WorldWideScience
1

Rasch Measurement in Language Research: Creating the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Inventory  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to construct a new scale for measuring foreign language classroom anxiety (FLCA. It begun with the creation of an extended item pool generated by qualitative methods. Subsequent Rasch and semantic analyses led to the final 18-item Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Inventory (FLCAI. In comparison with the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS, the FLCAI demonstrated more convincing evidence of unidimensionality and the optimal 5-point Likert scale functioned better. The FLCAI, while 55% the length of the FLCAS, thus more practical for classroom practitioners to administer and analyse, maintains its psychometric properties and covers a wider range on the construct continuum thus improving the degree of validity of the instrument. Finally, test anxiety was shown to be a component of FLCA.

Miranda J. Walker

2014-11-01

2

Research "Fitting" Practice: Firth and Wagner, Classroom Language Teaching, and Language Teacher Education  

Science.gov (United States)

This article argues that Firth and Wagner's 1997 contribution gained influence in second/foreign language teaching partly owing to a loose group of conceptual and ideological preconditions that drew on classroom methodologies, debates over educating second language teachers, and new views of how teachers could document and analyze their own…

Freeman, Donald

2007-01-01

3

Motivation in the Language Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Suggestions for motivating students in the language classroom include encouraging students' self-confidence in their abilities; setting realistic goals that do not push students past their maximum capacity; recognizing students' outstanding achievements; and reassessing and incorporating new ideas into classroom techniques and environment. (CB)

Muir, Barrie

1989-01-01

4

The Mainstream Primary Classroom as a Language-Learning Environment for Children with Severe and Persistent Language Impairment--Implications of Recent Language Intervention Research  

Science.gov (United States)

Many UK children with severe and persistent language impairment (SLI) attend local mainstream schools. Although this should provide an excellent language-learning environment, opportunities may be limited by difficulties in sustaining time-consuming, child-specific learning activities; restricted co-professional working, and the complex classroom

McCartney, Elspeth; Ellis, Sue; Boyle, James

2009-01-01

5

A Probe into Classroom Teaching and Second Language Acquisition  

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Full Text Available Due to the popularization of foreign language study, more and more people from education filed further enhance their exploration and researches in how to apply second acquisition theories into classroom teaching. This paper probes into the orientation, research objects, age, language environment and classroom activities of second language acquisition.

Zhengdan Li

2009-02-01

6

Plenary Speech: Researching Complex Dynamic Systems--"Retrodictive Qualitative Modelling" in the Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

While approaching second language acquisition from a complex dynamic systems perspective makes a lot of intuitive sense, it is difficult for a number of reasons to operationalise such a dynamic approach in research terms. For example, the most common research paradigms in the social sciences tend to examine variables in relative isolation rather…

Dörnyei, Zoltán

2014-01-01

7

Journals in the Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article, the author describes some of the ways that journals can be used as teaching tools in the language classroom; in fact, the suggestions he makes could be applied to the use of journals in teaching just about any subject. He begins by describing the concept of writing to learn, which is the theoretical foundation that journals are…

Baxter, Scott J.

2009-01-01

8

Learning Anxiety in the Language Classroom  

OpenAIRE

It has generally been acknowledged that anxiety is an affective factor that plays a significant role in any learning. A highly specific type of anxiety, foreign language classroom learning anxiety, has been distinguished and recognised as quite common among foreign language learners (Horwitz et al. 1991). The article provides some theoretical considerations related to the issue and presents findings from research on it conducted among Polish secondary school students of English. Conclusions i...

Zybert, Jerzy

2006-01-01

9

English in the Chinese foreign language classroom  

CERN Document Server

Chinese is an ancient language, but the present scope of its global study is unprecedented. Comprehending the impacts of worldwide linguistic realities on 'Chinese as a Foreign Language' (CFL) teachers and students will be critical to its long-term success. The most important phenomenon has been the establishment of English as a lingua franca, especially in the expanding marketplaces of Asia. This book examines the role of English as a medium of instruction in CFL classrooms. It begins by integrating existing studies on the global spread of English with research on English as a medium of secon

Wang, Danping

2013-01-01

10

Language Socialization in Korean-as-a-Foreign-Language Classrooms  

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Within the language socialization framework, the second language (L2) classroom would constitute a powerful context of secondary socialization, particularly when it exists outside the learners' culture of origin. In this paper, first year Korean-as-a-Foreign-Language (KFL) classrooms are viewed as L2 socializing environments in which students are…

Byon, Andrew Sangpil

2006-01-01

11

The Role of Grammar in the Second Language Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

In recent years, a number of articles have been written concerning the value of instruction in second language acquisition and the type of instruction that is most valuable for second language learners. Consequently, the place of the teaching of grammar in the second language classroom is being questioned. Generally, much of the research seems to…

Aquilina, Patrick J.

12

Conquering Language Babel in the Classroom  

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This article is an exploration of the available applications for speech to speech real-time translation software for use in the classroom. Three different types of machine language translation (MLT) software and devices are reviewed for their features and practical application in secondary education classrooms.

Minichino, Mario; Berson, Michael J.

2012-01-01

13

A Probe into Classroom Teaching and Second Language Acquisition  

OpenAIRE

Due to the popularization of foreign language study, more and more people from education filed further enhance their exploration and researches in how to apply second acquisition theories into classroom teaching. This paper probes into the orientation, research objects, age, language e...

Zhengdan Li

2009-01-01

14

Classroom interaction and language learning Classroom interaction and language learning  

OpenAIRE

In the field of second and foreign language learning, interaction has long been considered to play an important role. Studies taking a more traditional, formalist perspective on language and learning have focused on the role that interaction plays in helping learners to assimilate and internalize knowledge of linguistic forms in the target language. More recently, a group of scholars concerned with interaction and additional language learning, or the learning of languages other than the ...

Joan Kelly Hall

2008-01-01

15

Beyond Paradigm: The "What" and the "How" of Classroom Research  

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This article reviews studies in second language classroom research from a cross-theoretic perspective, arguing that the classroom holds the potential for bringing together researchers from opposing theoretical orientations. It shows how generative and general cognitive approaches share a view of language that implicates both implicit and explicit…

Whong, Melinda; Gil, Kook-Hee; Marsden, Heather

2014-01-01

16

The Missing Language of the Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Explores teachers' use of moral language when describing and interpreting K-12 classroom and graduate school experiences, analyzing products developed by practicing teachers from a nontraditional Master's program (exit portfolios, reflective essays, and admission essays). Results suggest that teacher education must encourage teachers to envision…

Sockett, Hugh; LePage, Pamela

2002-01-01

17

Naturalistic acquisition in an early language classroom  

OpenAIRE

This study investigated whether it is possible to provide naturalistic second language acquisition (SLA) of vocabulary for young learners in a classroom situation without resorting to a classical immersion approach. Participants were 60 first-grade pupils in Norwegian two elementary schools in their first year. The control group followed regular instruction as prescribed by the school curriculum, while the experimental group received increased naturalistic target language input. This entailed...

AnneDahl

2014-01-01

18

TEACHING CREATIVE WRITING IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSROOM  

OpenAIRE

Writing, like all other aspects of language, is communicative. In our real life we write e-mails, notes, covering letters, reports, curriculums, assignments, essays and so on. Some of us write articles or work on forums and websites. A few write stories and poems. All of these writing tasks have a communicative purpose and a target audience. In the English language classroom, however, writing often lacks this. There are many reasons, as there are lots of ways to make the writing...

Rodriques, Marku Monis And M. V.

2012-01-01

19

Task-Based Language Teaching in Online Ab Initio Foreign Language Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

Task-based language teaching (TBLT) has been attracting the attention of researchers for more than 2 decades. Research on various aspects of TBLT has been accumulating, including the evaluation studies on the implementation of TBLT in classrooms. The evaluation studies on students' and teachers' reactions to TBLT in the online courses are starting…

Lai, Chun; Zhao, Yong; Wang, Jiawen

2011-01-01

20

Classroom Discourse Of Malay Language Lesson: A Critical Analysis  

OpenAIRE

Research on the teaching and learning process of the Malay language in the classroom usually focuses on the method, content, strategy and teaching aids. Moving away from this norm, this research article examines the process from the discourse analysis perspective called pedagogic discourse analysis, with an adaptation of Fairclough’s Critical Discourse Analysis Framework (1992; 1995). The discussion is based on several hours of teaching-learning case study conducted in a secondary school cl...

Idris Aman; Rosniah Mustaffa

2006-01-01

21

FACEBOOK GROUPS AS A SUPPORTING TOOL FOR LANGUAGE CLASSROOMS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper attempts to present a review of Facebook group pages as an educational tool for language learning. One of the primary needs of foreign language learners is to gain the opportunity to use the target language outside the classroom practice. Social media communication provides occasions for learners to receive input and produce output while engaging in negotiation of meaning. In line with this point, teachers can instigate class group pages in the social media in an attempt to provide a space for practice and communication free of the traditional pedagogic concerns of a typical classroom. The distinctive discursive behaviour of Facebook group pages helps one to achieve that attempt. In light of these views, the researcher, in this study, formed a group page to understand the dynamics of social media environment as a supporting tool for language classrooms. This paper addresses various features which make social media a unique place to contribute to the sense of class community and collaboration outside the classroom. The face-to face classroom is a controlled communication event, that is, teachers and students are required to be in the classroom at the same time but a teacher’s use of Facebook is an attempt to communicate with students outside of that controlled environment where teachers can meet students in their territory. When compared to its disadvantages, the advantages of setting a class group page on the social media outweigh. Students can feel motivated to contribute to an online community if they subsequently receive support or help. It also leads students to feel that they are being supported by a whole portion of their class community and promotes students’ desire to maintain a valued relationship with others. Students continue developing and strengthening relationships with others.

Arzu Ekoç

2014-07-01

22

Naturalistic acquisition in an early language classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated whether it is possible to provide naturalistic second language acquisition (SLA) of vocabulary for young learners in a classroom situation without resorting to a classical immersion approach. Participants were 60 first-grade pupils in two Norwegian elementary schools in their first year. The control group followed regular instruction as prescribed by the school curriculum, while the experimental group received increased naturalistic target language input. This entailed extensive use of English by the teacher during English classes, and also during morning meetings and for simple instructions and classroom management throughout the day. Our hypothesis was that it is possible to facilitate naturalistic acquisition through better quality target language exposure within a normal curriculum. The students' English vocabulary knowledge was measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, version 4 (PPVT-IV, Dunn and Dunn, 2007a), at the beginning and the end of the first year of school. Findings are that (1) early-start second-language (L2) programs in school do not in themselves guarantee vocabulary development in the first year, (2) a focus on increased exposure to the L2 can lead to a significant increase in receptive vocabulary comprehension in the course of only 8 months, and (3) even with relatively modest input, learners in such an early-start L2 program can display vocabulary acquisition comparable in some respects to that of younger native children matched on vocabulary size. The overall conclusion is that naturalistic vocabulary acquisition is in fact possible in a classroom setting. PMID:24860518

Dahl, Anne; Vulchanova, Mila D

2014-01-01

23

Behavioral Problems in the Classroom and Underlying Language Difficulties  

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Full Text Available Dealing with the behavioral problems of students is one of many dimensions of most educators’ and schools’ requirements. While research has repeatedly shown that a large number of children with behavior problems have underlying, unrecognized language difficulties, few schools have implemented programs where children with problem behavior are evaluated in terms of these skills. This paper provides information to teachers about (1 the links between behavior and language, (2 the levels at which language can be impaired including phonology, grammar and pragmatics, (3 how language impairment can be recognized and (4 what can be done in the classroom to support the language skills of this group. Special attention is paid to the pragmatic level of language as impairment at this level may be misdiagnosed as behavior problems. The information provided is targeted towards pre-K and elementary school age, but can also be adapted for older children.

Jodi Tommerdahl

2013-04-01

24

Multimodality and Children's Participation in Classrooms: Instances of Research  

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This paper describes how language and literacy classrooms became more participatory, agentive spaces through addressing a central issue in teaching and learning: the forms of representation through which children make their meanings. It reconsiders pedagogic research in under-resourced Gauteng classrooms during the period 1994-2005, during the…

Newfield, Denise

2011-01-01

25

· Attitude towards Computers and Classroom Management of Language School Teachers  

OpenAIRE

Computer-assisted language learning (CALL) is the realization of computers in schools and universities which has potentially enhanced the language learning experience inside the classrooms. The integration of the technologies into the classroom demands that the teachers adopt a number of classroom management procedures to maintain a more learner-centered and conducive language learning environment. The current study explored the relationship between computer attitudes and behavior and instruc...

Sara Jalali; Vahid Panahzade; Ali Firouzmand

2014-01-01

26

Teachers’ approaches to language classroom assessment in Cameroon primary schools  

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Full Text Available Assessment has a huge impact on ESL primary pupils, in part, because on the curriculum English is both a subject and also a language of learning all the other subjects. For children still acquiring L1 it is daunting sometimes to be expected to understand concepts in L2. It may be difficult then to gather information to make an impartial judgement with regards to a pupil’s language level. This study is a preliminary inquiry that attempts to find out teachers’ approaches to classroom assessment in Cameroon primary schools. Using a qualitative open-ended question the researcher finds out three main categories of assessment approaches used by teachers. From the categories extrapolations on possible assumptions that guide teachers’ choices of assessment procedures are described and suggested for future study. Keywords Classroom assessment approach, Cameroon, scheme of work, ESL/EFL, Young Learners 

Achu Charles Tante

2013-10-01

27

TEACHING CREATIVE WRITING IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSROOM  

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Full Text Available Writing, like all other aspects of language, is communicative. In our real life we write e-mails, notes, covering letters, reports, curriculums, assignments, essays and so on. Some of us write articles or work on forums and websites. A few write stories and poems. All of these writing tasks have a communicative purpose and a target audience. In the English language classroom, however, writing often lacks this. There are many reasons, as there are lots of ways to make the writing, we do with learners more communicative. There are many areas in which language learners can benefit from creative writing. Students express themselves and their own ideas. Most teachers would agree that what we want to say, what comes from the heart, we are happier to work on. Creative Writing (CW can be very stimulating and a lot of fun. Creative writing involves playful but rigorous work with language. A lot of people seem to associate creative writing with an "anything goes" mentality. However, in order to produce a good text, poem, short story or dramatic scene, the language needs to be correct and it needs to work. Creative Writing requires greater precision in expression. In order to say precisely what they mean, students have to be very careful in their use of vocabulary and idioms. In this article, an effort is made to discuss the characteristics and difficulties of CW and similarly, a few ideas for CW writing, benefits of CW and solutions to simplify and make it interesting is presented.

MARKU MONIS AND . M. V. RODRIQUES

2012-11-01

28

Harmonious Learning: Yoga in the English Language Classroom  

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This article looks at one way for teachers to make classrooms emotionally, mentally, and physically healthy places to learn--places where tensions and stresses are lessened and where teachers and students are concentrating, yet relaxed. "Harmonious language learning classroom" is the term the author coined to describe this kind of language

Morgan, Lisa

2011-01-01

29

Classroom Instruction that Works with English Language Learners Participant's Workbook  

Science.gov (United States)

Everyone who participates in your workshop on "Classroom Instruction That Works with English Language Learners" needs this participant's workbook to gain expertise in strategies that are effective with ELL (English Language Learners) students.

Hill, Jane D.; Bjork, Cynthia Linnea

2008-01-01

30

Communication Strategies Used by High School English Language Learners in Multilingual Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

In this study, twenty-five high school English language learners were observed in their classrooms in a New York City public school while they worked in small groups. All observations were video recorded or done by the researcher while in the classrooms. The videos were then transcribed. Communication strategies that the participants used were…

Spromberg, Sarah

2011-01-01

31

Classroom Discourse Of Malay Language Lesson: A Critical Analysis  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Research on the teaching and learning process of the Malay language in the classroom usually focuses on the method, content, strategy and teaching aids. Moving away from this norm, this research article examines the process from the discourse analysis perspective called pedagogic discourse analysis, with an adaptation of Fairclough’s Critical Discourse Analysis Framework (1992; 1995. The discussion is based on several hours of teaching-learning case study conducted in a secondary school classroom, which emphasizes integrated curriculum in an attempt to understand the unseen social processes, i.e. teacher dominance in discourse. The research findings indicate that teacher dominance is concealed in turn-taking system, types of questions posed by the teacher, discourse control and the overall structure of the discourse, which have their implications on the implementation of the National Education Philosophy. Contrary to the emphasis on student centredness and thinking skills as laid out by the Integrated Curriculum for Secondary School, it is found that the nature of the learning process in the classroom hardly focused on students’ thinking skills. This article argues that students should be given the opportunity to exercise their critical and creative potentials.

Idris Aman

2006-01-01

32

Classroom Management Skills of The Language Teachers  

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Full Text Available Teachers or educators, most of the time, concentrate on the theoretical aspects oflanguage teaching and study them as much as possible. However, in practice, we start thinkingthat we will have to keep a number of people together in the same place. These are often thepeople who come from many different backgrounds and whose expectations differ. In thiscase, it becomes more and more difficult to appeal to every individual in class. Therefore, asteachers we should initially be trained on how to manage our classrooms and how to providethe necessary environment to put into practice the things we have learned to teach a language.Obviously, we need management skills as well as the language teaching skill. Actually, it isnot as difficult as many people think. As teachers if we fulfill our duties properly, a wellmanagedclass will ensue. In this study, therefore, the definition of class management isregarded roughly “to keep people from different environments directed to one single goal”.When this is accomplished, we are unlikely to live discipline problems.

Arif Sar?çoban

2005-04-01

33

Language Instructional Issues in Asian Classrooms.  

Science.gov (United States)

This collection of essays exemplifies the universal theme that competence in language is key to success in learning and in life. The research studies reported in the collection offer insights into the challenges of literacy learning in Asia: social, cultural, and linguistic factors that sometimes constrain the teacher's approach to instruction.…

Mee, Cheah Yin, Ed.; Moi, Ng Seok, Ed.

34

Preserving Home Languages and Cultures in the Classroom: Challenges and Opportunities.  

Science.gov (United States)

Decades of research document the powerful academic and socio-affective benefits of a strong home language base and affirmation of home language and culture as a valuable resource. This article explores the implicit challenges, daily realities, opportunities, and practical implications of incorporating language and culture into classrooms as they…

Soto, Lourdes Diaz; Smrekar, Jocelynn L.; Nekcovei, Deanna L.

1999-01-01

35

Achievement Motivational Characteristics of University Foreign Language Learners: From the Classroom to the Tutoring Table  

Science.gov (United States)

What influences who seeks foreign language tutoring? Using expectancy value theory, the present study researches the characteristics of university foreign language students in the language classroom (n = 258) and seeking tutoring (n = 29). Students' performance and mastery goal orientations, achievement task values, self-efficacy for foreign…

Matthews, Paul H.

2008-01-01

36

The Relationship between Gender and Iranian EFL Learners’ Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety (FLCA  

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Full Text Available Foreign language anxiety is widely used to describe the feeling of tension and apprehension, which is specifically associated with foreign language learning contexts, including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Foreign language classroom anxiety (FLCA is related to foreign language anxiety and language-skill-specific anxiety, and fairly recently identified as distinguished from other forms of anxiety. FLCA is a more general type of anxiety in learning a foreign language with a strong speaking anxiety element; and low self-confidence is identified as an important component of its construct. Research shows that FLCA is a complex, multi-dimensional phenomenon; it has many potential sources; and it interferes with the acquisition, retention, and production of a foreign language. It seems that in most of English classes in Iran little attention has been paid to the role of the gender on EFL learners' Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety (FLCA. Hence, this study attempted to investigate the relationship between EFL learners’ Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety (FLCA with regard to gender. The data were gathered through questionnaire: the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (Horwitz, Horwitz, & Cope, 1986.The participants were 52 students studying English at Salmas University. The findings revealed a significant relationship between FLCA and females. It was recommended that foreign language teachers should be aware of Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety (FLCA level, its causes and results. The study also offers some context-specific pedagogical implications for Iranian EFL teachers and practitioners.

Fakhri Mesri

2012-06-01

37

Classroom Management for Teachers of Japanese and Other Foreign Languages  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes the classroom management component of the Professional Development of Japanese Teachers of Texas (PDJT), a certification program for teachers of Japanese. In addition, it offers suggestions in classroom management for teachers of Japanese and other foreign languages as well as guidance for teacher trainers to help new…

Horwitz, Elaine K.

2005-01-01

38

Teaching is Communicating: Nonverbal Language in the Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Improving the act of teaching in a classroom implies the need to study nonverbal cues and events, for many classroom phenomena serve as communicators of information and tend to either facilitate or inhibit learning. Nonverbal language, a reflection of both cultural and individual differences, includes not only the teacher's facial expressions,…

Galloway, Charles M.

39

How Rude! Teaching Impoliteness in the Second-Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

English language teaching tends to deal with the pleasanter side of second-language interaction such as making friends, relating experiences, and expressing likes/dislikes while ignoring such everyday communicative realities as rudeness, disrespect, and impoliteness. While neglected in the English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classroom,…

Mugford, Gerrard

2008-01-01

40

Research methods for English language teachers  

CERN Document Server

This book offers a lively introduction to the research methods and techniques available to English language teachers who wish to investigate aspects of their own practice. It covers qualitative and quantitative methodology and includes sections on observation, introspection, diary studies, experiments, interviews, questionnaires, numerical techniques and case study research. Each method is illustrated with examples in language teaching contexts, and techniques of data collection and analysis are introduced. The authors focus particularly on research in the classroom, on tests, materials, the

McDonough, Jo

2014-01-01

41

A Look into the Local Pedagogy of an English Language Classroom in Nepal  

Science.gov (United States)

English language teaching (ELT) currently occurring in diverse social settings points to the need to locate ELT in its social context. Many researchers have highlighted the need to explore local vernacular practices, in particular ELT practices in peripheral contexts. The present study investigates events in an English language classroom at a…

Tin, Tan Bee

2014-01-01

42

Games for the Foreign Language Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Two marketing games are described, "Le Marche Francais" and "El Mercado: The Mexican Market Comes to Life in the Spanish Classroom." Both are patterned after a published game entitled "Market: A Simulation Game." The adaptation in each instance relied on simplifying the original game and presenting it in a form understandable to middle school…

McMillan, Nancy; Madaras, Susan W.

43

Bilingual and Group Poetry in the Foreign Language Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article suggests a variety of ancillary activities in which poetry may be introduced into the foreign language classroom to build confidence and have fun in the second language, while practicing and reinforcing important linguistic concepts. The use of topics and themes such as wishes, comparisons, dreams, colors, or metaphors, is…

Brod, Evelyn F.

1985-01-01

44

Sociolinguistics Inputs and English as Second Language Classrooms  

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Full Text Available Sociolinguistic inputs in language acquisition and use of English as Second Language in classrooms is the main focus of this study. A survey research design was adopted. The population consisted of all secondary school students in Akure Local Government of Ondo State, Nigeria. Two hundred and forty (240 students in senior secondary school classes were deliberately selected from six secondary schools randomly sampled. A fourteen-item questionnaire designated to elicit the required information on the sociolinguistic inputs was used for data collection. The face and content validity of the instrument was ensured. A trial test of the instrument was carried out with students in a community senior secondary school in Ekiti State. Split- half reliability was used and a reliability coefficient of 0.9 was obtained. One way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA, t-test and Pearson Product Moment correlation statistics were employed for the data analysis. Findings revealed that parents’ occupations have significant impact on secondary school students’ use of English. Results also revealed that gender, age and religion have insignificant input on secondary school students’ use of English. It was concluded that the family still remains a major source and most potent place for language learning; therefore, parents should give more attention to students language use at home and provide all the necessary impetus.

Ofodu Graceful Onovughe

2012-06-01

45

Second Language Research Forum Colloquia 2009: Colloquium--Language Learning Abroad: Insights from the Missionary Experience  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent years have brought increasing attention to studies of language acquisition in a country where the language is spoken, as opposed to formal language study in classrooms. Research on language learners in immersion contexts is important, as the question of whether study abroad is valuable is still somewhat controversial among researchers

Hansen, Lynne

2011-01-01

46

EDUC6550 - Research for the Classroom Teacher  

OpenAIRE

In this course, Dr. Eastmond uses a model for teaching called Guided Design. This course teaches classroom teachers how to design and carry out research according to this method. Note: You will need Flash player for this course.

Eastmond, Nick

2008-01-01

47

FACEBOOK GROUPS AS A SUPPORTING TOOL FOR LANGUAGE CLASSROOMS  

OpenAIRE

This paper attempts to present a review of Facebook group pages as an educational tool for language learning. One of the primary needs of foreign language learners is to gain the opportunity to use the target language outside the classroom practice. Social media communication provides occasions for learners to receive input and produce output while engaging in negotiation of meaning. In line with this point, teachers can instigate class group pages in the social media in an attempt to provide...

Arzu Ekoç

2014-01-01

48

Group work in the English language curriculum sociocultural and ecological perspectives on second language classroom learning  

CERN Document Server

This book explores how using small groups in second language classrooms supports language learning. Chappell's experience as a language teacher equips him to present a clear, evidence-based argument for the powerful influence group work has upon the opportunities for learning, and how it should therefore be an integral part of language lessons.

Chappell, Philip

2014-01-01

49

Classroom noise and children learning in a second language  

Science.gov (United States)

The presence of background noise affects children more negatively than adults. Understanding speech in noise is a skill that continues to develop well into a child's adolescent years. Childrens' experience with a specific language also may affect their ability to make sense of incoming speech. Research suggests that even for adults the presence of background noise negatively affects the ability to listen in a second language. Two studies were conducted to investigate the effects of classroom noise on attention and speech perception in native Spanish-speaking second graders learning English as their second language (L2), as compared to English-only speaking peers (EO). In Study 1 we measured childrens' on-task behavior during instructional activities with and without soundfield amplification. In Study 2 we measured the effects of noise (+10 dB signal-to-noise ratio) using an experimental English word-recognition task. Findings indicate although there were no effects of amplification on on-task behavior, word-recognition performance declined significantly for both EO and L2 groups in the noise condition. In particular, the impact of the noise was disproportionately greater for the L2 group. Children learning in their L2 appear to be at a distinct disadvantage when listening in rooms with typical noise and reverberation.

Nelson, Peggy; Kohnert, Kathryn; Sabur, Sabina; Shaw, Daniel

2005-04-01

50

Digital Images In The Language Arts Classroom. In the Curriculum: Language Arts  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent work in middle and high school classrooms throughout the past year suggests two key roles in which students can use digital images in the language arts classroom: as readers and as writers. These emerging capabilities can allow students and teachers to envision, understand, and communicate meaning. Here we offer three brief illustrations…

Kajder, Sara; Swenson, Janet A.

2004-01-01

51

Linguagem, NTIC e a sala de aula: o que propõem as pesquisas de intervenção / Language, ICT and the classroom: what interventional researches propose  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Desenvolveu-se uma análise de aspectos de linguagem e novas tecnologias de informação e comunicação (NTIC) nas teses e dissertações de caráter interventivo em sala de aula de Língua Portuguesa, produzidas entre 2000 e 2010 nos programas de pós-graduação nacionais de Letras e Linguística. Para este a [...] rtigo, foram abordadas as concepções de linguagem e de aprendizagem, os blogs de turma e o destaque dado a eles nos estudos, além do perfil e lugar dessas pesquisas de intervenção no âmbito da Linguística Aplicada. Ao final, com base nesses aspectos, procurou-se apresentar não só um balanço da produção no referido período, como também sinalizar desafios para as futuras ações e pesquisas em Linguística Aplicada nesse campo. Abstract in english We developed an analysis of linguistic aspects and of how information and communication technology (ICT) was treated in theses and dissertations that deal with interventional research in Portuguese language classes, produced between 2000 and 2012 in national post-graduation programs of Language and [...] Linguistics. We discuss here conceptions of language and learning adopted by the researches, the emphasis they give to class blogs and the features and place of these interventional researches in the scope of Applied Linguistics. Finally, based on these aspects, we tried to present not only a balance of the production in that period, but signaling as well challenges for future actions and research in Applied Linguistics in this field.

Núbio Delanne Ferraz, Mafra; Carla Viana, Coscarelli.

2013-09-01

52

Twenty Ideas for Using Mobile Phones in the Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

These days it seems mobile phones are used everywhere by everyone, which leads to the obvious question: How can mobile phone technology support learning in the second language classroom? The answer is "in a number of ways" because mobile phones come with ever-increasing functions that most students are adept at using. In this article the author…

Reinders, Hayo

2010-01-01

53

Student Engagement and Motivation in the Foreign Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This dissertation consists of two manuscripts to examine student motivation and engagement in the foreign language classroom. The purpose of the first paper is to propose a model that distinguishes between motivation and engagement. The paper highlights the connections and differences between motivation and engagement in order to point out issues…

Lin, Tsun-Ju

2012-01-01

54

"Experiential" Professional Development: Improving World Language Pedagogy inside Spanish Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

"Experiential" professional development (EPD), influenced by Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound design, was integrated in the classrooms of secondary Spanish teachers to create opportunities for them to learn to use communicative language teaching (CLT) through experience. Teachers collaborated with colleagues, students, and a…

Burke, Brigid Moira

2012-01-01

55

Language Practices in the Ci-Classroom  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Prelingually deafened children are nowadays likely to receive a cochlear implant (ci). As these children do their language acquisition with a cochlear implant they require a constant rehabilitation and support. Educational staff is instructed on how to work with children with ci in form of guidelines and workshops. This paper discusses language practices used in the setting of a school for cochlear-implanted children. These children encounter language and pronunciation problems that accompany prelingual deafness and hearing with a cochlear implant. I examine two practices, which are used during the storytelling activity: repeat requests and questions. Whereas repeat requests are used in ci-therapy, questions have been shown to be instrumentalized for educational purposes in the setting of a school. I will reveal the educational/rehabilitational issues that are linked to these practices.

Mourtou, Eleni

2014-01-01

56

The use of games in the language classroom  

OpenAIRE

This essay focuses on the use of games inside the classroom and it argues that games can be a good teaching method when teaching foreign languages. It looks at why games should be used as a teaching method and how in order to maximize the positive result on language learning. Also this essay explains various game categories and it gives an example of at least one game from each category which can be especially good in language teaching. In addition this essay looks at the four language skill ...

Sigríður Dögg Sigurðardóttir 1985

2010-01-01

57

Research for the Classroom: Oedipus Alive  

Science.gov (United States)

"Oedipus Rex" dramatizes a collision of past, present, and future. Once Oedipus recognizes the connection between the past and his horrific present, he stabs out his eyes, ashamed at what he has wrought and unwilling to look upon his future. The 21st-century English language arts classroom is in the midst of a collision as well. Coming into…

Malley, Joel

2009-01-01

58

Graphic Narratives: Cognitive and Pedagogical Choices for Implementation in the English Language Arts Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

There is little empirical research that investigates the implementation of graphic narratives into the English language arts classroom, subsequently leading to misperceptions and misconceptions about their educative uses. Despite sequential arts' long history, graphic narratives continue to experience a marginalized existence within the…

Dulaney, Margaret Anne

2012-01-01

59

How a Therapy Dog May Inspire Student Literacy Engagement in the Elementary Language Arts Classroom  

OpenAIRE

In this article, I discuss theoretical possibilities for the inclusion of therapy dogs in the elementary language arts classroom, particularly which may inspire students otherwise reluctant to engage in literacy activities. I incorporate Guthrie and colleagues’ work in engagement into research in Animal Assisted Therapy with children to posit a revised theory of engagement.

Lori Friesen

2009-01-01

60

How a Therapy Dog May Inspire Student Literacy Engagement in the Elementary Language Arts Classroom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this article, I discuss theoretical possibilities for the inclusion of therapy dogs in the elementary language arts classroom, particularly which may inspire students otherwise reluctant to engage in literacy activities. I incorporate Guthrie and colleagues’ work in engagement into research in Animal Assisted Therapy with children to posit a revised theory of engagement.

Lori Friesen

2009-12-01

61

Uses of Digital Tools and Literacies in the English Language Arts Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This article reviews research on English language arts teachers' use of digital tools in the classroom to remediate print literacies. Specifically, this review focuses on the affordances of digital tools to foster uses of digital literacies of informational/accessibility, collaboration knowledge construction, multimodal communication, gaming…

Beach, Richard

2012-01-01

62

Influencing Motivation in the Foreign Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Motivation is one of the main determining factors of success in developing a second or foreign language. However, motivation is a complex phenomenon and the more its constructs are understood the better we are able to understand the extent to which we can influence it. Teachers can cultivate student motivation to varying degrees and play a central…

Nicholson, Simon James

2013-01-01

63

· Attitude towards Computers and Classroom Management of Language School Teachers  

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Full Text Available Computer-assisted language learning (CALL is the realization of computers in schools and universities which has potentially enhanced the language learning experience inside the classrooms. The integration of the technologies into the classroom demands that the teachers adopt a number of classroom management procedures to maintain a more learner-centered and conducive language learning environment. The current study explored the relationship between computer attitudes and behavior and instructional classroom management approaches implemented by English institute teachers. In so doing, a total of 105 male (n = 27 and female (n = 78 EFL teachers participated in this study. A computer attitude questionnaire adapted from Albirini (2006 and a Behavior and Instructional Management Scale (BIMS adopted from Martin and Sass (2010 were benefitted from for the purpose of collecting the data. The results of the Pearson Correlation Coefficient revealed that there were no significant relationships between attitude and behavior and instructional management across gender. However, it was found that the more male teachers experience tendency toward using computers in their classes, the more teacher-centered their classes become. In addition, the more female teachers are prone to use computers in their classes, the more student-centered and lenient their classes become.

Sara Jalali

2014-07-01

64

Pre-Service Teachers: An Analysis of Reading Instruction in High Needs Districts Dual Language Classrooms  

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Full Text Available Pre-service teachers need opportunities to apply theory and connect to best practices as they teach in classroom settings be it, whole or small group. For many pre-service teachers often times their experience is limited to simply watching instruction or working with small groups of students (Pryor & Kuhn, 2004. The student teaching experience is a critical component of the teacher preparation program. Through the use of the English Language Learner Classroom Observation Instrument (ELLCOI, and researcher observation the hope is that these will aid in bringing to light the instructional activities used by pre-service teachers during reading instruction with ELLs. This study explores how pre-service bilingual teachers connect theory into practice by examining their instruction in the following categories: Instructional Practices, Interactive Teaching, English-Language Development, and Content Specific to Reading as listed in The English Language Learner Classroom Observation Instrument (ELLCOI developed by Haager, Gersten, Baker, and Graves (2003. To capture these instructional events video tape recordings of eight South Texas pre-service teachers were taken during a reading language arts lesson in order to observe instruction in high need districts’ dual language/bilingual classrooms. Data were compiled to capture the nature and quality of instruction on key essential elements, as well as reading instructional practices specific to the teaching/learning process in the dual language classroom. The findings portray the results of the ELLCOI with bilingual/ESL pre- service teachers and how they make sense of their instructional practices as a means to instruction in one-way dual language public school classrooms.

Michael Whitacre

2013-01-01

65

Helping students overcome foreign language speaking anxiety in the English classroom: theoretical issues and practical recommendations  

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Full Text Available Despite the fact that foreign language speaking anxiety is a common phenomenon in the teaching of English as a foreign language in Greece, teachers do not always identify anxious students, and often attribute their unwillingness to participate in speaking tasks to factors such as lack of motivation, or low performance. This article aims to contribute to the literature on language anxiety and to provide teachers with strategies for reducing foreign language speaking anxiety stemming from students’ fear of negative evaluation from their peers and perception of low ability. Using qualitative research, it presents a classroom-based case study which aims at examining the characteristics of anxious students with a view to implementing classroom interventions to reduce foreign language speaking anxiety. The effectiveness of these interventions is also presented and evaluated, and the pedagogical implications of the findings are discussed.

Iakovos Tsiplakides

2009-10-01

66

APTITUDE, ATTITUDES, AND ANXIETY: A STUDY OF THEIR RELATIONSHIPS TO ACHIEVEMENT IN THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM  

OpenAIRE

In recent years, much attention has been given to the impact of attitudes and anxiety on student achievement in the foreign language classroom, and teaching techniques and methodologies have even been developed for the purpose of alleviating anxiety in order to maximize learning. Although numerous studies have indicated that positive attitudes tend to facilitate language learning, there have been very few quantitative research studies on the role of anxiety in achievement.^ The present stu...

Trylong, Vicki Lynn

1987-01-01

67

Code-Switching in Japanese Language Classrooms: An Exploratory Investigation of Native vs. Non-Native Speaker Teacher Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

Research on language classroom code-switching ranges from describing both teachers' and learners' first language and target language use to making connections between code-switching and student learning. However, few studies compare differences in practice between native and non-native speaker teachers and even fewer consider culture of learning…

Hobbs, Valerie; Matsuo, Ayumi; Payne, Mark

2010-01-01

68

Creativity in the Language Classroom: Towards a "Vichian" Approach in Second Language Teaching.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes a "Vichian" approach (involving linguistic imagination and creativity) to the exploration of basic pedagogical matters in classroom language teaching. The approach is based on principles involving: (1) concrete language knowledge; (2) development from the concrete to the abstract; (3) the role of metaphor in verbal creativity; and (4)…

Danesi, Marcel; D'Alfonso, Aldo

1989-01-01

69

The link between foreign language classroom anxiety, second language tolerance of ambiguity and self-rated English proficiency among Chinese learners  

OpenAIRE

Previous research has suggested that high levels of Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety (FLCA) have a negative effect on foreign language learning (Horwitz, 2001; Lu & Liu, 2011) while moderate levels of Second Language Tolerance of Ambiguity (SLTA) are believed to boost foreign language learning (Ely, 1995). There is prima facie evidence that both dimensions are inversely related as Foreign Language Learning contexts are full of ambiguities which may contribute to anxiety. However, the rel...

Dewaele, Jean-marc; Ip, Tsui Shan

2013-01-01

70

SELF-POLICING IN THE ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM  

OpenAIRE

The present study explores how classroom participants invoke a monolingual target-language policy in an English as a foreign language (EFL) classroom, specifically focusing on one method of doing language policy through self-initiated language policing sequences, which I have called self-policing. Language policing refers to the mechanism deployed by the teacher and/or the pupils to (re-)establish the normatively prescribed medium of classroom interaction (Amir & Musk, 2013; cf. Bonacina & Ga...

Amir, Alia

2013-01-01

71

Learner perceptions of language choice in English as an additional language classrooms  

OpenAIRE

To better understand how and why students make choices about using first language or English within an English for Academic Purposes (EAP) context, a phenomenological approach was used in the present study to explore participants’ understandings of classroom language choice in an international student bridging program at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, Canada. This exploratory study found that participants’ beliefs surrounding language choice were related to their understandings of th...

Schindel, Angela Janet

2011-01-01

72

The Chinese Bouyei College Students’ Classroom Anxiety in Foreign Language Learning: A Survey Study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This survey study aims to investigate the level of the Chinese Bouyei college students’ general foreign language (FL classroom anxiety, the relationships between their FL classroom anxiety and the four independent variables, gender, major field of study, level of academic year, and level of college, and possible causal factors contributive to their FL classroom anxiety. A previously published written questionnaire was administered to 320 1st- and 2nd-year Bouyei college learners in three main fields of study at five colleges of two levels in south and southwest areas of Guizhou Province, China. Ten interview questions were also conducted to 25 interviewees randomly selected from these colleges. The results of the analysis show that the Chinese Bouyei college learners experienced medium level of FL classroom anxiety; there were significant differences between their FL classroom anxiety and the first three independent variables, but not the last; and twelve main causal factors were found contributive to their FL classroom anxiety, among which some are new or different from the findings of the previous studies. Discussion was made on the research findings and what the interviewees expected from the teachers, followed by implications and suggestions for FL instructors that might help enhance and facilitate students’ FL learning.

Jianhua Wei

2012-03-01

73

Speaking Correctly: Error Correction as a Language Socialization Practice in a Ukrainian Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This study uses a language socialization approach to explore the role of Ukrainian language instruction in the revitalization of Ukrainian as the national language. Based on 10 months ethnographic observation and videotaping of classroom interaction in two fifth-grade Ukrainian language and literature classrooms, it focuses on corrective feedback…

Friedman, Debra A.

2010-01-01

74

Classroom Management: What Does Research Tell Us?  

