WorldWideScience

Sample records for language classroom research

  1. Second Language Writing: Research Insights for the Classroom. Second Language Writing: Research Insights for the Classroom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Youmans

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of composition at the post-secondary level is a relatively new practice which has become widespread only during the past half-century. More recent is the emergence over the past two to three decades of composition studies as an academic discipline, and even more recent is the awareness that composition research and pedagogy must expand to meet the needs of the ESL population. As growing numbers of international students flood colleges and universities in the English-speaking world, and as English becomes increasingly important as a world language, ESL composition is a burgeoning field. The study of composition at the post-secondary level is a relatively new practice which has become widespread only during the past half-century. More recent is the emergence over the past two to three decades of composition studies as an academic discipline, and even more recent is the awareness that composition research and pedagogy must expand to meet the needs of the ESL population. As growing numbers of international students flood colleges and universities in the English-speaking world, and as English becomes increasingly important as a world language, ESL composition is a burgeoning field.

  2. Teaching Behaviors in Second or Foreign Language Classrooms: A Critical Review of Descriptive Research in the Field of Language Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Frances Joyce

    1976-01-01

    After reviewing the purposes of descriptive research on teaching in general, this paper discusses the value of using a system of analysis and a technical language to describe classroom interaction. The need for such descriptive research in language classrooms is then outlined in detail. A critical review of the few systems of analysis designed for…

  3. Rasch Measurement in Language Research: Creating the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda J. Walker

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to construct a new scale for measuring foreign language classroom anxiety (FLCA. It begun with the creation of an extended item pool generated by qualitative methods. Subsequent Rasch and semantic analyses led to the final 18-item Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Inventory (FLCAI. In comparison with the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS, the FLCAI demonstrated more convincing evidence of unidimensionality and the optimal 5-point Likert scale functioned better. The FLCAI, while 55% the length of the FLCAS, thus more practical for classroom practitioners to administer and analyse, maintains its psychometric properties and covers a wider range on the construct continuum thus improving the degree of validity of the instrument. Finally, test anxiety was shown to be a component of FLCA.

  4. Second Language Writing. Research Insights for the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Barbara, Ed.

    This book is addressed to those about to embark on the teaching of second language writing as well as to those already engaged in the field. Teachers are dedicated to postering growth in writing; researchers want to investigate the questions that shed the greatest light on the problem in the field. The concerns of both these groups are addressed…

  5. The transformative potential of action research and ICT in the Second Language (L2 classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farren Margaret

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the transformative potential of action research and information and communications technology (ICT in the second language (L2 classroom. Two enquiries from teacher-researchers are detailed in the article. Their engagement in a collaborative professional development Masters programme was pivotal in designing and implementing ICT creatively in their classroom. Gee (2008 advocates the use of the preferred media of our classroom students in order to address their learning. Prensky (2001 urges us to feel the fear and do it anyway with our digital native classes. A post-primary teacher and a primary teacher show us how they felt the fear, did it and transformed aspects of their own teaching in the process. The Masters programme required the teachers to engage with innovative practices, informed by their own values, and integrate technologies that were new to them into their repertoire of classroom strategies. Peer validation meetings with colleagues enabled meaningful insights to emerge from the research. The teachers improve and transform their second language (L2 practice in collaboration and validation with others.

  6. Classroom management in language education

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    Wright, Tony, Dr

    2005-01-01

    A book that develops an understanding of practices at the very centre of language education - the classroom. It is written for postgraduate students in Applied Linguistics and Education, and practitioners, whether in TESOL or other language teaching, In Part 1 the author explores key concepts in unpacking the complexity of classroom life. In Part 2 existing research and practice are examined through a series of research case studies. Part 3 provides a template for research activity and suggestions for projects and methodologies, and Part 4 collects resources for readers keen to follow up the t

  7. "!Luces, Camara, Accion!": A Classroom Teacher Research Analysis of Dual Language Students Translanguaging through One-Act Plays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, Lora Beth

    2012-01-01

    The study investigates how language is used among 17 children in a dual language classroom as they create academic-based one-act plays in conjunction with social studies instruction. Examining over 20 hours of video, the teacher researcher analyzes students' use of translanguaging during cooperative groupings in order to co-accomplish an…

  8. Advantage Girls: A Look at Women's Language in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meliza, Evette

    2009-01-01

    While others have focused on gender-based language and the workplace, this research study explores gender-based language, in this case women's language, and the classroom. The study specifically examines examples of women's language and how this language affects student response in the classroom. Five variables have been identified as…

  9. The praxis of English language teaching and learning (PELT) beyond the binaries researching critically in EFL classrooms

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    Vicars, Mark; McKenna, Tarquam; Cacciattolo, Marcelle

    2015-01-01

    This edition of Critical New Literacies: The Praxis of English Language Teaching and Learning (PELT) begins with an examination of bricolage as a way to engage in critical research in TEFL/TESOL teaching and research. The volume considers the quality of 'encounter' needed in the global and intercultural classroom. The authors address validity, reliability and an authentic need for research which has at its heart ethical practice. Disenfranchisement of the co-participants in research, which is usually not considered, is reviewed in the volume. The manner in which quantitative methods can be u

  10. Exploring the Utility of Action Research to Investigate Second-Language Classrooms as Complex Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian, Mohammad Javad; Tavakoli, Mansoor

    2011-01-01

    Action research is geared to changes for the better and has the potential to assist teachers to extend their teaching skills and develop a deeper understanding of themselves, their classroom and their learners. However, in the area of applied linguistics, the viability of action research has been seriously questioned. In this article, we argue…

  11. A Probe into Classroom Teaching and Second Language Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengdan

    2009-01-01

    Due to the popularization of foreign language study, more and more people from education field further enhance their exploration and researches in how to apply second acquisition theories into classroom teaching. This paper probes into the orientation, research objects, age, language environment and classroom activities of second language…

  12. A Probe into Classroom Teaching and Second Language Acquisition

    OpenAIRE

    Zhengdan Li

    2009-01-01

    Due to the popularization of foreign language study, more and more people from education filed further enhance their exploration and researches in how to apply second acquisition theories into classroom teaching. This paper probes into the orientation, research objects, age, language environment and classroom activities of second language acquisition.

  13. Preparing Palestinian Reflective English Language Teachers through Classroom Based Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajani, Majida "Mohammed Yousef "

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the implementation of individual action research projects among some forty English language teachers distributed in thirty Palestinian schools in Ramallah and Qabatya districts-Palestine. It aimed to analyze the outcomes of the teachers' action research as part of a broader participatory action research project that is…

  14. Classroom Interaction and Language Output

    OpenAIRE

    Qiaoying Wang; Carolyn D. Castro

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of classroom interactions between a) students and students and b) students and teachers on the learning of English passivization by L1 Chinese adult learners of English as a foreign language during the language input and output treatments. In phase 1, both groups were asked to read and underline the input material. After the materials were collected, the participants were required to produce the first reconstruction. After having been exposed to the same in...

  15. Journals in the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes some of the ways that journals can be used as teaching tools in the language classroom; in fact, the suggestions he makes could be applied to the use of journals in teaching just about any subject. He begins by describing the concept of writing to learn, which is the theoretical foundation that journals are…

  16. Changing Teacher Roles in the Foreign-Language Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Francis; Delarche, Marion; Marshall, Nicholas; Wurr, Adrian; Edwards, Jeffery

    This paper examines trends reflecting changes in the role of the classroom foreign language teacher, particularly as these trends affect English-as-a-Second-Language instruction. This study is based on relevant literature and research being carried out in the English Language Institute at Kanda University of International Studies (Japan). Past and…

  17. Language Development: Understanding Language Diversity in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levey, Sandra; Polirstok, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Language Development: Understanding Language Diversity in the Classroom offers comprehensive coverage of the language development process for pre- and in-service teachers while emphasizing the factors that further academic success in the classroom, including literacy skills, phonological awareness, and narrative. With chapters written by respected…

  18. English in the Chinese foreign language classroom

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    Wang, Danping

    2013-01-01

    Chinese is an ancient language, but the present scope of its global study is unprecedented. Comprehending the impacts of worldwide linguistic realities on 'Chinese as a Foreign Language' (CFL) teachers and students will be critical to its long-term success. The most important phenomenon has been the establishment of English as a lingua franca, especially in the expanding marketplaces of Asia. This book examines the role of English as a medium of instruction in CFL classrooms. It begins by integrating existing studies on the global spread of English with research on English as a medium of secon

  19. The Implementation of A Flipped Classroom in Foreign Language Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet BASAL

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alongside the rise of educational technology, many teachers have been taking gradual but innovative steps to redesign their teaching methods. For example, in flipped learning or a flipped classroom, students watch instructional videos outside the classroom and do assignments or engage in activities inside the classroom. Language teachers are one group of educators exploring the flipped classroom. In foreign language classes, such an approach may offer great benefits for both the teachers and students since classroom time can be applied to more interactive tasks. By extending classroom hours in this way, language teachers can focus on successfully addressing all subjects in the curriculum. The aim of this study is (a to gain insights into the perceptions of prospective English language teachers at a state university in Turkey on flipped classrooms and (b to introduce the implementation of a flipped classroom into an English language class. A total of 47 prospective English teachers participated in the study. Qualitative research design was used and data were collected via an open-ended question. Findings of the study indicated that pre-service English teachers had positive perceptions towards the use of the flipped classroom as an integral part of face-to-face courses. It can be concluded that flipped classroom was beneficial in terms of 4 categories based on the content analysis of the responses: learning at one’s own pace, advance student preparation, overcoming the limitations of class time, increasing the participation in the classroom. The study also provides recommendations towards LMS integration into courses in other English language teaching departments and for implementing flipped classrooms in language teaching.

  20. ?"Zapatero a tus zapatos"? Action Research in the Spanish Language Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacorte, Manel; Krastel, Teresa Cabal

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that Spanish teachers consider a new role as researchers of their own professional environment through a number of successful research techniques and strategies. The process of teacher-initiated research begins with the description of realistic teaching and learning situations in which a teacher could conduct research in the Spanish…

  1. Developing Children's Language Awareness: Switching Codes in the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoll, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    This article examines how learning an additional language can positively affect children's opinions and feelings about languages and how this process can be enriched when different languages--namely, the additional language and the children's L1s--are present and used in the classroom in an informed way. It is hypothesised that this will benefit…

  2. The Changing Face of Language Learning: Learning beyond the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jack C.

    2015-01-01

    There are two important dimensions to successful second language learning: what goes on inside the classroom and what goes on outside of the classroom. While language teaching has always been seen as a preparation for out-of-class uses of language, much of the focus in language teaching in the past has typically been on classroom-based language…

  3. Experiential Learning in Second-Language Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Sonja

    2003-01-01

    Discusses issues surrounding experiential learning in the second language classroom. Experiential learning is defined by the inclusion of phases of reflection designed to help the learner relate current learning experience to past and future experience. (Author/VWL)

  4. Defining, Teaching, and Evaluating Cultural Proficiency in the Foreign Language Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storme, Julie A.; Derakhshani, Mana

    2002-01-01

    Examines recent research on teaching culture in the foreign language classroom. Proposes a model for culture teaching that responds to a clearer definition of cultural proficiency. Focuses on classroom testing and proficiency assessment. (Author/VWL)

  5. Researching classroom questioning

    OpenAIRE

    Lores González, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    The complexities of the modern society and interconnected world in which we live requires students who are able to problem solve and think critically. The research on which is article is based aims to explore how classroom questioning can help students guide their learning and model the spirit of inquiry to become lifelong learners. The research took place in an International Bilingual School of Madrid during sixth grade English lessons. It shows how developing effective questioning skills re...

  6. Children's Learning Strategies in Language Immersion Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamot, Ana Uhl; El-Dinary, Pamela Beard

    1999-01-01

    Reports on an investigation of learning-strategy applications in elementary French, Japanese, and Spanish immersion classrooms. Focus is on identifying strategies that more and less effective learners use for classroom reading and writing tasks in the target language. Think-aloud data from 3rd-grade and 4th-grade students were quantified and…

  7. Teaching Culture in the Foreign Language Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Nelson

    2000-01-01

    This article was originally published in 1968 (Foreign Language Annals; v1 n3). It defines and describes culture in terms that will be meaningful to classroom teachers of foreign languages, especially in the earlier phases of instruction. Identifies a list of proposals that invite discussion and development of the meanings of culture leading to…

  8. An Approach to Developing Language Awareness in the Irish Language Classroom: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    O Laoire, Muiris

    2007-01-01

    This case study deals with language awareness (LA) oriented instruction in the Irish language classroom, based on qualitative-type research conducted in a class of 21 English-medium secondary students studying Irish as a subject. Having outlined the general background to the teaching of Irish in secondary schools, the first section of the paper…

  9. Preparing teachers to create a mainstream science classroom conducive to the needs of English-language learners: A feminist action research project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Gayle; Mast, Colette; Ehlers, Nancy; Franklin, Elizabeth

    2005-11-01

    A feminist action research team, which consisted of a science educator, an English-language learner (ELL) educator, a first-year science teacher, and a graduate assistant, set a goal to work together to explore the process a beginning teacher goes through to establish a classroom conducive to the needs of middle-level ELL learners. The guiding questions of the study were answered by gathering a wealth of data over the course of 5 months and taken from the classroom, planning sessions, and researchers and students. These data were collected by observations, semistructured interviews, and written document reviews. The progressive analysis ultimately revealed that: (a) successful strategies a beginning teacher must utilize for teaching middle-level ELL children in a mainstream classroom involve complex structural considerations that are not part of the teacher's preparation; (b) learning increases for all children, but there are differences in learning achievement between ELL and non-ELL children; and (c) student and peer feedback proved to be an effective means of enhancing the growth of a beginning teacher seeking to increase her skills in teaching ELL learners. The experiences and findings from this project have implications for teacher preparation programs committed to preparing educators to teach science to all children.

  10. Developing Reflective and Investigative Skills in Teacher Preparation Programs: The design and implementation of the Classroom Research Component at the Foreign Language Program of Universidad del Valle

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Rosalba, Cárdenas Ramos; Carmen Cecilia, Faustino.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available En este articulo se describe el proceso y la experiencia de diseño, planificación e implementación del componente de investigación en el aula en los primeros cinco semestres de la Licenciatura en Lenguas Extranjeras de la Universidad del Valle. Queremos resaltar el papel de la investigación en el au [...] la en la formación inicial de nuestros estudiantes y en nuestro desarrollo profesional como docentes. Además queremos mostrar la importancia de preparar a los futuros profesores no solo en el desarrollo de competencia lingüística en las lenguas extranjeras sino también de competencias que les permitan reflexionar, analizar y encontrar maneras de mejorar su práctica profesional. La descripción de esta experiencia busca compartir nuestros logros, dificultades y planes de desarrollo futuro. Abstract in english In this article we want to describe our process and experience in studying, designing, planning and implementing the Classroom Research Component in the first five semesters of the Licenciatura program at the School of Language Science, Universidad del Valle. We want to stress the role of Classroom [...] Research in our students' initial training and in our own professional development. We also want to show the importance of preparing students and future teachers who possess not only linguistic competence in the foreign languages, but also competences that allow them to reflect, analyze and find ways of improving their professional practice. The description of this experience leads us to share our achievements, difficulties and plans for future development.

  11. The Use of First Language in the Second-Language Classroom: A Support for Second Language Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmona Madriñan, Mara

    2014-01-01

    This action research project was carried out in order to identify the role of first language in the second-language classroom. This study was conducted in a Colombian international school with an English immersion program for kindergarten students attending their first year of school. The purpose of this study was to identify if the use of the…

  12. The Interactional Architecture of the Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Seedhouse

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a summary of some of the key ideas of Seedhouse (2004). The study applies Conversation Analysis (CA) methodology to an extensive and varied database of language lessons from around the world and attempts to answer the question ‘How is L2 classroom interaction organised?’ The main thesis is that there is a reflexive relationship between pedagogy and interaction in the L2 classroom. This means that there is a two-way, mutually dependent relationship. Furthermore, this rela...

  13. Role of Focus-on-Form Instruction, Corrective Feedback and Uptake in Second Language Classrooms: Some Insights from Recent Second Language Acquisition Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afitska, Oksana

    2015-01-01

    A considerable number of studies on focus-on-form instruction, corrective feedback and uptake have been carried out in the field of second language acquisition (SLA) research over the last two decades. These studies have investigated the above-mentioned concepts from different perspectives, in a number of different contexts and in a number of…

  14. Social Obstacles to Intercultural Competence in America's Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca-Greber, Bonnie

    2010-01-01

    In contrast with debates over language pedagogy or aptitude, this paper examines seven societal obstacles which impact the success of classroom language learning and the development of intercultural competence in American language classrooms. These include expectations for teacher preparation, language proficiency and target language use;…

  15. Sociolinguistics Inputs and English as Second Language Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Ofodu Graceful Onovughe

    2012-01-01

    Sociolinguistic inputs in language acquisition and use of English as Second Language in classrooms is the main focus of this study. A survey research design was adopted. The population consisted of all secondary school students in Akure Local Government of Ondo State, Nigeria. Two hundred and forty (240) students in senior secondary school classes were deliberately selected from six secondary schools randomly sampled. A fourteen-item questionnaire designated to elicit the required information...

  16. Language Teaching Research: Promoting a More Interdisciplinary Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Although research in the field of language teaching and learning has appeared to enhance classroom pedagogy, I argue here that these advances have had a relatively small impact on actual foreign language learning. Unlike in most school subjects, the recipients of language pedagogy, i.e. the students, arrive in the classroom with several…

  17. Naturalistic acquisition in an early language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    AnneDahl

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether it is possible to provide naturalistic second language acquisition (SLA) of vocabulary for young learners in a classroom situation without resorting to a classical immersion approach. Participants were 60 first-grade pupils in two Norwegian elementary schools in their first year. The control group followed regular instruction as prescribed by the school curriculum, while the experimental group received increased naturalistic target language input. This entailed...

  18. The Missing Language of the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockett, Hugh; LePage, Pamela

    2002-01-01

    Explores teachers' use of moral language when describing and interpreting K-12 classroom and graduate school experiences, analyzing products developed by practicing teachers from a nontraditional Master's program (exit portfolios, reflective essays, and admission essays). Results suggest that teacher education must encourage teachers to envision…

  19. Body Language in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Patrick W.

    2005-01-01

    Ralph Waldo Emerson and Mae West would seem to have little in common, but there is one thing they both understood--the importance of body language. Educators, psychologists, anthropologists and sociologists define body language or nonverbal communication as communication without words. It includes overt behaviors such as facial expressions, eye…

  20. Quality of Language and Literacy Instruction in Preschool Classrooms Serving At-Risk Pupils

    OpenAIRE

    Justice, Laura M.; Mashburn, Andrew; Hamre, Bridget; Pianta, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Policy-makers, administrators, researchers, and teachers are increasingly vested in ensuring the quality of preschool instruction, particularly in the areas of language and literacy. This research was conducted to characterize the quality of language and literacy instruction in 135 publicly-funded preschool classrooms serving at-risk pupils. As all teachers in these classrooms were implementing the same language and literacy curriculum, we also studied the interrelationships among procedural ...

  1. Teachers’ First Language Use in Second Language Learning Classroom Context : A Questionnaire-based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mohebbi, Hassan; Alavi, Sayyed Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Recently the issue of having recourse to second language (L2) learners’ first language (L1) in second language acquisition (SLA) is receiving a great amount of attention in SLA research. There has been a great deal of claims and counter-claims with respect to L1 use in L2 learning. The findings of L2 research to date cast doubt on the rationales of proponents of exclusive use of L2. Researchers and practitioners who have observed L2 classrooms have identified different functions of L1 in L2 l...

  2. Teaching English as a Global Language in Smart Classrooms with PowerPoint Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham Oommen

    2012-01-01

    The current study, as part of an ongoing investigation to examine teacher perceptions about the teaching of English as a global language at the tertiary level education, aims at examining learner perceptions about PowerPoint presentations used in English classroom instruction for enhancement and integration of four language skills and effective use of PowerPoint presentation as a teaching technique in smart classroom settings. A classroom action research and a questionnaire survey were conduc...

  3. Naturalistic acquisition in an early language classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnneDahl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether it is possible to provide naturalistic second language acquisition (SLA of vocabulary for young learners in a classroom situation without resorting to a classical immersion approach. Participants were 60 first-grade pupils in Norwegian two elementary schools in their first year. The control group followed regular instruction as prescribed by the school curriculum, while the experimental group received increased naturalistic target language input. This entailed extensive use of English by the teacher during English classes, and also during morning meetings and for simple instructions and classroom management throughout the day. Our hypothesis was that it is possible to facilitate naturalistic acquisition through better quality target language exposure within a normal curriculum. The students' English vocabulary knowledge was measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, version 4 (PPVT-IV, Dunn & Dunn, 2007, at the beginning and the end of the first year of school. Findings are that 1 early-start second-language (L2 programs in school do not in themselves guarantee vocabulary development in the first year, 2 a focus on increased exposure to the L2 can lead to a significant increase in receptive vocabulary comprehension in the course of only eight months, and 3 even with relatively modest input, learners in such an early-start L2 program can display vocabulary acquisition comparable in some respects to that of younger native children matched on vocabulary size. The overall conclusion is that naturalistic vocabulary acquisition is in fact possible in a classroom setting.

  4. Research methods for English language teachers

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    McDonough, Jo

    2014-01-01

    This book offers a lively introduction to the research methods and techniques available to English language teachers who wish to investigate aspects of their own practice. It covers qualitative and quantitative methodology and includes sections on observation, introspection, diary studies, experiments, interviews, questionnaires, numerical techniques and case study research. Each method is illustrated with examples in language teaching contexts, and techniques of data collection and analysis are introduced. The authors focus particularly on research in the classroom, on tests, materials, the

  5. FACEBOOK GROUPS AS A SUPPORTING TOOL FOR LANGUAGE CLASSROOMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Ekoç

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to present a review of Facebook group pages as an educational tool for language learning. One of the primary needs of foreign language learners is to gain the opportunity to use the target language outside the classroom practice. Social media communication provides occasions for learners to receive input and produce output while engaging in negotiation of meaning. In line with this point, teachers can instigate class group pages in the social media in an attempt to provide a space for practice and communication free of the traditional pedagogic concerns of a typical classroom. The distinctive discursive behaviour of Facebook group pages helps one to achieve that attempt. In light of these views, the researcher, in this study, formed a group page to understand the dynamics of social media environment as a supporting tool for language classrooms. This paper addresses various features which make social media a unique place to contribute to the sense of class community and collaboration outside the classroom. The face-to face classroom is a controlled communication event, that is, teachers and students are required to be in the classroom at the same time but a teacher’s use of Facebook is an attempt to communicate with students outside of that controlled environment where teachers can meet students in their territory. When compared to its disadvantages, the advantages of setting a class group page on the social media outweigh. Students can feel motivated to contribute to an online community if they subsequently receive support or help. It also leads students to feel that they are being supported by a whole portion of their class community and promotes students’ desire to maintain a valued relationship with others. Students continue developing and strengthening relationships with others.

  6. Multimodality and Children's Participation in Classrooms: Instances of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newfield, Denise

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes how language and literacy classrooms became more participatory, agentive spaces through addressing a central issue in teaching and learning: the forms of representation through which children make their meanings. It reconsiders pedagogic research in under-resourced Gauteng classrooms during the period 1994-2005, during the…

  7. Using Native Language in ESL Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Isa SPAHIU

    2013-01-01

    The debate over whether to use or not to use to learners’ L1 inside the classroom has always been the topic of discussion for various people for various reasons. The debate has also involved ESL/EFL teachers. Some argue that such use may lead to more dependence of an ESL/EFL on his/her L1 that may hinder the progress of mastering the target language. Whereas others believe that the use of an ESL/EFL learners’ L1 may ease the process of teaching and learning the target language as the teachers...

  8. Achievement Motivational Characteristics of University Foreign Language Learners: From the Classroom to the Tutoring Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Paul H.

    2008-01-01

    What influences who seeks foreign language tutoring? Using expectancy value theory, the present study researches the characteristics of university foreign language students in the language classroom (n = 258) and seeking tutoring (n = 29). Students' performance and mastery goal orientations, achievement task values, self-efficacy for foreign…

  9. The Adult Heritage Spanish Speaker in the Foreign Language Classroom: A Phenomenography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Angela

    2009-01-01

    For heritage speakers, the Spanish classroom is not the first point of contact with their native language. Though such learners would benefit from an educational philosophy that affirms the heritage language as a springboard for learning and increased self-awareness, there has been little support for non-dominant language research in the USA. This…

  10. · Attitude towards Computers and Classroom Management of Language School Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Jalali; Vahid Panahzade; Ali Firouzmand

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted language learning (CALL) is the realization of computers in schools and universities which has potentially enhanced the language learning experience inside the classrooms. The integration of the technologies into the classroom demands that the teachers adopt a number of classroom management procedures to maintain a more learner-centered and conducive language learning environment. The current study explored the relationship between computer attitudes and behavior and instruc...

  11. The Relationship between Gender and Iranian EFL Learners’ Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety (FLCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhri Mesri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Foreign language anxiety is widely used to describe the feeling of tension and apprehension, which is specifically associated with foreign language learning contexts, including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Foreign language classroom anxiety (FLCA is related to foreign language anxiety and language-skill-specific anxiety, and fairly recently identified as distinguished from other forms of anxiety. FLCA is a more general type of anxiety in learning a foreign language with a strong speaking anxiety element; and low self-confidence is identified as an important component of its construct. Research shows that FLCA is a complex, multi-dimensional phenomenon; it has many potential sources; and it interferes with the acquisition, retention, and production of a foreign language. It seems that in most of English classes in Iran little attention has been paid to the role of the gender on EFL learners' Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety (FLCA. Hence, this study attempted to investigate the relationship between EFL learners’ Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety (FLCA with regard to gender. The data were gathered through questionnaire: the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (Horwitz, Horwitz, & Cope, 1986.The participants were 52 students studying English at Salmas University. The findings revealed a significant relationship between FLCA and females. It was recommended that foreign language teachers should be aware of Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety (FLCA level, its causes and results. The study also offers some context-specific pedagogical implications for Iranian EFL teachers and practitioners.

  12. Naturalistic acquisition in an early language classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Anne; Vulchanova, Mila D

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether it is possible to provide naturalistic second language acquisition (SLA) of vocabulary for young learners in a classroom situation without resorting to a classical immersion approach. Participants were 60 first-grade pupils in two Norwegian elementary schools in their first year. The control group followed regular instruction as prescribed by the school curriculum, while the experimental group received increased naturalistic target language input. This entailed extensive use of English by the teacher during English classes, and also during morning meetings and for simple instructions and classroom management throughout the day. Our hypothesis was that it is possible to facilitate naturalistic acquisition through better quality target language exposure within a normal curriculum. The students' English vocabulary knowledge was measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, version 4 (PPVT-IV, Dunn and Dunn, 2007a), at the beginning and the end of the first year of school. Findings are that (1) early-start second-language (L2) programs in school do not in themselves guarantee vocabulary development in the first year, (2) a focus on increased exposure to the L2 can lead to a significant increase in receptive vocabulary comprehension in the course of only 8 months, and (3) even with relatively modest input, learners in such an early-start L2 program can display vocabulary acquisition comparable in some respects to that of younger native children matched on vocabulary size. The overall conclusion is that naturalistic vocabulary acquisition is in fact possible in a classroom setting. PMID:24860518

  13. Growing Language Awareness in the Classroom Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paugh, Patricia; Moran, Mary

    2013-01-01

    For four years, Pat Paugh, a university teacher educator, and Mary Moran, a teacher researcher, collaborated on action research by systematically studying literacy development connected to the latter's third-grade community gardening and urban farming curriculum. Their goal was to support an existing classroom culture that valued…

  14. Teachers’ approaches to language classroom assessment in Cameroon primary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achu Charles Tante

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Assessment has a huge impact on ESL primary pupils, in part, because on the curriculum English is both a subject and also a language of learning all the other subjects. For children still acquiring L1 it is daunting sometimes to be expected to understand concepts in L2. It may be difficult then to gather information to make an impartial judgement with regards to a pupil’s language level. This study is a preliminary inquiry that attempts to find out teachers’ approaches to classroom assessment in Cameroon primary schools. Using a qualitative open-ended question the researcher finds out three main categories of assessment approaches used by teachers. From the categories extrapolations on possible assumptions that guide teachers’ choices of assessment procedures are described and suggested for future study. Keywords Classroom assessment approach, Cameroon, scheme of work, ESL/EFL, Young Learners 

  15. Classroom Instruction that Works with English Language Learners Participant's Workbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jane D.; Bjork, Cynthia Linnea

    2008-01-01

    Everyone who participates in your workshop on "Classroom Instruction That Works with English Language Learners" needs this participant's workbook to gain expertise in strategies that are effective with ELL (English Language Learners) students.

  16. TEACHING CREATIVE WRITING IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARKU MONIS AND . M. V. RODRIQUES

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Writing, like all other aspects of language, is communicative. In our real life we write e-mails, notes, covering letters, reports, curriculums, assignments, essays and so on. Some of us write articles or work on forums and websites. A few write stories and poems. All of these writing tasks have a communicative purpose and a target audience. In the English language classroom, however, writing often lacks this. There are many reasons, as there are lots of ways to make the writing, we do with learners more communicative. There are many areas in which language learners can benefit from creative writing. Students express themselves and their own ideas. Most teachers would agree that what we want to say, what comes from the heart, we are happier to work on. Creative Writing (CW can be very stimulating and a lot of fun. Creative writing involves playful but rigorous work with language. A lot of people seem to associate creative writing with an "anything goes" mentality. However, in order to produce a good text, poem, short story or dramatic scene, the language needs to be correct and it needs to work. Creative Writing requires greater precision in expression. In order to say precisely what they mean, students have to be very careful in their use of vocabulary and idioms. In this article, an effort is made to discuss the characteristics and difficulties of CW and similarly, a few ideas for CW writing, benefits of CW and solutions to simplify and make it interesting is presented.

  17. Mobile Sign Language Learning Outside the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kimberly A.; Starner, Thad

    2012-01-01

    The majority of deaf children in the United States are born to hearing parents with limited prior exposure to American Sign Language (ASL). Our research involves creating and validating a mobile language tool called SMARTSign. The goal is to help hearing parents learn ASL in a way that fits seamlessly into their daily routine. (Contains 3 figures.)

  18. Strategy Training in a Task-Based Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chun; Lin, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Recent literature that examines the implementation of task-based language teaching (TBLT) in classroom settings has reported various challenges related to educational cultures, classroom management, teacher cognition and learner perceptions. To facilitate the smooth transition of TBLT from laboratory settings to classroom contexts, measures need…

  19. Harmonious Learning: Yoga in the English Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This article looks at one way for teachers to make classrooms emotionally, mentally, and physically healthy places to learn--places where tensions and stresses are lessened and where teachers and students are concentrating, yet relaxed. "Harmonious language learning classroom" is the term the author coined to describe this kind of language…

  20. Humor as Safe House in the Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantz, Anne; Bell, Nancy D.

    2011-01-01

    Analyses of second language (L2) classroom interaction often categorize joking and other humorous talk by students as disruptive, off-task behavior, thereby rendering it important only from a classroom management perspective. Studies of language play, however, have illustrated that such jocular talk not only allows students to construct a broader…

  1. Teaching Sensitivity to Cultural Difference in the First-Year Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durocher, Dennis O., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This article summarizes teacher action research for the teaching of subjective culture in the foreign language classroom. It begins with a literature review, followed by a description of Milton J. Bennett's Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity (Bennett, 1993), the theoretical paradigm upon which classroom activities and experiments…

  2. Bodies and Language: Process Drama and Intercultural Language Learning in a Beginner Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Julia

    2011-01-01

    In this article the author draws on classroom video recordings and student commentary to explore ways in which the kinaesthetic elements of a process drama provided the context and the space for beginner additional language learners to engage with intercultural language learning. In the light of student comments in interviews and questionnaires,…

  3. Exploring Bilinguals' Social Use of Language inside and out of the Minority Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Enlli Mon; Roberts, Dylan Bryn

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines bilingual children's use of language inside and out of the minority language classroom. A total of 145 children between 8 and 11 years of age, attending 16 bilingual Welsh-English primary schools in North Wales, responded to questionnaires (supplemented by classroom observations) requesting information about their language…

  4. Students and Teachers’ Reasons for Using the First Language Within the Foreign Language Classroom (French and English) in Central Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Mora Pablo Irasema; Lengeling M. Martha; Rubio Zenil Buenaventura; Crawford Troy; Goodwin Douglas

    2011-01-01

    The present study explores the use of the first language in a context of foreign language teaching. This qualitative research presents the classroom practice and points of view of French and English teachers and students within a public educational institute in central Mexico using the techniques of questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. The results show that teachers and the majority of students perceive the use of the first language as positive and part of the teaching and ...

  5. Related Services Research for Students with Low-Incidence Disabilities: Implications for Speech-Language Pathologists in Inclusive Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangreco, Michael F.

    2000-01-01

    This article summarizes a team process for making related services decisions called VISTA (Vermont Interdependent Services Team Approach) and nine research studies on the use and impact of VISTA with students with low incidence disabilities. It also addresses team size, consumer perspectives, and paraprofessional supports. Five major conclusions…

  6. Understanding L2 French Teaching Strategies in a Non-Target Language Classroom Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peijian; Yuan, Rui; Teng, Lin

    2015-01-01

    This research explored the congruence and disparity between teachers' and students' attitudes towards French as a second language (L2) teaching strategies in a non-target language classroom context in the USA. The findings suggest students' and teachers' attitudes towards the direct and indirect teaching strategies were generally consistent, but…

  7. Between the Lines: When Culture, Language and Poetry Meet in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Teaching poetry in second language (L2) classrooms raises theoretical and practical questions about how best to treat literature when target language and culture is also being negotiated. Current pedagogy derives from disparate sources, including the experientially-driven practices of individual teachers, the quantitative and qualitative research…

  8. Classroom Management Skills of The Language Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Sar?çoban

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Teachers or educators, most of the time, concentrate on the theoretical aspects oflanguage teaching and study them as much as possible. However, in practice, we start thinkingthat we will have to keep a number of people together in the same place. These are often thepeople who come from many different backgrounds and whose expectations differ. In thiscase, it becomes more and more difficult to appeal to every individual in class. Therefore, asteachers we should initially be trained on how to manage our classrooms and how to providethe necessary environment to put into practice the things we have learned to teach a language.Obviously, we need management skills as well as the language teaching skill. Actually, it isnot as difficult as many people think. As teachers if we fulfill our duties properly, a wellmanagedclass will ensue. In this study, therefore, the definition of class management isregarded roughly “to keep people from different environments directed to one single goal”.When this is accomplished, we are unlikely to live discipline problems.

