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Sample records for kapok fiber manufactured

  1. Flame-resistant kapok fiber manufactured using gamma ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owing to homogeneous hollow tube shape and hydrophobicity of kapok fiber, the usages of this fiber are various such as fiberfill in pillows, quilts, non-woven fabric for oil spill cleanup and plastic green house. Even though kapok fiber is able to apply various industrial usages, it has a serious disadvantage which is the extreme sensitivity to spark or flame. Therefore, we try to make flame-resistant kapok fiber using gamma ray. The radiation caused loss of hydrophobic compounds in kapok fiber and no morphological change, especially fine hollow tube shape, was observed. The lignin contents were negligible changed after gamma irradiation. However, the building units of lignin polymer such as coniferyl alcohol, and sinapyl alcohol were significantly changed that is, functional group as a methoxyl group from lignin polymer was cleaved by gamma irradiation. Based on the results of removal of hydrophobic compounds and cleavage of methoxyl group from lignin polymer, kapok fiber can be converted into a flame-resistant fiber by gamma ray treatment.

  2. Development Manufacturing Method of Highly Functional Kapok Fiber Absorbent Using Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrophobic characteristic of kapok fibers was changed to hydrophilic property after NaClO2, treatments which is able to break all phenolic units especially lignin. After NaClO2 treatment, NaIO4, applied to kapok fibers for opening hexagonal polysaccharide structure, this step led to produce carbonyl groups(>C=O) on kapok fibers. In the final step, NaClO2, treatments were performed again to provide carboxyl groups(-COOH) on kapok fibers. In addition, kapok fibers after all chemical treatments were retained hollow structure which was observed by scanning electron microscopy(SEM). Kapok fibers which were obtained after chemical treatments would be a good heavy metal absorbent when these fibers applied less than in 10 mg/L standard solution. Moreover, these fibers were not detached heavy metals even added physical forces and used kapok fibers are able to reuse after detached heavy metals under pH 2-3. The degree of grafting increased as the irradiation dose increased, and are in the range 32% to 250% when the concentration of glycidyl methacrylate monomer was 50 vol. %. Based on this result, various functional groups are possible to be attached on kapok fibers used by radiation grafting technique

  3. The development of nonwoven fabric and agricultural bed soil using kapok fiber for industrial usages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this project is the development of nonwoven fabric using natural kapok fiber and synthetic fiber for industrial usages and the development of manufacturing techniques for nursery bed soil using kapok fiber. Research scopes include the development of agricultural bed soil using kapok fiber and nonwoven fabric using kapok fiber. Main results are as follow; the physico-chemical characterization of kapok fiber (water holding capacity, bulk density, water retention curve, viscoelastic measurement, oil adsorption capacity, analysis of essential elements, measurement of anion and cation); the physico-chemical characterization of kapok bed soil; the evidence experiment of kapok bed soil; the optimum content of kapok fiber and synthetic fiber for nonwoven fabric; establishment of the optimum radiation dose for manufacturing kapok nonwoven fabric

  4. KAPOK I: CHARACTERISTCS OF KAPOK FIBER AS A POTENTIAL PULP SOURCE FOR PAPERMAKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somporn Chaiarrekij,

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The potential use of kapok fiber for pulping and papermaking has been investigated. The kapok fibers were cooked using the optimal dosage of sodium hydroxide determined from the experiments. Then, the pulp was refined with two passes using a disc refiner and mixed with commercial hardwood pulp and/or softwood pulp at different blend ratios to make papers. It was found that addition of the kapok pulp to the mixed pulps improved the tensile and burst strengths of the sheets but decreased the tear resistance and elongation. Water repellency of the sheets prepared from the kapok pulp mixed with the commercial pulps was also improved. These results indicate that kapok fiber can be a quality pulp source for papermaking, especially for packaging paper requiring strength and water repellency.

  5. Coated kapok fiber for removal of spilled oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A low-cost and biodegradable oil absorbent based on kapok fiber was prepared. ► The polymer-coated kapok fiber showed higher oil sorption capacity. ► Coated kapok fiber can be reused and the absorbed oil can be easily recovered. ► Adsorption of oil is spontaneous and exothermic physisorption and chemisorption. -- Abstract: Based on raw kapok fiber, two kinds of oil absorbers with high sorption capacity were prepared by a facile solution–immersion process. The coated polymer with low surface energy and rough fiber surface play important role in the retention of oil. The as-prepared fiber can quickly absorb gasoline, diesel, soybean oil, and paraffin oil up to above 74.5%, 66.8%, 64.4% and 47.8% of oil sorption capacity of raw fiber, respectively. The absorbed oils can be easily recovered by a simple vacuum filtration and the recovered coated-fiber still can be used for several cycles without obvious loss in oil sorption capacity. The thermodynamic study indicates that the adsorption process is spontaneous and exothermic, with complex physisorption and chemisorption. The results suggest that the coated fiber can be used as a low-cost alternative for the removal of oil spilled on water surface

  6. Effect of jute and kapok fibers on properties of thermoplastic cassava starch composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ? TPCS matrix was reinforced by the low (jute) and high (kapok) absorbency cellulosic fibers. ? Water absorption of the TPCS/jute and TPCS/kapok fiber composites decreases. ? Stress and Youngs modulus of the TPCS/jute and TPCS/kapok fiber composites increase. ? Thermal degradation temperature of the TPCS/kapok fiber composite decreases. - Abstract: Since mechanical properties and water uptake of biodegradable thermoplastic cassava starch (TPCS) was still the main disadvantages for many applications. The TPCS matrix was, therefore, reinforced by two types of cellulosic fibers, i.e. jute or kapok fibers; classified as the low and high oil absorbency characteristics, respectively. The TPCS, plasticized by glycerol, was compounded by internal mixer and shaped by compression molding machine. It was found that water absorption of the TPCS/jute fiber and TPCS/kapok fiber composites was clearly reduced by the addition of the cellulosic fibers. Moreover, stress at maximum load and Youngs modulus of the composites increased significantly by the incorporation of both jute and kapok fibers. Thermal degradation temperature, determined from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), of the TPCS matrix increased by the addition of jute fibers; however, thermal degradation temperature decreased by the addition of kapok fibers. Functional group analysis and morphology of the TPCS/jute fiber and TPCS/kapok fiber composites were also examined using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques

  7. Crosslinking of Kapok Cellulose Fiber via Azide Alkyne Click Chemistry as a New Material for Filtering System: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Syazwani Abd Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new class of green material has been elaborated by grafting the modified kapok fiber, by the means of azidated kapok fiber followed by “click-chemistry” reaction with the terminal alkyne crosslinker. The modified and synthesized product was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The study also was undertaken to investigate the effect on the absorption of methylene blue from aqueous solution onto the click fiber prepared. The findings showed that the click kapok absorbed more compared to the untreated kapok. Based on the result, the reaction of click chemistry influenced the properties of the filter made from kapok fiber.