Science.gov (United States)

The article reviews studies that focus on classroom management. The aim of classroom management is twofold. The first is to establish a quiet and calm environment in the classroom so that the pupils can take part in meaningful learning in a subject. The second aim is that classroom management contributes to the pupils' social and moral…

Postholm, May Britt

2013-01-01

75

EFL (English as a Foreign Language) Classroom Discourse Analysis of a Vocational College and Some Reflections  

Science.gov (United States)

The application of classroom discourse analysis of foreign language teaching and learning can reveal much about how teachers perform in their teaching practice and how to make improvement. In this paper, the author tries to reveal the present state of EFL (English as a foreign language) classrooms in a vocational college from the angle of…

Xin, Liu; Luzheng, Lou; Biru, Shi

2011-01-01

76

The Relationship between Language Learners’ Anxiety and Learning Strategy in the CLT Classrooms  

OpenAIRE

This paper intends to explore how Taiwanese students perceive the relationship between their language learning strategy and anxiety in the foreign language classroom. Due to their previous learning experience, most of the participants hold an un...

Kun-huei Wu

2010-01-01

77

Conflicting Ideologies and Language Policy in Adult ESL: Complexities of Language Socialization in a Majority-L1 Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This study looks at how language ideologies affect and are revealed in language socialization practices in a majority-L1 adult ESL classroom, particularly looking at language use and policy. It draws on recent theories and critiques of language socialization (Bayley & Langman, 2011; Bronson & Watson-Gegeo, 2008; Garrett &…

Mori, Miki

2014-01-01

78

English language classroom practices: Bangladeshi primary school children’s perceptions  

OpenAIRE

English language teaching (ELT) has been investigated from various angles including how English language teachers perceive what happens in an ELT classroom. How primary school English language learners perceive their experiences of ELT is rarely reported in the published literature, particularly from developing countries such as Bangladesh. This article reports on a study that examined Bangladeshi primary school learners’ experience of English language classroom practices in which technolog...

Shrestha, Prithvi

2013-01-01

79

Cooperation in the Classroom : Experimenting with Research Joint Ventures  

OpenAIRE

This paper describes a classroom exercise that illustrates the investment incentives facing firms when technological spillovers are present. The game involves two stages in which student ?sellers? first make investment decisions then production decisions. The classroom game can be used to motivate discussions of research joint ventures, the free-rider problem, collusion, and antitrust policy regarding research and development.

Goeree, Michelle S.; Hinloopen, Jeroen

2004-01-01

80

Probing EFL Students’ Language Skill Development in Tertiary Classrooms  

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Full Text Available Research in second or foreign language learning indicates that for adult learners, the improvement of one language skill facilitates the development of other skills. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlations among Chinese EFL students’ reading, writing, and listening development by examining their test scores on the College English Test Band 4. The findings showed that the resultant correlation coefficients between reading and writing and between reading and listening were low and not statistically significant. However, there was a significant relationship between listening and writing. It was suggested that factors such as the homogeneous sample selected, students’ motivation, and teaching methodology might affect the outcome of the research. The perceived implications of the research point to the importance of drawing close attention to teachers’ efforts in cultivating and developing students’ language skills evenly in the EFL context of China.

Hong Wang

2008-12-01

81

When language policy and pedagogy conflict: pupils’ and educators’ ‘practiced language policies’ in an English-medium kindergarten classroom in Greece  

OpenAIRE

An international school (BES) in Greece, overwhelmingly attended by Greek origin children, has adopted, as its language policy, English as the ‘official’ medium of interaction, including in the Reception classroom, the target of this research. That is, through its language policy, the school aims to promote the learning and use of English throughout school. At the same time, the school has adopted ‘free interaction’ in designated play areas as its pedagogical approach. ...

Papageorgiou, Ifigenia

2012-01-01

82

The Benefits of Management and Organisation: A Case Study in Young Language Learners’ Classrooms  

OpenAIRE

This study focuses on primary language education within a Greek region: specifically, on the positive effects of classroom management and organisation on a student-centred approach of teaching. In the case of the Greek education system, language teachers are encouraged to adopt student-centred approaches in their classroom but have not received any guidance on how to do so. Language educators are reluctant to abandon their teacher-centred ways, because they have not been trained to apply clas...

Christina Nicole Giannikas

2013-01-01

83

Investigating foreign language anxiety in Iranian classrooms: The effect of gender  

OpenAIRE

In an attempt to delve into the issue of affective variables related to language learning, the present study focuses on the influence of gender on learners' foreign language anxiety in the Iranian context. The objective of this case study is first to determine the extent to which Iranian EFL learners perceive foreign language anxiety in matched-gender and mixed-gender classrooms and second to see if there is any significant difference between the two types of the investigated classrooms. To t...

Mahmoodzadeh, Masoud

2013-01-01

84

The Role of Motivation and Controversial Conceptual Material in Foreign Language Classrooms  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Spanish classrooms in the U.S. rarely teach students about the tumultuous relationship with natives of the target language, and this lack of material can leave the learner without certain linguistic knowledge. The novelty of exploring controversial relationships in the target language has the possibility of challenging students’ conceptions of the world which can open up different channels for motivation in the classroom, and ultimately, language learning.

Antonio R. Iaccarino

2012-05-01

85

The Chinese Bouyei College Students’ Classroom Anxiety in Foreign Language Learning: A Survey Study  

OpenAIRE

This survey study aims to investigate the level of the Chinese Bouyei college students’ general foreign language (FL) classroom anxiety, the relationships between their FL classroom anxiety and the four independent variables, gender, major field of study, level of academic year, and level of college, and possible causal factors contributive to their FL classroom anxiety. A previously published written questionnaire was administered to 320 1st- and 2nd-year Bouyei college learners in three m...

Jianhua Wei; Butsakorn Yodkamlue

2012-01-01

86

The Evaluation of Classroom Teacher Candidates’ Attitudes Regarding Turkish Language I: Phonetics and Morphology Course  

OpenAIRE

This study has been carried out to determine the attitudes of the classroom teacher candidates regarding Turkish language I: Phonetics and morphology courses. The attitude scale consists of 28 items. The scale has been applied for the total 255 teacher candidates attending the third and fourth grades in the department of the classroom teaching of the educational faculty at Onsekiz Mart University in the academic year 2009-2010. According to the results, the attitudes of classroom teacher cand...

S?ahi?n, C?avus?; O?rge Yas?ar, Funda

2010-01-01

87

Student Teachers' Attitudes and Beliefs about Using the Target Language in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Although the language teaching profession has long emphasized the use of the target language in the classroom, student teachers face various challenges in their efforts to conduct class in their target language. This case study focused on 10 student teachers with respect to (1) their initial attitudes and beliefs about using the target language,…

Bateman, Blair E.

2008-01-01

88

Integrating a Corpus of Classroom Discourse in Language Teacher Education: The Case of Discourse Markers  

Science.gov (United States)

While language teacher education programmes and language syllabi in secondary education encourage the use of the target language in the classroom, resources to support teachers in this endeavour, such as books with useful phrases, do not state that the examples they provide are corpus-based, i.e. drawn from actual language use rather than invented…

Amador Moreno, Carolina P.; O'Riordan, Stephanie; Chambers, Angela

2006-01-01

89

Responding to the Challenge: Giving Pre-Service Classroom Teachers a Musical Language and Understanding  

Science.gov (United States)

Pre-service teacher degree programs are increasingly crowded with subjects covering the wide gamut of knowledge a teacher requires. Ensuring musical knowledge and language for classroom teaching poses a difficult problem for teacher educators. This article examines the challenges of including in the pre-service classroom teaching program a music…

Munday, Jenni; Smith, Wyverne

2010-01-01

90

Directness, Indirectness, and Deference in the Language of Classroom Management: Advice for Teacher Trainees?  

Science.gov (United States)

This article considers the pragmatic and pedagogic issues involved in trainee teachers' choice of direct and indirect classroom management directives, and presents an analysis of three English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) teacher trainees' classroom management requests. It recommends the use of more direct forms by ESL teacher trainees. Contains 25…

Goatly, Andrew

1995-01-01

91

The Relationship between Language Learners’ Anxiety and Learning Strategy in the CLT Classrooms  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper intends to explore how Taiwanese students perceive the relationship between their language learning strategy and anxiety in the foreign language classroom. Due to their previous learning experience, most of the participants hold an unfavorable attitude toward a grammar-translation teaching approach. Consequently, learner-centered instruction has been widely accepted and acknowledged as a welcome concept and feasible teaching approach in the English Foreign Language (EFL context. To improve the proficiency of language learners in EFL classrooms, it is very important to take into account the need of the learners. The present study utilizes Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS and Communicative Language Teaching Attitude Scale (COLTAS to examine the participants’ perceptions about learning English. The results indicate that most of the participants express a favorable attitude toward the Communicative Language Teaching (CLT approach; however, they also reveal their high level of anxiety in the language classroom. Language anxiety is usually reported to have adverse effects on the learning of a second language. It is the language instructors’ mission to accelerate the language learning of their students. One way is to teach students how to learn more effectively and efficiently. Language learning strategies (LLS are procedures that learners can use to facilitate learning. Both teachers and students should develop an awareness of the learning process and strategies that lead to success. The ultimate goal of this paper is to analyze the factors that affect the participants’ learning strategies and their language anxiety, and offer some pedagogical suggestions.

Kun-huei Wu

2010-01-01

92

The Relationship between Gender and Iranian EFL Learners’ Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety (FLCA)  

OpenAIRE

Foreign language anxiety is widely used to describe the feeling of tension and apprehension, which is specifically associated with foreign language learning contexts, including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Foreign language classroom anxiety (FLCA) is related to foreign language anxiety and language-skill-specific anxiety, and fairly recently identified as distinguished from other forms of anxiety. FLCA is a more general type of anxiety in learning a foreign language with a stron...

Fakhri Mesri

2012-01-01

93

Classroom Currents: Interrupting the Single Story: LGBT Issues in the Language Arts Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Two literacy leaders acknowledge the challenges of teaching LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) issues in the classroom. While children come from a variety of family structures, it is necessary to acknowledge that a gay individual was once a child sitting in a classroom. An argument against marginalization and an advocacy for inclusion of…

Hermann-Wilmarth, Jill; Ryan, Caitlin L.

2013-01-01

94

COML (Classroom Orchestration Modelling Language) and Scenarios Designer: Toolsets to Facilitate Collaborative Learning in a One-to-One Technology Classroom  

OpenAIRE

In a one-to-one collaborative learning classroom supported by ubiquitous computing, teachers require tools that allow them to design of learning scenarios, and to manage and monitor the activities happening in the classroom. Our project proposes an architecture for a classroom management system and a scenarios designer tool, both based on a Classroom Orchestration Modelling Language (COML), to support these requirements. We are developing and testing this with the GroupScribbles software usin...

Niramitranon, Jitti; Sharples, Mike; Greenhalgh, Chris

2006-01-01

95

Assessment practices in the English language classroom of Greek Junior High School  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present study aimed to compare teacher and student perceptions concerning assessment in the English language classroom of Greek Junior High Schools. It focuses on exploring teacher assessment practices and students’ view of these. The degree of agreement between teacher and student views can affect the results of instruction and learning. The central finding of the study was that English language teachers follow an approach that keeps a balance between the requirements of the Cross-Thematic Curriculum (DEPPS for performance assessment and the official specifications which define final achievement tests. Students understand the purpose of assessment and the importance of attitudes towards learning and have a clear picture of methods and tasks used for their assessment. On the basis of these research findings, a series of suggestions about teachers and teacher trainers are put forward, focusing on teacher professional development, which, in turn, will promote student involvement and responsibility for learning.

Stavroula Vlanti

2012-02-01

96

A Case Study on the Influence of Organizational Culture on Language Classroom  

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Full Text Available This paper tries to probe the influence of the organizational culture on language classroom at a newly-established local college. It firstly reviews the knowledge of the organizational culture and finds out its features, and then discusses how the organizational culture was greatly influenced by the host educational environment. On the basis of this, the paper interprets how organizational culture in turn influences the classroom culture in terms of English language teaching and learning in China.

Zhihui Liu

2009-07-01

97

Access to mathematics versus access to the language of power: the struggle in multilingual mathematics classrooms  

OpenAIRE

In this article I explore how teachers and learners position themselves in relation to use of language(s) in multilingual mathematics classrooms. I draw from two studies in multilingual mathematics classrooms in South Africa. The analysis presented shows that teachers and learners who position themselves in relation to English are concerned with access to social goods and positioned by the social and economic power of English. They do not focus on epistemological access but argue for English ...

Mamokgethi Setati

2008-01-01

98

What Does It Mean to Learn Oral and Written English Language: A Case Study of a Rural Kenyan Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This study was an ethnographic case study that investigated oral and written language learning in a first grade classroom in Kenya. The languages used in this classroom were Swahili and English only. Kamba the mother tongue of the majority of the children, was banned in the entire school. In this classroom there were 89 children with two teachers,…

Lisanza, Esther Mukewa

2011-01-01

99

Meaning-Making as Dialogic Process: Official and Carnival Lives in the Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This article adopts a Bakhtinian analysis to understand the complexities of discourse in language-learning classrooms. Drawing on empirical data from two of four linked case studies in a larger, ESRC-funded project, we argue that students learning in complementary (also known as community language, supplementary, or heritage language) schools…

Blackledge, Adrian; Creese, Angela

2009-01-01

100

A Small-Scale Study of Primary School English Language Teachers' Classroom Activities and Problems  

Science.gov (United States)

Turkey's search for upgrading the quality of English language teaching is still in progress. Publication of Ministry of National Education's "English Language Curriculum for Primary Education Grades 4,5,6,7 and 8" (2006) framed the content and delivery of our primary school English language teaching classes along with a list of suggested classroom

Arikan, Arda

2011-01-01

101

Reading, Living, and Writing Bilingual Poetry as ScholARTistry in the Language Arts Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Language arts educators who teach Latino English language learners know that part of their job is to help students learn to distinguish between the vernacular varieties of Spanish (or Mandarin, or Portuguese, or Swahili), English they use at home, and the school varieties of language expected in the classroom and in other professional and…

Cahnmann, Melisa

2006-01-01

102

Codeswitching in the Language Classroom: A Study of Four EFL Teachers' Cognition  

Science.gov (United States)

Although many language teachers resort to their first language (L1) at various junctures during their practice, not many studies have tried to understand the reasons for this from teachers' personal perspectives. This study aimed at investigating English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers' cognitive processes during their classroom

Samar, Reza Ghafar; Moradkhani, Shahab

2014-01-01

103

Book Review: Creating equitable classrooms through action research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Creating Equitable Classrooms through Action Research is compelling reading for a wide-ranging audience including professional development participants, preservice and inservice teachers, students of educational administration, and teacher educators.

Geoff Mills

2009-01-01

104

Students, language, and physics: Discourse in the science classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Women and minorities do not enter science professions at rates consistent with their populations (Rosser, 2000). A variety of theoretical frameworks and associated interventions have been cited in the literature; yet, the gender and racial gaps remain. Theoretical frameworks and the associated interventions to promote the success of women and minorities in the sciences have primarily been one dimensional: they address issues of Self (associated with experiential and psychoanalytical framings) or Language (categorical and deconstructive framings) (Grumet & Stone, 2000). Furthermore, research in science education with few exceptions (Hanson, 2004), has failed to address race and gender through an intersectional analysis. This study investigates the inclusion and exclusion of girls and minorities in the sciences by examining the connections between Self and Language in physics group work conversations. Critical Discourse Analysis was used to explore the connections between Self and Language. Eight students in two groups were the focus of the study. Transcription of conversations and coding of transcripts with students' subject positions, genres, and registers provided evidence of the reflexivity of Self and Language. Furthermore, the study demonstrated how group discourse and power imbalances within groups serve to simultaneously facilitate and constrain learning opportunities and learning itself.

Kowalski, Susan Marie

105

Aida and Her Mainstream Classroom: A Case Study of a Young English Language Learner's Literacy Development  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article reports a nine-month study of literacy development of Aida, a young English language learner from Indonesia, who was mainstreamed in a Grade 2 classroom in a primary school in the south-eastern part of Australia. This article initially reviews the literature concerning features of the mainstream classroom conducive for second language learning and for literacy development. Following the presentation of methodological issues, it examines English learning activities in Aida's classroom and highlights her literacy development with examples of her work. The results from this study show that Aida developed literacy skills considered important for her second language and learning development. The variety of English learning activities and the encouraging environment in her classroom contributed much to her literacy development.

Bambang Yudi Cahyono

2003-01-01

106

Developing the language of thinking within a classroom community of inquiry: pre-service teachers' experiences  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: English Abstract in english We argue that the "community of inquiry" approach, using reading materials modelled on Lipman's Philosophy for Children programme, is a theoretically justified and teacher-friendly means of promoting effective thinking skills. The stimulus materials, used by the pre-service teachers, consist ofshort [...] stories ofclassroom life designed to elicit children's ideas for further discussion as a community of inquiry. Research has shown that the community of inquiry approach to classroom discussion is perceived positively by educators and teachers and makes a difference to learners. This study explored how the Intermediate and Senior Phase pre-service teachers experienced a classroom community of inquiry by using a qualitative research design with 47 final year pre-service teachers. Data consisted of written reflections from the whole class and recordings of two focus group interviews with selected individuals from the group. From the analysis of the data, the following themes became evident: personal and professional development, changes in learners, contextual concerns, and curriculum links. We conclude that this approach is a valuable addition to the pedagogical strategies of pre-service teachers.

Lena, Green; Janet, Condy; Agnes, Chigona.

107

Second language writing anxiety, computer anxiety, and performance in a classroom versus a web-based environment  

OpenAIRE

This study examined the impact of writing anxiety and computer anxiety on language learning for 45 ESL adult learners enrolled in an English grammar and writing course. Two sections of the course were offered in a traditional classroom setting whereas two others were given in a hybrid form that in-volved distance learning. Contrary to previous research, writing anxiety showed no correlation with learning performance, whereas computer anxie-ty only yielded a positive correlation with performan...

Dracopoulos, Effie

2011-01-01

108

Factors Influencing Student Nurses’ Perceptions of Success and Failure in Second Language Writing – A Classroom-based Study  

OpenAIRE

This article applies attribution theory to identify the factors that influence nursing students’ perceptions of success and failure in learning English writing skills. The study took place in a language classroom in southern Taiwan involving fifty-one female nursing students, a writing teacher, and the researcher. Teaching activities included five writing cycles based on an online writing platform, process approach, and multiple revisions. Evidence data has been collected from learners’ q...

Tai, Hung-cheng

2013-01-01

109

Heritage Languages: In the 'Wild' and in the Classroom  

OpenAIRE

Heritage speakers are people raised in a home where one language is spoken who subsequently switch to another dominant language. The version of the home language that they have not completely acquired – heritage language – has only recently been given the attention it deserves from linguists and language instructors. Despite the appearance of great variation among heritage speakers, they fall along a continuum based upon the speakers' distance from the baseline language. Such a continuum-...

Polinsky, Maria; Kagan, Olga

2007-01-01

110

Classroom research in Environmental Engineering Courses- CREUPI: a feasible practice  

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Full Text Available Classroom research is a strategy that proposes linking teaching and research, thereby rendering teachers and students partners in the search for knowledge and combining theory and practice as allies in the educational process. This paper reports on classroom research experience in the subjects of Introduction to Environmental Engineering and Research Metodology, which are disciplines taught in CREUPI’s Environmental Engineering course. The conceptual and methological landmark achieved through this educational approach is discussed, analyzing the process involved in each discipline as well as the results derived from this practice.

Gerson Araújo de Medeiros

2004-06-01

111

The Evaluation of Classroom Teacher Candidates’ Attitudes Regarding Turkish Language I: Phonetics and Morphology Course  

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Full Text Available This study has been carried out to determine the attitudes of the classroom teacher candidates regarding Turkish language I: Phonetics and morphology courses. The attitude scale consists of 28 items. The scale has been applied for the total 255 teacher candidates attending the third and fourth grades in the department of the classroom teaching of the educational faculty at Onsekiz Mart University in the academic year 2009-2010. According to the results, the attitudes of classroom teacher candidates regarding Turkishlanguage I: Phonetics and morphology courses have been determined to have revealed significant differences according to gender, age and education type and success grade. On the other hand, the attitudes of the classroom teacher candidates regarding Turkish language I: Phonetics and morphology courses have been determined not to have revealed a significant difference according to the region where they are from, the high school and class type they attend.

Çavu? ?AH?N

2010-08-01

112

The Application of Virtual Simulations using Second Life in a Foreign Language Classroom  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of virtual simulation-based language learning in a foreign language class in Korea. Total 35 1st-year university students in Korea participated in this research to figure out the effect of simulations. A virtual English learning community, ‘Cypris Chat’ in Second Life was selected as a learning tool. For the data collection, a survey questionnaire was distributed and analysed quantitatively. The result shows that the majority of the students had a positive attitude toward using a virtual simulation in English learning and had better understanding in learning English by experiencing an authentic practice. The first section of this paper provides a general overview of simulations in educational settings through an insightful literature review of the current research in the area. The review includes a comprehensive outlook on simulations, an example of successful classroom integration and some of the considerations researchers have found for their implementation. The latter section addresses the research method, results and conclusions.

Tecnam Yoon

2014-02-01

113

Language Awareness in Language Learning and Teaching: A Research Agenda  

Science.gov (United States)

Following on from my state-of-the-art article on "Language Awareness and language learning" (Svalberg 2007), in this paper I will discuss specific research tasks which are centrally concerned with different aspects of language awareness (LA): "explicit knowledge about language, and conscious perception and sensitivity in language learning,…

Svalberg, Agneta M.-L.

2012-01-01

114

"Ma Sha Allah!" Creating Community through Humor Practices in a Diverse Arabic Language Flagship Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Drawing on Lave and Wenger's (1991) and Wenger's (1998) "communities of practice" (CoP) framework, this study explores the shared repertoire of humor practices in the creation of community within the context of a culturally diverse and multilevel adult Arabic language classroom consisting of two native speakers, five heritage language learners…

Hillman, Sara Katherine

2011-01-01

115

Preschool Classroom Conversations as Long-Term Resources for Second Language and Literacy Acquisition  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated relations between preschool talk exposure and immigrant first graders' second language literacy and oral skills outcomes. Participants in the study were 25 children with Turkish as their first language and Norwegian as their second, attending various multilingual and ethnically diverse preschool classrooms in Norway and…

Aukrust, Vibeke Grover; Rydland, Veslemoy

2011-01-01

116

Linguistic Contact Zones in the College Writing Classroom: An Examination of Ethnolinguistic Identity and Language Attitudes  

Science.gov (United States)

In this examination of Mexican-American bilingual college writers, it is argued that implicit language ideologies, common misconceptions about bidialectalism/bilingualism, and the classroom attitudinal domain subvert the success of ethnolinguistic minority students. The author designed and conducted a randomized language attitude survey (N = 195)…

Kells, Michelle Hall

2002-01-01

117

Teaching English Language Learners: 43 Strategies for Successful K-8 Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

Ideal as a supplementary text for a variety of courses and as a guide for in-service teachers and for professional development settings, "Teaching English Language Learners: 43 Strategies for Successful K-8 Classrooms" provides teachers of all content areas with a broad, practical approach to teaching English language learners in the regular…

Colombo, Michaela

2011-01-01

118

Outposts of Americana: Bringing Iowa Grassroots Democracy to European English-Language Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

We present a project that used the Iowa Caucus, an American political tradition, to support English-language instruction in Belgium and Luxembourg. Educators acknowledge that the cultural dimension is critically important in the acquisition of foreign languages, yet questions remain about effective ways to incorporate it in the classroom. Begun as…

Preus, Nate; Cohen, Alison Klebanoff

2011-01-01

119

Predicting Language Teachers’ Classroom Management Orientations on the Basis of Their Computer Attitude and Demographic Characteristics  

OpenAIRE

The advent of modern technologies has had a remarkable role in revolutionizing the classroom setting. It is, therefore, incumbent on teachers to utilize strategies for effective managing of the change. The aim of the present study was to find out English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers’ beliefs regarding classroom management. In so doing, the relationship between EFL teachers’ demographic variables (age and years of teaching experience), computer attitude, and the...

Sara Jalali; Vahid Panahzade

2014-01-01

120

Learners Involvement in Materials Selection for Teaching English in Language Classroom at Aligarh Muslim University  

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Full Text Available The onset of the present paper throws light on materials selection and traditional outlook. Then the paper discusses four types of materials, more specifically, instructional, experiential, exploratory and elicitative materials and their use in language classroom. It discusses the role relationship between teachers, learners and materials in the present scenario at Aligarh Muslim University, keeping in consideration the requirements of the changing times. The paper aims to highlight the positive effects of learner’s involvement in Materials Selection process. The researcher has tried to analyze the findings on the basis of a questionnaire distributed among teachers and students at Undergraduate level. Some suggestions are recommended, on the basis of the findings from the data collected.

Sheema Fatima

2014-06-01

121

Input enhancement in classroom second language acquisition of Japanese  

OpenAIRE

The study investigated the effects of input enhancement on classroom L2 acquisition using university-level beginning learners of Japanese. Two types of input enhancement—explicit explanation of target structures and textual enhancement (reading text which contained highlighted target structures)—were studied for their effect on student learning of two target structures with different levels of grammatical complexity (the gerund of adjectives and the gerund of verbs). The major part of the...

Kubota, Sayuri

2000-01-01

122

Transforming Language Ideologies through Action Research: A Case Study of Bilingual Science Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

This qualitative case study explored a third grade bilingual teacher's transformative language ideologies through participating in a collaborative action research project. By merging language ideologies theory, Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT), and action research, I was able to identify the analytic focus of this study. I analyzed how one teacher and I, the researcher, collaboratively reflected on classroom language practices during the video analysis meetings and focus groups. Further, I analyzed twelve videos that we coded together to see the changes in the teacher's language practices over time. My unit of analysis was the discourse practice mediated by additive language ideologies. Throughout the collaborative action research process, we both critically reflected on the classroom language use. We also developed a critical consciousness about the participatory shifts and learning of focal English Learner (EL) students. Finally, the teacher made changes to her classroom language practices. The results of this study will contribute to the literacy education research field for theoretical, methodological, and practical insights. The integration of language ideologies, CHAT, and action research can help educational practitioners, researchers, and policy makers understand the importance of transforming teachers' language ideologies in designing additive learning contexts for ELs. From a methodological perspective, the transformative language ideologies through researcher and teacher collaborated video analysis process provide a unique contribution to the language ideologies in education literature, with analytic triangulation. As a practical implication, this study suggests action research can be one of the teacher education tools to help the teachers transform language ideologies for EL education.

Yang, Eunah

123

The Relationship between Shyness, Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety, Willingness to Communicate, Gender, and EFL Proficiency  

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Full Text Available The present study aimed to examine the relationship found between shyness, foreign language classroom anxiety, willingness to communicate, gender, and EFL proficiency. To this end, sixty EFL undergraduates (40 females and 20 males majoring in English Translation were selected through simple random sampling. Stanford Shyness Inventory by Zimbardo (1977, Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale by Horwitz et al. (1986, and Willingness to Communicate Scale by McCroskey and Richmond (1987 were used to measure students’ shyness, FLCA, and WTC respectively. Moreover, students’ average score in their specialized courses were taken as a measure of their EFL proficiency. Analysis of the results showed that there is no significant relationship between shyness, foreign language classroom anxiety, willingness to communicate, gender, and EFL proficiency. The results have beneficial implications for teaching methodology and syllabus design.

Sam Bashosh

2013-11-01

124

Creating an Authentic Learning Environment in the Foreign Language Classroom  

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Full Text Available Theatrical activities are widely used by language educators to promote and facilitate language learning. Involving students in production of their own video or a short movie in the target language allows a seamless fusion of language learning, art, and popular culture. The activity is also conducive for creating an authentic learning situation where the real world becomes a part of the educational experience and necessitates the use of an authentic language by the learners. This article describes a video project carried out by Russian language learners at Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS. It examines how the work on the project created and supported authenticity of the learning experience. Though the article focuses on the video project done in the context of language learning and teaching this activity could be successfully implemented in teaching various subjects at both secondary and tertiary levels.

Larisa Nikitina

2011-01-01

125

Classroom and Formative Assessment in Second/Foreign Language Teaching and Learning  

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Full Text Available Formative assessment was first used by Scriven (1967, but studies focused on formative assessment in ESL and EFL classes started in 2000. Formative assessment is integrated in learning and teaching, so a great part of classroom assessment is formative. However, classroom assessment has been not defined clearly, as most of the texts about this type of assessment define it in terms of its formative or summative potentials (Fulcher & Davidson, 2007. This study is an attempt to define different types of assessment, compare formative and classroom assessment, and also identifies the areas which need more attention by researchers

Somaye Ketabi

2014-02-01

126

A sociolinguistics of the utopian and the use of language in classrooms  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The notion of the Utopian use of language in classrooms was developed and applied as a theoretical tool during the empirical study of language in classrooms. It is claimed that a notion like this may turn out to be particularly profitable when the purpose is to interpret and characterize the content and consequences of a certain use of language. It enables us to present the results of the interpretation in a form that facilitates the proposal of alternative ways of using language by the persons involved - in this case, by the teachers. A sample from the interpretations is presented, and the conclusion is ventured that it is necessary to anchor the sociolinguistic descriptions of actual language use in a sociological conception of the relevant social praxis - in our case taken from the sociology of education.

Hermann, Jesper

1979-01-01

127

Netbooks in Sixth-Grade English Language Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

As netbook computers are becoming an attractive option for K-12 educators, they have the potential to be a more integral part of language learning. In this study 45 sixth graders in two classes used netbooks to learn English as a second language. Forty-four students in two other classes served as the control group who received traditional…

Lin, Janet Mei-Chuen; Wu, Yi-Jiun

2010-01-01

128

CA for SLA: Arguments from the Chinese Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

When the seminal article on the organization of turn-taking by Sacks, Schegloff, and Jefferson (1974) was published 30 years ago, I started learning English as a foreign language. In addition to being a learner of the English language for many years, I was also trained in the traditions of Conversation Analysis (CA) and linguistic anthropology…

He, Agnes Weiyun

2004-01-01

129

Factors Influencing Student Nurses’ Perceptions of Success and Failure in Second Language Writing – A Classroom-based Study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article applies attribution theory to identify the factors that influence nursing students’ perceptions of success and failure in learning English writing skills. The study took place in a language classroom in southern Taiwan involving fifty-one female nursing students, a writing teacher, and the researcher. Teaching activities included five writing cycles based on an online writing platform, process approach, and multiple revisions. Evidence data has been collected from learners’ questionnaires and interviews, teacher’s interviews, classroom observations, teaching materials, and researcher’s diaries. The data has been analysed quantitatively using SPSS and qualitatively with the aid of QSR NVivo software. Results reveal the major factors given by learners involve the amount writing practice given and their perceptions of their competence in vocabulary and with grammar. The work is supported by observations made by the language teacher and the researcher on issues which have emerged on the students’ writing skills, psychology, language competence, and learning context. This article concludeswith the implications for teaching.

Hung-Cheng TAI

2013-06-01

130

Fostering Ecological Literacy: A Case Study of the Saint John Harbour in Two High School English Language Arts Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

Integrating environmental education into curriculum in a way that tackles the holistic and complicated nature of multi-dimensional issues continues to be a challenge for educators and administrators. There is potential in using ecological literacy to introduce local environmental case studies into English Language Arts high school classrooms. This research examines the experiences of two ELA classrooms in one Saint John, NB, high school with a two-week unit based on stakeholder relationships within the Saint John Harbour. Through presentations by guest speakers and research sourced from local community groups, students learned about the highly complex environmental issues that inform management decisions for the Harbour. Using these materials as background, students participated in a mock stakeholders meeting. Case study methodology was used to explore student learning in both a higher-level and a lower-level grade 10 ELA class. Data for the analysis included: cognitive mapping exercises; oral and written classroom assignments and activities; a videotape of the mock stakeholder meetings; a focus group interview with selected students; and researcher field notes. Data demonstrated significant student learning about environmental issues including increased sophistication in describing links between and among environmental issues affecting the harbour, and much more complex understandings of the positions and roles of the various stakeholder groups. Some important areas of resistance to new learning were also evident. Implications for practice and policy and recommendations for future research are discussed.

Douglas, Velta

131

Walking a Mile in Their Shoes: Non-Native English Speakers' Difficulties in English Language Mathematics Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

This autoethnographic investigation considers an English-speaking lecturer's observation and consideration of the predicament of non-native speakers of English in an English language mathematics classroom based on that same (non Spanish-speaking) lecturer's experience in a Spanish language mathematics classroom. Difficulties of understanding a…

Mallet, Dann G.

2011-01-01

132

An ORACLE Chronicle: A Decade of Classroom Research.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes Project ORACLE which was research carried out at the University of Leicester begun in 1975 concerning (1) a longitudinal process-product study of teaching and learning in elementary schools; and (2) a study which concentrated on collaborative group work in the same classrooms. Results and implications are discussed.…

Galton, Maurice

1987-01-01

133

Investigating foreign language anxiety in Iranian classrooms: The effect of gender  

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Full Text Available In an attempt to delve into the issue of affective variables related to language learning, the present study focuses on the influence of gender on learners' foreign language anxiety in the Iranian context. The objective of this case study is first to determine the extent to which Iranian EFL learners perceive foreign language anxiety in matched-gender and mixed-gender classrooms and second to see if there is any significant difference between the two types of the investigated classrooms. To this end, a 16 items self-reporting questionnaire with a five Likert-type scale was designed. The developed questionnaire was then given to 96 Iranian lower intermediate EFL learners to complete it. After analyzing the collected data, the findings indicated that mixed-gender classrooms can be considered as an anxiety-provoking teaching context in Iran, since the presence of the opposite gender in EFL classrooms was found to cause statistically significant amount of language anxiety among Iranian learners. The study also offers some context-specific pedagogical implications for Iranian EFL teachers and practitioners.

Mahmoodzadeh, Masoud

2013-01-01

134

Biliteracy and Language Development in Samoan Bilingual Classrooms: The Effects of Increasing English Reading Comprehension  

Science.gov (United States)

This article addresses an area of international concern, the need to enhance the development in reading comprehension for English Language Learners. We report results of an intervention to raise achievement in English (L2) in Samoan bilingual classrooms for 9-13 year old Samoan children. The general aim was to examine patterns of biliteracy and…

Toloa, Meaola; McNaughton, Stuart; Lai, Mei

2009-01-01

135

Integrating Language, Employment, and Culture in the ESL Classroom. SCANS Plans.  

Science.gov (United States)

This lesson guide argues that the focus of the English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) classroom should include all of the following: learning English, acquiring workplace skills, and developing a cross-cultural awareness. The renewed emphasis on employment-related ESL has created a growing interest in the competencies of the SCANS (Secretary's…

Brod, Shirley

136

Mediating Language Learning: Teacher Interactions with ESL Students in a Content-Based Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Draws on constructs of "mediation" from sociocultural theory and "mode continuum" from systemic functional linguistics to investigate how student-teacher talk in a content-based classroom contributes to learners' language development. Shows how teachers mediate between students' linguistic levels in English and their commonsense understandings of…

Gibbons, Pauline

2003-01-01

137

Galaxy Classroom Project Evaluation, Language Arts, Grades 3-5. Final Report.  

Science.gov (United States)

The GALAXY Language Arts Demonstration Program is a package of integrated curricular and instructional approaches that features the organization of instruction around themes presented through television broadcasts, children's literature, classroom activities, and the use of interactive technology. During the GALAXY Project demonstration phase for…

Guth, Gloria J. A.; Block, Clifford

138

Diversity and Inclusion of Sociopolitical Issues in Foreign Language Classrooms: An Exploratory Survey.  

Science.gov (United States)

Investigated diversity in the classroom, student background and learning experiences, and perceptions about the relationship between foreign language learning and issues of race, gender, class, and social justice among university students studying Spanish, Japanese, and Swahili. Found more racial diversity in Japanese and Swahili classes and in…

Kubota, Ryuko; Austin, Theresa; Saito-Abbott, Yoshiko

2003-01-01

139

Second Language Teaching and Learning: the Roles of Teachers, Students, and the Classroom Environment  

OpenAIRE

This portfolio is a compilation of the concepts and practices that the author believes constitute effective second language teaching. It is centered on the author’s teaching philosophy, which is based on the teacher’s roles as facilitator and the students’ roles as active participants in a student-centered, communicative classroom. The author claims that as teachers and students understand and carry out their respective roles, student proficiency in the target language will increase. In...

Briggs, Martin

2014-01-01

140

Assessment practices in the English language classroom of Greek Junior High School  

OpenAIRE

The present study aimed to compare teacher and student perceptions concerning assessment in the English language classroom of Greek Junior High Schools. It focuses on exploring teacher assessment practices and students’ view of these. The degree of agreement between teacher and student views can affect the results of instruction and learning. The central finding of the study was that English language teachers follow an approach that keeps a balance between the requirements of the Cross-Them...

Stavroula Vlanti

2012-01-01

141

Enhancing employability skills through the use of film in the language classroom  

OpenAIRE

Employability is increasingly becoming a central aspect of higher education in the United Kingdom and it is becoming imperative that modern foreign languages teachers engage directly and sincerely with the employability agenda. This article proposes the use of feature films as a successful method for developing and promoting employability skills in the language classroom, an approach which has not thus far been adopted. I begin by discussing different models for the delivery of employability ...

Daly, Selena

2013-01-01

142

Code-Switching in English as a Foreign Language Classroom: Teachers’ Attitudes  

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Full Text Available Code-switching has always been an intriguing phenomenon to sociolinguists. While the general attitude to it seems negative, people seem to code-switch quite frequently. Teachers of English as a foreign language too frequently claim that they do not like to code-switch in the language classroom for various reasons – many are of the opinion that only the target language should be used in the classroom. This study looks at the teachers’ attitudes towards code-switching in teaching English as a foreign language to Malay students at one of the local universities in Malaysia. Data was collected through observations, questionnaires and interviews. Each teacher was observed, their language use were recorded, transcribed and then analyzed using the functions proposed by Gumperz (1982. The results of the study showed that teachers do code-switch in the language classroom, despite their claim that they do not. Analysis of the data showed that, in most cases, code switching by teachers was done to serve pedagogical purposes.

Engku Haliza Engku Ibrahim

2013-06-01

143

SELF-POLICING IN THE ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present study explores how classroom participants invoke a monolingual target-language policy in an English as a foreign language (EFL classroom, specifically focusing on one method of doing language policy through self-initiated language policing sequences, which I have called self-policing. Language policing refers to the mechanism deployed by the teacher and/or the pupils to (re-establish the normatively prescribed medium of classroom interaction (Amir & Musk, 2013; cf. Bonacina & Gafaranga, 2011. The data comes from sequential analyses of 20 hours of video recordings in grades 8 & 9 of an international compulsory school in Sweden between the years 2007-2010. Drawing on Auer (1984 and Gafaranga’s (1999 organisational code-switching framework, this study sheds light on how teachers and pupils self-initiate a switch to English in their interactions. As will be demonstrated, both teachers and pupils, while orienting to the English-only norm, use a three-step sequence for language policing.

Alia AMIR

2013-10-01

144

A Reader Responds to Guilloteaux and Dornyei's "Motivating Language Learners: A Classroom-Oriented Investigation of the Effects of Motivational Strategies on Student Motivation"  

Science.gov (United States)

There is a wealth of literature examining the role of motivation in second language (L2) learning but remarkably little research that has examined how teachers can foster motivation in the classroom. For this reason alone Guilloteaux and Dornyei's (2008) correlational study of the relationship between motivational strategies and student motivation…

Ellis, Rod

2009-01-01

145

Towards an Understanding of the Role of Language in the Science Classroom and Its Association with Cultural Identity Development in the Context of Mozambique  

Science.gov (United States)

I am reflecting here my struggle to understand the issue of language in the science classroom and in our lives from three different perspectives: before and after Mozambican independence and after completion of my doctoral research. The main method used is auto|ethnographic inquiry in which I use the events in my life to question what is happening…

Cupane, Alberto Felisberto

2011-01-01

146

Turkish Teachers’ Practices of Assessment for Learning in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom  

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Full Text Available Recently there has been a noticeable paradigm shift in educational assessment where assessment and student learning are viewed as inseparable and assessment is perceived as a tool for supporting student learning. This study was designed to investigate Turkish teachers’ preferences of common assessment methods in the English as a foreign language (EFL classroom, their Assessment for Learning (AFL practices, and determine whether they differed in their AFL practices according to some variables such as years of teaching experience, gender, and public vs. private school context. 120 EFL teachers completed the online self-report Assessment for Learning Questionnaire for Teachers (TAFL-Q consisting of 28 statements on a 5-point (ranging from strongly disagree to strongly agree Likert scale (? = .92. The findings revealed that most Turkish EFL teachers rely on conventional methods of assessment rather than formative assessment processes. While they generally reported high levels of perceived monitoring (82.86% and scaffolding practices (86.94% of AFL, they had significant differences in their assessments, especially monitoring in support of student learning, according to years of teaching experience, gender, and private vs. public schools variables (p<0.05. To practice AFL, teachers need to appraise their current assessment practices and develop AFL strategies and feedback procedures. Their perceptions of AFL cannot change overnight, nor do they can do it individually and independently. They need support from different sources to recognize the effect of their previous perspectives on their practices and weigh them against the insights offered by the new assessment culture. Through self-report and observational data from both teachers and students to get better insights into monitoring and scaffolding practices, further research could be conducted to explore probable mismatches between teacher and student perceptions of AFL in EFL classrooms.