  9. Individual classroom experiences: a sociocultural comparison for understanding efl classroom language learning Individual classroom experiences: a sociocultural comparison for understanding efl classroom language learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Miccoli

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho compara as experiências de sala de aula (ESA de duas universitárias na aprendizagem de língua inglesa. As ESA emergiram de entrevistas individuais, onde vídeos das aulas promoveram a reflexão. A análise revelou que experiências de natureza cognitiva, social ou afetiva influem diretamente no processo de aprendizagem e as que se referem ao contexto, à história, crenças e metas dos alunos influem indiretamente no mesmo. A singularidade de algumas experiências levou à sua categorização como ESA individuais (ESAI. Ao comparar as ESAI de duas informantes, a importância da análise sociocultural do processo de aprendizagem de sala de aula fica evidente. Concluiremos com uma defesa do valor da teoria sociocultural no estudo da aprendizagem de língua estrangeira em sala de aula e com a apresentação das implicações deste estudo para pesquisadores e professores. This paper compares the classroom experiences (CEs of two university students in their process of learning English as a foreign language (EFL. The CEs emerged from individual interviews, where classroom videos promoted reflection. The analysis revealed that cognitive, social and affective experiences directly influence the learning process and that those which refer to setting, learner’s personal background, beliefs and goal influence the learning process indirectly. The analysis also revealed the singularity of some of these CEs that led to their categorization as individual CEs (ICEs. When comparing the ICEs of the two participants, the importance of a sociocultural analysis of the classroom learning process becomes evident. We conclude with an analysis of the value of sociocultural theory in the study of classroom EFL learning and with the implications of this study for teachers and researchers.

  10. Classroom Discourse Of Malay Language Lesson: A Critical Analysis

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    Idris Aman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on the teaching and learning process of the Malay language in the classroom usually focuses on the method, content, strategy and teaching aids. Moving away from this norm, this research article examines the process from the discourse analysis perspective called pedagogic discourse analysis, with an adaptation of Fairclough’s Critical Discourse Analysis Framework (1992; 1995. The discussion is based on several hours of teaching-learning case study conducted in a secondary school classroom, which emphasizes integrated curriculum in an attempt to understand the unseen social processes, i.e. teacher dominance in discourse. The research findings indicate that teacher dominance is concealed in turn-taking system, types of questions posed by the teacher, discourse control and the overall structure of the discourse, which have their implications on the implementation of the National Education Philosophy. Contrary to the emphasis on student centredness and thinking skills as laid out by the Integrated Curriculum for Secondary School, it is found that the nature of the learning process in the classroom hardly focused on students’ thinking skills. This article argues that students should be given the opportunity to exercise their critical and creative potentials.

  11. Can Language Classrooms Take the Multilingual Turn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet-Gauthier, Myriam; Beaulieu, Suzie

    2016-01-01

    For the past three decades, momentum has gathered in favour of a multilingual turn in second language acquisition research and teaching. "Multicompetence" has been proposed to replace "nativeness" and "monolingualism" to measure L2 learners' success. This proposed shift has not made its way into L2 teaching settings.…

  12. Can Language Classrooms Take the Multilingual Turn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet-Gauthier, Myriam; Beaulieu, Suzie

    2016-01-01

    For the past three decades, momentum has gathered in favour of a multilingual turn in second language acquisition research and teaching. "Multicompetence" has been proposed to replace "nativeness" and "monolingualism" to measure L2 learners' success. This proposed shift has not made its way into L2 teaching settings.…

  13. Language Classroom Risk-Taking Behavior in a Performed Culture-Based Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D. Luft

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While several studies have investigated the role of risk-taking in language learning, the findings of these studies may not be generalizable to language learning where the performed culture approach (PCA is used. This study describes the relationship between language learning and risk-taking in PCA, and the relationship between risk-taking and personal study habits, teaching style, daily grading, and classroom dynamics. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire. This study finds that risk-taking behavior has a moderate positive relationship with student performance in PCA. While questionnaire items related to teaching style and classroom dynamics are not found to significantly correlate with students’ risk-taking behavior, some items related to daily grading and personal study habits are found to have a moderate positive relationship with risk-taking behavior. Based on these findings, it is recommended that further research investigate the relationship between assessment and risktaking in language learning. As second language acquisition researchers have investigated the role of affective variables in language learning, risk-taking has frequently been identified as a variable linked with success (Beebe, 1983; Ely, 1986; Naiman, Frolich, Stern, & Todesco, 1978; Rubin, 1975; Samimy & Pardin, 1994; Samimy & Tabuse, 1992. However, it is difficult to apply these findings to language classrooms that use the performed culture approach (PCA, an approach to the teaching of East Asian languages, for two reasons: (a PCA’s focus on the learning of a foreign culture could mean that greater risk is involved in 106 Luft language learning than in a typical language classroom; (b PCA creates a language learning experience for which the risks involved are different than those in language classrooms where other approaches are used.

  14. Group work in the English language curriculum sociocultural and ecological perspectives on second language classroom learning

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    Chappell, Philip

    2014-01-01

    This book explores how using small groups in second language classrooms supports language learning. Chappell's experience as a language teacher equips him to present a clear, evidence-based argument for the powerful influence group work has upon the opportunities for learning, and how it should therefore be an integral part of language lessons.

  15. French-Language Satellite TV in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Russell G.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the elements of satellite technology, provides information on French and other foreign-language programming, and offers suggestions for using satellite television in the classroom. (Author/JL)

  16. Firefighter or Fireman? Teachers’ attitudes towards gender neutrality in the foreign language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Wessman, Sofia

    2007-01-01

    This essay investigates the extent and significance of a gender decisive language in the foreign language classroom. Focus lies on teachers teaching English as a foreign language and their attitudes towards gender neutrality from a pure linguistic point of view. My starting point was previous research done concerning my topic and the survey was performed through questionnaires that were sent out with both qualitative and quantitative questions to thirty teachers.   My findings indicate that t...

  17. Anxiety over EFL speaking and writing: A view from language classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Gkonou, Christina

    2011-01-01

    The assumption that foreign language learners experience a high level of anxiety mainly when faced with speaking activities implies that research should focus on those learners prone to anxiety over that skill. Despite not being widely investigated, foreign language writing anxiety also seems to be a concern for a large number of students. Drawing on questionnaire findings, the study reported in this article examined the nature of, and the connection between the English language classroom spe...

  18. Classroom Management for Teachers of Japanese and Other Foreign Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Elaine K.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the classroom management component of the Professional Development of Japanese Teachers of Texas (PDJT), a certification program for teachers of Japanese. In addition, it offers suggestions in classroom management for teachers of Japanese and other foreign languages as well as guidance for teacher trainers to help new…

  19. Using the target language in the foreign language classroom English as a foreign language (EFL) at Dutch secondary schools

    OpenAIRE

    Brands, F.A.

    2011-01-01

    This master's thesis deals with the use of the target language in the foreign language classroom, specifically EFL classes at Dutch secondary schools. The use of the target language in class, as supported by SLA theories and SLA pedagogy, appears to be highly dependant of the particular classroom context. From this thesis, it became clear that the amount of target language use in class differs per educational level (VWO, HAVO and VMBO) as well as lesson element (e.g. grammar instruction, spea...

  20. Use of Formative Assessment, Self- and Peer-Assessment in the Classrooms: Some Insights from Recent Language Testing and Assessment (LTA) Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afitska, Oksana

    2014-01-01

    A considerable number of studies on formative teacher assessment and feedback, learner self- and peer-assessment have been carried out in the field of Language Testing and Assessment (LTA) research over the last two decades. These studies investigated the above mentioned concepts from different perspectives (impact of assessment on learning,…

  1. Movies in the Language Classroom: Dealing with Problematic Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gareis, Elisabeth

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the use of film in the classroom as a tool for second-language instruction. Argues that controversial subject matter, such as sex, violence, and profane language, can enhance students' learning experience and deepen their critical thinking skills if treated sensitively and in a pedagogically sound manner. (12 references) (Author/CK)

  2. Foreign Films in the Classroom: Gateway to Language and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Lucia Guzzi

    2009-01-01

    The teaching of culture has become gradually more significant for all teachers involved in language education; it has been referred as the "hidden curriculum" of foreign language teaching. Because of limited time available in the classroom and curriculum constraints, the inclusion of cultural lessons often comes second to the teaching of the…

  3. Classroom tandem – Outlining a Model for Language Learning and Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katri KARJALAINEN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to outline classroom tandem by comparing it with informal tandem learning contexts and other language instruction methods. Classroom tandem is used for second language instruction in mixed language groups in the subjects of Finnish and Swedish as L2. Tandem learning entails that two persons with different mother tongues learn each other’s native languages in reciprocal cooperation. The students function, in turns, as a second language learner and as a model in the native language. We aim to give an overview description of the interaction in classroom tandem practice. The empirical data consists of longitudinal video recordings of meetings of one tandem dyad within a co-located Swedish-medium and Finnish-medium school. Focus in the analysis is on the language aspects the informants orient to and topicalize in their interaction. The language aspects vary depending on what classroom activities they are engaged in, text-based or oral activities.

  4. Code-Switching in Japanese Language Classrooms: An Exploratory Investigation of Native vs. Non-Native Speaker Teacher Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Valerie; Matsuo, Ayumi; Payne, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Research on language classroom code-switching ranges from describing both teachers' and learners' first language and target language use to making connections between code-switching and student learning. However, few studies compare differences in practice between native and non-native speaker teachers and even fewer consider culture of learning…

  5. Phonetics and Technology in the Classroom: A Practical Approach to Using Speech Analysis Software in Second-Language Pronunciation Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    While speech analysis technology has become an integral part of phonetic research, and to some degree is used in language instruction at the most advanced levels, it appears to be mostly absent from the beginning levels of language instruction. In part, the lack of incorporation into the language classroom can be attributed to both the lack of…

  6. Promoting Speaking Accuracy and Fluency in Foreign Language Classroom: A Closer Look at English Speaking Classrooms*

    OpenAIRE

    D?NÇER, Ali; YE??LYURT, Sava?; Göksu, Ali

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to analyze the literature about teaching and learning English speaking in depth and draw main guidelines about how to increase speaking accuracy and fluency in language classrooms for both English language learners and teachers. The first section of the paper is about the general features of speaking skills. The second section mentions the relevant studies related to speaking classrooms. The third section contains teaching speaking approaches by focusing on generally accuracy ...

  7. FACEBOOK GROUPS AS A SUPPORTING TOOL FOR LANGUAGE CLASSROOMS

    OpenAIRE

    Arzu Ekoç

    2014-01-01

    This paper attempts to present a review of Facebook group pages as an educational tool for language learning. One of the primary needs of foreign language learners is to gain the opportunity to use the target language outside the classroom practice. Social media communication provides occasions for learners to receive input and produce output while engaging in negotiation of meaning. In line with this point, teachers can instigate class group pages in the social media in an attempt to provide...

  8. The Relationship between Global Competence and Language Learning Motivation: An Empirical Study in Critical Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semaan, Gaby; Yamazaki, Kasumi

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between global competence and second language learning motivation in critical language classrooms. Data were collected from 137 participants who were studying critical languages (Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Persian) at two universities on the East and West Coasts of the United States, using a 30-item…

  9. Students' Language Learning Strategy Use and Achievement in the Korean as a Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Bokyung

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between student strategy use and the development of proficiency in a Korean as a Foreign Language classroom. A total of 66 English native speakers learning Korean as a Foreign Language were administered the Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL), Version 5.1. Findings indicated a low positive…

  10. Educating educators about second language idiomaticity through action research

    OpenAIRE

    John I. Liontas

    2013-01-01

    Idiomaticity is central to linguistic theory. Despite the pervasiveness of idioms in language, pedagogical articles in professional journals have yet to pay attention to the benefits of idiom instruction in the second language (SL) classroom. Addressing this concern, this article reports the results of an exploratory qualitative research study conducted with sixteen SL university instructors and two Language Program Directors (LPDs) at two large universities in the Southwest (Unit...

  11. Classroom noise and children learning in a second language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peggy; Kohnert, Kathryn; Sabur, Sabina; Shaw, Daniel

    2005-04-01

    The presence of background noise affects children more negatively than adults. Understanding speech in noise is a skill that continues to develop well into a child's adolescent years. Childrens' experience with a specific language also may affect their ability to make sense of incoming speech. Research suggests that even for adults the presence of background noise negatively affects the ability to listen in a second language. Two studies were conducted to investigate the effects of classroom noise on attention and speech perception in native Spanish-speaking second graders learning English as their second language (L2), as compared to English-only speaking peers (EO). In Study 1 we measured childrens' on-task behavior during instructional activities with and without soundfield amplification. In Study 2 we measured the effects of noise (+10 dB signal-to-noise ratio) using an experimental English word-recognition task. Findings indicate although there were no effects of amplification on on-task behavior, word-recognition performance declined significantly for both EO and L2 groups in the noise condition. In particular, the impact of the noise was disproportionately greater for the L2 group. Children learning in their L2 appear to be at a distinct disadvantage when listening in rooms with typical noise and reverberation.

  12. Nonverbal Teacher-student Communication in the Foreign Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Qi Pan

    2014-01-01

    Nonverbal communication refers to a form of communication without using the words to repress oneself. Nonverbal communication is so basic that the teachers tend to take it for granted and always ignore it in the English classroom teaching. For attaining the goal of teaching, and improving teaching quality and efficiency in the foreign language classroom, the improvement of teaching method is a very important factor. Briefly introducing the definition and types of nonverbal communication, this...

  13. DEVELOPING PLURILINGUAL IDENTITY IN THIRD LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

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    HACKETT-JONES A.V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the notions of plurilingualism and plurilingual identity through the prism of the concepts of multilingualism and multilingual identity and the perspective of the theories of bilingualism. The article suggests that plurilingual identity can be viewed as an objective in third language (second foreign language teaching and contemplates specific characteristic imposed on a third language learner by the process of third language acquisition and the necessity of managing a certain imbalance between the degrees of language command and culture experience in different target languages.

  14. Perceptions of Non-Native EFL Teachers' on L1 Use in L2 Classrooms: Implications for Language Program Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debreli, Emre

    2016-01-01

    The study of L1 (first language) use in L2 (second language) classrooms has long received attention in the literature. Despite the considerable amount of research that has been conducted on the phenomenon, the focus has often been on the advantages and disadvantages. Considerably, less research has been conducted regarding the non-native L2…

  15. The use of games in the language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Sigríður Dögg Sigurðardóttir 1985

    2010-01-01

    This essay focuses on the use of games inside the classroom and it argues that games can be a good teaching method when teaching foreign languages. It looks at why games should be used as a teaching method and how in order to maximize the positive result on language learning. Also this essay explains various game categories and it gives an example of at least one game from each category which can be especially good in language teaching. In addition this essay looks at the four language skill ...

  16. Graphic Novels in Advanced English/Language Arts Classrooms: A Phenomenological Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillenwater, Cary

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is a phenomenological case study of two 12th grade English/language arts (ELA) classrooms where teachers used graphic novels with their advanced students. The primary purpose of this case study was to gain insight into the phenomenon of using graphic novels with these students--a research area that is currently limited.…

  17. How a Therapy Dog May Inspire Student Literacy Engagement in the Elementary Language Arts Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Lori Friesen

    2009-01-01

    In this article, I discuss theoretical possibilities for the inclusion of therapy dogs in the elementary language arts classroom, particularly which may inspire students otherwise reluctant to engage in literacy activities. I incorporate Guthrie and colleagues’ work in engagement into research in Animal Assisted Therapy with children to posit a revised theory of engagement.

  18. "Why in This Bilingual Classroom … Hablamos Más Español?" Language Choice by Bilingual Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Alma D.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative sociolinguistic research study examines Latino/a students' use of language in a science classroom and laboratory. This study was conducted in a school in the southwestern United States that serves an economically depressed, predominantly Latino population. The object of study was a 5th-grade bilingual (Spanish/English) class.…

  19. Teaching Sociolinguistic Variation in the Intermediate Language Classroom: "Voseo" in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenk, Elaine M.

    2014-01-01

    The acquisition of sociolinguistic variation by second language learners has gained increased attention. Some research highlights the value of naturalistic exposure through study abroad while other studies point out that classroom input can facilitate the acquisition of particular features of variation. Nevertheless, said attention to the…

  20. How a Therapy Dog May Inspire Student Literacy Engagement in the Elementary Language Arts Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Friesen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I discuss theoretical possibilities for the inclusion of therapy dogs in the elementary language arts classroom, particularly which may inspire students otherwise reluctant to engage in literacy activities. I incorporate Guthrie and colleagues’ work in engagement into research in Animal Assisted Therapy with children to posit a revised theory of engagement.

  1. Appropriation of a Representational Tool in a Second-Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yun; Looi, Chee-Kit; Chen, Wenli

    2015-01-01

    While the affordances of face-to-face and online environments have been studied somewhat extensively, there is relatively less research on how technology-mediated learning takes place across multiple media in the networked classroom environment where face-to-face and online interactions are intertwined, especially in the context of language…

  2. The Use of English in the Chinese Language Classroom: Perspectives from American College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrietta Yang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available For a long time, whether learners' first language (L1 should be used in the foreign language classroom has been a controversial issue in the foreign language education field. The focus has been mostly on the use of L1 in the English language classroom (e.g.,Atkinson, 1987; Brooks-Lewis, 2009; Kieu, 2010; Krashen, 1981; Miles, 2004; Nazary, 2008; Prodromou, 2002; Schweers, 1999; Tang,2002. The debate centers on two diverse pedagogical approaches: the monolingual approach and the bilingual approach. The supporters of the monolingual approach contend that only the target language that learners are acquiring (i.e. English in most of the study should be allowed in the classroom, and Krashen (1981, 1985 was a pivotal supporter of this approach. However, other researchers and language teachers argue that the monolingual approach is not practical, particularly in lower-level classes (e.g., Atkinson, 1987; BrooksLewis, 2009; Schweers, 1999; Tang, 2002. They believe that using L1 in the classroom can be very effective when explaining difficult grammar points and linguistic elements that are language specific. The supporters of the bilingual approach do not deny the advantages of maximizing target language exposure and practice. However, they suggest that when learners' L1 is applied strategically, it can actually be a very important learning tool (e.g., Atkinson, 1987; Brooks-Lewis,2009; Schweers, 1999. Furthermore, both Schweers (1999 and Miles (2004 point out that the use of L1 provides students a more relaxed atmosphere and makes them less anxious and more confident in the classroom.

  3. The Influence of Classroom Drama on Teachers' Language and Students' On-Task Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Alida; Berry, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Teacher language and students' on-task behavior were examined in language arts lessons with and without classroom drama in two self-contained third grade classrooms for students with learning disabilities and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Language arts lessons that integrated classroom drama were associated with significantly higher…

  4. The Influence of Classroom Drama on Teachers' Language and Students' On-Task Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Alida; Berry, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Teacher language and students' on-task behavior were examined in language arts lessons with and without classroom drama in two self-contained third grade classrooms for students with learning disabilities and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Language arts lessons that integrated classroom drama were associated with significantly higher…

  5. Making Culture Happen in the English Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Yakup Doganay; Madina Ashirimbetova; Brent Davis

    2013-01-01

    The issue of introducing the target culture into language classroom practice has long been an object of debates as well as the opinions of the learners towards it. Eventually, modern practitioners found a way of having the language learners acquainted with the target culture and introducing culture through culture-based textbook activities. However, the issue of additional culturally-oriented activities in improving students learning habits is questionable today. The purpose of this paper is ...

  6. Towards criterion validity in classroom language analysis: methodological constraints of metadiscourse and inter-rater agreement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Altamiro Consolo

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available

    This paper reports on a process to validate a revised version of a system for coding classroom discourse in foreign language lessons, a context in which the dual role of language (as content and means of communication and the speakers' specific pedagogical aims lead to a certain degree of ambiguity in language analysis. The language used by teachers and students has been extensively studied, and a framework of concepts concerning classroom discourse well-established. Models for coding classroom language need, however, to be revised when they are applied to specific research contexts. The application and revision of an initial framework can lead to the development of earlier models, and to the re-definition of previously established categories of analysis that have to be validated. The procedures followed to validate a coding system are related here as guidelines for conducting research under similar circumstances. The advantages of using instruments that incorporate two types of data, that is, quantitative measures and qualitative information from raters' metadiscourse, are discussed, and it is suggested that such procedure can contribute to the process of validation itself, towards attaining reliability of research results, as well as indicate some constraints of the adopted research methodology.

  7. Associations between Chinese Language Classroom Environments and Students' Motivation to Learn the Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Siew Lian; Wong, Angela F. L.; Chen, Der-Thanq

    2009-01-01

    Associations between the nature of Chinese Language Classroom Environments and Singapore secondary school students' motivation to learn the Chinese Language were investigated. A sample of 1,460 secondary three (grade 9) students from 50 express stream (above average academic ability) classes in Singapore government secondary schools was involved…

  8. A Sociocognitive Perspective on Second Language Classroom Willingness to Communicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yiqian

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a multiple case study that investigated the dynamic and situated nature of learners' willingness to communicate (WTC) in second language (L2) classrooms. Framed within a sociocognitive perspective on L2 learning which draws together social, environmental, and individual factors, this study traced WTC among six learners…

  9. Student Engagement and Motivation in the Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsun-Ju

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation consists of two manuscripts to examine student motivation and engagement in the foreign language classroom. The purpose of the first paper is to propose a model that distinguishes between motivation and engagement. The paper highlights the connections and differences between motivation and engagement in order to point out issues…

  10. Literature and language learning in the EFL classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Teranishi, Masayuki; Wales, Katie

    2015-01-01

    This book examines how literary texts can be incorporated into teaching practices in an EFL classroom. It takes a multi-faceted approach to how English language teaching and learning can best be developed through presentation and exploration of literary texts.

  11. Meaningful Literacy: Writing Poetry in the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David I.

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops the concept of meaningful literacy and offers a classroom methodology--poetry writing--that manifests this approach to ESL/EFL literacy instruction. The paper is divided into three sections. The first deals with the concept of meaningful literacy learning in second and foreign language pedagogy; the second summarizes empirical…

  12. Using Skype in the Second and Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Sarah Elaine

    2010-01-01

    This presentation introduced Skype and how it can be used to: (1) connect teachers with other professionals - and save on long distance charges - even internationally (2) empower language teachers and tutors (3) give presentations and workshops (4) be a stepping stone to using more sophisticated technology in the classroom. It was noted that for…

  13. Twenty Ideas for Using Mobile Phones in the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinders, Hayo

    2010-01-01

    These days it seems mobile phones are used everywhere by everyone, which leads to the obvious question: How can mobile phone technology support learning in the second language classroom? The answer is "in a number of ways" because mobile phones come with ever-increasing functions that most students are adept at using. In this article the author…

  14. Spoken Grammar and Its Role in the English Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses key issues and considerations for teachers wanting to incorporate spoken grammar activities into their own teaching and also focuses on six common features of spoken grammar, with practical activities and suggestions for teaching them in the language classroom. The hope is that this discussion of spoken grammar and its place…

  15. Laptop Technology and Pedagogy in the English Language Arts Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrail, Ewa

    2007-01-01

    The English Language Arts teachers in this qualitative study reported somewhat negative outcomes in social and material spaces in the context of laptop technology in their classrooms. These outcomes included: (a) social isolation, (b) limited communication with a teacher or peers, and (c) off-task behavior. In an attempt to uncover the reasons for…

  16. Negotiating Language, Culture and Pupil Agency in Complementary School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytra, Vally

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, I examine the teaching of language and culture and in particular the use of songs as curriculum in two London Turkish complementary schools. Drawing on a series of interconnected classroom vignettes, I look at how children weave together their semiotic resources to negotiate and transform two songs and the talk and action around…

  17. Learning about and through Humor in the Second Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Nancy D.

    2009-01-01

    Humorous communication is extremely complex in both its forms and functions (e.g. Norrick, 1993; 2003). Much of the previous work that has put forth suggestions for incorporating humor into the language classroom (e.g. Trachtenberg, 1979; Deneire, 1995; Schmitz, 2002) has not examined these complexities in the detail necessary for the target…

  18. Code-switching in the foreign language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Youkhana, Sana

    2010-01-01

    It is a frequently observed phenomenon that language learners often turn to their native language in the foreign language classroom, i.e. they code-switch, but why is it so? In order to investigate this, this study had two aims; the first aim was about trying to see if the frequency of code-switching differed depending on the questions’ levels of difficulty. This study was conducted on three different upper-secondary schools and involved 24 pupils. The pupils’ age varied from 16 to 19. The hy...

  19. Language and Identity : attitudes towards code-switching in the immigrant language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Blomquist, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Although many studies have been conducted on second language acquisition and bilingual education, little is known about the role of language in the formation of identity by adolescent immigrants in the language classroom. More specifically, this study aims to investigate the use of code-switching by immigrant and refugee students learning Swedish and English in a high school preparatory program. Furthermore, this study investigates the relationship between students’ and teachers’ attitudes to...

  20. Games for the Foreign Language Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Nancy; Madaras, Susan W.

    Two marketing games are described, "Le Marche Francais" and "El Mercado: The Mexican Market Comes to Life in the Spanish Classroom." Both are patterned after a published game entitled "Market: A Simulation Game." The adaptation in each instance relied on simplifying the original game and presenting it in a form understandable to middle school…

  1. Competing Desires and Realities: Language Policies in the French-Language Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Giovanangeli

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available French language policy has historically centred on ways French can be considered a dominant and influential language. It has done this since the Middle Ages, by allowing the French language to serve as a political tool. On an international level, language was a way of subjugating conquered peoples (former colonies. It promoted France’s international status (by the 18th century French was the diplomatic language of Europe. On a national level, the French language was one of the ways governments were able to centralise political power (suppression of regional languages. One of the ways French language authorities have promoted the use of language has been through education policies and the way language is taught in schools. For example, the French language was imposed on the colonised territories of France through teaching in missionary schools. Within France, stringent laws were adopted, in particular during the nineteenth century, allowing the French language to replace local languages in schools. In France today, language policies continue to exist and to have an influence on the way we view language and society. One of the main priorities of French language policy is to protect the status of the national language in particular with respect to the increasing use of English as a global dominant language in areas such as science, technology, tourism, entertainment and the media (Nunan: 2007, 178. Consequently, France has adopted policies to respond to this linguistic climate. This has implications on the way the French language is taught both within France as well as outside of France. This paper will examine some of the policies and agencies created over recent years that affect the French language. It will also identify some of the consequences these policies have on the teaching of language. Finally it will argue that a space has been created within the language classroom that attempts to find a compromise between the language policies of the French government and the realities of spoken French in society.

  2. Language Practices in the Ci-Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourtou, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    Prelingually deafened children are nowadays likely to receive a cochlear implant (ci). As these children do their language acquisition with a cochlear implant they require a constant rehabilitation and support. Educational staff is instructed on how to work with children with ci in form of...... guidelines and workshops. This paper discusses language practices used in the setting of a school for cochlear-implanted children. These children encounter language and pronunciation problems that accompany prelingual deafness and hearing with a cochlear implant. I examine two practices, which are used...

  3. Language, Literacy, Literature: Using Storytelling in the Languages Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Stories and storytelling have been used for millennia to entertain, challenge and educate. As a shared form of language interaction, storytelling has engaged communities in developing and perpetuating common understandings of both language and culture, as critical foundations to harmonious societies. Stories and storytelling provide a rich source…

  4. Language Awareness in Language Learning and Teaching: A Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalberg, Agneta M.-L.

    2012-01-01

    Following on from my state-of-the-art article on "Language Awareness and language learning" (Svalberg 2007), in this paper I will discuss specific research tasks which are centrally concerned with different aspects of language awareness (LA): "explicit knowledge about language, and conscious perception and sensitivity in language learning,…

  5. Language Practices in the Ci-Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourtou, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    Prelingually deafened children are nowadays likely to receive a cochlear implant (ci). As these children do their language acquisition with a cochlear implant they require a constant rehabilitation and support. Educational staff is instructed on how to work with children with ci in form of guidelines and workshops. This paper discusses language practices used in the setting of a school for cochlear-implanted children. These children encounter language and pronunciation problems that accompany prelingual deafness and hearing with a cochlear implant. I examine two practices, which are used during the storytelling activity: repeat requests and questions. Whereas repeat requests are used in ci-therapy, questions have been shown to be instrumentalized for educational purposes in the setting of a school. I will reveal the educational/rehabilitational issues that are linked to these practices.

  6. Research in the FCS Secondary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Olivia Love; Brown, Lora Beth

    2009-01-01

    Much of what is taught in the family and consumer sciences (FCS) classroom is based on scientific research. The existing knowledge base is so broad that overlooking research as a teaching resource and tool happens often. Research enhances what is taught, thereby improving the effectiveness of teachers. Whether it be applying or translating…

  7. Early-Adolescents' Reading Comprehension and the Stability of the Middle School Classroom-Language Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámez, Perla B.; Lesaux, Nonie K.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined teachers' language use across the school year in 6th grade urban middle-school classrooms (n = 24) and investigated the influence of this classroom-based linguistic input on the reading comprehension skills of the students (n = 851; 599 language minority learners and 252 English-only) in the participating classrooms. Analysis…

  8. The Nature of Chinese Language Classroom Learning Environments in Singapore Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Siew Lian; Wong, Angela F. L.; Chen, Der-Thanq V.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports findings from a classroom environment study which was designed to investigate the nature of Chinese Language classroom environments in Singapore secondary schools. We used a perceptual instrument, the Chinese Language Classroom Environment Inventory, to investigate teachers' and students' perceptions towards their Chinese…

  9. The Impact of a Professional Development Program on English Language Teachers’ Classroom Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Giraldo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the findings of an action research study on a professional development program and its impact on the classroom performance of in-service English teachers who worked at a language institute of a Colombian state university. Questionnaires, semi-structured interviews, class observations, and a researcher’s journal were used as data collection instruments. Findings suggest that these in-service teachers improved their classroom performance as their teaching became more communicative, organized, attentive to students’ needs, and principled. In addition, theory, practice, reflection, and the role of the tutor combined effectively to help the in-service teachers improve classroom performance. It was concluded that these programs must be based on teachers’ philosophies and needs and effectively articulate theory, practice, experience, and reflection.

  10. Exploitation of Songs in Foreign Language Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil AYTEK?N

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Music holds a very important place in human life. People spend their days and free time listening to music. Music calms and relaxes the soul. Music is the best way to express one's feelings. Music is an important medium for teaching and educating as well. Music attracts the attention of students with its rhythm, singing style, emphasis on the target language and culture and provokes their desire to listen to it all the time. In the last few years music is basically a tool that many foreign language teachers have started to use. Music is used as a game to motivate students. This enables the class to remain energetic and lively. The song enables students to use the target language and learn about a new culture. Teachers must choose a song according to the objective of the class. These songs contribute to the student's oral and writing skills. Music also serves a special function of teaching student's the four basic language skills. Songs creates the opportunity to do many different types of activities in the class according to interest and age.

  11. Influencing Motivation in the Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Simon James

    2013-01-01

    Motivation is one of the main determining factors of success in developing a second or foreign language. However, motivation is a complex phenomenon and the more its constructs are understood the better we are able to understand the extent to which we can influence it. Teachers can cultivate student motivation to varying degrees and play a central…

  12. Influencing Motivation in the Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Simon James

    2013-01-01

    Motivation is one of the main determining factors of success in developing a second or foreign language. However, motivation is a complex phenomenon and the more its constructs are understood the better we are able to understand the extent to which we can influence it. Teachers can cultivate student motivation to varying degrees and play a central…

  13. Identity and participation in a workplace English language training classroom in Thailand: a community of practice perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Pimsiri

    2014-01-01

    This ethnographic study investigates identity and participation in a workplace English language training classroom in Thailand. As a practitioner’s enquiry, the research methods of participation observation, interviews and questionnaires were employed in exploring a 40-hour training classroom which acts as a workplace community of practice for both the teacher and the student participants. Through the lens of communities of practice (Lave and Wenger, 1991), the research shows the significance...

  14. Inquiring into Culture in our Foreign-Language Classrooms

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Damaris, Castro.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo presenta algunas reflexiones teóricas y de aplicación pedagógica sobre el concepto de cultura y su trascendental importancia en las clases de lengua extranjera como base para examinar la idea de currículo como indagación, una herramienta facilitadora para incorporar cultura en cursos del [...] Bachillerato en Enseñanza del Inglés de la Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica (UNA). El artículo también analiza posibles soluciones a problemas comunes que los profesores enfrentan al tratar de incorporar cultura en sus clases. Abstract in english This article presents some theoretical reflections about the concept of culture and its paramount importance in foreign language classrooms, as a basis for examining curriculum as inquiry, a facilitative tool to incorporate culture in courses in the Bachelor's degree in the Teaching of English as a [...] Foreign Language at the National University of Costa Rica (UNA). Feasible solutions to common problems that teachers face when trying to incorporate culture in their classrooms, are also discussed.

  15. Language-as-resource and language-as-political: tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, Núria; Civil, Marta

    2013-09-01

    In this article we reflect on the learning of mathematics in bilingual settings from a social and a political perspective. In particular we highlight two concepts that are key to our work: language-as-resource and language-as-political. To do so, we draw on classroom data from students of Mexican origin in Tucson, USA, and students from Latin America in Barcelona, Spain. The language policies in our contexts share a message of privileging the language of instruction (English or Catalan) over other languages. Our analysis of the two sets of data points to differences in the mathematical participation of students on the basis of which language they use. We develop the argument that, even if languages other than Catalan and English are accepted and certain pedagogies may be close to a language-as-resource approach, the use of the students' languages is politically mediated in such a way that its pedagogical value (as a medium of communication and learning) is not always taken into account in the bilingual mathematics classroom.

  16. Moving beyond Communicative Language Teaching: A Situated Pedagogy for Japanese EFL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochland, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    This article questions the appropriateness of communicative language teaching (CLT) in classrooms teaching English as a foreign language (EFL) to Japanese students. The four main criticisms of CLT are the ambiguity of its description, the benefits of CLT for language learning, the amalgamation of CLT methods with local classroom practices, and the…

  17. Classroom Tandem--Outlining a Model for Language Learning and Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Katri; Pörn, Michaela; Rusk, Fredrik; Björkskog, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to outline classroom tandem by comparing it with informal tandem learning contexts and other language instruction methods. Classroom tandem is used for second language instruction in mixed language groups in the subjects of Finnish and Swedish as L2. Tandem learning entails that two persons with different mother tongues…

  18. (Re)placing Literary Texts in the Intercultural Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Ana Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    In the history of language teaching, literary texts have gradually been reduced to a source for linguistic learning, as an informative representation of cultural traits or even dismissed from the foreign language classroom. This paper aims to add reasons that justify considering literary texts a vital presence in the foreign language classroom

  19. From Linguistic Analysis to Cultural Awareness: A Translation Framework for the Spanish Language Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Barbara N.; Rivera-Mills, Susana V.

    1999-01-01

    Proposes a translation framework to be used in the Spanish foreign-language classroom as a supplementary teaching technique. The use of translation techniques in the classroom can bridge the gap between language and culture by helping students develop metalinguistic skills that bring them to a higher level of awareness about the target language…

  20. Transforming Language Ideologies through Action Research: A Case Study of Bilingual Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eunah

    This qualitative case study explored a third grade bilingual teacher's transformative language ideologies through participating in a collaborative action research project. By merging language ideologies theory, Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT), and action research, I was able to identify the analytic focus of this study. I analyzed how one teacher and I, the researcher, collaboratively reflected on classroom language practices during the video analysis meetings and focus groups. Further, I analyzed twelve videos that we coded together to see the changes in the teacher's language practices over time. My unit of analysis was the discourse practice mediated by additive language ideologies. Throughout the collaborative action research process, we both critically reflected on the classroom language use. We also developed a critical consciousness about the participatory shifts and learning of focal English Learner (EL) students. Finally, the teacher made changes to her classroom language practices. The results of this study will contribute to the literacy education research field for theoretical, methodological, and practical insights. The integration of language ideologies, CHAT, and action research can help educational practitioners, researchers, and policy makers understand the importance of transforming teachers' language ideologies in designing additive learning contexts for ELs. From a methodological perspective, the transformative language ideologies through researcher and teacher collaborated video analysis process provide a unique contribution to the language ideologies in education literature, with analytic triangulation. As a practical implication, this study suggests action research can be one of the teacher education tools to help the teachers transform language ideologies for EL education.

