' self evaluation of their language knowledge, the…

  4. Handbook of Classroom Management: Research, Practice, and Contemporary Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evertson, Carolyn M., Ed.; Weinstein, Carol S., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Classroom management is a topic of enduring concern for teachers, administrators, and the public. It consistently ranks as the first or second most serious educational problem in the eyes of the general public, and beginning teachers consistently rank it as their most pressing concern during their early teaching years. Management problems continue…

  5. Trends in Qualitative Research in Language Teaching since 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Keith

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews developments in qualitative research in language teaching since the year 2000, focusing on its contributions to the field and identifying issues that emerge. Its aims are to identify those areas in language teaching where qualitative research has the greatest potential and indicate what needs to be done to further improve the…

  6. The Relationship between SLA Research and Language Pedagogy: Teachers' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassaji, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    There is currently a substantial body of research on second language (L2) learning and this body of knowledge is constantly growing. There are also many attempts in most teacher education programs around the world to inform practicing and prospective L2 teachers about second language acquisition (SLA) research and its findings. However, an…

  7. Literacy Lessons in One Language Arts Sixth-Grade Classroom: The Year of the Guinea Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliffe, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    All classrooms are active social systems; the middle school classroom involves complex interactions between and among peers as well as between students and teachers. In the elementary years, attention is often given to nurturing students and fostering relationships, yet when young adolescents transition to the middle school, a focus on control and…

  8. Beyond the Classroom: The Role of Self-Guided Learning in Second Language Listening and Speaking Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Marion Davis

    2013-01-01

    There is a significant difference in most language instruction pro­­grams concerning the number of hours students spend practicing reading/writing skills versus listening/speaking skills. The primary cause for this is most likely due to the lack of class time that can be feasibly spent on meaningful conversation exchanges. Thus, the most logical answer is to have students practice outside the classroom. However, the transition from in-class learning to out-of-class practice is often not a ver...

  9. The Language of Sustainability: From Basic Writing Classroom to Professional Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karatsolis, Andreas; Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.

    Understanding and describing professional practice, especially in Engineering and the Sciences,  has always been at the heart of research in Professional Communication. Several significant field  research projects have showed us that content knowledge alone is not sufficient to claim disciplinary expertise; a rhetorical understanding of the discipline and its ways of thinking is essential in achieving full participation in the field. Most professionals would expect that such a sophisticated approach can only be learned through on-the-job training or opportunities to interact with practitioners within authentic disciplinary contexts. Although this can certainly be the case in many instances, we argue that a rhetorical understanding can be enacted even within a freshman writing classroom. The results of our content and rhetorical analyses of student work from the beginning and the end of a course on academic writing with the theme of sustainability show that students were able in one semester to write in discipline-appropriate ways and understand the rhetorical strategies necessary to become part of a disciplinary conversation.  The implications of our findings can extend into the way we design courses in basic writing or professional communication and the ways we can use pre-assessment data to drive our course design decisions. 

  10. Science is for me: Meeting the needs of English language learners in an urban, middle school science classroom through an instructional intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joseph A.

    2011-12-01

    This study involved an intervention in which I explored how the multimodal, inquiry-based teaching strategies from a professional development model could be used to meet the educational needs of a group of middle school students, who were refugees, newly arrived in the United States, now residing in a large urban school district in the northeastern United States, and learning English as a second language. This group remains unmentioned throughout the research literature despite the fact that English Language Learners (ELLs) represent the fastest growing group of K-12 students in the United States. The specific needs of this particular group were explored as I attempted daily to confront a variety of obstacles to their science achievement and help to facilitate the development of a scientific discourse. This research was done in an effort to better address the needs of ELLs in general and to inform best practices for teachers to apply across a variety of different cultural and linguistic subgroups. This study is an autoethnographic case study analysis of the practices of the researcher, working in a science classroom, teaching the described group of students.

  11. Being Bilingual: Issues for Cross-Language Research

    OpenAIRE

    Bogusia Temple

    2006-01-01

    The current political debates in England highlight the role of language in citizenship, social exclusion, and discrimination. Similar debates can also be found around the world. Correspondingly, research addressing different language communities is burgeoning. Service providers and academics are increasingly employing bilingual community researchers or interpreters to carry out research. However, there is very little written about the effect of working with bilingual researchers. What it mean...

  12. Minority students in the science classroom: Issues of language, class, race, culture and pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Aldrin Edward

    A considerable proportion of the educationally at-risk students in the K-12 public education system is composed of minority students, either in terms of cultural background, linguistic background, and frequently, both. In particular, satisfactory levels of achievement in science are not being attained by these students. The concerns of this study center on examining and understanding the reasons underlying this situation, with a view to suggesting how these problems of underachievement in science might be addressed. Previous and ongoing educational research concerning these issues suggest that such underachievement may be due to current pedagogical practices which seem to actively discourage these students from achieving any significant measure of academic, educational or professional success. The purpose of this study is thus to explore the beliefs and pedagogical practices of science teachers as they relate to minority students, especially those minority students for whom English is not a first language and who have limited English proficiency (LEP). In the course of this study, the terminology 'minority students' will refer to and be inclusive of cultural and/or language minorities, i.e. those students who differ from the mainstream white American student in terms of cultural background and a native language other than English. Culturally derived usages of non-standard forms of English (e.g. Black English Vernacular) also will be subsumed within this definition of cultural and language minority students. Particular attention will be given to emergent issues relating to current pedagogical practices, also to the science teacher beliefs and epistemological rationales underlying such practices. In exploring these beliefs and pedagogical practices, the study also will seek to delineate and to understand the various problems which are being encountered in the teaching of science to minority students. As the result of exploring the beliefs and pedagogical practices of science teachers as they relate to minority students, it is intended that the completed study will contribute toward the development and elaboration of a substantive pedagogical content knowledge base for science teachers of cultural and language minority students. It is anticipated that the development of such a knowledge base will be of practical assistance to science teachers in their pedagogical decisions such that a greater inclusion of these students in the science discourse community may be attained.

  13. Student Microtransformations in English Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Paula

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to use psychoanalytic theory to examine how attempts at critical teaching in two English as a Second Language (ESL) classrooms related to changes in student subjectivity. The research critiques critical pedagogical assumptions regarding transformation and empowerment through a Lacanian perspective. More specifically,…

  14. Teaching in the Foreign Language Classroom: How Being a Native or Non-Native Speaker of German Influences Culture Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Carla

    2015-01-01

    The study explores the complexities associated with graduate language instructors' NS/NNS identities and teaching of culture. Researchers, who work mainly in the English as a Second/Foreign Language field, have been discussing this divide and have examined the advantages and disadvantages each group brings to the profession, but not the…

  15. Documenting and researching endangered languages: the Pangloss Collection

    OpenAIRE

    Michailovsky, Boyd; Mazaudon, Martine; Michaud, Alexis; Guillaume, Séverine; François, Alexandre; Adamou, Evangelia

    2014-01-01

    The Pangloss Collection is a language archive developed since 1994 at the Langues et Civilisations à Tradition Orale (LACITO) research group of the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS). It contributes to the documentation and study of the world's languages by providing free access to documents of connected, spontaneous speech, mostly in endangered or under-resourced languages, recorded in their cultural context and transcribed in consultation with native speakers. The Co...

  16. Classroom and Formative Assessment in Second/Foreign Language Teaching and Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Somaye Ketabi; Saeed Ketabi

    2014-01-01

    Formative assessment was first used by Scriven (1967), but studies focused on formative assessment in ESL and EFL classes started in 2000. Formative assessment is integrated in learning and teaching, so a great part of classroom assessment is formative. However, classroom assessment has been not defined clearly, as most of the texts about this type of assessment define it in terms of its formative or summative potentials (Fulcher & Davidson, 2007). This study is an attempt to define diffe...

  17. Language Tasks Using Touch Screen and Mobile Technologies: Reconceptualizing Task-Based CALL for Young Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, Martine

    2014-01-01

    This article examines how the use of mobile technologies (iPods and tablets) in language classrooms contributes to redesigning task-based approaches for young language learners. The article is based on a collaborative action research (CAR) project in Early French Immersion classrooms in the province of Alberta, Canada. The data collection included…

  18. Classroom Communication Climate and Communicative Linguistic Competence of EFL Learners

    OpenAIRE

    Danebeth Tristeza Glomo-Narzoles

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the classroom communication climate and communicative linguistic competence of EFL students who are in their senior years in a university. This is a descriptive method of research which intended to find out the correlation between classroom communication climate and communicative linguistic competence. A validated questionnaire on the perceived classroom communication climate was used. To measure the students’ proficiency in the English language, a validate...

  19. Being Bilingual: Issues for Cross-Language Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogusia Temple

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The current political debates in England highlight the role of language in citizenship, social exclusion, and discrimination. Similar debates can also be found around the world. Correspondingly, research addressing different language communities is burgeoning. Service providers and academics are increasingly employing bilingual community researchers or interpreters to carry out research. However, there is very little written about the effect of working with bilingual researchers. What it means to be bilingual is often essentialised and rarely problematised. Bilingual researchers are seen as unproblematically acting as bridges between communities just because they are bilingual. Their ties to communities, their use of language, and their perspectives on the research are rarely investigated. Language is tied in an unproblematic way to meaning, values, and beliefs. In this article, I use examples from my own research to question what it means to be bilingual and to do cross-language research. I argue that there is no straightforward way in which meanings can be read off from researchers’ ties to language and that being bilingual is not the same for everyone.

  20. Engaging Learner Attribute Research in Dialogue with Classroom Practice: Predictors of Success in the Accelerated, Online Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jean Mandernach

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Research examining student success in online education has focused extensively on internal learner attributes with little emphasis on external, controllable factors that may mediate a student’s ability to perform within the distinctive environment of the virtual classroom. The purpose of this study is to balance student characteristic research with external, direct data from the perspective of online instructors in order to provide a practice-oriented understanding of the unique factors predictive of student success in accelerated, online courses. Experienced online educators were surveyed to identify practical skills, strategies or factors most likely to lead to success for students enrolled in online courses. A content-analysis of open-ended responses revealed 23 relevant factors that clustered into six broad themes. Within these themes, four issues emerge as the most predictive of online learner success: time, technology, initiative, and competence. Discussion examines the practical, deliberate application of this information to facilitate students’ successful completion of online courses.

  1. The Effect of New Technologies on Sign Language Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Ceil; Mirus, Gene; Palmer, Jeffrey Levi; Roessler, Nicholas James; Frost, Adam

    2013-01-01

    This paper first reviews the fairly established ways of collecting sign language data. It then discusses the new technologies available and their impact on sign language research, both in terms of how data is collected and what new kinds of data are emerging as a result of technology. New data collection methods and new kinds of data are…

  2. A Multiple Word Association Probe in Second Language Acquisition Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Heleen; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The background of word association tests is described, their potential relevance to second language (L2) research considered, and the history of their use as L2 measuring instruments reviewed. A computer-controlled word association test is described. The test was not established as a valid indicator of language proficiency. (Author/LMO)

  3. Computer Assisted Language Learning.

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, T. John A.

    1997-01-01

    This article will provide an overview of computers; an overview of the history of CALL, its pros and cons, the internet, World Wide Web, Multimedia, and research related to the uses of computers in the language classroom. Also, it also aims to provide some background for the beginners on using the Internet in language classes today. It discusses some of the common types of Internet activities that are being used today, what the minimum requirements are for using the Internet for language lear...

  4. The Impact of Integrating Technology and Social Experience in the College Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulin

    2013-01-01

    Technology has been used widely in the field of education for a long period of time. It is a useful tool which could be a mediation to help language learners to learn the target language. In order to investigate how technology and social experience can be integrated into courses to promote language learners' desire to learn English, the…

  5. Opera in the Foreign Language Classroom: Learning German with Mozart, Wagner, Weber, and Johann Strauss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Solveig M.

    2010-01-01

    Content-based instruction (CBI) has been part of the foreign language curriculum for many years at US colleges, leading to courses that combine language instruction with specific content domains, such as film, literature, politics, sports and many others. This article presents a rather unusual choice of content domain for a second-year language

  6. Investigating the impact of learner codeswitching on L2 oral fluency in task-based activities: The case of EFL primary school classrooms in Cyprus.

    OpenAIRE

    Vrikki, Maria; Macaro, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    The potentially beneficial role of classroom codeswitching, or the use of the first language (L1) in foreign language (FL) classroom settings, is gradually becoming acknowledged in the field of second language acquisition (SLA) research. However, researchers call for the construction of a framework, which indicates when this use is beneficial for language learning and when it is not. In an attempt to contribute to the construction of this framework, the present study investigates whether code...

  7. ¿Duermes mucho Tony?: Interpersonal and Transactional Uses of L1 in the Foreign-Language Classroom ¿Duermes mucho Tony?: Usos interpersonales y transaccionales de la lengua materna en el aula de clase de lengua extranjera

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Higareda; Georgina López; Gerrard Mugford

    2009-01-01

    Whilst communicative teaching approaches sanction, often grudgingly, the limited use of the students' first language (L1) in English Language Teaching (ELT), critical debate is now centred on a much more substantial and energetic role for the use of mother tongue in the language classroom. Justifications favouring the use of L1 currently range from ideological arguments to classroom teaching considerations. This paper contributes to this ongoing debate by examining how new generations of ...

  8. Fostering Intercultural Communicative Competence through Reading Authentic Literary Texts in an Advanced Colombian EFL Classroom: A Constructivist Perspective (Desarrollo de la competencia comunicativa intercultural mediante la lectura de textos literarios auténticos: una perspectiva constructivista)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Luis Fernando R.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an action research experience carried out in an advanced English as a foreign language classroom of the language program at a university in Bogotá, Colombia, in 2010. The study proposes the inclusion of authentic literary texts in the English as a foreign language classroom through the implementation of four constructivist…

  9. Brain Matters: Translating Research into Classroom Practice. 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    While you don't need to be a scientist to understand brain-compatible teaching, you'll be far more effective when you base your teaching practices on the very best scientific information. This expanded and updated ASCD best-seller delivers that essential information in clear, everyday language that any teacher can immediately incorporate into…

  10. Cross-linguistic comparisons in child language research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Ruth A

    2014-07-01

    Major large-scale research projects in the early years of developmental psycholinguistics were English-based, yet even then numerous studies were available or under way in a range of different languages (Ferguson & Slobin, 1973). Since then, the field of cross-linguistic child language research has burgeoned in several directions. First, rich information is now available on the acquisition of dozens of languages from around the world in numerous language families, spearheaded by the five-volume series edited by Slobin (1985-1997) and complemented by in-depth examination of specific constructions - e.g. causative alternation, motion verbs, passive voice, subject elision, noun compounding - in various languages, culminating in an in-depth examination of the acquisition of ergativity in over a dozen languages (Bavin & Stoll, 2013). A second fruitful direction is the application of carefully comparable designs targeting a range of issues among children acquiring different languages, including: production of early lexico-grammatical constructions (Slobin, 1982), sentence processing comprehension (MacWhinney & Bates, 1989), expression of spatial relations (Bowerman, 2011), discourse construction of oral narratives based on short picture series (Hickmann, 2003) and longer storybooks (Berman & Slobin, 1994), and extended texts in different genres (Berman, 2008). Taken together, research motivated by the question of what is particular and what universal in child language highlights the marked, and early, impact of ambient language typology on processes of language acquisition. The challenge remains to operationalize such insights by means of psychologically sound and linguistically well-motivated measures for evaluating the interplay between the variables of developmental level, linguistic domain, and ambient language typology. PMID:25023494

  11. EFFECT OF TECHNOLOGY ON MOTIVATION IN EFL CLASSROOMS

    OpenAIRE

    Binnur GENC ILTER

    2009-01-01

    In language classrooms, being in unnatural conversational situations, students need motivation more than other learning milieus. Teachers try to capture the attention of students through various methods and techniques. Many researchers in EFL teaching profession have stated that good motivation has appositive effect on foreign language learning. The purpose of this study is to explore how technology could be used to increase students’ motivation in EFL classrooms. For this purpose; a questio...