Hüseyin Öz

2014-07-01

147

Learning to Teach with Videoconferencing in Primary Foreign Language Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

This qualitative study investigates the relationship between learning opportunities and teacher cognition in the context of a videoconferencing (VC) project for foreign languages (FL) in French primary schools. Six generalist primary teachers were followed throughout the initial six-month stage of the initiative, and data were collected from…

Whyte, Shona

2011-01-01

148

Moving from Informal to Formal Mathematical Language in Maltese Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

In Malta, mathematics is often taught through code-switching between Maltese and English, mainly due to the use of textbooks published in the UK. The mixing of the languages has been a source of discussion for several years, with some educators accepting the mixed pattern, and others arguing in favour of using English alone. Furthermore, the…

Farrugia, Marie Therese

2013-01-01

149

Raising Cultural Awareness in the English Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This article discusses how teachers can incorporate cultural knowledge into English language classes, exploring elements of culture, intercultural phenomena, and high-context and low-context cultures. Activities offered by the author to raise cultural awareness include web quests, role plays, cultural observations, and culture journals.

Frank, Jerrold

2013-01-01

150

Classroom Language Experiences of Trilingual Children in French Immersion.  

Science.gov (United States)

Reports the case studies of three trilingual elementary school children in separate Vancouver (British Columbia) early French immersion classes, focusing on themes emerging from analysis related to the children's literacy practices and contexts for language learning, and the teachers' perceptions of these students and representations of…

Dagenais, Diane; Day, Elaine

1998-01-01

151

Rethinking Communicative Language Teaching: Reflection and the EFL Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Analyzes the prominence in communicative language teaching (CLT) of phenomenalistic and intuitive activities, and examines when, how, and why a person reflects. The discussion also looks at three types of CLT activities that could encourage reflection, including task-oriented, process-oriented, and synthesis-oriented. (39 references) (GLR)

Tarvin, William L.; Al-Arishi, Ali Yahya

1991-01-01

152

Conceptualizing Humanistic Competence in the Language Classroom by TJP - A Chinese Case  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available As learning is seen to be a social process as well as an intellectual activity in which teachers work in active partnership with students, “Teaching by Joint Presentation” (TJP project sought to investigate what a humanistic concept of teacher-student joint presentation and critical inquiry can evoke in the language classroom within Chinese context. 289 college English literature learning students and 87 in-service secondary school teachers have participated in this study. The findings articulated a series of multifaceted differences concerning with students’ learning aspiration and competence, together with the complexities of teaching methods in a humanistic language classroom. The results indicate that humanistic ideal does increase students’ learning competence of critical insight, independent thought and reflective analysis. The study provides insights into humanistic competence growth of Chinese college language students based on empirical evidence.

Ling Zhang

2010-10-01

153

Jazyk komunikace ve výuce anglického jazyka v ?eské republice: míšení jazyk? / The language of communication in English classrooms in the Czech Republic: Mixing languages  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The paper deals with classroom communication. More specifically, it focuses on issues connected with the usage of English as the target language and Czech as the mother tongue in lessons of English as a foreign language in primary and lowersecondary schools in the Czech Republic. 89 English lessons were analysed and the proportion between English and Czech used in the sample lessons was established in order to show how the two languages are mixed in the lessons. The analysis of the number of words uttered in the lessons showed that teachers used Czech more than English but students said more English words than Czech words. When operationalized in terms of time, the use of language was equally balanced between the target language and the mother tongue. Another perspective described in the paper is one of opportunities that the teacher creates for the students to practice different language skills. Great differences in using the mother tongue and the target language were found between individual teachers, which is in line with the findings of a number of similar research studies. Towards the end of the paper, five typical situations of mixing languages are briefly presented.

Petr Najvar

2013-12-01

154

An Interaction Analysis of Teacher-Inspired Classroom Language Behaviour in Alternative Language Media Settings.  

Science.gov (United States)

Evaluated impact of using English, the "Mother Tongue" (Yoruba), or a structural bilingual mix of English and Yoruba in classroom communication. Found little difference in frequency of teaching behavior patterns, although in some instances teachers speaking Yoruba were more active. (CJM)

Awoniyi, Timothy A.; Ala, Florence B.O.

1984-01-01

155

Bringing One Language to Another: Multilingualism as a Resource in the Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Students who study English as a Foreign Language (EFL) often already speak two or more languages. Knowing more than one language is a necessity for many people worldwide, whether it is because their parents come from different language backgrounds, because their home, regional, national, or school languages are different, or for a variety of other…

Milambiling, Joyce

2011-01-01

156

Children's Literature in Traditional Arab Classrooms for Teaching English as a Foreign Language  

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Full Text Available This research has shown that the use of authentic children’s literature is an effective and motivating ESL classroom strategy. However, this study investigated the use of children’s stories in EFL elementary classrooms where the teaching methods are very traditional and the resources are limited. This study was carried out in an elementary school in an Arab town in Israel. Approximately a hundred fifth and sixth grade pupils filled in a questionnaire expressing their attitudes towards being taught through stories. Teacher trainees taught the classes, wrote reflections, filled in questionnaires and were observed by the researchers. This information has been collected and served as the data for the study. Results suggest that the use of this strategy is very positive and should be carefully considered by EFL teachers, EFL trainees and teacher educators.Keywords: children's stories, EFL teacher trainees, EFL pupils, traditional classrooms

Ruwaida Abu Rass

2010-02-01

157

Cross language information retrieval: a research roadmap  

OpenAIRE

Cross-Language Information Retrieval (CLIR) has been a research sub-field for more than a decade now. The field has sparked three major evaluation efforts: the TREC Cross Language Track which currently focuses on the Arabic language, the Cross-Language Evaluation Forum (CLEF) - a spinoff from TREC - covering many European languages, and the NTCIR Asian Language Evaluation (covering Chinese, Japanese and Korean). During this one-day workshop we reviewed and assessed the progress that has been ...

Gey, Fredric C.; Kando, Noriko; Peters, Carol

2003-01-01

158

Competing Desires and Realities: Language Policies in the French-Language Classroom  

OpenAIRE

French language policy has historically centred on ways French can be considered a dominant and influential language. It has done this since the Middle Ages, by allowing the French language to serve as a political tool. On an international level, language was a way of subjugating conquered peoples (former colonies). It promoted France’s international status (by the 18th century French was the diplomatic language of Europe). On a national level, the French language was one of the ways govern...

Angela Giovanangeli

2009-01-01

159

Reading comprehension through group work activities in an EFL classroom: An action research report  

OpenAIRE

This classroom action research study approaches the issue of reading skills based on the role of group work in the classroom. Group work is one of the major activities for generating ideas of any written piece of text. It facilitates EFL learners to read in social perspective, which makes their learning more diverse and informative. Classroom activities should reach learner’s needs and understanding and this action research is performed to make a change of classroom activities since we obse...

Rahaman, Arafat

2014-01-01

160

Living Language and Culture: Concordia Language Villages--One Example of Learning outside the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

At Concordia Language Villages, language and culture are inextricably intertwined, as they are in life. Participants "live" and "do" language and culture 16 hours per day. The experiential, residential setting immerses the participants in the culture of the country or countries where the target language is spoken through food, music, sports,…

Phillippe, Denise E.

2012-01-01

161

Formal and semantic dimensions of linguistic development: Implications for classroom English second language instruction in multilingual context  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The study compares English Second Language (ESL learners' (Zambian primary, secondaryschool and tertiary students intuitions on a number of semantic and grammatical phenomena.Using the Semanticity & Grammatical Judgement Test, a modified version of the GrammaticalityJudgement Test often used by researchers within the Chomskyan tradition (cf Hyams, 1986;White, 1986; Schachter, 1989, this study investigates the possibility of an accessibility hierarchyranging from semantic dimensions to formal dimensions of language. The implications of such ahierarchy for the conceptualization of classroom ESL instruction in a multilingual context arediscussed. Although Zambia serves as the principal point of reference, there are many elementsof relevance to classroom second or third language instruction in South Africa.Hierdie studie vergelyk Engels Tweede Taal (E1T leerders (Zambiese primere, sekondere skool en tersiere studente se intuisies oor verskeie semantiese en grammatikale verskynsels. Deur gebruik te maak van die Semantiese en Grammatikale Oordeel Toets, 'n veranderde uitleg van die Grammatikale Oordeel Toets wat gereeld gebruik word deur navorsers in die Chomskyan tradisie (cf Hyams, 1986; White, 1986; Schachter, 1989. Die studie doen navorsing oor die moontlikheid van 'n toeganklike hierargie wat wissel van semantiese dimensies tot formele dimensies van taal. Die implikasies van so 'n hierargie vir die begrip van klaskamer Err onderrig in 'n meertalige konteks word sowel bespreek. Alhoewel Zambie as die vernaamste punt van verwysing dien. is daar elemente van relevansie tot die klaskamer tweede of derde taal instruksie in Suid-Afrika.

Felix Banda

2008-08-01

162

Factor analysis of the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale in Korean learners of English as a foreign language.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the latent constructs of the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS) using two different groups of Korean English as a foreign language (EFL) university students. Maximum likelihood exploratory factor analysis with direct oblimin rotation was performed among the first group of 217 participants and produced two meaningful latent components in the FLCAS. The two components of the FLCAS were closely examined among the second group of 244 participants to find the extent to which the two components of the FLCAS fit the data. The model fit indexes showed that the two-factor model in general adequately fit the data. Findings of this study were discussed with the focus on the two components of the FLCAS, followed by future study areas to be undertaken to shed further light on the role of foreign language anxiety in L2 acquisition. PMID:25153961

Park, Gi-Pyo

2014-08-01

163

¿Duermes mucho Tony? Interpersonal and Transactional Uses of L1 in the Foreign-Language Classroom  

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Full Text Available Whilst communicative teaching approaches sanction, often grudgingly, the limited use of the students’ first language (l1 in English Language Teaching (elt , critical debate is now centred on a much more substantial and energetic role for the use of mother tongue in the language classroom. Justifications favouring the use of l1 currently range from ideological arguments to classroom teaching considerations. This paper contributes to this ongoing debate by examining how new generations of language teachers in Mexico are using the students’ mother tongue, Spanish, not only as a pedagogical tool but to develop and reinforce interpersonal relationships in the language classroom in order to enhance the learning of English. Key words: First language, critical pedagogy, phatic communion Mientras que los métodos comunicativos de enseñanza autorizan, muchas veces con poco entusiasmo, el uso de la lengua materna (l1 de los estudiantes del idioma inglés (ei, un gran debate propone un papel más sustancial y activo para el uso del español en el salón de clases. Actualmente, los argumentos que se muestran a favor del uso de la lengua materna (l1 parten desde motivos ideológicos hasta factores pedagógicos en la enseñanza en el salón de aprendizaje de idiomas. El presente artículo contribuye a este debate en curso examinando la forma en que las nuevas generaciones de profesores de inglés en México están utilizando la lengua materna de sus estudiantes, el español, no sólo como una herramienta pedagógica sino para desarrollar y reforzar las relaciones interpersonales en el salón de idiomas, de forma que el aprendizaje del inglés se vea favorecido. Palabras clave: Lengua materna, pedagogía crítica, comunión fática

Higareda Sandra

2009-11-01

164

The Influence of First-Language Bidialectism in Foreign-Language Classrooms: Observations from Cyprus  

Science.gov (United States)

The sociolinguistic phenomenon of bidialectism can significantly influence foreign-language learning. This study provides empirical evidence (drawn from the Greek Cypriot bidialectal community) for this influence and it supports the recommendation that foreign-language educators be trained in language-variation issues. The study's methodological…

Yiakoumetti, Androula; Mina, Marina

2011-01-01

165

L2 and L3 integrated learning – lingua franca use in learning an additional language in the classroom.  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

This study offers an empirical account of the use of English in Danish-as-a-foreign-language classroom settings. We will refer to English as the lingua franca - which in itself is a second language for the majority of the participants in the data - and to Danish as the target language. We consider implications of lingua franca interaction in target language classroom interactions, and show how in sequences where participants orient to linguistic issues in the target language, for example grammatical forms or lexical items, they often do this with reference to the lingua franca.

Hazel, Spencer; Wagner, Johannes

2015-01-01

166

The application of language-game theory to the analysis of science learning: Developing an interpretive classroom-level learning framework  

Science.gov (United States)

In this study an interpretive learning framework that aims to measure learning on the classroom level is introduced. In order to develop and evaluate the value of the framework, a theoretical/empirical study is designed. The researcher attempted to illustrate how the proposed framework provides insights on the problem of classroom-level learning. The framework is developed by construction of connections between the current literature on science learning and Wittgenstein's language-game theory. In this framework learning is defined as change of classroom language-game or discourse. In the proposed framework, learning is measured by analysis of classroom discourse. The empirical explanation power of the framework is evaluated by applying the framework in the analysis of learning in a fifth-grade science classroom. The researcher attempted to analyze how students' colloquial discourse changed to a discourse that bears more resemblance to science discourse. The results of the empirical part of the investigation are presented in three parts: first, the gap between what students did and what they were supposed to do was reported. The gap showed that students during the classroom inquiry wanted to do simple comparisons by direct observation, while they were supposed to do tool-assisted observation and procedural manipulation for a complete comparison. Second, it was illustrated that the first attempt to connect the colloquial to science discourse was done by what was immediately intelligible for students and then the teacher negotiated with students in order to help them to connect the old to the new language-game more purposefully. The researcher suggested that these two events in the science classroom are critical in discourse change. Third, it was illustrated that through the academic year, the way that students did the act of comparison was improved and by the end of the year more accurate causal inferences were observable in classroom communication. At the end of the study, the researcher illustrates that the application of the proposed framework resulted in an improved version of the framework. The improved version of the proposed framework is more connected to the topic of science learning, and is able to measure the change of discourse in higher resolution.

Ahmadibasir, Mohammad

167

The Zooniverse: Cutting Edge Scientific Research in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Increasingly scientists and researchers from a multitude of disciplines are finding themselves inundated with more data than they could possibly interpret in a lifetime. Computers can be used entirely or partially for some data analysis; but there are some tasks that are currently best suited to human eyes, ears and brains. Zooniverse (www.zooniverse.org) invites members of the public to help researchers analyze and interpret data. To date, hundreds of thousands of volunteers have been involved in classifying images, interpreting sounds and transcribing texts. Zooniverse citizen scientists are providing valuable analyses across a variety of fields, from the hunt for exoplanets in Planet Hunters (planethunters.org) to the transcription of Greek papyri in Ancient Lives (ancientlives.org). Multiple academic publications have resulted from the combined efforts of the Zooniverse community and science teams demonstrating that citizen science is more than ever becoming a well-established method of doing research. Unlike most research projects the data, analysis and interactions with the science teams have an established and visible online presence through the project website and related discussion sites and blogs. These in themselves provide a valuable classroom resource, an opportunity for free and easy access to cutting edge scientific research. Anecdotal evidence exists that teacher can and already do use Zooniverse projects. By providing a rich and varied scaffolding to accompany the Zooniverse projects the opportunity exists for bringing citizen scientists to a wider classroom audience. An audience that may include non-specialist teachers, who require additional support to deliver challenging content, or time strapped educators who haven't the time to develop their own accompanying resources to weave Zooniverse projects into their lessons. During the session we will discuss the recent Zooniverse projects specifically designed to support and promote classroom adoption locally, within the Chicago Public School (CPS) system and nationally within the United States. Introducing ZooTeach, a website where educators may share and search for lesson plans, activities, and resources. Beyond a simple lesson plan repository, ZooTeach is a community where educators are encouraged to modify, comment on, and otherwise actively participate in the educational efforts of Zooniverse. Teacher workshops run at Adler have and will continue to have the dual effect of promoting the Zooniverse and it's educational effort while increasing the pool of resources available nationally via ZooTeach. In house developed teacher guides and interactive tools allowing for the collection and manipulation of data will further enhance the classroom education experience and further lower the bar for entry into the world of citizen science.

Borden, K. A.; Whyte, L. F.; Smith, A.; Tarnoff, A.; Schmitt, H.

2012-12-01

168

Second Language Research Using Magnetoencephalography: A Review  

Science.gov (United States)

In this review we show how magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a constructive tool for language research and review MEG findings in second language (L2) research. MEG is the magnetic analog of electroencephalography (EEG), and its primary advantage over other cross-sectional (e.g. magnetic resonance imaging, or positron emission tomography) functional…

Schmidt, Gwen L.; Roberts, Timothy P. L.

2009-01-01

169

Changes in science classrooms resulting from collaborative action research initiatives  

Science.gov (United States)

Collaborative action research was undertaken over two years between a Korean science teacher and science education researchers at the University of Iowa. For the purpose of realizing science learning as envisioned by constructivist principles, Group-Investigations were implemented three or five times per project year. In addition, the second year project enacted Peer Assessments among students. Student perceptions of their science classrooms, as measured by the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES), provided evidence that the collaborative action research was successful in creating constructivist learning environments. Student attitudes toward science lessons, as examined by the Enjoyment of Science Lessons Scale (ESLS), indicated that the action research also contributed to developing more positive attitudes of students about science learning. Discourse analysis was conducted on video-recordings of in-class presentations and discussions. The results indicated that students in science classrooms which were moving toward constructivist learning environments engaged in such discursive practices as: (1) Communicating their inquiries to others, (2) Seeking and providing information through dialogues, and (3) Negotiating conflicts in their knowledge and beliefs. Based on these practices, science learning was viewed as the process of constructing knowledge and understanding of science as well as the process of engaging in scientific inquiry and discourse. The teacher's discursive practices included: (1) Wrapping up student presentations, (2) Addressing misconceptions, (3) Answering student queries, (4) Coaching, (5) Assessing and advising, (6) Guiding students discursively into new knowledge, and (7) Scaffolding. Science teaching was defined as situated acts of the teacher to facilitate the learning process. In particular, when the classrooms became more constructivist, the teacher intervened more frequently and carefully in student activities to fulfill a variety of pedagogical functions. Students perceived Group-Investigations and Peer Assessments as positive in that they contributed to realizing constructivist features in their classrooms. The students also reported that they gained several learning outcomes through Group-Investigations, including more positive attitudes, new knowledge, greater learning capabilities, and improved self-esteem. However, the Group-Investigation and Peer Assessment methods were perceived as negative and problematic by those who had rarely been exposed to such inquiry-based, student-centered approaches.

Oh, Phil Seok

170

Getting real in the language classroom: developing Japanese students' communicative competence with authentic materials  

OpenAIRE

The research described in this thesis reports on a 10-month quantitative/qualitative classroom-based study, carried out at a Japanese university, investigating the potential of authentic materials to develop learners’ communicative competence. It was hypothesised that the ‘richer’ input provided by authentic materials, combined with appropriate awareness-raising activities, would be better able to develop a range of communicative competencies in learners (linguistic, pragmalinguistic, s...

Gilmore, Alexander

2008-01-01

171

Observations of Teacher-Child Interactions in Classrooms Serving Latinos and Dual Language Learners: Applicability of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System in Diverse Settings  

Science.gov (United States)

With the rising number of Latino and dual language learner (DLL) children attending pre-k and the importance of assessing the quality of their experiences in those settings, this study examined the extent to which a commonly used assessment of teacher-child interactions, the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS), demonstrated similar…

Downer, Jason T.; Lopez, Michael L.; Grimm, Kevin J.; Hamagami, Aki; Pianta, Robert C.; Howes, Carollee

2012-01-01

172

Living Linguistic Diversity in the Classroom: A Teacher Inductee Explores Dual Language Books  

Science.gov (United States)

This article addresses strategies for promoting culturally responsive pedagogy through the implementation of a language awareness curriculum that includes a structured reading intervention program using dual language books. The research builds on the premise that resources such as dual language books can give teachers the opportunity to…

Naqvi, Rahat; Pfitscher, Christina

2011-01-01

173

Understanding and Facing Discipline-Related Challenges in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom at Public Schools  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available

Complying with school regulations and teachers’ instructions is a basic principle of an excellent class; both novice and experienced teachers face challenging situations when getting into real classrooms, especially those related to classroom management. There are various reasons that explain discipline problems in public schools, as well as varied strategies beginning teachers create and try when coping with those challenges. This article reports an action research study on how this methodology helped a group of teacher-trainees overcome indiscipline in English as a foreign language classrooms at public schools, and align with professional development initiatives which focus on reflection and decision-making processes that the new Colombian policies demand from new teachers seeking a higher quality 
of education.


Responder a las normas escolares y a las instrucciones de los profesores es un principio básico de una clase excelente. Tanto los profesores novatos como los experimentados enfrentan situaciones problemáticas en las aulas de clase reales, especialmente en relación con la disciplina. Hay varias razones que explican la indisciplina en los colegios públicos y también estrategias variadas que los profesores principiantes crean y ensayan para superar tal reto. Este artículo reporta un estudio de investigación acción que ayudó a un grupo de profesores principiantes a superar la indisciplina en el aula de inglés en colegios públicos y a responder a iniciativas de desarrollo profesional con base en procesos de reflexión y toma de decisiones que las nuevas políticas educativas colombianas demandan de las nuevas generaciones de profesores para mejorar la calidad de la educación.

Quintero Corzo Josefina

2011-11-01

174

Building Teachers’ Understanding of Classroom Action Research: A Rural Case Study in Indonesia  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Indonesia Open University (UT: Universitas Terbuka is a large, open university delivering distance education to students throughout Indonesia. An important aspect of its mission is to provide opportunities for Indonesian teachers to improve their education in-service. This includes two courses on classroom action research. In order to assess the effectiveness of these courses and, if necessary, improve them, a team of lecturers from UT conducted an investigation of the challenges teachers were facing in learning to conduct classroom action research through the UT modules. The team found that the modules did not adequately reflect an understanding of the actual characteristics of the teachers they were serving and were thus less effective than they might be in teaching teachers to conduct classroom action research. Changes in both the content and scheduling of the modules are recommended in order to more effectively promote classroom action research in Indonesian schools. Key Words: Classroom Action Research, Distance Education, Indonesia, Teacher Development

Dodi Sukmayadi

2011-12-01

175

Reading comprehension through group work activities in an EFL classroom: An action research report  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This classroom action research study approaches the issue of reading skills based on the role of group work in the classroom. Group work is one of the major activities for generating ideas of any written piece of text. It facilitates EFL learners to read in social perspective, which makes their learning more diverse and informative. Classroom activities should reach learner’s needs and understanding and this action research is performed to make a change of classroom activities since we observed a noticeable gap in student's text understanding. It is seen that group work works better in the classroom and is capable of making learners more conscious and understanding, which is of course an interesting and free environment. It also facilitates learners to be more interactive and socialized in the classroom.

Rahaman, Arafat

2014-09-01

176

Neuroimaging and Research into Second Language Acquisition  

Science.gov (United States)

Neuroimaging techniques are becoming not only more and more sophisticated but are also coming to be increasingly accessible to researchers. One thing that one should take note of is the potential of neuroimaging research within second language acquisition (SLA) to contribute to issues pertaining to the plasticity of the adult brain and to general…

Sabourin, Laura

2009-01-01

177

Validation of A Learning Environment Instrument in Tertiary Foreign Language Classrooms in China  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study validated the College and University Classroom Environment Inventory (CUCEI in the context of Chinese tertiary education, which has not been investigated before. The research sample included 4617 first-year undergraduate students (116 classes in two Chinese universities. Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA were conducted. Data analysis shows that the CUCEI has robust validity and reliability after six items being deleted. The final solution of the CUCEI performs well for the Chinese sample at tertiary schools, which suggests that the CUCEI is a promising instrument for assessing learning environment at Chinese university, and can be further applied for empirical studies of Chinese higher education.

Zheng Li

2014-09-01

178

Reading anxiety, classroom anxiety, language motivation, reader self-perception, and arabic achievement of arab-american students learning arabic as a second language.  

Science.gov (United States)

Summary.-The present study assessed the relations between reading anxiety, classroom anxiety, language motivation, and readers' self-perception for a sample of Arab-American students in Arabic classes. The effects of sex, grade, and years studying Arabic on academic achievement were examined as well. Measures were administered to 118 middle school students (56 boys, 62 girls; M age = 13.0 yr., SD = 0.8), and teachers reported academic grades in Arabic. Reading anxiety was significantly correlated with classroom anxiety and reader self-perception. Classroom anxiety scores were significantly correlated with motivation and reader self-perception. Significant positive correlations were found between language motivation and reader self-perception scores, and between years studying Arabic and reader self-perception scores. Boys in the second year of Arabic had significantly lower classroom anxiety than girls, and students in Grade 7 had higher reader self-perception than those in Grade 8. Classroom anxiety, language motivation, and reader self-perception significantly predicted Arabic achievement. Pedagogical implications are discussed. PMID:25457094

Alkhateeb, Haitham M

2014-12-01

179

Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety and Learners’ and Teachers’ Beliefs toward FLL: A Case Study of Iranian Undergraduate EFL Learners  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study was an attempt to determine the beliefs of undergraduate female and male EFL learners at Shahreza University, Isfahan, Iran, about foreign language classroom anxiety, and compare students’ and teachers’ attitudes toward FLL. For this purpose sixty linguistically homogeneous female and male students were selected after administering the QPT, and were given BALLI and FLCAS questionnaires designed by Horwitz (1987. Fifteen EFL instructors were selected to answer the BALLI questionnaire, and then the data from the two questionnaires were statistically analyzed with correlational analysist-tests. The findings revealed hat, first, there was a positive and statistically significant correlation between Iranian university students’ beliefs about FLL and their level of class anxiety; second, that teachers and students hold mostly different beliefs about FLL, despite some similar beliefs; and finally, male and female participants did not hold the same ideas regarding class anxiety and beliefs about FLL. The results of this study confirmed previous research findings in this area.Keywords: foreign language anxiety, beliefs about language learning, FLCAS, BALLI, university EFL learners.

Tina Toghraee

2014-03-01

180

What Will Classroom Teachers Do With Shared Research Results?  

Science.gov (United States)

Scientists are passionate about the research problems they investigate, and wish to share their discoveries as widely as possible. Similarly, classroom teachers who are passionate about their subject can better foster student learning. One way to enhance such passions involves bringing teachers and scientists together to discuss cutting-edge discoveries and develop curricular materials based on the respective strengths of educators and investigators. Our presentation describes one example of this approach based on research about gas blowout structures offshore Virginia and North Carolina. Methane venting processes along continental margins may have important climatic, geotechnical, hazard, and resource implications. In 2000, shipboard surveys documented that large structures offshore VA-NC resulted from massive gas expulsion. Gas appears to be trapped in shelf edge deltas and stresses resulting from downslope creep is favoring its release. Scientists undertook a new expedition in 2004 to determine if there is present-day discharge of methane-rich fluids through the floors or walls of the blowouts or whether these seepage sites are relict features, and to gain insight into the origin of the vented methane. In July 2005, 12 teachers from New York and New Jersey met with the co-PIs (Weissel and Cormier), graduate student (Newman), and educational specialist (Passow) over a 2-day workshop to learn about how scientific problems are identified, how a research cruise is organized, what was learned through the measurements and analysis, and what might be possible significant impacts from such understandings. Based on what they learned, participants began development of classroom activities, Internet-based investigations, and constructed-response assessment items utilizing data and concepts from the project and other sources. The resulting curriculum units are designed for use in middle and high school chemistry, physics, earth science, and technology courses. Curricular units include "Using Real-Life Problems to Learn Scientific Principles," "Mapping the Unseen Floors," "Landslide or Not," and a board game based on conducting a scientific research cruise. Materials are available through www.earth2class.org. Over the following academic year, participants will continue to develop instructional materials, field-test them, and provide peer training through in-district and regional professional development opportunities. The scientists and educational specialist will provide support to ensure scientific accuracy and pedagogical soundness. The project will utilize DLESE as an additional effective dissemination and evaluation mechanism. In these ways, the scientists and core of educators may be able to share these discoveries with hundreds of teachers and thousands of students.

Passow, M. J.; Weissel, J. K.; Cormier, M.; Newman, K. R.

2005-12-01

181

Engaging Learner Attribute Research in Dialogue with Classroom Practice: Predictors of Success in the Accelerated, Online Classroom  

OpenAIRE

Research examining student success in online education has focused extensively on internal learner attributes with little emphasis on external, controllable factors that may mediate a student’s ability to perform within the distinctive environment of the virtual classroom. The purpose of this study is to balance student characteristic research with external, direct data from the perspective of online instructors in order to provide a practice-oriented understanding of the unique factors pre...

Jean Mandernach, B.; Emily Donnelli; Amber Dailey-Hebert

2006-01-01

182

Learning with Music in the Classroom: What Research Says.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examines the argument that accelerated learning occurs in the presence of music. Summarizes animal and human research findings relating music exposure to enhanced learning, the role of introversion/extroversion on learning environment preferences, state-specific learning, the use of music to enhance second-language learning, and the impact of…

Ohlhaver, Dorothy

1998-01-01

183

The Pedagogical Mediation of a Developmental Learner Corpus for Classroom-Based Language Instruction  

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Full Text Available Although corpora have been used in language teaching for some time, few empirical studies explore their impact on learning outcomes. We provide a microgenetic account of learners’ responses to corpus-driven instructional units for German modal particles and pronominal da-compounds. The units are based on developmental corpus data produced by native speakers during interactions with the very learners for whom the units are designed. Thus, we address the issue of authentication in corpus-driven language pedagogy. Finally, we illustrate how an ethnographically supplemented developmental learner corpus may contribute to second language acquisition research via dense documentation of micro-changes in learners’ language use over time.

Julie A. Belz

2008-10-01

184

Hearing the Voices of Alternatively Certified Teachers in Texas: Narratives of Teaching English Language Learners in Urban Secondary Mainstream Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

In Texas, nearly half of all new teachers are alternatively certified (AC) whilst English language learners (ELL) are over one-third of the public school population in some districts. As this trend continues, the likelihood that AC teachers will teach ELLs increases and alters what Texas teachers must know upon entering the classroom. This…

Zannou, Yetunde Mobola

2012-01-01

185

The Ideological Production of Learner Identities in the World outside/inside the Classroom: Language Learning, Consumption, and National Belonging  

Science.gov (United States)

Adult education ESOL teachers usually know a lot about learners' lives inside the classroom, but they are less aware of learners' lives outside that space. This article focuses on learner talk about "Ingles Sin Barreras," a heavily advertised English-language program for Spanish-speakers who want to learn English. I analyzed learner talk along…

Ullman, Char

2010-01-01

186

Conducting Original, Hands-On Astronomical Research in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Since 2007 I have been a Team Leader for the Tzec Maun Foundation, a non-profit foundation dedicated to providing free, research grade, Internet telescopes to students, teachers and researchers around the world. The name Tzec Maun (pronounced “Teh-Zeck-Moan”) comes from Mayan culture. Tzec Maun was the jovial messenger, laughed at adversity. Based on the challenges students, researchers and professional astronomers face with finances, equipment, and telescope access, the jovial mascot seems to fit. Hundreds of hours performing astronomical outreach as a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador and Astronomical League Master of outreach taught me that the best way to inspirationally teach astronomy and space science (and most subjects) is actually being at the eyepiece. I’m NOT a fan of the traditional planetarium experience as a teaching tool because it inhibits inspiration and the learning experience to a 2-D mat on a faux horizon with artificial representations. Once, a student at my dark sky observatory excitedly commented that the night sky was like a 3-D planetarium. I have hosted several classes at my own personal dark sky observatory, but this resource is impractical for all but a few lucky students. Experience has taught me that the next best thing to being at the eyepiece is to control a remote telescope via the Internet. Tzec Maun’s arsenal of telescopes is all research capable, linked to the Internet and positioned for round-the-clock dark skies. The final conditions described above, mean that I can enter an 8:30am science class, log onto the Tzec Maun telescope Portal and turn over control of an Australian system (where it is night) to a student or teacher. Working as a group, the class can either begin their investigations. My Tzec Maun science team (TARP) is engaged in searching for potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs). PHA work excites student and teacher alike. Teaching from telescopes can unleash powerful attention-getting tools that enable teachers to convey moderately complex computer science, optical, geographic, mathematical, informational and physical principles through hands-on telescope operations. In addition to the general studies aspects of classroom internet-based astronomy, Tzec Maun supports real science by enabling operators precisely point telescopes and acquire extremely faint, magnitude 19+ CCD images. Thanks to the creative Team of Photometrica (photometrica.org), my teams now have the ability to process and analyze images online and produce results in short order. Normally, astronomical data analysis packages cost greater than thousands of dollars for single license operations. Free to my team members, Photometrica allows students to upload their data to a cloud computing server and read precise photometric and/or astrometric results. I’m indebted to Michael and Geir for their support. The efficacy of student-based research is well documented. The Council on Undergraduate Research defines student research as, "an inquiry or investigation conducted by an undergraduate that makes an original intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline." (http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/studentresearch/What. Teaching from Tzec Maun in the classroom is the most original teaching research I can imagine. I very much look forward to presenting this program to the convened body.

Corneau, M. J.

2009-12-01

187

Teaching and Learning Classroom Action Research at a Distance in an Indonesian Urban Community  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This action research project aims to understand whether teachers are mastering the knowledge and skills necessary to conduct classroom action research through two courses, Classroom Action Research (CAR and Enhancing Teaching Professional Skills (PKP: Pemantapan Kemampuan Profesional, offered via distance education to Indonesian teachers and to identify areas for possible improvement of both courses. The research was conducted in two urban study centers located in the cities of Bogor and Tangerang in the Indonesian provinces of West Java and Banten. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews, classroom observations, questionnaires, and focus group discussions. All data were analyzed for patterns that might offer insight into the problems tutors and teacher-learners were facing as they worked through the Classroom Action Research (PTK: Penelitian Tindakan Kelas module and tutorial. The research team from Indonesia Open University (UT: Universitas Terbuka identified several problematic aspects of each course, including excessive lag time between the first and second courses, insufficient examples of model classroom action research projects, a lack of supervised practice of action research techniques, variability of tutorial quality, and a mismatch between course assessments and the content and purpose of the courses. While the findings of this study focus primarily on two distance courses offered by UT, they offer insight into the challenges of providing in-service teacher development via distance education in the Indonesian context. Key Words: Distance Learning, Classroom Action Research, Teacher Professional Skill

[None] Sandra S.A.

2011-12-01

188

READING BASED-CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES: AN EFFORT TOWARD THE INTEGRATION OF LANGUAGE SKILLS IN TEACHING ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE IN INDONESIA  

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Full Text Available Abstract: This paper proposes the implementation of reading-based classroom activities for teaching English as a foreign language in Indonesia. Compared to other language skills, reading is viewed to provide a relatively stable foundation for Indonesian students to develop their communicative competence in English. It is argued that reading-focused activities stimulate confidence for Indonesian learners to get involved in listening, speaking, and writing related-activities in ways that are similar to normal daily life communication. The reasons for the proposed implementation of reading-based classroom activities in TEFLIN and the role of reading and its relation with other language skills are presented.

Hadi Hadi

2006-01-01

189

PDI: Science for English Language Learners (ELL): Integrating Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, and Thinking into the K-8 Classroom, New Orleans, Louisiana; March 18, 2009  

Science.gov (United States)

This Professional Development Institute (PDI) will focus on teaching strategies and methods that incorporate language acquisition with science instruction for English Language Learners (ELL) in the K-8 classroom. Specifically, this institute will begin with an overview of research on the ELL population, instruction, and programs available to teachers who have responsibilities for teaching science. The bulk of the 6 hours of instruction will provide guided inquiry activities that model integrated (Sheltered Instruction) strategies in science, reading, writing, listening, speaking, and thinking. The follow-up workshops will provide more in-depth research and instruction in each of the language skills (reading, writing, listening, speaking, and thinking) as they apply to science instruction as well as working with specific populations of ELL students and available programs. Classrooms in the United States are becoming more diverse thus requiring regular classroom teachers to develop new skills in working with students whose first language is not English. Recent census data show that over the past twenty five years the number of ELL students (ages 5-17) grew from 3.8 million to 9.9 million or approximately 10% of the entire U.S. school population (NCES, 2006). With this incredible growth, regular classroom teachers are in need of learning new teaching skills in language acquisition to integrate into everyday classroom content instruction. Sheltered Instructional strategies or Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) involve teaching strategies used in developing language skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking and incorporates them into content area (Science) planning, instruction and assessment. These strategies include clearly defined language and content objectives, creating instruction that relates to students' prior knowledge, tailoring teacher talk to students' English language proficiency levels, allowing students to process material in a variety of formats including guided inquiry, scaffolding content instruction, and using assessment methods that allow students to display learning in a variety of ways (Becijos,1997; Echevarria, Vogt, and Short, 2008). This is especially important to teachers at the elementary and middle school as the majority of ELL students are entering schools at these levels. Of all ELL students entering school, 44% are in grades K-3 and 35% in grades 4-8 (Kindler, 2002). This Professional Development Institute will be conducted by David Crowther, a Professor of Science Education at the University of Nevada, Reno. Dr. Crowther is the coauthor/editor of Science for English Language Learners by NSTA Press. He has written several chapters in books and articles about science for ELLs; presented at NSTA workshops and TESOL on the subject; and teaches science methods using Sheltered Instruction strategies at the University of Nevada, Reno. Joaquin Vil� is a Professor of English and Second Language Acquisition at Salisbury University in Maryland. In his numerous years of experience he has conducted many workshops on teaching EL students, written chapters / articles, and led departments and programs for ELL within the English departments at several universities. Dr. Vil� is also a NCATE evaluator of TESOL programs and is the Special Assistant to the Vice President of the University for Diversity. Presenters are recognized as top researchers, authors, and workshop facilitators in the field of science and language acquisition.

1900-01-01

190

Corpus in Foreign Language Teaching and Research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Corpus-based language research has been long prospered since the middle of last century. Corpus is therefore frequently used in foreign language (mostly English teaching and research due to the fundamental principles of modern Corpus Linguistics along with the colorful resources of word-banks and the corresponding tools, especially in western countries. In China, the related literature found its way from introducing the foreign researches to our own practice into this field. As a conclusion, corpus and Corpus Linguistics can be closely connected with and widely applied in foreign language teaching and research with a predictable bright future.
Keywords: corpus, Corpus Linguistics, foreign language teaching and research
Résumé Le moyen de recherches sur le corpus a connu un développement rapide depuis le milieu du siècle précédent et a atteint la maturité aujourd’hui. En raison de l’importance de la linguistique de corpus et de la méthode de recherches sur le corppus, et étant donné ses ressources riches ainsi que les facilités apportées par les outils de recherche, le corpus est appliquée amplement dans les recherches linguistiques notamment dans celles de l’anglais. A l’étranger, l’étude de la linguistique de corpus a débuté tôt et a donné beaucoup de fruits ; le travail du milieu des langues étrangères chinois dans ce domaine a commencé par la présentation du corpus étranger et sa situation d’étude, et puis procède à des applications pratiques. En somme, il existe des relations étroites et diverses entre le corpus et les recherches de l’enseignement-apprentissage des langues étrangères, et les recherches de l’enseignement-apprentissage des langues étrangères basant sur le corpus présente une bonne perspective.
Mots-clés: corpus, linguistique de corpus, recherches de l’enseignement-apprentissage des langues étrangères
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Xin-ping ZHOU

2006-12-01

191

Beyond the Classroom: The Role of Self-Guided Learning in Second Language Listening and Speaking Practice  

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Full Text Available There is a significant difference in most language instruction pro­­grams concerning the number of hours students spend practicing reading/writing skills versus listening/speaking skills. The primary cause for this is most likely due to the lack of class time that can be feasibly spent on meaningful conversation exchanges. Thus, the most logical answer is to have students practice outside the classroom. However, the transition from in-class learning to out-of-class practice is often not a very successful one. To address this deficiency and present possible options for creating successful learning environments beyond the classroom, this literature review offers an in-depth analysis of the role that guided learning plays in providing learning experiences for students beyond the classroom.