  8. Study of oil sorption behavior of filled and structured fiber assemblies made from polypropylene, kapok and milkweed fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengasamy, R S; Das, Dipayan; Karan, C Praba

    2011-02-15

    This article reports on oil sorption behavior of fiber assemblies made up of single natural and synthetic fibers as well as blend of natural and synthetic fibers when tested with high density oil and diesel oil. A series of filled fiber assemblies were prepared from 100% polypropylene, kapok, and milkweed fibers and another series of bonded structured fiber assemblies were prepared from a 70/30 blend of kapok and polypropylene fibers and a 70/30 blend of milkweed and polypropylene fibers. It was observed that the porosity of the fiber assemblies played a very important role in determining its oil sorption capacity. The polypropylene fiber assembly exhibited the highest sorption capacity (g/g) followed by the kapok and milkweed fiber assemblies at porosity diesel oil. As the kapok and milkweed fiber have low cellulose content, hence their slow degradation is an advantage in fresh and marine water applications. The good sorption capacity of kapok and milkweed fiber assemblies along with their bio-degradable nature offer great scope for structuring them into fiber assemblies with large porosity and uniform pores to have efficient oil sorbents. PMID:21146290

  9. Potential of Ceiba pentandra (L.) Gaertn. (kapok fiber) as a resource for second generation bioethanol: effect of various simple pretreatment methods on sugar production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye, Ying Ying; Lee, Keat Teong; Wan Abdullah, Wan Nadiah; Leh, Cheu Peng

    2012-07-01

    The importance of bioethanol currently has increased tremendously as it can reduce the total dependency on fossil-fuels, especially gasoline, in the transportation sector. In this study, Ceiba pentandra (kapok fiber) was introduced as a new resource for bioethanol production. The results of chemical composition analysis showed that the cellulose (alpha- and beta-) contents were 50.7%. The glucose composition of the fiber was 59.8%. The high glucose content indicated that kapok fiber is a potential substrate for bioethanol production. However, without a pretreatment, the kapok fiber only yielded 0.8% of reducing sugar by enzymatic hydrolysis. Thus, it is necessary to pre-treat the kapok fiber prior to hydrolysis. Taking into account environmentally friendliness, only simple pretreatments with minimum chemical or energy consumption was considered. It was interesting to see that by adopting merely water, acid and alkaline pretreatments, the yield of reducing sugar was increased to 39.1%, 85.2% and >100%, respectively. PMID:22595099

  10. Kapok oil methyl esters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increased need for biodiesel feedstocks has caused various vegetable oils to be examined for this purpose. In the present work, the methyl esters of kapok (Ceiba pentandra) oil were prepared. The essential fuel properties were comprehensively determined and evaluated in comparison to specifications in biodiesel standards and some prior results. The kinematic viscosity of kapok oil methyl esters was greater than expected, an observation traced to the elevated amounts of methyl esters with cyclic moieties. Overall, kapok oil is a potential biodiesel feedstock. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of kapok methyl esters are reported. - Highlights: • Methyl esters of kapok oil generally acceptable as a biodiesel fuel. • Kapok oil methyl esters a fuel with elevated content of fatty acid methyl esters containing cyclic moieties. • Kinematic viscosity of kapok oil methyl esters elevated likely due to fatty ester methyl esters with cyclic moieties. • Discusses and compares present results with prior literature

  11. Potential of Ceiba pentandra (L.) Gaertn. (kapok) fiber as a resource for second generation bioethanol: parametric optimization and comparative study of various pretreatments prior enzymatic saccharification for sugar production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye, Ying Ying; Lee, Keat Teong; Abdullah, Wan Nadiah Wan; Leh, Cheu Peng

    2013-07-01

    Various pretreatments on Ceiba pentandra (L.) Gaertn. (kapok) fiber prior to enzymatic hydrolysis for sugar production were optimized in this study. The optimum conditions for water, acid, and alkaline pretreatments were 170C for 45 min, 120C for 45 min in 1.0% (v/v) H2SO4 solution and 120C for 60 min in 2.0% (v/v) NaOH solution, respectively. Among the three pretreatments, the alkaline pretreatment achieved the highest total glucose yield (glucose yield calculated based on the untreated fiber) (38.5%), followed by the water (35.0%) and acid (32.8%) pretreatments. As a result, the relative effectiveness of the pretreatment methods for kapok fiber was verified as alkali>water>acid at the condition stated. PMID:23672935

  12. Evaluation of kapok (Ceiba pentandra (L.) Gaertn.) as a natural hollow hydrophobic-oleophilic fibrous sorbent for oil spill cleanup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Teik-Thye; Huang, Xiaofeng

    2007-01-01

    Oil sorption capacity and hydrophobic-oleophilic characteristics of an agricultural product, kapok (Ceiba pentandra), was thoroughly examined. The kapok fiber has a hollow structure with large lumen. Its performance was compared with that of a polypropylene (PP), a widely used commercial oil sorbent for oil spill cleanup. The oils investigated were diesel, hydraulic oil (AWS46), and engine oil (HD40). Reusability of the kapok after application to various oils was also evaluated. Both loose (at its natural state) and densely packed kapok assemblies were examined. Sorption capacities of the packed kapok assemblies were very much dependent on their packing densities. At 0.02gcm(-3), its oil sorption capacities were 36, 43 and 45gg(-1) for diesel, ASW46 and HD40, respectively. The values decreased to 7.9, 8.1 and 8.6gg(-1) at 0.09gcm(-3). Its sorption capacities for the three oils were significantly higher than those of PP. When the oil-saturated kapok assemblies were allowed to drain, they exhibited high oil retention ability, with less than 8% of the absorbed diesel and HD40, and 12% of the absorbed AWS46 lost even after 1h of dripping. When applied on oil-over-water baths, the kapok exhibited high selectivity for the oils over the water; almost all oils spilled could be removed with the kapok, leaving an invisible oil slick on water. After the 4th cycle of reuse, the reused kapok assembly only lost 30% of its virgin sorption capacity if packed at 0.02gcm(-3), and the loss in sorption capacity was much less at higher packing densities. The hydrophobic-oleophilic characteristics of the kapok fiber could be attributed to its waxy surface, while its large lumen contributed to its excellent oil absorbency and retention capacity. PMID:16839589