  12. Como evalvar la actuacion del profesor en una clase de segundo idioma (How to Evaluate a Teacher in a Second Language Classroom).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez de Bracamonte, Teresa

    This guide in Spanish provides performance criteria for evaluating the foreign language teacher. It provides an outline for analyzing the teacher's actions and teaching methods in the classroom. Through the evaluation by an outsider, the teacher can learn his or her faults in the views of others and can improve on them. The aspects to be analyzed…

  13. Blogs and the Development of Plurilingual and Intercultural Competence: Report of a Co-Actional Approach in Portuguese Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo-Pfeifer, Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Focusing on the topic of the development of the plurilingual and intercultural competence through the integration of electronic communicative practices both in foreign language classrooms and non-formal contexts, this work aims at defining and characterizing, in view of a co-actional perspective, a "pedagogical blog", by considering it…

  14. Are the Indicators for the Language and Reasoning Subscale of the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Revised Psychometrically Appropriate for Caribbean Classrooms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Michael Canute; Williams, Sian G.; Morrison, Johnetta W.; Samms-Vaughan, Maureen E.; Mayfield, Wayne A.; Thornburg, Kathy R.

    2008-01-01

    Evaluating the psychometric properties of the indicators that comprise the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Revised (ECERS-R) language-reasoning scale from an item response theory (IRT) perspective on a sample of observations from 334 Caribbean classrooms, Stout's procedure revealed that all indicators on this dimension are not part of a…

  15. How Do You Say "Twos" in Spanish, if "Two" Is "Dos"? Language as Means and Object in a Bilingual Kindergarten Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvihill, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    In this essay Naomi Mulvihill uses vignettes from her bilingual kindergarten classroom to explore the dynamic processes by which young children make sense of language, focusing on instances in which she asks her students to compare texts presented in English and Spanish. Using Piaget's concept of disequilibrium as a guiding framework,…

  16. Komm, Lass dir was erzahlen. Versuch einer Methodologie zum Geschichtenerzahlen fur Deutsch (A Methodology for Storytelling in the German Language Classroom).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicke, Rainer E.

    A methodology is presented for storytelling in the elementary school German language classroom. Intended for the instructor in Alberta, this guide is illustrated with examples of types of activities and techniques useful for teaching German to the elementary school student. (JC)

  17. "Do They Even Know That They Do It?": Exploring Awareness of Spanish-English Code-Switching in a Sixth-Grade English Language Arts Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Ramón Antonio

    2014-01-01

    This article draws on scholarship in educational and linguistic anthropology to explore awareness of Spanish-English code-switching among bilingual Chicana/o and Latina/o students in a sixth-grade English Language Arts classroom. Analysis of qualitative data gathered via participant observation, video/audio recording, and semistructured interviews…

  18. Urban Teaching in America: Theory, Research, and Practice in K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stairs, Andrea J.; Donnell, Kelly A.; Dunn, Alyssa Hadley

    2011-01-01

    "Urban Teaching in America: Theory, Research, and Practice in K-12 Classrooms" is a brief yet comprehensive overview of urban teaching. Undergraduate and graduate students who are new to the urban context will develop a deeper understanding of the urban teaching environment and the challenges and opportunities they can expect to face while…

  19. Generalizability and Decision Studies to Inform Observational and Experimental Research in Classroom Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottema-Beutel, Kristen; Lloyd, Blair; Carter, Erik W.; Asmus, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    Attaining reliable estimates of observational measures can be challenging in school and classroom settings, as behavior can be influenced by multiple contextual factors. Generalizability (G) studies can enable researchers to estimate the reliability of observational data, and decision (D) studies can inform how many observation sessions are…

  20. Using Qualitative Research to Assess Teaching and Learning in Technology-Infused TILE Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horne, Sam; Murniati, Cecilia Titiek; Saichaie, Kem; Jesse, Maggie; Florman, Jean C.; Ingram, Beth F.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes the results of an assessment project whose purpose was to improve the faculty-development program for instructors who teach in technology-infused TILE (Transform, Interact, Learn, Engage) classrooms at the University of Iowa. Qualitative research methods were critical for (1) learning about how students and instructors…

  1. Authentic Research Experience and "Big Data" Analysis in the Classroom: Maize Response to Abiotic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarevitch, Irina; Frechette, Cameo; Wiatros, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Integration of inquiry-based approaches into curriculum is transforming the way science is taught and studied in undergraduate classrooms. Incorporating quantitative reasoning and mathematical skills into authentic biology undergraduate research projects has been shown to benefit students in developing various skills necessary for future…

  2. Using biological control research in the classroom to promote scientific inquiry and literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many scientists who research biological control also teach at universities or more informally through cooperative outreach. The purpose of this paper is to review biological control activities for the classroom in four refereed journals, The American Biology Teacher, Journal of Biological Education...

  3. An Action Research Study: Using Classroom Guidance Lessons to Teach Middle School Students about Sexual Harassment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Rebecca C.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a three-part classroom guidance lesson that teaches middle school students the definition of sexual harassment, the difference between flirting and sexual harassment, and the harmful effects of sexual harassment. An action research study evaluated the effectiveness of the lessons in decreasing referrals for sexual harassment…

  4. Final Report on Pilot Studies / Final Report on Classroom Research with STEM and TESL Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biel, Carmen; Wake, Jo Dugstad

    2014-01-01

    This Deliverable is the final report on pilot studies within the NEXT-TELL project (D6.7) and furthermore comprises the Deliverable on Classroom Research with STEM and TESL Assessment (D2.9) in order to avoid redundancies between those two Deliverables.

  5. Research for the Classroom: To Read or Not to Read--Five Approaches to Teaching Shakespeare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    How teachers can use such materials as parallel-text editions, graphic novels, and film adaptations to increase students' understanding of and interest in Shakespeare was the impetus for a classroom action research project that examined the effects of teaching methods on student comprehension and engagement. The author of this article…

  6. Research-Based Strategies to Ignite Student Learning: Insights from a Neurologist and Classroom Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Judy

    2006-01-01

    The author of this book combs through brain research and pulls out the information that is most valid and relevant to classroom teaching. It describes how to enhance students' memory and test-taking abilities and presents ways to captivate and hold students' attention and encourage their participation and progress. This is the first book ever…

  7. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WEB-BASED LEARNING TIME OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT IN GERMAN AS A TERTIARY LANGUAGE BY THE STUDENTS ON VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan HANBAY

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this empirical research is to investigate the relationship between web-based learning time and academic achievement in German. 36 learners of L3 German with L1 Turkish and L2 English from Vocational High School of Kahta at Adiyaman University were the participants of this study. The empirical process of the study continued 6 weeks in 2011-2012 fall semesters. During this time, the German, as tertiary language, course was lectured by traditional face-to-face method in the classroom. But the students studied outside the course the same subjects in interactive form via web page, specifically designed for this study. At the end of the empirical process, the data about the study were obtained. The Pearson product-moment correlation was used to find out the relationship between web-based learning time and academic achievements in German. As a result of this study it is found out that there is a significant relationship between web-based learning time and academic achievement in German as a tertiary language.

  8. Students and Teachers' Reasons for Using the First Language Within the Foreign Language Classroom (French and English) in Central Mexico / Razones de alumnos y maestros sobre el uso de la primera lengua en el salón de lenguas extranjeras (francés e inglés) en el centro de México

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Irasema, Mora Pablo; M. Martha, Lengeling; Buenaventura, Rubio Zenil; Troy, Crawford; Douglas, Goodwin.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available La presente investigación explora el uso de la lengua materna en un contexto de enseñanza de lenguas extranjeras. Esta investigación cualitativa presenta la práctica docente y los puntos de vista de maestros y alumnos de francés e inglés en el contexto de una universidad pública del centro de México [...] , mediante el uso de las técnicas del cuestionario y la entrevista semiestructurada. Los resultados muestran que tanto los maestros como la mayoría de los alumnos perciben el uso de la lengua materna como algo positivo en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje. Un número reducido de estudiantes rechaza el uso de la lengua materna y prefiere que su clase de lengua extranjera sea dirigida exclusivamente en la lengua meta. Abstract in english The present study explores the use of the first language in a context of foreign language teaching. This qualitative research presents the classroom practice and points of view of French and English teachers and students within a public educational institute in central Mexico using the techniques of [...] questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. The results show that teachers and the majority of students perceive the use of the first language as positive and part of the teaching and learning process. A small number of students do not like the use of the first language in the classroom and prefer that their teachers use the target language only.

  9. PolarTREC-Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating: Bringing Polar Research to the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnick, W. K.; Warburton, J.; Breen, K.; Wiggins, H. V.; Larson, A.; Behr, S.

    2006-12-01

    PolarTREC-Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating is a three-year (2007-2009) teacher professional development program that pairs K-12 teachers with researchers to improve science education through authentic polar research experience. PolarTREC builds on the strengths of the existing TREC program in the Arctic, an NSF supported program managed by the Arctic Research Consortium of the US (ARCUS), to embrace a wider range of research activities in the Arctic and Antarctic. PolarTREC uses a Teacher Research Experience (TRE) model to foster the integration of research and education to produce a legacy of long-term teacher-researcher collaborations, improved teacher content knowledge through experiences in scientific inquiry, and broad public interest and engagement in polar science. PolarTREC will enable thirty-six teachers to spend two to six weeks in the Arctic or Antarctic, working closely with researchers investigating a wide range of topics such as sea-ice dynamics, terrestrial ecology, marine biology, atmospheric chemistry, and long-term climate change. With the help of their host researcher and the research team, teachers will develop the experience and tools necessary to teach science through scientific inquiry and investigation based on real-world experiences. While in the field, teachers and researchers will communicate extensively with their colleagues, communities, and hundreds of students of all ages across the globe, using a variety of tools including satellite phones, online journals, podcasts and interactive "Live from IPY" calls and web-based seminars. The online outreach elements of the project convey these experiences to a broad audience far beyond the classrooms of the PolarTREC teachers. In addition to field research experiences, PolarTREC will support teacher professional development and a sustained community of teachers, scientists, and the public through workshops, Internet seminars, an e-mail listserve, and ongoing teacher/researcher networks. For further information on PolarTREC, contact Wendy Warnick, ARCUS Executive Director at warnick@arcus.org or 907-474-1600. The PolarTREC website will be accessible in 2007 through the ARCUS web site at www.arcus.org.

  10. Literacy and Justice through Photography: A Classroom Guide. Language & Literacy Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Wendy; Hyde, Katherine; Lord, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This practical guide will help teachers to use the acclaimed "Literacy Through Photography" method developed by Wendy Ewald to promote critical thinking, self-expression, and respect in the classroom. The authors share their perspectives as an artist, a sociologist, and a teacher to show educators how to integrate four new "Literacy Through…

  11. A Comparative Study on Second Language Vocabulary Development: Study Abroad vs Classroom Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Jimenez, Antonio F.

    2010-01-01

    The present paper aims to achieve a better understanding of the process of vocabulary acquisition by examining the development of lexical knowledge in both classroom and study abroad contexts. Taking Ife, Vives Boix, and Meara's (2000) study as a starting point, this study attempts to determine whether development in both levels of vocabulary…

  12. Bringing the Field into the Classroom: A Field Methods Course on Saudi Arabian Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Anika; Mathur, Gaurav

    2012-01-01

    The methodology used in one graduate-level linguistics field methods classroom is examined through the lens of the students' experiences. Four male Deaf individuals from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia served as the consultants for the course. After a brief background information about their country and its practices surrounding deaf education, both…

  13. Does Foreign Language Writing Benefit from Increased Lexical Fluency? Evidence from a Classroom Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelderen, Amos; Oostdam, Ron; van Schooten, Erik

    2011-01-01

    We report a classroom experiment directed at increasing lexical fluency in writing. Participants were 107 Dutch students in bilingual (EFL) education (Grades 10 and 11). According to current theories of writing such fluency allows writers to devote more attention to higher order aspects of text production, such as idea generation, selection and…

  14. Supporting English Language Learners in the Elementary and Secondary Classrooms: How to Get Started

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitsett, Glee; Hubbard, Janie

    2009-01-01

    Learning how to communicate and instruct non-English proficient students in a regular classroom is a challenging task, especially for novice teachers. New teachers need to overcome fear, insufficient pedagogical knowledge, and lack of teaching experience; therefore, getting started can be the most overwhelming part of the process. This article…

  15. Developing laboratory research techniques for an ongoing research program in a high school classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adornato, Philip

    Incorporating research into a high school classroom is an excellent way to teach students fundamental concepts in science. One program that incorporates this approach is the Waksman Student Scholar Program (WSSP), which allows high school students, teachers and Rutgers professors to work side by side on an ongoing molecular biology research program. Students in the program first isolated plasmid clones from bacteria that contain cDNA fragments of genes from the Brine Shrimp Artemia franciscana. They then determined the size of the DNA by performing molecular biology experiments. Students then analyzed the DNA sequence and after review from WSSP staff and high school teachers, the student's sequences were published in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database. This was often the last step in the project the students performed. However, if the project were being conducted in a research lab instead of a high school, the cDNA clone would often be further analyzed. In the past, safety, convenience, and affordability have limited the availability of these experiments in a high school setting. Although additional bioinformatic experiments could easily be performed in the high school, there is a strong need for additional "wet lab" experiments to keep the students engaged and motivated to work on the project. I have worked on developing three experimental modules that can be performed in a high school setting. These experiments were tested with the students and teachers of the WSSP. This work will expand the scope of experiments that can be performed in a high school environment.