  1. Classroom tandem – Outlining a Model for Language Learning and Instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Karjalainen, Katri; Michaela PÖRN; Fredrik RUSK; Linda BJÖRKSKOG

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to outline classroom tandem by comparing it with informal tandem learning contexts and other language instruction methods. Classroom tandem is used for second language instruction in mixed language groups in the subjects of Finnish and Swedish as L2. Tandem learning entails that two persons with different mother tongues learn each other’s native languages in reciprocal cooperation. The students function, in turns, as a second language learner and as a model in the nat...

  2. The Influence of Classroom Drama on English Learners' Academic Language Use during English Language Arts Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Alida; Loughlin, Sandra M.

    2014-01-01

    Teacher and student academic discourse was examined in an urban arts-integrated school to better understand facilitation of students' English language learning. Participants' discourse was compared across English language arts (ELA) lessons with and without classroom drama in a third-grade classroom of English learning (EL) students (N =…

  3. Computer assisted (language) learning (CA(L)L) for the inclusive classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Greene, Cara

    2013-01-01

    Post-Primary Schools in Ireland are inclusive with a mix of students with diverse abilities in the classroom, including students with learning and literacy difficulties, such as dyslexia. This poses a strong challenge: how to create inclusive curricula and materials that cater to the needs of diverse students? The objective of this research is to investigate whether integrating Computer Assisted (Language) Learning (CA(L)L) into the curriculum can produce inclusive curricula that cater to ...

  4. TEACHER’S PERCEIVED CHARACTERISTICS AND PREFERENCES OF MOTIVATIONAL STRATEGIES IN THE LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

    OpenAIRE

    Winda Hapsari

    2013-01-01

    Motivated language teachers play a crucial role in building and developing students’ motivation in the classroom. This study aims to investigate teachers’motivational strategies in relation to their characteristics and preferences in Indonesian context of EFL instruction, which is an area that receives scant attention with regard to empirical research. The empirical data were collected through survey questionnaires and interviews. Twenty-eightactive teachers volunteered to participate in the ...

  5. Language Form, Task-Based Language Teaching, and the Classroom Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batstone, Rob

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I examine some of the ideas about task-based language teaching (TBLT) which have emerged over the 17 years of the current editorship of ELTJ, focusing in particular on grammar and vocabulary, and enquiring to what degree these ideas take adequate account of classroom context. Over this period, TBLT scholars have built up a…

  6. (Re)placing Literary Texts in the Intercultural Foreign Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Gonçalves Matos

    2011-01-01

    In the history of language teaching, literary texts have gradually been reduced to a source for linguistic learning, as an informative representation of cultural traits or even dismissed from the foreign language classroom. This paper aims to add reasons that justify considering literary texts a vital presence in the foreign language classroom. One general aim is to promote the study of foreign literature as enjoyable and (inter)culturally significant.The classroom is inevitably a culturally ...

  7. Understanding language use in the classroom a linguistic guide for college educators

    CERN Document Server

    Behrens, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    It is clear that a proper understanding of what academic English is and how to use it is crucial for success in college, and yet students face multiple obstacles in acquiring this new 'code', not least that their professors often cannot agree amongst themselves on a definition and a set of rules. Understanding Language Use in the Classroom aims to bring the latest findings in linguistics research on academic English to educators from other disciplines, and to help them help their students learn and achieve. Behrens combines a powerful argument for the importance of explicit teaching of languag

  8. Pre-Service Science Teachers' Understandings of Classroom Research and the Problems in Conducting Classroom Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantarakantee, Ekgapoom; Roadrangka, Vantipa; Clarke, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    This research paper explores pre-service science teachers' understandings of classroom research, problems in conducting classroom research and the supports that pre-service science teachers need from their cooperating teachers to help them conduct a classroom research project during the internship period. The participants in this study are 19…

  9. Directing Attention to Pronunciation in the Second Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counselman, David

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by predictions of the theory of Input Processing, this study adds to previous research on second language (L2) Spanish pronunciation learning by investigating the impact of two distinct types of pronunciation assignments on first language (L1) English L2 Spanish students' improvement in pronunciation of the vowels /e, o/. Two sections of…

  10. Teaching english through spanish: a secondary school EFL teachers`s language choices in the foreign language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Morata, Marisa; Coyle, Yvette

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines the language used by a Spanish secondary school teacher of English. Taking as a basic premise that exposure to the foreign language is conducive to language learning, transcripts of classroom discourse were analysed to identify the pedagogical functions present in the teacher’s speech and the language used to express them. The results show an overwhelming reliance by the teacher on the students’ first language for all of the most frequently occurring functions. Inst...

  11. Cross language information retrieval: a research roadmap

    OpenAIRE

    Gey, Fredric C.; Kando, Noriko; Peters, Carol

    2003-01-01

    Cross-Language Information Retrieval (CLIR) has been a research sub-field for more than a decade now. The field has sparked three major evaluation efforts: the TREC Cross Language Track which currently focuses on the Arabic language, the Cross-Language Evaluation Forum (CLEF) - a spinoff from TREC - covering many European languages, and the NTCIR Asian Language Evaluation (covering Chinese, Japanese and Korean). During this one-day workshop we reviewed and assessed the progress that has been ...

  12. Language of poverty strategies: Implemented in the urban elementary science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanpierre, Bobby Jo

    2000-08-01

    This research study reports the results of school-based staff development models used at three urban elementary schools that had liaison teachers assisting classroom teachers in implementing instructional strategies in science teaching from "Language of Poverty," a curriculum framework designed to address the academic needs of disadvantaged students. The case study of two urban elementary schools and six classroom teachers, and survey and interview data results of a third school, uncovered insights into several areas of science teaching in urban settings. One conclusion is that in spite of substantial allocation of resources and assistance, teachers did not translate instructional strategies from "Language of Poverty" curriculum into their classroom practices in a way that would foster urban disadvantaged students' understanding of "big science concepts." A second conclusion is that the school-based staff development models were limited in their ability to address the diverse professional needs of all of its staff. Third, as it relates to students, discipline issues occurred in these urban classrooms across ethnicity and gender. And in addition to teachers being knowledgeable of relevant social and cultural group norms' application of this knowledge in an appropriate and consistent manner is needed to effectively address discipline concerns.

  13. Principles for Code Choice in the Foreign Language Classroom: A Focus on Grammaring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Glenn S.

    2014-01-01

    The social and cultural "turn" in language education of recent years has helped move language teaching and curriculum design away from many of the more rigid dogmas of earlier generations, but the issue of the roles of the learners' first language (L1) in language pedagogy and classroom interaction is far from settled. Some follow a…

  14. Examination of Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety and Achievement in Foreign Language in Turkish University Students in Terms of Various Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Yunus; Tuncer, Murat

    2016-01-01

    This correlational survey study aimed to investigate whether the Turkish prep-class students' foreign language classroom anxiety levels and foreign language achievement significantly differ in terms of such variables as their gender, their experience abroad, perceived level of income and any third language (other than Turkish and English) they…

  15. Research and Reflective Practice in the ESL Classroom: Voices from Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirocki, Andrzej; Tennekoon, Sujeewa; Calvo, Alicia Pena

    2014-01-01

    Modern language education favours the model of a reflective teacher-researcher who is engaged in both individual and collaborative curriculum revision and teaching-learning environment improvement. The present paper addresses the issue of classroom research and reflective practice in current ESL pedagogy and teacher professional development. The…

  16. Making It Happen: Interaction in the Second Language Classroom, From Theory to Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard-Amato, Patricia A.

    A discussion linking theory and practice in second language instruction focuses on ways of providing opportunities for meaningful interaction in language classrooms. The first part lays a theoretical foundation, looking at: the variety and evolution of instructional approaches from grammar-based to communicative; the classroom as environment for…

  17. Bridging the Gap: Discourse in Text-Based Foreign Language Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantero, Miguel

    2002-01-01

    Investigated text-centered talk in an introduction to Hispanic literature university level classroom. Framed within sociocultural theory, the study aimed to establish the nature of classroom talk in the college level foreign language bridge course. Aimed to clarify the relationship between cognitive processes and language acquisition in a foreign…

  18. Motivation in Learning a Second Language: Exploring the Contributions of Family and Classroom Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Frank Wai-ming

    2009-01-01

    This study looks at how family and classroom factors influence second-language learning at the junior secondary level in schools in Hong Kong. It employed an ecological perspective to look at how family-level factors and classroom-level factors uniquely combine to influence students' learning motivations in second-language learning. Nineteen…

  19. EFL (English as a Foreign Language) Classroom Discourse Analysis of a Vocational College and Some Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Liu; Luzheng, Lou; Biru, Shi

    2011-01-01

    The application of classroom discourse analysis of foreign language teaching and learning can reveal much about how teachers perform in their teaching practice and how to make improvement. In this paper, the author tries to reveal the present state of EFL (English as a foreign language) classrooms in a vocational college from the angle of…

  20. The Relationship between Gender and Iranian EFL Learners’ Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety (FLCA)

    OpenAIRE

    Fakhri Mesri

    2012-01-01

    Foreign language anxiety is widely used to describe the feeling of tension and apprehension, which is specifically associated with foreign language learning contexts, including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Foreign language classroom anxiety (FLCA) is related to foreign language anxiety and language-skill-specific anxiety, and fairly recently identified as distinguished from other forms of anxiety. FLCA is a more general type of anxiety in learning a foreign language with a stron...

  1. Revamping the Classroom Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner-Burke, Nanci

    2014-01-01

    Too often, students don't feel engaged in their research projects. The problem begins as early as the topic-creation stage, when students may choose from a list of teacher-selected topics that don't interest them or struggle to select a single fruitful topic on their own. Nanci Werner-Burke describes how two students in an English…

  2. Research on Language and Learning: implications for Language Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Alcón

    2004-01-01

    Taking into account severa1 limitations of communicative language teaching (CLT), this paper calls for the need to consider research on language use and learning through communication as a basis for language teaching. It will be argued that a reflective approach towards language teaching and learning might be generated, which is explained in terms of the need to develop a context-sensitive pedagogy and in terms of teachers' and learners' development.

  3. Researching classroom interactions: A methodology for teachers and researchers

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Sally; Sutherland, Rosamund

    2007-01-01

    Teaching and learning in schools is a complex social process which involves both the teacher and students in distributed knowledge-building activities. Research into this process includes researchers exploring from the outside and teachers exploring from the inside (Bassey, 1995). Jaworski (2003) draws on the work of Wagner (1997) to elaborate a form of research which she calls co-learning, in which research on classroom learning is “conducted jointly by outsiders and insiders” (p 250). The w...

  4. New Proposals for Educational Development of Disciplines Taught in Foreign Languages in Multicultural Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Birch Gonçalves

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the current trend of offering courses in the undergraduate programs, taught in foreign languages, as a fundamental aspect for the formation of new global professionals who require different skills to work in multicultural markets. To do so, the research highlights some concepts of internationalization, academic mobility and curricula internationalization. A longitudinal case study was conducted over a period of three years (2010-2013, describing the trajectory of the Intercultural Communication discipline, taught in English in a multicultural classroom, in a Higher Education Institution. For the analysis, it was used the data provided by online assessment system. The results show the degree of satisfaction by students who attended this course and emphasizes the strong responsibility of professionals who teach courses in foreign languages where language proficiency is essential, however the content domain and the use of proper methodologies are no less important.

  5. The benefits of management and organisation: a case study in young language learners’ classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Christina Nicole Giannikas

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on primary language education within a Greek region: specifically, on the positive effects of classroom management and organisation on a student-centred approach of teaching. In the case of the Greek education system, language teachers are encouraged to adopt student-centred approaches in their classroom but have not received any guidance on how to do so. Language educators are reluctant to abandon their teacher-centred ways, because they have not been trained to apply clas...

  6. ¿Duermes mucho Tony? Interpersonal and Transactional Uses of L1 in the Foreign-Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Higareda Sandra; López Georgina; Mugford Gerrard

    2009-01-01

    Whilst communicative teaching approaches sanction, often grudgingly, the limited use of the students’ first language (l1) in English Language Teaching (elt ), critical debate is now centred on a much more substantial and energetic role for the use of mother tongue in the language classroom. Justifications favouring the use of l1 currently range from ideological arguments to classroom teaching considerations. This paper contributes to this ongoing debate by examining how new generations o...

  7. ¿duermes mucho tony? interpersonal and transactional uses of l1 in the foreign-language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Higareda, Sandra; López, Georgina; Mugford, Gerrard

    2009-01-01

    Whilst communicative teaching approaches sanction, often grudgingly, the limited use of the students’ first language (l1) in English Language Teaching (elt ), critical debate is now centred on a much more substantial and energetic role for the use of mother tongue in the language classroom. Justifications favouring the use of l1 currently range from ideological arguments to classroom teaching considerations. This paper contributes to this ongoing debate by examining how new generations of ...

  8. Investigating foreign language anxiety in Iranian classrooms: The effect of gender

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoodzadeh, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to delve into the issue of affective variables related to language learning, the present study focuses on the influence of gender on learners' foreign language anxiety in the Iranian context. The objective of this case study is first to determine the extent to which Iranian EFL learners perceive foreign language anxiety in matched-gender and mixed-gender classrooms and second to see if there is any significant difference between the two types of the investigated classrooms. To t...

  9. Probing EFL Students’ Language Skill Development in Tertiary Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Wang

    2008-01-01

    Research in second or foreign language learning indicates that for adult learners, the improvement of one language skill facilitates the development of other skills. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlations among Chinese EFL students’ reading, writing, and listening development by examining their test scores on the College English Test Band 4. The findings showed that the resultant correlation coefficients between reading and writing and between reading and listening were...

  10. Developing communicative competence through thinking tasks: Experimenting with Thinking Approach in Danish as Second Language Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maslo, Elina

    Danish as second and foreign language in transformative learning spaces”. Two teachers have developed and tried out some thinking tasks in their classrooms, with the aim to foster the development of students´ communicative competence. The learning processes from two classrooms will be analysed in the......Developing communicative competence through thinking tasks - Experimenting with Thinking Approach in Danish as Second Language ClassroomSession on Innovations in the classroom, a presentation. Abstract for the conference Creativity & Thinking Skills in Learning, teaching & Management. Riga 19......-20 September 2014 Elina Maslo, Aarhus University, Department of Education, elma@edu.au.dk Summary: The goal of this presentation is to present some of the experiences with thinking tasks in the Danish language classroom, conducted in the Nordplus Nordic Language Project “Problem solving tasks for learning of...

  11. Classroom Management: What Does Research Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postholm, May Britt

    2013-01-01

    The article reviews studies that focus on classroom management. The aim of classroom management is twofold. The first is to establish a quiet and calm environment in the classroom so that the pupils can take part in meaningful learning in a subject. The second aim is that classroom management contributes to the pupils' social and moral…

  12. English Language Classroom Practices: Bangladeshi Primary School Children's Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Prithvi Narayan

    2013-01-01

    English language teaching (ELT) has been investigated from various angles including how English language teachers perceive what happens in an ELT classroom. How primary school English language learners perceive their experiences of ELT is rarely reported in the published literature, particularly from developing countries such as Bangladesh. This…

  13. Meaning-Making as Dialogic Process: Official and Carnival Lives in the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackledge, Adrian; Creese, Angela

    2009-01-01

    This article adopts a Bakhtinian analysis to understand the complexities of discourse in language-learning classrooms. Drawing on empirical data from two of four linked case studies in a larger, ESRC-funded project, we argue that students learning in complementary (also known as community language, supplementary, or heritage language) schools…

  14. The Oral Interview and Cross-Cultural Understanding in the Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rings, Lana

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses cross-cultural oral interviews and how they can be used in the foreign language classroom to help students understand the differing, often culture-specific perspectives of language use among people speaking another language. By conducting interviews, or by teaching students the interview process, instructors can provide…

  15. Whose Language Is It? Struggles for Language Ownership in an Irish Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Bernadette

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine how struggles over language ownership are played out in a minority language setting, focusing on the case of Irish in the Republic of Ireland. The article examines the more or less serious struggles that emerge between so-called native, or L1, and nonnative, or L2, speakers of Irish in a language learning…

  16. Increasing Academic Oral Language Development: Using English Language Learner Shadowing in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Hinman, Ivannia

    2011-01-01

    According to Diane August (2002), a senior research scientist at the Center for Applied Linguistics, English Language Learners (ELLs) spend less than two percent of their school day in oral language development. Worse yet, when ELLs are speaking in school, it is often not about academic topics or rigorous content. This lack of academic oral…

  17. French Cuisine in the Classroom: Using Culture to Enhance Language Proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrate, Jane E.

    1993-01-01

    French cuisine offers a valuable resource for creating culture-based contexts for language use in the classroom. Suggestions and ideas are presented for incorporating food-related activities in the French class. (VWL)

  18. The Role of the Language Laboratory in Improving Teachers' Classroom English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedtke, Manfred; Hartford, Richard

    1977-01-01

    A course given to help German teachers of English master English phrases used frequently in the classroom is described. It was found that initial contextualization followed by language laboratory work enabled teachers to assimilate phrases best. (CHK)

  19. Research for the Classroom: Analyzing Classroom Literacy Events--What Observing Classroom Conversations about Popular Culture Can Reveal about Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Ms. Mayer, a recently retired English language arts teacher, frequently used strategies described in John Golden's book "Reading in the Dark: Using Film as a Tool in the English Classroom." In this book, Golden suggests that ELA teachers "reverse the order: use a film clip to practice the reading and analytical skills that we want our students to…

  20. Aida and Her Mainstream Classroom: A Case Study of a Young English Language Learner's Literacy Development

    OpenAIRE

    Bambang Yudi Cahyono

    2003-01-01

    This article reports a nine-month study of literacy development of Aida, a young English language learner from Indonesia, who was mainstreamed in a Grade 2 classroom in a primary school in the south-eastern part of Australia. This article initially reviews the literature concerning features of the mainstream classroom conducive for second language learning and for literacy development. Following the presentation of methodological issues, it examines English learning activities in Aida's class...

  1. A Case Study on the Influence of Organizational Culture on Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Zhihui Liu

    2009-01-01

    This paper tries to probe the influence of the organizational culture on language classroom at a newly-established local college. It firstly reviews the knowledge of the organizational culture and finds out its features, and then discusses how the organizational culture was greatly influenced by the host educational environment. On the basis of this, the paper interprets how organizational culture in turn influences the classroom culture in terms of English language teaching and learning in C...

  2. Elementary English Language Instruction: Colombian Teachers’ Classroom Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cadavid Múnera Isabel Cristina

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available An in-progress ethnographic research project about teachers who are facing the complex task of teaching English to children in 7 public elementary schools in the metropolitan area of Medellin is presented in this article. First, the need for this research is outlined by researchers; second, the methodology of the project is described; third, up-to-date findings which include a profile of the 12 teachers who are participating in this study, and an analysis of their class methodology in terms of activities, materials, teacher and student roles are reported. Lastly, implications of this research project related to early foreign language instruction are highlighted. Key words: Public Elementary-English-Language Instruction, English-Foreign Language, Ethnography-Research-Method, Teaching-Methodology Este artículo presenta los resultados preliminares de una investigación etnográfica acerca de las estrategias metodológicas utilizadas por profesores de básica primaria que enseñan inglés como lengua extranjera en 7 escuelas públicas del área metropolitana del municipio de Medellín. En la primera parte se resalta la importancia de esta investigación en nuestro medio y en la segunda, de los 12 profesores participantes y un análisis de la metodología empleada por ellos con respecto a las actividades de clase, los materiales y el rol del estudiante y del profesor. Finalmente, se discuten algunas de las implicaciones de este proyecto de investigación en la enseñanza de lenguas extranjeras a niños. Palabras claves: Inglés-Enseñanza-Básica Primaria, Lengua Extranjera-Inglés, Estudio Etnográfico-Investigación, Enseñanza-Metodología

  3. Language use in the English classroom : the role of students' first language in grades 9 and 10 in English classrooms in Iceland

    OpenAIRE

    Arna Borg Snorradóttir 1990

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this paper was to gather insight into students’ attitudes and perceptions towards language use during English instruction. What are students’ opinions about the benefit of their own and the teacher’s use of English in the classroom? When should the teacher and the students use the first language in the English classroom? These are two of the main questions explored in this paper. A study was conducted in grades 9 and 10 in an Icelandic compulsory school. A total of 121 s...

  4. Collaborative Classroom Management. Video to Accompany "A Biological Brain in a Cultural Classroom: Applying Biological Research to Classroom Management." [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001

    This 43-minute VHS videotape is designed to be used in course and workshop settings with "A Biological Brain in a Cultural Classroom: Applying Biological Research to Classroom Management." The videotape's principal values are as an introduction to the issues explored in the book and as a catalyst for group discussions and activities related to…

  5. O processo de conscientização na sala de aula de língua espanhola = The awareness process in a Spanish language classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Mayumi Meneghini

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo trata do processo de conscientização desenvolvido pelos alunos em uma sala de aula de espanhol como língua estrangeira de um Centro de Estudos de Línguas do interior do Estado de São Paulo. Considerou-se como arcabouço teórico a pedagogia freireana (FREIRE, 1980, 1984, 1987, 1999, 2000 além de autoras que tiveram como referencial teórico Paulo Freire e relacionaram sua pedagogia ao ensino de línguas estrangeiras (WALLERSTEIN, 1983; SCHLEPPEGRELL, 1997. É uma pesquisa de natureza qualitativa, que focalizou uma prática de pesquisa-ação em uma sala de aula de espanhol, na qual se implementou um planejamento freireano, para verificar como se dava o uso da língua-alvo na sala de aula (MENEGHINI, 2001. Com a análise e a discussão dos dados, realizadas por meio da triangulação desses dados, considerando-se como dados primários as interações em sala de aula, constata-se que as tarefas problematizadoras são o meio para o desenvolvimento da conscientização por parte dos alunos sobre a realidade que os cerca.This article discusses the awareness process of students in a Spanish as a foreign language classroom, at a Centre of Language Studies in a city in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The frame of reference is Paulo Freire’s pedagogy (FREIRE, 1980, 1984, 1987, 1999, 2000, Wallerstein (1983 and Schleppegrell (1997’s investigations which are important to the comprehension of the relation between Freirean’s pedagogy and the language teaching. This is a qualitative research and it focuses on action research practice in a Spanish language classroom, in which a syllabus based on Paulo Freire’s pedagogy was implemented in order to verify how the target language was used in the classroom (MENEGHINI, 2001. Data analysis and discussion are based on data triangulation and classroom interactions are taken on primary data. The implementation of this research suggests that the problem posing tasks on themes chosen from the student's realities are the way which leads to the awareness.

  6. Language Teacher Research in the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombe, Christine, Ed.; Barlow, Lisa, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    An openness to new ways of teaching and learning is vital for growth among English language teachers, teacher educators, teachers in training, and students. This volume in the Language Teacher Research Series (Thomas S. C. Farrell, series editor) shares the studies and reflections of teacher researchers working in Middle Eastern countries with…

  7. Second Language Research Using Magnetoencephalography: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gwen L.; Roberts, Timothy P. L.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we show how magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a constructive tool for language research and review MEG findings in second language (L2) research. MEG is the magnetic analog of electroencephalography (EEG), and its primary advantage over other cross-sectional (e.g. magnetic resonance imaging, or positron emission tomography) functional…

  8. Research Ethics in Sign Language Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Raychelle; Holmes, Heidi M.; Mertens, Donna M.

    2009-01-01

    Codes of ethics exist for most professional associations whose members do research on, for, or with sign language communities. However, these ethical codes are silent regarding the need to frame research ethics from a cultural standpoint, an issue of particular salience for sign language communities. Scholars who write from the perspective of…

  9. Classroom Has a Heart: Teachers and Students Affective Alignment in a Persian Heritage Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atoofi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    This research study investigated how the teachers and students at a Persian heritage language class acknowledged and modified their affective behavior based on the affective feedback they received from one another. The notion that interactants can modify their affective output in such fashion is referred in the literature as affective alignment…

  10. Classroom Has a Heart: Teachers and Students Affective Alignment in a Persian Heritage Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atoofi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    This research study investigated how the teachers and students at a Persian heritage language class acknowledged and modified their affective behavior based on the affective feedback they received from one another. The notion that interactants can modify their affective output in such fashion is referred in the literature as affective alignment…

  11. The Role of Relational and Instructional Classroom Supports in the Language Development of At-Risk Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosse, Carolyn S.; McGinty, Anita S.; Mashburn, Andrew J.; Hoffman, LaVae M.; Pianta, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the extent to which preschool classroom supports--relational support (RS) and instructional support (IS)--are associated with children's language development and whether these associations vary as a function of children's language ability. The language skills of 360 children within 95 classrooms were assessed…

  12. "I've Got an Idea": A Social Semiotic Perspective on Agency in the Second Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnow, Rachel J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the role of multimodal fluency in establishing agency in the second language classroom. The focus of the paper is on the semiotic resourcefulness of an English Language Learner in an English as a Second Language classroom in the United States. Framed from a social semiotic perspective, fine grained multimodal analysis of…

  13. L2 and L3 integrated learning – lingua franca use in learning an additional language in the classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazel, Spencer; Wagner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    This study offers an empirical account of the use of English in Danish-as-a-foreign-language classroom settings. We will refer to English as the lingua franca - which in itself is a second language for the majority of the participants in the data - and to Danish as the target language. We consider implications of lingua franca interaction in target language classroom interactions, and show how in sequences where participants orient to linguistic issues in the target language, for example grammat...

  14. Exploring Content Teachers' Knowledge of Language Pedagogy: A Report on a Small-Scale Research Project in a Dutch CLIL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Gerrit Jan; Skeet, Jason; de Graaff, Rick

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between language pedagogy and the content and language integrated learning (CLIL) classroom is a key issue for research into CLIL. In the Netherlands, as in other European contexts, non-native speakers of a target language with a non-language teaching background teach CLIL content lessons. Whilst CLIL teachers teaching their…

  15. ELT Teacher Trainees' Attitudes towards Environmental Education and Their Tendency to Use It in the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursoy, Esim; Saglam, Gulderen T.

    2011-01-01

    With the change of focus in language teaching from grammar-based approaches to more communicative approaches, contextual language learning gained importance and found body in the English Language classroom. Global issues constitute one of the most popular contexts for purposeful language learning and meaningful language use. Increasing number of…

  16. Aida and Her Mainstream Classroom: A Case Study of a Young English Language Learner's Literacy Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Yudi Cahyono

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports a nine-month study of literacy development of Aida, a young English language learner from Indonesia, who was mainstreamed in a Grade 2 classroom in a primary school in the south-eastern part of Australia. This article initially reviews the literature concerning features of the mainstream classroom conducive for second language learning and for literacy development. Following the presentation of methodological issues, it examines English learning activities in Aida's classroom and highlights her literacy development with examples of her work. The results from this study show that Aida developed literacy skills considered important for her second language and learning development. The variety of English learning activities and the encouraging environment in her classroom contributed much to her literacy development.

  17. Factors Influencing Student Nurses’ Perceptions of Success and Failure in Second Language Writing – A Classroom-based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hung-Cheng TAI

    2013-01-01

    This article applies attribution theory to identify the factors that influence nursing students’ perceptions of success and failure in learning English writing skills. The study took place in a language classroom in southern Taiwan involving fifty-one female nursing students, a writing teacher, and the researcher. Teaching activities included five writing cycles based on an online writing platform, process approach, and multiple revisions. Evidence data has been collected from learners’ quest...

  18. Second language writing anxiety, computer anxiety, and performance in a classroom versus a web-based environment

    OpenAIRE

    Dracopoulos, Effie

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the impact of writing anxiety and computer anxiety on language learning for 45 ESL adult learners enrolled in an English grammar and writing course. Two sections of the course were offered in a traditional classroom setting whereas two others were given in a hybrid form that in-volved distance learning. Contrary to previous research, writing anxiety showed no correlation with learning performance, whereas computer anxie-ty only yielded a positive correlation with performan...

  19. The relevance of body language to evolution of language research

    OpenAIRE

    Wacewicz, S?awomir; ?ywiczy?ski, Przemys?aw

    2010-01-01

    The heterogeneous category of phenomena covered by the term body language (roughly equivalent to nonverbal communication, NVC), although essential to human day-to-day communication, is also largely dissociable from human verbal behaviour. As such, it has received little attention in the area of evolution of language research. In this paper we point to an important factor – signal reliability (honesty) as an elementary constraint on communication as an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) – wh...

  20. What Do Learners Make of Teachers' Gestures in the Language Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    This study explores the meanings that learners of English as a foreign language give to teachers' gestures. It is a qualitative, descriptive study of the perceived functions that gestures perform in the EFL classroom, viewed mainly from the language learners' perspective. The data for the study was collected through interviews with twenty-two…

  1. 20 Ways for Classroom Teachers to Collaborate with Speech-Language Pathologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Kellie L.; Iyer, Suneeti Nathani; Boon, Richard T.; Fore, Cecil, III

    2010-01-01

    Students with disabilities are increasingly receiving services in the general education classroom, and as a result, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are using a variety of flexible models to meet the needs of these students. Although some schools continue to provide pullout service delivery models for speech-language therapy, many are…

  2. Teaching English as a Global Language in Smart Classrooms with PowerPoint Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oommen, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    The current study, as part of an ongoing investigation to examine teacher perceptions about the teaching of English as a global language at the tertiary level education, aims at examining learner perceptions about PowerPoint presentations used in English classroom instruction for enhancement and integration of four language skills and effective…

  3. Error Analysis in the Classroom. CAL-ERIC/CLL Series on Languages and Linguistics, No. 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Patricia B.

    This paper begins with a discussion of the meaning and importance of error analysis in language teaching and learning. The practical implications of what error analysis is for the classroom teacher are discussed, along with several possible systems for classifying learner errors. The need for the language teacher to establish certain priorities in…

  4. Teaching English Language Learners: 43 Strategies for Successful K-8 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Ideal as a supplementary text for a variety of courses and as a guide for in-service teachers and for professional development settings, "Teaching English Language Learners: 43 Strategies for Successful K-8 Classrooms" provides teachers of all content areas with a broad, practical approach to teaching English language learners in the regular…

  5. Gesture, Meaning-Making, and Embodiment: Second Language Learning in an Elementary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosborough, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the mediational role of gesture and body movement/positioning between a teacher and an English language learner in a second-grade classroom. Responding to Thibault's (2011) call for understanding language through whole-body sense making, aspects of gesture and body positioning were analyzed…

  6. Social Positioning, Participation, and Second Language Learning: Talkative Students in an Academic ESL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayi-Aydar, Hayriye

    2014-01-01

    Guided by positioning theory and poststructural views of second language learning, the two descriptive case studies presented in this article explored the links between social positioning and the language learning experiences of two talkative students in an academic ESL classroom. Focusing on the macro- and micro-level contexts of communication,…

  7. Teaching Pragmatics in the Foreign Language Classroom: Grammar as a Communicative Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix-Brasdefer, J. Cesar; Cohen, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the teaching of pragmatics in the Spanish as a Foreign Language classroom and examines the role of grammar as a communicative resource. It also aims to highlight the importance of teaching pragmatics from beginning levels of language instruction, with the spotlight on speech acts at the discourse level. After the concept of…

  8. "Ma Sha Allah!" Creating Community through Humor Practices in a Diverse Arabic Language Flagship Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Sara Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on Lave and Wenger's (1991) and Wenger's (1998) "communities of practice" (CoP) framework, this study explores the shared repertoire of humor practices in the creation of community within the context of a culturally diverse and multilevel adult Arabic language classroom consisting of two native speakers, five heritage language learners…

  9. Preschool Classroom Conversations as Long-Term Resources for Second Language and Literacy Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aukrust, Vibeke Grover; Rydland, Veslemoy

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated relations between preschool talk exposure and immigrant first graders' second language literacy and oral skills outcomes. Participants in the study were 25 children with Turkish as their first language and Norwegian as their second, attending various multilingual and ethnically diverse preschool classrooms in Norway and…

  10. Preschool Classroom Conversations as Long-Term Resources for Second Language and Literacy Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aukrust, Vibeke Grover; Rydland, Veslemoy

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated relations between preschool talk exposure and immigrant first graders' second language literacy and oral skills outcomes. Participants in the study were 25 children with Turkish as their first language and Norwegian as their second, attending various multilingual and ethnically diverse preschool classrooms in Norway and…

  11. Researcher Identity, Narrative Inquiry, and Language Teaching Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Bonny; Early, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Whereas there has been much research on language and identity with respect to learners, teachers, and teacher educators, there has been little focus on the identity of the researcher, an important stakeholder in language education. Our research therefore addresses the following question: To what extent can narrative inquiry illuminate the ways in…

  12. Code-Switching in English as a Foreign Language Classroom: Teachers’ Attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Engku Haliza Engku Ibrahim; Mohamed Ismail Ahamad Shah; Najwa Tgk. Armia

    2013-01-01

    Code-switching has always been an intriguing phenomenon to sociolinguists. While the general attitude to it seems negative, people seem to code-switch quite frequently. Teachers of English as a foreign language too frequently claim that they do not like to code-switch in the language classroom for various reasons – many are of the opinion that only the target language should be used in the classroom. This study looks at the teachers’ attitudes towards code-switching in teaching English as a f...

  13. Language Classroom Risk-Taking Behavior in a Performed Culture-Based Program

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen D. Luft

    2013-01-01

    While several studies have investigated the role of risk-taking in language learning, the findings of these studies may not be generalizable to language learning where the performed culture approach (PCA) is used. This study describes the relationship between language learning and risk-taking in PCA, and the relationship between risk-taking and personal study habits, teaching style, daily grading, and classroom dynamics. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire. Th...

  14. The Relationship between Language Learners’ Anxiety and Learning Strategy in the CLT Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Kun-huei Wu

    2010-01-01

    This paper intends to explore how Taiwanese students perceive the relationship between their language learning strategy and anxiety in the foreign language classroom. Due to their previous learning experience, most of the participants hold an unfavorable attitude toward a grammar-translation teaching approach. Consequently, learner-centered instruction has been widely accepted and acknowledged as a welcome concept and feasible teaching approach in the English Foreign Language (EFL) context. T...

  15. Non-native Teacher Talk as Lexical Input in the Foreign Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Eunice Tang

    2011-01-01

    Non-native or indigenous English teachers have provided the largest teaching and professional support in Asian countries where English is taught and learnt in school as an additional or international language. As the language environment outside classroom in these countries is generally poor, teachers become a major source of language input for learners. This article explores the Lexical Variation (LV) ratio of non-native teacher talk and the percentage of words teachers used at different voc...

  16. "Finding the key to the secret garden of reading" :extensive reading in the second language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Hauer, Elin Lævnæseth

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to communicate to those concerned with language teaching and to share some ideas on different reading approaches, especially with focus on extensive reading and the use of graded readers in the second language classroom. Furthermore I will make suggestions of how an extensive reading program might benefit language learning in general.Different approaches to reading and vocabulary learning will be presented and evaluated throughout this paper in an attempt to “pro...