  13. Preparation of Polyacrylonitrile-Kapok Hollow Microtubes Decorated with Cu Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agcaoili Apollo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel copper (Cu nanoparticle carrier was fabricated using kapok natural microtubes as a substrate. Cu nanoparticles were grown on a thin polymer film on the surface of the kapok fibers. The polymer film was deposited on the surface of the microtube using a surfactant-assisted polymerization of acrylonitrile monomers. Cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB was used surfactant. The contact angle decreased from 120.5 to 0 after polyacrylonitrile coating (PAN, which suggests improved hydrophilicity of the kapok fibers. Addition of 1.5 mL acrylonitrile and 0.020 – 0.035 g CTAB yielded evenly coated kapok fibers. Cu nanoparticles, with diameters of 82-186 nm, were formed on the surface of the composite by reducing 0.16 M copper sulphate (CuSO4 with hydrazine (N2H4 at 70°C. EDX reveals that more Cu nanoparticles formed on the surface of PAN-kapok composites with 0.035g CTAB due to thicker PAN coating.

  14. Manufacturing of Smart Structures Using Fiber Placement Manufacturing Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Matthew M.; Glowasky, Robert A.; McIlroy, Bruce E.; Story, Todd A.

    1996-01-01

    Smart structures research and development, with the ultimate aim of rapid commercial and military production of these structures, are at the forefront of the Synthesis and Processing of Intelligent Cost-Effective Structures (SPICES) program. As part of this ARPA-sponsored program, MDA-E is using fiber placement processes to manufacture integrated smart structure systems. These systems comprise advanced composite structures with embedded fiber optic sensors, shape memory alloys, piezoelectric actuators, and miniature accelerometers. Cost-effective approaches and solutions to smart material synthesis in the fiber-placement process, based upon integrated product development, are discussed herein.

  15. Radiation shielding fiber and its manufacturing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To manufacture radiation shielding fibers of excellent shielding effects. Method: Fibers containing more than 1 mmol/g of carboxyl groups are bonded with heavy metals, or they are impregnated with an aqueous solution containing water-soluble heavy metal salts dissolved therein. Fibers as the substrate may be any of forms such as short fibers, long fibers, fiber tows, webs, threads, knitting or woven products, non-woven fabrics, etc. It is however necessary that fibers contain more than 1 mmol/g, preferably, from 2 to 7 mmol/g of carboxylic groups. Since heavy metals having radiation shielding performance are bonded to the outer layer of the fibers and the inherent performance of the fibers per se is possessed, excellent radiation shielding performance can be obtained, as well as they can be applied with spinning, knitting or weaving, stitching, etc. thus can be used for secondary fiber products such as clothings, caps, masks, curtains, carpets, cloths, etc. for use in radiation shieldings. (Kamimura, M.)

  16. Carbon fiber manufacturing via plasma technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulauskas, Felix L. (Knoxville, TN); Yarborough, Kenneth D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Meek, Thomas T. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    The disclosed invention introduces a novel method of manufacturing carbon and/or graphite fibers that avoids the high costs associated with conventional carbonization processes. The method of the present invention avoids these costs by utilizing plasma technology in connection with electromagnetic radiation to produce carbon and/or graphite fibers from fully or partially stabilized carbon fiber precursors. In general, the stabilized or partially stabilized carbon fiber precursors are placed under slight tension, in an oxygen-free atmosphere, and carbonized using a plasma and electromagnetic radiation having a power input which is increased as the fibers become more carbonized and progress towards a final carbon or graphite product. In an additional step, the final carbon or graphite product may be surface treated with an oxygen-plasma treatment to enhance adhesion to matrix materials.

  17. Manufacturing of Nanocomposite Carbon Fibers and Composite Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Seng; Zhou, Jian-guo

    2013-01-01

    Pitch-based nanocomposite carbon fibers were prepared with various percentages of carbon nanofibers (CNFs), and the fibers were used for manufacturing composite structures. Experimental results show that these nanocomposite carbon fibers exhibit improved structural and electrical conductivity properties as compared to unreinforced carbon fibers. Composite panels fabricated from these nanocomposite carbon fibers and an epoxy system also show the same properties transformed from the fibers. Single-fiber testing per ASTM C1557 standard indicates that the nanocomposite carbon fiber has a tensile modulus of 110% higher, and a tensile strength 17.7% times higher, than the conventional carbon fiber manufactured from pitch. Also, the electrical resistance of the carbon fiber carbonized at 900 C was reduced from 4.8 to 2.2 ohm/cm. The manufacturing of the nanocomposite carbon fiber was based on an extrusion, non-solvent process. The precursor fibers were then carbonized and graphitized. The resultant fibers are continuous.