  16. Teacher Feedback to Support Oral Language Learning for Young Dual Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatham, Gregory A.; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Park, Hyejin

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing numbers of dual language learners (DLLs) in early childhood programmes, the use of research-based and effective pedagogical strategies to support oral language learning is important. Early childhood classrooms can provide many opportunities to support language learning. Teacher feedback is an intentional teaching strategy to…

  17. Transmediation in the Language Arts Classroom: Creating Contexts for Analysis and Ambiguity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    When a language arts curriculum provided students with the opportunity to translate meaning across sign systems (that is, from poetry to dance), numerous benefits were noted. Transmediation, the translation of meaning from one sign system to another, led students to analyze compositional structures and to enhance their use of academic language

  18. Task-Based Language Teaching: For the State Secondary FL Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruton, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate the applicability of task-based language teaching (TBLT) to state secondary foreign language classes. After discussion of method in general, TBLT is defined and its particularities described. Tasks are assessed as the basis for syllabus and then as the basis for method. In both cases, the proposals are…

  19. Setting the Foundation for Working with English Language Learners in the Secondary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Helen; Petron, Mary; Greybeck, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In many schools, an increasing number of students are learning English as their second language. Secondary teachers are faced with the challenge of teaching English Language Learners (ELLs) with little or no training. This article highlights ideas and strategies that teachers can incorporate to make their instruction more effective in meeting the…

  20. Criteria for Evaluating Synchronous Learning Management Systems: Arguments from the Distance Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Chen, N.-S.

    2009-01-01

    As Virtual Learning Environments (VLE) supported by synchronous technologies such as Synchronous Learning Management Systems (SLMSs) are still new to distance language professionals, criteria guiding the evaluation of the appropriate SLMSs for Distance Language Education (DLE) are urgently needed. This article proposes and discusses such criteria.…

  1. The Emergence of U.S. French Language Learners' Intercultural Competence in Online Classroom Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett-Rucks, Paula

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to further the understanding of foreign language (FL) learners' development of intercultural competence in an instructed learning environment. In this study, second-semester U.S. French language learners enrolled in a Midwestern two-year technical school were directed to access explicit cultural instruction, authentic…

  2. The Integration of English Language Development and Science Instruction in Elementary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwiep, Susan Gomez; Straits, William J.; Stone, Kristin R.; Beltran, Dolores D.; Furtado, Leena

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores one district's attempt to implement a blended science and English Language Development (ELD) elementary program, designed to provide English language learners opportunities to develop proficiency in English through participation in inquiry-based science. This process resulted in blended program that utilized a combined…

  3. Effective Behavior Management in Preschool Classrooms and Children's Task Orientation: Enhancing Emergent Literacy and Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs-Oates, Jennifer; Kaderavek, Joan N.; Guo, Ying; Justice, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relations among preschool teachers' behavior management, children's task orientation, and children's emergent literacy and language development, as well as the extent to which task orientation moderated the relation between teachers' behavior management and children's emergent literacy and language development.…

  4. Developing Pre-Service English Teachers' Competencies for Integration of Technology in Language Classrooms in Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, Victor V.; Jantassova, Damira D.; Churchill, Natalia

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the implementation of the "Information and Communication Technologies in Foreign Language Teaching and Learning" course conducted as a component of the pre-service English language teacher training program in the Buketov Karaganda State University, Kazakhstan. The course was introduced in 2003. The central objective of the…

  5. Opening the Science Doorway: Strategies and Suggestions for Incorporating English Language Learners in the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Sandy

    2004-01-01

    Due to unavailable effective methods for teaching science to language-minority students, science teachers attempting to teach bilingual students experience frustration and become disheartened and discouraged. Often, science teachers only learn successful minority-language teaching strategies through trial and error or through networking and…

  6. Classrooms in the Wild: Learning Language and Life Skills in the KUIS Outdoor Sports Circle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurr, Adrian

    The role of outdoor education activities in the Kanda University English language institute is described. The outdoor program was developed to unite faculty and students interested in recreational activities and provide an opportunity to explore common interests in nature, sports, and language learning. The activities develop self-esteem,…

  7. Promoting Humor with Prekindergarten Children with and without Language Impairments in Classroom Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Karen L.; Craig-Unkefer, Lesley

    2008-01-01

    The promotion of language and social skill development for young children occurs in multiple contexts with a range of empirically validated methods. One specific intervention strategy used to promote language and communication would be to arrange the environment so that it is structured to elicit a range of communicative functions, such as…

  8. Examination of the Relationship between Perfectionism and English Achievement as Mediated by Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    GhorbanDordinejad, Farhad; Nasab, Amir Hosein Farjad

    2013-01-01

    There are a number of individual and affective factors which correlate foreign language learners' achievement both positively and negatively. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between perfectionism and English language achievement among high school third graders in Chenaran, a city in northeast of Iran, mediated by foreign…

  9. Scottish Classroom Voices: A Case Study of Teaching and Learning Scots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoba, Jo Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Research in multilingual classrooms demonstrates education as a key site within which social and linguistic values are shaped. This study extends such research by investigating language use in a Scottish primary classroom. Scots is widely spoken throughout Scotland, figuring in a 2003 Scottish Parliament report as one of two indigenous heritage…

  10. First language transfer in second language writing: An examination of current research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Karim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available First language (L1 transfer has been a key issue in the field of applied linguistics, second language acquisition (SLA, and language pedagogy for almost a century. Its importance, however, has been re-evaluated several times within the last few decades. The aim of this paper is to examine current research that has investigated the role of L1 transfer in second language (L2 writing. The paper begins by discussing the different views of L1 transfer and how they have changed over time and then reviews some of the major studies that have examined the role of L1 transfer both as a learning tool and as a communicative strategy in L2 writing. The paper concludes with a number of suggestions for L2 writing instruction and future research.

  11. Communication and Language in Learners Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing With Disabilities: Theories, Research, and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Susan M; Borders, Christy

    2015-01-01

    findings are presented from communication intervention research in three areas related to deafness with disability (DWD): D/deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) with (a) intellectual disability, (b) autism spectrum disorders, (c) deafblindness. Early identification, prevalence, theoretical perspectives, and evidence-based practices are discussed. Developmental theory, behavioral theory, and social-interactionism theory undergird many assessment and intervention practices in communication. The tri-focus framework and the four aspects of communication are useful frameworks. While communication research is a relative strength in the deafblindness field, a dire need exists for research in the other two DWD areas. Across all DWD areas there is a need for interventions addressing receptive language. Effective communication and language intervention can only occur when children who are DWD are identified early, placed in individually suitable classrooms with appropriately prepared professionals, and provided with services that build on their strengths and meet their needs. PMID:26497075

  12. Listening Comprehension in the Foreign Language Classroom. CAL-ERIC/CLL Series on Languages and Linguistics, No. 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Terence; Wheeler, James

    This paper suggests that language teachers reconsider their approach to listening comprehension, as recent studies seem to indicate that listening is not a passive but a highly active skill. The importance of listening comprehension as an independent skill is stressed in the first section, and principles of speech processing from which the…

  13. Comparing students' performance on research-based conceptual assessments and traditional classroom assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, N. Sanjay

    2012-02-01

    The use of concept inventories to investigate students' learning gains is common in physics education research. However, comparatively little research has compared students' learning gains on concept inventories with other more traditional assessments in the classroom. We present a study comparing second semester calculus-based physics students' performance on traditional classroom assessments including exams and homework with learning gains on SEMCO (Survey of Electricity, Magnetism, Circuits and Optics), which was previously created by combining questions on other conceptual surveys such as CSEM and DIRECT. We report on students' performance on specific items on SEMCO and corresponding traditional classroom assessments that are based on the same topic. Our results indicate that while the overall performance on SEMCO might correlate with aggregate performance on class exams, the performance on clusters of SEMCO items that assess conceptual understanding in various topical areas does not correlate as strongly with performance on corresponding traditional exams. These results raise some potentially interesting issues on the validity and usefulness of traditional classroom assessments and conceptual assessments that are often used to measure student learning in introductory physics.

  14. English language teaching textbooks content, consumption, production

    CERN Document Server

    Harwood, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    English language teaching textbooks (or coursebooks) play a central role in the life of a classroom. This edited volume contains research-informed chapters focusing on: analysis of textbook content; how textbooks are used in the classroom; and textbook writers' accounts of the materials writing, design, and publishing process.

  15. Focus on the use of language in the multicultural mathematics classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Lene Østergaard

    Learning mathematics can be seen as learning a foreign language or learning a particular mathematical discourse.  Nolte (2004) calls mathematics the students' first second language. The use of language in mathematics teaching, hence the way we talk and the way we write, differ from the way the same words and concepts are used in everyday language or in teaching and learning other subjects. Looking through material for mathematics teaching shows that the students are expected to have a certain level of mathematical ability (ex. being able to count to ten) and a certain level of language ability (ex. understanding the meaning of the words "in front of") when they enter first grade in primary school (Nyborg and Nyborg, 1990). Students who lack these abilities either with regard to mathematics or language are from the beginning of schooling limited in their mathematical performance and in a "risk zone" of developing learning difficulties in mathematics. Teaching the teachers a consciousness for the use of language in mathematics teaching as well as educating them to have a special focus on developing the vocabulary of the students can render the mathematics teaching more inclusive. Furthermore, it may help students with different ethnical background to succeed in mathematics (Johansen; 2007).

  16. A New Educational Scaffolding Approach to Support Authentic Solar Research in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuth, N.; Walker, C. E.; Isbell, D. M.; Pompea, S. M.

    2006-12-01

    Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science Education (TLRBSE) is a multi-year teacher professional development program sponsored by NSF and administered through the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). The program reaches the formal education community through a national audience of well-trained and supported middle- and high-school teachers. Every year, a new cohort of teachers prepare for research through an on-line course in the spring. In the summer they conduct astronomy research at NOAO, working with astronomer-mentors to gather and analyze their data. They then return to their classrooms and engage their students in inquiry-based astronomy research using this authentic data. TLRBSE has much to offer teachers both inside and outside the program who wish to initiate research in the classroom. However, the activation energy to conduct authentic research is high. To address the needs of a wider audience of teachers and students, steps have been taken to supply web-based foundational resources for the solar research program. Teachers can use this "solar scaffolding" to support the implementation of authentic solar research in the classroom. The scaffolding files on the webpage will serve as a template for other TLRBSE research strands, as well as enable non-TLRBSE middle and high school teachers to download and use TLRBSE data in their own classrooms. The resultant webpage has links to high quality, vetted resources (webpages, interactives, movies, etc.) that provide content background and lesson plans relevant to solar research. Tools on presenting research, print resources, sample articles on research, videos, DVDs, and posters are included. Powerpoint presentations have been provided with lecture notes on themes ranging from "Why Study the Sun" to "The Nature of Light." Sample teaching materials give examples for a calendar to implement the research project, a daily point sheet, a rubric for a student poster evaluation, a student research project description and a student self evaluation. Various background activities help to pave the way to more challenging solar research projects. As a culminating feature, the website includes several downloadable support files from the TLRBSE solar research project, as well as the solar data files and software programs. These scaffolding resources and future directions will be described in detail. NOAO is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation. For further information on the TLRBSE.

  17. Research on First Language Attrition of Morphosyntax in Adult Bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurel, Ayse

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a selective review of previous research findings on first language (L1) attrition. The review is intentionally limited in scope as it only discusses studies on morphosyntactic attrition in the L1 grammar of adult bilinguals. To this end--and in order to present the most current line of research in this field--I first report…

  18. Practice and Progression in Second Language Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Since its inception, the field of second language research has utilized methods from a number of areas, including general linguistics, psychology, education, sociology, anthropology and, recently, neuroscience and corpus linguistics. As the questions and objectives expand, researchers are increasingly pushing methodological boundaries to gain a…

  19. Teaching English language learners in mainstream science classrooms: Teacher practice and educational opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Carlotta Dorothy

    2011-12-01

    Equal educational opportunity for English language learners (ELLs) has been a goal of the public educational system in the United States. Language policy reforms have increasedaccountability in order for schools to improve student achievement and measure the progress of ELLs. The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) requires assessment and accountability. In this study, the number of ELLs has increased significantly at the high school level and school district as a whole. Along with the changing demographics, the findings reveal a district-wide policy of equalizing educational opportunity through equal treatment. Language policies provide critical decisions about how to measure what students know in all subjects. The assimilation model limited access to mainstream course content, produced inaccurate assessment results and grades. The science curriculum was only accessible through English and the use of the students' native languages was discouraged. The voices of the students were silenced and their academic achievement continues to lag behind their English-speaking peers.

  20. Fostering Intercultural Communicative Competence in the Foreign Language Classroom: Pedagogical Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Vicente Beltrán-Palanques

    2014-01-01

    The development of learners' communicative competence has been regarded as the major goal of foreign and second language teaching. Several authors have advanced various communicative models in order to better explain how language teaching and learning work (e.g. Canale & Swain, 1980; Canale, 1983; Bachman, 1990; Celce-Murcia et al. 1995; Usó-Juan & Martínez-Flor 2006). One of the elements of the communicative model is that of intercultural competence (Byram, 1997; Usó-Juan & Martínez-Flor, 20...

  1. The Effects of Global Education in the English Language Conversation Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Reza Omidvar; Benjamin Sukumar

    2013-01-01

    Global education is the backbone of balanced teaching. This is also applicable in the second language teaching domain where its application could result in enhancing global awareness and the linguistic competence of learners. It is, however, important to consider the platform of teaching English to speakers of other languages where the participant’s content as well as task plays an important role in enhancing the learning curve. With the above as a theoretical background, this study puts glob...

  2. PRACTICAL VALUE OF UNDERSTANDING THE MINDSET OF SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS AND STUDENTS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

    OpenAIRE

    Noora Abdul Kader

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mind set of students and teachers seeks much more importance in the present scenario. The present study is intended to find the type of mindset of secondary school students in learning English language on the select areas and also made an attempt to find out the effect of fixed mindset of students on the attitude of students towards English language. Understanding the mind set of secondary school English teachers regarding the performance and attitude of students in learning...

  3. Une approche discursive de la classe de langue étrangère en tant que lieu de travail / A discoursive approach of foreign language classroom as a place of work

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Décio, Rocha.

    Full Text Available O presente artigo centra-se na análise dos discursos da aula de língua estrangeira em uma situação particular: o ensino da língua francesa como língua profissional. Nosso objetivo consistirá em depreender marcas enunciativas por intermédio das quais se inscreve a natureza do trabalho realizado em sa [...] la de aula, tendo em vista a construção coletiva de um texto cuja autoria é responsabilidade dos atores da cena didática, professor e alunos. Para tal, interrogamos esses discursos da sala de aula sob uma tríplice ótica: em primeiro lugar, a oposição que se verifica entre trabalho coletivo e trabalho individual; a seguir, a dupla função exercida pela linguagem no referido contexto, a saber, a linguagem enquanto trabalho e a linguagem sobre o trabalho; finalmente, a distância que se verifica entre o trabalho prescrito e o trabalho real da sala de aula. Abstract in english This paper focuses the analysis of speech in foreign language classroom in a particular situation: the teaching of French as a professional language. Our purpose will be to explore enunciative marks that contribute to determine the nature of the work carried out in classroom throughout the collectiv [...] e construction of a text which is built by the actors of the didactic scene, the teacher and the students. In order to achieve our goal, we will interrogate these discourses from a triple point of view: first of all, the opposition between collective work and individual work in classroom; afterwards, the double function of language - language as work and language about work - in such a context; finally, the distance verified between prescribed work and real work in classroom.