  17. Narrative Research in Language Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhuizen, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Narrative research in language teaching and learning (LTL) is concerned with the stories teachers and learners tell about their lived and imagined experiences. Teachers typically tell about their professional development and their practices, and learners about their experiences of learning and using languages. What stories are, and indeed what…

  18. Exploring content teachers’ knowledge of language pedagogy: a report on a small-scale research project in a Dutch CLIL context

    OpenAIRE

    Koopman, G.J.; Skeet, J.A.; Graaff, H.C.J. de

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between language pedagogy and the content and language integrated learning (CLIL) classroom is a key issue for research into CLIL. In the Netherlands, as in other European contexts, non-native speakers of a target language with a non-language teaching background teach CLIL content lessons. Whilst CLIL teachers teaching their subject through the L2 are expected to support language learning in their lessons, little is known about these teachers' knowledge of language pedagogy. ...

  19. Bilingual Lexical Interillumination in the Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. John, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Foreign language (FL) education has been marked by a monolingual principle that has favoured "intralingual" methodologies. Bakhtin's view of language interillumination--that languages throw light on each other--challenges such language teaching practices radically. Using conversation analysis methods, this article examines transcripts of…

  20. Language Through Literature : Benefits of Using Literature for Foreign Language Acquisition, with Practical Suggestions for the English Language Classroom in Dutch Secondary Education

    OpenAIRE

    Jager, Lotte

    2008-01-01

    This thesis researches the place literature has occupied within Dutch foreign language education from the 19th century to the educational changes of the 1990s. As the 1990s witnessed a growing split between language and literature education, this thesis researches benefits of using foreign language literature for foreign language education. Finally, practical exercises are proposed in which foreign language literature and foreign language education are combined.

  1. Creating an Authentic Learning Environment in the Foreign Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Larisa Nikitina

    2011-01-01

    Theatrical activities are widely used by language educators to promote and facilitate language learning. Involving students in production of their own video or a short movie in the target language allows a seamless fusion of language learning, art, and popular culture. The activity is also conducive for creating an authentic learning situation where the real world becomes a part of the educational experience and necessitates the use of an authentic language by the learners. This article descr...

  2. Peer effects in preschool classrooms: is children's language growth associated with their classmates' skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Laura M; Petscher, Yaacov; Schatschneider, Christopher; Mashburn, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    With an increasing number of young children participating in preschool education, this study determined whether peer effects are present in this earliest sector of schooling. Specifically, this work examined whether peer effects were influential to preschoolers' growth in language skills over an academic year and whether peer effects manifest differently based on children's status in reference to their peers. Peer effects were assessed for 338 children in 49 classrooms. A significant interaction between the language skills of children's classmates and children's fall language skills indicated that peer effects were strongest for children with low language skills who were in classrooms that served children with relatively low skill levels, on average. Findings further showed that reference status, or children's relative standing to their peers, has the greater consequence for children with very low language skills in relation to their peers. PMID:22026480

  3. Students' Social Positioning in the Language Classroom: Implications for Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Paul; Kidd, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines some findings of a three-month investigation into the effects of students' interpersonal relationships on communication in two EFL classrooms in a Japanese university. Data was collected to identify and describe the various social subgroups that existed within the classes, and samples of classroom discourse were then analysed…

  4. The Computer in the Foreign Language Classroom: "Mogwai" or Gremlin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D. Hampton

    The role of the computer in the classroom can range from "toy" to be used when boredom sets in to mechanical monster that monopolizes precious classroom time with little residual benefit. However, a middle ground exists. At Auburn University (Alabama), the computer is used in an intermediate French course to complement rather than replace personal…

  5. Preparing pre-service teachers for multilingual classrooms - designing a multiple African language module

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Rinelle

    2011-01-01

    South African classrooms have become increasingly diverse and the shifting demographics of the instructional context have necessitated a change in the way preservice students are prepared for the linguistic and cultural diversity of their future classrooms. In response to this, undergraduates enrolled in the Faculty of Education at the University of Pretoria are now required to extend their personal language repertoire by acquiring a functional knowledge of words and appropr...

  6. A Constructive Teaching Model in Learning Research Concept for English Language Teaching Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Khoirul

    2015-01-01

    This is a study to focus on analyzing the use of constructive teaching method toward the students' motivation in learning content subject of Introduction to Research of English Language Teaching. By using a mix-method of qualitative and quantitative analysis, the data are collected by using questionnaire and classroom observation. The…

  7. Understanding the Cultural-Linguistic Divide in American Classrooms: Language Learning Strategies for a Diverse Student Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Kerry P.; Rutledge, Susan; Gauthier, Lane Roy

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses critical factors that impact learning for a growing population of students in American classrooms, the English Language Learner (ELL). Even in the smallest school districts, it is common for teachers to have one or more students with limited or no command of the English language in their classrooms. Many students in schools…

  8. Sign Language: Meeting Diverse Needs in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Cynthia G.; Lynch, Sharon A.

    2007-01-01

    For a number of years, sign language has been used in special education settings for learners with disabilities. Children with hearing loss, autism, cognitive disabilities, and language disorders have demonstrated improved communication skills with the use of signs. Recently, however, teachers have begun to use sign language with typical learners…

  9. Facilitating Comprehension and Processing of Language in Classroom and Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, Elaine Z.

    A speech/language remediation-intervention model is proposed to enhance processing of auditory information in students with language or learning disabilities. Such children have difficulty attending to language signals (verbal and nonverbal responses ranging from facial expressions and gestures to those requiring the generation of complex…

  10. Exploring the Main Barriers of Technology Integration in the English Language Teaching Classroom: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouholllah Khodabandelou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The abundance of technology in recent years has contributed to development in the societies, industries, and education. It is proven from the current trend of technology such as the emergence and rise of smart phones, tablets, laptops and wireless internet connection that the present and future world will be heralded by technology. The integration of technology into the teaching and learning process is idealistic with the existence of vast information and multimedia on the internet and innovative inventions of devices that serve as great assistance. However, the available technology has not been put to good use in the English language teaching and learning classroom for some reasons, especially in developing countries like Malaysia. Thus, this research is conducted to determine the hindrances faced by the education community in Malaysia. The current qualitative research involved seven individuals who discussed issues relating to the hindrances of technology integration in English language teaching and learning. This paper presents the results of the discussion and provides suggestions on some possible solutions to the identified obstacles faced by the education community in using technology in a more efficient and resourceful manner for the teaching and learning development.Keywords: TESL, barriers, technology, integration, higher education

  11. Towards an Understanding of the Role of Language in the Science Classroom and Its Association with Cultural Identity Development in the Context of Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupane, Alberto Felisberto

    2011-01-01

    I am reflecting here my struggle to understand the issue of language in the science classroom and in our lives from three different perspectives: before and after Mozambican independence and after completion of my doctoral research. The main method used is auto|ethnographic inquiry in which I use the events in my life to question what is happening…

  12. The Intersection of Inquiry-Based Science and Language: Preparing Teachers for ELL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinburgh, Molly; Silva, Cecilia; Smith, Kathy Horak; Groulx, Judy; Nettles, Jenesta

    2014-08-01

    As teacher educators, we are tasked with preparing prospective teachers to enter a field that has undergone significant changes in student population and policy since we were K-12 teachers. With the emphasis placed on connections, mathematics integration, and communication by the New Generation Science Standards (NGSS) (Achieve in Next generation science standards, 2012), more research is needed on how teachers can accomplish this integration (Bunch in Rev Res Educ 37:298-341, 2013; Lee et al. in Educ Res 42(4):223-233, 2013). Science teacher educators, in response to the NGSS, recognize that it is necessary for pre-service and in-service teachers to know more about how instructional strategies in language and science can complement one another. Our purpose in this study was to explore a model of integration that can be used in classrooms. To do this, we examined the change in science content knowledge and academic vocabulary for English language learners (ELLs) as they engaged in inquiry-based science experience utilizing the 5R Instructional Model. Two units, erosion and wind turbines, were developed using the 5R Instructional Model and taught during two different years in a summer school program for ELLs. We analyzed data from interviews to assess change in conceptual understanding and science academic vocabulary over the 60 h of instruction. The statistics show a clear trend of growth supporting our claim that ELLs did construct more sophisticated understanding of the topics and use more language to communicate their knowledge. As science teacher educators seek ways to prepare elementary teachers to help preK-12 students to learn science and develop the language of science, the 5R Instructional Model is one pathway.

  13. Creating an Authentic Learning Environment in the Foreign Language Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Nikitina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Theatrical activities are widely used by language educators to promote and facilitate language learning. Involving students in production of their own video or a short movie in the target language allows a seamless fusion of language learning, art, and popular culture. The activity is also conducive for creating an authentic learning situation where the real world becomes a part of the educational experience and necessitates the use of an authentic language by the learners. This article describes a video project carried out by Russian language learners at Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS. It examines how the work on the project created and supported authenticity of the learning experience. Though the article focuses on the video project done in the context of language learning and teaching this activity could be successfully implemented in teaching various subjects at both secondary and tertiary levels.

  14. Enhancing employability skills through the use of film in the language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Daly, Selena

    2013-01-01

    Employability is increasingly becoming a central aspect of higher education in the United Kingdom and it is becoming imperative that modern foreign languages teachers engage directly and sincerely with the employability agenda. This article proposes the use of feature films as a successful method for developing and promoting employability skills in the language classroom, an approach which has not thus far been adopted. I begin by discussing different models for the delivery of employability ...

  15. Federal Interagency Committee on Aviation Noise (FICAN) Position on Research into Effects of Aircraft Noise on Classroom Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This symposium report presents a summary of research on the affect of aircraft noise on the classroom environment revealing that aircraft noise can interfere with learning in the following areas: reading, motivation, language and speech acquisition, and memory. The strongest findings are in the area of reading, where more than 20 studies have…

  16. Classroom Currents: Interrupting the Single Story: LGBT Issues in the Language Arts Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann-Wilmarth, Jill; Ryan, Caitlin L.

    2013-01-01

    Two literacy leaders acknowledge the challenges of teaching LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) issues in the classroom. While children come from a variety of family structures, it is necessary to acknowledge that a gay individual was once a child sitting in a classroom. An argument against marginalization and an advocacy for inclusion of…

  17. SELF-POLICING IN THE ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alia AMIR

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study explores how classroom participants invoke a monolingual target-language policy in an English as a foreign language (EFL classroom, specifically focusing on one method of doing language policy through self-initiated language policing sequences, which I have called self-policing. Language policing refers to the mechanism deployed by the teacher and/or the pupils to (re-establish the normatively prescribed medium of classroom interaction (Amir & Musk, 2013; cf. Bonacina & Gafaranga, 2011. The data comes from sequential analyses of 20 hours of video recordings in grades 8 & 9 of an international compulsory school in Sweden between the years 2007-2010. Drawing on Auer (1984 and Gafaranga’s (1999 organisational code-switching framework, this study sheds light on how teachers and pupils self-initiate a switch to English in their interactions. As will be demonstrated, both teachers and pupils, while orienting to the English-only norm, use a three-step sequence for language policing.

  18. Educating educators about second language idiomaticity through action research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John I. Liontas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Idiomaticity is central to linguistic theory. Despite the pervasiveness of idioms in language, pedagogical articles in professional journals have yet to pay attention to the benefits of idiom instruction in the second language (SL classroom. Addressing this concern, this article reports the results of an exploratory qualitative research study conducted with sixteen SL university instructors and two Language Program Directors (LPDs at two large universities in the Southwest (United States of America that explored teachers’ own knowledge and theories about SL idiomaticity. Survey and interview data indicate that university instructors and LPDs share beliefs and assumptions about how best to teach idioms and assess students’ knowledge of SL idiomaticity. It was concluded that both university instructors and LPDs have an important role to play in the development of idiom pedagogy and that such pedagogy can be greatly enhanced through action research. Recommendations are included for further study of the issues surrounding SL idiomaticity, and teaching implications are considered for the development of meaningful pedagogical practices suitable for the promotion of idiomatic learning.

  19. The role of background music in the English language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Sorger, Anna

    2014-01-01

    According to the Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia, the interest in second language learning has been increasing in recent years. In the context of primary and secondary education in Slovenia, English language is prominent in the field of foreign languages. A quite similar picture can also be seen in the context of non-formal educational system for adults (http://www.stat.si). Throughout recent years, more and more attention has been given to the importance of a learning env...

  20. Application of the Theory of Multiple Intelligences to Second Language Learners in Classroom Situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Gloria T.

    This paper argues for the "nurture" side of the "nature versus nurture" debate of the nature of intelligence. It argues for the theory of multiple intelligences in relation to sociocultural and cognitive perspectives of second language learning. A brief historical overview of intelligence is presented, and classroom practices that lead to…

  1. Code-Switching: L1-Coded Mediation in a Kindergarten Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on a qualitative inquiry that investigated the role of teachers' mediation in three different modes of coding in a kindergarten foreign language classroom in China (i.e. L2-coded intralinguistic mediation, L1-coded cross-lingual mediation, and L2-and-L1-mixed mediation). Through an exploratory examination of the varying effects…

  2. Learner Code-Switching in the Content-Based Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebscher, Grit; Dailey-O'Cain, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    Using a framework based on conversation analysis (Auer, 1984, 1995, 1998), this article presents an analysis of learner code-switching between L1 and L2 in an advanced foreign language (FL) classroom. It was found that students code-switch not only as a fallback method when their knowledge of the L2 fails them, or for other participant-related…

  3. A Case Study on the Influence of Organizational Culture on Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihui

    2009-01-01

    This paper tries to probe the influence of the organizational culture on language classroom at a newly-established local college. It firstly reviews the knowledge of the organizational culture and finds out its features, and then discusses how the organizational culture was greatly influenced by the host educational environment. On the basis of…

  4. Improving the Classroom Language Proficiency of Non-Native Teachers of English: What and How?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Yoshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    The present paper attempts to examine the possibilities of the Classroom Language Assessment Benchmark (CLAB) as a professional development tool for EFL teachers in Japan. Two questionnaire surveys were carried out several months after the last day of the graduate course (both in 2006 and 2007) where CLAB was used as a self- and peer-assessment…

  5. ICT and an Exploratory Pedagogy for Classroom-Based Chinese Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, XingLong; Wang, MinJuan; Wu, Juan; He, KeKang

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a new pedagogy for Chinese language teaching and learning at elementary schools through exploratory classroom instruction using Information and Communication Technologies. The study used quantitative method to collect data from two elementary schools of China. The results showed that: (1) the three-in-one pedagogy of…

  6. The "Kulturpass": Strategies for Enhancing Cultural Engagement outside the German-Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Debra N.; Kramer, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Extracurricular events in foreign language programs are often treated either as extra credit or an afterthought. And yet if organized creatively and systematically, activities that promote cultural engagement outside the classroom can enhance and extend the curriculum, deepen exposure to the target culture, create a sense of community among…

  7. Investigating foreign language anxiety in Iranian classrooms: The effect of gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoodzadeh, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to delve into the issue of affective variables related to language learning, the present study focuses on the influence of gender on learners' foreign language anxiety in the Iranian context. The objective of this case study is first to determine the extent to which Iranian EFL learners perceive foreign language anxiety in matched-gender and mixed-gender classrooms and second to see if there is any significant difference between the two types of the investigated classrooms. To this end, a 16 items self-reporting questionnaire with a five Likert-type scale was designed. The developed questionnaire was then given to 96 Iranian lower intermediate EFL learners to complete it. After analyzing the collected data, the findings indicated that mixed-gender classrooms can be considered as an anxiety-provoking teaching context in Iran, since the presence of the opposite gender in EFL classrooms was found to cause statistically significant amount of language anxiety among Iranian learners. The study also offers some context-specific pedagogical implications for Iranian EFL teachers and practitioners.

  8. "We Don't Believe Media Anymore": Mapping Critical Literacies in an Adult Immigrant Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, Monica

    2012-01-01

    This article maps critical literacies conceptually and empirically in the context of adult immigrant language classrooms. It begins by describing Deleuze and Guattari's cartographic approach. Then it traces critical literacies situated conceptually within a Freirean paradigm before mapping them differently through the Deleuzian-informed Multiple…

  9. Functions of Repetition in Learners' Private Speech in Japanese Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Reiko

    2008-01-01

    Studies investigating repetition in SL/FL learners' private speech have focused mainly on its cognitive and metacognitive functions. In the present study, the classroom observations, video-recordings of lessons, audio-recordings of six learners and two teachers and simulated recall interviews were conducted in Japanese language classes over two…

  10. Mobile Technology in Second Language Classrooms: Insights into Its Uses, Pedagogical Implications, and Teacher Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praag, Benjamin; Sanchez, Hugo Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Adopting a multiple-case, multiple-method design, this study investigates mobile technology use in the practices of three experienced second language teachers. The findings, based on an analysis of the teachers' rationales, stated beliefs and classroom actions, show that the teachers tend to prohibit or reluctantly tolerate mobile device usage,…

  11. Galaxy Classroom Project Evaluation, Language Arts, Grades 3-5. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guth, Gloria J. A.; Block, Clifford

    The GALAXY Language Arts Demonstration Program is a package of integrated curricular and instructional approaches that features the organization of instruction around themes presented through television broadcasts, children's literature, classroom activities, and the use of interactive technology. During the GALAXY Project demonstration phase for…

  12. Working for and with Latino/Latina Immigrant Newcomers in the English Language Arts Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musetti, Bernadette; Salas, Spencer; Perez, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    "Newcomers" are English learners who are new to the United States and arrive with limited or interrupted formal schooling. These students have below-grade-level literacy skills in their home language and do not speak English. Newcomers' arrivals to the middle school and high school classrooms often present a formidable "what to do" for classroom…

  13. Digital Stories: A 21st-Century Communication Tool for the English Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Digital storytelling can motivate and engage students and create a community in the classroom. This article lays out a 12-week digital storytelling project, describing the process in detail, including assessment, and pinpointing issues and challenges as well as benefits the project affords English language students.

  14. Language, Literature, and Learning in the ESL Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooy, Mary; Chiu, Annette

    1998-01-01

    Argues that English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) teaching should begin with meaning through immersion in literature and incorporate language study. Describes offering an inclusive sampling of North American literature. Notes specific picture book, drama, short story, novel, and poetry titles. Discusses ways to meaningfully engage ESL students in…

  15. English as a scientific and research language debates and discourses

    CERN Document Server

    Plo Alastrué, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    This volume examines the role of English in academic and research settings in Europe and provides recommendations on the challenges posed by the dominance of English over national languages as languages of science and research dissemination; the need for language support for academics that need to disseminate their research in English; and the effect of past and present language policies.

  16. Factors Influencing Student Nurses’ Perceptions of Success and Failure in Second Language Writing – A Classroom-based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Cheng TAI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article applies attribution theory to identify the factors that influence nursing students’ perceptions of success and failure in learning English writing skills. The study took place in a language classroom in southern Taiwan involving fifty-one female nursing students, a writing teacher, and the researcher. Teaching activities included five writing cycles based on an online writing platform, process approach, and multiple revisions. Evidence data has been collected from learners’ questionnaires and interviews, teacher’s interviews, classroom observations, teaching materials, and researcher’s diaries. The data has been analysed quantitatively using SPSS and qualitatively with the aid of QSR NVivo software. Results reveal the major factors given by learners involve the amount writing practice given and their perceptions of their competence in vocabulary and with grammar. The work is supported by observations made by the language teacher and the researcher on issues which have emerged on the students’ writing skills, psychology, language competence, and learning context. This article concludeswith the implications for teaching.

  17. A Research on Second Language Acquisition and College English Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Changyu Li

    2009-01-01

    It was in 1970s that American linguist S.D. Krashen created the theory of “language acquisition”. And the theories on second language acquisition were proposed based on the study on the second language acquisition process and its rules. Here, the second language acquisition process refers to the process in which a learner with the mastery of his mother language learns another language without its social environment. Due to the close relationship between second language acquisition research an...

  18. Preparing Undergraduates for Research Careers: Using Astrobites in the Classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, Nathan E; Newton, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Because undergraduate participation in research is a longstanding and increasingly important aspect of the career path for future scientists, students can benefit from additional resources to introduce them to the culture and process of research. We suggest the adoption of the web resource Astrobites as a classroom tool to increase the preparation of undergraduate physics and astronomy students for careers in research. We describe the content and development of the website, discuss previous university courses that have made use of Astrobites, and suggest additional strategies for using Astrobites in the classroom.

  19. Teacher Belief, Teacher Action: Connecting Research and the Classroom. Proceedings of the JALT International Conference on Language Teaching and Learning and Educational Materials Expo (25th, Maebashi City, Japan, October 1999).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David, Ed.; Robbins, Jill, Ed.; Long, Robert, Ed.

    Forty papers presented at the Japanese Association for Language Teaching (JALT) conference were selected for inclusion in this volume. JALT is a nonprofit professional organization of language teachers dedicated to the improvement of language learning and teaching in Japan. JALT's publications and events serve as vehicles for the exchange of new…

  20. L2 and L3 integrated learning – lingua franca use in learning an additional language in the classroom.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazel, Spencer; Wagner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    This study offers an empirical account of the use of English in Danish-as-a-foreign-language classroom settings. We will refer to English as the lingua franca - which in itself is a second language for the majority of the participants in the data - and to Danish as the target language. We consider implications of lingua franca interaction in target language classroom interactions, and show how in sequences where participants orient to linguistic issues in the target language, for example grammatical forms or lexical items, they often do this with reference to the lingua franca.

  1. Transfronterizo Literacies and Content in a Dual Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Piedra, Maria Teresa; Araujo, Blanca

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the ways in which young transfronterizo students who live between the two worlds of El Paso (USA) and Ciudad Juarez (Mexico) bring their literacy practices and content to the classroom. Drawing on the data gathered during a 3-year ethnographic study, we illustrate how transfronterizo texts and content are…

  2. Promoting Creativity in the Middle Grades Language Arts Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Katherine E.; Bintz, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Middle level educators around the country aim to create a classroom environment and a way of teaching that is developmentally responsive, challenging, empowering, and equitable for every student. One way to ensure this is to include instruction that promotes creativity. This article offers guiding principles and shares instructional lessons that…

  3. Competing Desires and Realities: Language Policies in the French-Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Angela Giovanangeli

    2009-01-01

    French language policy has historically centred on ways French can be considered a dominant and influential language. It has done this since the Middle Ages, by allowing the French language to serve as a political tool. On an international level, language was a way of subjugating conquered peoples (former colonies). It promoted France’s international status (by the 18th century French was the diplomatic language of Europe). On a national level, the French language was one of the ways governme...

  4. Biography, policy and language teaching practices in a multilingual context: Early childhood classrooms in Mauritius

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Aruna, Ankiah-Gangadeen; Michael Anthony, Samuel.

    Full Text Available Language policies in education in multilingual postcolonial contexts are often driven by ideological considerations more veered towards socio-economic and political viability for the country than towards the practicality at implementation level. Centuries after the advent of colonisation, when cultu [...] rally and linguistically homogenous countries helped to maintain the dominion of colonisers, the English language still has a stronghold in numerous countries due to the material rewards it offers. How then are the diversity of languages - often with different statuses and functions in society - reconciled in the teaching and learning process? How do teachers deal with the intricacies that are generated within a situation where children are taught in a language that is foreign to them? This paper is based on a study involving pre-primary teachers in Mauritius, a developing multilingual African country. The aim was to understand how their approach to the teaching of English was shaped by their biographical experiences of learning the language. The narrative inquiry methodology offered rich possibilities to foray into these experiences, including the manifestations of negotiating their classroom pedagogy in relation to their own personal historical biographies of language teaching and learning, the policy environment, and the pragmatic classroom specificities of diverse, multilingual learners. These insights become resources for early childhood education and teacher development in multilingual contexts caught within the tensions between language policy and pedagogy.

  5. Spanish as a Second Language when L1 Is Quechua: Endangered Languages and the SLA Researcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalt, Susan E.

    2012-01-01

    Spanish is one of the most widely spoken languages in the world. Quechua is the largest indigenous language family to constitute the first language (L1) of second language (L2) Spanish speakers. Despite sheer number of speakers and typologically interesting contrasts, Quechua-Spanish second language acquisition is a nearly untapped research area,…

  6. Reading Comprehension in the Second Language Classroom: A Hands-On Approach to Teaching and Learning Reading Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Meena

    Some general principles of teaching reading in the second language classroom are reviewed. To illustrate the connection between theory and practice, examples are provided of teaching practices used with adult learners of English as a Second language (ESL) who have Chinese and Vietnamese-language backgrounds. A discussion follows of how instruction…

  7. Understanding Influences of Play on Second Language Learning: A Microethnographic View in One Head Start Preschool Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piker, Ruth A.

    2013-01-01

    With dual language learners falling behind their same-age peers at the beginning of kindergarten, understanding how school experiences can enhance language learning is critical. This study demonstrates how play among preschool-aged children can foster English language learning. Using an ethnographic approach, one classroom composed of two teachers…

  8. Non-Native English Language Teachers' Perspective on Culture in English as a Foreign Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayyurt, Yasemin

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the importance of raising non-native English language teachers' awareness of different dimensions of culture in the teaching of English as an international language. The author believes that the more critical English language teachers become about the involvement of culture in their English language teaching, the more they…

  9. · Attitude towards Computers and Classroom Management of Language School Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Jalali

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Computer-assisted language learning (CALL is the realization of computers in schools and universities which has potentially enhanced the language learning experience inside the classrooms. The integration of the technologies into the classroom demands that the teachers adopt a number of classroom management procedures to maintain a more learner-centered and conducive language learning environment. The current study explored the relationship between computer attitudes and behavior and instructional classroom management approaches implemented by English institute teachers. In so doing, a total of 105 male (n = 27 and female (n = 78 EFL teachers participated in this study. A computer attitude questionnaire adapted from Albirini (2006 and a Behavior and Instructional Management Scale (BIMS adopted from Martin and Sass (2010 were benefitted from for the purpose of collecting the data. The results of the Pearson Correlation Coefficient revealed that there were no significant relationships between attitude and behavior and instructional management across gender. However, it was found that the more male teachers experience tendency toward using computers in their classes, the more teacher-centered their classes become. In addition, the more female teachers are prone to use computers in their classes, the more student-centered and lenient their classes become.

  10. Class size reduction in the second language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    García Bayonas, Mariche; Gottschall, Holli

    2008-01-01

    In this study, class size reduction (CSR) was implemented in six sections of second semester, university level Spanish classes in which the enrollment cap was lowered from 27 to 20 students. The methodology for the study included a student opinion questionnaire, classroom observations, and student course grades. The study aimed at finding the effect of CSR on student participation, motivation, passing rates and dropout rates. Results showed that students in smaller classes have a higher numbe...

  11. Review Article: Second Language Acquisition of Bantu Languages--A (Mostly) Untapped Research Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinner, Patti

    2011-01-01

    This review article presents a summary of research on the second language acquisition of Bantu languages, including Swahili, Zulu, Xhosa and Lingala. Although second language (L2) research on these languages is currently very limited, work in morphosyntax and phonology suggests promising directions for future study, particularly on noun class,…

  12. Factor analysis of the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale in Korean learners of English as a foreign language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gi-Pyo

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the latent constructs of the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS) using two different groups of Korean English as a foreign language (EFL) university students. Maximum likelihood exploratory factor analysis with direct oblimin rotation was performed among the first group of 217 participants and produced two meaningful latent components in the FLCAS. The two components of the FLCAS were closely examined among the second group of 244 participants to find the extent to which the two components of the FLCAS fit the data. The model fit indexes showed that the two-factor model in general adequately fit the data. Findings of this study were discussed with the focus on the two components of the FLCAS, followed by future study areas to be undertaken to shed further light on the role of foreign language anxiety in L2 acquisition. PMID:25153961

  13. Hearing the voices of alternatively certified teachers in Texas: Narratives of teaching English language learners in urban secondary mainstream classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannou, Yetunde Mobola

    In Texas, nearly half of all new teachers are alternatively certified (AC) whilst English language learners (ELL) are over one-third of the public school population in some districts. As this trend continues, the likelihood that AC teachers will teach ELLs increases and alters what Texas teachers must know upon entering the classroom. This research explores teacher knowledge and beliefs about teaching ELLs through constructivist and narrative lenses. Four AC science teachers in two diverse school districts participated in in-depth interviews and reflective interviews following classroom observations to answer the research questions: (1) how do AC teachers describe and interpret their acts of teaching ELLs in mainstream classrooms; and (2) how do AC teachers describe and interpret their learning to teach ELLs in mainstream classrooms. Data were transcribed and analyzed using thematic narrative methods. This study found that participants saw ELL instruction as: (1) "just good teaching" strategies, (2) consisting primarily of cultural awareness and consideration for student comfort, and (3) less necessary in science where all students must learn the language. The most experienced teacher was the only participant to reference specific linguistic knowledge in describing ELL instruction. Many of the teachers described their work with ELL students as giving them an opportunity to improve their lives, which was consistent with their overall teaching philosophy and reason for entering the profession. Participant narratives about learning to teach ELLs described personal experience and person-to-person discussions as primary resources of knowledge. District support was generally described as unhelpful or incomplete. Participants portrayed their AC program as helpful in preparing them to work with ELL students, but everyone desired more relevant information from the program and more grade-appropriate strategies from the district. Participant narratives reveal AC teachers needed a pragmatic and less theoretical understanding of diversity during pre-service training. Participant tendency to draw upon "common sense", affective, and practical strategies in teaching ELL students in lieu of the state-mandated English language proficiency standards (ELPS) suggests AC programs should have teachers articulate and discuss their beliefs about ELL instruction in order to provide training targeted towards misconceptions about language development, particularly in science.

  14. Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Among China Chinese Students Undergoing The Laureate English Programme in INTI International University, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghavaani d/o Ampalagan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between foreign language classroom anxiety (communication apprehension, test anxiety and fear of negative evaluation among  Mainland Chinese students undergoing the Laureate English Programme

  15. Learning English as an International Language: EFL Learners' Perceptions of Cultural Knowledge Acquisition in the English Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Hsuan-Yau Tony Lai

    2013-01-01

    Culture is an important element in the foreign language classroom. Some scholars believe that culture is the fifth language skill along with the four traditional skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) of English. Traditionally, learning English required learners to acquire some target language cultural knowledge (e.g. British culture and/or American culture) especially in the context of English as a foreign language. However, with the increasingly important status of English as an ...

  16. Equity for English Language Learners in Mathematics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgioli, Gina M.

    2008-01-01

    Although English Language Learners (ELLs) quickly acquire basic interpersonal communication skills, most struggle for several years with reading and writing academic content in English. In particular, in English-only mathematics classes, children are likely to have difficulty reading and comprehending text, reading word problems, and giving…

  17. Bringing Mexican Culture to the Spanish Language Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Lili A.

    This curriculum project offers ways to teach students about Mexico to make the country come alive for them. The curriculum is designed to create avenues for third-year Spanish students to practice the following language skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. The lessons included can be adapted for other-level students. There are four…

  18. Teaching Culture in the Classroom to Arabic Language Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldin, Ahmad Abdel Tawwab Sharaf

    2015-01-01

    Arabic language learning comprises of certain elements, including syntactic ability, oral capability, dialect proficiency, and a change in state of mind towards different culture or society. For teachers and laymen alike, cultural competence, i.e., the knowledge of the customs, beliefs, and systems of another country, is indisputably an integral…

  19. Beyond the Classroom: Maintaining and Improving Teachers' Language Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga-Canadas, Cynthia P.

    2010-01-01

    The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education and the ACTFL suggest that a high proficiency in the Spanish language is essential for all Spanish teachers. With the growth of the Spanish-speaking population in the United States and the diversity of Hispanic culture, teacher education programs need to ensure that teacher candidates are…

  20. Program Evaluation: English Grammar in the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Mozhgan

    2014-01-01

    The present study wants to find out the reasons for choosing the current methods/techniques for teaching grammar and it also wants to investigate whether there is a relation between teachers' thinking and their actions in the class or not. For this reason, four language teachers were selected. The subjects were selected by non-random sampling.…

  1. Towards a Bernsteinian Language of Description for Mathematics Classroom Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straehler-Pohl, Hauke; Gellert, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    This article aims at developing an external language of description to investigate the problem of why particular groups of students are systematically not provided access to school mathematical knowledge. Based on Basil Bernstein's conceptualisation of power in classification, we develop a three-dimensional model that operationalises the…

  2. Raising Cultural Awareness in the English Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jerrold

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses how teachers can incorporate cultural knowledge into English language classes, exploring elements of culture, intercultural phenomena, and high-context and low-context cultures. Activities offered by the author to raise cultural awareness include web quests, role plays, cultural observations, and culture journals.

  3. Improving Instruction in the Mathematics Methods Classroom through Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostofo, Jameel; Zambo, Ron

    2015-01-01

    There is a continuing emphasis in the United States on improving students' mathematical abilities, and one approach is to better prepare teachers. To investigate the potential usefulness of Lesson Study to better prepare teachers, one author set out to conduct action research on his classroom practice. Specifically, he sought to determine whether…

  4. An ORACLE Chronicle: A Decade of Classroom Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galton, Maurice

    1987-01-01

    This article describes Project ORACLE which was research carried out at the University of Leicester begun in 1975 concerning (1) a longitudinal process-product study of teaching and learning in elementary schools; and (2) a study which concentrated on collaborative group work in the same classrooms. Results and implications are discussed.…

  5. Encouraging Empirical Research: Findings from the Music Appreciation Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Dirkse

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirical research can be a very useful tool for the music history pedagogue, as a collection of studies relating to the teaching of collegiate-level music appreciation classes has shown. Although the body of literature is small, the existing empirical research involving collegiate-level music appreciation classrooms provides important pedagogical findings. Studies have investigated how students’ backgrounds influence their music appreciation experience, the success of courses in increasing students’ levels of appreciation for music, and the effectiveness of particular curricular and teaching strategies in the music appreciation classroom. Findings from these studies can help music appreciation teachers make informed, research-supported choices when deciding how to structure and teach their courses. Examining these studies may also stimulate ideas for further areas of empirical research. A willingness to accept and engage in empirical research will lead to a better understanding of our students and an increased quality of teaching.

  6. Query Language for Research in Phonetics

    OpenAIRE

    Heid, Ulrich; Mengel, Andreas

    1999-01-01

    With the growing availability of spoken language corpora more and more data driven research in phonetics is possible. The downside of having huge speech corpora is that they have to be segmented and labeled, before they can be exploited. As labeling and annotation are time-consuming and costly, there is an interest in standardization which would support the exchange and reuse of labeled data. The MATE project proposes standards for an integrated and consistent multi-level...

  7. Is Teaching Sign Language in Early Childhood Classrooms Feasible for Busy Teachers and Beneficial for Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brereton, Amy Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Infants' hands are ready to construct words using sign language before their mouths are ready to speak. These research findings may explain the popularity of parents and caregivers teaching and using sign language with infants and toddlers, along with speech. The advantages of using sign language with young children go beyond the infant and…

  8. Living Linguistic Diversity in the Classroom: A Teacher Inductee Explores Dual Language Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Rahat; Pfitscher, Christina

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses strategies for promoting culturally responsive pedagogy through the implementation of a language awareness curriculum that includes a structured reading intervention program using dual language books. The research builds on the premise that resources such as dual language books can give teachers the opportunity to…

  9. Five Board Games for the Language Classroom: Uvas, Montana Rusa, El Futbol, La Corrida de Verbos, Paso a Paso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Barbara

    A collection of five board games for the Spanish language classroom contains gameboards, game markers, and directions for each game. It also contains general instructions for the teacher about the classroom use of board games. The games include: "Uvas," for use in vocabulary development and cultural awareness; "Montana Rusa," for general…

  10. Incorporating Competency-Based Blended Learning in a Chinese Language Classroom: A Web 2.0 Drupal Module Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chung-Kai; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chiang, Yueh-Hui

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to create a blended learning environment, based on the concept of competency-based training, in a Chinese as a Foreign Language (CFL) classroom at an American university. Drupal platform and web 2.0 tools were used as supplements to traditional face-to-face classroom instruction. Students completed various selective tasks and…

  11. Never Fear; Scaffolding is Here: Solar Research in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.; DeMuth, N.; Isbell, D.; Pompea, S. M.; Garmany, K.