  18. Dissolution behavior of high strength bioresorbable glass fibers manufactured by continuous fiber drawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, Timo J; Tuominen, Jukka U; Hiekkanen, Elina

    2013-04-01

    This article describes the dissolution behavior of three silica-based resorbable glasses manufactured by an industrial-type continuous fiber drawing process yielding fibers with tensile strength of 1800-2300MPa. The results of a long-term in vitro degradation testing of the manufactured high strength bioresorbable glass fibers are presented. The degradation was performed by exposing the glass fibers to SBF and TRIS for 26 weeks at physiological conditions at 37C. All fibers showed continuous resorption throughout the study and two of the fibers revealed bioactivity by forming a calcium phosphate (CaP) layer in SBF. PMID:23537596

  19. High Power Fiber Lasers and Applications to Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Martin; McComb, Timothy; Sudesh, Vikas

    2008-09-01

    We summarize recent developments in high power fiber laser technologies and discuss future trends, particularly in their current and future use in manufacturing technologies. We will also describe our current research programs in fiber laser development, ultra-fast and new lasers, and will mention the expectations in these areas for the new Townes Laser Institute. It will focus on new core laser technologies and their applications in medical technologies, advanced manufacturing technologies and defense applications. We will describe a program on large mode area fiber development that includes results with the new gain-guiding approach, as well as high power infra-red fiber lasers. We will review the opportunities for high power fiber lasers in various manufacturing technologies and illustrate this with applications we are pursuing in the areas of femtosecond laser applications, advanced lithographies, and mid-IR technologies.

  20. Effects of the Composition and the Preparation Methods on Oil Sorption Capacity of Recycled Rayon Waste-Kapok Mixtures (RRWK Sorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutha Khaodhiar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the utilization of a recycled rayon waste-kapok mixtures as an oil sorbent for the removal of diesel, motor oil and bunker C. The effects of the kapok fibers: rayon fibers ratio and the additional of sodium sulfate on RRWK sorbents properties were investigated through series of oil sorption tests. The ASTM 726-06 method was used to determine the oil sorption capacity of the sorbents under both static and dynamic conditions. The results showed the high sorption capacity of the recycled rayon waste-kapok mixture for difference kinds of oil. Oil, which has a high viscosity, tends to have a higher oil sorption ratio. RRWK sorbents had higher oil sorption capacity than commercial polypropylene. The presence of kapok fibers in RRWK increases the hydrophobicity and oil sorption capacity of the sorbents while the presence of rayon fibers improves the strength of the sorbents. The additional of sodium sulfate during sorbent preparation increases the surface area and pore size of RRWK sorbent and thus improves the oil sorption capacity. It can be concluded that RRWK, which can be produced by utilizing industrial waste, is effective low cost, environmentally friendly oil sorbent with comparable performance to commercial products.

  1. Modelling fiber flow in fiberboard manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Jorge(Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA, U.K.); Pinheiro, Diogo; Penedones, João; Matos, José; Freitas, Pedro; Gama, Slvio; Gonçalves, Vasco

    2012-01-01

    Resin weighs substantially on the costs associated with the manufacturing of MDF (medium-density fiberboard). It is thus important to ensure the efficiency of resin usage in production lines with the purpose of ensuring a given internal bond strength (IB) for specific products. Sonae has two MDF production lines using similar technologies and materials but which need different resin percentages to reach the same IB. It was asked of the study group to find out what were the determi...

  2. New Manufacturing Method for Paper filler and Fiber Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doelle, Klaus

    2011-11-22

    The study compares commercial available filler products with a new developed “Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material” and how main structural, optical and strength properties are affected by increasing the filler content of at least 5% over commercial values. The study consists of: (i) an overview of paper filler materials used in the paper production process, (ii) discusses the manufacturing technology of lime based filler materials for paper applications, (iii) gives an overview of new emerging paper filler technologies, (iv) discusses a filler evaluation of commercial available digital printing paper products, (v) reports from a detailed handsheet study and 12” pilot plant paper machine trial runs with the new Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material, and (vi) evaluates and compares commercial filler products and the new Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material with a life cycle analyses that explains manufacturing, economic and environmental benefits as they are applied to uncoated digital printing papers.

  3. Fiber-reinforced composites materials, manufacturing, and design

    CERN Document Server

    Mallick, P K

    2007-01-01

    The newly expanded and revised edition of Fiber-Reinforced Composites: Materials, Manufacturing, and Design presents the most up-to-date resource available on state-of-the-art composite materials. This book is unique in that it not only offers a current analysis of mechanics and properties, but also examines the latest advances in test methods, applications, manufacturing processes, and design aspects involving composites. This third edition presents thorough coverage of newly developed materials including nanocomposites. It also adds more emphasis on underlying theories, practical methods, and problem-solving skills employed in real-world applications of composite materials. Each chapter contains new examples drawn from diverse applications and additional problems to reinforce the practical relevance of key concepts. New in The Third Edition: Contains new sections on material substitution, cost analysis, nano- and natural fibers, fiber architecture, and carbon-carbon composites Provides a new chapter on poly...

  4. Effect of epoxy coatings on carbon fibers during manufacture of carbon fiber reinforced resin matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The changes in oxygen and nitrogen during manufacture of the carbon fiber reinforced resin matrix composites were measured using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method. The effects of the change in oxygen and nitrogen on the strength of the carbon fibers were investigated and the results revealed that the change of the tensile strength with increasing heat curing temperature was attributed to the change in the surface flaws of the carbon fibers because the carbon fibers are sensitive to the surface flaws. The effect of the surface energy that was calculated using Kaelble's method on the strength of the carbon fibers was investigated. Furthermore, the surface roughness of the carbon fibers was measured using atom force microscopy. The change trend of roughness was reverse to that of the strength, which was because of the brittle fracture of the carbon fibers.

  5. EB manufacturing of polymer-fiber composite vehicle structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The treatment of curable monomeric and polymeric systems by energetic electrons offers a high speed, low-temperature, continuous method for the large scale manufacture of vehicle structures. Based on modern EB sources, the process is proven to be extremely reliable, rugged, and easily integrated into continuous production schemes. Unlike other radiation curing techniques, the EB process uses no radioactive materials and neither the processing area, or product become radioactive. This paper describes on-going work to develop and commercialize an EB process for the manufacture of thick (e.g., 5 cm) polymer-fiber composite structures

  6. The manufacturing engineering of a hermetic cast fiber calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have made the first pass at designing and engineering a cast lead calorimeter with a rapidity coverage to ? = 5.5. The design preserves detector hermeticity. Plastic scintillating fibers provide a fast, hadronically compensated, high-resolution device. A lead-eutectic, which melts below the softening point of the plastic, provides an easily manufactured high Z absorber. This calorimeter, designed with the TEXAS SSC detector as a baseline, is easily scaled in size and in segmentation without major design changes