  4. Discussing Animal Rights and Animal Research in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Harold A.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews two prominent philosophical justifications for animal liberation and describes a simulation that facilitates class discussion of animal research issues. Students reported that the exercise increased their awareness of the issues and of the complexity of making ethical decisions. (DB)

  5. Divergent Perceptions of Telecollaborative Language Learning Tasks: Task-as-Workplan vs. Task-as-Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooly, Melinda

    2011-01-01

    The use of computer-supported collaborative learning is more and more commonplace in language learning classrooms; this has given rise to the need for more research on roles and processes of telecollaboration in language teaching and learning and how online interactions are integrated with face-to-face classroom activities. Using a data-driven,…

  6. Research on teaching of "Solar Eclipse" in primary classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Winnie Wing Mui SO; Yun Foon KWONG

    2003-01-01

    It has been realized that children have their own understanding of how the world works preceding formal education in schools. It is also found in research that the social-cultural views about specific scientific concepts have generated certain alternative concepts in pupils. A great number of western studies have been done to find out students' science understanding; less has been done to understand local children's understanding of science. This research attempts to explore children's unders...

  7. Experimental research on thermal comfort in the university classroom of regular semesters in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research has investigated physical variables affecting indoor thermal comfort and subjective responses of thermal comfort of students in a university in Korea in which the weather is oceanic temperate climate, and has been performed to contribute to the research fields of Sustainable Thermal Standard and Adaptive Thermal Comfort (ATC). This research is based on the ISO 7730-2005 standard and the ATC theories and 4 main variables of PMV such as dry bulb temperature (Ta), relative humidity (RH), black bulb temperature (Tg), and air velocity (Va) are measured once a week during two regular semesters. A clothing insulation, a thermal sensation vote (TSV), an acceptability of thermal environment, and a preference for cooling and heating are investigated at the same time using a questionnaire. This study was carried out for 26 weeks during the spring season, from March to June 2009, and the autumn season, from September to December 2009. The main achievements of this study are as follows. Monthly Mean Outdoor Temperature (MMOT) and Operative Temperature (OT) in the classroom during research periods are 7.4?23.3 .deg. C and 17.5?29.0 .deg. C, respectively. The acceptability ratio of thermal environment shows over 80% when the range of OT in the classroom is 17?25 .deg. C, and the range can be applicable to operative index of heating and cooling of classroom. The mean TSV of respondents is almost 'neutral (0)' when the PMV in the classroom moves to 'neutral (0)' and 'slightly cool (-1)', and the TSV is almost '+1.5' when the PMV moves to 'slightly warm (+1)'. The acceptability ratio of thermal environment is slightly different from ASHRAE Standard 55-2004. So it is necessary to more investigate standard range of acceptability of thermal environment in oceanic temperate climate region using much more databases

  8. The Impact of the Interactive Whiteboard on the Teacher and Children's Language Use in an ESL Immersion Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Yvette; Yanez, Lorena; Verdu, Mercedes

    2010-01-01

    As a teaching resource, interactive whiteboards (IWB) are becoming increasingly popular in schools outside the UK, including Spain. Research carried out so far has tended to examine the effects of IWB use on teaching and learning in monolingual contexts where English is the first language for learners. The present study adds a new dimension to…

  9. "I Never Really Knew the History behind African American Language": Critical Language Pedagogy in an Advanced Placement English Language Arts Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Bell, April

    2013-01-01

    This article responds to two long-standing dilemmas that limit the effectiveness of language education for students who speak and write in African American Language (AAL): (1) the gap between theory and research on AAL and classroom practice, and (2) the need for critical language pedagogies. This article presents the effectiveness of a critical…

  10. The embodied turn in research on language and social interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    I use the term the embodied turn to mean the point when interest in the body became established among researchers on language and social interaction, exploiting the greater ease of video-recording. This review paper tracks the growth of "embodiment" in over 400 papers published in Research on Language and Social Interaction from 1987-2013. I consider closely two areas where analysts have confronted challenges, and how they have responded: settling on precise and analytically helpful terminology for the body; and transcribing and representing the body, particularly its temporality and manner.

  11. Mathematics Education and Language Diversity: A Dialogue across Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phakeng, Mamokgethi Setati; Moschkovich, Judit N.

    2013-01-01

    This article shares the authors' views on language-diversity issues in research in mathematics education. Described are tensions, questions, and myths that they have regularly faced as researchers. They use similarities and differences in two settings (multilingual classrooms in South Africa and U.S. mathematics classrooms with Latino/a…

  12. Promoting Science Among English Language Learners: Professional Development for Today's Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Cory; Lee, Okhee; Santau, Alexandra

    2008-10-01

    We describe a model professional development intervention currently being implemented to support 3rd- through 5th-grade teachers’ science instruction in 9 urban elementary schools with high numbers of English language learners. The intervention consists of curriculum materials for students and teachers, as well as teacher workshops throughout the school year. The curriculum materials and workshops are designed to complement and reinforce each other in improving teachers’ knowledge, beliefs, and practices in science instruction and English language development for ELL students. In addition to these primary goals, secondary goals of the intervention included supporting mathematical understanding, improving scientific reasoning, capitalizing on students’ home language and culture, and preparing students for high-stakes science testing and accountability through hands-on, inquiry-based learning experiences.

  13. Visual Methodology in Classroom Inquiry: Enhancing Complementary Qualitative Research Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the argument that combining visual methods with other qualitative research methods enhances the inherent strengths of each methodology and allows new understandings to emerge. These would otherwise remain hidden if only one method were used in isolation. In a qualitative inquiry of an elementary teacher's constructivist…

  14. Researching the Minimum Wage: A Moral Economy for the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neverow-Turk, Vara

    1991-01-01

    Describes a writing assignment that requires students to research and report on what it would be like to live on minimum wage. Explains that this assignment is not really any different than the traditional assignment, it is simply more obvious about its political content because it involves an inquiry into economics rather than literature or…

  15. Stress and Stress Relief in the Educational Research Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Vicki A.

    Factors that increase stress and those that decrease stress were studied with 33 graduate students in an introductory educational research course. Participants completed the Statistical Anxiety Rating Scale (STARS) (R. Cruse, R. Cash, and D. Bolton, 1985) and were asked to rate their anxiety daily during the 4 weeks of the class. The instructor's…

  16. Identity, literacy, and English language teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Bonny Norton

    2013-01-01

    In the field of English language teaching, there has been increasing interest in the way literacy development is influenced by institutional and community practices, and the way power is implicated in language learners’ engagement with text. In this paper, I trace the trajectory of my research on identity, literacy, and English language teaching, informed by theories of investment and imagined communities. Data from English language classrooms in Canada, Pakistan, and Uganda sugge...

  17. Significance of Literature in Foreign Language Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Ruzbeh Babaee; Wan Roselezam Bt Wan Yahya

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to consider literature as a significant tool for teaching fundamental language skills including speaking, listening, reading and writing. Reasons for the use of literature in language classrooms and major factors for choosing appropriate kinds of literary texts in such classes should be highlighted in order to make readers aware of the primary reasons that why language instructors are suggested to use literary texts. Furthermore, teaching language skills through literature,...

  18. Fostering Intercultural Communicative Competence Through Reading Authentic Literary Texts in an Advanced Colombian EFL Classroom: A Constructivist Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez Luis Fernando

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an action research experience carried out in an advanced English as a foreign language classroom of the language program at a university in Bogotá, Colombia, in 2010. The study proposes the inclusion of authentic literary texts in the English as a foreign language classroom through the implementation of four constructivist approaches as a means to develop intercultural communicative competence. Data were collected to show how those approaches engaged learners t...

  19. Language and Space in a Multilingual Undergraduate Physics Classroom in Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ingrid; Rusanganwa, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This case study examines how a lecturer and a group of students adjust to a request for English-only medium of instruction in tertiary education. The study draws on sociocultural theories considering context and language use as tools for meaning making. Goffman's theories of stage setting and footing are used to analyse how the lecturer positions…

  20. Learning to Watch Cinema in the Classroom: Production and Investigation for the Teaching of Cinematographic Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Ana Luisa; Fandos, Manuel; Aguaded, Jose-Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    This article synthesises an investigation of the making of a didactic programme as a consequence of the excess of consumption of audiovisual messages and the non critical and non-thoughtful attitude the youngsters have towards it. As an answer to this problem, the authors have produced a didactical programme about cinema and its language, the main…

  1. Learning to Teach English-Language Learners in Mainstreamed Secondary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaoan; Stephens, Vernon

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined six preservice teachers' learning of knowledge for secondary English-language learners (ELLs). The results indicated that the Student Teacher Enrichment Program helped preservice teachers become aware of the strategies for teaching ELLs and realize the discrepancies and differences between ELL code and linguistic…

  2. Reaching English Language Learners in Every Classroom: Energizers for Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arechiga, Debbie

    2012-01-01

    Reach all of your English language learners with the effective and engaging approaches in this book. It's filled with practical tools, strategies, and real-world vignettes that will help you teach reading and writing to a diverse student population. The book features "Mental Energizers," aptitudes that will help sustain your commitment as you work…

  3. Videoconferencing Improves Students' Language Learning in the EFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Mi-Young

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze a videoconferencing class for English as a foreign language (EFL), and to investigate how learners can develop their linguistic competence via videoconferencing. It examines the benefits and drawbacks of using videoconferencing systems in class. Forty-five students (19 graduates and 26 undergraduates) in a…

  4. Sound Effects: Social Pressure and Identity Negotiation in the Spanish Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkowitz, Natalie; Hedgcock, John S.

    2006-01-01

    This study explores how social pressure and identity construction patterns interact with the oral performance of secondary and post-secondary learners of Spanish as a foreign language. Data derive from 268 questionnaires probing students' perceptions of Spanish, Spanish speakers, their peers, and their instructors. Ethnographic interviews…

  5. Shakespeare as a Second Language: Playfulness, Power and Pedagogy in the ESL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Astrid Yi-Mei; Winston, Joe

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an argument for the inclusion of Shakespeare in the senior high school ESL (English as a Second Language) curriculum in Taiwan, to be taught through a physical, participatory pedagogy in line with the approaches of drama education in general and those currently being promoted by the education department of the UK-based Royal…

  6. School-Readiness Profiles of Children with Language Impairment: Linkages to Home and Classroom Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentimonti, Jill M.; Justice, Laura M.; Kaderavek, Joan N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study represents an effort to advance our understanding of the nature of school readiness among children with language impairment (LI), a population of children acknowledged to be at risk of poor academic achievement. The academic, social-emotional, and behavioural competencies with which children arrive at kindergarten affect the…

  7. Preschool Second-Language Acquisition: A Parent Involvement Program To Reinforce Classroom Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, Dorothy

    Although Montessori parents recognize the importance of early second-language acquisition and would like to help their children obtain these skills, they often lack the knowledge that would enable them to take an active role in supporting such learning. The staff of the Montessori Center of Nyack, New York, devised three simple ways to bring…

  8. Cross-Language Poetics: Proposal for an Interdisciplinary Research Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis, Norbert

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available For creative writers and for readers, opportunities to work with language in ways that engage two linguistic systems and/or two writing systems continue to expand with the growing influence of international and regional lingua francas. At the same time, we have witnessed the continuing development of literary creation in languages with fewer speakers, even in communities facing the outright erosion and replacement of their language. Alongside the tendencies of globalization, literature has also become more diverse, a new recognition of multilingualism and multiculturalism emerging among writers and readers alike. The special circumstances of composition and understanding that the different kinds of language and cultural interaction highlight also present us with an opportunity to study what it is that is fundamental in verbal art. After reviewing three historical examples of European origin (in Section 2 we will turn our attention to problems of language, writing system and poetry in East Asia (in Section 3. The examples from history will help us to put the current situation of multilingual and multicultural contexts for literature into a broader perspective. This is will allow us to return to consider a proposal for research on cross-language poetics.

  9. A Framework for Successful Research Experiences in the Classroom: Combining the Power of Technology and Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Paige Valderrama; Stefanov, William L.; Willis, Kim; Runco, Susan; McCollum, Tim; Lindgren, Charles F.; Baker, Marshalyn; Mailhot, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Authentic research opportunities in the classroom are most impactful when they are student-driven and inquiry-based. These experiences are even more powerful when they involve technology and meaningful connections with scientists. In today's classrooms, activities are driven by state required skills, education standards, and state mandated testing. Therefore, programs that incorporate authentic research must address the needs of teachers. NASA's Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program has developed a framework that addresses teacher needs and incorporates the use of technology and access to mentors to promote and enhance authentic research in the classroom. EEAB is a student involvement program that facilitates student investigations of Earth or planetary comparisons using NASA data. To promote student-led research, EEAB provides standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources, an implementation structure to facilitate research, educator professional development, and ongoing support. This framework also provides teachers with the option to incorporate the use of technology and connect students with a mentor, both of which can enrich student research experiences. The framework is structured by a modeled 9-step process of science which helps students organize their research. With more schools gaining increased access to technology, EEAB has created an option to help schools take advantage of students' interest and comfort with technology by leveraging the use of available technologies to enhance student research. The use of technology not only allows students to collaborate and share their research, it also provides a mechanism for them to work with a mentor. This framework was tested during the 2010/2011 school year. Team workspaces hosted on Wikispaces for Educators allow students to initiate their research and refine their research question initially without external input. This allows teams to work independently and rely on the skills and interests of team members. Once teams finalize their research question, they are assigned a mentor. The mentor introduces himself/herself, acknowledges the initial work the team has conducted, and asks a focused question to help open the lines of communication. Students continue to communicate with their mentor throughout their research. As research is completed, teams can share their investigation during a virtual presentation. These live presentations allow students to share their research with their mentor, other scientists, other students, parents, and school administrators. After the initial year of testing this authentic research process, EEAB is working to address the many lessons learned. This will allow the program to refine and improve the overall process in an effort to maximize the benefits. Combined, these powerful strategies provide a successful framework to help teachers enhance the skills and motivation of their students, preparing them to become the next generation of scientists, explorers, and STEM-literate citizens of our nation.