Marion Davis

2013-06-01

192

Interlanguage corpora and second language acquisition research  

OpenAIRE

Abstract This article presents a selective review of the work carried out recently in second language acquisition (SLA) research which makes use of oral learner corpora and computer technologies. In the first part, the reasons why the field of SLA needs corpora for addressing current theoretical issues are briefly reviewed. In the second part, recent literature on corpora and SLA is presented, as well as co...

Myles, Florence

2005-01-01

193

Query Language for Research in Phonetics  

OpenAIRE

With the growing availability of spoken language corpora more and more data driven research in phonetics is possible. The downside of having huge speech corpora is that they have to be segmented and labeled, before they can be exploited. As labeling and annotation are time-consuming and costly, there is an interest in standardization which would support the exchange and reuse of labeled data. The MATE project proposes standards for an integrated and consistent multi-level...

Heid, Ulrich; Mengel, Andreas

1999-01-01

194

Research Informing Practice--Practice Informing Research: Innovative Teaching Methologies for World Language Teachers. Research in Second Language Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

"Research Informing Practice--Practice Informing Research: Innovative Teaching Methodologies for World Language Educators" is an edited volume that focuses on innovative, nontraditional methods of teaching and learning world languages. Using teacher-research projects, each author in the volume guides readers through their own personal journey and…

Schwarzer, David, Ed.; Petron, Mary, Ed.; Luke, Christopher, Ed.

2011-01-01

195

The Impact of Learner-Centered Classrooms on Second Language Learning: Communicating with Educators.  

Science.gov (United States)

A study used the Preschool Teacher Verbal Behavior Index (PTVBI) to measure the extent to which classrooms were learner-directed or teacher-directed. The instrument can be used to help teachers learn the appropriate degree of control for different classroom situations and individual learner needs. Verbatim teachers statements are categorized as…

Smrekar, Jocelynn Luisa

196

The Language of Sustainability: From Basic Writing Classroom to Professional Discourse  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Understanding and describing professional practice, especially in Engineering and the Sciences,  has always been at the heart of research in Professional Communication. Several significant field  research projects have showed us that content knowledge alone is not sufficient to claim disciplinary expertise; a rhetorical understanding of the discipline and its ways of thinking is essential in achieving full participation in the field. Most professionals would expect that such a sophisticated approach can only be learned through on-the-job training or opportunities to interact with practitioners within authentic disciplinary contexts. Although this can certainly be the case in many instances, we argue that a rhetorical understanding can be enacted even within a freshman writing classroom. The results of our content and rhetorical analyses of student work from the beginning and the end of a course on academic writing with the theme of sustainability show that students were able in one semester to write in discipline-appropriate ways and understand the rhetorical strategies necessary to become part of a disciplinary conversation.  The implications of our findings can extend into the way we design courses in basic writing or professional communication and the ways we can use pre-assessment data to drive our course design decisions. 

Karatsolis, Andreas; Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.

197

Improving Language-Focused Comprehension Instruction in Primary-Grade Classrooms: Impacts of the "Let's Know!" Experimental Curriculum  

Science.gov (United States)

This quasi-experimental study was designed to test the impacts of a curriculum supplement, "Let's Know!", on the quantity and quality of language-focused comprehension instruction in pre-kindergarten to third grade classrooms. Sixty classrooms (12 per each of pre-K to grade 3) were enrolled in the study, with 40 teachers assigned to…

Justice, Laura M.; Pratt, Amy; Logan, Jessica; Gray, Shelley

2014-01-01

198

Handbook of Classroom Management: Research, Practice, and Contemporary Issues  

Science.gov (United States)

Classroom management is a topic of enduring concern for teachers, administrators, and the public. It consistently ranks as the first or second most serious educational problem in the eyes of the general public, and beginning teachers consistently rank it as their most pressing concern during their early teaching years. Management problems continue…

Evertson, Carolyn M., Ed.; Weinstein, Carol S., Ed.

2006-01-01

199

Using Original Methods in Teaching English Language to Foreign Students (Chinese in Indian Classroom  

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Full Text Available The article gives information on English language teaching schemes in Indian classrooms for foreign students. The teacher monitors as facilitator and instructor. The trainees were trained in the four macro skills, LSRW. I taught some topics in three skills, namely, writing, listening and reading (just three, not speaking skills to Chinese students in VIT University. The other skill speaking was trained by other teachers among the four. Students were trained to listen to English words and passages, to read the comprehension passages and answer the questions, and to coach basic grammar and revising it. More over, beginners were also guided to learn technical words related to their respective disciplines (major subjects other than English words. For example, Chinese students posed a query to the faculty to explain on technical words and terms of their main subjects in English, for instance, B.Sc Computer Science (under graduate programme students wished to learn about the word data. Since, the English Oxford Dictionary meaning is ‘facts or statistics used for reference or analysis’, but in the field of Computer Science, the word means “information processed by a computer”. So, there arouse a need to help them in distinguishing the different meanings of the word. In addition to, many students were not familiar with English. Thus through the above said way of facilitating, they acquired a good knowledge by varied types of expressions to master their particular subjects. It was a moment to state that they had come from China to India to obtain the nuances of English language. They undertook and were gradually expertised at specific courses in English medium of instruction, perhaps to get degree. Teacher’s a few lesson plans (how the practices are conducted in listening, reading and writing skills as well as some parts in allotted syllabus (listening to songs, passages, writing a paragraph and essay, picture-story writing and write about yourself, reading the passage and writing were discussed in the current paper. Role of the teacher and student were explained in detail. Therefore, the abstract would portray how the beginners were trained, taught, convinced, persuaded and managed by a tutor to reach the goal of English language teaching to Chinese students.

Devimeenakshi. K.

2012-07-01

200

BUILDING BLOCKS IN THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM (PILARES BÁSICOS EN EL AULA DE IDIOMAS  

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Full Text Available Resumen:Este artículo presenta las ventajas de la integración de tres áreas comúnmente estudiadas en la enseñanza de idiomas: Estilos de Aprendizaje, Inteligencias Múltiples y Estrategias para el Aprendizaje de Idiomas. Cada una de estas áreas tiene un papel fundamental en la enseñanza de idiomas y el aprendizaje, pero por lo general se utilizan por separado, o en el mejor de los casos, los y las docentes integran ya sea estilos e inteligencias o estrategias, pero no las tres al mismo tiempo. De hecho, la mayoría de la literatura presenta cada una por separado, dando la idea de que sólo una o dos se pueden utilizar en la clase de idiomas, por lo que en muchas oportunidades se ignoran aspectos fundamentales. La tesis principal del artículo es que, para ser más eficaz, Estilos de Aprendizaje, Inteligencias Múltiples y Estrategias de Aprendizaje deben entrelazarse a fin de crear un pilar sólido para el aprendizaje de idiomas. Primeramente, la autora ofrece una visión general de cada una de estas áreas. Luego en el referente teórico explica cómo estas deben usarse como una unidad, y posteriormente da un ejemplo de esto a través de un plan de clase sobre el tema de la conservación del medio ambiente para un curso de Comunicación Oral I de la carrera de inglés de la Escuela de Lenguas Modernas de la Universidad de Costa Rica. Por último, se ofrecen algunas recomendaciones a los y las instructores sobre la integración de estos pilares en el aula.Abstract: This article presents the advantages of integrating three areas commonly addressed in the teaching of languages: Learning Styles, Multiple Intelligences and Language Learning Strategies. Each of these areas plays a fundamental role when teaching and learning languages, but usually they are used separately or in the best of cases, instructors integrate either styles and intelligences or strategies, but not the three of them at the same time. Indeed, most of the literature presents each separately, giving the idea that only one or two can be used in the language classroom, thus missing some important matters. The point of this article is that in order to be more effective, Learning Styles, Multiple Intelligences and Language Learning Strategies must intertwine, so as to create a solid building block. The author first gives an overview of each of these areas. She then explains in the review of the literature how they should be used as a closely-knit unit. Next, she provides an example of this integration through a lesson plan on the topic of environmental conservation for an Oral Communication course for English majors at School of Modern Languages, University of Costa Rica. Finally, some advice is given to instructors on the incorporation of each of these building blocks.

Coto Keith Rossina

2010-12-01

201

Review Article: Second Language Acquisition of Bantu Languages--A (Mostly) Untapped Research Opportunity  

Science.gov (United States)

This review article presents a summary of research on the second language acquisition of Bantu languages, including Swahili, Zulu, Xhosa and Lingala. Although second language (L2) research on these languages is currently very limited, work in morphosyntax and phonology suggests promising directions for future study, particularly on noun class,…

Spinner, Patti

2011-01-01

202

Spanish as a Second Language when L1 Is Quechua: Endangered Languages and the SLA Researcher  

Science.gov (United States)

Spanish is one of the most widely spoken languages in the world. Quechua is the largest indigenous language family to constitute the first language (L1) of second language (L2) Spanish speakers. Despite sheer number of speakers and typologically interesting contrasts, Quechua-Spanish second language acquisition is a nearly untapped research area,…

Kalt, Susan E.

2012-01-01

203

Classroom and Formative Assessment in Second/Foreign Language Teaching and Learning  

OpenAIRE

Formative assessment was first used by Scriven (1967), but studies focused on formative assessment in ESL and EFL classes started in 2000. Formative assessment is integrated in learning and teaching, so a great part of classroom assessment is formative. However, classroom assessment has been not defined clearly, as most of the texts about this type of assessment define it in terms of its formative or summative potentials (Fulcher & Davidson, 2007). This study is an atte...

Somaye Ketabi; Saeed Ketabi

2014-01-01

204

The inclusive classroom : teaching mathematics and science to English-language learners  

Science.gov (United States)

This electronic document contains a PDF version of a booklet for K to 12 teachers that explores the specialized languages of mathematics and science and highlights strategies that link second-language acquisition techniques with content instruction. The booklet is part of the IT'S JUST GOOD TEACHING series produced by the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory. Each booklet in the series contains a summary of the research and current literature on a topic along with a discussion of effective strategies and an annotated listing of related resources. The material in the booklet discusses techniques found to be particularly effective for helping language-minority students develop skills in using the specialized languages of mathematics and science. Suggested techniques include thematic instruction with units set in the context of students' everyday lives, cooperative learning that stresses authentic discourse for all students whatever their level of English proficiency, and inquiry and problem solving lessons that progress from concrete concepts to more abstract content. This resource is appropriate for all users, particularly for girls, women, and ethnic minorities because it uses inclusive images of women and people of ethnic minorities, addresses concerns relating to ethnic-bias and/or discrimination, involves teamwork and communication skills, and involves hands-on activities that produce a tangible result or product.

Jarrett, Denise

1999-01-01

205

Language diversity in the mathematics classroom: does a learner companion make a difference?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Language and education are interrelated because all teaching is given through the medium of language. Language is considered to be both a precondition for thought and a bearer of thought and therefore influences the extent to which a child's intelligence is actualised. In the South African context linguistic diversity is a complex issue. It has increasingly become the task and responsibility of educators to develop strategies in an attempt to facilitate quality education for their learners. In this study, the researchers developed an 'aid' that would assist learners to relate mathematics terms and concepts in English with terms in their own languages. The study determined whether a visual multilingual learner companion brought change in learners' performance in mathematics. Also what the educators' views were about this. A combination of a quasiexperimental study and an interview schedule was conducted. The quasiexperimental study was conducted among learners while the interview schedule was with their educators. The sample comprised 2,348 learners in Grade 4, Grade 5 and Grade 6 from 20 schools as well as 20 educators from the treatment schools. The results indicated that the mathematics marks of the treatment group improved. Also, the educators were complimentary about the learner companion and indicated that they would utilise this going forward in their teaching. It is recommended that the multilingual visual explanatory mathematics learner companion be used and investigated on a larger scale to corroborate the efficacy reported here.

Hendrik Botes

2010-01-01

206

New notions in a classic classroom : Applying late modern sociolinguistics and socially informed SLA to foreign language learner data  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The dissertation investigates learner beliefs, language ideologies, self-positioning, and language use among a group of Swiss university students of Danish as a foreign language. The theoretical framework of the study draws on socially informed second language acquisition (SLA) research and on late modern sociolinguistics. The main research questions are: What do Swiss university students of Danish as a foreign language believe about language and language learning, why do they hold these beliefs, and how do the beliefs relate to language ideologies? How do the participants present themselves in terms of beliefs, ideologies, and selfpositioning? In what ways do the participants use linguistic features generally thought to belong to different languages, to what degree can their language use be compared with polylingual behaviour, and how does their language use relate to the beliefs and ideologies expressed by the participants?

Ritzau, Ursula

2014-01-01

207

The Classroom Equalizer.  

Science.gov (United States)

The Multiple Activities Curriculum, developed by the Stanford University Center for Educational Research, broadens the scope of classroom experiences and thinking skills required, so that students weak in the traditional academic skills of reading and language have more chance to participate in class and to feel worthwhile. (Author/SJL)

Rosenholtz, Susan J.

1979-01-01

208

Engaging Learner Attribute Research in Dialogue with Classroom Practice: Predictors of Success in the Accelerated, Online Classroom  

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Full Text Available Research examining student success in online education has focused extensively on internal learner attributes with little emphasis on external, controllable factors that may mediate a student’s ability to perform within the distinctive environment of the virtual classroom. The purpose of this study is to balance student characteristic research with external, direct data from the perspective of online instructors in order to provide a practice-oriented understanding of the unique factors predictive of student success in accelerated, online courses. Experienced online educators were surveyed to identify practical skills, strategies or factors most likely to lead to success for students enrolled in online courses. A content-analysis of open-ended responses revealed 23 relevant factors that clustered into six broad themes. Within these themes, four issues emerge as the most predictive of online learner success: time, technology, initiative, and competence. Discussion examines the practical, deliberate application of this information to facilitate students’ successful completion of online courses.

B. Jean Mandernach

2006-07-01

209

Incomplete Journeys: Code-Switching and Other Language Practices in Mathematics, Science, and English Language Classrooms in South Africa.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes and discusses the language practice of mathematics, science, and English language teachers and learners in a sample of urban and rural, primary, and secondary schools in South Africa. Particular focus is on reception and production of language through code switching, exploratory talk, and discourse specific talk. (Author/VWL)

Setati, Mamokgethi; Adler, Jill; Reed, Yvonne; Bapoo, Abdool

2002-01-01

210

Standard Modern Greek and Greek-Cypriot Dialect in Kindergarten Classroom Interaction: Teachers' and Learners' Language Attitudes and Language Use  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigates language use and language attitudes in state kindergarten education in Cyprus. Kindergarten education is the primary setting where Greek-Cypriots learn to employ the standard variety on a systematic basis. Consequently, the context of kindergarten education is a principal setting for examining language attitudes and…

Sophocleous, Andry; Wilks, Clarissa

2010-01-01

211

Speakers' comfort and voice level variation in classrooms: laboratory research.  

Science.gov (United States)

Teachers adjust their voice levels under different classroom acoustics conditions, even in the absence of background noise. Laboratory experiments have been conducted in order to understand further this relationship and to determine optimum room acoustic conditions for speaking. Under simulated acoustic environments, talkers do modify their voice levels linearly with the measure voice support, and the slope of this relationship is referred to as room effect. The magnitude of the room effect depends highly on the instruction used and on the individuals. Group-wise, the average room effect ranges from -0.93 dB/dB, with free speech, to -0.1 dB/dB with other less demanding communication tasks as reading and talking at short distances. The room effect for some individuals can be as strong as -1.7 dB/dB. A questionnaire investigation showed that the acoustic comfort for talking in classrooms, in the absence of background noise, is correlated to the decay times derived from an impulse response measured from the mouth to the ears of a talker, and that there is a maximum of preference for decay times between 0.4 and 0.5 s. Teachers with self-reported voice problems prefer higher decay times to speak in than their healthy colleagues. PMID:22779474

Pelegrín-García, David; Brunskog, Jonas

2012-07-01

212

Speakers’ comfort and voice level variation in classrooms: Laboratory research  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Teachers adjust their voice levels under different classroom acoustics conditions, even in the absence of background noise. Laboratory experiments have been conducted in order to understand further this relationship and to determine optimum room acoustic conditions for speaking. Under simulated acoustic environments, talkers do modify their voice levels linearly with the measure voice support, and the slope of this relationship is referred to as room effect. The magnitude of the room effect depends highly on the instruction used and on the individuals. Group-wise, the average room effect ranges from 0.93 dB/dB, with free speech, to 0.1 dB/dB with other less demanding communication tasks as reading and talking at short distances. The room effect for some individuals can be as strong as 1.7 dB/dB. A questionnaire investigation showed that the acoustic comfort for talking in classrooms, in the absence of background noise, is correlated to the decay times derived from an impulse response measured from the mouth to the ears of a talker, and that there is a maximum of preference for decay times between 0.4 and 0.5 s. Teachers with self-reported voice problems prefer higher decay times to speak in than their healthy colleagues.

Pelegrin Garcia, David; Brunskog, Jonas

2012-01-01

213

Fostering Learner Autonomy in an ESL Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Reports on an action research project on ways and means of promoting learner autonomy in an English-as-a-Second-Language classroom. Focuses on the implementation of an autonomy-based English program with first-year university students at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. The context and objective of the program are presented, classroom

Chan, Victoria

2000-01-01

214

"Deja Vu"? A Decade of Research on Language Laboratories, Television and Video in Language Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

The developments in the last ten years in the form of DVD, streaming video, video on demand, interactive television and digital language laboratories call for an assessment of the research into language teaching and learning making use of these technologies and the learning paradigms underpinning them. This paper surveys research on language

Vanderplank, Robert

2010-01-01

215

Instruction in Spanish in Pre-Kindergarten Classrooms and Child Outcomes for English Language Learners  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationships among proportion of instruction in Spanish, observed classroom quality, and preschool-aged children's academic skills. Study participants included 357 Spanish-speaking 4-year-old children who attended state-funded pre-kindergarten programs in 11 states that participated in one of…

Burchinal, Margaret; Field, Samuel; Lopez, Michael L.; Howes, Carollee; Pianta, Robert

2012-01-01

216

Classroom Language Use in Hong Kong's Reformed English-Medium Stream  

Science.gov (United States)

During the last two decades of colonial rule, a wide gulf existed between policy and practice in Hong Kong's English-medium secondary schools: while English was the medium of textbooks, assignments and examinations, Cantonese and Cantonese-English mixed code were the dominant media of classroom communication. Although mixed-mode instruction was…

Evans, Stephen

2008-01-01

217

Towards a Classroom Pedagogy for Learner Autonomy: A Framework of Independent Language Learning Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

In recent years there has been a growing recognition of the importance of learner autonomy and the role of individual learners in directing their own learning process, both inside and outside the classroom (Alford & Pachler, 2007; Benson, 2000; Breen, 2001; Conacher & Kelly-Holmes, 2007). However, in practice it is not always clear how to support…

Reinders, Hayo

2010-01-01

218

Where's Your Partner? Pairing Bilingual Learners in Preschool and Primary Grade Dual Language Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

Children working alone is a common instructional strategy in some early childhood classrooms. According to foundational work by Johnson and Johnson (1986), however, cooperative teams employ higher levels of thought and retain information longer than children who work individually. Children engage in discussion, take responsibility for their…

Alanis, Iliana

2013-01-01

219

Finding a Place for Critical Thinking and Self-voice in College English as a Foreign Language Writing Classrooms  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Although the concepts of critical thinking and self-voice have been extensively discussed in a second language writing, little attention has been given, on the pedagogical level, to critical thinking and self-voice in college EFL writing instruction. To fill such a void, this paper attempts to propose some pedagogical tasks namely:  persuasive writing tasks, draft workshops one-on-one mentoring approaches for finding a place for critical thinking and self-voice in EFL classrooms. In doing so, this paper provides the operational definitions of critical thinking and self-voice concepts. It then discusses how these two concepts are closely related to complement EFL writing learning. In what follows, it presents the rationale for finding a place for critical thinking and self-voice in EFL writing. It then touches on some pedagogical practices for developing critical thinking and self-voice in classrooms. Lastly, it addresses some challenges related to implementing critical thinking and self-voice tasks in EFL classrooms.

Osman Barnawi

2011-06-01

220

Professional Development of Mexican Secondary EFL Teachers: Views and Willingness to Engage in Classroom Research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The effective implementation of any educational reform is largely dependent on the preparation of teachers. In the case of the National English Program in Basic Education, (NEPBE implemented in public schools in Mexico in 2009, teacher preparation options have been designed by both public and private higher education institutions in several states of the country. Most options have been based on the needs of teacher trainers and educational administrators, rather than on teachers’ needs. This paper presents the partial results of a professional development needs analysis carried out with secondary English language teachers in northeast Mexico. The study examined the teachers’ previous professional development experiences; their views on professional development contents and formats; and disposition to engage in inquiry-based professional development. Results indicated that stand-alone and degree courses were the only professional development activities the participants had experienced. Other practices such as mentoring, peer observation, attending conferences, or networking, were unfamiliar to the majority of them. Although most of the teachers considered that training courses had a high impact on teaching, some of them valued the impact of professional development practices that involve autonomy, reflection and collaboration. A high percentage of teachers reported disposition to learn about and engage in classroom research.

Ruth Roux

2014-08-01

221

Towards a Model of Strategic Actions in the Classroom: Games Theory as a Research Heuristic.  

Science.gov (United States)

Discusses how the conceptual apparatus and modus operandi of games theory provides a research heuristic for understanding the strategic possibilities inherent in typical classroom situations in which the interests of students and teachers are partially concurrent and partly in conflict. Also discusses the preconditions for contracts between…

Elstad, Eyvind

2002-01-01

222

Final Report on Pilot Studies / Final Report on Classroom Research with STEM and TESL Assessment  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

This Deliverable is the final report on pilot studies within the NEXT-TELL project (D6.7) and furthermore comprises the Deliverable on Classroom Research with STEM and TESL Assessment (D2.9) in order to avoid redundancies between those two Deliverables.

Biel, Carmen; Wake, Jo Dugstad

2014-01-01

223

Classroom Research and Experiential Learning: Three Successful Experiences--Involvement in Psychology.  

Science.gov (United States)

Assesses the effectiveness of methods used by instructors in Collin County Community College's psychology department to increase student involvement in learning: a laboratory component, extensive writing to learn, classroom research, and business/industry apprenticeships. Concludes that active participation promotes synthesis and integration of…

Ewing, Martha M.

1991-01-01

224

Creating Learning Opportunities for Teachers and Students: A Cultural-Historical Understanding of Classroom Research  

Science.gov (United States)

There is considerable agreement about the fact that the presence of researchers in the classroom mediates teaching and learning. Why "should" two very different forms of human activity, one designed to study the other, interact and mediate each other? In this article, we propose cultural-historical activity theory as a framework for understanding…

Maheux, Jean-Francois; Roth, Wolff-Michael

2013-01-01

225

Extending the Conversation: Why Does He Want a Dictator? Action Research on Democratic Classroom Decision Making  

Science.gov (United States)

This article extends the conversation on English education as preparation for democratic participation. The author journeys through a cycle of action research, analyzing one classroom case study to improve her practice of curricular negotiation in a methods of teaching writing course.

Ellis, Lindsay

2013-01-01

226

PolarTREC-Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating: Bringing Polar Research to the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

PolarTREC-Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating is a three-year (2007-2009) teacher professional development program that pairs K-12 teachers with researchers to improve science education through authentic polar research experience. PolarTREC builds on the strengths of the existing TREC program in the Arctic, an NSF supported program managed by the Arctic Research Consortium of the US (ARCUS), to embrace a wider range of research activities in the Arctic and Antarctic. PolarTREC uses a Teacher Research Experience (TRE) model to foster the integration of research and education to produce a legacy of long-term teacher-researcher collaborations, improved teacher content knowledge through experiences in scientific inquiry, and broad public interest and engagement in polar science. PolarTREC will enable thirty-six teachers to spend two to six weeks in the Arctic or Antarctic, working closely with researchers investigating a wide range of topics such as sea-ice dynamics, terrestrial ecology, marine biology, atmospheric chemistry, and long-term climate change. With the help of their host researcher and the research team, teachers will develop the experience and tools necessary to teach science through scientific inquiry and investigation based on real-world experiences. While in the field, teachers and researchers will communicate extensively with their colleagues, communities, and hundreds of students of all ages across the globe, using a variety of tools including satellite phones, online journals, podcasts and interactive "Live from IPY" calls and web-based seminars. The online outreach elements of the project convey these experiences to a broad audience far beyond the classrooms of the PolarTREC teachers. In addition to field research experiences, PolarTREC will support teacher professional development and a sustained community of teachers, scientists, and the public through workshops, Internet seminars, an e-mail listserve, and ongoing teacher/researcher networks. For further information on PolarTREC, contact Wendy Warnick, ARCUS Executive Director at warnick@arcus.org or 907-474-1600. The PolarTREC website will be accessible in 2007 through the ARCUS web site at www.arcus.org.

Warnick, W. K.; Warburton, J.; Breen, K.; Wiggins, H. V.; Larson, A.; Behr, S.

2006-12-01

227

Efficacy of Supplemental Phonics-Based Instruction for Low-Skilled Kindergarteners in the Context of Language Minority Status and Classroom Phonics Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

This study tested the efficacy of supplemental phonics instruction for 84 low-skilled language minority (LM) kindergarteners and 64 non-LM kindergarteners at 10 urban public schools. Paraeducators were trained to provide the 18-week (January-May) intervention. Students performing in the bottom half of their classroom language group (LM and non-LM)…

Vadasy, Patricia F.; Sanders, Elizabeth A.

2010-01-01

228

The Use of L1 in the Foreign Language Classroom / El uso de la lengua materna en el salón de inglés como lengua extranjera  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: English Abstract in spanish El uso de la lengua materna es una ocurrencia común en los contextos de la enseñanza de la lengua extranjera, a pesar de que a veces reciba críticas por su interferencia en la adquisición de la Lengua meta. Mientras que los docentes deben maximizar el uso de la Lengua meta, sin duda, hay espacios pa [...] ra que el profesor utilice la lengua materna de los estudiantes en su pedagogía. En este trabajo se presenta un argumento basado en las perspectivas teóricas y la investigación empírica dentro de la literatura existente, apoyando el uso apropiado de la Lengua materna en el salón de inglés como lengua extranjera. El argumento se centra en tres cuestiones fundamentales-racionales para el uso de la lengua materna: Los efectos positivos que la lengua materna tiene tanto en el aprendizaje y la instrucción de una lengua extranjera, como en las formas en las que la lengua materna ayuda a los docentes de idiomas extranjeros. Abstract in english L1 use is a common occurrence in foreign language teaching contexts despite the fact that it often receives criticism for its interference with target language (TL) acquisition. While foreign language teachers should maximize their use of the TL, there is indeed a place for the teacher to use the st [...] udents' L1 in their pedagogy. In this paper, an argument derived from theoretical perspectives and empirical research within existing literature supporting the appropriate use of L1 in foreign language classrooms is presented. The argument addresses three key issues-rationales for L1 use, positive effects L1 has on both foreign language learning and instruction, and ways that L1 assists instructors on foreign languages.

Yi-chun, Pan; Yi-ching, Pan.

2010-07-01

229

Developing laboratory research techniques for an ongoing research program in a high school classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Incorporating research into a high school classroom is an excellent way to teach students fundamental concepts in science. One program that incorporates this approach is the Waksman Student Scholar Program (WSSP), which allows high school students, teachers and Rutgers professors to work side by side on an ongoing molecular biology research program. Students in the program first isolated plasmid clones from bacteria that contain cDNA fragments of genes from the Brine Shrimp Artemia franciscana. They then determined the size of the DNA by performing molecular biology experiments. Students then analyzed the DNA sequence and after review from WSSP staff and high school teachers, the student's sequences were published in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database. This was often the last step in the project the students performed. However, if the project were being conducted in a research lab instead of a high school, the cDNA clone would often be further analyzed. In the past, safety, convenience, and affordability have limited the availability of these experiments in a high school setting. Although additional bioinformatic experiments could easily be performed in the high school, there is a strong need for additional "wet lab" experiments to keep the students engaged and motivated to work on the project. I have worked on developing three experimental modules that can be performed in a high school setting. These experiments were tested with the students and teachers of the WSSP. This work will expand the scope of experiments that can be performed in a high school environment.

Adornato, Philip

230

The role of teachers’ classroom discipline in their teaching effectiveness and students’ language learning motivation and achievement: A path method  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study investigated the role of EFL teachers’ classroom discipline strategies in their teaching effectiveness and their students’ motivation and achievement in learning English as a foreign language. 1408 junior high-school students expressed their perceptions of the strategies their English teachers used (punishment, recognition/reward, discussion, involvement, and aggression to discipline the classroom. The students evaluated their teachers’ teaching effectiveness by completing effective Iranian EFL teacher questionnaire (Moafian, & Pishghadam, 2009. They also filled in Attitude/Motivation Test Battery (GhorbanDordinejad & ImamJomeh, 2011 that assessed their motivation towards learning English as a foreign language. Achievement in English was established based on formal grades students received at the end of the academic year. The results showed that EFL teachers reward and praise students for good behavior and they are not very authoritarian. Further, teaching effectiveness, motivation and achievement in learning English were all found to be related to discipline strategies. The results of path analysis showed that those teachers who used involvement and recognition strategies more frequently were perceived to be more effective teachers; however, students perceived teachers who used punitive strategies as being less effective in their teaching. It was also revealed that in classes where teachers managed disruptive behaviors by using punitive strategies, students had problems in learning as punitive strategies lowered students’ motivation. Teaching effectiveness was found to mediate the effect of punishment on motivation while motivation mediated the effect of punitive strategies on achievement. Motivation was found to have the strongest effect on achievement.

Mehrak Rahimi

2015-01-01

231

Experimental research on thermal comfort in the university classroom of regular semesters in Korea  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This research has investigated physical variables affecting indoor thermal comfort and subjective responses of thermal comfort of students in a university in Korea in which the weather is oceanic temperate climate, and has been performed to contribute to the research fields of Sustainable Thermal Standard and Adaptive Thermal Comfort (ATC). This research is based on the ISO 7730-2005 standard and the ATC theories and 4 main variables of PMV such as dry bulb temperature (Ta), relative humidity (RH), black bulb temperature (Tg), and air velocity (Va) are measured once a week during two regular semesters. A clothing insulation, a thermal sensation vote (TSV), an acceptability of thermal environment, and a preference for cooling and heating are investigated at the same time using a questionnaire. This study was carried out for 26 weeks during the spring season, from March to June 2009, and the autumn season, from September to December 2009. The main achievements of this study are as follows. Monthly Mean Outdoor Temperature (MMOT) and Operative Temperature (OT) in the classroom during research periods are 7.4?23.3 .deg. C and 17.5?29.0 .deg. C, respectively. The acceptability ratio of thermal environment shows over 80% when the range of OT in the classroom is 17?25 .deg. C, and the range can be applicable to operative index of heating and cooling of classroom. The mean TSV of respondents is almost 'neutral (0)' when the PMV in the classroom moves to 'neutral (0)' an classroom moves to 'neutral (0)' and 'slightly cool (-1)', and the TSV is almost '+1.5' when the PMV moves to 'slightly warm (+1)'. The acceptability ratio of thermal environment is slightly different from ASHRAE Standard 55-2004. So it is necessary to more investigate standard range of acceptability of thermal environment in oceanic temperate climate region using much more databases

232

Science for English Language Learners: K-12 Classroom Strategies (e-book)  

Science.gov (United States)

If you work with linguistically and culturally diverse students, you and your students will benefit from the foundation this book provides for teaching both science and language. Science for English Language Learners brings you the best

2009-06-30

233

Brain Matters: Translating Research into Classroom Practice. 2nd Edition  

Science.gov (United States)

While you don't need to be a scientist to understand brain-compatible teaching, you'll be far more effective when you base your teaching practices on the very best scientific information. This expanded and updated ASCD best-seller delivers that essential information in clear, everyday language that any teacher can immediately incorporate into…

Wolfe, Patricia

2010-01-01

234

The Impact of Integrating Technology and Social Experience in the College Foreign Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Technology has been used widely in the field of education for a long period of time. It is a useful tool which could be a mediation to help language learners to learn the target language. In order to investigate how technology and social experience can be integrated into courses to promote language learners' desire to learn English, the…

Chen, Yulin

2013-01-01

235

Learning from Each Other: Bilingual Pairs in Dual-Language Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

Early education programs in the United States are experiencing an increase in the number of English learners and, consequently, an increase in dual-language programs that best serve the needs of these children. Dual-language programs enable children to communicate orally and in written forms in both their native languages and in English. This…

Alanis, Iliana

2011-01-01

236

Symbolism in Japanese Language and Culture: Activities for the Elementary Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Presents a lesson excerpt from a Foreign Language Experience (FLEX) program to expose elementary school students to the language and culture of Japan. Explains that the theme of the lesson is symbolism in Japanese language and culture. Includes a handout choral reading of a Japanese folktale. (DK)

Mukai, Gary

1992-01-01

237

A Comparative Study of Developmental Outcomes in Web-Based and Classroom-Based German Language Education at the Post-Secondary Level: Vocabulary, Grammar, Language Processing, and Oral Proficiency Development  

Science.gov (United States)

A number of universities offer fully web-based language courses. Many others are considering this option. Yet it remains unclear whether web-based courses can be as comprehensively effective as classroom-based courses. And, if so, what might an effective web-based language course look like? This dissertation considers the German Online at PSU…

Isenberg, Noelle Ariane

2010-01-01

238

Successful Second-Language Speakers: A Review of Research Literature.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article reviews some of the research literature dealing with factors which contribute to success in acquiring second language speaking skills. Language attitudes, cognitive style variables (i.e., field dependence and independence; overgeneralization and negative transfer from the native language), personality variables (tolerance of…

Cohen, Andrew

1977-01-01

239

Researching "Practiced Language Policies": Insights from Conversation Analysis  

Science.gov (United States)

In language policy research, "policy" has traditionally been conceptualised as a notion separate from that of "practice". In fact, language practices were usually analysed with a view to evaluate whether a policy is being implemented or resisted to. Recently, however, Spolsky in ("Language policy". Cambridge University press, Cambridge, 2004;…

Bonacina-Pugh, Florence

2012-01-01

240

Research in Second Language Studies at Michigan State University  

Science.gov (United States)

The Second Language Studies (SLS) Program was established in 2005 with the express purpose of providing "a firm foundation in the field of Second Language Acquisition and its application to current second language research and teaching" (http://sls.msu.edu). Under the leadership of Professor Susan Gass, the program has grown to include 12 core…

White, Benjamin; , Fei, Fei; Russell, Marthe

2009-01-01

241

The Application of Statistics Education Research in My Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

A collaborative, statistics education research project (Lovett, 2001) is discussed. Some results of the project were applied in the computer lab sessions of my elementary statistics course. I detail the process of applying these research results, as well as the use of knowledge surveys. Furthermore, I give general suggestions to teachers who want…

Jordan, Joy

2007-01-01

242

Varieties of Science Education Research : their applications in the classroom  

OpenAIRE

To aid in the task of demonstrating that a variety of research questions needs to be addressed, this paper gives a sketch of the functions of modem science education, then uses that sketch to identify topics about which we need research data, and suggests possible implications for practice.

Lucas, A. M.

1990-01-01

243

Discussing Animal Rights and Animal Research in the Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Reviews two prominent philosophical justifications for animal liberation and describes a simulation that facilitates class discussion of animal research issues. Students reported that the exercise increased their awareness of the issues and of the complexity of making ethical decisions. (DB)

Herzog, Harold A.

1990-01-01

244

Psycholinguistic Techniques and Resources in Second Language Acquisition Research  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article, a survey of current psycholinguistic techniques relevant to second language acquisition (SLA) research is presented. I summarize many of the available methods and discuss their use with particular reference to two critical questions in current SLA research: (1) What does a learner's current knowledge of the second language (L2)…

Roberts, Leah

2012-01-01

245

Natural Language Processing in Game Studies Research: An Overview  

Science.gov (United States)

Natural language processing (NLP) is a field of computer science and linguistics devoted to creating computer systems that use human (natural) language as input and/or output. The authors propose that NLP can also be used for game studies research. In this article, the authors provide an overview of NLP and describe some research possibilities…

Zagal, Jose P.; Tomuro, Noriko; Shepitsen, Andriy

2012-01-01

246

Teacher Talking Time in the EFL Classroom Tiempo de participación oral del profesor en el aula de inglés como lengua extranjera  

OpenAIRE

Classroom Research may be simply defined as ongoing and cumulative intellectual inquiry by classroom teachers into the nature of teaching and learning in their own classrooms (Cross and Steadman, 1996, p.2). This paper reports on a piece of classroom research, aiming to support the hypothesis that most of the talk in my English-as-a-foreign-language elementary and intermediate classrooms was done by the teacher, presumably implying a more teacher-centred approach. In terms of the percentage o...

Nilton Hitotuzi

2005-01-01

247

Student Voices: The Missing Link in the Spanish Heritage Language Debate  

Science.gov (United States)

Though much of the research looking at the issue of language in the Spanish heritage language field is intended to guide the Spanish heritage language teacher in the classroom, students' voices are often stifled. This article fills this gap by giving voice to students' opinions on language use in the Spanish heritage language classroom. Survey…

Ducar, Cynthia M.

2008-01-01

248

Chinese Language and Culture: 9-Year Program Classroom Assessment Materials, Grade 4  

Science.gov (United States)

This document is designed to provide assessment materials for specific Grade 4 outcomes in the Chinese Language and Culture Nine-year Program, Grades 4-5-6. The assessment materials are designed for the beginner level in the context of teaching for communicative competence. Grade 4 learning outcomes from the Chinese Language and Culture Nine-year…

Alberta Education, 2008

2008-01-01

249

Setting the Foundation for Working with English Language Learners in the Secondary Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

In many schools, an increasing number of students are learning English as their second language. Secondary teachers are faced with the challenge of teaching English Language Learners (ELLs) with little or no training. This article highlights ideas and strategies that teachers can incorporate to make their instruction more effective in meeting the…

Berg, Helen; Petron, Mary; Greybeck, Barbara

2012-01-01

250

Promoting Humor with Prekindergarten Children with and without Language Impairments in Classroom Settings  

Science.gov (United States)

The promotion of language and social skill development for young children occurs in multiple contexts with a range of empirically validated methods. One specific intervention strategy used to promote language and communication would be to arrange the environment so that it is structured to elicit a range of communicative functions, such as…

Fitzgerald, Karen L.; Craig-Unkefer, Lesley

2008-01-01

251

Project LINC: Supporting Lecturers and Adjunct Instructors in Foreign Language Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

Foreign language learning can pose a barrier to some students with disabilities. This practice brief describes a collaborative process used on one campus to provide professional development for foreign language instructors. Training opportunities were intentionally focused on the needs of adjunct and temporary lecturers in providing inclusive…

Scott, Sally S.; Edwards, Wade

2012-01-01

252

The Emergence of U.S. French Language Learners' Intercultural Competence in Online Classroom Discussions  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study is to further the understanding of foreign language (FL) learners' development of intercultural competence in an instructed learning environment. In this study, second-semester U.S. French language learners enrolled in a Midwestern two-year technical school were directed to access explicit cultural instruction, authentic…

Garrett-Rucks, Paula

2010-01-01

253

Language Learning in Cyberspace: Teleporting the Classroom into the Target Culture.  

Science.gov (United States)

Reports a study that tested the possibility of language instruction in a MOO (Multiple-User Domain, Object-Oriented). The experiment consisted of two groups: adult evening-school participants in Germany learning English-as-a-Second-Language and American college students in their fourth semester of college German. Partnerships were formed with one…

Donaldson, Randall P.; Kotter, Markus

1999-01-01

254

Language at a Distance: Sharpening a Communication Tool in the Online Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Both immensely powerful and entirely fickle, language in online instruction is a double-edged sword. A potent intermediary between instructor and students, and among students themselves, language is a key tool in online learning. It carries and cultivates information. It builds knowledge and self-awareness. It brings learners together in a…

Hannan, Annika

2009-01-01

255

A University Level Linguistics Course Classroom Research: Vocabulary Retention and the Use of L2 and L1  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study is a classroom research carried out in the Linguistics course at university level. The present study aims at finding out to what degree the technical vocabulary of the course is retained by the individuals, while also investigating the effect of using L2 and L1 in the classroom during the lectures. Participants were second grade (N=70 and fourth grade (N=30 university students in the English Language Teaching Department. The data were conducted through a vocabulary and knowledge retention test, and the visa and final exams of the linguistics course. Students’ opinions about the Linguistics course were also collected by the help of an interview. The findings suggest that the technical vocabulary as well as the knowledge of the course is forgotten at a significant rate within a certain time. Considering the grades of the students as an indicator of success, the study also revealed that the use of L1 contributed positively to the comprehension of the subject.