  7. Assessment of different dietary fibers (tomato fiber, beet root fiber, and inulin) for the manufacture of chopped cooked chicken products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cava, Ramón; Ladero, Luis; Cantero, V; Rosario Ramírez, M

    2012-04-01

    Three dietary fibers (tomato fiber [TF], beet root fiber [BRF], and inulin) at 3 levels of addition (1%, 2%, and 3%) were assessed for the manufacture of chopped, cooked chicken products and compared with a control product without fiber added. The effect of fiber incorporation on (i) batters, (ii) cooked (30 min at 70 °C), and (iii) cooked and stored (for 10 d at 4 °C) chicken products were studied. The addition of the fiber to chicken meat products reduced the pH of chicken batters in proportional to the level of fiber addition. Fiber incorporation increased water-holding capacity but only the addition of TF reduced cook losses. The color of batters and cooked products was significantly modified by the type and level of fiber added. These changes were more noticeable when TF was added. Texture parameters were affected by the incorporation of TF and BRF; they increased the hardness in proportional to the level of addition. The addition of tomato and BRF to chicken meat products reduced lipid oxidation processes. These changes were dependent on the level of fiber added. The reduction of lipid oxidation processes was more marked in TF meat products than in products with other types of fibers. In contrast, the addition level of inulin increased TBA-RS numbers in chicken meat products. Although the addition of TF increased the redness of the meat products, the use of this fiber was more suitable as it reduced the extent of lipid oxidation processes. INDUSTRIAL APPLICATION: Nowadays, the reduction of fat and the increase of fiber content in meat products is one of the main goals of meat industry. Numerous sources of fiber can be added to the meat products; however, before that it is necessary to study their technological effect on raw and cooked meat products in order to evaluate their suitability for meat products manufacture. In addition, some of them could have beneficial effect on meat products conservation that could also increase their shelf life. PMID:22352766

  8. Effects of process parameters of various pretreatments on enzymatic hydrolysability of Ceiba pentandra (L.) Gaertn. (Kapok) fibre: A response surface methodology study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapok fibre is a promising raw material to produce sugar by enzymatic hydrolysis. In this work, effects of water, acid and alkaline pretreatments on the enzymatic sugar yield were studied through response surface methodology (RSM) and supported by the analysis of chemical compositions and physical structure of the fibre. For water pretreatment, reaction temperature and time were the independent variables while chemical concentration was also used as the third independent variable for acid and alkaline pretreatments. For all pretreatments, the enzymatic hydrolysis conditions were kept constant. The structure of pretreated fibre was also examined using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results showed that water and acid pretreatments effectively dissolved hemicellulose of the fibre with the latter unveiled better results. The alkaline pretreatment resulted in the highest total glucose yield (g/kg of untreated fibre) as compared to water and acid pretreatments. SEM analysis illustrated that water and acid pretreatments led severe destruction of fibre structure; however, both of these pretreatments exhibited lower enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysability of kapok fibre as compared to that observed in alkaline pretreatment. - Highlights: • Effect of pretreatments on sugar yield was studied by response surface methodology. • Glucose yield was highly related to the chemical compositions of pretreated fibers. • Pretreatments altered the physical structure of kapok fibers. • Enzymatic hydrolysability of fibre was improved the most by alkaline treatment. • Over 94% cellulose of the pretreated fibres was converted to glucose

  9. Optimization of a thermal manufacturing process: drawing of optical fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Cheng; Jaluria, Y. [State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    2005-08-01

    The optimization of thermal systems and processes has received much less attention than their simulation and often lags behind optimization in other engineering areas. This paper considers the optimization of the important thermal manufacturing process involved in the drawing of optical fibers. Despite the importance of optical fibers and the need to enhance product quality and reduce costs, very little work has been done on the optimization of the process. The main aspects that arise in the optimization of such thermal processes are considered in detail in order to formulate an appropriate objective function and to determine the existence of optimal conditions. Using validated numerical models to simulate the thermal transport processes that govern the characteristics of the fiber and the production rate, the study investigates the relevant parametric space and obtains the domain in which the process is physically feasible. This is followed by an attempt to narrow the feasible region and focus on the domain that could lead to optimization. Employing standard optimization techniques, optimal conditions are determined for typical operating parameters. The study thus provides a basis for choosing optimal design conditions and for more detailed investigations on the feasibility and optimization of this complicated and important process. (author)

  10. Oxidative activation of wood fibers for the manufacture of medium-density fiberboard (MDF)

    OpenAIRE

    Widsten, Petri

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this thesis work was to study the possibilities of radical formation in wood fiber surfaces to enable direct fiber-to-fiber adhesion by radical-based reactions in the manufacture of fibreboard, particularly medium-density fiberboard (MDF). The fibers were produced by defibration at high temperatures. Radical formation was achieved by treatment with laccase, treatment with Fenton's reagent, or gamma-irradiation. High-temperature defibration was found to cause cleavage of interun...

  11. Manufacturing of robust natural fiber preforms utilizing bacterial cellulose as binder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Koon-Yang; Shamsuddin, Siti Rosminah; Fortea-Verdejo, Marta; Bismarck, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    A novel method of manufacturing rigid and robust natural fiber preforms is presented here. This method is based on a papermaking process, whereby loose and short sisal fibers are dispersed into a water suspension containing bacterial cellulose. The fiber and nanocellulose suspension is then filtered (using vacuum or gravity) and the wet filter cake pressed to squeeze out any excess water, followed by a drying step. This will result in the hornification of the bacterial cellulose network, holding the loose natural fibers together. Our method is specially suited for the manufacturing of rigid and robust preforms of hydrophilic fibers. The porous and hydrophilic nature of such fibers results in significant water uptake, drawing in the bacterial cellulose dispersed in the suspension. The bacterial cellulose will then be filtered against the surface of these fibers, forming a bacterial cellulose coating. When the loose fiber-bacterial cellulose suspension is filtered and dried, the adjacent bacterial cellulose forms a network and hornified to hold the otherwise loose fibers together. The introduction of bacterial cellulose into the preform resulted in a significant increase of the mechanical properties of the fiber preforms. This can be attributed to the high stiffness and strength of the bacterial cellulose network. With this preform, renewable high performance hierarchical composites can also be manufactured by using conventional composite production methods, such as resin film infusion (RFI) or resin transfer molding (RTM). Here, we also describe the manufacturing of renewable hierarchical composites using double bag vacuum assisted resin infusion. PMID:24893649