  10. Astrophysical Computation in Research, the Classroom and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Adam

    2009-03-01

    In this talk I review progress in the use of simulations as a tool for astronomical research, for education and public outreach. The talk will include the basic elements of numerical simulations as well as advances in algorithms which have led to recent dramatic progress such as the use of Adaptive Mesh Refinement methods. The scientific focus of the talk will be star formation jets and outflows while the educational emphasis will be on the use of advanced platforms for simulation based learning in lecture and integrated homework. Learning modules for science outreach websites such as DISCOVER magazine will also be highlighted.

  11. Dyslexia in Chinese Language: An Overview of Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kevin K. H.; Ho, Connie S. H.

    2010-01-01

    Dyslexia appears to be the most prevalent disability of students with special educational needs in many mainstream classes, affecting around 9.7% of the school population in Hong Kong. The education of these students is therefore of great concern to the community. In the present paper research into dyslexia in the Chinese language is briefly…

  12. Statistical Literacy among Applied Linguists and Second Language Acquisition Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewen, Shawn; Lavolette, Elizabeth; Spino, Le Anne; Papi, Mostafa; Schmidtke, Jens; Sterling, Scott; Wolff, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    The importance of statistical knowledge in applied linguistics and second language acquisition (SLA) research has been emphasized in recent publications. However, the last investigation of the statistical literacy of applied linguists occurred more than 25 years ago (Lazaraton, Riggenbach, & Ediger, 1987). The current study undertook a partial…

  13. Research Methodology on Language Development from a Complex Systems Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen-Freeman, Diane; Cameron, Lynne

    2008-01-01

    Changes to research methodology motivated by the adoption of a complexity theory perspective on language development are considered. The dynamic, nonlinear, and open nature of complex systems, together with their tendency toward self-organization and interaction across levels and timescales, requires changes in traditional views of the functions…

  14. A Pragmatist Perspective on Building Intercultural Communicative Competency: From Theory to Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Aleidine J.; Osborn, Sarah R. Faltin

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes and synthesizes the major theoretical frameworks for building intercultural communicative competency (ICC) within the domain of the foreign language classroom. Researchers used a pragmatist orientation as a venue for the translation of theoretical models into usable, accessible guidelines for classroom teachers in order to…

  15. Independent Environmental Modeling Research in the Undergraduate Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittinghill, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    Models allow scientists and others to represent features and behaviors of environmental systems in order to promote inquiry, develop insights, test hypotheses, and consider solutions to problems. Environmental modeling also offers a way to include independent research on environmental issues in undergraduate classes, especially during winter when outdoor labs are more difficult. I will present on an Environmental Studies Topics course on Environmental Modeling taught at St. Olaf College during interim, including student feedback. The class used primary literature and hands on experiences with computer models to introduce environmentally relevant modeling tools. Topics covered in readings, lectures, or student presentations included process based models of disease, climate, ice, ecosystems, ecosystem services, hydrology, predator-prey systems, and competition among species for resources. Students conducted student-designed original research projects either by developing their own environmental model or by using existing models. Students participating in the class were environmental studies, economics, biology, math, or physics majors, although the class was open to all students who were "comfortable thinking quantitatively". No prior programming experience was required as a prerequisite, although students who had previous experience with R or Matlab were able to design more complex models. The students were graded on their class participation in discussions, several modeling "checkpoint" assignments designed to monitor progress, and on 4 in-class presentations designed to foster a collaborative atmosphere and improve communication skills. While the course was taught over a month-long interim "semester", students were evenly divided in their feedback about whether they would prefer the course in that format or in a semester-long format.

  16. The Combine Project: An Experience in a Dual-Language Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Wilson

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes what happened when a bilingual kindergarten class in West Liberty, Iowa, investigated a combine. The dual-language program supports content area instruction in both Spanish and English. The first part of the article tells the story of the Combine Project, this class's first project work. The story begins with a typical kindergarten field trip to a farm and ends with a parent night to show a combine constructed by the kindergartners. The second part of the article discusses the teacher's reflections on learning how to guide projects. Reflections by the teacher include relating kindergarten goals to projects, supporting second-language learners, involving parents, and including children with special needs.

  17. Investigating participation level in foreign language classrooms through the analysis of communicative discourse

    OpenAIRE

    Velasco Moreno, Mª. Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Foreign Language classes have not been sufficiently investigated probably due to the difficulty of finding a successful method of analysis. We propose a model of Communicative Discourse Analysis (CODAM) with a taxonomy of Verbal and Non Verbal acts in Initiation, Response and Follow Up moves (I, R, F) according to the intention of each speaker's contribution to communicative discourse. By applying CODAM to the corpus obtained from actual classes in Andalusia, we have been able to compare not ...

  18. Natural Conversation Reconstruction Tasks: The Language Classroom as a Meeting Place

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ohashi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper, drawing on Pratt’s notion of ‘transculturation’ and Bhabha’s ‘third space’, presents an example of language learning tasks that empower learners’ agency and promote their cross-cultural awareness and sensitivities to a different set of cultural expectations, using a naturally occurred Japanese thanking episodes. The paper discusses the merits of Natural Conversation Reconstruction Tasks (NCRTs as a practical method for helping L2 learners develop this ‘intercultural competence’. It is based on a qualitative study of the results of one NCRT created for use in the context of teaching Japanese as a L2 in a multicultural society. It suggests the NCRT encourages the learners to explore the intersection where language use, speaker intention and L1 and L2 cultural norms meet. Such a process helps the learners become aware of socially expected patterns of communication in L1 and L2 in terms of the choices of speech act, formulaic expressions, sequential organization and politeness orientation. The learners’ comments suggest that the NCRT helps learners transcend their cultural boundaries by overcoming their narrow understanding of ‘thanking’ as ‘expressions of gratitude and appreciation’ and by cross-culturally widening their views of what counts as thanking. The NCRT with rich contextual information promotes the learners’ intercultural awareness, sensitivity to context and intercultural exploration in the space between L1 and L2, where they have authority and freedom of making sense of conversations, and pragmatics is fully integrated into language pedagogy.

  19. Earth2Class Overview: An Innovative Program Linking Classroom Educators and Research Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, M.; Iturrino, G. J.; Baggio, F. D.; Assumpcao, C. M.

    2005-12-01

    The Earth2Class (E2C) workshops, held at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO), provide an effective model for improving knowledge, teaching, and technology skills of middle and high school science educators through ongoing interactions with research scientists and educational technology. With support from an NSF GeoEd grant, E2C has developed monthly workshops, web-based resources, and summer institutes in which classroom teachers and research scientists have produced exemplar curriculum materials about a wide variety of cutting-edge geoscience investigations suitable for dissemination to teachers and students. Some of the goals of this program are focused to address questions such as: (1) What aspects of the E2C format and educational technology most effectively connect research discoveries with classroom teachers and their students? (2) What benefits result through interactions among teachers from highly diverse districts and backgrounds with research scientists, and what benefits do the scientists gain from participation? (3) How can the E2C format serve as a model for other research institution-school district partnerships as a mechanism for broader dissemination of scientific discoveries? E2C workshops have linked LDEO scientists from diverse research specialties-seismology, marine geology, paleoclimatology, ocean drilling, dendrochronology, remote sensing, impact craters, and others-with teachers from schools in the New York metropolitan area. Through the workshops, we have trained teachers to enhance content knowledge in the Earth Sciences and develop skills to incorporate new technologies. We have made a special effort to increase the teaching competency of K-12 Earth Sciences educators serving in schools with high numbers of students from underrepresented groups, thereby providing greater role models to attract students into science and math careers. E2C sponsored Earth Science Teachers Conferences, bringing together educators from New York and New Jersey to consider challenges facing classroom teachers trying to incorporate recent research discoveries into the curriculum. Their efforts led to creating web-based resources that provide succinct statements of core concepts, essential vocabulary lists, selected labs, activities, and links to Internet sites providing scientific information that may not be incorporated into textbooks for years. The E2C web site (www.earth2class.org), has become an important resource for Earth Science educators. It provides an effective format for disseminating results of scientific research to teachers and students through a workshop section that includes an introduction, links to scientific discoveries, and suggestions for classroom applications. The educational resources section provides extensive curricular materials, including lesson plans, classroom activities, and links to state and national Science Education Standards. Overall, E2C seeks to make significant contributions to national efforts for creating networks of science researchers working with classroom teachers and teacher-trainers seeking effective methods for innovative instructional techniques, problem-solving strategies, and professional development, as well as meeting the challenges of state and national mandates.

  20. Research in Progress: Invited Colloquium--Foreign Languages in an Age of Globalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramsch, Claire

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of globalization and the increasingly multilingual and multicultural nature of nations, institutions and classrooms, the fundamental nature of foreign language instruction is changing. Such traditional notions as: "native speaker", "target culture", "standard L2" are becoming problematic with the…

  1. LANGUAGES AND LANGUAGE VARIETIES: COMPARATIVE RESEARCH ON THE LINGUISTIC ATTITUDES IN FOUR BILINGUAL MINORITY COMMUNITIES IN HUNGARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Borbely

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A central issue of this paper is to study the patterns in variation of attitudes toward minority language varieties in four minority communities from Hungary: German, Slovak, Serb and Romanian. This study takes part from the research which focuses on how to obtain significant information about the mechanism of the language shift process concerning autochthonous minorities in Hungary. The results demonstrate that in the course of language shift communities at an advanced stage of language shift have less positive attitudes toward their minority languages than individuals from communities where language shift is in a less advanced stage.In Hungarian minority groups speakers’ attitudes toward minority language varieties (dialect vs. standard are the symptoms of language shift.

  2. Forging new pathways for research on language learning motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raby Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on motivation in the field of applied linguistics seeks to better understand how and why learners become involved in learning activities and maintain their efforts in this regard. Dörnyei provided a seminal model drawing essentially from cognitive and social psychology (Dörnyei, 2001. In the wake of his reflection, and after investigating motivation in a range of academic contexts, we are now able to present our own model, which is dynamic, weighted, and polytomic (Raby, 2007. After presenting cognitive ergonomics as a new pathway for research in second language acquisition, we shall present the results of our investigations in foreign language learning motivation in technologically enhanced contexts, outlining major methodological difficulties pertaining to this sort of this grounded research.

  3. Carving the World for Language: How Neuroscientific Research Can Enrich the Study of First and Second Language Learning

    OpenAIRE

    George, Nathan R.; Göksun, Tilbe; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick

    2014-01-01

    Linguistics, psychology, and neuroscience all have rich histories in language research. Crosstalk among these disciplines, as realized in studies of phonology, is pivotal for understanding a fundamental challenge for first and second language learners (SLLs): learning verbs. Linguistic and behavioral research with monolinguals suggests that infants attend to foundational event components (e.g., path, manner). Language then heightens or dampens attention to these components as children map wor...

  4. L’erreur fondamentale d’attribution dans la classe de langue Fundamental attribution errors in the foreign language classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Müller-Jacquier

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Dans la classe de langue étrangère, les étudiants apprennent les conventions d’usage de la langue-cible (L2 et passent des tests dans les domaines suivants : lexique, phonétique, grammaire, stylistique, composition, etc. Mais dans la situation de communication authentique et interculturelle, tout le monde fait des erreurs qui résultent de deux ou plusieurs jeux de conventions superposées et utilisées simultanément. Les tâches des co-participants s’avèrent difficiles car il faut, en même temps, d’une part, communiquer en utilisant des expressions (non-, para- linguistiques adéquates, compréhensibles pour l’autre et, d’autre part, interpréter des signes, tout en sachant que l’interlocuteur peut se baser sur des conventions qui peuvent être communes ou « déviantes ».Dans cette contribution, l’auteur veut élaborer des catégories linguistiques et interactionnelles importantes pour maîtriser des situations interculturelles non enseignées dans la classe de langue. L’accent sera mis sur la tendance observée à interpréter les conventions non congruentes comme l’expression d’un état psychologique de l’autre. Dans ces cas d’erreur fondamentale d’attribution, les co-participants négligent la dimension linguistique en attribuant toute expression inattendue à un « fait » psychologique individuel, situationnel ou culturel.Foreign language learners do learn conventions of use of the target language (L2 and are tested in subjects such as lexicon, phonetics, grammar, stylistics, writing skills, etc. However, in real cross-cultural communication situations, everyone commits “errors” due to two or several sets of linguistic conventions, juxtaposed and used simultaneously. Co-participants’ tasks end up being difficult : they must simultaneously firstly communicate by using appropriate and understandable linguistic, non-linguistic and paralinguistic expressions, and secondly, interpret signs which they know that the speaker may refer to shared or unconventional, “misconstrued” L2-conventions.In this paper, the author will elaborate linguistic and interactional categories in order to overcome cross-cultural situations not taught in the language classroom and focus on the trend among speakers in intercultural situations to interpret “deviant” and L2-influenced conventions as expressions of a psychological state. Here, fundamental attribution errors become apparent : co-participants ignore the linguistic dimensions of interpersonal and intercultural interaction by attributing any unexpected “pieces of talk” to individual, situated or cultural psychological categories.

  5. Authentic Research Experience and "Big Data" Analysis in the Classroom: Maize Response to Abiotic Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarevitch, Irina; Frechette, Cameo; Wiatros, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Integration of inquiry-based approaches into curriculum is transforming the way science is taught and studied in undergraduate classrooms. Incorporating quantitative reasoning and mathematical skills into authentic biology undergraduate research projects has been shown to benefit students in developing various skills necessary for future scientists and to attract students to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines. While large-scale data analysis became an essential part of modern biological research, students have few opportunities to engage in analysis of large biological data sets. RNA-seq analysis, a tool that allows precise measurement of the level of gene expression for all genes in a genome, revolutionized molecular biology and provides ample opportunities for engaging students in authentic research. We developed, implemented, and assessed a series of authentic research laboratory exercises incorporating a large data RNA-seq analysis into an introductory undergraduate classroom. Our laboratory series is focused on analyzing gene expression changes in response to abiotic stress in maize seedlings; however, it could be easily adapted to the analysis of any other biological system with available RNA-seq data. Objective and subjective assessment of student learning demonstrated gains in understanding important biological concepts and in skills related to the process of science. PMID:26163561

  6. Corpus-based collocation research targeted at Japanese language learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena SRDANOVI?

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses corpus-based research on collocations, introduces various tools for querying and extracting Japanese collocations and presents an analysis of Japanese collocations using language corpora and related tools. First, major corpus query tools such as Sketch Engine, NINJAL-NLP, Natsume, Chunagon, which can be used by learners and teachers of Japanese language, are briefly described. Focus then shifts to adjectival and nominal collocates and the resource "Collocation data of adjectives and nouns" which consists of adjective headwords and their nominal collocates extracted from two large corpora, BCCWJ and JpTenTen: 500 adjectives and 9,218 collocate nouns, and 500 adjectives and 23,220 collocate nouns from each corpus respectively. Finally, it is shown that corpus-based resources can be used in the creation of reference materials for learners of the Japanese language. The benefits of empirical research into collocations are also shown by comparing the obtained results with collocations in textbooks for Japanese as foreign language.