Levent UZUN

2011-10-01

256

Stress and Stress Relief in the Educational Research Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Factors that increase stress and those that decrease stress were studied with 33 graduate students in an introductory educational research course. Participants completed the Statistical Anxiety Rating Scale (STARS) (R. Cruse, R. Cash, and D. Bolton, 1985) and were asked to rate their anxiety daily during the 4 weeks of the class. The instructor's…

Wilson, Vicki A.

257

Close-to-practice classroom research by way of Vygotskian units of analysis  

OpenAIRE

This paper discusses the potential of Vygotskian units in researching classroom practices. Adopting a close-to-practice approach and action research where possible, an attempt is made to shed light on ongoing practices across grades 4-6, 7-9 and the gymnaisum. The theory/practice approach adopted keeps alive the relationship between theory-which-informs and theory-being-built, as well as existing-practice and steered-practice in these studies. The potential to inform researcher reflexivity an...

Gade, Sharada

2012-01-01

258

Combining Research and Teaching in the Undergraduate Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Bridging the gap between scholarship and teaching is perhaps the most difficult challenge facing faculty members in the sciences. Here I discuss a pedagogical strategy that combines these seemingly disconnected areas. In a semester-long, upper-level astronomical techniques class that has been offered three times at Macalester College, I have integrated a major research component into the curriculum. In each iteration of the course, students have analyzed new scientific data acquired with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Large Array (either from General Observer programs or from the "Observing for University Classes" program). Each of the three courses has produced a journal article in the peer-reviewed literature (Cannon et al. 2010, 2011, 2012); every student enrolled in these three courses is now a co-author on one of these manuscripts. Representative course design materials are presented here to motivate faculty members with diverse research specialties to undertake similar endeavors.

Cannon, John M.

2013-01-01

259

How Do You Say "Twos" in Spanish, if "Two" Is "Dos"? Language as Means and Object in a Bilingual Kindergarten Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

In this essay Naomi Mulvihill uses vignettes from her bilingual kindergarten classroom to explore the dynamic processes by which young children make sense of language, focusing on instances in which she asks her students to compare texts presented in English and Spanish. Using Piaget's concept of disequilibrium as a guiding framework,…

Mulvihill, Naomi

2014-01-01

260

A Comparison of the Neurological Impress Method, the Language Experience Approach, and Classroom Teaching for Children with Reading Disabilities. Final Report.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated the effectiveness of the neurological impress method (NIM), the language experience approach (LEA), and classroom teaching as remedial reading treatments for disabled readers. Subjects referred to the Purdue Reading Clinic were screened to determine whether they met criteria for the study and were randomly assigned to the…

Arnold, Richard D.

261

Como evalvar la actuacion del profesor en una clase de segundo idioma (How to Evaluate a Teacher in a Second Language Classroom).  

Science.gov (United States)

This guide in Spanish provides performance criteria for evaluating the foreign language teacher. It provides an outline for analyzing the teacher's actions and teaching methods in the classroom. Through the evaluation by an outsider, the teacher can learn his or her faults in the views of others and can improve on them. The aspects to be analyzed…

Galvez de Bracamonte, Teresa

262

Classroom Management. Brief  

Science.gov (United States)

In learning-centered classrooms, the emphasis of classroom management shifts from maintaining behavioral control to fostering student engagement and self-regulation as well as community responsibility. This brief describes classroom management in "learning centered" classrooms, where practices are consistent with recent research knowledge about…

National Education Association Research Department, 2006

2006-01-01

263

A Framework for Successful Research Experiences in the Classroom: Combining the Power of Technology and Mentors  

Science.gov (United States)

Authentic research opportunities in the classroom are most impactful when they are student-driven and inquiry-based. These experiences are even more powerful when they involve technology and meaningful connections with scientists. In today's classrooms, activities are driven by state required skills, education standards, and state mandated testing. Therefore, programs that incorporate authentic research must address the needs of teachers. NASA's Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program has developed a framework that addresses teacher needs and incorporates the use of technology and access to mentors to promote and enhance authentic research in the classroom. EEAB is a student involvement program that facilitates student investigations of Earth or planetary comparisons using NASA data. To promote student-led research, EEAB provides standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources, an implementation structure to facilitate research, educator professional development, and ongoing support. This framework also provides teachers with the option to incorporate the use of technology and connect students with a mentor, both of which can enrich student research experiences. The framework is structured by a modeled 9-step process of science which helps students organize their research. With more schools gaining increased access to technology, EEAB has created an option to help schools take advantage of students' interest and comfort with technology by leveraging the use of available technologies to enhance student research. The use of technology not only allows students to collaborate and share their research, it also provides a mechanism for them to work with a mentor. This framework was tested during the 2010/2011 school year. Team workspaces hosted on Wikispaces for Educators allow students to initiate their research and refine their research question initially without external input. This allows teams to work independently and rely on the skills and interests of team members. Once teams finalize their research question, they are assigned a mentor. The mentor introduces himself/herself, acknowledges the initial work the team has conducted, and asks a focused question to help open the lines of communication. Students continue to communicate with their mentor throughout their research. As research is completed, teams can share their investigation during a virtual presentation. These live presentations allow students to share their research with their mentor, other scientists, other students, parents, and school administrators. After the initial year of testing this authentic research process, EEAB is working to address the many lessons learned. This will allow the program to refine and improve the overall process in an effort to maximize the benefits. Combined, these powerful strategies provide a successful framework to help teachers enhance the skills and motivation of their students, preparing them to become the next generation of scientists, explorers, and STEM-literate citizens of our nation.

Graff, Paige Valderrama; Stefanov, William L.; Willis, Kim; Runco, Susan; McCollum, Tim; Lindgren, Charles F.; Baker, Marshalyn; Mailhot, Michele

2011-01-01

264

A Framework for Successful Research Experiences in the Classroom: Combining the Power of Technology and Mentors  

Science.gov (United States)

Authentic research opportunities in the classroom are most impactful when they are student-driven and inquiry-based. These experiences are even more powerful when they involve technology and meaningful connections with scientists. In today's classrooms, activities are driven by state required skills, education standards, and state mandated testing. Therefore, programs that incorporate authentic research must address the needs of teachers. NASA's Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program has developed a framework that addresses teacher needs and incorporates the use of technology and access to mentors to promote and enhance authentic research in the classroom. EEAB is a student involvement program that facilitates student investigations of Earth or planetary comparisons using NASA data. To promote student-led research, EEAB provides standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources, an implementation structure to facilitate research, educator professional development, and ongoing support. This framework also provides teachers with the option to incorporate the use of technology and connect students with a mentor, both of which can enrich student research experiences. The framework is structured by a modeled 9-step process of science which helps students organize their research. With more schools gaining increased access to technology, EEAB has created an option to help schools take advantage of students' interest and comfort with technology by leveraging the use of available technologies to enhance student research. The use of technology not only allows students to collaborate and share their research, it also provides a mechanism for them to work with a mentor. This framework was tested during the 2010/2011 school year. Team workspaces hosted on Wikispaces for Educators allow students to initiate their research and refine their research question initially without external input. This allows teams to work independently and rely on the skills and interests of team members. Once teams finalize their research question, they are assigned a mentor. The mentor introduces himself/herself, acknowledges the initial work the team has conducted, and asks a focused question to help open the lines of communication. Students continue to communicate with their mentor throughout their research. As research is completed, teams can share their investigation during a virtual presentation. These live presentations allow students to share their research with their mentor, other scientists, other students, parents, and school administrators. After the initial year of testing this authentic research process, EEAB is working to address the many lessons learned. This will allow the program to refine and improve the overall process in an effort to maximize the benefits. Combined, these powerful strategies provide a successful framework to help teachers enhance the skills and motivation of their students, preparing them to become the next generation of scientists, explorers, and STEM-literate citizens of our nation.

Graff, P. V.; Stefanov, W. L.; Willis, K.; Runco, S.; McCollum, T.; Lindgren, C. F.; Baker, M.; Mailhot, M.

2011-12-01

265

Documenting and researching endangered languages: the Pangloss Collection  

OpenAIRE

The Pangloss Collection is a language archive developed since 1994 at the Langues et Civilisations à Tradition Orale (LACITO) research group of the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS). It contributes to the documentation and study of the world's languages by providing free access to documents of connected, spontaneous speech, mostly in endangered or under-resourced languages, recorded in their cultural context and transcribed in consultation with native speakers. The C...

Michailovsky, Boyd; Mazaudon, Martine; Michaud, Alexis; Guillaume, Se?verine; Franc?ois, Alexandre; Adamou, Evangelia

2014-01-01

266

Sociolinguistic Approaches to Second Language Acquisition Research: 1997-2007  

Science.gov (United States)

This article discusses sociolinguistically oriented research on second language acquisition (SLA) in the decade since Firth and Wagner (1997). Over the last 10 years, substantial progress has been made in developing a model of the sociolinguistic processes that inform second language acquisition. This model is supported by empirical evidence on…

Tarone, Elaine

2007-01-01

267

The African Languages Research Institute: A Milestone in the Development of the Zimbabwean Languages  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available

Abstract: This article is an assessment of the work the African Languages Research Institute (ALRI has done towards developing the indigenous languages of Zimbabwe. It looks at what the research team at ALRI has achieved, first in initiating serious research on the Zimbabwean languages and the progress it has made towards achieving its goal, developing and raising the status of these languages. It also considers what ALRI has planned for the future of the different categories or levels into which the various Zimbabwean languages have been classified. Part of the assessment focuses on measures ALRI has put in place to ensure the initiated research programme is sustainable and will continue in future. The article furthermore discusses the importance of the research work being done at ALRI, especially with regard to language development as a means towards self-realisation and actualisation, national advancement and the sustenance of the languages involved. ALRI's agenda is also analysed to see how well it agrees with popular thinking in Zimbabwe concerning the development and promotion of all of the indigenous languages.

Keywords: ALRI, CAPACITY BUILDING, INSTITUTIONALISATION, LANGUAGE HAR-MONISATION, LANGUAGE STANDARDISATION, MONOLINGUAL LEXICOGRAPHY, ZIM-BABWEAN LANGUAGES

Opsomming: Die African Languages Research Institute: 'n Mylpaal in die ont-wikkeling van die Zimbabwiese tale. Hierdie artikel is 'n evaluering van die werk wat die African Languages Research Institute (ALRI gedoen het in die ontwikkeling van die inheemse tale van Zimbabwe. Dit kyk na wat die navorsingspan bereik het, eerstens deur ernstige navorsing oor die Zimbabwiese tale te onderneem en die vordering wat gemaak is met die bereiking van sy doel, die ontwikkeling en die statusverhoging van hierdie tale. Dit beskou ook wat ALRI beplan het vir die toekoms van die verskillende kategorieë of vlakke waarin die onderskeie Zimbabwiese tale geklassifiseer is. 'n Deel van die evaluering fokus op maatreëls wat ALRI in plek gestel het om te verseker dat die onderneemde navorsingsprogram volhoubaar is en in die toekoms sal voortgaan. Verder bespreek die artikel die belangrikheid van die navorsingswerk wat by ALRI gedoen word, veral met betrekking tot taalontwikkeling as 'n manier tot selfverwesenliking en -aktualisering, nasionale vooruitgang en die onderhoubaarheid van die betrokke tale. ALRI se agenda word ook ontleed om te sien hoe goed dit ooreenstem met die algemene denke in Zimbabwe betreffende die ontwikkeling en bevordering van al die inheemse tale.

Sleutelwoorde: ALRI, VERMOËNSBOU, INSTITUSIONALISERING, TAALHARMONI-ERING, TAALSTANDAARDISERING, EENTALIGE LEKSIKOGRAFIE, ZIMBABWIESE TALE

Emmanuel Chabata

2011-10-01

268

Linking Geography to Reading and English Language Learners' Achievement in US Elementary and Middle School Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

The "GeoLiteracy for English language learners" (ELLs) program is a curriculum that enhances reading and writing skills while teaching geography content for US students in kindergarten through eighth grades. The program includes 85 lesson plans that address all US national geography standards, a quarter of which address environmental issues. The…

Hinde, Elizabeth R.; Osborn Popp, Sharon E.; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Dorn, Ronald I.

2011-01-01

269

Critical Pedagogy beyond the Classroom Walls: Community Service-Learning and Spanish Heritage Language Education  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes a critical service-learning initiative in which college students of Spanish taught in an after-school Spanish class for young heritage language (HL) speakers at a local elementary school. We contextualize the program within broad curricular revisions made to the undergraduate Spanish program in recent years, explaining how…

Leeman, Jennifer; Rabin, Lisa; Roman-Mendoza, Esperanza

2011-01-01

270

Language and Space in a Multilingual Undergraduate Physics Classroom in Rwanda  

Science.gov (United States)

This case study examines how a lecturer and a group of students adjust to a request for English-only medium of instruction in tertiary education. The study draws on sociocultural theories considering context and language use as tools for meaning making. Goffman's theories of stage setting and footing are used to analyse how the lecturer positions…

Andersson, Ingrid; Rusanganwa, Joseph

2011-01-01

271

Observations of Real-Time Captioning in the Elementary English Language Learner Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This qualitative study reviews the effects of real-time captioning on vocabulary acquisition of a novice elementary English language learner (ELL). Triangulation of data was completed through review of teacher journaling, captioning transcripts, and student pretest and posttest assessments. Results illuminate improved retention and usage of…

Ingraham, Nissa

2014-01-01

272

Social Networking in an Intensive English Program Classroom: A Language Socialization Perspective  

Science.gov (United States)

This ongoing project seeks to investigate the impact, inside and outside of class, of instruction focused on developing learner awareness of social-networking site (SNS) use in an American Intensive English Program (IEP). With language socialization as an interpretative framework (Duff, in press; Ochs, 1988; Watson-Gegeo, 2004), the project uses a…

Reinhardt, Jonathon; Zander, Victoria

2011-01-01

273

"Because She Made Beds. Every Day". Social Positioning, Classroom Discourse, and Language Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper discursively analyzes two events of gendered positioning that took place during a unit on employment in an adult English as a Second Language program in California. Because the program primarily served Latina immigrant women, the teacher focused in this unit on the needs and goals of full-time homemakers who might want to transition…

Menard-Warwick, Julia

2008-01-01

274

First language transfer in second language writing: An examination of current research  

OpenAIRE

First language (L1) transfer has been a key issue in the field of applied linguistics, second language acquisition (SLA), and language pedagogy for almost a century. Its importance, however, has been re-evaluated several times within the last few decades. The aim of this paper is to examine current research that has investigated the role of L1 transfer in second language (L2) writing. The paper begins by discussing the different views of L1 transfer and how they have changed ov...

Khaled Karim; Hossein Nassaji

2013-01-01

275

Earth2Class Overview: An Innovative Program Linking Classroom Educators and Research Scientists  

Science.gov (United States)

The Earth2Class (E2C) workshops, held at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO), provide an effective model for improving knowledge, teaching, and technology skills of middle and high school science educators through ongoing interactions with research scientists and educational technology. With support from an NSF GeoEd grant, E2C has developed monthly workshops, web-based resources, and summer institutes in which classroom teachers and research scientists have produced exemplar curriculum materials about a wide variety of cutting-edge geoscience investigations suitable for dissemination to teachers and students. Some of the goals of this program are focused to address questions such as: (1) What aspects of the E2C format and educational technology most effectively connect research discoveries with classroom teachers and their students? (2) What benefits result through interactions among teachers from highly diverse districts and backgrounds with research scientists, and what benefits do the scientists gain from participation? (3) How can the E2C format serve as a model for other research institution-school district partnerships as a mechanism for broader dissemination of scientific discoveries? E2C workshops have linked LDEO scientists from diverse research specialties-seismology, marine geology, paleoclimatology, ocean drilling, dendrochronology, remote sensing, impact craters, and others-with teachers from schools in the New York metropolitan area. Through the workshops, we have trained teachers to enhance content knowledge in the Earth Sciences and develop skills to incorporate new technologies. We have made a special effort to increase the teaching competency of K-12 Earth Sciences educators serving in schools with high numbers of students from underrepresented groups, thereby providing greater role models to attract students into science and math careers. E2C sponsored Earth Science Teachers Conferences, bringing together educators from New York and New Jersey to consider challenges facing classroom teachers trying to incorporate recent research discoveries into the curriculum. Their efforts led to creating web-based resources that provide succinct statements of core concepts, essential vocabulary lists, selected labs, activities, and links to Internet sites providing scientific information that may not be incorporated into textbooks for years. The E2C web site (www.earth2class.org), has become an important resource for Earth Science educators. It provides an effective format for disseminating results of scientific research to teachers and students through a workshop section that includes an introduction, links to scientific discoveries, and suggestions for classroom applications. The educational resources section provides extensive curricular materials, including lesson plans, classroom activities, and links to state and national Science Education Standards. Overall, E2C seeks to make significant contributions to national efforts for creating networks of science researchers working with classroom teachers and teacher-trainers seeking effective methods for innovative instructional techniques, problem-solving strategies, and professional development, as well as meeting the challenges of state and national mandates.

Passow, M.; Iturrino, G. J.; Baggio, F. D.; Assumpcao, C. M.

2005-12-01

276

The Combine Project: An Experience in a Dual-Language Classroom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article describes what happened when a bilingual kindergarten class in West Liberty, Iowa, investigated a combine. The dual-language program supports content area instruction in both Spanish and English. The first part of the article tells the story of the Combine Project, this class's first project work. The story begins with a typical kindergarten field trip to a farm and ends with a parent night to show a combine constructed by the kindergartners. The second part of the article discusses the teacher's reflections on learning how to guide projects. Reflections by the teacher include relating kindergarten goals to projects, supporting second-language learners, involving parents, and including children with special needs.

Rebecca Wilson

2001-01-01

277

Classroom Management. TESOL Classroom Practice Series  

Science.gov (United States)

This series captures the dynamics of the contemporary ESOL classroom. It showcases state-of-the-art curricula, materials, tasks, and activities reflecting emerging trends in language education and seeks to build localized language teaching and learning theories based on teachers' and students' unique experiences in and beyond the classroom. Each…

Farrell, Thomas S. C., Ed.

2008-01-01

278

A Research-Informed Approach to Teaching About Exoplanet Detection in STEM Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

JPL’s NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program’s (ExEP) Public Engagement Program, in collaboration with the Center for Astronomy Education (CAE), is engaged in a research and curriculum development program to bring the science of exoplanet detection into STEM classrooms. In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of astronomers pursuing research related to exoplanets, along with a significant increase in interest amongst students and the general public regarding the topic of exoplanets. CAE has previously developed a curriculum unit (including Think-Pair-Share questions and a Lecture-Tutorial) to help students develop a deeper understanding of the Doppler method for detecting extrasolar planets. To date, there is a nearly nonexistent research base on students’ conceptual and reasoning difficulties related to the science of the transit and gravitational microlensing methods for detecting extrasolar planets. Appropriate for physical science classrooms from middle school to the introductory college level, the learner-centered active engagement activities we are developing are going through an iterative research and assessment process to ensure that they enable students to achieve increased conceptual understandings and reasoning skills in these areas. In this talk, we will report on our development process for two new Lecture-Tutorials that help students learn about the transit and gravitational microlensing methods for finding exoplanets.

Brissenden, Gina; Wallace, C. S.; Prather, E. E.; Traub, W. A.; Greene, W. M.; Biferno, A. A.

2014-01-01

279

Une approche discursive de la classe de langue étrangère en tant que lieu de travail / A discoursive approach of foreign language classroom as a place of work  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: French Abstract in portuguese O presente artigo centra-se na análise dos discursos da aula de língua estrangeira em uma situação particular: o ensino da língua francesa como língua profissional. Nosso objetivo consistirá em depreender marcas enunciativas por intermédio das quais se inscreve a natureza do trabalho realizado em sa [...] la de aula, tendo em vista a construção coletiva de um texto cuja autoria é responsabilidade dos atores da cena didática, professor e alunos. Para tal, interrogamos esses discursos da sala de aula sob uma tríplice ótica: em primeiro lugar, a oposição que se verifica entre trabalho coletivo e trabalho individual; a seguir, a dupla função exercida pela linguagem no referido contexto, a saber, a linguagem enquanto trabalho e a linguagem sobre o trabalho; finalmente, a distância que se verifica entre o trabalho prescrito e o trabalho real da sala de aula. Abstract in english This paper focuses the analysis of speech in foreign language classroom in a particular situation: the teaching of French as a professional language. Our purpose will be to explore enunciative marks that contribute to determine the nature of the work carried out in classroom throughout the collectiv [...] e construction of a text which is built by the actors of the didactic scene, the teacher and the students. In order to achieve our goal, we will interrogate these discourses from a triple point of view: first of all, the opposition between collective work and individual work in classroom; afterwards, the double function of language - language as work and language about work - in such a context; finally, the distance verified between prescribed work and real work in classroom.

Décio, Rocha.

280

Cross-linguistic comparisons in child language research.  

Science.gov (United States)

Major large-scale research projects in the early years of developmental psycholinguistics were English-based, yet even then numerous studies were available or under way in a range of different languages (Ferguson & Slobin, 1973). Since then, the field of cross-linguistic child language research has burgeoned in several directions. First, rich information is now available on the acquisition of dozens of languages from around the world in numerous language families, spearheaded by the five-volume series edited by Slobin (1985-1997) and complemented by in-depth examination of specific constructions - e.g. causative alternation, motion verbs, passive voice, subject elision, noun compounding - in various languages, culminating in an in-depth examination of the acquisition of ergativity in over a dozen languages (Bavin & Stoll, 2013). A second fruitful direction is the application of carefully comparable designs targeting a range of issues among children acquiring different languages, including: production of early lexico-grammatical constructions (Slobin, 1982), sentence processing comprehension (MacWhinney & Bates, 1989), expression of spatial relations (Bowerman, 2011), discourse construction of oral narratives based on short picture series (Hickmann, 2003) and longer storybooks (Berman & Slobin, 1994), and extended texts in different genres (Berman, 2008). Taken together, research motivated by the question of what is particular and what universal in child language highlights the marked, and early, impact of ambient language typology on processes of language acquisition. The challenge remains to operationalize such insights by means of psychologically sound and linguistically well-motivated measures for evaluating the interplay between the variables of developmental level, linguistic domain, and ambient language typology. PMID:25023494

Berman, Ruth A

2014-07-01

281

The Role of the African Languages Research Institute in Addressing Language of Instruction Dilemmas in Zimbabwe  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available

Abstract: The lexicographic work of the African Languages Research Institute (ALRI has played a significant role in attempting to avoid some of the dilemmas associated with using African languages as media of instruction in the Zimbabwean education system. Monolingual Shona and Ndebele dictionaries, biomedical reference works, dictionaries of musical, literary and linguistic terms as well as children's dictionaries constitute part of ALRI's contribution towards the goal of mainstreaming African languages in the education system. This article is an evaluation of the research activities taking place at ALRI. The aim of the article is to demonstrate that if they receive adequate attention through corpus planning, African languages possess the capacity to play an important role as media of instruction across the entire spectrum of the education curricula in Zimbabwe and elsewhere. The article concludes by observing that, if the efforts of ALRI are to succeed, there is need for the co-operation of all stakeholders in language practice.

Keywords: DICTIONARIES, LEXICOGRAPHY, LEXICOGRAPHER, LEXICOGRAPHIC RESEARCH, INDIGENOUS AFRICAN LANGUAGES, AFRICAN LANGUAGES RESEARCH INSTITUTE (ALRI, EDUCATION, CURRICULUM, MEDIUM OF INSTRUCTION, SHONA, NDEBELE, ZIMBABWE

Opsomming: Die rol van die African Languages Research Institute by die hantering van onderrigtaaldilemmas in Zimbabwe. Die leksikografiese werk van die African Languages Research Institute (ALRI het 'n betekenisvolle rol gespeel om sommige van die dilemmas te probeer vermy wat gepaard gaan met die gebruik van Afrikatale as onderrigmedia in die Zimbabwiese opvoedingstelsel. Eentalige Sjona- en Ndebelewoordeboeke, biomediese naslaanwerke, woordeboeke van musiek-, letterkunde- en taalkundeterme sowel as woordeboeke vir kinders maak deel uit van ALRI se bydrae tot die doelwit om Afrikatale in die hoofstroom van die opvoedingstelsel te plaas. Hierdie artikel is 'n beoordeling van die navorsingsaktiwiteite wat by ALRI plaasvind. Die doel van die artikel is om te toon dat, indien hulle voldoende aandag deur korpusbeplanning ontvang, Afrikatale die vermoë besit om 'n belangrike rol as onderrigmedia oor die hele spektrum van die opvoedingsleerplanne in Zimbabwe en elders te speel. Die artikel sluit met die waarneming dat, indien die pogings van ALRI wil slaag, daar behoefte is aan die same-werking van alle belanghebbendes in die taalpraktyk.

Sleutelwoorde: WOORDEBOEKE, LEKSIKOGRAFIE, LEKSIKOGRAAF, LEKSIKO-GRAFIESE NAVORSING, INHEEMSE AFRIKATALE, AFRICAN LANGUAGES RESEARCH INSTITUTE (ALRI, OPVOEDING, LEERPLAN, ONDERRIGMEDIUM, SJONA, NDEBELE, ZIMBABWE

Jesta Masuku

2011-10-01

282

Toward a New Pluralism in ABE/ESOL Classrooms: Teaching to Multiple "Cultures of Mind." Research Monograph. NCSALL Reports.  

Science.gov (United States)

This document contains information about and from a study of the experiences of 41 adults enrolled in adult basic education/English for speakers of other languages (ABE/ESOL) programs that was conducted to determine what their learning meant to them and to identify strategies for developing a new pluralism in ABE/ESOL classrooms and teaching to…

Kegan, Robert; Broderick, Maria; Drago-Severson, Eleanor; Helsing, Deborah; Popp, Nancy; Portnow, Kathryn

283

First language transfer in second language writing: An examination of current research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available First language (L1 transfer has been a key issue in the field of applied linguistics, second language acquisition (SLA, and language pedagogy for almost a century. Its importance, however, has been re-evaluated several times within the last few decades. The aim of this paper is to examine current research that has investigated the role of L1 transfer in second language (L2 writing. The paper begins by discussing the different views of L1 transfer and how they have changed over time and then reviews some of the major studies that have examined the role of L1 transfer both as a learning tool and as a communicative strategy in L2 writing. The paper concludes with a number of suggestions for L2 writing instruction and future research.

Khaled Karim

2013-01-01

284

Teaching materials: a critical position about the role they play in the language classroom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Resumen: Este artículo se propone esclarecer la importancia y la función que juegan los materiales didácticos –desde los planteamientos de la pedagogía crítica– en la conformación y desarrollo del proceso de la enseñanza-aprendizaje de una lengua. Más allá de la función instrumentalista que suele asignarse a los materiales didácticos, en el presente trabajo éstos se visualizan como construcciones discursivas que pueden facultar la apropiación del pensamiento basada en el desarrollo de habilidades lingüísticas que reflejen un discurso crítico ante los diferentes reclamos (problemas históricos a los que estudiantes se ven expuestos dentro y fuera del aula. Para tal propósito, se realiza una revisión conceptual-teórica sobre la importancia y la función que los materiales tienen en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje de una lengua. Bajo una perspectiva crítica, se aborda el tema de los materiales didácticos y la construcción de la motivación así como el tema de ideología y materiales didácticos. Finalmente, se concluye que en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje de una lengua, los materiales didácticos son reproductores y reproducciones discursivas e ideológicas de ciertas realidades que pueden ofrecer visiones de mundo basadas en los intereses de clases dominantes si no se abordan desde posturas críticas.Abstract: The aim of this article is to state the importance teaching materials have in developing a language teaching-learning process based on the principles of the critical thinking pedagogy. From this perspective, this work questions the traditional conceptions and notions related to instruments of access assigned to materials. They are conceived as discursive constructions that can, or cannot, help to empower students with a critical discourse in order to promote a significant change in their attitudes towards the social, political and economical problems they face every day. To support this position, a conceptual study about theoretical assumptions related to the importance and the role teaching materials have in the language teaching-learning process has been carried out. Also, there is a general analysis regarding the relationship among teaching materials, motivation and ideology. Finally, it can be concluded that materials are reproductions and constructors of certain discursive and ideological realities that usually favor the interests of the dominant classes. That is why a critical position about the role teaching materials have is necessary to prevent the reproduction of prejudices and common sense assumptions about language and society.

Araya Araya, Karla

2007-12-01

285

Connecting Content and Language for English Language Learners  

CERN Document Server

Bridge the gap between content and language and put research into practice to instruct English language learners with strategies that meet their needs in language development and literacy. This must-have book reviews the author's experiences as a teacher in a diverse instructional setting and discusses the challenges and successes teachers experience in the ELL classroom. 200pp.

Smith, Jodene

2011-01-01

286

The Lasting Impacts of an Oceanographic Teacher Research Experiences in a Land-locked Classroom (Invited)  

Science.gov (United States)

Authentic science research opportunities for classroom teachers, like the NSF-funded ARMADA Project, improves teacher motivation, enables rigor and relevance in the classroom, and provides mentoring to new teachers. This project also facilitates communication between scientists, educators, and the public by connecting scientists to a broader audience through the teacher. In January and February 2009, we participated in a six-week cruise aboard the R/V Knorr studying the oceanographic controls and distribution of subseafloor microbial life in the equatorial Pacific. The international team of scientists employed geophysics, geochemistry, microbiology, and geology to characterize microbial activity. The integrated techniques demonstrate how modern science is not separated by discipline, but relies on the strengths of many to understand the complexities of the natural world. This experience has affected dramatic change in teaching about natural resources, plate tectonics, and climate in Honors Earth Science and ecology, sustainability, and global change in AP Environmental Science. Integrating many different approaches to studying natural phenomenon creates a more challenging and interesting learning environment that both students and parents respect, making them less likely to question more rigorous assignments. The ARMADA Project encourages teachers to journal daily about their experiences, which resulted in real-time web-log of cruise activities that documented how teachers, scientists and crew work together to achieve scientific goals. Finally, the authentic research experience demonstrates that when teachers and scientists work together to communicate research goals and results, both communities benefit, mutual respect is enhanced, and potential long-term collaborations are fostered.

Manning, C.; Pockalny, R. A.; D'Hondt, S. L.

2009-12-01

287

Center for the Study of Language and Information Research Program on Situated Language  

OpenAIRE

Founded early in 1983, the center for the Study of Language and Information (CSLI) at Stanford University grew out of a long-standing collaboration between scientists at research laboratories in the Palo Alto area and the faculty and students of several Stanford University departments and out of a need for an institutional focus for this work on natural and computer languages. At present, CSLI has 17 senior members and about as many associate members, from SRI International, Xerox PARC, Fairc...

Macken, Elizabeth

1984-01-01

288

Reading with a Purpose: Communicative Reading Tasks for the Foreign Language Classroom. ERIC Digest.  

Science.gov (United States)

In describing reading proficiency--the relative difficulty or ease that an individual reader experiences reading a particular text--researchers have recognized the importance of both text- and reader-based factors. This digest focuses on the factor of purpose, as determined by the reader or the instructional context. Having a purpose means having…

Knutson, Elizabeth M.

289

The Teaching and Learning of Arabic Post 9/11: Late Modernity and Possibilities for Change in Language Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

In this current era of postmodernity, globalization, and new technological and social conditions, new approaches to literacy teaching are being introduced and examined. Studies that explore complexities of language teaching and learning in discourses of postmodernity as they relate to college contexts are significant for educators, researchers,…

Abbadi, Sawsan Omar

2011-01-01

290

Investment and Second Language Acquisition  

Science.gov (United States)

The article argues that Norton Peirce's (1995) concept of a language learner's investment should figure centrally in how instructors address the needs of adult learners in ESL classrooms. Investment is discussed in relation to second language acquisition research that addresses the role of social factors in second language acquisition. The article…

Pittaway, Daniel S.

2004-01-01

291

Researching multicultural mathematics classroom through the lens of landscapes of learning : NORMA 2008  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Students' motives for learning mathematics cannot be understood by looking solely at mathematical classroom activities. We discuss this claim in a multicultural context using the notion of 'landscapes of learning'. This notion serves as a theoretical and methodological tool that both defines a research perspective and sketches a field of empirical research. In this paper we want to focus on the notion and illustrate its usefulness when researching mathematical learning in multicultural contexts. We draw on data and results of an empirical study on student’s foregrounds with 45 teenage students in two 8th grade multicultural classes in Denmark. We show the dialectical relationship between each dimension of the landscape and the whole of it; and how, as a whole, it can help us coming closer to better theorisations.

AlrØ, Helle; Skovsmose, Ole

292

Investigating the Efficacy of a Professional Development Program in Formative Classroom Assessment in Middle School English Language Arts and Mathematics  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Teachers who engage in formative classroom assessment using practices that accurately measure student learning should be better positioned to diagnose the instructional needs of their students and to act on that information. For this reason, there has been increased interest in formative classroom assessment in recent years. Although…

Schneider, M. Christina; Meyer, J. Patrick

2012-01-01

293

“COMING TO KNOW”: WEAVING ABORIGINAL AND WESTERN SCIENCE KNOWLEDGE, LANGUAGE, AND LITERACY INTO THE SCIENCE CLASSROOM  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Following the work of contemporary thinkers, we propose that every culture has its own science and that both indigenous and western science knowledge systems are valuable and have been useful to the cultures developing them. Because a valid interpretation of scientific literacy must be consistent with a prevailing image of science and rapid changes taking place in society, we propose more inclusive definitions and metaphors of science literacy. Science literacy for Aboriginal people must reflect a broad cultural approach that recognizes the unique way Aboriginal people live and present their experience and knowledge. Literacy programs from an Aboriginal perspective must go beyond reading, writing, and numeracy to include oracy – stories, songs, dances, symbols, ceremonies. Science literacy from an Aboriginal perspective involves being knowledgeable about the extensive examples and applications of Aboriginal science knowledge, as well as western science knowledge, and science discourse about the nature of science. Literacy also includes the wisdom component of Aboriginal science, which brings the discussion of values and ethics to science and technology and requires sustaining both community and environment. Aboriginal languages serve as storehouses of experience and perspectives that help main-tain cultural identity, resist assimilation, and interpret the relationship between society and environment.

GLORIA J. SNIVELY

2008-03-01

294

How Latino/a Bilingual Students use their Language in a Fifth Grade Classroom and in the Science Laboratory during Science Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

This qualitative research study examines how Latino/a bilingual students use their linguistic resources in their homeroom classroom and in the science laboratory during science instruction. This study was conducted in a school district located in the southwestern part of the United States. The school was chosen based on the criterion that the…

Stevenson, Alma R.

2011-01-01

295

WormClassroom.org: An Inquiry-Rich Educational Web Portal for Research Resources of "Caenorhabditis elegans"  

Science.gov (United States)

The utilization of biology research resources, coupled with a "learning by inquiry" approach, has great potential to aid students in gaining an understanding of fundamental biological principles. To help realize this potential, we have developed a Web portal for undergraduate biology education, WormClassroom.org, based on current research

Lu, Fong-Mei; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Stewart, James; White, John G.

2007-01-01

296

A Research-Informed Approach to Teaching About Light & Matter in STEM Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

In collaboration with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), we have engaged in a research and curriculum development program to bring the detailed science of light and matter into STEM classrooms. Typical Astro 101 classes often discuss emission/absorption spectra with reference to the Bohr model only and teach radiation as produced/absorbed only by electron transitions. We present here curricula developed to highlight other emission/absorption phenomena (specifically those produced by rotational/vibrational molecular transitions as well as synchrotron radiation.) Appropriate for physical science classrooms from middle school to the introductory college level, the learner-centered active engagement activities we are developing are going through an iterative research and assessment process to ensure that they enable students to achieve increased conceptual understandings and reasoning skills. In this talk, we will report on our development process for a suite of activities, including lecture slides, Think-Pair-Share questions, assessment questions and a new Lecture-Tutorial that help students learn about these other important emission models.

Hornstein, Seth D.; Wallace, C. S.; Schlingman, W. M.; Prather, E. E.

2014-01-01

297

Language Contact and Language Conflict in Autochthonous Language Minority Settings in the EU: A Preliminary Round-Up of Guiding Principles and Research Desiderata  

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This contribution deals with language contact and language conflict in autochthonous language minority settings in the European Union. It rounds up a number of concepts that guide macro-socio-linguistic and macrocontact-linguistic research on language minorities. The description of these concepts results in a list of research desiderata.

Darquennes, Jeroen

2010-01-01

298

Exploring alternative assessment strategies in science classrooms  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: English Abstract in english The knowledge children bring to the classroom or construct in the classroom may find expression in a variety of activities and is often not measurable with the traditional assessment instruments used in science classrooms. Different approaches to assessment are required to accommodate the various wa [...] ys in which learners construct knowledge in social settings. In our research we attempted to determine the types of outcomes achieved in a Grade 6 classroom where alternative strategies such as interactive assessments were implemented. Analyses of these outcomes show that the learners learned much more than the tests indicate, although what they learnt was not necessarily science. The implications for assessment are clear: strategies that assess knowledge of science concepts, as well as assessment of outcomes other than science outcomes, are required if we wish to gain a holistic understanding of the learning that occurs in science classrooms.

Michèle, Stears; Nirmala, Gopal.

299

Family Literacy and Second Language Literacy Research: Focus on Language Minority Children  

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Full Text Available Problem Statement: Countries like the U. S. A. or Canada have citizens from various ethnic backgrounds. Although English is the dominant language in many parts of these countries, immigrants generally prefer speaking their native language when they are in their homes. Whatever the reason for using native language at home is, when we consider the children in these families, we can say that being exposed to different languages at home and at school may be a problem for their language development.Purpose of Study: There are many studies conducted in order to better understand the problems of language minority children. A great deal of literature on language minority students focuses on the ties between these children?s literacy development and their literacy practices at home. In other words, these studies aim to see how the literacy events these children are exposed to at home affect their literacy learning in the second language.Methods: This paper is an attempt to put together and discuss various theoretical and empirical studies conducted on the literacy development of language minority children in English speaking countries.Findings: Literacy education of language minority students is not an easy task. It is very complicated and difficult to achieve as it requires a complete collaboration among all the responsible parties (teachers, families, researchers, education policy makers, school administrators. Conclusion and Recommendations: Successful collaboration among all the involved parties would bring successful outcomes in terms of children?s healthy literacy development. The collaboration between teachers and families is the most vital one because these two parties are the ones that have one-to-one interaction with children.

Özgür Y?ld?r?m

2013-04-01

300

CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT  

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Full Text Available This paper is aiming to discover the paths that enable teachers to manage their work with students in the classroom. To be an efficient teacher means to know with what and how to motivate students to learn. Teacher as an efficient classroom manager needs to have skills to plan and prepare the education process, know how to organize the teaching and how to guide the class. An efficient teacher moreover needs o establish positive classroom climate and working discipline. Also, teacher should be able to evaluate the progress of the students and self-evaluate his own work.In order to examine classroom management skills of teachers in Republic of Macedonia, a research has been made for teachers in primary schools in Republic of Macedonia. Instruments which will be used in order to complete the research and analyses are the following: questionnaire for teachers and educational policy analyses in our country in order to discover whether there is concrete strategy for promotion and implementation of classroom management on local and national level.Analyses of results show that there is a deficit of classroom management skills among teachers, which is due moreover to some lapses in initial education of teachers.

Jasmina Delceva – Dizdarevik

2014-06-01

301

On Ethnography: Approaches to Language and Literacy Research. Language & Literacy (NCRLL)  

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Two experienced and esteemed ethnographers examine how to use ethnographic methods to conduct research in language and literacy. The authors begin by mapping some of the developments in ethnography across the last century, from colonial interests to contemporary studies of migration, multiculturalism, and global citizenship. The authors then draw…

Heath, Shirley Brice; Street, Brian V.

2008-01-01

302

Factors Influencing Chinese Language Learners' Strategy Use  

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This survey study, which involved 134 language learners enrolled in first-year Chinese as a foreign language classrooms in the US universities, intended to address the research question, "Do learners' strategy use differ based on the following learner differences: (1) gender; (2) home language/culture; and (3) number of other foreign languages

Sung, Ko-Yin

2011-01-01

303

Recruitment and engagement research for a language school  

OpenAIRE

The research objective was to find out the current recruitment and engagement methods at a Spanish language school. The theory part includes recruiting with its stages, the engagement of the current employees, and the effects of company image on the recruiting process. In addition, expatriation is dealt with, because some of the employees are from abroad. Focused interview was used as the research method in the study. The number of interviews was nine in total, and each lasted approximate...