  12. New Manufacturing Method for Paper Filler and Fiber Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doelle, Klaus [SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

    2013-08-25

    The use of fillers in printing and writing papers has become a prerequisite for competing in a global market to reduce the cost of materials. Use of calcium carbonates (ranging from 18% to 30%) as filler is a common practice in the paper industry but the choices of fillers for each type of papers vary widely according to its use. The market for uncoated digital printing paper is one that continues to introduce exciting growth projections. and it is important to understand the effect that new manufacturing methods of calcium carbonates have on the energy efficiency and paper production. Research conducted under this award showed that the new fiber filler composite material has the potential to increase the paper filler content by up to 5% without losing mechanical properties. Benefits of the technology can be summarized as follows for a 1% filler increase per metric ton of paper produced: (i) production cost savings over $12, (ii) Energy savings of 100,900 btu, (iii) CO{sub 2} emission savings of 33 lbs, and additional savings for wood preparation, pulping, recovery of 203593 btu with a 46lbs of CO{sub 2} emission savings per 1% filler increase. In addition the technology has the potential to save: (i) additional $3 per ton of bleached pulp produced, (ii) bleaching energy savings of 170,000 btu, (iii) bleaching CO{sub 2} emission savings of 39 lbs, and (iv) additional savings for replacing conventional bleaching chemicals with a sustainable bleaching chemical is estimated to be 900,000 btu with a 205 lbs of CO{sub 2} emission savings per ton of bleached pulp produced. All the above translates to a estimated annual savings for a 12% filler increase of 296 trillion buts� or 51 million barrel of oil equivalent (BOE) or 13.7% of the industries energy demand. This can lead to a increase of renewable energy usage from 56% to close to 70% for the industry sector. CO{sub 2} emission of the industry at a 12% filler increase could be lowered by over 39 million tons annually. If the new technology could be implemented for bleaching process a total annual estimated energy savings potential of 64 trillion buts� or 11 million barrel of oil equivalent (BOE) equal to 3% of the paper industries energy demand could be realized. This could lead to a increase of renewable energy usage from 56% to close to 60% for the industry. CO{sub 2} emissions could be lowered by over 7.4 million tons annually. It is estimated that an installed system could also yield a 75 to 100% return of investment (ROI) rate for the capital equipment that need to be installed for the fiber filler composite manufacturing process.

  13. Premixed Combustion of Kapok (ceiba pentandra) seed oil on Perforated Burner

    OpenAIRE

    I.K.G. Wirawan; I.N.G. Wardana; Rudy Soenoko; Slamet Wahyudi

    2014-01-01

    Availability of fossil fuels in the world decrease gradually due to excessive fuel exploitation. This situations push researcher to look for alternative fuels as a source of renewable energy, one of them is kapok (ceiba pentandra) seed oil. The aim this study was to know the behavior of laminar burning velocity, secondary Bunsen flame with open tip, cellular and triple flame. Premixed combustion of kapok seed oil was studied experimentally on perforated burner with equivalence ratio (?) varie...

  14. Microwave-assisted methyl esters synthesis of Kapok (Ceiba pentandra) seed oil: parametric and optimization study

    OpenAIRE

    Awais Bokhari; Lai Fatt Chuah; Suzana Yusup; Junaid Ahmad; Muhammad Rashid Shamsuddin; Meng Kiat Teng

    2015-01-01

    The depleting fossil fuel reserves and increasing environmental concerns have continued to stimulate research into biodiesel as a green fuel alternative produced from renewable resources. In this study, Kapok (Ceiba pentandra) oil methyl ester was produced by using microwave-assisted technique. The optimum operating conditions for the microwave-assisted transesterification of Kapok seed oil including temperature, catalyst loading, methanol to oil molar ratio, and irradiation time were investi...

  15. Experimental investigation of kapok (Ceiba pentandra) oil biodiesel as an alternate fuel for diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Kapok (C. pentandra) oil, an indigenous source, has been used to synthesis biodiesel. • A different method has been availed to extract oil from the kapok seeds. • Kapok methyl ester (KME) is tested for the first time in a diesel engine. • Brake thermal efficiency for B25 blend of KME is noticed to be 4% higher than diesel. • Combustion and emission results for B25 blend of KME are almost comparable to diesel. - Abstract: This manuscript explores the possibility of using kapok oil as a source for biodiesel production and experimentally investigate it, KME (kapok oil methyl ester), as a diesel engine fuel. Distinctly, this manuscript is novel on the basis of adopting a different approach in extracting oil from kapok seeds and testing of the produced KME in a diesel engine, perhaps for the first time. Accordingly, kapok oil, an indigenous source, has been extracted from kapok seeds through steam treatment process followed by crushing in an expeller, which has not been considered so far by researchers. Significantly, this method is chosen with the intent to extract oil for its use in diesel engine. Typically, KME is synthesized by trans-esterification process, and the properties of it, evaluated by ASTM standard methods, are in concordance with biodiesel standards. Having ensured the feasibility of its use in diesel engine, KME is tested in a single cylinder diesel engine to appraise the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of the engine. The experimental investigation reveals that the thermal efficiency of the engine for B25 is superior to conventional diesel by 4%. In the same token, the emission and combustion results of lower blend of KME (B25), showed comparable results with diesel, making KME as one of the pertinent fuel for diesel engine

  16. Manufacturing Of Robust Natural Fiber Preforms Utilizing Bacterial Cellulose as Binder

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, K-Y; Shamsuddin, S. R.; Fortea-Verdejo, M.; Bismarck, A.

    2014-01-01

    A novel method of manufacturing rigid and robust natural fiber preforms is presented here. This method is based on a papermaking process, whereby loose and short sisal fibers are dispersed into a water suspension containing bacterial cellulose. The fiber and nanocellulose suspension is then filtered (using vacuum or gravity) and the wet filter cake pressed to squeeze out any excess water, followed by a drying step. This will result in the hornification of the bacterial cellulose network, hold...