    2006-12-01

    Astronomy Research Based Science Education (A-RBSE) has been a multi-year teacher professional development program sponsored by NSF and administered through the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). Previously TLRBSE, the program reaches the formal education community through a national audience of well-trained and supported middleand high-school teachers. Every year, a new cohort of teachers prepare for research through an on-line course in the spring. In the summer they conduct astronomy research at NOAO, working with astronomer-mentors to gather and analyze their data. They then return to their classrooms and engage their students in inquiry-based astronomy research using the data. A-RBSE has much to offer teachers both inside and outside the program who wish to initiate research in the classroom. However, the activation energy to conduct authentic research is high. To address the needs of a wider audience of teachers and students, steps have been taken to supply web-based resources for the solar research program. Teachers can use this solar scaffolding to support the implementation of authentic solar research in the classroom. The scaffolding files will serve as a template for other A-RBSE research strands, as well as enable non-A-RBSE middle and high school teachers to download and use A-RBSE data in their own classrooms. These scaffolding resources and future directions will be described in this session. NOAO is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation. For further information, visit http://www.noao.edu/outreach/tlrbse/.

  12. Bringing Language to Life: Science Exploration and Inquiry in the Early Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seewald, Amanda

    2007-01-01

    Preschool and early elementary science provides engaging opportunities for integrated content-based language learning. This instruction uses the concepts of other content areas as a springboard for language acquisition and self-expression. It is through the active interpretation of content standards by foreign language teachers that the ideas and…

  13. Students and Teachers' Reasons for Using the First Language within the Foreign Language Classroom (French and English) in Central Mexico (Razones de alumnos y maestros sobre el uso de la primera lengua en el salón de lenguas extranjeras (francés e inglés) en el centro de México)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora Pablo, Irasema; Lengeling, M. Martha; Rubio Zenil, Buenaventura; Crawford, Troy; Goodwin, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    The present study explores the use of the first language in a context of foreign language teaching. This qualitative research presents the classroom practice and points of view of French and English teachers and students within a public educational institute in central Mexico using the techniques of questionnaires and semi-structured interviews.…

  14. Creative use of Twitter for Dynamic Assessment in Language Learning classroom at the university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Cacchione

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This contribution describes an experimentation involving two classes of basic Italian as L2 during the A. Y. 2014-15 I term at the University Complutense of Madrid. Within a general MALL and BYOD approach, Twitter was adopted as in-classroom tool for language learning Dynamic and Authentic Assessment, aiming at boosting the learning success and overall language proficiency. Students’ satisfaction, engagement factors and levels have been measured via a post-intervention questionnaire, showing general positive outcomes. Final formal summative assessment also showed very positive general results and opened the way for further investigations.

  15. The Application of Task-based Language Teaching to English Reading Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Zan Mao

    2012-01-01

    Task-based approach is a new approach in education practice. In task-based classroom, the chief focus is the performance of tasks. The task, rather than being a unit of grammar to be digested or a collection of lexical items to be remembered, is a means of learning the language by doing tasks. It requires exposure to comprehensive input and opportunities to interact in the language. The task has to be negotiated by the learners with the help of the teacher, whose job is to facilitate learning...

  16. Learners Involvement in Materials Selection for Teaching English in Language Classroom at Aligarh Muslim University

    OpenAIRE

    Sheema Fatima

    2014-01-01

    The onset of the present paper throws light on materials selection and traditional outlook. Then the paper discusses four types of materials, more specifically, instructional, experiential, exploratory and elicitative materials and their use in language classroom. It discusses the role relationship between teachers, learners and materials in the present scenario at Aligarh Muslim University, keeping in consideration the requirements of the changing times. The paper aims to highlight the posit...

  17. Differentiation in the foreign language classroom:teacher perspectives, practices and experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Alikoski, M. (Maria)

    2015-01-01

    Students come in to the foreign language classroom with very different learning profiles, that is, readiness, interests, learning styles, social backgrounds and emotional needs. In order to respond to these differences and needs, and consequently promote students’ growth to their full potential as both human beings and FL users, teachers need to differentiate their teaching. This is also in the requirements of the Finnish Core Curriculum (2004) and the amendments of 2010, as differentiation i...

  18. Repetition and joking in children’s second language conversations : playful recyclings in an immersion classroom

    OpenAIRE

    ?ekait?, Asta; Aronsson, Karin

    2004-01-01

    Repetition is often associated with traditional teaching drills.However, it has been documented how repetitionsare exploited by learners themselves (Duff, 2000). In a study of immersion classroom conversations, it wasfound that playful recyclings were recurrentfeatures of young learners’ second language repertoires.Such joking events were identified on the basisof the participants’ displayed amusement,and they often involved activity-based jokes (Lampert, 1996)and meta pragmatic play, that is...

  19. A Self-evaluation of Classroom Language Used When Teaching Grammar

    OpenAIRE

    Fang Huan; Li Wang

    2011-01-01

    In the attempt to evaluate the quality of teacher talk, recent communicative approaches have suggested that the modification of teacher classroom speech and the functional distribution of teacher talk in terms of pedagogical goals should be considered (Seedhouse: 1996). This study investigates the relationship between language use and pedagogic purpose from an analysis of a lesson transcript of a grammar lesson, and evaluates the quality of the teacher talk based on the Self-Evaluation of Tea...

  20. Turkish Teachers’ Practices of Assessment for Learning in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Hüseyin Öz

    2014-01-01

    Recently there has been a noticeable paradigm shift in educational assessment where assessment and student learning are viewed as inseparable and assessment is perceived as a tool for supporting student learning. This study was designed to investigate Turkish teachers’ preferences of common assessment methods in the English as a foreign language (EFL) classroom, their Assessment for Learning (AFL) practices, and determine whether they differed in their AFL practices according to some va...

  1. Using Original Methods in Teaching English Language to Foreign Students (Chinese) in Indian Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Devimeenakshi. K.; C. N. Baby Maheswari

    2012-01-01

    The article gives information on English language teaching schemes in Indian classrooms for foreign students. The teacher monitors as facilitator and instructor. The trainees were trained in the four macro skills, LSRW. I taught some topics in three skills, namely, writing, listening and reading (just three, not speaking skills) to Chinese students in VIT University. The other skill speaking was trained by other teachers among the four. Students were trained to listen to English words and pa...

  2. The Distance Learning of Foreign Languages: A Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Research into the distance learning of languages is now established as a significant avenue of enquiry in language teaching, with evident research trajectories in several domains. This article selects and analyses significant areas of investigation in distance language learning and teaching to identify new and emerging gaps, along with research…

  3. Educators Experiencing Research - Benefits for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, J.

    2003-12-01

    I have been involved with two Planetary Society geology expeditions looking for evidence of asteroid impacts. We worked in Belize and Italy with teams of international scientists from various scientific fields. Through the REVEL program, I spent two weeks onboard the RV Atlantis studying hydrothermal vents off the coast of Washington. I worked with an interdisciplinary team of scientists and graduate students and was involved in designing my own research project. As an educator I have designed activities for my students which were based on these research experiences. My students became aware of the type of science taking place in this "cutting-edge" research. I have learned to work in a team and have encouraged my students to work in that manner as well. The contacts that I have made have provided sources of information, borrowing equipment and other research opportunities. This research experience also supports my high school research science program.

  4. Classroom code-switching: Three decades of research

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I provide a review of the historical development of different research paradigms and approaches adopted in studies on classroom code-switching. I also discuss the difficulties and problems faced by this field of studies and share some of my own critical reflections on how this field might move forward in the future, speaking from the position of a researcher who has been engaged in this area of studies for close to three decades.

  5. Encouraging Empirical Research: Findings from the Music Appreciation Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Scott Dirkse

    2011-01-01

    Empirical research can be a very useful tool for the music history pedagogue, as a collection of studies relating to the teaching of collegiate-level music appreciation classes has shown. Although the body of literature is small, the existing empirical research involving collegiate-level music appreciation classrooms provides important pedagogical findings. Studies have investigated how students’ backgrounds influence their music appreciation experience, the success of courses in increasing s...

  6. Research on College Teachers’ Politeness Strategies in EFL Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Peng; Lingling Cai; Xianjun Tan

    2012-01-01

    Politeness is a common phenomenon in any society. Thus conventions of politeness vary from culture to culture. How people value politeness or show politeness is influenced by many factors such as age, gender, knowledge level, or social status or power. In this research, we deal with politeness in China EFL classrooms. Based on Brown and Levinson’s Face Theory and applying a series of research methods like class observation, survey questionnaires and semi-structured interviews in a case ...

  7. Teaching English as an Additional Language In The Global Classroom: A Transnational Study In The United States and United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail McEachron

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Global research has shown the persistence of inequality with regard to accessing curriculum with a view to obtaining suitable work and making useful contributions to society. The intersection of race, gender, language and low socio-economic levels creates situations which often marginalize ethnic minorities in school settings (Freire, 1968; Nieto & Turner, 2012. The graduation rates in the United States for Native American, African American and Hispanic students are lower than the graduation rates of Whites and Asian Americans. In addition, Bangladeshis and African Caribbeans currently living in the UK are under-represented in higher education, particularly young men in those communities. The research questions that guide this inquiry are: (1 According to databases, how does the academic performance of language minority groups compare to the academic performance of non-linguistic minority groups at the elementary and secondary levels of education? (2 According to language support teachers and university students, what are the strengths and weaknesses of the instructional practices for language minorities who are learning English in the United Kingdom (UK (Bristol and the United States (US (Henrico? Participants were: five UK teachers, four UK university students, five US teachers, four US university students. Data collection supervised by lead researchers included interviews, focus groups, classroom observation, and performance documents. Data analysis utilized a mixed-methods approach. Overall, linguistic minority groups performed lower than their English proficient peers. Culturally, UK teachers provided a greater emphasis on religious instruction, whereas US teachers addressed patriotic topics more frequently. Teachers in the United States and the United Kingdom were culturally supportive with slight variation in the encouraged use of the students’ heritage languages.

  8. Sign language perception research for improving automatic sign language recognition:

    OpenAIRE

    Ten Holt, G.A.; Arendsen, J.; De Ridder, H; Doorn, A.J. van; Reinders, M.J.T.; E. A. Hendriks

    2009-01-01

    Current automatic sign language recognition (ASLR) seldom uses perceptual knowledge about the recognition of sign language. Using such knowledge can improve ASLR because it can give an indication which elements or phases of a sign are important for its meaning. Also, the current generation of data-driven ASLR methods has shortcomings which may not be solvable without the use of knowledge on human sign language processing. Handling variation in the precise execution of signs is an example o...

  9. Corrective Feedback in Classrooms at Different Proficiency Levels: A Case Study of Chinese as a Foreign Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Li

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study investigating the relationship between corrective feedback, students’ language proficiency and classroom communication orientation in classrooms of Chinese as a Foreign Language (CFL at a US university. Inspired by Lyster and Mori (2006, this comparative analysis of teacher-student interaction investigates the immediate effects of prompt, recast, and explicit correction on learner uptake and repair across three different Chinese proficiency levels. By use of two measurement tools—Error Treatment Model and COLT coding scheme, the study attempts to seek the distribution pattern of feedbacks and the sequent uptakes, as well as the impact of learners’ proficiency levels on the pattern of feedback and uptakes in CFL classrooms. Results show that recasts still remain the most common feedback type across the classes in this study. The uptake of feedback is influenced both by classroom communication orientation and the students’ language proficiency.

  10. Evaluating the Psychometric Properties of the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale for Cypriot Senior High School EFL Students: The Rasch Measurement Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Panayiotis Panayides; Miranda Jane Walker

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS) for Cypriot senior high school EFL students, through Rasch measurement. In doing so, the researchers clarified two discrepancies found in the literature: first the factor structure of the scale and second whether test anxiety is a component of FLCA. The Greek version of the FLCAS was administered to a sample of 304 senior high school EFL students. Results showed that af...

  11. California/Spain Visiting Teachers Program Participants' Opinions about the Use and Effects of Students' Primary Languages in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    This study examined opinions about some theoretical and practical tenets of bilingualism and bilingual education, as well as about the instructional use of English language learners' (ELLs) native languages in the classroom, of 77 teachers from Spain working in California as part of the California/Spain Visiting Teachers Program. In their…

  12. Doing Culture, Doing Race: Everyday Discourses of "Culture" and "Cultural Difference" in the English as a Second Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ena

    2015-01-01

    While current conceptualisations of the inextricable connection between language and culture in English language education are largely informed by complex sociocultural theories that view culture as constructed in and through social practices among people, classroom practices continue to be influenced by mainstream discourses of culture that…

  13. Experiential Learning: Dissolving Classroom and Research Borders

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Rhonda; Hyle, Adrienne E.

    2012-01-01

    During a summer cruise to Mexico and Central America, students earned academic credit for doctoral-level coursework in qualitative research approaches and data collection and analysis. This study explored how participants, 16 doctoral students at a midwestern university, perceived experiential education and its effect upon their understanding of…

  14. An Historical Overview of Second Language Acquistion Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Evelyn

    An historical overview of research on second language acquisition considers research topics examined in observational/longitudinal studies and experimental studies. The questions that have reappeared across both observational and experimental studies concern: (1) whether second language learning is the same or different from first language…

  15. Language Proficiency Assessment: Research Findings and Their Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Charlene; Simich, Carmen

    Current research is reviewed for implications for language proficiency assessment practices. Research is discussed concerning adult language proficiency testing, cognitive studies which attempt to conceptualize the construct of language proficiency, development of theoretical models of communicative competence, studies investigating the validity…

  16. The application of language-game theory to the analysis of science learning: Developing an interpretive classroom-level learning framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadibasir, Mohammad

    In this study an interpretive learning framework that aims to measure learning on the classroom level is introduced. In order to develop and evaluate the value of the framework, a theoretical/empirical study is designed. The researcher attempted to illustrate how the proposed framework provides insights on the problem of classroom-level learning. The framework is developed by construction of connections between the current literature on science learning and Wittgenstein's language-game theory. In this framework learning is defined as change of classroom language-game or discourse. In the proposed framework, learning is measured by analysis of classroom discourse. The empirical explanation power of the framework is evaluated by applying the framework in the analysis of learning in a fifth-grade science classroom. The researcher attempted to analyze how students' colloquial discourse changed to a discourse that bears more resemblance to science discourse. The results of the empirical part of the investigation are presented in three parts: first, the gap between what students did and what they were supposed to do was reported. The gap showed that students during the classroom inquiry wanted to do simple comparisons by direct observation, while they were supposed to do tool-assisted observation and procedural manipulation for a complete comparison. Second, it was illustrated that the first attempt to connect the colloquial to science discourse was done by what was immediately intelligible for students and then the teacher negotiated with students in order to help them to connect the old to the new language-game more purposefully. The researcher suggested that these two events in the science classroom are critical in discourse change. Third, it was illustrated that through the academic year, the way that students did the act of comparison was improved and by the end of the year more accurate causal inferences were observable in classroom communication. At the end of the study, the researcher illustrates that the application of the proposed framework resulted in an improved version of the framework. The improved version of the proposed framework is more connected to the topic of science learning, and is able to measure the change of discourse in higher resolution.

  17. Enhancing student schematic knowledge of culture through literature circles in a foreign language classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham-Marr Alastair

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving student understanding of a foreign language culture is anything but a peripheral issue in the teaching of a foreign language. This pilot study reports on a second year required English course in a university in Japan that took a Literature Circles approach, where students were asked to read short stories out of class and then discuss these stories in class. Although students reported that they did not gain any special insights into the target language culture presented, they did report that reading fiction as source material for classroom activity helps with the acquisition of a vocabulary set that is more closely associated with lifestyle and culture. The results suggest that further study is warranted. Procedures of this pilot study are described and interpreted in the context of the English education system in Japan.

  18. Predicting Acceptance of Diversity in Pre-Kindergarten Classrooms. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kay; Downer, Jason T.

    2013-01-01

    Given the increasing ethnic and language diversity within the United States, this study examined practices that acknowledge and promote diversity in pre-Kindergarten classrooms. Findings indicate that acceptance of diversity is a component of positive environments for young children, particularly in classrooms with high poverty levels where there…

  19. Students and Teachers' Reasons for Using the First Language Within the Foreign Language Classroom (French and English) in Central Mexico Razones de alumnos y maestros sobre el uso de la primera lengua en el salón de lenguas extranjeras (francés e inglés) en el centro de México

    OpenAIRE

    Irasema Mora Pablo; M. Martha Lengeling; Buenaventura Rubio Zenil; Troy Crawford; Douglas Goodwin

    2011-01-01

    The present study explores the use of the first language in a context of foreign language teaching. This qualitative research presents the classroom practice and points of view of French and English teachers and students within a public educational institute in central Mexico using the techniques of questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. The results show that teachers and the majority of students perceive the use of the first language as positive and part of the teaching and learning ...

  20. Elementary English Language Instruction: Colombian Teachers’ Classroom Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Cadavid Múnera Isabel Cristina; McNulty María; Quinchía Ortiz Diana Isabel

    2004-01-01

    An in-progress ethnographic research project about teachers who are facing the complex task of teaching English to children in 7 public elementary schools in the metropolitan area of Medellin is presented in this article. First, the need for this research is outlined by researchers; second, the methodology of the project is described; third, up-to-date findings which include a profile of the 12 teachers who are participating in this study, and an analysis of their class methodology in te...

  1. Elementary english language instruction: colombian teachers’ classroom practices

    OpenAIRE

    Cadavid Múnera Isabel Cristina; McNulty María; Quinchía Ortiz Diana Isabel

    2009-01-01

    An in-progress ethnographic research project about teachers who are facing the complex task of teaching English to children in 7 public elementary schools in the metropolitan area of Medellin is presented in this article. First, the need for this research is outlined by researchers; second, the methodology of the project is described; third, up-to-date findings which include a profile of the 12 teachers who are participating in this study, and an analysis of their class methodology in te...

  2. O desenvolvimento de uma metaconsciência, no professor, acerca da importância de vivenciar a linguagem como prática social na sala de aula de língua inglesa por meio da pesquisa colaborativa / The development of a teacher's meta-awareness on the importance of experiencing language as social practice in an EFL classroom through collaborative research

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Luciane Kirchhof, Ticks.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, discutimos o processo reflexivo vivenciado por duas professoras de inglês ao problematizarem suas ações em sala de aula. Destacamos particularmente o processo de reconfiguração de suas atividades pedagógicas que inicialmente focalizam estruturas lexicogramaticais isoladas e, no decorre [...] r do processo reflexivo, são reconfiguradas em direção ao uso de gêneros textuais e à (des)construção dos contextos de situação e cultura nos quais esses textos são socialmente produzidos e vivenciados (MOTTA-ROTH, 2006). Essas reflexões foram desenvolvidas por meio de um processo de pesquisa colaborativo (MAGALHÃES, 2004). A análise do discurso dessas professoras indica que o processo reflexivo lhes permitiu desenvolver uma metaconsciência acerca de como a linguagem se organiza e se constitui ao mediar a atividade social. Abstract in english In this paper is discussed the thoughtful process experienced by two English teachers, as they problematize their procedures in the classroom. In the foreground is the process of reconfiguration of their pedagogical activities, which initially would focus on the isolated lexical-grammatical structur [...] es and which, along the reflective process, were reconfigured to focus more on textual genres and on the (de)construction of the situational and cultural contexts in which such texts are socially produced and experienced (MOTTA-ROTH, 2006). Such thoughts were developed by means of a collaborative research process (MAGALHÃES, 2004). The discourse analysis of those teachers indicate that the reflective process allowed them to develop a metaawareness about how language organizes itself and constitutes itself when it mediates the social activity.

  3. The Impact of a Professional Development Program on English Language Teachers' Classroom Performance (El impacto de un programa de desarrollo profesional en el desempeño en clase de profesores de lengua inglesa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the findings of an action research study on a professional development program and its impact on the classroom performance of in-service English teachers who worked at a language institute of a Colombian state university. Questionnaires, semi-structured interviews, class observations, and a researcher's journal were used as…

  4. The Articulation of Formative Research and Classrooms Projects in the Language and Culture Class in an Undergraduate English Teaching Program (Articulación de Prácticas de Investigación Formativa con los Proyectos de Aula de las Clases de Lengua y Cultura Anglófona en un Programa de Licenciatura en Lengua Extranjera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroquín, Paula Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    This article shows the results of a research project which searched to answer how to articulate formative research with classroom projects in an undergraduate English teaching program. To accomplish the purpose of this paper, the document will focus on the two specific objectives of this qualitative research: document revision, and knowing about…

  5. Language in the Classroom: Studies of the Pygmalion Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Frederick; Whitehead, Jack L.

    1971-01-01

    Research is reported on the degree to which the speaker characteristics of children can be related to the attitudes of teachers, in the absence, and in the presence of additional visual information about the speaker. (JM)

  6. La photographie, un outil pour communiquer en classe de langue Photography as a Tool to Communicate in the Language Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Muller

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cette contribution, qui relève de la didactique des langues, s’appuie sur l’analyse des interactions verbales et de la communication en classe de langue. Elle repose sur la capacité de l’image à susciter des productions verbales. La photographie d’auteur est ici considérée comme un déclencheur d’interactions orales permettant de communiquer. Nous avons mis en œuvre une tâche dans des cours de français langue étrangère en contexte pluriculturel à Paris avec des apprenants de niveaux A1 à B2. Le projet mené en groupe consiste à commenter des photographies d’auteur sans objectifs langagiers prédéterminés. L’analyse d’une séquence recueillie devant la photographie Rue Mouffetard d’H. Cartier-Bresson révèle l’importance de la communication entre les apprenants. La photographie suscite des enjeux communicatifs qui favorisent l’implication des étudiants. Ces derniers prennent position sur l’image et sont amenés à confronter leurs points de vue avec leurs pairs. Les apprenants peuvent également avoir recours à l’humour et modifier leur rôle conversationnel habituel.The article, in the field of foreign language classroom research, deals with verbal interaction analysis. It is based on the capacity of images to trigger verbal expression. Photography is here considered as a means to induce oral interaction, thus enabling students to communicate. We have implemented a task in a “French as a foreign language” classroom in a multicultural context in Paris, learners’ levels ranging from A1 to B2. In this group project, students were invited to comment on artistic and documentary photographs. We had no predetermined language objectives. The analysis of interactions triggered by the photograph Rue Mouffetard by H. Cartier-Bresson highlights learners’ interactions. The photograph creates communicative needs and induces students to get involved in the activity. They express their views on the image and confront their opinions with their peers. They also use humour, thus modifying their usual interactional role.

  7. Examining the literacy component of science literacy: 25 years of language arts and science research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yore, Larry D.; Bisanz, Gay L.; Hand, Brian M.

    2003-06-01

    This review, written to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the International Journal of Science Education, revealed a period of changes in the theoretical views of the language arts, the perceived roles of language in science education, and the research approaches used to investigate oral and written language in science, science teaching, and learning. The early years were dominated by behavioralist and logico-mathematical interpretations of human learning and by reductionist research approaches, while the later years reflected an applied cognitive science and constructivist interpretations of learning and a wider array of research approaches that recognizes the holistic nature of teaching and learning. The early years focus on coding oral language into categories reflecting source of speech, functional purpose, level of question and response, reading research focused on the readability of textbooks using formulae and the reader's decoding skills, and writing research was not well documented since the advocates for writing in service of learning were grass roots practitioners and many science teachers were using writing as an evaluation technique. The advent of applied cognitive science and the constructivist perspectives ushered in interactive-constructive models of discourse, reading and writing that more clearly revealed the role of language in science and in science teaching and learning. A review of recent research revealed that the quantity and quality of oral interactions were low and unfocused in science classrooms; reading has expanded to consider comprehension strategies, metacognition, sources other than textbooks, and the design of inquiry environments for classrooms; and writing-to-learn science has focused on sequential writing tasks requiring transformation of ideas to enhance science learning. Several promising trends and future research directions flow from the synthesis of this 25-year period of examining the literacy component of science literacy - among them are critical listening and reading of various sources, multi-media presentations and representations, effective debate and argument, quality explanation and the role of information and communication technologies/environments.

  8. The use of weblog in language learning: motivation of second language learners in reading classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Nasaruddin Sulaiman; Asiah Kassim

    2010-01-01

    The age of technology has enabled learners to interact with other users outside the four wallsof the classroom. Weblogs, in particular, provide a channel for asynchronous computermediatedcommunication to take place in the learning process. Motivation is one of thelearning aspects that is greatly enhanced by the use of technology. Questionnaires andobservations were carried out to 108 undergraduate engineering students taking ReadingCourse to determine the level of the learners’ motivation to ...

  9. Children's Use of Language and Pictures in Classroom Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Esther Cappon

    2006-01-01

    The article examines third graders who use reading, speaking, writing, gestures, and visual representation strategically in their inquiry research and to share what they learn. Examples of their speaking, writing and drawing shows their developing skill in choosing semiotic meaning-making systems appropriately for the purpose of developing their…

  10. WHY CORRUPTION MAY HAPPEN?: A CLASSROOM ACTION RESEARCH

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Maharani

    2014-01-01

    The Anti Corruption course is one of several ways of anti-corruption’s campaign in Indonesia’s higher education system. In terms of education, the Anti Corruption’s curriculum were prepared and developed by Indonesia’s ministry of education, but in practice it is possible for lecturers to creatively modify the way of delivering subjects to students. The purpose of this study is to explore student perspectives on what causes corruption. The researches itself is a classroom action research, and...

  11. A Critical Appraisal of Foreign Language Research in Content and Language Integrated Learning, Young Language Learners, and Technology-Enhanced Language Learning Published in Spain (2003-2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooly, Melinda; Masats, Dolors

    2015-01-01

    This state-of-the-art review provides a critical overview of research publications in Spain in the last ten years in three areas of teaching and learning foreign languages (especially English): context and language integrated learning (CLIL), young language learners (YLL), and technology-enhanced language learning (TELL). These three domains have…

  12. Corpus in Foreign Language Teaching and Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-ping ZHOU

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Corpus-based language research has been long prospered since the middle of last century. Corpus is therefore frequently used in foreign language (mostly English teaching and research due to the fundamental principles of modern Corpus Linguistics along with the colorful resources of word-banks and the corresponding tools, especially in western countries. In China, the related literature found its way from introducing the foreign researches to our own practice into this field. As a conclusion, corpus and Corpus Linguistics can be closely connected with and widely applied in foreign language teaching and research with a predictable bright future.
    Keywords: corpus, Corpus Linguistics, foreign language teaching and research
    Résumé Le moyen de recherches sur le corpus a connu un développement rapide depuis le milieu du siècle précédent et a atteint la maturité aujourd’hui. En raison de l’importance de la linguistique de corpus et de la méthode de recherches sur le corppus, et étant donné ses ressources riches ainsi que les facilités apportées par les outils de recherche, le corpus est appliquée amplement dans les recherches linguistiques notamment dans celles de l’anglais. A l’étranger, l’étude de la linguistique de corpus a débuté tôt et a donné beaucoup de fruits ; le travail du milieu des langues étrangères chinois dans ce domaine a commencé par la présentation du corpus étranger et sa situation d’étude, et puis procède à des applications pratiques. En somme, il existe des relations étroites et diverses entre le corpus et les recherches de l’enseignement-apprentissage des langues étrangères, et les recherches de l’enseignement-apprentissage des langues étrangères basant sur le corpus présente une bonne perspective.
    Mots-clés: corpus, linguistique de corpus, recherches de l’enseignement-apprentissage des langues étrangères
    摘 要 語料���研究方法自上個世紀中葉以來迅速發展,到今天已空前繁榮。由於語料庫語言學和語料庫研究方法的重要性,又由於豐富的語料庫資源及檢索工具提供了實踐的可能和便利,語料庫被廣泛應用於語言研究特別是英語教學研究中。國外語料庫語言學研究起步早,成果多;我國外語界在這方面的工作主要是從介紹國外語料庫及其研究現狀開始,然後進行一些應用實踐。總之,語料庫與外語教學研究有著緊密的、多層面的關係,基於語料庫的外語教學研究大有可為、前景廣闊。
    關鍵詞:語料庫;語料庫語言學;外語教學研究

  13. Korean as a Heritage Language in the U.S. University Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Sook Kang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the less-commonly-taught foreign languages in U.S. universities, Korean-language classes are often taken by students of Korean descent. Many Korean Americans with long-term exposure to the target language in a combination of naturalistic and instructional settings have developed proficiency in their heritage language through parental and community support, such as Saturday schools (Lee, 2002. However, upon closer examination, the bilingualism that many Korean-American learners achieve is unbalanced. These heritage learners often lack grammatical accuracy and precision despite high fluency, as the moniker "kitchen Korean" implies. As a way to facilitate the accuracy aspect of the heritage learners' language, this article suggests the benefits of corrective feedback, explicit and implicit, in the forms of metalinguistic comments, provision of an alternative correct form contingent on the learner's ill-formed utterance, and partial or full repetitions or reformulations of the learner's output when interacting with them in the classroom and beyond.

  14. Getting Used to Content and Language Integrated Learning: What Can Classroom Interaction Reveal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yuen Yi; Macaro, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Bilingual programmes in which an L2 is used as the medium of instruction are becoming popular in different parts of the world, and content and language integrated learning (CLIL) is one variant of such programmes. Recent research on CLIL has gradually shifted from product-oriented (i.e. evaluating the effectiveness of CLIL in terms of language and…

  15. MALL Technology: Use of Academic Podcasting in the Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdous, M'hammed; Camarena, Margaret M.; Facer, Betty Rose

    2009-01-01

    Integrating Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL) technology (personal multimedia players, cell phones, and handheld devices) into the foreign language curriculum is becoming commonplace in many secondary and higher education institutions. Current research has identified both pedagogically sound applications and important benefits to students.…

  16. Who's Holding El Marcador? Peer Linguistic Mediation Gone Awry in a Dual Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Within dual language education programs, well-structured peer interactions can facilitate the learning of language and curricular content simultaneously. Research has found that even very young bilingual students can engage in peer linguistic mediation to help less proficient classmates participate in small group work. In this article, I analyze…

  17. Reenvisioning Language Anxiety in the Globalized Classroom through a Social Imaginary Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Costa, Peter I.

    2015-01-01

    The last three decades have witnessed a notable growth in research on affect. Among the various affective variables, foreign language anxiety has been heavily studied. This interest in foreign language anxiety is consistent with increased attention to emotions in the neurosciences, cognitive psychology, and the social sciences. Instead of…

  18. The Pedagogical Mediation of a Developmental Learner Corpus for Classroom-Based Language Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A. Belz

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Although corpora have been used in language teaching for some time, few empirical studies explore their impact on learning outcomes. We provide a microgenetic account of learners’ responses to corpus-driven instructional units for German modal particles and pronominal da-compounds. The units are based on developmental corpus data produced by native speakers during interactions with the very learners for whom the units are designed. Thus, we address the issue of authentication in corpus-driven language pedagogy. Finally, we illustrate how an ethnographically supplemented developmental learner corpus may contribute to second language acquisition research via dense documentation of micro-changes in learners’ language use over time.

  19. Hit or Miss, or Missing: The Role of Second Language Acquisition Research in Language Teacher Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Jamie

    1994-01-01

    This article discusses how the syllabus for language teacher training in German has evolved and considers what direction foreign language teacher training might take if it were to follow the cue of "Deutsch als Fremdsprache" and appropriate the research agenda of second-language acquisition studies. (Contains 51 references.) (JL)

  20. Second-Language-Acquisition Research and Foreign Language Teaching, Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanPatten, Bill

    1992-01-01

    Details six major research findings regarding second-language acquisition, including transitional stages for acquiring syntax; fixed-order emergence of grammatical morphemes; language acquisition progress from unmarked to marked elements; first-language influence; rule-governed learner output; and learner access to input. (27 references) (CB)

  1. Ape language research: A review and behavioral perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hixson, Michael D.

    1998-01-01

    The ape language research of the Gardners, Fouts, Terrace, Rumbaugh, and Savage-Rumbaugh is reviewed. This research involved the raising of chimpanzees (and a bonobo) in human-like environments over extended time periods. The results indicate that apes are capable of learning small verbal repertoires in a fashion similar to that of human infants. The writings of the ape language researchers show an opposition to behavioral approaches to language. Although they characterize each other's work a...

  2. The Power of Story in the ESL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Bonnie J.; Rossiter, Marian J.; Abbott, Marilyn L.

    2011-01-01

    Although considerable research has examined the use of literature in the second language (L2) classroom, there has been less investigation into the integration of learners' personal stories in the English as a second language (ESL) classroom. Following Wajnryb's (2003) categorizations of story as language learning, genre, and the creation of what…

  3. Jazyk komunikace ve výuce anglického jazyka v České republice: míšení jazyků / The language of communication in English classrooms in the Czech Republic: Mixing languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Najvar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with classroom communication. More specifically, it focuses on issues connected with the usage of English as the target language and Czech as the mother tongue in lessons of English as a foreign language in primary and lowersecondary schools in the Czech Republic. 89 English lessons were analysed and the proportion between English and Czech used in the sample lessons was established in order to show how the two languages are mixed in the lessons. The analysis of the number of words uttered in the lessons showed that teachers used Czech more than English but students said more English words than Czech words. When operationalized in terms of time, the use of language was equally balanced between the target language and the mother tongue. Another perspective described in the paper is one of opportunities that the teacher creates for the students to practice different language skills. Great differences in using the mother tongue and the target language were found between individual teachers, which is in line with the findings of a number of similar research studies. Towards the end of the paper, five typical situations of mixing languages are briefly presented.

  4. THE ROLE OF OUTPUT AND FEEDBACK IN SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION: A CLASSROOM-BASED STUDY OF GRAMMAR ACQUISITION BY ADULT ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Donesch-Jezo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Second language acquisition (SLA has been a concern of many teachers and researchers since the early 1960s.One of the issues related to SLA has been finding the techniques which effectively focus the learners’ attention on the target form.A number of theories and methods have been advocated for this purpose, ranging from implicit options to more explicit ones. Although each of the suggested methods has its own advantages,they have, so far, proved insufficient to get learners to be able to notice the gap between their own interlanguage forms and the target language forms. Swain (1995, 1998 has argued that apart from providing the learners with comprehensible input, comprehensible output also plays a beneficial role in L2 acquisition. By encouraging the learners to speak or write in the L2 and providing them with the opportunities to do so, the learners can notice that they are not able to say what they want to say in the target language. On the basis of Swain’s output hypothesis, we assumed that encouraging adult learners (university students to produce target-like output would promote their achievement of the grammatical competence necessary for producing academic tests. The purpose of this article is to present the evidence from a classroom-based, small-scale study of the effect of output on learner acquisition of L2 modal verbs, adjectives and adverbs conveying the meanings of uncertainty, all of which are parts of speech that are important metadiscourse items. The results of the present study suggest that an approach in which students are encouraged to produce comprehensible output, combined with their being provided with learning reinforcement ensured by appropriate feedback, can be an effective source of establishing long-lasting grammatical accuracy in the students’ target language.