  7. Effects of Task Reasoning Demand and Task Condition on Learner Written Output in ESL Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Lilliati Ismail; Arshad Abd. Samad; Bee Eng Wong; Nooreen Noordin

    2012-01-01

    Considering the growing interest in task-based language teaching, classroom-based researchthat investigates the effects of task complexity on L2 development is needed. Despite theinclusion of task reasoning demand (TRD) as a dimension of task complexity in Robinson’sCognition Hypothesis (2007), there is insufficient classroom-based research that investigatesthe language learning outcomes that may occur as a result of engaging in tasks of differingreasoning demands in a variety of task condi...

  8. How can we carry out an action-research to improve practice in the science classroom?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartolomé Vázquez Bernal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The work describes a program of action-research carried out with secondary education science teachers. The program persues the professional development through the curricular innovation, taking as promotional agent the action-oriented reflection, lending itself special attention to the socialization of the teachers. Throughout two school years actions directed to such effects were taken, organizing themselves through pedagogical content knowledge. The results show that the teachers, in a slow and gradual form, are incorporating new practical theories to their reflections and work in the classroom.

  9. Classroom Research and Professional Development Investigación en el aula y desarrollo profesional

    OpenAIRE

    Rosalba Cárdenas Ramos; Fanny Hernández Gaviria; Omaira Vergara Luján

    2009-01-01

    This article intends to share the experience of a group of teachers in the Classroom Research Seminar of the Teacher Development Program in English carried out at Universidad del Valle, Cali , from January to June, 2007. The seminar was part of a high-level in-service program for teachers of English of a network of private educational institutions. We would like to share the highlights and difficulties of the experience. We will start with the general framework of the program and the concept ...

  10. Teaching materials: a critical position about the role they play in the language classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araya Araya, Karla

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Este artículo se propone esclarecer la importancia y la función que juegan los materiales didácticos –desde los planteamientos de la pedagogía crítica– en la conformación y desarrollo del proceso de la enseñanza-aprendizaje de una lengua. Más allá de la función instrumentalista que suele asignarse a los materiales didácticos, en el presente trabajo éstos se visualizan como construcciones discursivas que pueden facultar la apropiación del pensamiento basada en el desarrollo de habilidades lingüísticas que reflejen un discurso crítico ante los diferentes reclamos (problemas históricos a los que estudiantes se ven expuestos dentro y fuera del aula. Para tal propósito, se realiza una revisión conceptual-teórica sobre la importancia y la función que los materiales tienen en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje de una lengua. Bajo una perspectiva crítica, se aborda el tema de los materiales didácticos y la construcción de la motivación así como el tema de ideología y materiales didácticos. Finalmente, se concluye que en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje de una lengua, los materiales didácticos son reproductores y reproducciones discursivas e ideológicas de ciertas realidades que pueden ofrecer visiones de mundo basadas en los intereses de clases dominantes si no se abordan desde posturas críticas.Abstract: The aim of this article is to state the importance teaching materials have in developing a language teaching-learning process based on the principles of the critical thinking pedagogy. From this perspective, this work questions the traditional conceptions and notions related to instruments of access assigned to materials. They are conceived as discursive constructions that can, or cannot, help to empower students with a critical discourse in order to promote a significant change in their attitudes towards the social, political and economical problems they face every day. To support this position, a conceptual study about theoretical assumptions related to the importance and the role teaching materials have in the language teaching-learning process has been carried out. Also, there is a general analysis regarding the relationship among teaching materials, motivation and ideology. Finally, it can be concluded that materials are reproductions and constructors of certain discursive and ideological realities that usually favor the interests of the dominant classes. That is why a critical position about the role teaching materials have is necessary to prevent the reproduction of prejudices and common sense assumptions about language and society.

  11. Bilingualism/Second-Language Research and the Assessment of Oral Proficiency in Minority Bilingual Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Liliana

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses some of the challenges that researchers working in the fields of bilingualism and second-language acquisition (SLA) and in the field of language testing face in developing comparable and culturally and cognitively appropriate data collection and language assessment tools for bilingual children from rural minority-language

  12. Research and Innovation in Physics Education: Transforming Classrooms, Teaching, and Student Learning at the Tertiary Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Pratibha

    2009-04-01

    It is well recognized that science and technology and the quality of scientifically trained manpower crucially determines the development and economic growth of nations and the future of humankind. At the same time, there is growing global concern about flight of talent from physics in particular, and the need to make physics teaching and learning effective and careers in physics attractive. This presentation presents the findings of seminal physics education research on students' learning that are impacting global praxis and motivating changes in content, context, instruments, and ways of teaching and learning physics, focusing on active learning environments that integrate the use of a variety of resources to create experiences that are both hands-on and minds-on. Initiatives to bring about innovative changes in a university system are described, including a triadic model that entails indigenous development of PHYSARE using low-cost technologies. Transfer of pedagogic innovations into the formal classroom is facilitated by professional development programs that provide experiential learning of research-based innovative teaching practices, catalyze the process of reflection through classroom research, and establish a collaborative network of teachers empowered to usher radical transformation.

  13. The language of intersectionality: researching ‘lesbian’ identity in urban Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Stella, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between identity, lived experience, sexual practices and the language through which these are conveyed has been widely debated in sexuality literature. For example, ‘coming out’ has famously been conceptualised as a ‘speech act’ (Sedgwick 1990) and as a collective narrative (Plummer 1995), while a growing concern for individuals’ diverse identifications in relations to their sexual and gender practices has produced interesting research focusing on linguistic practices among ...

  14. Carving the World for Language: How Neuroscientific Research Can Enrich the Study of First and Second Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Nathan R.; Göksun, Tilbe; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick

    2014-01-01

    Linguistics, psychology, and neuroscience all have rich histories in language research. Crosstalk among these disciplines, as realized in studies of phonology, is pivotal for understanding a fundamental challenge for first and second language learners (SLLs): learning verbs. Linguistic and behavioral research with monolinguals suggests that infants attend to foundational event components (e.g., path, manner). Language then heightens or dampens attention to these components as children map word to world in language-specific ways. Cross-linguistic differences in semantic organization also reveal sources of struggles for SLLs. We discuss how better integrating neuroscience into this literature can unlock additional mysteries of verb learning. PMID:24854772

  15. English Language Learners interactions with various science curriculum features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norland, Jennifer Jane

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the interactions of eighth grade English Language Learners in an inclusive science classroom. There is a paucity of research in this area. Central to this study was the students' perceptions and interactions with five different science curriculum features; teacher presentation and guided notes, worksheets, homework, labs, and practice and review activities. The student participants were English Language Learners from two language proficiency levels and the teacher was a provisionally licensed first year science teacher. The aggregate data included individual interviews with the students and teacher, classroom observations, and the collection of classroom artifacts. The findings revealed: (a) students' comprehension of the material was inconsistent throughout all of the curriculum features and differences were observed not only between but also within the two proficiency levels; (b) classroom organizational issues created challenges for both the teacher and the students; (c) off task behavior was most prevalent during the teacher's one-to-one instruction and interfered with learning; (d) differences between levels of language proficiency were observed among students who preferred to work independently and were comfortable asking the teacher for assistance and the students who preferred working with and receiving assistance from peers; and (e) language proficiency rather than cultural differences appeared to be the greatest barrier to classroom success. Overall, English language proficiency was a crucial determinant in the English Language Learners success in the inclusive classroom. Additionally, implications suggest that a limited teaching skill set could adversely affect the success of students in inclusive classrooms.

  16. The influence of constructivism on nature of Science as an area of research and as a classroom subject

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet KARAKAS

    2007-01-01

    This paper is an general article about the influence of constructivism on nature of science Constructivism has influenced research on the teaching and learning of nature of science, as well as actual teaching of the nature of science ideas. In the area of research, a constructivist learning theory perspective has influenced researchers to shift from using quantitative research techniques to using qualitative research methods in investigating the nature of science in the science classrooms. In...

  17. CRITICAL READING OF RESEARCH ARTICLES AS ORAL ACTIVATOR IN THE LANGUAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica VIVANCO

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on an experience carried out with second course students of the School of Aeronautical Engineers at the Polytechnic University of Madrid in the subject class Modern Technical Language. In the previous years the problem in that class had been the scarce participation of the students in the oral practices. They seemed to be lead and exclusively represented by a few students when it came to oral participation. The students proposed tackling recent research articles in which opinions could be discussed. The reading of these articles has risen new elements that work as language activators in the language classroom: critical reading and thinking have developed participation in the oral activities and produced a noticeable influence on their scientific and humanist thinking and behavior.From this, we may extract the consequence that the experience is not only related to scientific knowledge, since it has made them better speakers or speaking-counterparts and more class-participating and collaborative, which implies that the human, scientific and linguistic factors progress at the same time through the critical experience. This way, the exposition of their critical ideas has developed both their humanism and scientific mind. These two facets which seem to belong to far away fields become a bond in our experience: the process is scientific since it tries to be a systematic study of the knowledge fleshed in written texts and it is also humanist because it fulfils the students need to grow up as persons, that is absorbing knowledge and processing it in order to produce a new personal approach to the world.

  18. Insider-Outsider Perspective: Revisiting the Conceptual Framework of Research Methodology in Language Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    The present paper discusses three types of research perspective on the insider-outsider continuum: outsider research, (insider's) outsider research, and insider research. It examines the essential features of the insider-outsider distinction with reference to categories such as researcher, students, classroom context, contribution, control of…

  19. Code-Switching to English in the German as a Second Foreign Language Classroom: The Case of Turkish Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sert, Olcay

    2007-01-01

    This study is built upon an understanding of a wide range of variables including foreign language education in Turkey, the sociolinguistic profile of English, the phenomena of code-switching, language transfer (in particular second language transfer in third language production), teaching of a second foreign language after English, plurilingualism…

  20. Researching multicultural mathematics classroom through the lens of landscapes of learning : NORMA 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    AlrØ, Helle; Skovsmose, Ole

    Students' motives for learning mathematics cannot be understood by looking solely at mathematical classroom activities. We discuss this claim in a multicultural context using the notion of 'landscapes of learning'. This notion serves as a theoretical and methodological tool that both defines a research perspective and sketches a field of empirical research. In this paper we want to focus on the notion and illustrate its usefulness when researching mathematical learning in multicultural contexts. We draw on data and results of an empirical study on student’s foregrounds with 45 teenage students in two 8th grade multicultural classes in Denmark. We show the dialectical relationship between each dimension of the landscape and the whole of it; and how, as a whole, it can help us coming closer to better theorisations.

  1. Classroom Discourse and Reading Comprehension in Bilingual Settings: A Case Study of Collaborative Reasoning in a Chinese Heritage Language Learners' Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the participation of one Chinese teacher and five 13 to 15 year-old Chinese heritage students in a classroom in a Chinese community school during group discussions about narrative texts. In this study, the teacher used Collaborative Reasoning (CR) (Anderson, et al., 2001) to help the Chinese heritage students extend…

  2. THE ROLE OF OUTPUT AND FEEDBACK IN SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION: A CLASSROOM-BASED STUDY OF GRAMMAR ACQUISITION BY ADULT ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS

    OpenAIRE

    Ewa Donesch-Jezo

    2011-01-01

    Second language acquisition (SLA) has been a concern of many teachers and researchers since the early 1960s.One of the issues related to SLA has been finding the techniques which effectively focus the learners’ attention on the target form.A number of theories and methods have been advocated for this purpose, ranging from implicit options to more explicit ones. Although each of the suggested methods has its own advantages,they have, so far, proved insufficient to get learners to be able to no...

  3. WormClassroom.org: An Inquiry-Rich Educational Web Portal for Research Resources of "Caenorhabditis elegans"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fong-Mei; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Stewart, James; White, John G.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization of biology research resources, coupled with a "learning by inquiry" approach, has great potential to aid students in gaining an understanding of fundamental biological principles. To help realize this potential, we have developed a Web portal for undergraduate biology education, WormClassroom.org, based on current research

  4. A Research-Informed Approach to Teaching about Interferometry in STEM Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Colin Scott; Chambers, Timothy G.; Kamenetzky, Julia R.; Prather, Edward E.; Hornstein, Seth D.

    2016-01-01

    In collaboration with Associated Universities Inc. (AUI), we have engaged in a research and curriculum development program to create a new suite of evidence-based educational materials that bring the science of radio interferometry into STEM classrooms. These materials, which include Think-Pair-Share questions, presentation slides, and a new Lecture-Tutorial, can be used together or separately to help students understand the advantages of radio interferometers over single telescopes. Appropriate for physical science classrooms from middle school to the introductory college level, the learner-centered active engagement activities we developed are going through an iterative research and assessment process to ensure that they enable students to achieve increased conceptual understandings and reasoning skills. In this talk, we present several of the conceptually challenging collaborative learning tasks that students encounter with this new suite of educational materials and some of the assessment questions we are using to assess the efficacy of their use in general education college-level astronomy courses.

  5. For the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartig, Gordon; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Four games for use in the foreign language classroom are described. The first, "A Shopping Game," by Gordon Hartig, is played on a game board in the German classroom and provides practice in producing sentences with the preposition "in," which in some instances takes the dative and in others takes the accusative. A diagram of the game board is…

  6. Using Current Polar Research to Guide Inquiry and Content Education in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, A. E.; King, T.; Holmes, R. M.

    2006-12-01

    The upcoming International Polar Year presents a fantastic opportunity for educators to focus their energies towards teaching students about the polar regions. Although there are many ways to introduce students to Arctic and Antarctic science, one way to excite students while still teaching to local, state, and federal standards is to use current polar research projects to teach science content. By doing this, the ever asked question "Why do we have to learn this?" is easily answered as students learn about the scientists who are using such content in their projects in the polar regions. By taking research in the polar regions and applying it to drive science content education in the classroom, students have the opportunity to learn not only about science content but also about the scientists conducting the research and the scientific process. For example, through involvement in research on arctic rivers in Russia, Canada, and Alaska, the Student- PARTNERS project (www.whrc.org/studentpartners) engages upper elementary through high school aged students in the exploration of concepts related to density, the water cycle, water chemistry, and climate. By doing so, students have a context in order to understand the relevance of the science concepts they are being taught. Additionally, they have the opportunity to work with scientists on the project, and communicate and collaborate with other students. An additional benefit of this type of learning is knowledge of how the polar regions affect other Earth systems. Finally, by using polar research to drive curriculum in the classroom, students are introduced, at a young age, to many of the issues, such as global climate change, that are going to influence their lives.