  17. A New Fiber Preform with Nanocarbon Binder for Manufacturing Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite by Liquid Molding Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Dong Gi; Ha, Jong Rok; Lee, Jea Uk; Lee, Wonoh; Kim, Byung Sun

    2015-11-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced composite has been a good candidate of lightweight structural component in the automotive industry. As fast production speed is essential to apply the composite materials for the mass production area such as automotive components, the high speed liquid composite molding processes have been developed. Fast resin injection through the fiber preform by high pressure is required to improve the production speed, but it often results in undesirable deformations of the fiber preform which causes defectives in size and properties of the final composite products. In order to prevent the undesirable deformation and improve the stability of preform shape, polymer type binder materials are used. More stable fiber preform can be obtained by increasing the amount of binder material, but it disturbs the resin impregnation through the fiber preform. In this study, carbon nanomaterials such as graphene oxide were embedded on the surface of carbon fiber by electrophoretic deposition method in order to improve the shape stability of fiber preform and interfacial bonding between polymer and the reinforcing fiber. Effects of the modified reinforcing fiber were investigated in two respects. One is to increase the binding energy between fiber tows, and the other is to increase the interfacial bonding between polymer matrix and fiber surface. The effects were analyzed by measuring the binding force of fiber preform and interlaminar shear strength of the composite. This study also investigated the high speed liquid molding process of the composite materials composed of polymer matrix and the carbon fiber preforms embedded by carbon nanomaterials. Process parameter such as permeability of fiber preform was measured to investigate the effect of nanoscale surface modification on the macroscale processing condition for composite manufacturing. PMID:26726642

  18. Manufacture of a 2D optical fiber array coupler with micrometer precision for laser radar applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents the manufacture of a 2D-fiber array coupler using UV-LIGA technology for the precise positioning of a two-dimensional (2D) optical fiber array. The precision of the alignment of the eight-by-eight fiber array was demonstrated to be less than 2 μm. The average concentricity error of the fibers to the positioning holes of the array coupler had a minimum and maximum error of 1.7 µm and 6.5 μm, respectively. The 2D fiber array coupler can fulfill the coupling and transmission requirements of 2D light spots for laser radar applications. The method developed here can easily be extended to the manufacture of larger arrays. (paper)

  19. Basalt fiber manufacturing technology and the possibility of its use in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavaeva, E.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Nikitin, V.; Cherepennikov, Yu; Lysakov, A.

    2015-11-01

    The article touches upon the technology of basalt fiber manufacturing and prospects of its use in dental practice. Two kinds of construction using basalt fiber have been proposed. The first one is a splinting construction for mobile teeth and the second one is the reinforced base for removable plate-denture. The work presents the results of the investigation of physical and mechanical properties of the constructions based on basalt fiber. It also describes the aspects of biomechanical modeling of such constructions in the ANSYS software package. The results of the investigation have proved that applying constructions using basalt fiber is highly promising for prosthetic dentistry practice.

  20. Fiber Volume Fraction Influence on Fiber Compaction in Tapered Resin Injection Pultrusion Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuram, N. B.; Roux, J. A.; Jeswani, A. L.

    2015-10-01

    Liquid resin is injected into the tapered injection chamber through the injection slots to completely wetout the fiber reinforcements in a resin injection pultrusion process. As the resin penetrates through the fibers, the resin also pushes the fibers away from the wall towards the centerline causing compaction of the fiber reinforcements. The fibers are squeezed together due to compaction, making resin penetration more difficult; thus higher resin injection pressures are required to effectively penetrate through the fibers and achieve complete wetout. Fiber volume fraction in the final pultruded composite is a key to decide the mechanical and/or chemical properties of the composite. If the fiber volume fraction is too high, more fibers are squeezed together creating a fiber lean region near the wall and fiber rich region away from the wall. Also, the design of the injection chamber significantly affects the minimum injection pressure required to completely wet the fibers. A tapered injection chamber is considered such that wetout occurs at lower injection pressures due to the taper angle of the injection chamber. In this study, the effect of fiber volume fraction on the fiber reinforcement compaction and complete fiber wetout for a tapered injection chamber is investigated.

  1. Presence of Tungsten-Containing Fibers in Tungsten Refining and Manufacturing Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Mckernan, John L.; Toraason, Mark A.; Fernback, Joseph E; Petersen, Martin R

    2009-01-01

    In tungsten refining and manufacturing processes, a series of tungsten oxides are typically formed as intermediates in the production of tungsten powder. The present study was conducted to characterize airborne tungsten-containing fiber dimensions, elemental composition and concentrations in the US tungsten refining and manufacturing industry. During the course of normal employee work activities, seven personal breathing zone and 62 area air samples were collected and analyzed using National ...

  2. In-Line Quality Assurance for the Manufacturing of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Aircraft Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Ullmann, Thomas; Schmidt, Thomas; Hoffmann, Severin; Jemmali, Raouf

    2010-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers are playing a key role for future aircraft structure design concepts as the newest technical developments for aircraft models B787 and A350 are showing. Due to the specific mechanical properties of this composite material and the novel manufacturing and machining techniques for large-scale CFRP made aircraft structures, it is necessary to establish an adequate process integrated quality assurance system that enables a cost-effective automated manufacturing rou...

  3. Highly Aligned Carbon Fiber in Polymer Composite Structures via Additive Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tekinalp, Halil L [ORNL; Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL; Velez-Garcia, Gregorio M [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Love, Lonnie J [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL; Blue, Craig A [ORNL; Ozcan, Soydan [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, diverging from traditional manufacturing techniques, such as casting and machining materials, can handle complex shapes with great design flexibility without the typical waste. Although this technique has been mainly used for rapid prototyping, interest is growing in using this method to directly manufacture actual parts of complex shape. To use 3D-printing additive manufacturing in wide spread applications, the technique and the feedstock materials require improvements to meet the mechanical requirements of load-bearing components. Thus, we investigated the short fiber (0.2 mm to 0.4 mm) reinforced acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene composites as a feedstock for 3D-printing in terms of their processibility, microstructure and mechanical performance; and also provided comparison with traditional compression molded composites. The tensile strength and modulus of 3D-printed samples increased ~115% and ~700%, respectively. 3D-printer yielded samples with very high fiber orientation in printing direction (up to 91.5 %), whereas, compression molding process yielded samples with significantly less fiber orientation. Microstructure-mechanical property relationships revealed that although the relatively high porosity is observed in the 3D-printed composites as compared to those produced by the conventional compression molding technique, they both exhibited comparable tensile strength and modulus. This phenomena is explained based on the changes in fiber orientation, dispersion and void formation.