  5. The role of teachers’ classroom discipline in their teaching effectiveness and students’ language learning motivation and achievement: A path method

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrak Rahimi; Fatemeh Hosseini Karkami

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the role of EFL teachers’ classroom discipline strategies in their teaching effectiveness and their students’ motivation and achievement in learning English as a foreign language. 1408 junior high-school students expressed their perceptions of the strategies their English teachers used (punishment, recognition/reward, discussion, involvement, and aggression) to discipline the classroom. The students evaluated their teachers’ teaching effectiveness by completing effecti...

  6. When Commas Meet Kryptonite: Classroom Lessons from the Comic Book Project. Language and Literacy Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This definitive book presents the newest research linking graphic narratives and literacy learning, as well as the tools teachers will need to make comic book projects a success in their classrooms. The Comic Book Project (www.comicbookproject.org) is an internationally celebrated initiative where children plan, write, design, and publish original…

  7. When Commas Meet Kryptonite: Classroom Lessons from the Comic Book Project. Language and Literacy Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This definitive book presents the newest research linking graphic narratives and literacy learning, as well as the tools teachers will need to make comic book projects a success in their classrooms. The Comic Book Project (www.comicbookproject.org) is an internationally celebrated initiative where children plan, write, design, and publish original…

  8. Language in Science Classrooms: An Analysis of Physics Teachers' Use of and Beliefs about Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyoo, Samuel Ouma

    2012-01-01

    The world over, secondary school science is viewed mainly as a practical subject. This may be one reason why effectiveness of teaching approaches in science education has often been judged on the kinds of practical activity with which teachers and students engage. In addition to practical work, language--often written (as in science texts) or oral…

  9. The Distribution of Instructional Time and Its Effect on Group Cohesion in the Foreign Language Classroom: A Comparison of Intensive and Standard Format Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinger, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    This paper argues for the influence of the distribution of instructional time on group cohesion in the foreign language classroom and postulates that concentrating classroom time enhances group cohesion. To test the hypothesis, a comparative classroom study of two groups of Spanish learners in their second year of learning, one following an…

  10. The Zooniverse: Cutting Edge Scientific Research in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, K. A.; Whyte, L. F.; Smith, A.; Tarnoff, A.; Schmitt, H.

    2012-12-01

    Increasingly scientists and researchers from a multitude of disciplines are finding themselves inundated with more data than they could possibly interpret in a lifetime. Computers can be used entirely or partially for some data analysis; but there are some tasks that are currently best suited to human eyes, ears and brains. Zooniverse (www.zooniverse.org) invites members of the public to help researchers analyze and interpret data. To date, hundreds of thousands of volunteers have been involved in classifying images, interpreting sounds and transcribing texts. Zooniverse citizen scientists are providing valuable analyses across a variety of fields, from the hunt for exoplanets in Planet Hunters (planethunters.org) to the transcription of Greek papyri in Ancient Lives (ancientlives.org). Multiple academic publications have resulted from the combined efforts of the Zooniverse community and science teams demonstrating that citizen science is more than ever becoming a well-established method of doing research. Unlike most research projects the data, analysis and interactions with the science teams have an established and visible online presence through the project website and related discussion sites and blogs. These in themselves provide a valuable classroom resource, an opportunity for free and easy access to cutting edge scientific research. Anecdotal evidence exists that teacher can and already do use Zooniverse projects. By providing a rich and varied scaffolding to accompany the Zooniverse projects the opportunity exists for bringing citizen scientists to a wider classroom audience. An audience that may include non-specialist teachers, who require additional support to deliver challenging content, or time strapped educators who haven't the time to develop their own accompanying resources to weave Zooniverse projects into their lessons. During the session we will discuss the recent Zooniverse projects specifically designed to support and promote classroom adoption locally, within the Chicago Public School (CPS) system and nationally within the United States. Introducing ZooTeach, a website where educators may share and search for lesson plans, activities, and resources. Beyond a simple lesson plan repository, ZooTeach is a community where educators are encouraged to modify, comment on, and otherwise actively participate in the educational efforts of Zooniverse. Teacher workshops run at Adler have and will continue to have the dual effect of promoting the Zooniverse and it's educational effort while increasing the pool of resources available nationally via ZooTeach. In house developed teacher guides and interactive tools allowing for the collection and manipulation of data will further enhance the classroom education experience and further lower the bar for entry into the world of citizen science.

  11. Changes in science classrooms resulting from collaborative action research initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Phil Seok

    Collaborative action research was undertaken over two years between a Korean science teacher and science education researchers at the University of Iowa. For the purpose of realizing science learning as envisioned by constructivist principles, Group-Investigations were implemented three or five times per project year. In addition, the second year project enacted Peer Assessments among students. Student perceptions of their science classrooms, as measured by the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES), provided evidence that the collaborative action research was successful in creating constructivist learning environments. Student attitudes toward science lessons, as examined by the Enjoyment of Science Lessons Scale (ESLS), indicated that the action research also contributed to developing more positive attitudes of students about science learning. Discourse analysis was conducted on video-recordings of in-class presentations and discussions. The results indicated that students in science classrooms which were moving toward constructivist learning environments engaged in such discursive practices as: (1) Communicating their inquiries to others, (2) Seeking and providing information through dialogues, and (3) Negotiating conflicts in their knowledge and beliefs. Based on these practices, science learning was viewed as the process of constructing knowledge and understanding of science as well as the process of engaging in scientific inquiry and discourse. The teacher's discursive practices included: (1) Wrapping up student presentations, (2) Addressing misconceptions, (3) Answering student queries, (4) Coaching, (5) Assessing and advising, (6) Guiding students discursively into new knowledge, and (7) Scaffolding. Science teaching was defined as situated acts of the teacher to facilitate the learning process. In particular, when the classrooms became more constructivist, the teacher intervened more frequently and carefully in student activities to fulfill a variety of pedagogical functions. Students perceived Group-Investigations and Peer Assessments as positive in that they contributed to realizing constructivist features in their classrooms. The students also reported that they gained several learning outcomes through Group-Investigations, including more positive attitudes, new knowledge, greater learning capabilities, and improved self-esteem. However, the Group-Investigation and Peer Assessment methods were perceived as negative and problematic by those who had rarely been exposed to such inquiry-based, student-centered approaches.

  12. Reading anxiety, classroom anxiety, language motivation, reader self-perception, and arabic achievement of Arab-American students learning arabic as a second language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Haitham M

    2014-12-01

    The present study assessed the relations between reading anxiety, classroom anxiety, language motivation, and readers' self-perception for a sample of Arab-American students in Arabic classes. The effects of sex, grade, and years studying Arabic on academic achievement were examined as well. Measures were administered to 118 middle school students (56 boys, 62 girls; M age = 13.0 yr., SD = 0.8), and teachers reported academic grades in Arabic. Reading anxiety was significantly correlated with classroom anxiety and reader self-perception. Classroom anxiety scores were significantly correlated with motivation and reader self-perception. Significant positive correlations were found between language motivation and reader self-perception scores, and between years studying Arabic and reader self-perception scores. Boys in the second year of Arabic had significantly lower classroom anxiety than girls, and students in Grade 7 had higher reader self-perception than those in Grade 8. Classroom anxiety, language motivation, and reader self-perception significantly predicted Arabic achievement. Pedagogical implications are discussed. PMID:25457094

  13. Research on College Teachers’ Politeness Strategies in EFL Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Peng

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Politeness is a common phenomenon in any society. Thus conventions of politeness vary from culture to culture. How people value politeness or show politeness is influenced by many factors such as age, gender, knowledge level, or social status or power. In this research, we deal with politeness in China EFL classrooms. Based on Brown and Levinson’s Face Theory and applying a series of research methods like class observation, survey questionnaires and semi-structured interviews in a case study, the researcher tries to find out: how students’ gender and level of English proficiency influence their understanding of teachers’ politeness strategies, what attitudes they have towards the application of teachers’ PS, and how students value politeness strategies in EFL classrooms. In conclusion, on one hand, teachers should increase their own politeness awareness as well as students’; on the other hand, it is very important to improve students’ English proficiency, which can help them understand situational contexts in English and interpret teachers’ well meaning in the term of politeness.

  14. Corpora, classroom and context: the place of spoken grammar in English language teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Timmis, Ivor

    2003-01-01

    The main research question investigated in this thesis is: In an era when English is increasingly used in international contexts, how relevant are the grammatical findings of native speaker spoken corpora in the ELT classroom? In terms of original research data, the thesis draws, initially, on data from a large-scale quantitative survey into the attitudes of students and teachers to conforming to native speaker norms. The data from this survey shows that a desire to conform to native speak...

  15. Implications for Language Diversity in Instruction in the Context of Target Language Classrooms: Development of a Preliminary Model of the Effectiveness of Teacher Code-Switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jang Ho

    2012-01-01

    This paper concerns the conceptual and pedagogical issues that revolve around target language (TL) only instruction and teacher code-switching in the context of TL classrooms. To this end, I first examine four intertwined ideas (that is, monolingualism, naturalism, native-speakerism, and absolutism) that run through the monolingual approach to TL…

  16. The use of weblog in language learning: motivation of second language learners in reading classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Nasaruddin Sulaiman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The age of technology has enabled learners to interact with other users outside the four wallsof the classroom. Weblogs, in particular, provide a channel for asynchronous computermediatedcommunication to take place in the learning process. Motivation is one of thelearning aspects that is greatly enhanced by the use of technology. Questionnaires andobservations were carried out to 108 undergraduate engineering students taking ReadingCourse to determine the level of the learners’ motivation to participate in online discussionsand to find out whether interactions through the blog have in any way influenced the level ofmotivation to participate in face-to-face discussions. Findings indicate that students werehighly motivated to participate in discussions through the use of blog, and to use it as alearning tool. However, motivation to participate in class discussions was not affected by thetendency of learners to participate in discussion via the weblog.

  17. Syntax mentioned seven times in the CEFR – and how many times at school, in foreign language classrooms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darja Mertelj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the teaching of foreign languages, complex-clause syntax does not seem to have had an established role over the last 20 years, especially within the communicative approach and, of course, the CEFR. It was previously part of methods which stressed formal approaches to foreign languages and their being taught, but not of natural, acquisition-based methods. With the communicative approach, two important premises were introduced: authentic texts and grammar as a tool when necessary. This is one probable reason why explicit, complex-clause syntax is hardly mentioned in the CEFR, even though it is implicitly present in descriptors, even though it is particularly recognisable in those for writing skills, and even though we know that it can be used for all four skills, as well as to guide learners towards some self-directed learning about language features. To date, in the era of the communicative approach, not much is known about the role of complex-clause syntax in foreign/second language classrooms, in particular from the learners’ viewpoint. In order to bridge this research gap, the paper analyses a questionnaire among learners in secondary schools that looked at their perspectives regarding the (possible role of syntax. The examined aspects consider its role for the four skills, and the benefits of knowing syntax; implicitly, the paper touches on some affective factors and related methodological approaches, along with problems concerning the teaching of syntax. The findings are based on quantitative data; an evaluation of the need for complex-clause syntax is included, and some pedagogical implications are presented.

  18. Trends in Qualitative Research in Language Teaching since 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Keith

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews developments in qualitative research in language teaching since the year 2000, focusing on its contributions to the field and identifying issues that emerge. Its aims are to identify those areas in language teaching where qualitative research has the greatest potential and indicate what needs to be done to further improve the…

  19. The Relationship between SLA Research and Language Pedagogy: Teachers' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassaji, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    There is currently a substantial body of research on second language (L2) learning and this body of knowledge is constantly growing. There are also many attempts in most teacher education programs around the world to inform practicing and prospective L2 teachers about second language acquisition (SLA) research and its findings. However, an…

  20. Natural Language Processing in Game Studies Research: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagal, Jose P.; Tomuro, Noriko; Shepitsen, Andriy

    2012-01-01

    Natural language processing (NLP) is a field of computer science and linguistics devoted to creating computer systems that use human (natural) language as input and/or output. The authors propose that NLP can also be used for game studies research. In this article, the authors provide an overview of NLP and describe some research possibilities…

  1. Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety of Arab learners of English: The effect of personality, linguistic and sociobiographical variables

    OpenAIRE

    Dewaele, Jean-Marc; Al-Saraj, Taghreed M.

    2015-01-01

    The present study focuses on the link between psychological, sociobiographical and linguistic variables and Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety of 348 Arabic learners of English (250 females, 98 males). Data were collected using the Arabic Foreign Language Anxiety Questionnaire (AFLAQ; Al-Saraj, 2011, 2014) and an Arabic version of the Multicultural Personality Questionnaire-Short Form (MPQ-SF; van der Zee, van Oudenhoven, Ponterotto & Fietzer, 2013). Multiple regression analyses revealed that...

  2. The Mismatch between Non-native English as a Foreign Language (EFL) Teachers’ Grammar Beliefs and Classroom Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Rabia Hos; Mustafa Kekec

    2014-01-01

    Teachers’ beliefs affect their classroom practices, whether these beliefs are implicit or explicit (Williams & Burden, 1997). However, there may be discrepancies between what teachers believe and practice. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mismatches between language instructors’ beliefs and practices regarding grammar teaching. The participants were non-native instructors of English as a foreign language (EFL). A 12-item qualitative questionnaire was used for t...

  3. Negotiating and appropriating new literacies in English language classrooms in Hong Kong primary schools : economies of knowledge, attention and enjoyment

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Margaret Muann

    2014-01-01

    In the context of social and economic globalisation, the nature and uses of literacy have been profoundly impacted by information technologies, giving rise to an increasing variety of multimodal, digitally mediated texts, practices and relationships called new literacies. This study explores how new literacies were taken up by teachers and students in English Language (English as a Second/Foreign Language) classrooms in Hong Kong primary schools. Set within a government funded project aimed a...

  4. Timing of translation in cross-language qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Hudson P O; Black, Amanda M; Sandelowski, Margarete

    2015-01-01

    Although there is increased understanding of language barriers in cross-language studies, the point at which language transformation processes are applied in research is inconsistently reported, or treated as a minor issue. Differences in translation timeframes raise methodological issues related to the material to be translated, as well as for the process of data analysis and interpretation. In this article we address methodological issues related to the timing of translation from Portuguese to English in two international cross-language collaborative research studies involving researchers from Brazil, Canada, and the United States. One study entailed late-phase translation of a research report, whereas the other study involved early phase translation of interview data. The timing of translation in interaction with the object of translation should be considered, in addition to the language, cultural, subject matter, and methodological competencies of research team members. PMID:25189538

  5. A framework to build readers and writers in the second language classroom

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Gilma, Zúñiga Camacho.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo propone un marco de referencia para crear lectoescritores en el aula donde se enseña una segunda lengua. Los componentes son el currículo, la enseñanza y la evaluación. El currículo establece los objetivos, y la filosofía del programa de lectura y también pretende el desarrollo de un l [...] ector crítico, que encuentra en la lectura en segunda lengua una fuente de información y entretenimiento. El currículo también tiene en cuenta el efecto de la lectura en primera lengua sobre la segunda, y el uso de materiales adecuados para el logro de los objetivos. La enseñanza está enmarcada en principios tales como la lectura y la escritura se enseñan simultáneamente, y la tecnología influye en el desarrollo de la lectoescritura. La evaluación de la lectura es el siguiente componente, y propone el uso de instrumentos auténticos tales como el portafolio y la observación. Se menciona, además, el uso de instrumentos tradicionales tales como los exámenes. Abstract in english This article proposes a framework to create readers and writers in the second language classroom. The components of the framework are curriculum, instruction and assessment. The curriculum states the goals and philosophy of the program that intends to create lifelong readers that find reading as a s [...] ource of entertainment and information. It will also include the kind of literacy that the curriculum wants to support, the effect of reading in the first language, and the use of appropriate materials to achieve the goals. Instruction is framed under principles like reading is thinking and learning, reading and writing are taught together, and technology influences reading and writing development. Assessing reading in the second language classroom is the next component of the framework discussed in the article and it proposes the use of authentic tools like portfolios and observations. Traditional tools like tests are also mentioned.

  6. New notions in a classic classroom : Applying late modern sociolinguistics and socially informed SLA to foreign language learner data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritzau, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    The dissertation investigates learner beliefs, language ideologies, self-positioning, and language use among a group of Swiss university students of Danish as a foreign language. The theoretical framework of the study draws on socially informed second language acquisition (SLA) research and on late modern sociolinguistics. The main research questions are: What do Swiss university students of Danish as a foreign language believe about language and language learning, why do they hold these beliefs, and how do the beliefs relate to language ideologies? How do the participants present themselves in terms of beliefs, ideologies, and selfpositioning? In what ways do the participants use linguistic features generally thought to belong to different languages, to what degree can their language use be compared with polylingual behaviour, and how does their language use relate to the beliefs and ideologies expressed by the participants?

  7. READING BASED-CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES: AN EFFORT TOWARD THE INTEGRATION OF LANGUAGE SKILLS IN TEACHING ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Hadi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This paper proposes the implementation of reading-based classroom activities for teaching English as a foreign language in Indonesia. Compared to other language skills, reading is viewed to provide a relatively stable foundation for Indonesian students to develop their communicative competence in English. It is argued that reading-focused activities stimulate confidence for Indonesian learners to get involved in listening, speaking, and writing related-activities in ways that are similar to normal daily life communication. The reasons for the proposed implementation of reading-based classroom activities in TEFLIN and the role of reading and its relation with other language skills are presented.

  8. Being Bilingual: Issues for Cross-Language Research

    OpenAIRE

    Bogusia Temple

    2006-01-01

    The current political debates in England highlight the role of language in citizenship, social exclusion, and discrimination. Similar debates can also be found around the world. Correspondingly, research addressing different language communities is burgeoning. Service providers and academics are increasingly employing bilingual community researchers or interpreters to carry out research. However, there is very little written about the effect of working with bilingual researchers. What it mean...

  9. The Application of Virtual Simulations using Second Life in a Foreign Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Tecnam Yoon

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of virtual simulation-based language learning in a foreign language class in Korea. Total 35 1st-year university students in Korea participated in this research to figure out the effect of simulations. A virtual English learning community, ‘Cypris Chat’ in Second Life was selected as a learning tool. For the data collection, a survey questionnaire was distributed and analysed quantitatively. The result shows that the majority of the ...

  10. Digital Literacy and Identity Formation in 21st Century Classrooms: Implications for Second Language Development

    OpenAIRE

    Lavern Byfield; Crystal Shelby-Caffey; Heidi Bacon; Xiang Shen

    2016-01-01

    As technology is increasingly adapted for educational purposes, previous research has confirmed the impact of technology on English learners’ (ELs’) literacy development. Given the increased attention to self-based studies in second language acquisition, this paper explores how ELs are motivated to learn a second language by pursuing the imagined selves, investing in the target culture, and negotiating identities in digitally mediated contexts. The motivational capacity of identity is discuss...

  11. Moving Research into the Classroom with the Electron Microscopy Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyles, Paul

    2008-03-01

    Due to the strongly interdisciplinary nature of research in nanotechnology and materials, a course on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) must often serve student from a very broad range academic disciplines, level of background, and research interests. Someone in the class will want to learn about all the possible capabilities of the TEM, which span diffraction, spectroscopy, and imaging. Research students learn best from real-world examples, which are usually drawn from the research of the instructor, but very few instructors have the breadth of research and instrumentation needed to obtain high-quality examples of all the possible combinations of techniques and materials. I have therefore developed the Electron Microscopy Database (EMdb, http://tem.msae.wisc.edu/emdb/) as part of the education plan of my NSF CAREER project. The goal of the EMdb it to enable TEM teachers to easily exchange high-quality TEM example data and associated homework problems. This serves the NSF education goals of promoting excellence in research training and of bringing cutting-edge research into the classroom, and has significantly improved my own teaching.

  12. The Effectiveness of a Model of Language-Focused Classroom Instruction on the Vocabulary and Narrative Development of Kindergarten Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Diane Corcoran; Friesen, Lisa Dinner; Fink, Judy

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a model of language-focused instruction, delivered by the classroom teacher, on the vocabulary and narrative development of kindergarten children living in high-poverty conditions. There were 22 participants, the majority significantly behind their peers on standardized measures of vocabulary and narrative…

  13. Newcomers Navigating Language Choice and Seeking Voice: Peer Talk in a Multilingual Primary School Classroom in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokkonen, Alicia Copp

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates how two young newcomers navigate an institutional policy of "English only" in a Finnish primary school and how this policy impacts opportunities for voice. From a discourse analytic and sociolinguistic perspective, the analysis takes an ethnographic path to a focal event of language conflict in the classroom. The analysis…

  14. The Ideological Production of Learner Identities in the World outside/inside the Classroom: Language Learning, Consumption, and National Belonging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Char

    2010-01-01

    Adult education ESOL teachers usually know a lot about learners' lives inside the classroom, but they are less aware of learners' lives outside that space. This article focuses on learner talk about "Ingles Sin Barreras," a heavily advertised English-language program for Spanish-speakers who want to learn English. I analyzed learner talk along…

  15. Newcomers Navigating Language Choice and Seeking Voice: Peer Talk in a Multilingual Primary School Classroom in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokkonen, Alicia Copp

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates how two young newcomers navigate an institutional policy of "English only" in a Finnish primary school and how this policy impacts opportunities for voice. From a discourse analytic and sociolinguistic perspective, the analysis takes an ethnographic path to a focal event of language conflict in the classroom. The analysis…

  16. Reporting Qualitative Data Quantitatively: Code-Switching in Mathematics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, Kian-Sen; Heng, Buai-Chin

    2012-01-01

    This article is based on a research investigating the communication in primary mathematics classrooms. One of the research's objectives was to determine what languages were used in the primary mathematics classrooms, and to what extent, do teachers and students resort to code-switching in teaching and learning mathematics. A total of 16 classroom…

  17. Reading Dual Language Books: Improving Early Literacy Skills in Linguistically Diverse Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Rahat; Thorne, Keoma J; Pfitscher, Christina M; Nordstokke, David W; McKeough, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Research has determined that dual language books have a positive effect on literacy achievement, motivation, and family involvement in children’s schooling. In this study we used quantitative methods to complement the largely qualitative extant research. We analyzed the early literacy skills of 105 kindergarten children (45 comparison, 60…

  18. A Case for Explicit Grammar Instruction in English as Second/Foreign Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kent

    2013-01-01

    This paper will provide a review of research--regarding explicit grammar instruction--that groups recent studies into three main categories and then sub-categorizes these studies under key terms in second language acquisition (SLA) research. The overall purpose of this paper is to argue that in light of these issues, recent studies have shown that…

  19. Research on teaching of "Solar Eclipse" in primary classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winnie Wing Mui SO

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been realized that children have their own understanding of how the world works preceding formal education in schools. It is also found in research that the social-cultural views about specific scientific concepts have generated certain alternative concepts in pupils. A great number of western studies have been done to find out students' science understanding; less has been done to understand local children's understanding of science. This research attempts to explore children's understanding of a natural phenomenon "Solar Eclipse". The research also looks into the effectiveness of employing constructivist view in designing teaching and the feasibility of research on teaching in primary classrooms. All primary six pupils of a local school and their General Studies teachers were involved in the study. Research methods include interviews, questionnaires and analysis of lesson. The results showed that children's understanding are enhanced, at the same time, children chose their favorite effective teaching activities. Also, there were changes in teachers' conceptual understandings and use of teaching methods. There was evidence that research on teaching can enhance teachers' professional development.

  20. Documenting and researching endangered languages: the Pangloss Collection

    OpenAIRE

    Michailovsky, Boyd; Mazaudon, Martine; Michaud, Alexis; Guillaume, Séverine; François, Alexandre; Adamou, Evangelia

    2014-01-01

    The Pangloss Collection is a language archive developed since 1994 at the Langues et Civilisations à Tradition Orale (LACITO) research group of the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS). It contributes to the documentation and study of the world's languages by providing free access to documents of connected, spontaneous speech, mostly in endangered or under-resourced languages, recorded in their cultural context and transcribed in consultation with native speakers. The Co...

  1. Getting real in the language classroom: developing Japanese students' communicative competence with authentic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Gilmore, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The research described in this thesis reports on a 10-month quantitative/qualitative classroom-based study, carried out at a Japanese university, investigating the potential of authentic materials to develop learners’ communicative competence. It was hypothesised that the ‘richer’ input provided by authentic materials, combined with appropriate awareness-raising activities, would be better able to develop a range of communicative competencies in learners (linguistic, pragmalinguistic, sociopr...

  2. Teachers’ motivation, classroom strategy use, students’ motivation and second language achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Bernaus, Mercè; Wilson, Annie; Gardner, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate student motivation and achievement in English and their relation to teacher motivation and strategy use in the classroom. Research participants were 31 teachers in Catalonia (Spain) and the 694 students in their classes. The unit of analysis was the English class. The results of our study suggest that teacher motivation is related to teacher use of motivating strategies, which in turn are related to student motivation and English ...

  3. Validation of A Learning Environment Instrument in Tertiary Foreign Language Classrooms in China

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Li

    2014-01-01

    This study validated the College and University Classroom Environment Inventory (CUCEI) in the context of Chinese tertiary education, which has not been investigated before. The research sample included 4617 first-year undergraduate students (116 classes) in two Chinese universities. Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) were conducted. Data analysis shows that the CUCEI has robust validity and reliability after six items being deleted. The final solution of...

  4. The Effect of New Technologies on Sign Language Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Ceil; Mirus, Gene; Palmer, Jeffrey Levi; Roessler, Nicholas James; Frost, Adam

    2013-01-01

    This paper first reviews the fairly established ways of collecting sign language data. It then discusses the new technologies available and their impact on sign language research, both in terms of how data is collected and what new kinds of data are emerging as a result of technology. New data collection methods and new kinds of data are…

  5. The Effect of New Technologies on Sign Language Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Ceil; Mirus, Gene; Palmer, Jeffrey Levi; Roessler, Nicholas James; Frost, Adam

    2013-01-01

    This paper first reviews the fairly established ways of collecting sign language data. It then discusses the new technologies available and their impact on sign language research, both in terms of how data is collected and what new kinds of data are emerging as a result of technology. New data collection methods and new kinds of data are…

  6. A Multiple Word Association Probe in Second Language Acquisition Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Heleen; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The background of word association tests is described, their potential relevance to second language (L2) research considered, and the history of their use as L2 measuring instruments reviewed. A computer-controlled word association test is described. The test was not established as a valid indicator of language proficiency. (Author/LMO)

  7. Sign Languages: Contribution to Neurolinguistics from Cross-Modal Research

    OpenAIRE

    Malaia, Evie; Wilbur, Ronnie

    2010-01-01

    Using sign language research as an example, we argue that both the cross-linguistic descriptive approach to data, advocated by Evans and Levinson (2009), as well as abstract (‘formal’) analyses are necessary steps towards the development of “neurolinguistic primitives” for investigating how human languages are instantiated in the brain.

  8. Being Bilingual: Issues for Cross-Language Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogusia Temple

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The current political debates in England highlight the role of language in citizenship, social exclusion, and discrimination. Similar debates can also be found around the world. Correspondingly, research addressing different language communities is burgeoning. Service providers and academics are increasingly employing bilingual community researchers or interpreters to carry out research. However, there is very little written about the effect of working with bilingual researchers. What it means to be bilingual is often essentialised and rarely problematised. Bilingual researchers are seen as unproblematically acting as bridges between communities just because they are bilingual. Their ties to communities, their use of language, and their perspectives on the research are rarely investigated. Language is tied in an unproblematic way to meaning, values, and beliefs. In this article, I use examples from my own research to question what it means to be bilingual and to do cross-language research. I argue that there is no straightforward way in which meanings can be read off from researchers’ ties to language and that being bilingual is not the same for everyone.

  9. Building Teachers’ Understanding of Classroom Action Research: A Rural Case Study in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dodi Sukmayadi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia Open University (UT: Universitas Terbuka is a large, open university delivering distance education to students throughout Indonesia. An important aspect of its mission is to provide opportunities for Indonesian teachers to improve their education in-service. This includes two courses on classroom action research. In order to assess the effectiveness of these courses and, if necessary, improve them, a team of lecturers from UT conducted an investigation of the challenges teachers were facing in learning to conduct classroom action research through the UT modules. The team found that the modules did not adequately reflect an understanding of the actual characteristics of the teachers they were serving and were thus less effective than they might be in teaching teachers to conduct classroom action research. Changes in both the content and scheduling of the modules are recommended in order to more effectively promote classroom action research in Indonesian schools. Key Words: Classroom Action Research, Distance Education, Indonesia, Teacher Development

  10. Practitioner Research or Descriptions of Classroom Practice? A Discussion of Teachers Investigating Their Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Steve; Burton, Diana

    2006-01-01

    This article outlines how a group of primary school teachers from a cluster of nine schools in a networked learning community enquired into their classroom teaching. The teachers each identified an area of practice that they were developing in their classroom and wanted to evaluate, such as the benefits of pupils working in teams, or the creation…

  11. Facilitating Research and Learning in Petrology and Geochemistry through Classroom Applications of Remotely Operable Research Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    Bringing the use of cutting-edge research tools into student classroom experiences has long been a popular educational strategy in the geosciences and other STEM disciplines. The NSF CCLI and TUES programs have funded a large number of projects that placed research-grade instrumentation at educational institutions for instructional use and use in supporting undergraduate research activities. While student and faculty response to these activities has largely been positive, a range of challenges exist related to their educational effectiveness. Many of the obstacles these approaches have faced relate to "scaling up" of research mentoring experiences (e.g., providing training and time for use for an entire classroom of students, as opposed to one or two), and to time tradeoffs associated with providing technical training for effective instrument use versus course content coverage. The biggest challenge has often been simple logistics: a single instrument, housed in a different space, is difficult to integrate effectively into instructional activities. My CCLI-funded project sought primarily to knock down the logistical obstacles to research instrument use by taking advantage of remote instrument operation technologies, which allow the in-classroom use of networked analytical tools. Remote use of electron microprobe and SEM instruments of the Florida Center for Analytical Electron Microscopy (FCAEM) in Miami, FL was integrated into two geoscience courses at USF in Tampa, FL. Remote operation permitted the development of whole-class laboratory exercises to familiarize students with the tools, their function, and their capabilities; and it allowed students to collect high-quality chemical and image data on their own prepared samples in the classroom during laboratory periods. These activities improve student engagement in the course, appear to improve learning of key concepts in mineralogy and petrology, and have led to students pursuing independent research projects, as well as requesting additional Geology elective courses offering similar kinds of experiences. I have sustained these activities post-project via student lab fees to pay for in-class microprobe time.

  12. Cross-linguistic comparisons in child language research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Ruth A

    2014-07-01

    Major large-scale research projects in the early years of developmental psycholinguistics were English-based, yet even then numerous studies were available or under way in a range of different languages (Ferguson & Slobin, 1973). Since then, the field of cross-linguistic child language research has burgeoned in several directions. First, rich information is now available on the acquisition of dozens of languages from around the world in numerous language families, spearheaded by the five-volume series edited by Slobin (1985-1997) and complemented by in-depth examination of specific constructions - e.g. causative alternation, motion verbs, passive voice, subject elision, noun compounding - in various languages, culminating in an in-depth examination of the acquisition of ergativity in over a dozen languages (Bavin & Stoll, 2013). A second fruitful direction is the application of carefully comparable designs targeting a range of issues among children acquiring different languages, including: production of early lexico-grammatical constructions (Slobin, 1982), sentence processing comprehension (MacWhinney & Bates, 1989), expression of spatial relations (Bowerman, 2011), discourse construction of oral narratives based on short picture series (Hickmann, 2003) and longer storybooks (Berman & Slobin, 1994), and extended texts in different genres (Berman, 2008). Taken together, research motivated by the question of what is particular and what universal in child language highlights the marked, and early, impact of ambient language typology on processes of language acquisition. The challenge remains to operationalize such insights by means of psychologically sound and linguistically well-motivated measures for evaluating the interplay between the variables of developmental level, linguistic domain, and ambient language typology. PMID:25023494

  13. The African Languages Research Institute: A Milestone in the Development of the Zimbabwean Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Chabata

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract: This article is an assessment of the work the African Languages Research Institute (ALRI has done towards developing the indigenous languages of Zimbabwe. It looks at what the research team at ALRI has achieved, first in initiating serious research on the Zimbabwean languages and the progress it has made towards achieving its goal, developing and raising the status of these languages. It also considers what ALRI has planned for the future of the different categories or levels into which the various Zimbabwean languages have been classified. Part of the assessment focuses on measures ALRI has put in place to ensure the initiated research programme is sustainable and will continue in future. The article furthermore discusses the importance of the research work being done at ALRI, especially with regard to language development as a means towards self-realisation and actualisation, national advancement and the sustenance of the languages involved. ALRI's agenda is also analysed to see how well it agrees with popular thinking in Zimbabwe concerning the development and promotion of all of the indigenous languages.

    Keywords: ALRI, CAPACITY BUILDING, INSTITUTIONALISATION, LANGUAGE HAR-MONISATION, LANGUAGE STANDARDISATION, MONOLINGUAL LEXICOGRAPHY, ZIM-BABWEAN LANGUAGES

    Opsomming: Die African Languages Research Institute: 'n Mylpaal in die ont-wikkeling van die Zimbabwiese tale. Hierdie artikel is 'n evaluering van die werk wat die African Languages Research Institute (ALRI gedoen het in die ontwikkeling van die inheemse tale van Zimbabwe. Dit kyk na wat die navorsingspan bereik het, eerstens deur ernstige navorsing oor die Zimbabwiese tale te onderneem en die vordering wat gemaak is met die bereiking van sy doel, die ontwikkeling en die statusverhoging van hierdie tale. Dit beskou ook wat ALRI beplan het vir die toekoms van die verskillende kategorieë of vlakke waarin die onderskeie Zimbabwiese tale geklassifiseer is. 'n Deel van die evaluering fokus op maatreëls wat ALRI in plek gestel het om te verseker dat die onderneemde navorsingsprogram volhoubaar is en in die toekoms sal voortgaan. Verder bespreek die artikel die belangrikheid van die navorsingswerk wat by ALRI gedoen word, veral met betrekking tot taalontwikkeling as 'n manier tot selfverwesenliking en -aktualisering, nasionale vooruitgang en die onderhoubaarheid van die betrokke tale. ALRI se agenda word ook ontleed om te sien hoe goed dit ooreenstem met die algemene denke in Zimbabwe betreffende die ontwikkeling en bevordering van al die inheemse tale.

    Sleutelwoorde: ALRI, VERMOËNSBOU, INSTITUSIONALISERING, TAALHARMONI-ERING, TAALSTANDAARDISERING, EENTALIGE LEKSIKOGRAFIE, ZIMBABWIESE TALE

  14. What Will Classroom Teachers Do With Shared Research Results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, M. J.; Weissel, J. K.; Cormier, M.; Newman, K. R.