  7. Safety and science at sea: connecting science research settings to the classroom through live video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, E.; Peart, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    Many science teachers start the year off with classroom safety topics. Annual repetition helps with mastery of this important and basic knowledge, while helping schools to meet their legal obligations for safe lab science. Although these lessons are necessary, they are often topical, rarely authentic and relatively dull. Interesting connections can, however, be drawn between the importance of safety in science classrooms and the importance of safety in academic laboratories, fieldwork, shipboard research, and commercial research. Teachers can leverage these connections through live video interactions with scientists in the field, thereby creating an authentic learning environment. During the School of Rock 2009, a professional teacher research experience aboard the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program's research vessel JOIDES Resolution, safety and nature-of-science curricula were created to help address this need. By experimenting with various topics and locations on the ship that were accessible and applicable to middle school learning, 43 highly visual "safety signs" and activities were identified and presented "live" by graduate students, teachers, scientists; the ship's mates, doctor and technical staff. Students were exposed to realistic science process skills along with safety content from the world's only riserless, deep-sea drilling research vessel. The once-in-a-lifetime experience caused the students' eyes to brighten behind their safety glasses, especially as they recognized the same eye wash station and safety gear they have to wear and attended a ship's fire and safety drill along side scientists in hard hats and personal floatation devices. This collaborative and replicable live vide approach will connect basic safety content and nature-of-science process skills for a memorable and authentic learning experience for students.

  8. Professora e pesquisadora: um encontro na sala de aula / Teacher and researcher: contact in a classroom

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Laura Noemi, Chaluh.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Estive inserida como pesquisadora em uma escola de Ensino Fundamental da Rede Municipal de Campinas-SP de 2003 a 2005. Opto, neste trabalho, por narrar o meu encontro em sala de aula com uma professora cujo trabalho acompanhei no ano letivo de 2004. Esta escolha está motivada por eu ter sido convida [...] da por essa professora para participar semanalmente das suas aulas e pelas inquietações surgidas a partir do diálogo por nós estabelecido. Problematizo o lugar de uma pesquisadora quando entra na sala de aula, as expectativas da professora diante da presença da pesquisadora na sua sala e os sentidos produzidos pelos alunos com a presença de uma outra professora. A partir de uma pesquisa de orientação sócio-histórica, trago para reflexão a questão da alteridade e do diálogo, a fim de pensarmos na formação de professores e pesquisadores. Abstract in english During the period from 2003 to 2005 I worked as a researcher in an elementary school from the Municipal Education Network of Campinas. This paper is about my contact with a teacher whose classes I attended during the school year of 2004. This choice was motivated by this teacher's invitation to part [...] icipate in her classes on a weekly basis and by the doubts that arised from our dialogue. The condition of a researcher in a classroom, a teacher's expectations in the presence of a researcher in her classroom and the students' senses in the presence of another teacher are questioned. From a socio-historical research, the alterity and the dialogue issues are discussed to foster a reflection about teachers' and researchers' education.

  9. Professora e pesquisadora: um encontro na sala de aula Teacher and researcher: contact in a classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Noemi Chaluh

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Estive inserida como pesquisadora em uma escola de Ensino Fundamental da Rede Municipal de Campinas-SP de 2003 a 2005. Opto, neste trabalho, por narrar o meu encontro em sala de aula com uma professora cujo trabalho acompanhei no ano letivo de 2004. Esta escolha está motivada por eu ter sido convidada por essa professora para participar semanalmente das suas aulas e pelas inquietações surgidas a partir do diálogo por nós estabelecido. Problematizo o lugar de uma pesquisadora quando entra na sala de aula, as expectativas da professora diante da presença da pesquisadora na sua sala e os sentidos produzidos pelos alunos com a presença de uma outra professora. A partir de uma pesquisa de orientação sócio-histórica, trago para reflexão a questão da alteridade e do diálogo, a fim de pensarmos na formação de professores e pesquisadores.During the period from 2003 to 2005 I worked as a researcher in an elementary school from the Municipal Education Network of Campinas. This paper is about my contact with a teacher whose classes I attended during the school year of 2004. This choice was motivated by this teacher's invitation to participate in her classes on a weekly basis and by the doubts that arised from our dialogue. The condition of a researcher in a classroom, a teacher's expectations in the presence of a researcher in her classroom and the students' senses in the presence of another teacher are questioned. From a socio-historical research, the alterity and the dialogue issues are discussed to foster a reflection about teachers' and researchers' education.

  10. A Research in the Influences of Vague Language on Second Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongyun; Zhu, Yue

    2005-01-01

    Vague language is widely used in both spoken and written English and it is also a very important language variable. The process of language use is active, during which speakers and hearers constantly have to make choices out of variables. This paper mainly studies the influences of vagueness in language on second language learning and attaches…

  11. CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Delceva – Dizdarevik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aiming to discover the paths that enable teachers to manage their work with students in the classroom. To be an efficient teacher means to know with what and how to motivate students to learn. Teacher as an efficient classroom manager needs to have skills to plan and prepare the education process, know how to organize the teaching and how to guide the class. An efficient teacher moreover needs o establish positive classroom climate and working discipline. Also, teacher should be able to evaluate the progress of the students and self-evaluate his own work.In order to examine classroom management skills of teachers in Republic of Macedonia, a research has been made for teachers in primary schools in Republic of Macedonia. Instruments which will be used in order to complete the research and analyses are the following: questionnaire for teachers and educational policy analyses in our country in order to discover whether there is concrete strategy for promotion and implementation of classroom management on local and national level.Analyses of results show that there is a deficit of classroom management skills among teachers, which is due moreover to some lapses in initial education of teachers.

  12. Reading with a Purpose: Communicative Reading Tasks for the Foreign Language Classroom. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Elizabeth M.

    In describing reading proficiency--the relative difficulty or ease that an individual reader experiences reading a particular text--researchers have recognized the importance of both text- and reader-based factors. This digest focuses on the factor of purpose, as determined by the reader or the instructional context. Having a purpose means having…

  13. The Ideal "Native Speaker" Teacher: Negotiating Authenticity and Legitimacy in the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creese, Angela; Blackledge, Adrian; Takhi, Jaspreet Kaur

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a linguistic ethnographic study of a Panjabi complementary school in Birmingham, UK. Researchers observed classes for one academic year, writing field notes, conducting interviews, and making digital audio recordings of linguistic interactions. Sets of beliefs about the production and deployment of certain linguistic signs…

  14. The Impact of a Professional Development Program on English Language Teachers' Classroom Performance / El impacto de un programa de desarrollo profesional en el desempeño en clase de profesores de lengua inglesa

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Frank, Giraldo.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presentan los resultados de una investigación-acción en un programa de desarrollo profesional y su impacto en el desempeño de clase de profesores de inglés de un instituto de lenguas de una universidad pública colombiana. Para recoger los datos se utilizaron cuestionarios, entrev [...] istas, observaciones de clase y el diario del investigador. Los resultados sugieren mejorías en el desempeño de los docentes, ya que la enseñanza fue más comunicativa, organizada, atenta a las necesidades de los estudiantes y basada en principios. La teoría, la práctica, la reflexión y el papel desempeñado por el tutor se combinaron de manera efectiva para ayudar a los profesores a mejorar. Se concluye que los programas de desarrollo profesional deben planearse con base en las filosofías y necesidades de los profesores y articular la teoría, la práctica, la experiencia y la reflexión de manera más efectiva. Abstract in english This article reports the findings of an action research study on a professional development program and its impact on the classroom performance of in-service English teachers who worked at a language institute of a Colombian state university. Questionnaires, semi-structured interviews, class observa [...] tions, and a researcher's journal were used as data collection instruments. Findings suggest that these in-service teachers improved their classroom performance as their teaching became more communicative, organized, attentive to students' needs, and principled. In addition, theory, practice, reflection, and the role of the tutor combined effectively to help the in-service teachers improve classroom performance. It was concluded that these programs must be based on teachers' philosophies and needs and effectively articulate theory, practice, experience, and reflection.

  15. Assessment and Outcomes of Teacher Professional Development Programs That Promote the Use of Authentic Science Research in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, S.

    2012-12-01

    Recent education research and national policy documents actively promote the use of authentic science research in the classroom as an effective way to help students to learn first-hand how science is done. One strategy for increasing the use of authentic science research in classrooms is engaging science teachers in authentic research experiences. These experiences occur at universities, labs, and field-sites across the United States funded by government grants and private organizations. Assessments of program outcomes often target increases in teachers' knowledge and intention to use inquiry methods. Many programs also aim to engage students in authentic science research experiences of these teachers. This paper will present assessment strategies used to research and evaluate several research experiences for teachers that have been completed in the last five years at various sites across the United States for both pre-service and in-service teachers. The discussion will include benefits and challenges of different quantitative and qualitative strategies for assessing program outcomes. Research and evaluation outcomes of these programs include many personal and professional values for teachers, increases in implementation of reformed teaching methods including engaging students in scientific inquiry, and best practices that lead to increased student engagement in research in the classroom. Recent research has followed teachers for several years after their research internships to understand how their research experiences have led to changes in their teaching practice.

  16. A Study on the Functions of Western Cultural Non-Verbal Behavior in English Classroom in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yuehong Wei

    2013-01-01

    In China, English classroom is the main place of English language acquisition. Therefore, how to improve English classroom teaching effectively has become the scholars’ concern. This paper reports a study conducted at North China Electric Power University on the functions of western cultural nonverbal behaviors in English classroom in China. Questionnaires with both close-ended and open-ended questions were distributed to the students. By means of quantitative and qualitative research methods...

  17. Introducing History (and Philosophy) of Science in the Classroom: A Field Research Experience in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibattista, Liborio; Morgese, Francesca

    2013-03-01

    For quite some time, many EU and Italian Ministry of Education official documents have warmly suggested the introduction of the history and the philosophy of science in the teaching of science disciplines at school. Accordingly, there is a shared agreement between pedagogists and science historians about the efficacy of this approach towards an understanding of the current curriculum content and the Nature of Science. What is missing, at least in Italy, is a concrete fieldwork in the classroom to show the validity of these declarations. This essay is a report of the experience of introducing history and philosophy of science into junior and senior high school classrooms in Apulia (Italy). The aims of this project are: (a) to build a model of research involving high school teachers and university lecturers in the design and construction of teaching units that use the story of science and epistemology for teaching science and (b) produce evidence that this approach is effective in getting more interest from students in science. We relied on many schools for carrying out the historical-scientific teaching modules. The modules were carried out through the case study approach. In the first phase, the participating teachers were trained by University tutors on the modalities of this particular teaching approach. In the second phase, the teachers carried out the modules in their classes and finally these modules were presented in a conclusive conference. Moreover, we evaluated the efficacy of the intervention through specifically created agreement questionnaires.

  18. The Solid Earth Research and Teaching Environment, a new software framework to share research tools in the classroom and across disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, K.; Becker, T. W.; Boschi, L.; Sain, J.; Schorlemmer, D.; Waterhouse, H.

    2009-12-01

    The Solid Earth Teaching and Research Environment (SEATREE) is a modular and user-friendly software framework to facilitate the use of solid Earth research tools in the classroom and for interdisciplinary research collaboration. SEATREE is open source and community developed, distributed freely under the GNU General Public License. It is a fully contained package that lets users operate in a graphical mode, while giving more advanced users the opportunity to view and modify the source code. Top level graphical user interfaces which initiate the calculations and visualize results, are written in the Python programming language using an object-oriented, modern design. Results are plotted with either Matlab-like Python libraries, or SEATREE’s own Generic Mapping Tools wrapper. The underlying computational codes used to produce the results can be written in any programming language and accessed through Python wrappers. There are currently four fully developed science modules for SEATREE: (1) HC is a global geodynamics tool based on a semi-analytical mantle-circulation program based on work by B. Steinberger, Becker, and C. O'Neill. HC can compute velocities and tractions for global, spherical Stokes flow and radial viscosity variations. HC is fast enough to be used for classroom instruction, for example to let students interactively explore the role of radial viscosity variations for global geopotential (geoid) anomalies. (2) ConMan wraps Scott King’s 2D finite element mantle convection code, allowing users to quickly observe how modifications to input parameters affect heat flow over time. As seismology modules, SEATREE includes, (3), Larry, a global, surface wave phase-velocity inversion tool and, (4), Syn2D, a Cartesian tomography teaching tool for ray-theory wave propagation in synthetic, arbitrary velocity structure in the presence of noise. Both underlying programs were contributed by Boschi. Using Syn2D, students can explore, for example, how well a given input structure (e.g., a checkerboard pattern) will be resolved by data for different types of earthquake-receiver geometries. Additionally, Larry3D, a three-dimensional seismic tomography tool contributed by Boschi, and NonLinLoc, a nonlinear earthquake relocation tool by Anthony Lomax, are both under development. The goal of all of the implemented modules is to aid in teaching research techniques, while remaining flexible enough for use in true research applications. In the long run, SEATREE may contribute to new ways of sharing scientific research, making published (numerical) experiments truly reproducible again. SEATREE can be downloaded as a package from http://geosys.usc.edu/projects/seatree/wiki/, and users can also subscribe to our Subversion project page. The software is designed to run on GNU/Linux based platforms and has also been successfully run on Mac OS-X. Our poster will present the four currently implemented modules, along with our design philosophies and implementation details.

  19. Teachers' Perceptions of Task-Based Language Teaching in English Classrooms in Taiwanese Junior High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Bin; Wu, Chiao-Wen

    2012-01-01

    After introducing new curriculum guidelines during education reform, the Taiwan Ministry of Education has taken the lead in integrating a communicative approach into the new English language curriculum. Task-based language teaching (TBLT) is viewed as a realisation of communicative language teaching and is one of the most popular English language

  20. Promises and Obstacles of L1 Use in Language Classrooms: A State-of-the-Art Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadi, Mehdi; Ghasemi, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Translation and language teaching techniques which take language learners' first language (L1) as point of reference for teaching the second language (L2) have been long discouraged on the ground that these teaching techniques would end in the fossilization of L2 structure forms in the learner's Interlanguage system. However, in recent years, the…

  1. The TOEFL Trump Card: An Investigation of Test Impact in an ESL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karen E.; Jordan, Stefanie Rehn; Poehner, Matthew E.

    2005-01-01

    Much of the research on the effects of tests on foreign and second-language classrooms has examined the impact or washback effect that commercial/institutional language tests, such as the TOEFL, have on teachers' instructional practices (Hughes, 1998; Wall & Alderson, 1993). Using a case study methodology, this study uncovered the ways in which…

  2. Conceptual Issues in Second Language Research in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Olushola Bamidele Are

    2013-01-01

    This paper is an overview of some of the complications associated with conceptualizing second language in African societies, particularly with reference to European languages. Most popular opinions and many scholarly insights appear to define second language mainly in terms of sequence of acquisition. From this perspective, the term second language refers to a language learnt in addition to a previously acquired one. While this view of second language actually applies to many African situatio...