Hakola, Ilari

2013-01-01

304

Talking the Talk: Library Classroom Communication and International Students  

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Language is a primary barrier for international students in library instruction classes. This article reviews the literature on classroom communication from both the second language acquisition and library fields, and suggests ways in which second language acquisition research can be applied to communication with international students in library…

Amsberry, Dawn

2008-01-01

305

Teaching in Linguistically Diverse Classrooms: Difficulties in the Implementation of the Language-in-Education Policy in Multilingual Kenyan Primary School Classrooms  

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Kenya's language-in-education policy supports mother-tongue education as the ideal approach to developing language and literacy skills of young learners. The policy has been informed by findings of various past national education commissions as well as international declarations such as the UNESCO declaration on the use of Vernacular Languages in…

Nyaga, Susan; Anthonissen, Christine

2012-01-01

306

Research Methodology on Language Development from a Complex Systems Perspective  

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Changes to research methodology motivated by the adoption of a complexity theory perspective on language development are considered. The dynamic, nonlinear, and open nature of complex systems, together with their tendency toward self-organization and interaction across levels and timescales, requires changes in traditional views of the functions…

Larsen-Freeman, Diane; Cameron, Lynne

2008-01-01

307

Dyslexia in Chinese Language: An Overview of Research and Practice  

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Dyslexia appears to be the most prevalent disability of students with special educational needs in many mainstream classes, affecting around 9.7% of the school population in Hong Kong. The education of these students is therefore of great concern to the community. In the present paper research into dyslexia in the Chinese language is briefly…

Chung, Kevin K. H.; Ho, Connie S. H.

2010-01-01

308

Introducing History (and Philosophy) of Science in the Classroom: A Field Research Experience in Italy  

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For quite some time, many EU and Italian Ministry of Education official documents have warmly suggested the introduction of the history and the philosophy of science in the teaching of science disciplines at school. Accordingly, there is a shared agreement between pedagogists and science historians about the efficacy of this approach towards an understanding of the current curriculum content and the Nature of Science. What is missing, at least in Italy, is a concrete fieldwork in the classroom to show the validity of these declarations. This essay is a report of the experience of introducing history and philosophy of science into junior and senior high school classrooms in Apulia (Italy). The aims of this project are: (a) to build a model of research involving high school teachers and university lecturers in the design and construction of teaching units that use the story of science and epistemology for teaching science and (b) produce evidence that this approach is effective in getting more interest from students in science. We relied on many schools for carrying out the historical-scientific teaching modules. The modules were carried out through the case study approach. In the first phase, the participating teachers were trained by University tutors on the modalities of this particular teaching approach. In the second phase, the teachers carried out the modules in their classes and finally these modules were presented in a conclusive conference. Moreover, we evaluated the efficacy of the intervention through specifically created agreement questionnaires.

Dibattista, Liborio; Morgese, Francesca

2013-03-01

309

Bringing Geoscience Research into Undergraduate Education in the Classroom and Online  

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The growth of the cyberinfrastructure provides new opportunities for students and instructors to place data- driven, classroom and laboratory exercises in the context of an integrated research project. Undergraduate majors in a classroom section of the applied geophysics course at SJSU use Google Earth to first visualize the geomorphic expression of the Silver Creek fault in the foothills of the eastern Santa Clara Valley in order to identify key research questions regarding the northward projection of the fault beneath the valley floor, near downtown San Jose. The 3-D visualization, both regionally and locally, plays a key element in establishing the overall framework of the research. Students then plan a seismic hazards study in an urban environment, which is the primary focus of the class, using satellite imagery to locate specific stations along a geophysical transect crossing the inferred location of the fault. Geophysical modeling along the transect combines field-based data acquisition by members of the class with regional geophysical data, downloaded from an online USGS database. Students carry out all aspects of the research from project planning, to data acquisition and analysis, report writing, and an oral presentation of the results. In contrast, online courses present special challenges as students may become frustrated navigating complex user interfaces, sometimes employed in research-driven online databases, and not achieve the desired learning outcomes. Consequently, an alternate approach, implemented in an online oceanography course, is for the instructor to first extract research data from online databases, build visualizations, and then place the learning objects in the context of a virtual oceanographic research expedition. Several examples of this approach, to engage students in the experience of oceanographic research, will be presented, including seafloor mapping studies around the Golden Gate and across the major ocean basins, using data obtained in part through the use of the Marine Geoscience Data System and GeoMapApp. Students also locate and undertake submersible dives inside hydrothermal vents using visualizations provided by the OceanExplorer program and New Millennium Observatory of NOAA/PMEL. Other learning activities include participation, at least virtually, in an iron fertilization experiment in the Southern Ocean (SOFeX) and the development of a model of surface circulation using data from the Global Drifter Program and the National Data Buoy Center. One factor contributing to student learning is to establish a research context for the class early on, so that students become engaged in a sense of exploration, testing and discovery.

Reed, D. L.

2008-12-01

310

Constructing and Using Multimodal Narratives to Research in Science Education: Contributions Based on Practical Classroom  

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This study deals with the problem of how to collect genuine and useful data about science classroom practices, and preserving the complex and holistic nature of teaching and learning. Additionally, we were looking for an instrument that would allow comparability and verifiability for teaching and research purposes. Given the multimodality of teaching and learning processes, we developed the multimodal narrative (MN), which describes what happens during a task and incorporates data such as examples of students' work, photos, diagrams, etc. Also, it describes teachers' intentions, preserving the nature of teaching practice in natural settings and it is verifiable and comparable. In this paper, we show how the MN was developed and present the protocol that was used for its construction. We identify the main characteristics of the MN and place it in the context of international research. We explore the potential of the MN for research purposes, illustrating its use in a research study that we carried out. We find that the MN provides a way to gather, organize and transform data, avoiding confusing and time-consuming manipulation of data, while minimizing the natural subjectivity of the narrator. The same MN can be used by the same or by different researchers for different purposes. Furthermore, the same MN can be used with different analysis techniques. It is also possible to study research practices on a large scale using MNs from different teachers and lessons. We propose that MNs can also be useful for teachers' professional development.

Lopes, J. B.; Silva, A. A.; Cravino, J. P.; Santos, C. A.; Cunha, A.; Pinto, A.; Silva, A.; Viegas, C.; Saraiva, E.; Branco, M. J.

2014-06-01

311

An Action Research Study Designed to Implement Student Negotiation to Improve Speaking Classroom Practice in Turkey  

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This paper reports the second stage of an action research study designed to improve the effectiveness of speaking classes through negotiating the lesson contents with students. The data were collected through interviews, questionnaires and observations as a way of eliciting students' views. The research, conducted in an English language

Uztosun, Mehmet Sercan; Skinner, Nigel; Cadorath, Jill

2014-01-01

312

EFFECT OF TECHNOLOGY ON MOTIVATION IN EFL CLASSROOMS  

OpenAIRE

In language classrooms, being in unnatural conversational situations, students need motivation more than other learning milieus. Teachers try to capture the attention of students through various methods and techniques. Many researchers in EFL teaching profession have stated that good motivation has appositive effect on foreign language learning. The purpose of this study is to explore how technology could be used to increase students’ motivation in EFL classrooms. For this purpose; a quest...

Genc Ilter, Binnur

2009-01-01

313

English language teaching textbooks content, consumption, production  

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English language teaching textbooks (or coursebooks) play a central role in the life of a classroom. This edited volume contains research-informed chapters focusing on: analysis of textbook content; how textbooks are used in the classroom; and textbook writers' accounts of the materials writing, design, and publishing process.

Harwood, Nigel

2013-01-01

314

Research on Fostering Intercultural Communication Competence of Foreign Language Learners  

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Full Text Available Globalization has made cross-cultural communication a necessity. The mobility of people and the contact between countries have greatly increased cross-cultural communication. Intercultural awareness has become a prerequisite for successful cross-cultural communication. Intercultural awareness is required if a foreign language learner is to achieve the intercultural communication competence, which is now considered to be the major goal of foreign language learning. Intercultural communication competence is multi-dimensional in nature, implicating not only the linguistic competence, but also the power of perceiving and interpreting socio-cultural events, and the behavioral ability of coping independently with cross-cultural encounters. The objective of this paper is to present an overview of how language and culture are dealt with from a cross-cultural perspective, to discuss concerns with defining norms and standards for foreign language learning raised by this perspective, and to consider how to foster the intercultural communication competence by pedagogical approaches that integrate current understandings and researches of language, culture and learning into their curricular and instructional designs.Key words: Intercultural awareness; Intercultural communication competence; Language and culture; Socio-cultural perspective; Curriculum design

Yueqin HAN

2013-03-01

315

Cross-Language Poetics: Proposal for an Interdisciplinary Research Program  

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Full Text Available For creative writers and for readers, opportunities to work with language in ways that engage two linguistic systems and/or two writing systems continue to expand with the growing influence of international and regional lingua francas. At the same time, we have witnessed the continuing development of literary creation in languages with fewer speakers, even in communities facing the outright erosion and replacement of their language. Alongside the tendencies of globalization, literature has also become more diverse, a new recognition of multilingualism and multiculturalism emerging among writers and readers alike. The special circumstances of composition and understanding that the different kinds of language and cultural interaction highlight also present us with an opportunity to study what it is that is fundamental in verbal art. After reviewing three historical examples of European origin (in Section 2 we will turn our attention to problems of language, writing system and poetry in East Asia (in Section 3. The examples from history will help us to put the current situation of multilingual and multicultural contexts for literature into a broader perspective. This is will allow us to return to consider a proposal for research on cross-language poetics.

Francis, Norbert

2014-02-01

316

Beyond the Language Classroom  

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This comprehensive exploration of theoretical and practical aspects of out-of-class teaching and learning, from a variety of perspectives and in various settings around the world, includes a theoretical overview of the field, 11 data-based case studies, and practical advice on materials development for independent learning. Contents of this book…

Benson, Phil, Ed.; Reinders, Hayo, Ed.

2011-01-01

317

Expedition Earth and Beyond: Using NASA Data Resources and Integrated Educational Strategies to Promote Authentic Research in the Classroom  

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Teachers in today s classrooms are bound by state required skills, education standards, and high stakes testing. How can they gain skills and confidence to replace units or individual activities with curriculum that incorporates project and inquiry-based learning and promotes authentic research in the classroom? The key to promoting classroom authentic research experiences lies in educator professional development that is structured around teacher needs. The Expedition Earth and Beyond Program is a new geosciences program based at the NASA Johnson Space Center designed to engage, inspire and educate teachers and students in grades 5-14. The program promotes authentic research experiences for classrooms and uses strategies that will help NASA reach its education goals while still allowing educators to teach required standards. Teachers will have access to experts in terrestrial and planetary remote sensing and geoscience; this will enhance their use of content, structure, and relevant experiences to gain the confidence and skills they need to actively engage students in authentic research experiences. Integrated and powerful educational strategies are used to build skills and confidence in teachers. The strategies are as follows: 1) creating Standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources as ready-to-use materials that can be modified by teachers to fit their unique classroom situation; 2) providing ongoing professional development opportunities that focus on active experiences using curricular materials, inquiry-based techniques and expanding content knowledge; 3) connecting science experts to classrooms to deepen content knowledge and provide relevance to classroom activities and real world applications; 4) facilitating students sharing research with their peers and scientists reinforcing their active participation and contributions to research. These components of the Expedition Earth and Beyond Education Program will be enhanced by providing exciting and diverse research opportunities that are inspired by views of Earth from space taken by astronauts on board the International Space Station. The interest and connection to viewing our home planet from space will inevitably spark questions that will drive students to pursue their research investigations, as well as forming a basis for comparisons to the exploration of other planetary bodies in our solar system.

Graffi, Paige Valderrama; Stefanov, William; Willis, Kim; Runco, Sue

2009-01-01

318

The Value of Applied Research: Retrieval Practice Improves Classroom Learning and Recommendations from a Teacher, a Principal, and a Scientist  

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Over the course of a 5-year applied research project with more than 1,400 middle school students, evidence from a number of studies revealed that retrieval practice in authentic classroom settings improves long-term learning (Agarwal et al. 2009; McDaniel et al., "Journal of Educational Psychology" 103:399-414, 2011; McDaniel et al. 2012; Roediger…

Agarwal, Pooja K.; Bain, Patrice M.; Chamberlain, Roger W.

2012-01-01

319

Social and Individual Aspects of Classroom Learning in Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Action Research Pilot Study on Assessment  

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The current paper reports on the outcome of an ongoing action research project at a school for higher-functioning students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in Sweden. The overall aim of the study was to develop and evaluate a questionnaire that captures social and individual aspects of classroom learning suitable for use with students with ASD.…

Asberg, Jakob; Zander, Ulla; Zander, Eric; Sandberg, Annika Dahlgren

2012-01-01

320

The influence of constructivism on nature of Science as an area of research and as a classroom subject  

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Full Text Available This paper is an general article about the influence of constructivism on nature of science Constructivism has influenced research on the teaching and learning of nature of science, as well as actual teaching of the nature of science ideas. In the area of research, a constructivist learning theory perspective has influenced researchers to shift from using quantitative research techniques to using qualitative research methods in investigating the nature of science in the science classrooms. In the area of promoting the teaching of the nature of science, a constructivist learning theory perspective has influenced science educators to shift from merely emphasizing the teaching of the history of science in science classrooms to sequencing in instruction in science lessons and promotion of better teacher preparation programs in the universities.

Mehmet KARAKAS

2007-12-01

321

Analysing Students’ Drawings of their Classroom: A Child-Friendly Research Method  

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Full Text Available Including students’ voices in research directly affecting their life and development has been emphasised in a wide range of studies. Children's rights movement and childhood sociology have argued that young students are active participants in investigations and not merely passive recipients or objects to be studied; when adequate participatory strategies are used, children have the ability to report competently and meaningfully on issues relevant to them. However, despite this re-conceptualization of children as social actors, their opinions have not often found their way into research. Concerns about children communicative and cognitive abilities, about appropriateness and desirability of involving them directly in research have restricted their participation. The study “School as it is – research on students’ and teachers’ profiles and interactions”, conducted by UNICEF and Centre Education 2000+, Romania, demonstrates that children are nor overlooked exactly when specialists reflect on educational matters. Child inclusive methodologies have been added for this purpose to a multi-method, multi-site research project focused mainly on depicting the real portrait of Romanian school. The present paper explores the use of students’ drawings of their classroom as a child friendly research method, utilized – together with other approaches involving adults – to present “school as it is”. Drawings are considered an open-ended, familiar activity for children, one of their preferred means of communication and, therefore, an effective strategy for engaging them in research. As a concrete proof of the efficiency and reliability of the method, the interpretation of students’ drawings is selectively presented. The findings fully demonstrate children capacity of contributing to research, as their drawings revealed a powerful, convincing image of their learning environment.

Anca NEDELCU

2013-08-01

322

A Working Model for Assessing Spanish Heritage Language Learners' Language Proficiency through a Placement Exam  

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Having a clear idea of the knowledge in the heritage language that a student brings to the classroom is essential for a successful language-learning experience; for that reason, research in heritage language education has been focusing increasingly on assessment issues, especially language placement exams. Professionals debate whether assessment…

Fairclough, Marta

2012-01-01

323

Understanding and Facing Discipline-Related Challenges in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom at Public Schools / Comprensión y tratamiento de los retos asociados a la disciplina en el aula de lengua extranjera en escuelas públicas  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: English Abstract in spanish Responder a las normas escolares y a las instrucciones de los profesores es un principio básico de una clase excelente. Tanto los profesores novatos como los experimentados enfrentan situaciones problemáticas en las aulas de clase reales, especialmente en relación con la disciplina. Hay varias razon [...] es que explican la indisciplina en los colegios públicos y también estrategias variadas que los profesores principiantes crean y ensayan para superar tal reto. Este artículo reporta un estudio de investigación acción que ayudó a un grupo de profesores principiantes a superar la indisciplina en el aula de inglés en colegios públicos y a responder a iniciativas de desarrollo profesional con base en procesos de reflexión y toma de decisiones que las nuevas políticas educativas colombianas demandan de las nuevas generaciones de profesores para mejorar la calidad de la educación. Abstract in english Complying with school regulations and teachers' instructions is a basic principle of an excellent class; both novice and experienced teachers face challenging situations when getting into real classrooms, especially those related to classroom management. There are various reasons that explain discip [...] line problems in public schools, as well as varied strategies beginning teachers create and try when coping with those challenges. This article reports an action research study on how this methodology helped a group of teacher-trainees overcome indiscipline in English as a foreign language classrooms at public schools, and align with professional development initiatives which focus on reflection and decision-making processes that the new Colombian policies demand from new teachers seeking a higher quality of education.

Josefina, Quintero Corzo; Odilia, Ramírez Contreras.

2011-10-01

324

Earth2Class: Assessing Interactions Between Research Scientists and Classroom Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

The Earth2Class Workshops at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (E2C) have brought together research scientists and secondary school teachers from the New York metropolitan area and neighboring states to learn about outcomes of investigations into many aspects of the Earth System and processes involved in making such discoveries. NSF Geoscience Education Grant 0331232 has provided support for an expanded program over the past three years, described at the 2005 Fall Meeting. We now present the results of formative and summative assessments of the effectiveness of this project. Among questions explored were: What aspects of the E2C format and educational technology most effectively connect research discoveries with classroom teachers and their students? What benefits result through interactions among teachers from highly diverse districts and backgrounds with research scientists, and what benefits do the scientists gain from participation? How can the E2C format serve as a model for other research institution-school district partnerships as a mechanism for broader dissemination of scientific discoveries? Formative evaluations were conducted through online and written responses from participants, feedback from conference presentations, and comments posted on teacher list-servers. Almost all responses were overwhelmingly positive. Formal, summative studies conducted by two external grant evaluators also noted many positive results. One abridged conclusion states: The E2C project is a unique and effective professional development program that can stimulate teachers and keep them informed of the vital content they teach. It is a model worthy of duplication in other subject areas and across the country. It may help to retain the best of our teachers and overcome an unfortunate attrition rate. The direct contact with professional scientists and collegial interactions in a non-threatening professional environment are critical dispositional and cognitive components of this success. The second reports: The E2C program and its associated resources provide unique, high-quality professional development to both teachers in the E2C workshops and to those that seek on-line professional development and/or useful classroom materials and ideas. The E2C website promises to be a site of first choice when searching for curricular materials. Although there are negligible concerns regarding the scalability of the program, Earth2Class has proven that cutting-edge research in the Earth sciences can be made accessible to classroom teachers, who, in turn, can share exciting research with their students. The E2C concept clearly warrants further exploration and testing at other sites. This exciting, innovative program has successfully modeled a synergistic relationship between notable scientists and K-12 teachers. Through this program, K-12 teachers receive unparalleled professional development and researchers are provided with a clearly delineated, direct means of achieving their mandated education and public outreach (Criterion 2) responsibilities. One can hardly imagine a more fruitful, win/win situation. Cooperating scientists utilized this program to make results of their investigations known to hundreds of teachers and, through them, thousands of students. Participants in the Workshops and others using archived versions on www.earth2class.org gained new understandings about many areas of geoscience and how scientists identify questions to explore. Middle and high school Earth Science teachers and students benefited from the myriad of online resources.

Passow, M. J.; Iturrino, G.; Assumpcao, C. M.; Baggio, F. D.

2006-12-01

325

Observed Classroom Quality Profiles of Kindergarten Classrooms in Finland  

Science.gov (United States)

Research Findings: The aim of the present study was to examine classroom quality profiles of kindergarten classrooms using a person-centered approach and to analyze these patterns in regard to teacher and classroom characteristics. Observations of the domains of Emotional Support, Classroom Organization, and Instructional Support were conducted in…

Salminen, Jenni; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Pakarinen, Eija; Siekkinen, Martti; Hannikainen, Maritta; Poikonen, Pirjo-Liisa; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena

2012-01-01

326

Application of Critical Classroom Discourse Analysis (CCDA in Analyzing Classroom Interaction  

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Full Text Available As an area of classroom research, Interaction Analysis developed from the need and desire to investigate the process of classroom teaching and learning in terms of action-reaction between individuals and their socio-cultural context (Biddle, 1967. However, sole reliance on quantitative techniques could be problematic, since they conceal more than they reveal of the intricacies of classroom interaction. Moving away from this quantitative norm, this study examines the classroom process from the discourse analysis perspective called Critical Classroom Discourse Analysis (CCDA, proposed by Kumaravadivelu (1999; which draws on Poststructuralism and postcolonialism concepts of discourse; to analyze and understand classroom input and interaction in terms of power and dominance. This ethnographic study aimed at using CCDA as a tool for critical reflection to analyze the differences in the discourse of males and females in an EFL situation. The discussion, based on a case study conducted at a university classroom in Iran, aims at understanding the unseen social processes, i.e. male dominance in discourse. Transcriptions of classroom interactions were put into a qualitatively interpretation of males and females' adherence to, or flouting of four maxims. The research findings suggest that male dominance could be concealed in discourse control, types of questions, and turn-taking. Male participants tended to exert more power and used less indirect language, more negative face, and fewer politeness phenomena.

Sima Sadeghi

2012-01-01

327

Original research in the classroom: why do zebrafish spawn in the morning?  

Science.gov (United States)

As part of an upper level undergraduate developmental biology course at the University of Minnesota Duluth, we developed a unit in which students carried out original research as part of a cooperative class project. Students had the opportunity to gain experience in the scientific method from experimental design all of the way through to the preparation of publication on their research that included text, figures, and tables. This kind of inquiry-based learning has been shown to have many benefits for students, including increased long-term learning and a better understanding of the process of scientific discovery. In our project, students designed experiments to explore why zebrafish typically spawn in the first few hours after the lights come on in the morning. The results of our experiments suggest that spawning still occurs when the dark-to-light transition is altered or absent. This is consistent with the work of others that demonstrates that rhythmic spawning behavior is regulated by an endogenous circadian clock. Our successes and failures carrying out original research as part of an undergraduate course should contribute to the growing approaches for using zebrafish to bring the excitement of experimental science to the classroom. PMID:22181662

Liang, Jennifer O; Abata, Katie; Bachelder, Eric; Bartley, Becca; Bozadjieva, Nadejda; Caskey, Victoria; Christianson, Benjamin; Detienne, Shannon; Dillon, Cassandra; Ecklund, Derek; Eckwright, David; Erickson, Raymond; Fadness, Tyler; Fealey, Michael; Fetter, Nicholas; Flatten, Michael; Fulton, Joshua; Galloway, Ryan; Gauer, Jacob; Hagler, Michael; Hammer, Andrea; Hasbargen, David; Heckmann, Brandon; Hildebrandt, Anne; Hillesheim, Jaclyn; Hoffman, Meghan; Hovey, Jonathan; Iverson, Sonja; Joyal, Matthew; Jubran, Rami; Keller, Stephanie; Kent, Derek; Kiefer, Brendan; King, Jacob; Kuefler, Aaron; Larson, Alex; Lewis, Nathan; Lu, Po-nien; Malone, Jessica; Mickolichek, Chelsey; Mitchell, Sean; Nelson, Pamela; Nemec, Michelle; Olsen, Shayna; Olson, Kendelle; Pautz, Kelsey; Pieper, Kelsey; Remackel, Michelle; Rengo, Cody; Sekenski, Jaime; Sievers, Tyson; Slavik, Brittney; Sloan, Jami; Smrekar, Candice; Stromquist, Emily; Tandberg, Patrick; Taurinskas, Nicholas; Thiele, Mark; Timinski, Peter; Tusa, Barite; Tuthill, Andrew; Uher, Bradley; Ward, Amy; Wilson, Luke; Young, Nathan

2011-12-01

328

Mathematics Education and Language Diversity: A Dialogue across Settings  

Science.gov (United States)

This article shares the authors' views on language-diversity issues in research in mathematics education. Described are tensions, questions, and myths that they have regularly faced as researchers. They use similarities and differences in two settings (multilingual classrooms in South Africa and U.S. mathematics classrooms with Latino/a…

Phakeng, Mamokgethi Setati; Moschkovich, Judit N.

2013-01-01

329

Use of the Outdoor Classroom and Nature-Study to Support Science and Literacy Learning: A Narrative Case Study of a Third-Grade Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

A case study of an exemplary third grade teacher's use of the outdoor classroom for meeting both state science and language arts standards is described. Data from the researcher's field journal, teacher lesson plans, and teacher interviews document how this teacher used nature-study to bridge outdoor classroom experiences with the state science…

Eick, Charles J.

2012-01-01

330

TEACHERS? ACCOUNTS OF LANGUAGE VARIATIONS  

OpenAIRE

This paper focuses on teachers' stigmatizing perspectives of their students' nonstandard varieties of Portuguese. Theoretically, the study was grounded on Personal Construct Psychology, Perspective Transformation in Teacher Education, Transformative Bidialectalism and Critical Language Awareness. The objectives were to jointly access and assess the teachers? implicit theories about nonstandard language and to verify to what extent these theories affected their classroom pedagogy. My research ...

Telles João A.

1998-01-01

331

DIY Media in the Classroom: New Literacies Across Content Areas (Middle Through High School). Language & Literacy Series (Practitioner's Bookshelf)  

Science.gov (United States)

This book shows teachers how to bring students' Do-It-Yourself media practices into the classroom (Grades 6-12). In one accessible resource, the authors explain DIY media, identify their appealing features for content area instruction, and describe the literacy skills and strategies they promote. Chapters address: Adolescents' DIY Media as New…

Guzzetti, Barbara; Elliot, Kate; Welsch, Diana

2010-01-01

332

Literacy Tools in the Classroom: Teaching through Critical Inquiry, Grades 5-12. Language and Literacy Series  

Science.gov (United States)

This innovative resource describes how teachers can help students employ "literacy tools" across the curriculum to foster learning. The authors demonstrate how literacy tools such as narratives, question-asking, spoken-word poetry, drama, writing, digital communication, images, and video encourage critical inquiry in the 5-12 classroom. The book…

Beach, Richard; Campano, Gerald; Edmiston, Brian; Borgmann, Melissa

2010-01-01

333

WALS in the university classroom  

OpenAIRE

The world atlas of language structures (WALS) originally appealed to the linguistics community as a resource for research. However, the relevance of the feature chapters to teaching environments and the user-friendly nature of the Interactive Reference Tool also make it suitable for university classrooms. Based on our experiences using WALS in two typology courses at the University of Manchester and the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), we provide a review of WALS as a teaching a...

Hildebrandt, Ka; Bond, O.

2009-01-01

334

Investigaciones en las Aulas Escolares en Apoyo del Fortalecimiento de la Enseñanza y el Aprendizaje / Classroom Research That Serves to Strengthen Teaching and Learning  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Una función importante de la investigación en las aulas escolares es orientar el fortalecimiento de la calidad de las oportunidades de aprendizaje que los docentes diseñan para sus estudiantes. Examinando prácticas pedagógicas con distintos niveles de especificidad, los 5 estudios compilados en esta [...] sección especial ofrecen enfoques alternativos para abordar este desafío. Estos estudios retratan prácticas de enseñanza y actividades de aprendizaje que presentan bajo nivel de desafío cognitivo a los estudiantes, así como ejemplos de una enseñanza reformada. En su conjunto, estos estudios destacan la importancia de investigaciones en las aulas escolares que simultáneamente atiendan a la enseñanza y al aprendizaje. Con el propósito de dar cuenta del carácter situado y distribuido del conocimiento profesional, el estudio de las prácticas docentes a nivel de las aulas escolares requiere, además, atención explícita a factores extra aula que condicionan las acciones individuales. Abstract in english One relevant purpose for classroom research is to provide orientations for strengthening the quality of the learning opportunities that teachers design for their students. The 5 studies included in this special section provide alternative approaches to address this challenge by examining, with varyi [...] ng levels of specificity, pedagogical practices. These studies portray teaching practices and learning activities that pose low-level cognitive challenges to students, as well as examples of reform-oriented teaching. Collectively, these studies highlight the importance of classroom research that concomitantly examines teaching and learning. When studying teaching practices at the classroom level, explicitly connecting what individual teachers do with external factors that impinge upon their work is also needed to account for the situated and distributed character of professional knowledge.

Carmen, Montecinos.

2014-11-01

335

Classroom of the Future...Now!  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes projects at the University of Central Florida to test new training technologies under controlled but realistic settings. Original plans for an "Experimental Prototyping Classroom" are discussed; and current developments in language training research, gaming technology, and virtual environments are described. (EAM)

Orwig, Gary; And Others

1993-01-01

336

Classroom management of situated group learning: A research study of two teaching strategies  

Science.gov (United States)

Although peer-based work is encouraged by theories in developmental psychology and although classroom interventions suggest it is effective, there are grounds for recognising that young pupils find collaborative learning hard to sustain. Discontinuities in collaborative skill during development have been suggested as one interpretation. Theory and research have neglected situational continuities that the teacher may provide in management of formal and informal collaborations. This experimental study, with the collaboration of the science faculty in one urban secondary college, investigated the effect of two role attribution strategies on communication in peer groups of different gender composition in three parallel Year 8 science classes. The group were set a problem that required them to design an experiment to compare the thermal insulating properties of two different materials. This presents the data collected and key findings, and reviews the findings from previous parallel studies that have employed the same research design in different school settings. The results confirm the effectiveness of social role attribution strategies in teacher management of communication in peer-based work.

Smeh, Kathy; Fawns, Rod

2000-06-01

337

C-IMAGE Teachers at Sea Maiden Voyages: Promoting Authentic Scientific Research in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

The Center for Integrated Modeling & Analysis of Gulf Ecosystems (C-IMAGE) is one of eight consortia participating in the BP/Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative. C-IMAGE is a comprehensive research consortium of 13 national and international universities tasked with evaluating the environmental impacts of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (DWH) on coastal ecosystems, the water column and the sea floor. The associated C-IMAGE research cruises provide a unique opportunity for Florida's K12 science educators to participate in the data collection and collaboration process alongside marine scientists as a member of the scientific crew. The mission of the C-IMAGE cruises is to help to answer several fundamental questions about the DWH event and subsequent impacts on the plankton population, reef and fish communities and the microbial communities. Deep sea sediment samples, plankton and fishes collected during these expeditions are the data sources. Sampling activities include the use of the SIPPER plankton sampler, multi-core sediment system and long line surveys to assess fish health. While at sea teachers participate in the at sea research and serve as the ship to shore communicator via social media (FB, Twitter, daily blogs) and LIVE video conferencing with formal and informal classrooms. Marine scientists, post-docs and graduate students participating in the C-IMAGE cruises collaborate with the teacher on board to communicate the science, technology and life at sea experiences to educational and general audiences. Upon return to shore, teachers will translate their At Sea learning experience to understandable inquiry-based lessons about the science and technology encompassing the northern Gulf of Mexico ecology, the DWH event and subsequent impacts. Lessons developed from the cruises will inform a future series of C-IMAGE Teacher Professional Developments during Phase 2 of Outreach activities. The results from three Gulf of Mexico expeditions (Aug-Nov) will be presented: related to teachers' working knowledge of research and sampling procedures as well as metrics for the potential value-added of social media as a mechanism for communicating research with formal and informal audiences. C-IMAGE teachers will engage in research with experts in biological and chemical modeling, marine resource assessment, sedimentary geochemistry and toxicology. This research is made possible by a grant from BP/The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative. Contract #SA 12-10/GoMRI-007;

Hine, A. C.; Greely, T.; Lodge, A.

2012-12-01

338

Exploring the Determinants of Language Barriers in Health Care (LBHC): Toward a Research Agenda for the Language Sciences  

Science.gov (United States)

There is growing interest in language barriers in health care (LBHC)--interest, that is, in how the quality of health care service delivery might be compromised when patients and health care providers do not share the same first language. This article discusses LBHC as an emerging research area that provides valuable opportunities for researchers

Segalowitz, Norman; Kehayia, Eva

2011-01-01

339

LANGUAGES AND LANGUAGE VARIETIES: COMPARATIVE RESEARCH ON THE LINGUISTIC ATTITUDES IN FOUR BILINGUAL MINORITY COMMUNITIES IN HUNGARY  

OpenAIRE

A central issue of this paper is to study the patterns in variation of attitudes toward minority language varieties in four minority communities from Hungary: German, Slovak, Serb and Romanian. This study takes part from the research which focuses on how to obtain significant information about the mechanism of the language shift process concerning autochthonous minorities in Hungary. The results demonstrate that in the course of language shift communities at an advanced stage of language shif...

Anna Borbely

2011-01-01

340

The Application of Syntactic Priming in Second Language Research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this report, we provide a brief discussion of syntactic priming and how this methodology has provided insight into issues of syntactic representation, specifically in terms of the autonomy of syntax and the relationship between production and perception in syntactic representation. We present results from studies related to syntactic priming in bilinguals and second/foreign language learners that focus on the ways in which syntactic priming can illuminate the representation of syntax in acquisition and bilingual grammar. Finally, we suggest further paths of research using this methodology.

Ahmad Ameri-Golestan

2012-09-01

341

Early Childhood Guided Tour: Promoting Language and Literacy Among Young Students with Developmental Disabilities in Early Childhood Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

The National Center to Improve Practice in Special Education through Technology, Media and Materials has made a guided tour through two Early Childhood (age 3 to 7) classes available via the Web. The classes, in Brockton, Massachussetts, and Wade County, North Carolina, exemplify: "engineering the classroom environment to optimize access to learning; modifying instructional strategies, materials, and tools to meet individual needs; integrating the curriculum through theme-based learning; and embedding assessment in all classroom activities." The site provides a "bus tour" through free choice, circle time, small group activities, and story time, complete with text, photos, and Quicktime videos, to show users how these classes achieve their goals, while at the same time vividly demonstrating the challenges of providing Early Childhood Special Education.

Merkell, Susan.

342

Non-native EFL Teacher Trainees’ Attitude towards the Recruitment of NESTs and Teacher Collaboration in Language Classrooms  

OpenAIRE

Teacher collaboration is a key feature of effective professional development and is a necessary element for improved student achievement and ongoing school success. This study investigated pre-service Non-Native English Speaking Teachers (NNESTs)’ attitude towards the recruitment of Native English Speaking Teachers (NESTs) and the collaboration with NESTs in EFL classrooms. The results show that most participants are not against the presence of NESTs as their teaching partners, but see ...

Li-Yi Wang

2013-01-01

343

Determining an Effective Interactive Multimedia Arabic Language Courseware for Malaysian Primary School Children: An Alternative Paradigm for Learning in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

The prime purpose of this experimental research was to determine whether learning Arabic as a foreign language can be effectively enhanced through traditional methodology. As such, this research carefully investigated and critically analyzed the effectiveness of the traditional paradigm in teaching Arabic as a foreign language to 3rd grade primary…

Faryadi, Qais; Bakar, Zainab Abu; Maidinsah, Hamidah

2007-01-01

344

Understanding and Facing Discipline-Related Challenges in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom at Public Schools Comprensión y tratamiento de los retos asociados a la disciplina en el aula de lengua extranjera en escuelas públicas  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Complying with school regulations and teachers' instructions is a basic principle of an excellent class; both novice and experienced teachers face challenging situations when getting into real classrooms, especially those related to classroom management. There are various reasons that explain discipline problems in public schools, as well as varied strategies beginning teachers create and try when coping with those challenges. This article reports an action research study on how this methodology helped a group of teacher-trainees overcome indiscipline in English as a foreign language classrooms at public schools, and align with professional development initiatives which focus on reflection and decision-making processes that the new Colombian policies demand from new teachers seeking a higher quality of education.Responder a las normas escolares y a las instrucciones de los profesores es un principio básico de una clase excelente. Tanto los profesores novatos como los experimentados enfrentan situaciones problemáticas en las aulas de clase reales, especialmente en relación con la disciplina. Hay varias razones que explican la indisciplina en los colegios públicos y también estrategias variadas que los profesores principiantes crean y ensayan para superar tal reto. Este artículo reporta un estudio de investigación acción que ayudó a un grupo de profesores principiantes a superar la indisciplina en el aula de inglés en colegios públicos y a responder a iniciativas de desarrollo profesional con base en procesos de reflexión y toma de decisiones que las nuevas políticas educativas colombianas demandan de las nuevas generaciones de profesores para mejorar la calidad de la educación.

Josefina Quintero Corzo

2011-10-01

345

The Medium of Instruction and Classroom Interaction: Evidence from Hong Kong Secondary Schools  

Science.gov (United States)

Teacher-student interaction in classrooms is perceived to be crucial for learning. Previous research has compared the interaction in classrooms where a second language is used as the medium of instruction (MoI) with those where the mother tongue is used. This has been done mainly via qualitative impressions. The current study adopted a mixed…

Lo, Yuen Yi; Macaro, Ernesto

2012-01-01

346

The Evaluation of Physical Variables Which Effects Classroom Management  

OpenAIRE

Classroom managament has great importance on increasing productivity of education activities.So that,it is necessary to be careful while arranging classroom environment.The teacher has an important role on arranging classroom environment.The teachers should arrange the classroom by taking care classroom physical variables and effects of classroom management.It increases productivity of education.This research explains the importance of classroom management and classroom’s physical variables...

Karac?ali, Ays?e

2006-01-01

347

S'COOL Provides Research Opportunities and Current Data for Today's Technological Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

NASA's Students' Cloud Observations On-Line (S'COOL) project, a hands-on educational project, was an innovative idea conceived by the scientists in the Radiation Sciences Branch at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, in 1996. It came about after a local teacher expressed the idea that she wanted her students to be involved in real-life science. S'COOL supports NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument, which was launched on the Tropical Rainforest Measuring Mission (TRMM) in November, 1997, as part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise. With the S'COOL project students observe clouds and related weather conditions, compute data and note vital information while obtaining ground truth observations for the CERES instrument. The observations can then be used to help validate the CERES measurements, particularly detection of clear sky from space. In addition to meeting math, science and geography standards, students are engaged in using the computer to obtain, report and analyze current data, thus bringing modern technology into the realm of classroom, a paradigm that demands our attention.

Green, Carolyn J.; Chambers, Lin H.; Racel, Anne M.

1999-01-01

348

Valuing a Plurality of Research Methodologies and Instructional Ideologies in Classroom Research  

Science.gov (United States)

The critical issue Connor, Gallagher, Ferri, Dudley-Marling, and others have put before everyone in this special issue of the "Learning Disability Quarterly" is the hegemony of quantitative methodologies and subsequent marginalization of qualitative research. On this the author is in full agreement. When the human sciences use only quantitative…

Poplin, Mary

2011-01-01

349

Bringing Languages and Cultures into Contact: Why Lexical Phrases May Build Bridges between Native and Foreign/Second Languages in the Classroom, and between Native/Heritage and Other Cultures  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper explores the role of lexical phrases in language education in general (native language or L1; and second/foreign language or L2) and more specifically, in the education of English learners in US and European contexts as well as in other English-speaking countries worldwide. Even though this topic has been addressed by researchers and…

Porto, Melina

2011-01-01

350

LANGUAGES AND LANGUAGE VARIETIES: COMPARATIVE RESEARCH ON THE LINGUISTIC ATTITUDES IN FOUR BILINGUAL MINORITY COMMUNITIES IN HUNGARY  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A central issue of this paper is to study the patterns in variation of attitudes toward minority language varieties in four minority communities from Hungary: German, Slovak, Serb and Romanian. This study takes part from the research which focuses on how to obtain significant information about the mechanism of the language shift process concerning autochthonous minorities in Hungary. The results demonstrate that in the course of language shift communities at an advanced stage of language shift have less positive attitudes toward their minority languages than individuals from communities where language shift is in a less advanced stage.In Hungarian minority groups speakers’ attitudes toward minority language varieties (dialect vs. standard are the symptoms of language shift.

Anna Borbely

2011-01-01

351

Using a Humanoid Robot to Develop a Dialogue-Based Interactive Learning Environment for Elementary Foreign Language Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

Elementary school is the critical stage during which the development of listening comprehension and oral abilities in language acquisition occur, especially with a foreign language. However, the current foreign language instructors often adopt one-way teaching, and the learning environment lacks any interactive instructional media with which to…

Chang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Gwo-Dong

2010-01-01

352

The Impact of Foreign Language Mediated Teaching on Teachers' Sense of Professional Integrity in the CLIL Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Content and language integrated learning (CLIL) has received significant interest in recent years as a practical means of creating a plurilingual European community. A key feature of CLIL is the non-native speaking teacher responsible for developing learners' content and language knowledge in a foreign language mediated environment. Teachers often…

Moate, Josephine Marie

2011-01-01

353

Culture in the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Culture plays a large but often unnoticeable role in what we teach and how we teach children. We are a country of immense diversity, but in classrooms the dominant European-American culture has become the language of learning.