    2005-12-01

    Scientists are passionate about the research problems they investigate, and wish to share their discoveries as widely as possible. Similarly, classroom teachers who are passionate about their subject can better foster student learning. One way to enhance such passions involves bringing teachers and scientists together to discuss cutting-edge discoveries and develop curricular materials based on the respective strengths of educators and investigators. Our presentation describes one example of this approach based on research about gas blowout structures offshore Virginia and North Carolina. Methane venting processes along continental margins may have important climatic, geotechnical, hazard, and resource implications. In 2000, shipboard surveys documented that large structures offshore VA-NC resulted from massive gas expulsion. Gas appears to be trapped in shelf edge deltas and stresses resulting from downslope creep is favoring its release. Scientists undertook a new expedition in 2004 to determine if there is present-day discharge of methane-rich fluids through the floors or walls of the blowouts or whether these seepage sites are relict features, and to gain insight into the origin of the vented methane. In July 2005, 12 teachers from New York and New Jersey met with the co-PIs (Weissel and Cormier), graduate student (Newman), and educational specialist (Passow) over a 2-day workshop to learn about how scientific problems are identified, how a research cruise is organized, what was learned through the measurements and analysis, and what might be possible significant impacts from such understandings. Based on what they learned, participants began development of classroom activities, Internet-based investigations, and constructed-response assessment items utilizing data and concepts from the project and other sources. The resulting curriculum units are designed for use in middle and high school chemistry, physics, earth science, and technology courses. Curricular units include "Using Real-Life Problems to Learn Scientific Principles," "Mapping the Unseen Floors," "Landslide or Not," and a board game based on conducting a scientific research cruise. Materials are available through www.earth2class.org. Over the following academic year, participants will continue to develop instructional materials, field-test them, and provide peer training through in-district and regional professional development opportunities. The scientists and educational specialist will provide support to ensure scientific accuracy and pedagogical soundness. The project will utilize DLESE as an additional effective dissemination and evaluation mechanism. In these ways, the scientists and core of educators may be able to share these discoveries with hundreds of teachers and thousands of students.

  15. Investigating Situational Willingness to Communicate within Second Language Classrooms from an Ecological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yiqian

    2011-01-01

    Previous research into willingness to communicate (WTC) in L2 has focused primarily on its trait dispositions that remain stable across contexts and its situated nature is under explored. Framed with an ecological perspective on second language learning, this multiple case study investigated the dynamic and situated nature of WTC in second…

  16. Principles and Practices for Building Academic Self-Efficacy in Middle Grades Language Arts Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTigue, Erin; Liew, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Academic self-efficacy contributes to students' motivation and persistence for learning. However, motivation for reading and learning, and students' self-efficacy in school often declines in adolescence. This manuscript presents research-based strategies for facilitating students' motivations within the context of language arts classes.

  17. Extending the Flipped Classroom Model: Developing Second Language Writing Skills through Student-Created Digital Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engin, Marion

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a project that aimed to leverage the students' interest and experience of technology and multimodal environments to develop their academic writing skills and second language learning. Students were expected to follow a model, research a topic, and craft a digital video tutorial on an aspect of academic writing which would…

  18. Language Contact and Language Conflict in Autochthonous Language Minority Settings in the EU: A Preliminary Round-Up of Guiding Principles and Research Desiderata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darquennes, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    This contribution deals with language contact and language conflict in autochthonous language minority settings in the European Union. It rounds up a number of concepts that guide macro-socio-linguistic and macrocontact-linguistic research on language minorities. The description of these concepts results in a list of research desiderata.

  19. The Applied Research of Code-Switching in Building Ecological English Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang SHI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Studying the educational problems from the perspective of ecology, educational ecology has important implications in second language acquisition. Advocating people first and dynamic balance, ecological English classroom is one of the new progresses in the application of educational ecology to teach practice. There are many ways to build ecological English classroom. Based on such educational ecology theories as the law of tolerance and the optimum principle, the flowerpot effect and the law of educational ecology niche, this paper explores the application of code-switching in building ecological English classroom and arrives at the conclusion that code-switching has the following functions as the function to adapt to linguistic reality, the function to strengthen the language teaching effects, the function of affinity, the regulatory function, the function of implication and the support function.

  20. Does Equal Access Mean Treat the Same? From Theory to Practice in the Classroom of English as an Additional Language Learner in Ireland--Towards a Transformative Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Niamh

    2014-01-01

    While a substantial body of research exists on First- and Second-Language Acquisition (SLA), research on the language acquisition process that a language minority student goes through when they are acquiring a second language has been largely unexplored. Pedagogical practices that espouse language learning theories facilitate both the language…

  1. Implementing Interventions to Increase Motivation in the English Language Classroom: from Theory to Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Iakovos Tsiplakides; Areti Keramida

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of empirical research shows a relationship between student motivation and learning outcomes in the teaching of English in ESL and EFL contexts. Despite a sound theoretical framework, however, there are few studies which implement strategies intended to increase motivation and report findings. Using qualitative research, this article attempts to link theory with practice and shed light into the factors which demotivate students and act as barriers to effective foreign language l...

  2. Research in the Classroom with the WISE Mission (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, B. J.

    2010-12-01

    NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has surveyed the sky in four bands of infrared light creating a treasure trove of data. These data will not only be useful to the professional space science community, but also to teachers and students. The education and public outreach program for WISE has been working to create experiences and resources for students and teachers to use WISE data in classroom investigations. Prior to the launch of WISE, we trained a group of ambassador teachers to conduct original research using the Spitzer Space Telescope in partnership with a scientist from the Spitzer Science Center. During the survey operations of the telescope we worked with the International Astronomical Search Collaboration to engage students in confirmation studies of WISE-discovered asteroids and comets. We are now developing resources for teachers and students to access WISE data when in becomes public in 2011 to conduct both original research and laboratory-style investigations. We will describe the WISE mission, its data products, and our efforts to engage students in science by having them do science.

  3. Language Teaching at a Distance: An Overview of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobel, Oksana; Kim, Deoksoon

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we review empirical research on language teaching at a distance, published between 2005 and 2010. After compiling a list of journals, we went through a multi-stage process of analyzing relevant studies. This overview of research is based on twenty-four articles. The content analysis of research studies led our inquiry on topics…

  4. Teaching Additional Languages. Educational Practices Series 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Elliot L.; Tan, Lihua; Walberg, Herbert J.

    This booklet describes key principles of and research on teaching additional languages. The 10 chapters focus on the following: (1) "Comprehensible Input" (learners need exposure to meaningful, understandable language); (2) "Language Opportunities" (classroom activities should let students use natural and meaningful language with their…

  5. Conducting Original, Hands-On Astronomical Research in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneau, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    Since 2007 I have been a Team Leader for the Tzec Maun Foundation, a non-profit foundation dedicated to providing free, research grade, Internet telescopes to students, teachers and researchers around the world. The name Tzec Maun (pronounced “Teh-Zeck-Moan”) comes from Mayan culture. Tzec Maun was the jovial messenger, laughed at adversity. Based on the challenges students, researchers and professional astronomers face with finances, equipment, and telescope access, the jovial mascot seems to fit. Hundreds of hours performing astronomical outreach as a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador and Astronomical League Master of outreach taught me that the best way to inspirationally teach astronomy and space science (and most subjects) is actually being at the eyepiece. I’m NOT a fan of the traditional planetarium experience as a teaching tool because it inhibits inspiration and the learning experience to a 2-D mat on a faux horizon with artificial representations. Once, a student at my dark sky observatory excitedly commented that the night sky was like a 3-D planetarium. I have hosted several classes at my own personal dark sky observatory, but this resource is impractical for all but a few lucky students. Experience has taught me that the next best thing to being at the eyepiece is to control a remote telescope via the Internet. Tzec Maun’s arsenal of telescopes is all research capable, linked to the Internet and positioned for round-the-clock dark skies. The final conditions described above, mean that I can enter an 8:30am science class, log onto the Tzec Maun telescope Portal and turn over control of an Australian system (where it is night) to a student or teacher. Working as a group, the class can either begin their investigations. My Tzec Maun science team (TARP) is engaged in searching for potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs). PHA work excites student and teacher alike. Teaching from telescopes can unleash powerful attention-getting tools that enable teachers to convey moderately complex computer science, optical, geographic, mathematical, informational and physical principles through hands-on telescope operations. In addition to the general studies aspects of classroom internet-based astronomy, Tzec Maun supports real science by enabling operators precisely point telescopes and acquire extremely faint, magnitude 19+ CCD images. Thanks to the creative Team of Photometrica (photometrica.org), my teams now have the ability to process and analyze images online and produce results in short order. Normally, astronomical data analysis packages cost greater than thousands of dollars for single license operations. Free to my team members, Photometrica allows students to upload their data to a cloud computing server and read precise photometric and/or astrometric results. I’m indebted to Michael and Geir for their support. The efficacy of student-based research is well documented. The Council on Undergraduate Research defines student research as, "an inquiry or investigation conducted by an undergraduate that makes an original intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline." (http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/studentresearch/What. Teaching from Tzec Maun in the classroom is the most original teaching research I can imagine. I very much look forward to presenting this program to the convened body.

  6. Exploring South African Grade 11 Learners' Perceptions of Classroom Inquiry: Validation of a Research Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudu, Washington T.; Vhurumuku, Elaosi

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the adoption and validation of a research instrument, on determining learners' levels of perception of classroom inquiry based on data collected from South African Grade 11 learners. The Learners' Perception of Classroom Inquiry (LPCI) instrument consists only of Likert-type items which rank activities according to how often…

  7. How Latino/a bilingual students use their language in a fifth grade classroom and in the science laboratory during science instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Alma R.

    This qualitative research study examines how Latino/a bilingual students use their linguistic resources in their homeroom classroom and in the science laboratory during science instruction. This study was conducted in a school district located in the southwestern part of the United States. The school was chosen based on the criterion that the school is located in an area considered economically depressed, with a predominantly Latino student, school, and neighborhood population. The object of study was a fifth grade bilingual (Spanish/English) classroom where English was the means of instruction. Classroom interaction was examined from a sociolinguistics perspective. The study was descriptive in nature with the objective of analyzing the students' use of their linguistic resources while participating in science learning. The results of this study suggest that the students used their linguistic resources purposefully in order to facilitate their participation in science leaning. In the same manner, it was observed the students' reliance on Spanish as a foundation to enhance their comprehension of the scientific concepts and the dynamics involved in the science lessons, with the purpose of making sense, and thus, to express their understanding (orally and in writing) using their linguistic resources, especially their English language, as it was expected from them. Further, the findings disclose the students' awareness of their own bilingualism, preference for speaking Spanish, and their conceptualization of English as the language to achieve academic success. It has also been observed how the pressure put upon the teacher and the students by the accountability system brings about an implicit bias against Spanish, causing the teacher to assume a paradoxical stance regarding the students' use of Spanish, and thereby, placing the students in an ambivalent position, that might affect, to a certain extent, how students use their Spanish language as a resource to participate in science learning.

  8. Classroom Management: A Persistent Challenge for Pre-Service Foreign Language Teachers (Manejo del salón de clase: un reto persistente para docentes practicantes de lenguas extranjeras)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, Diego Fernando; Sánchez, Jesús Ariel

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative descriptive study aimed to ascertain the extent to which classroom management constituted a problem among pre-service foreign language teachers in a teacher education program at a public university in Colombia. The study also sought to identify classroom management challenges, the approaches to confronting them, and the…

  9. Beyond the Classroom: The Role of Self-Guided Learning in Second Language Listening and Speaking Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Davis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a significant difference in most language instruction pro­­grams concerning the number of hours students spend practicing reading/writing skills versus listening/speaking skills. The primary cause for this is most likely due to the lack of class time that can be feasibly spent on meaningful conversation exchanges. Thus, the most logical answer is to have students practice outside the classroom. However, the transition from in-class learning to out-of-class practice is often not a very successful one. To address this deficiency and present possible options for creating successful learning environments beyond the classroom, this literature review offers an in-depth analysis of the role that guided learning plays in providing learning experiences for students beyond the classroom.

  10. "The Foreign Language Classroom is Like an Airplane" Metaphorical Conceptualizations of Teachers’ Beliefs

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    Volkan ?nceçay

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Drawing on constructivist perspectives, this study aimed to investigate the tacit knowledge of pre-service English teachers regarding the foreign language classroom by discovering their belief systems mainly through a metaphor analysis. The participants consisted of two pre-service teachers, who enrolled in a practicum class of a one-year intensive teaching certificate course offered at an English-medium foundation university located in Istanbul, Turkey, during the spring semester of 2012-2013 academic year. The possible effects of practice teaching period on the metaphors were also explored. In so doing, the participants were requested to reflect on the metaphors they generated. In this exploratory design, the data collection tools included a metaphor completion task, a semi-structured interview, and follow-up e-mails. The results suggested that pre-service teachers do not enter teacher education as a tabula rasa and that the use of metaphors to reveal previous knowledge was a useful instrument. It was also found that real teaching experience seemed to influence the metaphors expressed prior to practicum. Implications and applications for teacher education and suggestions for future research are discussed. Keywords: Pre-service teacher education, teaching certificate programs, practicum, metaphor analysis, prior beliefs, tacit knowledge Öz Yap?land?rmac? yakla??m? takip eden bu çal??ma hizmet öncesi ?ngilizce ö?retmenlerinin yabanc? dil s?n?f? ile ilgili var olan bilgilerini metafor analizi yöntemi ile ortaya ç?karmay? amaçlam??t?r. 2012-2013 e?itim-ö?retim y?l?n?n bahar döneminde bir vak?f üniversitesinde verilmekte olan bir y?ll?k yo?un bir pedagojik formasyon program?n?n okul deneyimi dersine kay?t olan iki hizmet öncesi ?ngilizce ö?retmeni çal??mada yer alm??lard?r. Bahsi geçen okul deneyimi döneminin ara?t?rmaya kat?lan ö?retmenler taraf?ndan dile getirilen metaforlar üzerinde bir etkisinin olup olmad??? da ayr?ca incelenmi?tir. Bu yap?l?rken, kat?l?mc?lardan çal??ma boyunca belirttikleri metaforlar üzerinde yans?t?c? bir ?ekilde dü?ünmeleri istenmi?tir. Ara?t?rmada veriler metafor tamamlama, yar?-yap?land?r?lm?? görü?me ve takip amaçl? gönderilen elektronik postalarla toplanm??t?r. Elde edilen verilerin nitel analizinin sonucunda hizmet öncesi ?ngilizce ö?retmenlerinin mesle?e ba?lamadan önce tabula rasa olmad?klar? ve metafor kullan?m?n?n örtülü bilgilerin gün yüzüne ç?kar?lmas?nda etkili bir yöntem oldu?u belirlenmi?tir. Bunun yan? s?ra gerçek s?n?f ortam?nda elde edilen ö?retim tecrübesinin çal??mada yer alan hizmet öncesi ?ngilizce ö?retmenlerinin okul deneyimi ba?lamadan önce ifade ettikleri metaforlar üzerinde bir derece etkili oldu?u belirtilebilir. Anahtar Sözcükler: Hizmet öncesi ö?retmen e?itimi, pedagojik formasyon programlar?, okul deneyimi, metafor analizi, var olan inançlar, örtülü bilgi

  11. Research Based Science Education: Bringing Authentic Scientific Research into the Secondary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, J.

    2003-12-01

    Teachers and students at Northview High School in Brazil, Indiana have the opportunity to engage in authentic scientific research through our participation in two national projects, TLRBSE and PEPP. Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science Education (TLRBSE) is a teacher professional development and retention program coupled with authentic scientific research projects in astronomy. Teacher-Leaders are trained in research-based pedagogy and serve as mentors to less experienced colleagues and work with students to develop science research methods and research projects for the classroom. Astronomical data collected at Kitt Peak by astronomers and teachers is made available on CD for classroom use. Northview is in its second year as a TLRBSE school. The Princeton Earth Physics Project (PEPP) trains mentor teachers in fundamentals of research in seismology. Teachers and students then gain hands on experience in science research through operation of a research quality seismic station sited at the high school. Data from the Northview seismometer are stored locally and also transmitted over the Internet to a database at Indiana University. Students have access to local data as well as seismic databases accessible through the Internet to use for research projects. The Northview Seismic Station has been in operation since 1998. In this presentation, I will describe how these projects have been incorporated into the physics and earth science programs at Northview High School. I will discus how our teachers and students have benefited from the opportunity to take part in hands-on scientific research under the guidance of university faculty. In particular, I will describe our participation in a regional seismic network through seismic data acquisition, data analysis using seismological software, and students' experiences in a university-based student research symposium. I reflect on the some of the successes and barriers to high-school teachers' and students' involvement in scientific research programs. I conclude with a discussion of a successful student seismology project that was a finalist in the 2003 INTEL International Science and Engineering Fair

  12. Co-Constructing Representations of Culture in ESL and EFL Classrooms: Discursive Faultlines in Chile and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard-Warwick, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Based on qualitative research conducted in 3 university English as a foreign language classrooms in Chile and 3 community college English as a second language classrooms in California, this article examines the approaches used in teaching culture in these classrooms, the differences in how particular cultures (usually national cultures) were…

  13. First language transfer in second language writing: An examination of current research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Karim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available First language (L1 transfer has been a key issue in the field of applied linguistics, second language acquisition (SLA, and language pedagogy for almost a century. Its importance, however, has been re-evaluated several times within the last few decades. The aim of this paper is to examine current research that has investigated the role of L1 transfer in second language (L2 writing. The paper begins by discussing the different views of L1 transfer and how they have changed over time and then reviews some of the major studies that have examined the role of L1 transfer both as a learning tool and as a communicative strategy in L2 writing. The paper concludes with a number of suggestions for L2 writing instruction and future research.

  14. Finding a Place for Critical Thinking and Self-voice in College English as a Foreign Language Writing Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Osman Barnawi

    2011-01-01

    Although the concepts of critical thinking and self-voice have been extensively discussed in a second language writing, little attention has been given, on the pedagogical level, to critical thinking and self-voice in college EFL writing instruction. To fill such a void, this paper attempts to propose some pedagogical tasks namely:  persuasive writing tasks, draft workshops one-on-one mentoring approaches for finding a place for critical thinking and self-voice in EFL classrooms. In doing so,...

  15. Teaching and Learning Classroom Action Research at a Distance in an Indonesian Urban Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    [None] Sandra S.A.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This action research project aims to understand whether teachers are mastering the knowledge and skills necessary to conduct classroom action research through two courses, Classroom Action Research (CAR and Enhancing Teaching Professional Skills (PKP: Pemantapan Kemampuan Profesional, offered via distance education to Indonesian teachers and to identify areas for possible improvement of both courses. The research was conducted in two urban study centers located in the cities of Bogor and Tangerang in the Indonesian provinces of West Java and Banten. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews, classroom observations, questionnaires, and focus group discussions. All data were analyzed for patterns that might offer insight into the problems tutors and teacher-learners were facing as they worked through the Classroom Action Research (PTK: Penelitian Tindakan Kelas module and tutorial. The research team from Indonesia Open University (UT: Universitas Terbuka identified several problematic aspects of each course, including excessive lag time between the first and second courses, insufficient examples of model classroom action research projects, a lack of supervised practice of action research techniques, variability of tutorial quality, and a mismatch between course assessments and the content and purpose of the courses. While the findings of this study focus primarily on two distance courses offered by UT, they offer insight into the challenges of providing in-service teacher development via distance education in the Indonesian context. Key Words: Distance Learning, Classroom Action Research, Teacher Professional Skill

  16. Developing the language of thinking within a classroom community of inquiry: pre-service teachers' experiences

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Lena, Green; Janet, Condy; Agnes, Chigona.

    Full Text Available We argue that the "community of inquiry" approach, using reading materials modelled on Lipman's Philosophy for Children programme, is a theoretically justified and teacher-friendly means of promoting effective thinking skills. The stimulus materials, used by the pre-service teachers, consist ofshort [...] stories ofclassroom life designed to elicit children's ideas for further discussion as a community of inquiry. Research has shown that the community of inquiry approach to classroom discussion is perceived positively by educators and teachers and makes a difference to learners. This study explored how the Intermediate and Senior Phase pre-service teachers experienced a classroom community of inquiry by using a qualitative research design with 47 final year pre-service teachers. Data consisted of written reflections from the whole class and recordings of two focus group interviews with selected individuals from the group. From the analysis of the data, the following themes became evident: personal and professional development, changes in learners, contextual concerns, and curriculum links. We conclude that this approach is a valuable addition to the pedagogical strategies of pre-service teachers.

  17. Results of a research project carried out in the primary classroom using two units of work based on the task-based approach

    OpenAIRE

    Durán Fernández, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    This research proposes a new model of a Task-Based Didactic Unit while at the same time attempting to demonstrate its effectiveness in the Primary Classroom. The main objective is to find out whether more effective English Language Learning is brought about when we apply Task-Based Didactic Units than when we apply Didactic Units based on the Traditional Approach: Presentation, Practice and Production. In the Post-test, significant differences between the Control Group and the ...

  18. The Embryology Research on Students’ Classroom Learning Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le ZHANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The inherent behavior transition of students’ classroom learning behavior is a process of transition from outside to inside and from the inside to the outside. Perceptual information is the starting point of classroom learning behavior inherently occurs. Abstract internalization is the basis of classroom learning behavior inherently occurs. Innovation generation is the key to classroom learning behavior inherently occurs. Firstly, the consciously degree of students’ learning cogitation restricts the processes of innovation generation learning behavior. Secondly, the learning cogitation type restricts the quality of innovation generation of learning behavior. External action is the practice of learning behavior inherently occurs. Firstly, the change of students’ learning behavior at any time should be observed and recorded. Secondly, students continuous reflect on the process of classroom learning behavior. Finally, classroom learning behavior should be constantly improved and modified according to the questions found by students after their reflections. These four aspects are not a simple “flat loop” from perceptual information to external application, but a “spiral process.” External application also means the beginning of the next perceptual information. These four stages are relatively independent, though they are connected to each other and interlocking.

  19. Language Teacher Research in Australia and New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Anne, Ed.; Burton, Jill, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, inquiry-based teaching has become a highly valued component of professional development and practitioner research in Australia and New Zealand. This volume of the Language Teacher Research Series focuses on teaching and learning experiences in those two countries, which encompass a large geographical area with diverse…

  20. Research on First Language Attrition of Morphosyntax in Adult Bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurel, Ayse

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a selective review of previous research findings on first language (L1) attrition. The review is intentionally limited in scope as it only discusses studies on morphosyntactic attrition in the L1 grammar of adult bilinguals. To this end--and in order to present the most current line of research in this field--I first report…

  1. Practice and Progression in Second Language Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Since its inception, the field of second language research has utilized methods from a number of areas, including general linguistics, psychology, education, sociology, anthropology and, recently, neuroscience and corpus linguistics. As the questions and objectives expand, researchers are increasingly pushing methodological boundaries to gain a…

  2. Effective Use of the Media: Video in the Foreign Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    ?epon, Slavica

    2013-01-01

    Because there is no study in the existing literature to address the usefulness of video exposure to teach a foreign language (FL), the present article has tried to close this research gap. The study reveals the impact of unassisted video exposure on FL lexis and grammar acquisition, reading-based general comprehension and writing skill. The study first employs quantitative pre- and post-test surveys, and then qualitative in-depth interviews with students at the Faculty of Economics in Ljublja...

  3. Some Recommendations for Integrating Literature into EFL/ESL Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Khatib; Saeed Nourzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Many EFL/ESL learners find English language classrooms boring, partly because of the fact that learners are engaged in those activities they consider unrelated to the requirements of out-of-class communication in the L2. One solution offered to this problem is to introduce literature and literary texts into language classrooms. Many researchers support the proposal that literature needs to be incorporated into language teaching curricula, both for children and adults. However, researchers and...

  4. A Working Model for Assessing Spanish Heritage Language Learners' Language Proficiency through a Placement Exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairclough, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Having a clear idea of the knowledge in the heritage language that a student brings to the classroom is essential for a successful language-learning experience; for that reason, research in heritage language education has been focusing increasingly on assessment issues, especially language placement exams. Professionals debate whether assessment…

  5. Using Technology To Cross Cultural and Linguistic Borders in Spanish Language Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lear, Darcy

    2003-01-01

    Explores the divide between possibilities for technology use in classrooms and the realities of technology use in these same classrooms. Specific focus is on ways in which technology is used to teach culture in university Spanish classes. (Author/VWL)

  6. The Spoken Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, George

    1989-01-01

    An analysis is made of research focusing on how speaking and listening activities are relevant to the language classroom. Current thinking is reviewed on spoken language, with a focus on pronunciation, as a medium of information transfer and of interpersonal exchange. (66 references) (GLR)

  7. BUILDING BLOCKS IN THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM (PILARES BÁSICOS EN EL AULA DE IDIOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coto Keith Rossina

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:Este artículo presenta las ventajas de la integración de tres áreas comúnmente estudiadas en la enseñanza de idiomas: Estilos de Aprendizaje, Inteligencias Múltiples y Estrategias para el Aprendizaje de Idiomas. Cada una de estas áreas tiene un papel fundamental en la enseñanza de idiomas y el aprendizaje, pero por lo general se utilizan por separado, o en el mejor de los casos, los y las docentes integran ya sea estilos e inteligencias o estrategias, pero no las tres al mismo tiempo. De hecho, la mayoría de la literatura presenta cada una por separado, dando la idea de que sólo una o dos se pueden utilizar en la clase de idiomas, por lo que en muchas oportunidades se ignoran aspectos fundamentales. La tesis principal del artículo es que, para ser más eficaz, Estilos de Aprendizaje, Inteligencias Múltiples y Estrategias de Aprendizaje deben entrelazarse a fin de crear un pilar sólido para el aprendizaje de idiomas. Primeramente, la autora ofrece una visión general de cada una de estas áreas. Luego en el referente teórico explica cómo estas deben usarse como una unidad, y posteriormente da un ejemplo de esto a través de un plan de clase sobre el tema de la conservación del medio ambiente para un curso de Comunicación Oral I de la carrera de inglés de la Escuela de Lenguas Modernas de la Universidad de Costa Rica. Por último, se ofrecen algunas recomendaciones a los y las instructores sobre la integración de estos pilares en el aula.Abstract: This article presents the advantages of integrating three areas commonly addressed in the teaching of languages: Learning Styles, Multiple Intelligences and Language Learning Strategies. Each of these areas plays a fundamental role when teaching and learning languages, but usually they are used separately or in the best of cases, instructors integrate either styles and intelligences or strategies, but not the three of them at the same time. Indeed, most of the literature presents each separately, giving the idea that only one or two can be used in the language classroom, thus missing some important matters. The point of this article is that in order to be more effective, Learning Styles, Multiple Intelligences and Language Learning Strategies must intertwine, so as to create a solid building block. The author first gives an overview of each of these areas. She then explains in the review of the literature how they should be used as a closely-knit unit. Next, she provides an example of this integration through a lesson plan on the topic of environmental conservation for an Oral Communication course for English majors at School of Modern Languages, University of Costa Rica. Finally, some advice is given to instructors on the incorporation of each of these building blocks.

  8. How Static Is the Statics Classroom? An Investigation into How Innovations, Specifically Research-Based Instructional Strategies, Are Adopted into the Statics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Stephanie Leigh

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate how educational research, specifically Research-Based Instructional Strategies (RBIS), is adopted by education practice, specifically within the engineering Statics classroom. Using a systematic approach, changes in classroom teaching practices were investigated from the instructors' perspective.…

  9. Arctic research in the classroom: A teacher's experiences translated into data driven lesson plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, E. O.; Deegan, L.

    2011-12-01

    Incorporating research into high school science classrooms can promote critical thinking skills and provide a link between students and the scientific community. Basic science concepts become more relevant to students when taught in the context of research. A vital component of incorporating current research into classroom lessons is involving high school teachers in authentic research. The National Science Foundation sponsored Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program has inspired me to bring research to my classroom, communicate the importance of research in the classroom to other teachers and create lasting connections between students and the research community. Through my experiences as an RET at Toolik Field Station in Alaska, I have created several hands-on lessons and laboratory activities that are based on current arctic research and climate change. Each lesson uses arctic research as a theme for exemplifying basic biology concepts as well as increasing awareness of current topics such as climate change. For instance, data collected on the Kuparuk River will be incorporated into classroom activities that teach concepts such as primary production, trophic levels in a food chain and nutrient cycling within an ecosystem. Students will not only understand the biological concepts but also recognize the ecological implications of the research being conducted in the arctic. By using my experience in arctic research as a template, my students will gain a deeper understanding of the scientific process. I hope to create a crucial link of information between the science community and science education in public schools.

  10. Snapshot Assessment System for Migrant, Language-Minority, and Mobile Students. An Informal Tool for Classroom Teachers. Intermediate Level: Grades 4-6. User's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Richard; Bansberg, Bill

    This classroom assessment tool for grades 4-6 offers teachers a method to quickly identify the needs of migrant, language-different, and mobile students in language arts, mathematics, and science in relation to national content standards. The Snapshot System asks the student to perform a series of tasks that are keyed to content standards and…

  11. Modes of Governmentality in an Online Space: A Case Study of Blog Activities in an Advanced Level Japanese-as-a-Foreign-Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerr, Neriko M.; Sato, Shinji

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the validity of the incorporation of online communication in language education classes as a practice free of power politics. By examining blog activities in an advanced-level Japanese-as-a-Foreign-Language classroom at a university in the USA, we show that the blog's postings and readers' comments evoke certain modes of…

  12. The Power of "Can Do" Statements: Teachers' Perceptions of CEFR-Informed Instruction in French as a Second Language Classrooms in Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faez, Farahnaz; Majhanovich, Suzanne; Taylor, Shelley; Smith, Maureen; Crowley, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on French as a second language (FSL) teachers' perceptions of using the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR)-informed instruction (action-oriented instruction focusing on language use) in FSL classrooms in Ontario. In particular, this paper focuses on teachers' perspectives of the strengths and challenges of providing…

  13. The embodied turn in research on language and social interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    I use the term the embodied turn to mean the point when interest in the body became established among researchers on language and social interaction, exploiting the greater ease of video-recording. This review paper tracks the growth of "embodiment" in over 400 papers published in Research on Language and Social Interaction from 1987-2013. I consider closely two areas where analysts have confronted challenges, and how they have responded: settling on precise and analytically helpful terminology for the body; and transcribing and representing the body, particularly its temporality and manner.

  14. The Use of L1 in the Foreign Language Classroom / El uso de la lengua materna en el salón de inglés como lengua extranjera

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Yi-chun, Pan; Yi-ching, Pan.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available El uso de la lengua materna es una ocurrencia común en los contextos de la enseñanza de la lengua extranjera, a pesar de que a veces reciba críticas por su interferencia en la adquisición de la Lengua meta. Mientras que los docentes deben maximizar el uso de la Lengua meta, sin duda, hay espacios pa [...] ra que el profesor utilice la lengua materna de los estudiantes en su pedagogía. En este trabajo se presenta un argumento basado en las perspectivas teóricas y la investigación empírica dentro de la literatura existente, apoyando el uso apropiado de la Lengua materna en el salón de inglés como lengua extranjera. El argumento se centra en tres cuestiones fundamentales-racionales para el uso de la lengua materna: Los efectos positivos que la lengua materna tiene tanto en el aprendizaje y la instrucción de una lengua extranjera, como en las formas en las que la lengua materna ayuda a los docentes de idiomas extranjeros. Abstract in english L1 use is a common occurrence in foreign language teaching contexts despite the fact that it often receives criticism for its interference with target language (TL) acquisition. While foreign language teachers should maximize their use of the TL, there is indeed a place for the teacher to use the st [...] udents' L1 in their pedagogy. In this paper, an argument derived from theoretical perspectives and empirical research within existing literature supporting the appropriate use of L1 in foreign language classrooms is presented. The argument addresses three key issues-rationales for L1 use, positive effects L1 has on both foreign language learning and instruction, and ways that L1 assists instructors on foreign languages.

  15. The Role of Culture in Second or Foreign Language Teaching: Moving Beyond the Classroom Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleet, Marilyn

    2006-01-01

    Second Language (L2) and Foreign Language (FL) curricula have a cultural component intricately woven into the fabric of the language syllabus. To teach language, one must also teach the culture inherent in the language, including the verbal as well as the non-verbal aspects. A review of the literature will show that studying the target culture…

  16. Idiosyncratic sound systems of the South African Bantu languages: Research and clinical implications for speech-language pathologists and audiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Merwe, Anita; Roux, Mia Le

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to create awareness amongst speech-language pathologists and audiologists in South Africa regarding the difference between the sound systems of Germanic languages and the sound systems of South African Bantu languages. A brief overview of the sound systems of two Bantu languages, namely isiZulu and Setswana, is provided. These two languages are representative of the Nguni language group and the Sotho group respectively.Consideration is given to the notion of language-specific symptoms of speech, language and hearing disorders in addition to universal symptoms. The possible impact of speech production, language and hearing disorders on the ability to produce and perceive speech in these languages, and the challenges that this holds for research and clinical practice, are pointed out. PMID:26305444

  17. CLIL Across languages: research outcomes in two bilingual communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda RUIZ DE ZAROBE

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available 0 0 1 193 1064 Instituto Universitario de Ciencias de la Educación 8 2 1255 14.0 Normal 0 21 false false false ES JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:ES; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL seems to be fully accepted as the preferred approach at present to promote multilingualism in Europe. Spain has also followed this trend, although the way it has been implemented varies depending on the community involved, whether monolingual or bilingual, since in the latter case the foreign language, usually English, adds to two previous languages. The aim of this paper is to carry out a comparison of the linguistic competence attained in two bilingual communities, namely the Basque Country and Catalonia, two settings where we find both educational approaches: on the one hand, a traditional English as a Foreign Language (non-CLIL strand and, on the other, the CLIL strand. More precisely, we will analyse the written competence that secondary students reach in these two communities when different variables are considered. Firstly, we will compare the educational approach followed in the communities (CLIL versus non-CLIL and, secondly, we will analyse the influence of the number of hours of instruction in two different age groups. Our results demonstrate that the amount of instruction has an important bearing on written competence, irrespective of the approach followed in the classroom

  18. Cross-Language Poetics: Proposal for an Interdisciplinary Research Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis, Norbert

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available For creative writers and for readers, opportunities to work with language in ways that engage two linguistic systems and/or two writing systems continue to expand with the growing influence of international and regional lingua francas. At the same time, we have witnessed the continuing development of literary creation in languages with fewer speakers, even in communities facing the outright erosion and replacement of their language. Alongside the tendencies of globalization, literature has also become more diverse, a new recognition of multilingualism and multiculturalism emerging among writers and readers alike. The special circumstances of composition and understanding that the different kinds of language and cultural interaction highlight also present us with an opportunity to study what it is that is fundamental in verbal art. After reviewing three historical examples of European origin (in Section 2 we will turn our attention to problems of language, writing system and poetry in East Asia (in Section 3. The examples from history will help us to put the current situation of multilingual and multicultural contexts for literature into a broader perspective. This is will allow us to return to consider a proposal for research on cross-language poetics.

  19. The Competency Based Approach to English Language Education and the Walls between the Classroom and the Society in Cameroon: Pulling Down the Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Carlous Muluh Nkwetisama

    2012-01-01

    This paper contends that English as a foreign language teaching in the classrooms at all the levels of education is not adapted to the everyday communication needs of the Cameroonian learners and that an English language pedagogy of integration; otherwise known as the outcomes approach or the competency based approach can solve the problem. This approach seeks for linguistic and sociolinguistic competence in the language. In fact, walls seem to exist between the knowledge these learners get i...

  20. Research on Chinese College English Teachers’ Classroom Code-switching: Beliefs and Attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoli Cheng

    2013-01-01

    This article documents the beliefs and attitudes of Chinese college English teachers towards classroom code-switching. The findings suggest that teachers’ code-switching is commonplace in class, although most of them still hold negative attitude toward it. Besides, students’ ability is regarded as the most significant factor affecting teachers’ code-switching, and the first language (L1) is mainly used to teach grammar and abstract words. The conclusion is that, in Chinese E...