  3. Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education (INSPIRE): Enhancing Scientific Communication by Bringing STEM Research into the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, D.; Radencic, S.; Funderburk, W. K.; Walker, R. M.; Jackson, B. S.; Dawkins, K. S.; Schmitz, D.; Bruce, L. M.; McNeal, K.

    2014-12-01

    INSPIRE, a five-year partnership between Mississippi State University and three local school districts, is designed to strengthen the communication skills of graduate Fellows in geosciences, physics, astronomy, chemistry, and engineering as they incorporate their research into inquiry-based lessons in 7th - 12th grade science and math classrooms. All lesson plans designed and taught by the graduate Fellows must include one or more connections to their research, and these connections must be demonstrated to the students during the lessons. International research partnerships with Australia, the Bahamas, England, and Poland provide valuable opportunities for graduate Fellows to conduct field work abroad and allow our partner teachers to have authentic research experiences that they can bring back to their classrooms. Program effectiveness has been examined using pre- and post-year attitudinal surveys, formal lesson plan documents, Fellow and teacher journals, focus group meetings with a project evaluator, and direct observation of Fellow-led classroom activities. Analyses of data gathered during the past four years of the partnership will be presented that examine the diversity in approaches taken by Fellows to communicate big ideas, changes in the ability of Fellows to find connections between their research and classroom lessons while keeping them aligned with state and national standards, and the quality of the mentorship provided to the Fellows by our partner teachers. INSPIRE is funded by the Graduate K-12 (GK-12) STEM Fellowship Program of the National Science Foundation (Award No. DGE-0947419).

  4. DISCURSO DA SALA DE AULA DE LÍNGUA ESTRANGEIRA: DIALOGICIDADE INTER-REGULADA / Foreign language classroom speech: inter-regulated dialogue

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Jader Martins, Rodrigues Junior; Izabel, Magalhães.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: O presente trabalho tem como objetivo analisar o discurso em uma sala de aula de nível iniciante em escola de língua estrangeira. Para tanto, apresentamos uma breve revisão do conceito de discurso ( FOUCAULT, 1996 2008 FAIRCLOUGH, 2003 2010 MAINGUENEAU, 2008 ), também abordando os conceitos [...] do dialogismo bakhtiniano (2011) e da interincompreensão regulada de Maingueneau (2008 ). Nessa esteira adotamos, em nossa metodologia de análise, a teoria social do discurso ( FAIRCLOUGH, 2001 ), bem como as considerações de Blommaert (2005 ) sobre a natureza dialógica da comunicação. Dessa forma, pretendemos estabelecer a ancoragem teórico-metodológica que norteia nossa análise das amostras de eventos comunicativos. Como resultado da análise, concluímos que as relações interdiscursivas que se realizam nessa sala de aula são controladas entre os participantes da interação, conforme as metas estabelecidas no programa do curso, gerando uma dialogicidade inter-regulada de acordo com o plano de ensino. Abstract in spanish Resumen: Este trabajo tiene como objetivo analizar el discurso en una sala de aula de nivel iniciante, en escuela de lengua extranjera. Así, presentamos una breve revisión del concepto de discurso ( FOUCAULT, 1996 2008 FAIRCLOUGH, 2003 2010 MAINGUENEAU, 2008 ), abordando también los conceptos del di [...] alogismo de Bajtín (2011) y de la inter-incomprensión regulada de Maingueneau (2008 ). En ese camino, adoptamos como metodología de análisis la teoría social del discurso ( FAIRCLOUGH, 2001 ), y las consideraciones de Blommaert (2005 ) sobre la naturaleza dialógica de la comunicación. Además, pretendemos establecer el anclaje teórico-metodológico que sirve de norte para nuestro análisis de las muestras de eventos comunicativos. Como resultado del análisis, concluimos que las relaciones inter-discursivas que se realizan en esa sala de aula son controladas entre los participantes de la interacción, de acuerdo con las metas establecidas en el programa del curso, generando una dialogicidad inter-regulada conforme el plan de enseñanza. Abstract in english Abstract: The present work aims at analysing the discourse of a beginner's foreign language classroom. To do so, we present a brief review of the concept of discourse ( FOUCAULT, 1996 2008 FAIRCLOUGH, 2003 2010 MAINGUENEAU, 2008 ), bringing to our discussion the Bakhtinian (2011 ) principle of dialo [...] gism, and the concept of regulated inter-incomprehension ( MAINGUENEAU, 2008 ). For the analysis, our methodology is based on the social theory of discourse ( FAIRCLOUGH, 2001 ), as well as Blommaert's (2005 ) considerations on the dialogic nature of meaning. Thus, we propose to set the theoretical and methodological basis guiding our analysis of samples of communicative events. As a result of the analysis, we conclude that the interdiscursive relations which take place in this classroom are regulated in interaction, according to the goals set in the course program, generating an inter-regulated dialogue in accordance with the teaching plan.

  5. Power and meaning making in an EAP classroom engaging with the everyday

    CERN Document Server

    Chun, Christian W

    2015-01-01

    This book examines how critical literacy pedagogy has been implemented in a classroom through a year-long collaboration between the author (a researcher) and an EAP teacher. It details the teacher's introduction to functional grammar and accompanying critical literacy approaches to EAP, and her growing critical language and discourse awareness of power and meaning making in the classroom. The book traces her evolving classroom practices and addresses how powerful discourses in social circulation found their way into the classroom via the curriculum materials the students encountered. The main

  6. WormClassroom.org: An Inquiry-rich Educational Web Portal for Research Resources of Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Fong-Mei; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Stewart, James; White, John G

    2007-01-01

    The utilization of biology research resources, coupled with a “learning by inquiry” approach, has great potential to aid students in gaining an understanding of fundamental biological principles. To help realize this potential, we have developed a Web portal for undergraduate biology education, WormClassroom.org, based on current research resources of a model research organism, Caenorhabditis elegans. This portal is intended to serve as a resource gateway for students to learn biological conc...

  7. Expedition Earth and Beyond: Using NASA Data Resources and Integrated Educational Strategies to Promote Authentic Research in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffi, Paige Valderrama; Stefanov, William; Willis, Kim; Runco, Sue

    2009-01-01

    Teachers in today s classrooms are bound by state required skills, education standards, and high stakes testing. How can they gain skills and confidence to replace units or individual activities with curriculum that incorporates project and inquiry-based learning and promotes authentic research in the classroom? The key to promoting classroom authentic research experiences lies in educator professional development that is structured around teacher needs. The Expedition Earth and Beyond Program is a new geosciences program based at the NASA Johnson Space Center designed to engage, inspire and educate teachers and students in grades 5-14. The program promotes authentic research experiences for classrooms and uses strategies that will help NASA reach its education goals while still allowing educators to teach required standards. Teachers will have access to experts in terrestrial and planetary remote sensing and geoscience; this will enhance their use of content, structure, and relevant experiences to gain the confidence and skills they need to actively engage students in authentic research experiences. Integrated and powerful educational strategies are used to build skills and confidence in teachers. The strategies are as follows: 1) creating Standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources as ready-to-use materials that can be modified by teachers to fit their unique classroom situation; 2) providing ongoing professional development opportunities that focus on active experiences using curricular materials, inquiry-based techniques and expanding content knowledge; 3) connecting science experts to classrooms to deepen content knowledge and provide relevance to classroom activities and real world applications; 4) facilitating students sharing research with their peers and scientists reinforcing their active participation and contributions to research. These components of the Expedition Earth and Beyond Education Program will be enhanced by providing exciting and diverse research opportunities that are inspired by views of Earth from space taken by astronauts on board the International Space Station. The interest and connection to viewing our home planet from space will inevitably spark questions that will drive students to pursue their research investigations, as well as forming a basis for comparisons to the exploration of other planetary bodies in our solar system.

  8. Drama in the mixed-ability EFL classroom : observing its effects on motivation and self-confidence

    OpenAIRE

    Bess Renee Neal 1980

    2012-01-01

    This study is a result of experimenting with the use of drama to teach English as a foreign language in Iceland with special attention placed on a mixed-ability classroom environment. It begins with a comprehensive review of research pertaining to the use of drama for the instruction of English as a foreign language. It then examines my experience in the classroom through personal observation and unstructured interviews. The discussion focuses on the main benefits to using drama in the EFL cl...

  9. Democratic Deliberations in the Finnish Elementary Classroom: The Dilemmas of Deliberations and the Teacher's Role in an Action Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammi, Tuure

    2013-01-01

    Finnish youth are found to be, despite their broad knowledge, uninterested in politics and in societal participation. As a remedy, international studies suggest enabling democratic experiences in schools. This article discusses an action research project aimed at developing deliberation-based democratic practice in an elementary classroom. Results…

  10. The Value of Applied Research: Retrieval Practice Improves Classroom Learning and Recommendations from a Teacher, a Principal, and a Scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pooja K.; Bain, Patrice M.; Chamberlain, Roger W.

    2012-01-01

    Over the course of a 5-year applied research project with more than 1,400 middle school students, evidence from a number of studies revealed that retrieval practice in authentic classroom settings improves long-term learning (Agarwal et al. 2009; McDaniel et al., "Journal of Educational Psychology" 103:399-414, 2011; McDaniel et al. 2012; Roediger…

  11. Understanding and Facing Discipline-Related Challenges in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom at Public Schools / Comprensión y tratamiento de los retos asociados a la disciplina en el aula de lengua extranjera en escuelas públicas

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Josefina, Quintero Corzo; Odilia, Ramírez Contreras.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Responder a las normas escolares y a las instrucciones de los profesores es un principio básico de una clase excelente. Tanto los profesores novatos como los experimentados enfrentan situaciones problemáticas en las aulas de clase reales, especialmente en relación con la disciplina. Hay varias razon [...] es que explican la indisciplina en los colegios públicos y también estrategias variadas que los profesores principiantes crean y ensayan para superar tal reto. Este artículo reporta un estudio de investigación acción que ayudó a un grupo de profesores principiantes a superar la indisciplina en el aula de inglés en colegios públicos y a responder a iniciativas de desarrollo profesional con base en procesos de reflexión y toma de decisiones que las nuevas políticas educativas colombianas demandan de las nuevas generaciones de profesores para mejorar la calidad de la educación. Abstract in english Complying with school regulations and teachers' instructions is a basic principle of an excellent class; both novice and experienced teachers face challenging situations when getting into real classrooms, especially those related to classroom management. There are various reasons that explain discip [...] line problems in public schools, as well as varied strategies beginning teachers create and try when coping with those challenges. This article reports an action research study on how this methodology helped a group of teacher-trainees overcome indiscipline in English as a foreign language classrooms at public schools, and align with professional development initiatives which focus on reflection and decision-making processes that the new Colombian policies demand from new teachers seeking a higher quality of education.

  12. Languages in contact: The influence of language activation and competing language patterns on translation performance

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrensberger-Dow, Maureen; Jekat, Susanne J.

    2005-01-01

    The two pilot studies described in this article, both part of a larger on-going project investigating multilingualism in a translation context, deal with separation of languages in translation students. At the same time, they demonstrate how multilingualism research can be integrated into the translation classroom. Within the framework of Grosjean's model (1997, 1998, 2001), the first study tests the influence on translation performance of preferentially activating one of the languages for th...

  13. The influence of constructivism on nature of Science as an area of research and as a classroom subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet KARAKAS

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an general article about the influence of constructivism on nature of science Constructivism has influenced research on the teaching and learning of nature of science, as well as actual teaching of the nature of science ideas. In the area of research, a constructivist learning theory perspective has influenced researchers to shift from using quantitative research techniques to using qualitative research methods in investigating the nature of science in the science classrooms. In the area of promoting the teaching of the nature of science, a constructivist learning theory perspective has influenced science educators to shift from merely emphasizing the teaching of the history of science in science classrooms to sequencing in instruction in science lessons and promotion of better teacher preparation programs in the universities.

  14. Family Literacy and Second Language Literacy Research: Focus on Language Minority Children

    OpenAIRE

    Özgür Y?ld?r?m

    2013-01-01

    Problem Statement: Countries like the U. S. A. or Canada have citizens from various ethnic backgrounds. Although English is the dominant language in many parts of these countries, immigrants generally prefer speaking their native language when they are in their homes. Whatever the reason for using native language at home is, when we consider the children in these families, we can say that being exposed to different languages at home and at school may be a problem for their language developmen...

  15. 'Passivity' or 'Potential'?: Teacher responses to learner identity in the low-level ESL classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Ollerhead

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores some initial findings from a multi-site, classroom-based case study research project into English as a Second Language (ESL literacy provision to very low-literate adult learners within Australia’s Language, Literacy and Numeracy Program (LLNP. The aim of the research is to report on the researcher’s observations of teachers’ pedagogical practices and to investigate the extent to which they are responsive to learners’ developing and multiple identities.

  16. Clinical Implications of Research on Language Development and Disorders in Bilingual Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Brian A.

    2006-01-01

    Assessing and treating bilingual children with speech and language disorders is difficult given the relative paucity of data on the speech and language skills of typically developing bilingual children and those with speech and language disorders. The purpose of this article is to review the research that is available with regard to clinical…

  17. Research for Practice: A Look at Issues in Technology for Second Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past fourteen years, the pages of "Language Learning & Technology" have been filled with examples of research that take up the challenge of investigating second language learning through technology. It has been a period of expansion and growth in many ways. The expansion of technologies as well as their acceptance and use in language

  18. Effective Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Azlin Norhaini; Eng, Wong Kim; Rasul, Mohamad Sattar; Hamzah, Mohd Izham Mohd; Hamid, Aida Hanim A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper attempts to explore and identify the characteristics of an effective teacher who teaches English as a second language to 10 year old students from different ethnics, various social economic background and multi-level language ability, at a private primary school in Malaysia. The study focused on classroom management using a case study…

  19. Fostering Intercultural Communicative Competence Through Reading Authentic Literary Texts in an Advanced Colombian EFL Classroom: A Constructivist Perspective Desarrollo de la competencia comunicativa intercultural mediante la lectura de textos literarios auténticos: una perspectiva constructivista

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Fernando Gómez R

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an action research experience carried out in an advanced English as a foreign language classroom of the language program at a university in Bogotá, Colombia, in 2010. The study proposes the inclusion of authentic literary texts in the English as a foreign language classroom through the implementation of four constructivist approaches as a means to develop intercultural communicative competence. Data were collected to show how those approaches engaged learners to read au...

  20. Language and rigour in qualitative research: Problems and principles in analyzing data collected in Mandarin

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Jing; Smith Helen J; Liu Xiaoyun

    2008-01-01

    Abstract In collaborative qualitative research in Asia, data are usually collected in the national language, and this poses challenges for analysis. Translation of transcripts to a language common to the whole research team is time consuming and expensive; meaning can easily be lost in translation; and validity of the data may be compromised in this process. We draw on several published examples from public health research conducted in mainland China, to highlight how language can influence r...