Medin, Douglas L.; Bang, Megan

2014-01-01

354

Effective Classroom Management  

OpenAIRE

This paper attempts to explore and identify the characteristics of an effective teacher who teaches English as a second language to 10 year old students from different ethnics, various social economic background and multi-level language ability, at a private primary school in Malaysia. The study focused on classroom management using a case study methodology where data was collected using both interviews and classroom observations. The findings concur with previous literature reviews on eff...

Azlin Norhaini Mansor; Kim Eng Wong; Mohamad Sattar Rasul; Mohd Izham Mohd Hamzah; Hamid, Aida Hanim A.

2012-01-01

355

Quizzes on tap: exporting a test generation system from one less resourced language to another  

OpenAIRE

It is difficult to develop and deploy Language Technology and applications for minority languages for many reasons. These include the lack of Natural Language Processing (NLP) resources for the language, a scarcity of NLP researchers who speak the language and the communication gap between teachers in the classroom and researchers working in universities and other centres of research. One approach to overcoming these obstacles is for researchers interested in Less-Resourced Languages (LRLs...

Maritxalar, Montse; Ui Dhonnchadha, Elaine; Foster, Jennifer; Ward, Monica

2011-01-01

356

Expedition Earth and Beyond: Engaging Classrooms in Student-Led Research Using NASA Data, Access to Scientists, and Integrated Educational Strategies  

Science.gov (United States)

Classroom teachers are challenged with engaging and preparing today s students for the future. Activities are driven by state required skills, education standards, and high-stakes testing. Providing educators with standards-aligned, inquiry-based activities that will help them engage their students in student-led research in the classroom will help them teach required standards, essential skills, and help inspire their students to become motivated learners. The Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Education Program, classroom educators, and ARES scientists at the NASA Johnson Space Center created the Expedition Earth and Beyond education program to help teachers promote student-led research in their classrooms (grades 5-14) by using NASA data, providing access to scientists, and using integrated educational strategies.

Graff, P. V.; Stefanov, W. L.; Willis, K. J.; Runco, S.; McCollum, T.; Baker, M.; Lindgren, C.; Mailhot, M.

2011-01-01

357

LEAPing on with language: An on-line language programme to support classroom teachers and parents of primary school children (aged 5-11 years).  

Science.gov (United States)

The Leaping on with Language programme provides a combination of strategies and activities to accelerate children's spoken language use from simple sentences to complex language. Using a conversational philosophy it expands the building blocks of language (vocabulary, grammar, speech), whilst emphasising the importance of developing independent social communication and acknowledging a child's developing self esteem and self identity between the ages of 4-11. Three pilot projects evaluated the programme with a total of 51 delegates. The outcomes were hugely positive. Changes in behaviour were reported from the 3rd pilot 1 month later. Comments regarding the length of training, practical strategies and more film clips were implemented. Leaping on with language is now a free to access resource available on line. PMID:24869439

Clare Allen, M; Kendrick, Andrew; Archbold, Sue; Harrigan, Suzanne

2014-05-01

358

How word decoding, vocabulary and prior topic knowledge predict reading comprehension. A study of language-minority students in Norwegian fifth grade classrooms  

OpenAIRE

This study examined the contribution of word decoding, first-language (L1) and second-language (L2) vocabulary and prior topic knowledge to L2 reading comprehension. For measuring reading comprehension we employed two different reading tasks: Woodcock Passage Comprehension and a researcher-developed content-area reading assignment (the Global Warming Test) consisting of multiple lengthy texts. The sample included 67 language-minority students (native Urdu or native Turkish speakers) from 21 d...

Rydland, Veslemøy; Aukrust, Vibeke Grøver; Fulland, Helene

2010-01-01

359

Beyond Linguistic Purism in Language-in-Education Policy and Practice: Exploring Bilingual Pedagogies in a Hong Kong Science Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper proposes to overcome the traditional essentialist and dichotomous ways of conceptualising language and language pedagogies, i.e. to go beyond linguistic purist perspectives. Analysing bilingual teaching practices in a science lesson, the paper proposes that practical bilingual pedagogies can be developed to help students in bilingual…

Lin, Angel

2006-01-01

360

Using Music and Image to Raise Spiritual and Moral Questions in the Foreign Language Classroom: Exploring the Sohne Mannheims  

Science.gov (United States)

Music offers to language teachers benefits in terms of language exposure, cultural information, and multisensory appeal. This article describes how the use of music videos offers potential for exploring spiritual and moral concerns, especially as the intersections between words, sounds, and images are explored. Exploring how (in this case)…

Smith, David I.; DeVries, Herman J., Jr.; Roberts, F. Corey

2011-01-01

361

The Effects of Songs in the Foreign Language Classroom on Text Recall, Delayed Text Recall and Involuntary Mental Rehearsal  

Science.gov (United States)

Music represents an integral part of the human culture, and particularly language and communication. Music can be a powerful tool in the learning experience. The purpose of the present study is to investigate whether English native-speaker students learning a foreign language can benefit from integrating music into the curriculum. Students' text…

Salcedo, Claudia S.

2010-01-01

362

Foreign Students and the Tutoring Practicum: Intercultural Literacy for Students of Language and Culture beyond the Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

A practicum for teachers of English as a second language at the Michigan Technological University allows American foreign language students and foreign students enrolled at the institution to be paired for tutoring in cultural facts and awareness. The course has a minimum of two contact hours per week, and participants are involved in three areas:…

Boschetto, Sandra M.

363

Non-native EFL Teacher Trainees’ Attitude towards the Recruitment of NESTs and Teacher Collaboration in Language Classrooms  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Teacher collaboration is a key feature of effective professional development and is a necessary element for improved student achievement and ongoing school success. This study investigated pre-service Non-Native English Speaking Teachers (NNESTs’ attitude towards the recruitment of Native English Speaking Teachers (NESTs and the collaboration with NESTs in EFL classrooms. The results show that most participants are not against the presence of NESTs as their teaching partners, but see qualification as the key criterion in recruiting NESTs. Even though the participants believe that team teaching with NESTs is beneficial to English learners, they are concerned about unequal partnerships and communication problems with NESTs. The results suggest that teacher educators need to take greater responsibilities to engage pre-service teachers in team teaching to support pre-service teachers’ professional lives.

Li-Yi Wang

2013-01-01

364

Understanding and Facing Discipline-Related Challenges in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom at Public Schools Comprensión y tratamiento de los retos asociados a la disciplina en el aula de lengua extranjera en escuelas públicas  

OpenAIRE

Complying with school regulations and teachers' instructions is a basic principle of an excellent class; both novice and experienced teachers face challenging situations when getting into real classrooms, especially those related to classroom management. There are various reasons that explain discipline problems in public schools, as well as varied strategies beginning teachers create and try when coping with those challenges. This article reports an action research study on how this methodol...

Josefina Quintero Corzo; Odilia Ramírez Contreras

2011-01-01

365

Taking peer victimization research to the next level: complex interactions among genes, teacher attitudes/behaviors, peer ecologies, & classroom characteristics.  

Science.gov (United States)

This commentary reviews research findings of the five papers in the special entitled "School-related Factors in the Development of Bullying Perpetration and Victimization", which represent critical areas that are often overlooked in the literature. First, one paper points to the complex interaction between a genetic disposition for aggression and classroom norms toward aggression. Second, an intervention paper unpacks the underlying mechanisms of an efficacious school-wide bully prevention program by opening the "black box" and testing for mediators. Third, the remaining studies employ a wide range of rigorous designs to identify how teachers' attitudes, behaviors, and classroom practices play a critical role in the prevalence of victimization and bullying in the classroom. Further, teachers' attitudes and behaviors are shown to be predictive of youth's willingness to intervene to assist a peer who is being victimized. Results are situated in what is known about bullying prevention, and how the findings from these studies could maximize the sensitivity of future prevention efforts. PMID:25345834

Espelage, Dorothy L

2015-01-01

366

Research-Based Vocabulary Instruction for English Language Learners  

Science.gov (United States)

A major reading-achievement gap exists between English language learners and English-only students. In order for ELLs to experience school success, they must achieve English language proficiency. This article presents why vocabulary acquisition plays the most vital role in ELLs' learning of the English language. Factors include the severity and…

Chung, Stephanie F.

2012-01-01

367

Applying Research Findings to Instruction for Adult English Language Students  

Science.gov (United States)

This brief is written for the practitioners: teachers, teacher trainers, curriculum writers, and program administrators who work with adult English language students in English as a second language (ESL) classes or in mixed adult basic education ABE classes (with native English speakers and English language learners). If educators are not…

Smith, Cristine; Harris, Kathryn; Reder, Stephen

2005-01-01

368

Power and meaning making in an EAP classroom engaging with the everyday  

CERN Document Server

This book examines how critical literacy pedagogy has been implemented in a classroom through a year-long collaboration between the author (a researcher) and an EAP teacher. It details the teacher's introduction to functional grammar and accompanying critical literacy approaches to EAP, and her growing critical language and discourse awareness of power and meaning making in the classroom. The book traces her evolving classroom practices and addresses how powerful discourses in social circulation found their way into the classroom via the curriculum materials the students encountered. The main

Chun, Christian W

2015-01-01

369

Coming to Our Senses: Incorporating Brain Research Findings into Classroom Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

The following paper addresses the responses that the learner has to changes in the learning environment that enhance instruction. While theorists have supported the notion that instruction embedded in sensory-filled, brain-based and hands-on activities, classrooms remain unchanged in many, if not most interactions. What can we do to wake up…

Wilmes, Barbara; Harrington, Lauren; Kohler-Evans, Patty; Sumpter, David

2008-01-01

370

Taking New Historical Research into the Classroom: Getting Medieval (and Global) at Key Stage 3  

Science.gov (United States)

Although history teachers frequently work with academic historical writing, direct face-to-face encounters with academic historians are rare in secondary history classrooms. This article reports a collaboration between an academic historian and a history teacher that aimed to engage 13-14 year-old pupils with developments in contemporary…

Watts, John; Gimson, David

2014-01-01

371

The Reliability of Classroom Observations by School Personnel. Research Paper. MET Project  

Science.gov (United States)

For many teachers, the classroom observation has been the only opportunity to receive direct feedback from another school professional. As such, it is an indispensable part of every teacher evaluation system. Yet it also requires a major time commitment from teachers, principals, and peer observers. To justify the investment of time and resources,…

Ho, Andrew D.; Kane, Thomas J.

2013-01-01

372

"La Chanson de Roland" in the Elementary School Classroom: A Case for Medieval Literature and Young Language Students.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes successful experiment in teaching of medieval literature to elementary French language classes in the Cincinnati public schools. Purpose was to strengthen linguistic awareness and expand social studies unit on medieval France. (BK)

Petry, Karla L.

1981-01-01

373

Beyond linguistic purism in language-in-education policy and practice: Exploring bilingual pedagogies in a Hong Kong science classroom  

OpenAIRE

This paper proposes to overcome the traditional essentialist and dichotomous ways of conceptualising language and language pedagogies, i.e. to go beyond linguistic purist perspectives. Analysing bilingual teaching practices in a science lesson, the paper proposes that practical bilingual pedagogies can be developed to help students in bilingual education programmes to access dominant linguistic resources and discourses by capitalising on their indigenous linguistic and cultural resources. © ...

Lin, A.

2006-01-01

374

Review Article: Recent Publications on Research Methods in Second Language Acquisition  

Science.gov (United States)

The central goal of the field of second language acquisition (SLA) is to describe and explain how second language learners acquire the target language. In order to achieve this goal, SLA researchers work with second language data, which can take a variety of forms, including (but not limited to) such commonly used methods as naturalistic…

Ionin, Tania

2013-01-01

375

"I Never Really Knew the History behind African American Language": Critical Language Pedagogy in an Advanced Placement English Language Arts Class  

Science.gov (United States)

This article responds to two long-standing dilemmas that limit the effectiveness of language education for students who speak and write in African American Language (AAL): (1) the gap between theory and research on AAL and classroom practice, and (2) the need for critical language pedagogies. This article presents the effectiveness of a critical…

Baker-Bell, April

2013-01-01

376

The Language Learner as Language Researcher: Putting Corpus Linguistics on the Timetable.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes an attempt to make room for the subject corpus linguistics in an already packed English language major undergraduate program. Describes the rationale for bringing together two existing subjects--information technology and discourse analysis--to more systematically and meaningfully introduce students to corpus-based language study in…

Cheng, Winnie; Warren, Martin; Xun-Feng, Xu

2003-01-01

377

Language  

OpenAIRE

Professor Dan Everett, linguistic anthropologist and author of Language: The Cultural Tool, tells us how a language spoken by a tribe living deep in the Amazon jungle poses a direct challenge to the widely-held view that language is inherent. Prize-winning poet Philip Gross talks to us about his father’s loss of language and reads from his collections Deep Field and The Water Table. As part of our academic inspiration series we speak to LSE economist and Bloomberg TV broadcaster Linda Yueh ...

Everett, Dan; Gross, Philip; Yueh, Linda; Mollett, Amy; Brumley, Cheryl

2012-01-01

378

Research scientists in the service of public science education: Ideal versus actual roles as perceived by secondary classroom teachers, scientists and other stakeholders  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to explore the role of research scientists in the service of K-12 science education. The perceptions and expectations of three key stakeholder group, classroom teachers, research scientists and science educators were examined and compared. The role that research scientists could, and perhaps should, play in science education was assessed from their own perspectives as well as from the view of the other two groups. The relationship between scientists and teachers was investigated with the goal of proposing strategies that could enhance collaboration between them, including techniques that could be employed by science educators. Data was collected via online surveys that targeted relevant interest group members. The questionnaires asked respondents to rank their knowledge level of science education, views on where classroom teachers obtain science content for their curriculum and their perception of what research scientists' role in science education should be and then what they thought classroom teachers wanted from scientists.

Carter, Cassandra Ruth

379

Teaching to Exceed the English Language Arts Common Core State Standards A Literacy Practices Approach for 6-12 Classrooms  

CERN Document Server

As the new English Language Arts Common Core State Standards take hold across the United States, the need grows for pre-service and in-service teachers to be ready to develop curriculum and instruction that addresses their requirements. This timely, thoughtful, and comprehensive text directly meets this need. It delineates a literacy practices and critical engagement curriculum framework for 6-12 English language arts education that explains and illustrates how the Standards' highest and best intentions for student success can be implemented from a critical, culturally relevant perspective tha

Beach, Richard; Webb, Allen

2012-01-01

380

Process Research Methods and Their Application in the Didactics of Text Production and Translation : Shedding Light on the Use of Research Methods in the University Classroom  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Teaching of translation and writing in the university classroom tends to focus on task knowledge by practicing text production and analyzing and discussing the quality of products. In this article, we will argue that the outcome of teaching may be increased if students are taught to see themselves not only as learners, but also as thinkers and problem solvers. This can be achieved by systematically applying knowledge from process research as this can give insight into mental and physical processes of text production. This article provides an overview of methods commonly used in process research and discusses the pros and cons of their application in teaching of translation and writing at university levels.

Dam-Jensen, Helle; Heine, Carmen

2009-01-01

381

Social interactive entropy and interaction in the language teacher education classroom / Entropia sociointerativa e interação na sala de aula de formação de professores de línguas  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in portuguese Este trabalho tem como ideias centrais o pressuposto de que a interação é essencial para a construção do conhecimento e a afirmação de que grupos de indivíduos em contextos de aprendizagem podem ser vistos como sistemas adaptativos complexos (SAC). Alguns pontos de vista diferentes, mas congruentes [...] sobre a sala de aula como um SAC são apresentados, e o fenômeno que está constantemente em ação e afetando todo e qualquer SAC - a entropia - é trazido à discussão. Um tipo específico de entropia para grupos sociais, definido como entropia socio-interativa, também é apresentado com o objetivo de promover a reflexão sobre como tal fenômeno afeta o comportamento de uma sala de aula, sob a perspectiva complexa, e influencia tal SAC social, quando propicia ou restringe condições para que a interação ocorra e, consequentemente, para que a aprendizagem emerja. Abstract in english This paper has as core ideas the assumption that interaction is essential for knowledge construction and the claim that groups of individuals in learning contexts can be seen as complex adaptive systems (CAS). Some different, but congruous views on the classroom as a complex adaptive system are pres [...] ented and the phenomenon which is constantly at work and affecting each and every CAS - the entropy - is brought to discussion. A specific type of entropy for social groups, defined as social interactive entropy, is also introduced as an attempt to promote reflection on how this phenomenon affects the behavior of a classroom under a complex perspective and how it influences such a social CAS by providing or restricting conditions for interaction and, hence, learning to emerge.

Rafael, Vetromille-Castro.

2013-06-01

382

An Ecological View of Whole-Class Discussions in a Second Language Literature Classroom: Teacher Reformulations as Affordances for Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

This article analyzes whole-class discussions between a teacher and her students in a Latin American Colonial literature course at the college level. The study is theoretical-exploratory in nature in that it (a) articulates theoretical assumptions inherent in an ecological perspective on second language learning and teaching and (b) attempts to…

Thoms, Joshua J.

2014-01-01

383

An Investigation of the Effectiveness of Using an Advance Organizer to Introduce Video in the Foreign Language Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Using 38 beginning-level university students of French, this study confirmed that student listening comprehension of a foreign language video would be facilitated by the use of an advance organizer consisting of several short sentences, written in French, that summarized chronologically the events in the video. Sample test items and answers are…

Herron, Carol

1994-01-01

384

Closing the Classroom Door and the Achievement Gap: Teach for America Alumni Teachers' Appropriation of Arizona Language Policy  

Science.gov (United States)

This qualitative study explored Teach for America (TFA) alumni teachers' discourse on Arizona language policy, conducted with eight teachers in the Phoenix metropolitan area who received their professional teacher preparation from TFA, a national organization that uses alternative paths to certification to place teachers in low-income schools.…

Heineke, Amy J.; Cameron, Quanna

2013-01-01

385

The Use and Effectiveness of a Question Exploration Routine in Secondary-Level English Language Arts Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

This purpose of the study was to determine the effects of teachers using the Question Exploration Routine (QER) in regularly scheduled secondary-level English Language Arts classes to help students answer questions about the development and use of main ideas in Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet." Questions were posed in both…

Bulgren, Janis A.; Marquis, Janet G.; Deshler, Donald D.; Lenz, B. Keith; Schumaker, Jean B.

2013-01-01

386

Problems in SLA. Second Language Acquisition Research Series  

Science.gov (United States)

Second language acquisition has an identity problem. It is a young field struggling to emerge from the parent fields of education and applied linguistics. In this book, the author proposes a way to help second language acquisition develop a systematic and coherent focus using the philosophy of science as the lens. The structure of the book allows…

Long, Michael H.

2006-01-01

387

Research in Foreign Language Education in Hungary (2006-2012)  

Science.gov (United States)

In the past quarter century, Hungary has offered fertile ground for innovative developments in foreign language (FL) education. The appropriate, albeit disparaging, label applied to Hungary in the mid-1970s--"a land of foreign language illiterates" (Köllo 1978: 6)--no longer applies. In the wake of the dramatic changes of 1989, the…

Medgyes, Péter; Nikolov, Marianne

2014-01-01

388

Second Language Teacher Education: Review of Recent Research on Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

Second language teacher education (SLTE) has undergone considerable change over the past 25 years. The question of how language teaching is learnt and how programmes of professional preparation can contribute to this process now elicits quite different answers. A new agenda of theory and practice has emerged as SLTE has incorporated many of the…

Wright, Tony

2010-01-01

389

A Review of Empirical Research in Drama and Language.  

Science.gov (United States)

Discusses 32 studies which address the relationship between creative drama and language skills. Also provides a chart that includes the following information on each study: drama treatment, language measurement instruments, population, control group or alternate treatment, significant results, conclusions, and other factors studied. (PD)

Vitz, Kathie

1983-01-01

390

Clickers in the Large Classroom: Current Research and Best-Practice Tips  

OpenAIRE

Audience response systems (ARS) or clickers, as they are commonly called, offer a management tool for engaging students in the large classroom. Basic elements of the technology are discussed. These systems have been used in a variety of fields and at all levels of education. Typical goals of ARS questions are discussed, as well as methods of compensating for the reduction in lecture time that typically results from their use. Examples of ARS use occur throughout the literature and often detai...

Caldwell, Jane E.

2007-01-01

391

Foreign language research and pedagogy: A comparison between EFL and FL writing  

OpenAIRE

Research in Second Language Writing has predominantly focused on English as Second Language Writing (ESL), which has caused an imbalance in the available literature. While there has been a growing interest in foreign language writing in the past few years (Manchon, 2009; Reichelt, 2001), there is little understanding of how English as a Foreign Language (EFL) and Foreign Language Writing (non-English) have emerged as overlapping, yet potentially distinct lines of scholarship. Through the conc...

Pelaez-morales, Carolina

2013-01-01

392

From Beacon Valley, Antarctica to Mars: Bringing the PolarTREC Teacher Research Experience to the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

PolarTREC is an educational research experience in which K-14 teachers participate in polar research with scientists as a pathway to improving science education. The program is funded by the National Science Foundation and managed by the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States. Teachers share their experiences with scientists, educators, communities, and students around the world during the expeditions through online journals, and translate the experience to the classroom by developing curricula based on the research expedition. A 2008 PolarTREC teacher research experience involved drilling through buried ice beneath glaciers in one of the Dry Valleys located in the cold-polar desert region of Antarctica. PolarTREC teacher Jacquelyn Hams accompanied Boston University researchers Dr. David Marchant and Sean Mackay to Beacon Valley, Antarctica. Beacon Valley is significant because the ice beneath it is estimated to be over several million years in age, making it the oldest ice known on this planet and it is one of the most Mars-like climatic environments and landscapes on Earth. In order to translate this unique environment to the classroom, lesson plans were created for students to study the topography, glacial landforms, and wind patterns of Beacon Valley. Students also examine the same imagery that scientists use to study the processes that operate in the extreme environments of Antarctica and Mars. The topographic maps and aerial images of Beacon Valley were obtained from the NASA LIMA (Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica) website and Mars imagery was obtained from the University of Arizona HiRISE (Hi Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) website. Wind data was downloaded from an anemometer in Beacon Valley and provided courtesy of Sean Mackay of Boston University. The lesson plans are available through the PolarTREC website or by contacting Jacquelyn Hams at hamsje@lavc.edu.

Hams, J. E.; Marchant, D. R.

2009-12-01

393

Science Students' Classroom Discourse: Tasha's Umwelt  

Science.gov (United States)

Over the past twenty-five years researchers have been concerned with understanding the science student. The need for such research is still grounded in contemporary issues including providing opportunities for all students to develop scientific literacy and the failure of school science to connect with student's lives, interests and personal identities. The research reported here is unusual in its use of discourse analysis in social psychology to contribute to an understanding of the way students make meaning in secondary school science. Data constructed for the study was drawn from videotapes of nine consecutive lessons in a year-seven science classroom in Melbourne, post-lesson video-stimulated interviews with students and the teacher, classroom observation and the students' written work. The classroom videotapes were recorded using four cameras and seven audio tracks by the International Centre for Classroom Research at the University of Melbourne. Student talk within and about their science lessons was analysed from a discursive perspective. Classroom episodes in which students expressed their sense of personal identity and agency, knowledge, attitude or emotion in relation to science were identified for detailed analysis of the function of the discourse used by students, and in particular the way students were positioned by others or positioned themselves. This article presents the discursive Umwelt or life-space of one middle years science student, Tasha. Her case is used here to highlight the complex social process of meaning making in science classrooms and the need to attend to local moral orders of rights and duties in research on student language use, identity and learning in science.

Arnold, Jenny

2012-04-01

394

Transforming Practice in Design and Technology: Evidence from a Classroom-Based Research Study of Students' Responses to an Intervention on Inclusive Design  

Science.gov (United States)

This article offers evidence from a classroom-based research study in English secondary schools which developed an innovative approach to teaching in Design and Technology based on inclusive design (also known as universal design). The research evidence highlights how creative, problem-solving approaches in Design and Technology can be used to…

Nicholl, B.; Flutter, J. A. E.; Hosking, I. M.; Clarkson, P. J.

2013-01-01

395

Java Language for Numerical Control Simulation System Research  

OpenAIRE

Java language is very good in a variety of development platforms to develop all kinds of application software for its simple and efficient, widely used. The programming language owning platform independent is adopted to solve the image flicker, sound loading and other issues by the threading technology, multimedia technology, graphics and point by point comparison techniques.Dynamic real-time simulation process simulation is implemented and a two-dimensional network of CNC machining simulatio...

Li Hongmei; Li Lei; Zhou Huiqiang

2013-01-01

396

Classroom Management  

Science.gov (United States)

Perhaps the most important skill a good teacher should possess is the ability to control students. A teacher who can devise fascinating and unique lesson plans for her classroom is useless if she can't get the kids to sit down and listen to her instructions. Unfortunately, many beginning teachers simply are not prepared to manage their classrooms effectively. Managing a classroom means you must teach your students behavior expectations, not just post your rules on the classroom wall. Classroom management becomes even more of an issue when it applies to the active nature of the science classroom.

Swango, C. J.; Steward, Sally B.

2003-01-01

397

Using Geospatial Information Technologies and Field Research to Enhance Classroom Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes a learning module for the classroom that was developed to enable students in a grazing management course to actively study livestock distribution by analyzing recently collected geospatial data from an on-ranch situation. Students can develop hypotheses concerning the relationship between independent variables such as topographical position or livestock water location and livestock distribution, and test them using the output from the module. Student evaluations indicate that the module is effective in engaging the students as learners and improving their ability to think critically.

Schacht, Walter

398

Research and Teaching: An Analysis of Calibrated Peer Review (CPR) in a Science Lecture Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Calibrated Peer Review (CPR) is an online tool being used to integrate a writing component in classrooms. In an introductory zoology lecture class, the authors found that CPR-assigned scores were significantly higher than instructor-assigned scores on two of three essay assignments. They also found that neither students' technical-writing skills nor their abilities to convey scientific understanding of articles through summary essays improved during the semester. However, the CPR system offered fairly simple setup and submission for students and decreased grading time for instructors.

Long, David A.; Gaffin, Douglas D.; Hoefnagels, Mari�lle H.; Walvoord, Mark E.; Chumchal, Matthew M.

2008-03-01

399

Graphic Novels in the Secondary Classroom and School Libraries  

Science.gov (United States)

The author examines the rise in popularity of graphic novels, the sales of which have steadily increased as their influence expands into adolescent culture. This article also includes an overview of current research results supporting the use of graphic novels within the classroom and school library; graphic novels support English-language

Griffith, Paula E.

2010-01-01

400

The Importance of Corpus-Based Research for Language Teachers.  

Science.gov (United States)

Introduces the fundamental characteristics of corpus-based research and illustrates such research with a study of a complex grammatical feature in English: linking adverbials (i.e., connecting expressions such as "therefore" and "in other words"). Shows that corpus-based research is useful even with features that cannot be studied with automatic…

Conrad, S. M.

1999-01-01

401

Propuesta didáctica en optimización dinámica. Investigación en el aula / Didactic in dynamic optimization. Classroom research  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Mexico | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Este artículo tiene como objetivo informar los resultados de la puesta a prueba de una propuesta didáctica para la enseñanza de la optimización dinámica, en particular del cálculo de variaciones. El diseño de la propuesta se hizo con base en la teoría APOE y se puso a prueba en una institución de en [...] señanza superior. Los resultados obtenidos del análisis de las respuestas de los estudiantes a un cuestionario y una entrevista ponen de manifiesto que los estudiantes muestran concepciones proceso y, en ocasiones, objeto de los conceptos abstractos de esta disciplina como resultado de su aplicación, aunque se detectaron algunas dificultades que resultaron difíciles de superar para dichos alumnos. Abstract in english The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a research study on a didactical proposal to teach Dynamical Optimization, in particular, Calculus of Variations. The proposal design was based on APOS theory and was tested at a Mexican private university. Results obtained from the analysis of [...] students' responses to a questionnaire and an interview show that students construct process conceptions, and in some cases, object conceptions of this discipline's abstract concepts. Some problems were however difficult to overcome for these students.

José, Campero; María, Trigueros.

2010-12-01

402

Identity and the Young English Language Learner. Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.  

Science.gov (United States)

This ethnographic case study examines the language socialization experiences of Hari, a Punjabi-speaking English language learner integrated into a mainstream kindergarten classroom in an urban area of British Columbia, Canada. The book begins by discussing theory and literature (e.g., mainstream second language acquisition research, language as…

Day, Elaine Mellen

403

Early Field Experiences in Language Teacher Education: An Ecological Analysis of a Program Implementation  

Science.gov (United States)

Language teacher education (LTE) has received increased attention over the last several decades. Language teacher educators, university researchers, classroom teachers, and future teachers have contributed immensely to existing knowledge on how language teachers learn to teach. Researchers and practitioners have finally acknowledged that future…

Rodriguez Arroyo, Sandra

2009-01-01

404

Recent Research in Language Learning Studies: Promises and Problems.  

Science.gov (United States)

From perspective of a psycholinguist, discusses three leading questions that have arisen from foundational, descriptive second-language-acquisiton studies: Why are certain L2 constructions learnable and others not?; In considering input requirements, is it fair to say that adult learners can take advantage of metalinguistic information about the…

Schachter, Jacquelyn

1998-01-01

405

Languages in contact: The influence of language activation and competing language patterns on translation performance  

OpenAIRE

The two pilot studies described in this article, both part of a larger on-going project investigating multilingualism in a translation context, deal with separation of languages in translation students. At the same time, they demonstrate how multilingualism research can be integrated into the translation classroom. Within the framework of Grosjean's model (1997, 1998, 2001), the first study tests the influence on translation performance of preferentially activating one of the languages for th...

Ehrensberger-dow, Maureen; Jekat, Susanne J.

2005-01-01

406

Research in the Doctoral Program in Second Language Acquisition at the University of Wisconsin-Madison  

Science.gov (United States)

Faculty and graduate students in the Doctoral Program in Second Language Acquisition (SLA) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison engage in a broad spectrum of research. From Professor Sally Magnan's research on study abroad and Professor Monika Chavez's work in foreign language policy through Professor Richard Young's examination of…

De Costa, Peter I.; Bernales, Carolina; Merrill, Margaret

2011-01-01

407

Proficiency Assessment Standards in Second Language Acquisition Research: "Clozing" the Gap  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study aims to sensitize SLA researchers to the importance of documenting and controlling for their participants' proficiency in the target language, with the goal of establishing more robust proficiency assessment standards in experimental research. First, this article presents a survey of recent (2000-2008) foreign and second-language

Tremblay, Annie

2011-01-01

408

The Use of Research and Theory in English Language Teaching in Botswana Secondary Schools  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to establish the usage of research and theory in the teaching of English language in secondary schools in Botswana. Altogether 100 questionnaires were administered in 19 secondary schools. The results of this study indicate that teachers rarely ever refer to language research in their teaching. Less value was also…

Mooko, Theophilus

2005-01-01

409

Quantifying the Burden of Writing Research Articles in a Second Language: Data from Mexican Scientists  

Science.gov (United States)

This article provides quantitative data to establish the relative, perceived burden of writing research articles in English as a second language. Previous qualitative research has shown that scientists writing English in a second language face difficulties but has not established parameters for the degree of this difficulty. A total of 141…

Hanauer, David I.; Englander, Karen

2011-01-01

410

From the research work on Miloš Crnjanski's language: Linguistic synthesis of some examples  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The paper considers several elements that make the language of M. Crnjanski be characteristic by its layers. Author is suggesting that Crnjanski, besides of his native dialect, had the language of written documents, of the Holy Bible (New Testament texts and languages in contact as the most probable common source of some of his novels language features. Author's research was based on the theoretical works of R. Jakobson, St. Ullmann and M. Ivi?.

Stanoj?i? Živojin

2008-01-01

411

Narratividade do professor: mediação e linguagem na sala de aula / Teacher's narrativity: mediation and language in the classroom  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVO: construir e analisar uma experiência de formação do professor em sua narratividade e os efeitos da mesma na narratividade das crianças. MÉTODO: a amostra se constituiu de duas professoras de pré-escola, 28 alunos, 14 de cada professora sendo, um grupo experimental e o outro grupo controle, [...] e os pais das crianças como controle ambiental. As avaliações foram feitas a partir de sessões de filmagem das professoras, coleta das narrativas das crianças e questionário sobre como desenvolviam a atividade de contar em casa. RESULTADOS: o processo de mediação fonoaudiólogo/professor, com enfoque na narrativa, provocou mudança no modo de narrar não só do professor, mas também nas categorias narrativas das crianças, demonstrando a importância de o profissional que assessore o professor em sua prática trazendo novos subsídios teóricos. CONCLUSÃO: após a realização desta pesquisa observou-se que a Experiência de Aprendizagem Mediada (EAM) e os princípios interacionistas sobre a aquisição da linguagem e o desenvolvimento narrativo foram efetivos na construção de uma experiência formativa do professor para melhorar sua narratividade e que a evolução do professor se refletiu na evolução das habilidades narrativas das crianças. Abstract in english PURPOSE: to build and analyze an experience in the teacher's formation in his/her narrativity and the effects of it on the children's narrativity. METHOD: the sample consisted of two pre-school teachers, 28 students, composing two groups of 14, one for each teacher, being one the experimental group [...] and the other the control group, and the children's parents as the environmental control. Evaluations were conducted through filming sessions of the teachers, collection of children's narratives and a questionnaire about how the recounting activity was developed at home. RESULTS: the process of pnonoaudiologist/teacher mediation, focusing on narrative, caused variation not only in the teacher's way of narrating, but also in the children's narrative categories, demonstrating the importance of a professional who can advise the teacher in his/her practice by bringing in new theoretical support. CONCLUSION: after the development of this study, it was observed that the Mediated Learning Experience (MLE) and the interactionism principles on language acquisition and narrative development were effective in building teacher's formative experience to improve his/her narrativity and that the teacher's evolution was reflected in the development of the children's narrative skills.

Isabel Maganin, Chesini; Anelise Henrich, Crestani; Ana Paula Ramos de, Souza.

1259-12-01

412

Using PROLOG with Graphics in the Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

PROLOG is a relatively new programing language with graphics capability. In addition, the language has a declarative rather than a procedural structure. Two programs illustrating use of the language in the mathematics classroom are presented. (JN)

Ball, Derek

1984-01-01

413

Why Do Care Workers Withdraw From Elderly Care? Researcher’s Language as a Hermeneutical Key  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Care workers frequently withdraw from elderly people in their care; this has resulted in a number of scandals in the media. Here I analyze an empirical scene observed at an old people’s home in Denmark, which contains behavioral patterns among the care workers which could be seen as withdrawal. At the same time it illustrates the care workers’ commitment to the elderly. A paradoxical “empathy at a distance” is characteristic of the scene. When analyzing my written observations in an interpretation group, my use of language was a point of discussion. What did it mean when I described the interactions between care workers and elderly residents in words commonly used to describe mother-child interactions? My use of language became a “hermeneutical key” which enabled a psychoanalytically inspired interpretation. This focuses on the care relationship as activating our earliest memories of our own care relations, independently of whether we are in the role of care providers or care receivers. Through collusion theory, the interpretation accepts both the anxiety which the helpless elderly people arouse in the care workers and their motivation for care work as two sides of a subjectively important theme. The article illustrates how working consciously with the researcher’s subjectivity makes it possible to understand apparently irrational patterns. The insights thus gained may be used to prevent withdrawals in care work as an argument for care workers’ need for emotional supervision.

Anne Liveng

2012-11-01

414

Experiencia de enseñanza multimodal en una clase de idiomas [Experience of multimodal teaching in a language classroom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Resumen: Nuestra sociedad es cada vez más tecnológica y multimodal por lo que es necesario que la enseñanza se adapte a los nuevos tiempos. Este artículo analiza el modo en que la asignatura Lengua Inglesa IV de la Licenciatura en Filología Inglesa en la Universidad de Alicante combina el desarrollo de las cinco destrezas (escucha, habla, lectura, escritura e interacción evaluadas por medio de un portafolio con la multimodalidad en las prácticas docentes y en cada una de las actividades que componen el portafolio. Los resultados de una encuesta preparada al final del curso académico 2011-2012 ponen de manifiesto las competencias principales que el alumnado universitario desarrolla gracias a la docencia multimodal y la importancia de las tutorías en este tipo de enseñanza. Abstract: Our society becomes more technological and multimodal and, consequently, teaching has to be adapted to the new time. This article analyses the way in which the subject English Language IV of the degree English Studies at the University of Alicante combines the development of the five skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing and interacting evaluated through a portfolio with multimodality in the teaching practices and in each of the activities that are part of the portfolio. The results of a survey prepared at the end of the academic year 2011-2012 point out the main competences that university students develop thanks to multimodal teaching and the importance of tutorials in this kind of teaching.

María Martínez Lirola

2013-12-01

415

CONCEIVING LANGUAGE AS A COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SYSTEM: A PROBLEM FOR SLA RESEARCHERS?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present article aims at discussing the impact of the adoption of a perspective which conceives language as a Complex Adaptive System on the Second Language Acquisition research work. In order to achieve this goal, the text first presents a definition of language as a Complex Adaptive, as opposed to the perspective which traditionally permeates research in the field. Next, the main contributions of such a perspective to Second Language Acquisition are addressed. Finally, the implications of adopting this perspective for research in the field are approached. It is argued that conceiving language as a Complex Adaptive System presupposes a paradigm shift on the view of what this object of study is. As a consequence, researchers need to take into account multiple factors in interaction. Although, at first, this necessity might be faced as a problem for conducting scientific research on the field, it is concluded that this necessity may actually be seen as a motivational factor.

Bruno Moraes Schwartzhaupt

2014-03-01

416

Research Timeline: Dictionary Use by English Language Learners  

Science.gov (United States)

The history of research into dictionary use tends to be characterised by small-scale studies undertaken in a variety of different contexts, rather than larger-scale, longer-term funded projects. The research conducted by dictionary publishers is not generally made public, because of its commercial sensitivity, yet because dictionary production is…

Nesi, Hilary

2014-01-01

417

Java Language for Numerical Control Simulation System Research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Java language is very good in a variety of development platforms to develop all kinds of application software for its simple and efficient, widely used. The programming language owning platform independent is adopted to solve the image flicker, sound loading and other issues by the threading technology, multimedia technology, graphics and point by point comparison techniques.Dynamic real-time simulation process simulation is implemented and a two-dimensional network of CNC machining simulation system is developed while Java Applet application is as a carrier. The simulation results show that the system has a friendly interface and fast calculation speed and platform portability has a certain practicality and application value.

Li Hongmei

2013-12-01

418

Scientific writing in teaching foreign languages to future researchers  

OpenAIRE

This article highlights the need to address the stylistics of scientific writing when teaching a foreign language to future scientists. The author presents a historical overview of the key stages of development of functional style theory and describes the modern perspective on scientific writing in the following aspects: field of use, topic and content, characteristics of the sender and recipient, purpose and forms of speech, and general properties, linguistic features, and types of texts.

Ildutova O.

2014-01-01

419

On Quantitative Comparative Research in Communication and Language Evolution.  

Science.gov (United States)

Quantitative comparison of human language and natural animal communication requires improved conceptualizations. We argue that an infrastructural approach to development and evolution incorporating an extended interpretation of the distinctions among illocution, perlocution, and meaning (Austin 1962; Oller and Griebel 2008) can help place the issues relevant to quantitative comparison in perspective. The approach can illuminate the controversy revolving around the notion of functional referentiality as applied to alarm calls, for example in the vervet monkey. We argue that referentiality offers a poor point of quantitative comparison across language and animal communication in the wild. Evidence shows that even newborn human cry could be deemed to show functional referentiality according to the criteria typically invoked by advocates of referentiality in animal communication. Exploring the essence of the idea of illocution, we illustrate an important realm of commonality among animal communication systems and human language, a commonality that opens the door to more productive, quantifiable comparisons. Finally, we delineate two examples of infrastructural communicative capabilities that should be particularly amenable to direct quantitative comparison across humans and our closest relatives. PMID:25285057

Oller, D Kimbrough; Griebel, Ulrike

2014-09-01

420

ANALISIS DE LA CONVERSACION: UNA PROPUESTA PARA EL ESTUDIO DE LA INTERACCION DIDACTICA EN SALA DE CLASE / Conversation analysis: A proposal for didactical interaction research in the classroom  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish El artículo ofrece una metodología de análisis de la conversación aplicado al estudio de la interacción didáctica en sala de clase. La propuesta metodológica articula los aportes de la etnografía de la comunicación, la lingüística interaccional y la pragmática de la comunicación en el estudio de la [...] relación profesor-alumnos. La metodología de análisis de la conversación aquí desarrollada es caracterizada por procesos secuenciales e interrelacionados de fases y secuencias temáticas, intercambios verbales, intervenciones y actos de habla, que configuran la estructura de significados que distinguen un contexto educativo determinado. Ofrece elementos para comprender las prácticas pedagógicas del docente y sus posibilidades de innovación. Abstract in english The article offers a conversation analysis methodology applied to the research of didactical interaction in the classroom. The methodological proposal articulates the contributions of the communication ethnography, the interactional linguistic and the pragmatic of communication, in the study of the [...] teacher-student's relationship. The conversation analysis methodology here developed, is characterized by sequential processes and interrelated stages and thematic sequences, verbal exchange, interventions and speech acts that form the meaning structure that distinguishes a specific educative context. It offers elements to understand the teaching practices and its possibilities of innovation.