  1. Dyslexia in Chinese Language: An Overview of Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kevin K. H.; Ho, Connie S. H.

    2010-01-01

    Dyslexia appears to be the most prevalent disability of students with special educational needs in many mainstream classes, affecting around 9.7% of the school population in Hong Kong. The education of these students is therefore of great concern to the community. In the present paper research into dyslexia in the Chinese language is briefly…

  2. Developmental Speech and Language Disorders: Hope through Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This pamphlet presents an overview of speech and language disorders including a description of symptoms, possible causes, identification, intervention, and current research. Description of the disorders includes examples of symptoms; the four components and the physical tools of speech; and the role of the brain, including its hemispheres,…

  3. Statistical Literacy among Applied Linguists and Second Language Acquisition Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewen, Shawn; Lavolette, Elizabeth; Spino, Le Anne; Papi, Mostafa; Schmidtke, Jens; Sterling, Scott; Wolff, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    The importance of statistical knowledge in applied linguistics and second language acquisition (SLA) research has been emphasized in recent publications. However, the last investigation of the statistical literacy of applied linguists occurred more than 25 years ago (Lazaraton, Riggenbach, & Ediger, 1987). The current study undertook a partial…

  4. Research Methodology on Language Development from a Complex Systems Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen-Freeman, Diane; Cameron, Lynne

    2008-01-01

    Changes to research methodology motivated by the adoption of a complexity theory perspective on language development are considered. The dynamic, nonlinear, and open nature of complex systems, together with their tendency toward self-organization and interaction across levels and timescales, requires changes in traditional views of the functions…

  5. Researcher reflexivity leading to action research in a mathematics classroom : enabling Nelly to multiply again through deconstruction and reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Gade, Sharada

    2011-01-01

    Two studies, at grade six and grade four in Sweden with a mathematics teacher Lea, are drawn upon in this paper to discuss the active role of researcher reflexivity made possible when situated narrative, classroom talk and mediated action are deployed as units of analysis. While in the first study, situated narrative provides access to voices and strategies of students in their attempts at learning the mathematics being demanded of them; the deployment of classroom talk and mediated action as...

  6. On Ethnography: Approaches to Language and Literacy Research. Language & Literacy (NCRLL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Shirley Brice; Street, Brian V.

    2008-01-01

    Two experienced and esteemed ethnographers examine how to use ethnographic methods to conduct research in language and literacy. The authors begin by mapping some of the developments in ethnography across the last century, from colonial interests to contemporary studies of migration, multiculturalism, and global citizenship. The authors then draw…

  7. Research into Sexism in Language Testing & Its Implications to Language Testing in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Baiqiang

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews foreign and domestic sexism research and practice in language testing and reveals that China lags behind in this sociolinguistics perspective in both theoretical study and practice. The paper indicates that sexism is represented in the listening comprehension section in National Matriculation English Test (NMET) after a case…

  8. Foreign Language Textbook Activities: Keeping Pace with Second Language Acquisition Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aski, Janice M.

    2003-01-01

    Recent research in second language acquisition found that learners reached higher levels of achievement when grammar practice included the processing and negotiation of meaning. Explored the degree to which certain textbook activities reflected earlier findings. Activities for two grammar points from Italian texts still rely heavily on…

  9. Communication and Language in Learners Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing With Disabilities: Theories, Research, and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Susan M; Borders, Christy

    2015-01-01

    Findings are presented from communication intervention research in three areas related to deafness with disability (DWD): D/deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) with (a) intellectual disability, (b) autism spectrum disorders, (c) deafblindness. Early identification, prevalence, theoretical perspectives, and evidence-based practices are discussed. Developmental theory, behavioral theory, and social-interactionism theory undergird many assessment and intervention practices in communication. The tri-focus framework and the four aspects of communication are useful frameworks. While communication research is a relative strength in the deafblindness field, a dire need exists for research in the other two DWD areas. Across all DWD areas there is a need for interventions addressing receptive language. Effective communication and language intervention can only occur when children who are DWD are identified early, placed in individually suitable classrooms with appropriately prepared professionals, and provided with services that build on their strengths and meet their needs. PMID:26497075

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF INTERCULTURAL COMPETENCE IN CONTEMPORARY FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM BY INCORPORATING INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Danilovi?, Mirjam

    2011-01-01

    The idea for the diploma thesis arouse from the fact that technology and the Internet are still not widely used in the English classroom. When thinking about how to integrate technology in the classroom I was inspired by different web sites which offer a vast variety of authentic as well as ELT-specific materials that can be used in the English classroom. I decided to focus on developing intercultural competence with information and communication technology by extending the intercultural topi...

  11. Power, Participation and Decision Making in the Primary Classroom: Children as Action Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sue; Robinson-Pant, Anna

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses a project focused on children researching their role in decision making in their classrooms and schools, with a view to increasing their involvement. The action research project was carried out by children, their class teachers and university researchers in six Norfolk primary schools from 2004 to 2006. As the project aimed…

  12. The Flipped Classroom: Student-Driven Library Research Sessions for Nutrition Education

    OpenAIRE

    Pannabecker, Virginia; Barroso, Cristina S.; Lehmann, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the use of a flipped classroom technique to teach library research skills to upper-level undergraduate nutrition students. A public university Health Sciences librarian and two Nutrition faculty members collaborated to implement a flipped classroom model utilizing online videos and brief assignments packaged in a course-specific library guide for pre-class preparation.  Implementation, materials examples, and an evaluation of the method are included.  This method provi...

  13. Computer Assisted Language Learning.

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, T. John A.

    1997-01-01

    This article will provide an overview of computers; an overview of the history of CALL, its pros and cons, the internet, World Wide Web, Multimedia, and research related to the uses of computers in the language classroom. Also, it also aims to provide some background for the beginners on using the Internet in language classes today. It discusses some of the common types of Internet activities that are being used today, what the minimum requirements are for using the Internet for language lear...

  14. Swearing and how to deal with it in the classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Fiona Elizabeth Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Swearing is a phenomenon that has been overlooked in EFL/ESL classrooms in Iceland and little has been published on the subject. EFL teachers should help pupils learn the use of appropriate language in the appropriate context. This study aimed to investigate teachers’ attitudes and approaches to teaching about swearing and appropriate language use in EFL classrooms in Iceland. In this research paper I examined the sociolinguistics of swearing by discussing taboo language, recalling taboo l...

  15. Box: Natural Language Processing Research Using Amazon Web Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axelrod Amittai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a publicly-available state-of-the-art research and development platform for Machine Translation and Natural Language Processing that runs on the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud. This provides a standardized research environment for all users, and enables perfect reproducibility and compatibility. Box also enables users to use their hardware budget to avoid the management and logistical overhead of maintaining a research lab, yet still participate in global research community with the same state-of-the-art tools.

  16. Speakers’ comfort and voice level variation in classrooms: Laboratory research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelegrin Garcia, David; Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    from 0.93 dB/dB, with free speech, to 0.1 dB/dB with other less demanding communication tasks as reading and talking at short distances. The room effect for some individuals can be as strong as 1.7 dB/dB. A questionnaire investigation showed that the acoustic comfort for talking in classrooms, in the...

  17. Minority students in the science classroom: Issues of language, class, race, culture and pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Aldrin Edward

    A considerable proportion of the educationally at-risk students in the K-12 public education system is composed of minority students, either in terms of cultural background, linguistic background, and frequently, both. In particular, satisfactory levels of achievement in science are not being attained by these students. The concerns of this study center on examining and understanding the reasons underlying this situation, with a view to suggesting how these problems of underachievement in science might be addressed. Previous and ongoing educational research concerning these issues suggest that such underachievement may be due to current pedagogical practices which seem to actively discourage these students from achieving any significant measure of academic, educational or professional success. The purpose of this study is thus to explore the beliefs and pedagogical practices of science teachers as they relate to minority students, especially those minority students for whom English is not a first language and who have limited English proficiency (LEP). In the course of this study, the terminology 'minority students' will refer to and be inclusive of cultural and/or language minorities, i.e. those students who differ from the mainstream white American student in terms of cultural background and a native language other than English. Culturally derived usages of non-standard forms of English (e.g. Black English Vernacular) also will be subsumed within this definition of cultural and language minority students. Particular attention will be given to emergent issues relating to current pedagogical practices, also to the science teacher beliefs and epistemological rationales underlying such practices. In exploring these beliefs and pedagogical practices, the study also will seek to delineate and to understand the various problems which are being encountered in the teaching of science to minority students. As the result of exploring the beliefs and pedagogical practices of science teachers as they relate to minority students, it is intended that the completed study will contribute toward the development and elaboration of a substantive pedagogical content knowledge base for science teachers of cultural and language minority students. It is anticipated that the development of such a knowledge base will be of practical assistance to science teachers in their pedagogical decisions such that a greater inclusion of these students in the science discourse community may be attained.

  18. Teaching in the Foreign Language Classroom: How Being a Native or Non-Native Speaker of German Influences Culture Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Carla

    2015-01-01

    The study explores the complexities associated with graduate language instructors' NS/NNS identities and teaching of culture. Researchers, who work mainly in the English as a Second/Foreign Language field, have been discussing this divide and have examined the advantages and disadvantages each group brings to the profession, but not the…

  19. Forging new pathways for research on language learning motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raby Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on motivation in the field of applied linguistics seeks to better understand how and why learners become involved in learning activities and maintain their efforts in this regard. Dörnyei provided a seminal model drawing essentially from cognitive and social psychology (Dörnyei, 2001. In the wake of his reflection, and after investigating motivation in a range of academic contexts, we are now able to present our own model, which is dynamic, weighted, and polytomic (Raby, 2007. After presenting cognitive ergonomics as a new pathway for research in second language acquisition, we shall present the results of our investigations in foreign language learning motivation in technologically enhanced contexts, outlining major methodological difficulties pertaining to this sort of this grounded research.

  20. Literacy Lessons in One Language Arts Sixth-Grade Classroom: The Year of the Guinea Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliffe, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    All classrooms are active social systems; the middle school classroom involves complex interactions between and among peers as well as between students and teachers. In the elementary years, attention is often given to nurturing students and fostering relationships, yet when young adolescents transition to the middle school, a focus on control and…

  1. Beyond the Classroom: The Role of Self-Guided Learning in Second Language Listening and Speaking Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Marion Davis

    2013-01-01

    There is a significant difference in most language instruction pro­­grams concerning the number of hours students spend practicing reading/writing skills versus listening/speaking skills. The primary cause for this is most likely due to the lack of class time that can be feasibly spent on meaningful conversation exchanges. Thus, the most logical answer is to have students practice outside the classroom. However, the transition from in-class learning to out-of-class practice is often not a ver...

  2. The Language of Sustainability: From Basic Writing Classroom to Professional Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karatsolis, Andreas; Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.

    Understanding and describing professional practice, especially in Engineering and the Sciences,  has always been at the heart of research in Professional Communication. Several significant field  research projects have showed us that content knowledge alone is not sufficient to claim disciplinary expertise; a rhetorical understanding of the discipline and its ways of thinking is essential in achieving full participation in the field. Most professionals would expect that such a sophisticated approach can only be learned through on-the-job training or opportunities to interact with practitioners within authentic disciplinary contexts. Although this can certainly be the case in many instances, we argue that a rhetorical understanding can be enacted even within a freshman writing classroom. The results of our content and rhetorical analyses of student work from the beginning and the end of a course on academic writing with the theme of sustainability show that students were able in one semester to write in discipline-appropriate ways and understand the rhetorical strategies necessary to become part of a disciplinary conversation.  The implications of our findings can extend into the way we design courses in basic writing or professional communication and the ways we can use pre-assessment data to drive our course design decisions. 

  3. Science is for me: Meeting the needs of English language learners in an urban, middle school science classroom through an instructional intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joseph A.

    2011-12-01

    This study involved an intervention in which I explored how the multimodal, inquiry-based teaching strategies from a professional development model could be used to meet the educational needs of a group of middle school students, who were refugees, newly arrived in the United States, now residing in a large urban school district in the northeastern United States, and learning English as a second language. This group remains unmentioned throughout the research literature despite the fact that English Language Learners (ELLs) represent the fastest growing group of K-12 students in the United States. The specific needs of this particular group were explored as I attempted daily to confront a variety of obstacles to their science achievement and help to facilitate the development of a scientific discourse. This research was done in an effort to better address the needs of ELLs in general and to inform best practices for teachers to apply across a variety of different cultural and linguistic subgroups. This study is an autoethnographic case study analysis of the practices of the researcher, working in a science classroom, teaching the described group of students.

  4. Corpus-based collocation research targeted at Japanese language learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena SRDANOVI?

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses corpus-based research on collocations, introduces various tools for querying and extracting Japanese collocations and presents an analysis of Japanese collocations using language corpora and related tools. First, major corpus query tools such as Sketch Engine, NINJAL-NLP, Natsume, Chunagon, which can be used by learners and teachers of Japanese language, are briefly described. Focus then shifts to adjectival and nominal collocates and the resource "Collocation data of adjectives and nouns" which consists of adjective headwords and their nominal collocates extracted from two large corpora, BCCWJ and JpTenTen: 500 adjectives and 9,218 collocate nouns, and 500 adjectives and 23,220 collocate nouns from each corpus respectively. Finally, it is shown that corpus-based resources can be used in the creation of reference materials for learners of the Japanese language. The benefits of empirical research into collocations are also shown by comparing the obtained results with collocations in textbooks for Japanese as foreign language.

  5. Talking the Talk: Library Classroom Communication and International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsberry, Dawn

    2008-01-01

    Language is a primary barrier for international students in library instruction classes. This article reviews the literature on classroom communication from both the second language acquisition and library fields, and suggests ways in which second language acquisition research can be applied to communication with international students in library…

  6. The Use of Literature and Literary Texts in the EFL Classroom; Between Consensus and Controversy

    OpenAIRE

    Jelena Bobkina; Elena Dominguez

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a review of ideas and research regarding the role of literature in the EFL university classroom. After a brief historical overview of the question of using literature in the language classroom, the article discusses the reasons for the demise and resurrection of literature as an input for language classes. Right after that, the article deals with advantages and drawbacks of using literary texts as language tools by means of drawing on recent ideas on language teaching pr...

  7. The dilemma of dialect in the classroom: A case forXhosa

    OpenAIRE

    D.S. Gxilishe

    2013-01-01

    One of the most controversial issues in language learning is whether or not to use the pupils' non-standard variety in the classroom. It would seem that more colleagues oppose than favour it. Since language research has particularly come to appreciate the importance of multilingual competence it is opportune to review the issue of dialect in the classroom. Public opinion is too firmly entrenched in the factor of standard language to allow dialect as a language of instruction. Some teachers ma...

  8. Language Tasks Using Touch Screen and Mobile Technologies: Reconceptualizing Task-Based CALL for Young Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, Martine

    2014-01-01

    This article examines how the use of mobile technologies (iPods and tablets) in language classrooms contributes to redesigning task-based approaches for young language learners. The article is based on a collaborative action research (CAR) project in Early French Immersion classrooms in the province of Alberta, Canada. The data collection included…

  9. LANGUAGES AND LANGUAGE VARIETIES: COMPARATIVE RESEARCH ON THE LINGUISTIC ATTITUDES IN FOUR BILINGUAL MINORITY COMMUNITIES IN HUNGARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Borbely

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A central issue of this paper is to study the patterns in variation of attitudes toward minority language varieties in four minority communities from Hungary: German, Slovak, Serb and Romanian. This study takes part from the research which focuses on how to obtain significant information about the mechanism of the language shift process concerning autochthonous minorities in Hungary. The results demonstrate that in the course of language shift communities at an advanced stage of language shift have less positive attitudes toward their minority languages than individuals from communities where language shift is in a less advanced stage.In Hungarian minority groups speakers’ attitudes toward minority language varieties (dialect vs. standard are the symptoms of language shift.

  10. Brain Matters: Translating Research into Classroom Practice. 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    While you don't need to be a scientist to understand brain-compatible teaching, you'll be far more effective when you base your teaching practices on the very best scientific information. This expanded and updated ASCD best-seller delivers that essential information in clear, everyday language that any teacher can immediately incorporate into…

  11. Carving the World for Language: How Neuroscientific Research Can Enrich the Study of First and Second Language Learning

    OpenAIRE

    George, Nathan R.; Göksun, Tilbe; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick

    2014-01-01

    Linguistics, psychology, and neuroscience all have rich histories in language research. Crosstalk among these disciplines, as realized in studies of phonology, is pivotal for understanding a fundamental challenge for first and second language learners (SLLs): learning verbs. Linguistic and behavioral research with monolinguals suggests that infants attend to foundational event components (e.g., path, manner). Language then heightens or dampens attention to these components as children map wor...

  12. PolarTREC-Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating: Bringing Polar Research to the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnick, W. K.; Warburton, J.; Breen, K.; Wiggins, H. V.; Larson, A.; Behr, S.

    2006-12-01

    PolarTREC-Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating is a three-year (2007-2009) teacher professional development program that pairs K-12 teachers with researchers to improve science education through authentic polar research experience. PolarTREC builds on the strengths of the existing TREC program in the Arctic, an NSF supported program managed by the Arctic Research Consortium of the US (ARCUS), to embrace a wider range of research activities in the Arctic and Antarctic. PolarTREC uses a Teacher Research Experience (TRE) model to foster the integration of research and education to produce a legacy of long-term teacher-researcher collaborations, improved teacher content knowledge through experiences in scientific inquiry, and broad public interest and engagement in polar science. PolarTREC will enable thirty-six teachers to spend two to six weeks in the Arctic or Antarctic, working closely with researchers investigating a wide range of topics such as sea-ice dynamics, terrestrial ecology, marine biology, atmospheric chemistry, and long-term climate change. With the help of their host researcher and the research team, teachers will develop the experience and tools necessary to teach science through scientific inquiry and investigation based on real-world experiences. While in the field, teachers and researchers will communicate extensively with their colleagues, communities, and hundreds of students of all ages across the globe, using a variety of tools including satellite phones, online journals, podcasts and interactive "Live from IPY" calls and web-based seminars. The online outreach elements of the project convey these experiences to a broad audience far beyond the classrooms of the PolarTREC teachers. In addition to field research experiences, PolarTREC will support teacher professional development and a sustained community of teachers, scientists, and the public through workshops, Internet seminars, an e-mail listserve, and ongoing teacher/researcher networks. For further information on PolarTREC, contact Wendy Warnick, ARCUS Executive Director at warnick@arcus.org or 907-474-1600. The PolarTREC website will be accessible in 2007 through the ARCUS web site at www.arcus.org.

  13. The Impact of Integrating Technology and Social Experience in the College Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulin

    2013-01-01

    Technology has been used widely in the field of education for a long period of time. It is a useful tool which could be a mediation to help language learners to learn the target language. In order to investigate how technology and social experience can be integrated into courses to promote language learners' desire to learn English, the…

  14. Opera in the Foreign Language Classroom: Learning German with Mozart, Wagner, Weber, and Johann Strauss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Solveig M.

    2010-01-01

    Content-based instruction (CBI) has been part of the foreign language curriculum for many years at US colleges, leading to courses that combine language instruction with specific content domains, such as film, literature, politics, sports and many others. This article presents a rather unusual choice of content domain for a second-year language…

  15. Grammar in the Second Language Classroom: An Ever-Changing Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, Carolyn

    The history of grammar instruction in second language education is traced, focusing on the evolution of grammar's role from a central place in instruction to its current peripheral, almost problematic role. The objective is to provide background information so that second language educators can redefine grammar's role in language instruction. The…

  16. The role of teachers’ classroom discipline in their teaching effectiveness and students’ language learning motivation and achievement: A path method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrak Rahimi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the role of EFL teachers’ classroom discipline strategies in their teaching effectiveness and their students’ motivation and achievement in learning English as a foreign language. 1408 junior high-school students expressed their perceptions of the strategies their English teachers used (punishment, recognition/reward, discussion, involvement, and aggression to discipline the classroom. The students evaluated their teachers’ teaching effectiveness by completing effective Iranian EFL teacher questionnaire (Moafian, & Pishghadam, 2009. They also filled in Attitude/Motivation Test Battery (GhorbanDordinejad & ImamJomeh, 2011 that assessed their motivation towards learning English as a foreign language. Achievement in English was established based on formal grades students received at the end of the academic year. The results showed that EFL teachers reward and praise students for good behavior and they are not very authoritarian. Further, teaching effectiveness, motivation and achievement in learning English were all found to be related to discipline strategies. The results of path analysis showed that those teachers who used involvement and recognition strategies more frequently were perceived to be more effective teachers; however, students perceived teachers who used punitive strategies as being less effective in their teaching. It was also revealed that in classes where teachers managed disruptive behaviors by using punitive strategies, students had problems in learning as punitive strategies lowered students’ motivation. Teaching effectiveness was found to mediate the effect of punishment on motivation while motivation mediated the effect of punitive strategies on achievement. Motivation was found to have the strongest effect on achievement.

  17. Motivating language learners: a classroom-orientated investigation of teachers' motivational practices and students' motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Guilloteaux, Marie-Jose

    2007-01-01

    The teachers' use of motivational strategies is generally believed to enhance student motivation, yet there is scant empirical evidence to support this claim. This classroom-oriented investigation focused on how the motivational practices of EFL teachers in South Korea related to students' L2 motivation and motivated classroom behavior. In a first phase, the motivation of over 1,300 students was measured by a self-report questionnaire, and the use of motivational strategies by 27 teachers in ...

  18. Classroom and Formative Assessment in Second/Foreign Language Teaching and Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Somaye Ketabi; Saeed Ketabi

    2014-01-01

    Formative assessment was first used by Scriven (1967), but studies focused on formative assessment in ESL and EFL classes started in 2000. Formative assessment is integrated in learning and teaching, so a great part of classroom assessment is formative. However, classroom assessment has been not defined clearly, as most of the texts about this type of assessment define it in terms of its formative or summative potentials (Fulcher & Davidson, 2007). This study is an attempt to define diffe...

  19. Factors Affecting Learners' Attention to Teacher Talk in Nine ESL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiqing

    2015-01-01

    With classroom observation and stimulated recall interviews as research instruments, the present study investigated some of the factors that affected learners' attention to teacher talk in nine English as a Second Language (ESL) classrooms. The results revealed five such factors, namely, learners' self evaluation of their language knowledge, the…

  20. Developing laboratory research techniques for an ongoing research program in a high school classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adornato, Philip

    Incorporating research into a high school classroom is an excellent way to teach students fundamental concepts in science. One program that incorporates this approach is the Waksman Student Scholar Program (WSSP), which allows high school students, teachers and Rutgers professors to work side by side on an ongoing molecular biology research program. Students in the program first isolated plasmid clones from bacteria that contain cDNA fragments of genes from the Brine Shrimp Artemia franciscana. They then determined the size of the DNA by performing molecular biology experiments. Students then analyzed the DNA sequence and after review from WSSP staff and high school teachers, the student's sequences were published in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database. This was often the last step in the project the students performed. However, if the project were being conducted in a research lab instead of a high school, the cDNA clone would often be further analyzed. In the past, safety, convenience, and affordability have limited the availability of these experiments in a high school setting. Although additional bioinformatic experiments could easily be performed in the high school, there is a strong need for additional "wet lab" experiments to keep the students engaged and motivated to work on the project. I have worked on developing three experimental modules that can be performed in a high school setting. These experiments were tested with the students and teachers of the WSSP. This work will expand the scope of experiments that can be performed in a high school environment.

  1. Linguistic Diversity in First Language Acquisition Research: Moving beyond the Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Barbara F.; Forshaw, William; Nordlinger, Rachel; Wigglesworth, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    The field of first language acquisition (FLA) needs to take into account data from the broadest typological array of languages and language-learning environments if it is to identify potential universals in child language development, and how these interact with socio-cultural mechanisms of acquisition. Yet undertaking FLA research in remote…

  2. Review Article: Recent Publications on Research Methods in Second Language Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionin, Tania

    2013-01-01

    The central goal of the field of second language acquisition (SLA) is to describe and explain how second language learners acquire the target language. In order to achieve this goal, SLA researchers work with second language data, which can take a variety of forms, including (but not limited to) such commonly used methods as naturalistic…

  3. Bilingualism/Second-Language Research and the Assessment of Oral Proficiency in Minority Bilingual Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Liliana

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses some of the challenges that researchers working in the fields of bilingualism and second-language acquisition (SLA) and in the field of language testing face in developing comparable and culturally and cognitively appropriate data collection and language assessment tools for bilingual children from rural minority-language…

  4. Double vision uncertainty: the bilingual researcher and the ethics of cross-language research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklarov, Svetlana

    2007-04-01

    Translation is a significant factor in cross-language research and can make an overarching impact on research outcomes and ethical adequacy. In this article, the author examines ethical considerations of language translation and interpretation in human science research. The focus is narrowed to ethical aspects of research design in which a bilingual researcher assumes a double role, as an interpreter and translator in his or her inquiry with monolingual, non-English-speaking research participants. The bilingual researcher has a great advantage of expertise and clear vision in the cross-cultural ethical environment. However, such clarity of the ethical vision can cause many reasonable doubts, because it might not fully fit into the framework of standardized, rational ethics. The author shows that the dualism of the bilingual researcher's position can either induce caution or carry solutions, but both aspects of this role contribute to its essential significance for good cross-cultural knowledge exchange. PMID:17416706

  5. Researching Aptitude in a Process-based Approach to Foreign Language Writing Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Zare-ee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the study reported here, we explored writing processes employed by 70 undergraduate learners of English as a Foreign Language (EFL through questionnaires and think-aloud protocols. Then we looked for possible differences in the writing processes employed by high- and low-aptitude learners. We observed that learners with higher aptitude scores devoted more attention to clausal complexity than those with lower levels of aptitude. Moreover, they resorted less frequently to their mother tongue while writing texts in English. High-aptitude EFL learners also used more global planning strategies than their low-aptitude peers and edited while writing much more frequently. Our review showed that even though aptitude has been extensively researched in second language acquisition and shown to correlate with the level of success in different skills, it has rarely been considered in relation to writing processes. We suggest that, as classroom teachers, EFL writing instructors accumulate and incorporate knowledge of their students’ aptitude in deploying their teaching strategies. 

  6. Teacher Feedback to Support Oral Language Learning for Young Dual Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatham, Gregory A.; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Park, Hyejin

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing numbers of dual language learners (DLLs) in early childhood programmes, the use of research-based and effective pedagogical strategies to support oral language learning is important. Early childhood classrooms can provide many opportunities to support language learning. Teacher feedback is an intentional teaching strategy to…

  7. Research in Progress: Invited Colloquium--Foreign Languages in an Age of Globalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramsch, Claire

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of globalization and the increasingly multilingual and multicultural nature of nations, institutions and classrooms, the fundamental nature of foreign language instruction is changing. Such traditional notions as: "native speaker", "target culture", "standard L2" are becoming problematic with the…

  8. Carving the World for Language: How Neuroscientific Research Can Enrich the Study of First and Second Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Nathan R.; Göksun, Tilbe; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick

    2014-01-01

    Linguistics, psychology, and neuroscience all have rich histories in language research. Crosstalk among these disciplines, as realized in studies of phonology, is pivotal for understanding a fundamental challenge for first and second language learners (SLLs): learning verbs. Linguistic and behavioral research with monolinguals suggests that infants attend to foundational event components (e.g., path, manner). Language then heightens or dampens attention to these components as children map word to world in language-specific ways. Cross-linguistic differences in semantic organization also reveal sources of struggles for SLLs. We discuss how better integrating neuroscience into this literature can unlock additional mysteries of verb learning. PMID:24854772

  9. A University Level Linguistics Course Classroom Research: Vocabulary Retention and the Use of L2 and L1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent UZUN

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study is a classroom research carried out in the Linguistics course at university level. The present study aims at finding out to what degree the technical vocabulary of the course is retained by the individuals, while also investigating the effect of using L2 and L1 in the classroom during the lectures. Participants were second grade (N=70 and fourth grade (N=30 university students in the English Language Teaching Department. The data were conducted through a vocabulary and knowledge retention test, and the visa and final exams of the linguistics course. Students’ opinions about the Linguistics course were also collected by the help of an interview. The findings suggest that the technical vocabulary as well as the knowledge of the course is forgotten at a significant rate within a certain time. Considering the grades of the students as an indicator of success, the study also revealed that the use of L1 contributed positively to the comprehension of the subject.

  10. A Research in the Influences of Vague Language on Second Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongyun; Zhu, Yue

    2005-01-01

    Vague language is widely used in both spoken and written English and it is also a very important language variable. The process of language use is active, during which speakers and hearers constantly have to make choices out of variables. This paper mainly studies the influences of vagueness in language on second language learning and attaches…

  11. Engaging Learner Attribute Research in Dialogue with Classroom Practice: Predictors of Success in the Accelerated, Online Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jean Mandernach

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Research examining student success in online education has focused extensively on internal learner attributes with little emphasis on external, controllable factors that may mediate a student’s ability to perform within the distinctive environment of the virtual classroom. The purpose of this study is to balance student characteristic research with external, direct data from the perspective of online instructors in order to provide a practice-oriented understanding of the unique factors predictive of student success in accelerated, online courses. Experienced online educators were surveyed to identify practical skills, strategies or factors most likely to lead to success for students enrolled in online courses. A content-analysis of open-ended responses revealed 23 relevant factors that clustered into six broad themes. Within these themes, four issues emerge as the most predictive of online learner success: time, technology, initiative, and competence. Discussion examines the practical, deliberate application of this information to facilitate students’ successful completion of online courses.

  12. Focus on the use of language in the multicultural mathematics classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Lene Østergaard

    Learning mathematics can be seen as learning a foreign language or learning a particular mathematical discourse.  Nolte (2004) calls mathematics the students' first second language. The use of language in mathematics teaching, hence the way we talk and the way we write, differ from the way the same...... words and concepts are used in everyday language or in teaching and learning other subjects. Looking through material for mathematics teaching shows that the students are expected to have a certain level of mathematical ability (ex. being able to count to ten) and a certain level of language ability (ex...... developing learning difficulties in mathematics. Teaching the teachers a consciousness for the use of language in mathematics teaching as well as educating them to have a special focus on developing the vocabulary of the students can render the mathematics teaching more inclusive. Furthermore, it may help...

  13. Students and Teachers' Reasons for Using the First Language Within the Foreign Language Classroom (French and English in Central Mexico Razones de alumnos y maestros sobre el uso de la primera lengua en el salón de lenguas extranjeras (francés e inglés en el centro de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irasema Mora Pablo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study explores the use of the first language in a context of foreign language teaching. This qualitative research presents the classroom practice and points of view of French and English teachers and students within a public educational institute in central Mexico using the techniques of questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. The results show that teachers and the majority of students perceive the use of the first language as positive and part of the teaching and learning process. A small number of students do not like the use of the first language in the classroom and prefer that their teachers use the target language only.La presente investigación explora el uso de la lengua materna en un contexto de enseñanza de lenguas extranjeras. Esta investigación cualitativa presenta la práctica docente y los puntos de vista de maestros y alumnos de francés e inglés en el contexto de una universidad pública del centro de México, mediante el uso de las técnicas del cuestionario y la entrevista semiestructurada. Los resultados muestran que tanto los maestros como la mayoría de los alumnos perciben el uso de la lengua materna como algo positivo en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje. Un número reducido de estudiantes rechaza el uso de la lengua materna y prefiere que su clase de lengua extranjera sea dirigida exclusivamente en la lengua meta.

  14. Students and Teachers' Reasons for Using the First Language Within the Foreign Language Classroom (French and English) in Central Mexico / Razones de alumnos y maestros sobre el uso de la primera lengua en el salón de lenguas extranjeras (francés e inglés) en el centro de México

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Irasema, Mora Pablo; M. Martha, Lengeling; Buenaventura, Rubio Zenil; Troy, Crawford; Douglas, Goodwin.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available La presente investigación explora el uso de la lengua materna en un contexto de enseñanza de lenguas extranjeras. Esta investigación cualitativa presenta la práctica docente y los puntos de vista de maestros y alumnos de francés e inglés en el contexto de una universidad pública del centro de México [...] , mediante el uso de las técnicas del cuestionario y la entrevista semiestructurada. Los resultados muestran que tanto los maestros como la mayoría de los alumnos perciben el uso de la lengua materna como algo positivo en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje. Un número reducido de estudiantes rechaza el uso de la lengua materna y prefiere que su clase de lengua extranjera sea dirigida exclusivamente en la lengua meta. Abstract in english The present study explores the use of the first language in a context of foreign language teaching. This qualitative research presents the classroom practice and points of view of French and English teachers and students within a public educational institute in central Mexico using the techniques of [...] questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. The results show that teachers and the majority of students perceive the use of the first language as positive and part of the teaching and learning process. A small number of students do not like the use of the first language in the classroom and prefer that their teachers use the target language only.

  15. Listening Comprehension in the Foreign Language Classroom. CAL-ERIC/CLL Series on Languages and Linguistics, No. 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Terence; Wheeler, James

    This paper suggests that language teachers reconsider their approach to listening comprehension, as recent studies seem to indicate that listening is not a passive but a highly active skill. The importance of listening comprehension as an independent skill is stressed in the first section, and principles of speech processing from which the…

  16. ¿Duermes mucho Tony?: Interpersonal and Transactional Uses of L1 in the Foreign-Language Classroom ¿Duermes mucho Tony?: Usos interpersonales y transaccionales de la lengua materna en el aula de clase de lengua extranjera

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Higareda; Georgina López; Gerrard Mugford

    2009-01-01

    Whilst communicative teaching approaches sanction, often grudgingly, the limited use of the students' first language (L1) in English Language Teaching (ELT), critical debate is now centred on a much more substantial and energetic role for the use of mother tongue in the language classroom. Justifications favouring the use of L1 currently range from ideological arguments to classroom teaching considerations. This paper contributes to this ongoing debate by examining how new generations of ...

  17. Conceptual Issues in Second Language Research in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Olushola Bamidele Are

    2013-01-01

    This paper is an overview of some of the complications associated with conceptualizing second language in African societies, particularly with reference to European languages. Most popular opinions and many scholarly insights appear to define second language mainly in terms of sequence of acquisition. From this perspective, the term second language refers to a language learnt in addition to a previously acquired one. While this view of second language actually applies to many African situatio...

  18. Using Qualitative Research to Assess Teaching and Learning in Technology-Infused TILE Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horne, Sam; Murniati, Cecilia Titiek; Saichaie, Kem; Jesse, Maggie; Florman, Jean C.; Ingram, Beth F.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes the results of an assessment project whose purpose was to improve the faculty-development program for instructors who teach in technology-infused TILE (Transform, Interact, Learn, Engage) classrooms at the University of Iowa. Qualitative research methods were critical for (1) learning about how students and instructors…

  19. Authentic Research Experience and "Big Data" Analysis in the Classroom: Maize Response to Abiotic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarevitch, Irina; Frechette, Cameo; Wiatros, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Integration of inquiry-based approaches into curriculum is transforming the way science is taught and studied in undergraduate classrooms. Incorporating quantitative reasoning and mathematical skills into authentic biology undergraduate research projects has been shown to benefit students in developing various skills necessary for future…

  20. Extending the Conversation: Why Does He Want a Dictator? Action Research on Democratic Classroom Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    This article extends the conversation on English education as preparation for democratic participation. The author journeys through a cycle of action research, analyzing one classroom case study to improve her practice of curricular negotiation in a methods of teaching writing course.