Marco Antonio, Villalta Páuca.

421

'Passivity' or 'Potential'?: Teacher responses to learner identity in the low-level ESL classroom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper explores some initial findings from a multi-site, classroom-based case study research project into English as a Second Language (ESL literacy provision to very low-literate adult learners within Australia’s Language, Literacy and Numeracy Program (LLNP. The aim of the research is to report on the researcher’s observations of teachers’ pedagogical practices and to investigate the extent to which they are responsive to learners’ developing and multiple identities.

Sue Ollerhead

2012-05-01

422

The Importance of Read-Aloud and Dialogue in an Era of Narrowed Curriculum: An Examination of Literature Discussions in a Second-Grade Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This research focuses on read-aloud discussions in the classroom of an exemplary second-grade teacher, Mae Graham, during an academic year. We found the classroom environment Mae created, along with her instructional moves, fostered engagement and student-initiated talk. Our analysis affirms the importance of teachers' language in building…

Worthy, Jo; Chamberlain, Katharine; Peterson, Katie; Sharp, Caron; Shih, Pei-Yu

2012-01-01

423

Benefits of Visual Feedback on Segmental Production in the L2 Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

While a growing body of research has established the benefits of pronunciation training on second language (L2) production, these benefits have yet to be incorporated into the general skills language classroom in a systematic manner. Furthermore, although relatively new speech analysis software has been shown to be useful in providing visual…

Olson, Daniel J.

2014-01-01

424

Making Sense of the Eclectic: Conceptualising Teacher Practice in the Communicative Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper considers communicative language teaching in relation to what Coyle (2005) describes as the "legacy" of the communicative approach--the dissolution of clearly defined parameters that frame and structure how individuals understand, discuss, and research language teaching in the context of the "communicative classroom." As Johnson (1995)…

Cross, Russell

2005-01-01

425

Drawing as a Tool to Promote Emotional Health in the EFL Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Due to frequent exposure of Israeli pupils to political violence, it was meaningful to conduct research on ways to promote the expression of emotions in the English as a foreign language (EFL) classroom in conflict-ridden contexts. Drawing, as a tool for emotional health, may serve to reduce general anxiety, as well as foreign language learning…

Rajuan, Maureen; Gidoni, Yasmin

2014-01-01

426

Collaboration Between Astronomers at UT Austin and K-12 Teachers: Connecting the Experience of Observing and Research with the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

McDonald Observatory has a long history of providing teacher professional development (PD), and recently we have developed a new workshop model for more advanced participants. By choosing a select group of middle and high school teachers from those previously involved in our past PD programs, we have created a joint workshop / observing run program for them. After traveling to the observatory, the teachers participate in an actual observing run with a research astronomer. The teachers are trained first-hand how to take observations, operate the telescope, set up the instrument, and monitor observing conditions. The teachers are fully put in the role of observer. They are also given background information before and during the workshop related to the science and data they are helping to collect. The teachers work in teams to both perform the nightly observations with an astronomer, but to also perform new interactive classroom activities with education staff, and use other telescopes on the mountain. This is a unique experience for teachers since it allows them to take the resources and experiences directly back to their classrooms and students. They can directly relate to their students what skills for specific careers in STEM fields are needed. Evaluation from these workshops shows that there is: increased content knowledge among participants, greater impact that will be passed on to their students, and an authentic research experience that can't be replicated in other PD settings. In addition, not only is this program beneficial to the teachers, but this group is benefit to the education program of McDonald Observatory. Building on an existing PD program (with a 16 year history) we have the opportunity to test out new products and new education endeavors with this devoted group of well-trained teachers before bringing them to wider teacher and student audiences. This program is currently supported by the NSF grant AST-1211585 (PI Sneden).

Finkelstein, Keely D.; Sneden, Christopher; Hemenway, Mary Kay; Preston, Sandra; EXES Teachers Associate Program

2015-01-01

427

Classroom Management in Diverse Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

Classroom management continues to be a serious concern for teachers and especially in urban and diverse learning environments. The authors present the culturally responsive classroom management practices of two teachers from an urban and diverse middle school to extend the construct, culturally responsive classroom management. The principles that…

Milner, H. Richard, IV; Tenore, F. Blake

2010-01-01

428

¿Duermes mucho Tony?: Interpersonal and Transactional Uses of L1 in the Foreign-Language Classroom / ¿Duermes mucho Tony?: Usos interpersonales y transaccionales de la lengua materna en el aula de clase de lengua extranjera  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: English Abstract in spanish Mientras que los métodos comunicativos de enseñanza autorizan, muchas veces con poco entusiasmo, el uso de la lengua materna (L1) de los estudiantes del idioma inglés (EI ), un gran debate propone un papel más sustancial y activo para el uso del español en el salón de clases. Actualmente, los argume [...] ntos que se muestran a favor del uso de la lengua materna (L1) parten desde motivos ideológicos hasta factores pedagógicos en la enseñanza en el salón de aprendizaje de idiomas. El presente artículo contribuye a este debate en curso examinando la forma en que las nuevas generaciones de profesores de inglés en México están utilizando la lengua materna de sus estudiantes, el español, no sólo como una herramienta pedagógica sino para desarrollar y reforzar las relaciones interpersonales en el salón de idiomas, de forma que el aprendizaje del inglés se vea favorecido. Abstract in english Whilst communicative teaching approaches sanction, often grudgingly, the limited use of the students' first language (L1) in English Language Teaching (ELT), critical debate is now centred on a much more substantial and energetic role for the use of mother tongue in the language classroom. Justifica [...] tions favouring the use of L1 currently range from ideological arguments to classroom teaching considerations. This paper contributes to this ongoing debate by examining how new generations of language teachers in Mexico are using the students' mother tongue, Spanish, not only as a pedagogical tool but to develop and reinforce interpersonal relationships in the language classroom in order to enhance the learning of English.

Sandra, Higareda; Georgina, López; Gerrard, Mugford.

2009-10-01

429

Reflective Classroom Practice for Effective Classroom Instruction  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Improving English language skills of learners is a strenuous task because of the variations in culture, background and learning styles. This strenuous task is further aggravated when English teachers realizes the proficiency level of students is far too low that his/her expectation. In most of the ESL and EFL context, English teachers rely on mid-term test to evaluate the proficiency level of the students. Blame game follows when there are too many failures in the classroom. Teachers blame the students for giving least importance to English language which resulted in low scores while the students blame the teacher for making the exam tough. The college/university management considers failure of students as a failure of the teachers in the classroom teaching.The information presented in this paper is an alarming wakeup call and a reminder for the teachers to be constant self-evaluators of their classroom teaching rather than waiting for the results of a test to understand the students’ progress in classroom. This paper gives insights to the struggling teachers to succeed through reflective teaching practices.

Nalliveettil George Mathew

2012-04-01

430

There is another choice: an exploration of integrating formative assessment in a Chinese high school chemistry classroom through collaborative action research  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explored integrating formative assessment to a Chinese high school chemistry classroom, where the extremely high-stakes testing and Confucian-heritage culture constituted a particular context, through a collaborative action research. One researcher worked with a high school chemistry teacher in China to integrate formative assessment into his teaching with 54 students in one of his classes. Data resources included transcripts from planning sessions, lesson plans, teacher interviews, classroom observations, student work, student interviews and surveys. The findings of this study revealed that as the teacher allowed his original views about students' learning and assessment tasks to be challenged by the students' learning, his teaching practice and understandings of formative assessment were transformed. Students' learning experience was also examined in the formative assessment process. The potentials and challenges of integrating formative assessment in the Chinese high school science classroom are discussed. This study indicated that formative assessment is promising to implement in Chinese high school science classrooms to enhance students' learning and meet the imperative needs for high-stakes exam preparation as well; and writing formative assessment tasks are favorable in this particular socio-cultural context. Further, this study suggested that facilitating in-service science teachers to integrate formative assessment through collaborative action research is a powerful professional development on improving teaching and learning under the highly constraint context.

Yin, Xinying; Buck, Gayle A.

2015-01-01

431

Teachers' Reactions to Foreign Language Learner Output  

OpenAIRE

[eng] "Teachers' Reactions to Foreign Language Learner Output" BY: Leticia Vicente-Rasoamalala TEXT: A series of theoretical and practical educational studies have suggested that learners need teacher assistance to progress in their learning. Therefore, a considerable amount of language classroom research has been concerned with the study of teacher activities, especially those focusing on their instructional methods. In an attempt to contribute to this research area, the general objective of...

Vicente-rasoamalala, Leticia

2009-01-01

432

Research on Language Teaching and Learning in Austria (2004-2009)  

Science.gov (United States)

This overview of six years of research on language learning and teaching in Austria covers a period of dynamic development in the field. While all the studies reviewed here illustrate research driven by a combination of local and global concerns and theoretical frameworks, some specific clusters of research interest emerge. The first of these…

Dalton-Puffer, Christiane; Faistauer, Renate; Vetter, Eva

2011-01-01

433

English-Language Teachers' Engagement with Research: Findings from Bangladesh  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article, we report on a small-scale study in which we investigated English-language teachers' engagement with educational research. We conceptualized engagement with research as reading and systematically using research for professional development. Using questionnaires and in-depth interviews, we gathered empirical materials from 40…

Anwaruddin, Sardar M.; Pervin, Nasrin

2015-01-01

434

Research to Practice (and Back Again) in Speech-Language Intervention.  

Science.gov (United States)

Notes inherent differences between clinical practice and experimental research in speech-language intervention. It suggests that nonexperimental research can be a link between experimental investigation and clinical application. Both researchers and practicing professionals are urged to work in a complementary manner to develop effective…

Fey, Marc E.; Johnson, Bonnie W.

1998-01-01

435

Research Notes ~ Second Language Acquisition Theories as a Framework for Creating Distance Learning Courses  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Moore and Kearsley (1996 maintain distance educators should provide for three types of interaction: a learner-content; b learner-instructor; and c learner-learner. According to interactionist second language acquisition (SLA theories that reflect Krashen’s theory (1994 that comprehensible input is critical for second language acquisition, interaction can enhance second language acquisition and fluency. Effective output is necessary as well. We reviewed the research on distance learning for second language learners and concluded that SLA theories can, and should, be the framework that drives the development of courses for students seeking to learn languages by distance technology. This article delineates issues to consider in support of combining SLA theories and research literature as a guide in creating distance language learning courses.

Eileen N. Ariza

2003-10-01

436

Research and Report Writing in the Elementary Grades (In the Classroom).  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes how to initiate research projects by having students work with a grid, or QUAD (questions, answers, details). Notes that this approach helps students learn that research stems from asking clear questions about the world around them. (MG)

Cudd, Evelyn T.

1989-01-01

437

Imperfect Language  

OpenAIRE

This study poses the low scientific usage of oral and written language in classrooms of higher education through evidence shown by students in their work and direct answers to questions. It reflects upon a possible turn toward a language that does not contribute to analysis and reflexive observation and that, therefore, deviates from the model that has been used to date.

Pe?rez-gonza?lez, A-beatriz

2013-01-01

438

Art Practice as Research in the Classroom: A New Paradigm in Art Education  

Science.gov (United States)

The artmaking process is increasingly accepted in experimental forms of qualitative ethnographic, narrative, and phenomenological research in the social sciences, psychology, and education. Some artists and art educators are taking idea of using art practice in research a step further and claiming that art practice is research. That is to say,…

Marshall, Julia; D'Adamo, Kimberley

2011-01-01

439

The Evaluation of Physical Variables Which Effects Classroom Management  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Classroom managament has great importance on increasing productivity of education activities.So that,it is necessary to be careful while arranging classroom environment.The teacher has an important role on arranging classroom environment.The teachers should arrange the classroom by taking care classroom physical variables and effects of classroom management.It increases productivity of education.This research explains the importance of classroom management and classroom’s physical variables on positive learning environment and reaching the students’learning aims.

Ay?e KARAÇALI

2006-06-01

440

Research Notes ~ Second Language Acquisition Theories as a Framework for Creating Distance Learning Courses  

OpenAIRE

Moore and Kearsley (1996) maintain distance educators should provide for three types of interaction: a) learner-content; b) learner-instructor; and c) learner-learner. According to interactionist second language acquisition (SLA) theories that reflect Krashen’s theory (1994) that comprehensible input is critical for second language acquisition, interaction can enhance second language acquisition and fluency. Effective output is necessary as well. We reviewed the research on distance learnin...

Ariza, Eileen N.; Sandra Hancock

2003-01-01

441

A comparison of vowel normalization procedures for language variation research  

Science.gov (United States)

An evaluation of vowel normalization procedures for the purpose of studying language variation is presented. The procedures were compared on how effectively they (a) preserve phonemic information, (b) preserve information about the talker's regional background (or sociolinguistic information), and (c) minimize anatomical/physiological variation in acoustic representations of vowels. Recordings were made for 80 female talkers and 80 male talkers of Dutch. These talkers were stratified according to their gender and regional background. The normalization procedures were applied to measurements of the fundamental frequency and the first three formant frequencies for a large set of vowel tokens. The normalization procedures were evaluated through statistical pattern analysis. The results show that normalization procedures that use information across multiple vowels (``vowel-extrinsic'' information) to normalize a single vowel token performed better than those that include only information contained in the vowel token itself (``vowel-intrinsic'' information). Furthermore, the results show that normalization procedures that operate on individual formants performed better than those that use information across multiple formants (e.g., ``formant-extrinsic'' F2-F1). .

Adank, Patti; Smits, Roel; van Hout, Roeland

2004-11-01

442

Weaving Moral Elements and Research-Based Reading Practices in Inclusive Classrooms Using Shared Book Reading Techniques  

Science.gov (United States)

Promoting moral, language and literacy development is particularly important for children in inclusive early childhood programs serving disadvantaged children. In the first section of this article, the author: (1) summarizes research about the gap between typically developing children in professional families and most disadvantaged children and…

Al Otaiba, Stephanie

2004-01-01

443

The ABCs of Successful Classroom Design  

Science.gov (United States)

... please enable JavaScript. The ABCs of Successful Classroom Design Lighting, temperature can influence student achievement, researchers say (* ... Health WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Classroom design can have a major impact on student achievement, ...

444

¿Duermes mucho Tony?: Interpersonal and Transactional Uses of L1 in the Foreign-Language Classroom ¿Duermes mucho Tony?: Usos interpersonales y transaccionales de la lengua materna en el aula de clase de lengua extranjera  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Whilst communicative teaching approaches sanction, often grudgingly, the limited use of the students' first language (L1 in English Language Teaching (ELT, critical debate is now centred on a much more substantial and energetic role for the use of mother tongue in the language classroom. Justifications favouring the use of L1 currently range from ideological arguments to classroom teaching considerations. This paper contributes to this ongoing debate by examining how new generations of language teachers in Mexico are using the students' mother tongue, Spanish, not only as a pedagogical tool but to develop and reinforce interpersonal relationships in the language classroom in order to enhance the learning of English.Mientras que los métodos comunicativos de enseñanza autorizan, muchas veces con poco entusiasmo, el uso de la lengua materna (L1 de los estudiantes del idioma inglés (EI , un gran debate propone un papel más sustancial y activo para el uso del español en el salón de clases. Actualmente, los argumentos que se muestran a favor del uso de la lengua materna (L1 parten desde motivos ideológicos hasta factores pedagógicos en la enseñanza en el salón de aprendizaje de idiomas. El presente artículo contribuye a este debate en curso examinando la forma en que las nuevas generaciones de profesores de inglés en México están utilizando la lengua materna de sus estudiantes, el español, no sólo como una herramienta pedagógica sino para desarrollar y reforzar las relaciones interpersonales en el salón de idiomas, de forma que el aprendizaje del inglés se vea favorecido.

Sandra Higareda

2009-10-01

445

Music and language : the case for music in linguistic curricula and research  

OpenAIRE

This dissertation offers an interdisciplinary argument in favour of integrating empirically grounded musicological evidence into linguistic curricula. Phonological, syntactic, and neurological convergences between music and language are identified and supported by existing research. However, differences in semantic content and the deliberateness ascribed to a musical or linguistic event inhibit the extent to which a music-language comparison can advance without qualification. I...

Houston, David Andrew Samuel

2006-01-01

446

Research in the School of Languages and Linguistics at Griffith University  

Science.gov (United States)

Griffith University is set across five campuses in south-east Queensland, Australia, and has a student population of 43,000. The School of Languages and Linguistics (LAL) offers programs in linguistics, international English, Chinese, Italian, Japanese and Spanish, as well as English language enhancement courses. Research strands reflect the…

Fenton-Smith, Ben; Walkinshaw, Ian

2014-01-01

447

Review of Doctoral Research in Second Language Acquisition in Germany (2006-2009)  

Science.gov (United States)

Our overview of current dissertation work at German universities has identified four main strands of research interest within the field of second language acquisition (SLA). The 38 Ph.D. theses reviewed here were all read between 2006 and 2009 and fall into the subject areas of: foreign language (FL) teaching in primary school, Content and…

Behrent, Sigrid; Doff, Sabine; Marx, Nicole; Ziegler, Gudrun

2011-01-01

448

Language Abilities in Children Who Stutter: Toward Improved Research and Clinical Applications  

Science.gov (United States)

The nature of the association between language and stuttering in young children has been the focus of debate for many years. One aspect of this ongoing discussion is the status of language abilities in children who stutter (CWS). Available research findings and associated interpretations of these findings are equivocal. This article asserts that…

Watkins, Ruth V.; Johnson, Bonnie W.

2004-01-01

449

Classrooms as Complex Adaptive Systems: A Relational Model  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article, we describe and model the language classroom as a complex adaptive system (see Logan & Schumann, 2005). We argue that linear, categorical descriptions of classroom processes and interactions do not sufficiently explain the complex nature of classrooms, and cannot account for how classroom change occurs (or does not occur), over…

Burns, Anne; Knox, John S.

2011-01-01

450

Classroom Management  

OpenAIRE

This paper is aiming to discover the paths that enable teachers to manage their work with students in the classroom. To be an efficient teacher means to know with what and how to motivate students to learn. Teacher as an efficient classroom manager needs to have skills to plan and prepare the education process, know how to organize the teaching and how to guide the class. An efficient teacher moreover needs o establish positive classroom climate and working discipline. Also, teacher should...

Dizdarevik, Jasmina Delceva –.

2008-01-01

451

Attitudes, Orientations, and Motivations in Language Learning: Advances in Theory, Research, and Applications.  

Science.gov (United States)

Provides an overview of recent advances in research on motivation to learn a foreign or second language (L2) and to create the theoretical context of the articles contained in this special issue of the journal. (Author/VWL)

Dornyei, Zoltan

2003-01-01

452

Reflective Classroom Practice for Effective Classroom Instruction  

OpenAIRE

Improving English language skills of learners is a strenuous task because of the variations in culture, background and learning styles. This strenuous task is further aggravated when English teachers realizes the proficiency level of students is far too low that his/her expectation. In most of the ESL and EFL context, English teachers rely on mid-term test to evaluate the proficiency level of the students. Blame game follows when there are too many failures in the classroom. Teachers blame th...

Nalliveettil George Mathew

2012-01-01

453

Language Learning Podcasts and Learners' Belief Change  

Science.gov (United States)

The ubiquitous use of Internet-based mobile devices in educational contexts means that mobile learning has become a plausible alternative to or a good complement for conventional classroom-based teaching. However, there is a lack of research that explores and defines the characteristics and effects of mobile language learning (LL) through language

Basaran, Süleyman; Cabaroglu, Nese

2014-01-01

454

Research on language and prejudices in the environment field  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The research in question has explored 39 central notions of the environmental discussion as to its semantic and meaning for persons and institutions - from waste incineration to the dying of woods. The interviewed were asked to give a semantic profile, a common description, the positive, the negative aspects as well as synonyms/alternatives for every notion. 200 members of institutions (out of the sections of economy, public institutions, environmental initiatives) and consumers were questioned. The results show, that single notions that are of high significance to an institutional section of the consumers may mean little to other institutional sections and vice versa. If a notion is regarded as unimportant, communication with this notion and about the corresponding facts will hardly be possible. Depending on the point of interest notions are used in totally different meanings. The differences in meaning are revealed. (orig.) With 7 tabs., 38 diagrams

455

Transposing from the Laboratory to the Classroom to Generate Authentic Research Experiences for Undergraduates  

OpenAIRE

Large lecture classes and standardized laboratory exercises are characteristic of introductory biology courses. Previous research has found that these courses do not adequately convey the process of scientific research and the excitement of discovery. Here we propose a model that provides beginning biology students with an inquiry-based, active learning laboratory experience. The Dynamic Genome course replicates a modern research laboratory focused on eukaryotic transposable elements where be...

Burnette, James M.; Wessler, Susan R.

2013-01-01

456

Language Contact.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examines the phenomenon of language contact and recent trends in linguistic contact research, which focuses on language use, language users, and language spheres. Also discusses the role of linguistic and cultural conflicts in language contact situations. (13 references) (MDM)

Nelde, Peter Hans

1995-01-01

457

Immediate Dissemination of Student Discoveries to a Model Organism Database Enhances Classroom-Based Research Experiences  

OpenAIRE

A model for integrating course-based research with community genome annotation efforts at model organism databases is presented. Disseminating gene function discoveries directly to an interested audience increased student motivation to more deeply engage all aspects of an authentic research experience.

Wiley, Emily A.; Stover, Nicholas A.

2014-01-01

458

Classroom Analysis: Concepts, Findings, and Applications. DPA Helsinki Investigations III. Research Bulletin No. 56.  

Science.gov (United States)

Three papers exploring facets of the teaching process are presented in this report. The papers are part of the Didactic Process Analysis (DPA) Helsinki research project. The DPA research team, composed of educators investigating instructional processes, has, since 1967, examined taxonomies and classifications of teaching processes. The first…

Komulainen, Erkki, Ed.; Kansanen, Pertti, Ed.

459

The Brain in Singing and Language  

Science.gov (United States)

This article summarizes currently available brain research concerning relationships between singing and language development. Although this is a new field of investigation, there are findings that are applicable to general music teaching classroom. These findings are presented along with suggestions about how to apply them to teaching music.

Trollinger, Valerie L.

2010-01-01

460

Como ser feliz em meio ao portunhol que se produz na sala de aula de espanhol: por uma pedagogia translíngue / How to be happy amid the portuñol produced in the spanish language classroom: towards a translanguaging pedagogy  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Este artigo se contrapõe à perspectiva que associa o portunhol à noção de interlíngua, que conduz ao erro e à insuficiência do aprendiz que não progride em direção ao domínio proficiente da língua espanhola. Por meio de conceitos oriundos da Sociolinguística e dos estudos do discurso, busca-se const [...] ruir uma concepção do portunhol que se produz na sala de aula de espanhol como translíngua, como produto de uma epistemologia de fronteira. Dessa forma, propõe-se para o ensino de espanhol uma pedagogia translíngue, que se pauta no movimento entre as fronteiras linguísticas do português e do espanhol, no movimento que o aprendiz faz, como falante de língua portuguesa, em direção à criação de sentidos na sala de aula de espanhol. Abstract in english This article challenges the perspective which links portuñol to the concept of interlanguage, leading language learners both to errors and to failure, as well as causing them not to progressing toward a proficiency in Spanish. From the standpoint of Sociolinguistics and discourse studies, the aim is [...] to launch a conception of the portuñol produced in the Spanish language classroom as translanguaging, a product of a border epistemology. Thus, it is proposed a translanguaging pedagogy for Spanish teaching grounded on the movement between the linguistic borders of Portuguese and Spanish, as well as on the movement that the learner produces as a Portuguese speaker in order to create meanings in the Spanish language classroom.

Fernando, Zolin-Vesz.

2014-12-01

461

Teaching English-Language Learners: What Does the Research Say? ATF Educational Issues Research Brief Number 14  

Science.gov (United States)

This policy brief describes the ongoing debates over the most appropriate methods for educating students, the need for stronger research into the educational attainment of English language learners (ELLs) and recommendations for developing quality programs for ELLs. The National Research Council (NRC) recommends that schools seek to implement…

American Federation of Teachers, 2002

2002-01-01

462

Connecting Brain Research to Classroom Learning: A Mixed-Method Study on How Teachers Apply Brain Research to Their Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose. The purpose of this study was to examine how knowledgeable teachers are in utilizing brain-researched instructional strategies. The research focused on determining which brain-researched strategies are implemented, the accuracy with which they are employed, and the degree to which they are utilized. A literature review revealed the most…

McAteer, Todd C.

2010-01-01

463

Grounding the Translation: Intertwining analysis and translation in cross-language grounded theory research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Grounded theory research in cross-language, cross-cultural context is associated with the challenges of linguistic sensitivity of conceptualization. The author, a bilingual researcher, offers reflection on her experience of doing grounded theory research, assuming a dual role of a theorist and a translator. The reflection is based on self-observations. Grounding the translation is shown to be acheived through the strategy of intertwining the activities of translation and conceptual analysis, performed by one person. The two activities are inseparable in time and take place along with constant comparison across language boundaries. Intertwining requires that theoretical sensitivity of the researcher be enriched with the sensitivity to linguistic and cultural meanings. Intertwining, through revealing differences between linguistic meanings or language structures, facilitates the emergence of concepts and theoretical categories from the very act of translation. Combining the functions of translation and analysis and using the strategy of intertwining worked effectively for this researcher.

Svetlana Shklarov, MD, RSW, PhD Candidate

2009-03-01

464

Transposing from the laboratory to the classroom to generate authentic research experiences for undergraduates.  

Science.gov (United States)

Large lecture classes and standardized laboratory exercises are characteristic of introductory biology courses. Previous research has found that these courses do not adequately convey the process of scientific research and the excitement of discovery. Here we propose a model that provides beginning biology students with an inquiry-based, active learning laboratory experience. The Dynamic Genome course replicates a modern research laboratory focused on eukaryotic transposable elements where beginning undergraduates learn key genetics concepts, experimental design, and molecular biological skills. Here we report on two key features of the course, a didactic module and the capstone original research project. The module is a modified version of a published experiment where students experience how virtual transposable elements from rice (Oryza sativa) are assayed for function in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana. As part of the module, students analyze the phenotypes and genotypes of transgenic plants to determine the requirements for transposition. After mastering the skills and concepts, students participate in an authentic research project where they use computational analysis and PCR to detect transposable element insertion site polymorphism in a panel of diverse maize strains. As a consequence of their engagement in this course, students report large gains in their ability to understand the nature of research and demonstrate that they can apply that knowledge to independent research projects. PMID:23172853

Burnette, James M; Wessler, Susan R

2013-02-01

465

Up to date Assessment of the results of the research on the Dahalik language (December 1996 - December 2005).  

OpenAIRE

A brief history of the French research on some languages spoken in Eritrea and the discovery that the islanders of the Dahlak Archipelago have their own language, never listed. Main linguistic features, allowing classification. Linguistic situation and languages in contact. Oral literature in Dahalik. Research perspectives and collaboration with Eritrean researchers.

Simeone-senelle, Marie-claude

2005-01-01

466

An Analysis of College English Classroom Discourse  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available English classroom teaching and learning is an important aspect of English teaching and learning. The analysis of classroom discourse is a very important form which classroom process research has taken. The present study focuses on college English classroom discourse. Through a detailed description and analysis of the collected data by referring to Sinclair and Coulthard’s classroom discourse analysis model, the problem of patterns of the classroom discourse is made clear and on the basis of which a few strategies for college English teachers are put forward by the author in order to improve college English teaching and learning.

Weihua Yu

2009-06-01

467

En Francasis: A Supplement of Classroom Activities.  

Science.gov (United States)

This classroom activity supplement is designed to accompany the "En Francais" language instruction series (programs 1-13) used on closed circuit television in South Carolina. It is intended to enrich classroom follow-up of the film program and to prvide a variety of activities and suggestions for teaching French language skills. Lessons introduce…

Enwall, Beverly; Joiner, Elizabeth

468

Investigating Vocabulary and Reading Strategies with Middle Grades English Language Learners: A Research Synthesis  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent data indicate that many adolescent English language learners (ELLs) comprehend English texts at only a limited literal level. The purpose of this research synthesis was to systematically identify and describe the research related to the English reading comprehension of middle grades ELLs while also making practical connections to…

Cisco, Brooke Kandel; Padron, Yolanda

2012-01-01

469

Fieldwork for Language Education Research in Rural Bangladesh: Ethical Issues and Dilemmas  

Science.gov (United States)

This contribution documents the author's lived experiences in his fieldwork for his PhD research in the field of English as a second/foreign language in a familiar social setting in Bangladesh. The account suggests that insider researchers can helpfully draw on their tacit knowledge of local social and cultural norms and values to understand their…

Hamid, M. Obaidul

2010-01-01

470

Handbook of Research on Teaching the English Language Arts. Second Edition.  

Science.gov (United States)

This updated second edition reflects developments in educational research and new information within the areas of language learning and instruction since the publication of the first edition in 1991. Its 75 essays assess the significance of research, evaluates new developments, and examines current conflicts, controversies, and issues, while…

Flood, James, Ed.; Lapp, Diane, Ed.; Squire, James R., Ed.; Jensen, Julie M., Ed.

471

Using Large-Scale Classroom Research to Study Student Conceptual Learning in Mechanics and to Develop New Approaches to Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

Microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) tools and guided discovery curricula have been developed as an aid to all students, including the underprepared and underserved, in learning physical concepts. To guide this development, extensive work has been done to find useful measures of students' conceptual understanding that can be used in widely varying contexts. This paper focuses primarily on the evaluation of student conceptual understanding of mechanics (kinematics and dynamics) with an emphasis on Newton's 1st and 2nd laws in introductory courses in the university. Student understanding of mechanics is looked at before and after traditional instruction. It is examined before and after MBL curricula that are consciously designed to promote active and collaborative learning by students. The results show that the majority of students have difficulty learning essential physical concepts in the best of our traditional courses where students read textbooks, solve textbook problems, listen to well-prepared lectures, and do traditional laboratory activities. Students can, however, learn these fundamental concepts using MBL curricula and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations which have been based on extensive classroom research. Substantial evidence is given that student answers to the short answer questions in the Tools for Scientific Thinking Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation provide a useful statistical means of evaluating students' beliefs and understandings about mechanics. Evidence for the hierarchical learning of velocity, acceleration, and force concepts is presented.

Thornton, Ronald K.

2006-12-07

472

Meaning: lost, found or 'made' in translation? : A hermeneutical approach to cross-language interview research  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Qualitative research that includes interviews in languages foreign to the researcher(s) has become increasingly common. However, there is surprisingly little reflection on the methodological implications of such research practices. Furthermore, strategies on how to analyse cross- and multi-language interview material are lacking. The aim of this article is to present possible ways of handling these challenges, focusing mainly on analysis. I propose a hermeneutical approach to the issue. First, I will discuss the epistemological/methodological foundations of the approach before proposing some 'tools' to help practically tackle the 'problem' of analysis using the chosen methodological perspective. Rather than ignoring or trying to circumvent the question of foreign language and/or translation, in the proposed approach linguistic questions and questions of translation are the central focus.

Fersch, Barbara

2013-01-01

473

Meaning: lost, found or 'made' in translation? : A hermeneutical approach to cross-language interview research.  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Qualitative research that includes interviews in languages foreign to the researcher(s) has become increasingly common. However, there is surprisingly little reflection on the methodological implications of such research practices. Furthermore, strategies on how to analyse cross- and multi-language interview material are lacking. The aim of this article is to present possible ways of handling these challenges, focusing mainly on analysis. I propose a hermeneutical approach to the issue. First, I will discuss the epistemological/methodological foundations of the approach before proposing some 'tools' to help practically tackle the 'problem' of analysis using the chosen methodological perspective. Rather than ignoring or trying to circumvent the question of foreign language and/or translation, in the proposed approach linguistic questions and questions of translation are the central focus.

Fersch, Barbara

2013-01-01

474

Interdisciplinary Literacy through Social Media in the Mathematics Classroom: An Action Research Study  

Science.gov (United States)

This article looks at how social and participatory media can be used to strengthen interdisciplinary literacy and connects the multimodality of social environments with Middle-Years Mathematics curriculum and delivery. The article reports on part of an eighteen months action research study in an Australian public high school within the…

Casey, Gail

2013-01-01

475

Film in the Undergraduate Anthropology Classroom: Applying Audience Response Research in Pedagogical Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

While we often assume media are highly effective tools for learning, research shows an unpredictable relationship between text and audience response, with variable interpretation being the norm. This can be especially problematic in anthropology, whose central goal is to understand different cultures; some studies suggest that films may reinforce…

Bird, S. Elizabeth; Godwin, Jonathan P.

2006-01-01

476

Back to Learning: How Research-Based Classroom Instruction Can Make the Impossible Possible  

Science.gov (United States)

Based on the most up-to-date research, "Back to Learning" presents straightforward analysis and practical guidance on confronting bullying, taming the digital universe, and changing the troublesome trend in students' entitled attitudes toward learning and grades. "Back to Learning" gives teachers the background they need to: (1) understand how the…

Parsons, Les

2012-01-01

477

Reading Instruction for Diverse Classrooms: Research-Based, Culturally Responsive Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

This practical, teacher-friendly book provides indispensable guidance for implementing research-based reading instruction that is responsive to students' diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Structured around the "big five" core topics of an effective reading program--phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension--the…

McIntyre, Ellen; Hulan, Nancy; Layne, Vicky

2010-01-01

478

Looking into Classrooms: Papers on Didactics. Issues in Curriculum Theory, Policy, and Research.  

Science.gov (United States)

This book explores a set of fundamental problems in curriculum theory. It is a work from within the traditions of Bildungstheorie, human-science education theory, and Didaktik. Chapters include: (1) "Research in Education and Didactics in Germany"; (2) "Bildung: A Core Concept of German Didaktik"; (3) "General Didactics: A Theoretical Framework";…

Menck, Peter

479

Advancing Research in Second Language Writing through Computational Tools and Machine Learning Techniques: A Research Agenda  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper provides an agenda for replication studies focusing on second language (L2) writing and the use of natural language processing (NLP) tools and machine learning algorithms. Specifically, it introduces a range of the available NLP tools and machine learning algorithms and demonstrates how these could be used to replicate seminal studies…

Crossley, Scott A.

2013-01-01

480

The Language of People with Mild Intellectual Disability – the research written tasks  

OpenAIRE

The research showed that intellectualy disabled children are ablo to use a wide variety of parts of speech. During the research, the analysts observed huge discrepancies in the ability to use language including its rules and system. The discrepancies are a result of individual abilities and social impact. During the research five children refused to do the task ( despite receiving motivational support). This may be a consequence of their limited psychophysical capabilities or the reluctunce ...

B?eszyn?ski, Jacek Jaros?aw

2013-01-01

481

The Dance of Elementary School Classroom Management  

Science.gov (United States)

At times, classroom management and guidance elude even the most seasoned teachers. Yet, students need guidance and practice in self-regulatory skills to assist in the learning that occurs in classrooms. Teachers need both practical and research-based classroom management strategies that benefit the environment and help create a space conducive to…

Powell, Pamela

2014-01-01

482

Classroom Management, Bullying, and Teacher Practices  

Science.gov (United States)

While bullying in schools has begun to receive attention, little is known about the relationship between classroom management and bullying in the classroom. The process for exploring this relationship will be a review of research and literature related to bullying in the school environment, classroom management, teacher practices, and student…

Allen, Kathleen P.

2010-01-01

483

Want to Inspire Science Students to Consider a Research Career? Host a Scientist in Your Classroom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Most biology students have limited exposure to research since this is not a public activity and the pace of science does not lend itself to television dramatization. In contrast, medicine is the subject of numerous TV shows, and students’ experience visiting doctors may lead them to think they want to become physicians. One effective way to encourage these students to consider a research career is to invite engaging scientists to speak about their career paths and lives during class. Students are most likely to be influenced by people they consider to be like themselves. While this method is well-suited to a lecture format where the scientist can address a larger audience, the laboratory would also be appropriate.

Patricia J. Baynham

2010-04-01

484

Promoting 21st Century Skills in the Classroom through the Use of Authentic Student Research  

Science.gov (United States)

Preparing students for the workforce starts well before they start college. The Mars Student Imaging Project has incorporated 21st Century Skills into their project to help the students practice and sharpen these skills. Professional development for the educational facilitators helps the teachers become familiar with these skills. By augmenting the authentic research project with these 21st Century Skills, the students are able to achieve a higher level experience that mirrors the real-world workforce.

Klug, S. L.; Swann, J. L.; Manfredi, L.; Christensen, P. R.

2012-12-01

485

RESEARCHING ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES: H istory and H eritage in the classroom.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study dialogs with the patrimonial education theme, questioning about methodological potentialities of the scholarship History to contemplate proposals that aim to educate the students towards the recognition and respect of the cultural patrimony and, as consequence, to a solid historical formation. The premise taken as initial point is the one that says that the History, as scholastic discipline responsible for the production of the knowledge about how societies had responded to their time challenges, is made through determinate cognitive operations and information researching/organization practices, at last, as active and reflexive intellectual activity. From this premise, was developed a didactical sequence in two public school sixth grade classes which central purpose was the simulation of an archeological site excavation, followed by a conjunct of operational procedures inherent to the archeology practices, reproducing laboratorial activities as separation, cleaning, labeling, hypothesis survey and information systemization. The interventional research has demonstrated the students involvement with the historical knowledge production, as they became the protagonists of the class; the solid absorption of the specific concepts of the theme object study; the comprehension at the historic knowledge results from research practices and procedures, approaching themselves to the historical method; and, at last, the understanding that the vestiges of the human interactions in the past have a value in the contemporary world, what qualify them to recognize these vestiges/evidences potentialities in the historical and cultural patrimony construction.

Francielle Moreira Cassol

2012-06-01

486

Everyday classroom assessment practices in science classrooms in Sweden  

Science.gov (United States)

The focus of this study is to examine to what extent and in what ways science teachers practice assessment during classroom interactions in everyday activities in an upper-secondary school in Sweden. We are science teachers working now with a larger research project on assessment in science education that seeks to examine teachers' assessment practices in the upper-secondary school. Framing questions include: are teachers performing an integrated assessment of students' skills as the national curriculum mandates? If so, what do the instructional discourses look like in those situations and what are students' experiences regarding their agency on learning and assessment? We emphasize the social, cultural and historic character of assessment and sustain a situated character of learning instead of the notion that learning is "stored inside the head". Teacher led lessons in three science classrooms were video-recorded and analyzed by combining ethnographic and discourse methods of analysis. Both methods are appropriate to the theoretical foundation of our approach on learning and can give some answers to questions about how individuals interact socially, how their experience is passed on to next generations through language and how language use may reveal cultural changes in the studied context. Making the study of action in a classroom the focal point of sociocultural analysis supports the examination of assessment processes and identification of the social roles in which teachers and students are immersed. Such an approach requires observations of how teachers act in authentic teaching situations when they interact with their students in classroom making possible to observe negotiation processes, agencies when both teachers and students are involved in every-day activities. Our study showed that teachers mostly ignored students' questions and that students solved their own problems by helping each other. Teachers did not provide opportunities for students to discuss or argue scientific issues as the national science curriculum stipulates. We found that traditional assessment methods, such as tests, examinations and assignments were the most common methods used to assess and grade students' learning. Different aspects of knowledge stipulated in the national Swedish curriculum, such as lifelong learning, stimulation to students' creativity, curiosity as well as their wish to explore and convert new ideas into action, and find solutions to problems, were restricted by teachers' discourses. The observed teachers' learning and assessment practices constrain students' agency leading to students' silence consequently hindering students' development.

Gómez, María del Carmen; Jakobsson, Anders

2014-12-01