  4. Size Classification of Chopped Carbon Fibers in the Composite Materials Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.S. Dovbysh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Information synthesis of the learning decision support system for automation of the chopped carbon fibers size control used for the matrix filling within the manufacturing of composite materials based on polytetrafluoroethylene is considered. To improve the reliability of recognition learning algorithm with the optimization of the precision control is proposed.

  5. Size Classification of Chopped Carbon Fibers in the Composite Materials Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    А.S. Dovbysh; А.F. Budnik; N.І. Andriienko

    2010-01-01

    Information synthesis of the learning decision support system for automation of the chopped carbon fibers size control used for the matrix filling within the manufacturing of composite materials based on polytetrafluoroethylene is considered. To improve the reliability of recognition learning algorithm with the optimization of the precision control is proposed.

  6. Design and Manufacturing of Tow-Steered Composite Shells Using Fiber Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Tatting, Brian F.; Smith, Brett H.; Stevens, Randy S.; Occhipiniti, Gina P.; Swift, Jonathan B.; Achary, David C.; Thornburgh, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    Advanced composite shells that may offer the potential to improve the structural performance of future aircraft fuselage structures were developed under this joint NASA-industry collaborative effort. Two cylindrical shells with tailored, tow-steered layups and continuously varying fiber angle orientations were designed and built at the National Center for Advanced Manufacturing - Louisiana Partnership. The shells were fabricated from unidirectional IM7/8552 graphite-epoxy pre-preg slit tape material fiber-placed on a constant-diameter mandrel. Each shell had the same nominal 8-ply [plus or minus 45/plus or minus Theta]s layup, where the nominal fiber angle in the tow-steered plies varied continuously from 10 degrees along the crown to 45 degrees on each side, then back to 10 degrees on the keel. One shell was fabricated with all 24 tows placed during each pass of the fiber placement machine, resulting in many tow overlaps on the shell surface. The fiber placement machine's individual tow cut/restart capability was also used to manufacture a second shell with tow drops and a more uniform laminate thickness. This paper presents an overview of the detailed design and manufacturing processes for these shells, and discusses issues encountered during their fabrication and post-cure evaluation. Future plans for structural testing and analyses of the shells are also discussed.

  7. Energy Saving Method of Manufacturing Ceramic Products from Fiber Glass Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael J. Haun

    2005-07-15

    The U.S. fiber glass industry disposes of more than 260,000 tons of industrial fiber glass waste in landfills annually. New technology is needed to reprocess this industrial waste into useful products. A low-cost energy-saving method of manufacturing ceramic tile from fiber glass waste was developed. The technology is based on sintering fiber glass waste at 700-900 degrees C to produce products which traditionally require firing temperatures of >1200 degrees C, or glass-melting temperatures >1500 degrees C. The process also eliminates other energy intensive processing steps, including mining and transportation of raw materials, spray-drying to produce granulated powder, drying pressed tile, and glazing. The technology completely transforms fiber glass waste into a dense ceramic product, so that all future environmental problems in the handling and disposal of the fibers is eliminated. The processing steps were developed and optimized to produce glossy and matte surface finishes for wall and floor tile applications. High-quality prototype tile samples were processed for demonstration and tile standards testing. A Market Assessment confirmed the market potential for tile products produced by the technology. Manufacturing equipment trials were successfully conducted for each step of the process. An industrial demonstration plant was designed, including equipment and operating cost analysis. A fiber glass manufacturer was selected as an industrial partner to commercialize the technology. A technology development and licensing agreement was completed with the industrial partner. Haun labs will continue working to transfer the technology and assist the industrial partner with commercialization beyond the DOE project.

  8. New techniques for manufacturing optical-fiber-based fiber Fabry-Perot sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, Christopher J.; Fernando, Gerard F.

    2002-07-01

    Optical fiber-based extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFPI) sensors have been extensively deployed for sensing a number of measurands including temperature, strain, vibration and pressure. Their circular cross-section has made it relatively simple and attractive to embed them in advanced fibre reinforced composites (AFRCs) such as glass and carbon fibers. However, a typical construction of an EFPI consists of two optical fibers that are positioned and secured within a precision bore capillary. The relative outer diameters of the various key components are as follows: capillary = 300 micrometers ; optical fibre = 125 micrometers ; carbon and glass fibers = 8 and 14 micrometers respectively. This mismatch in relative diameters of the reinforcing and the sensor fibers can result in significant spatial distortion of the former. The location of the embedded sensing fibre in relation to the reinforcing fibre layers can also lead to the formation of resin-rich regions in the AFRC. These factors can have a detrimental effect on the compressive properties of the material. Therefore, there is significant attraction in reducing the overall diameter of the sensor. In this current paper, the feasibility of reducing the diameter of EFPI sensor design to that of the optical fibre is demonstrated via two techniques. The first technique involved the use of hydrofluoric acid to etch and create the Fabry-Perot cavity. In the second technique, the feasibility of using laser ablation to fabricate the Fabry-Perot cavity in silica and sapphire substrates is presented. The optical fibre-based Fabry-Perot cavity produced via acid etching was interrogated using white light interferometry.

  9. Femtosecond fiber laser additive manufacturing and welding for 3D manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; Nie, Bai; Wan, Peng; Yang, Lih-Mei; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian

    2015-03-01

    Due to the unique ultra-short pulse duration and high peak power, femtosecond (fs) laser has emerged as a powerful tool for many applications but has rarely been studied for 3D printing. In this paper, welding of both bulk and powder materials is demonstrated for the first time by using high energy and high repetition rate fs fiber lasers. It opens up new scenarios and opportunities for 3D printing with the following advantages - greater range of materials especially with high melting temperature, greater-than-ever level of precision (sub-micron) and less heat-affected-zone (HAZ). Mechanical properties (strength and hardness) and micro-structures (grain size) of the fabricated parts are investigated. For dissimilar materials bulk welding, good welding quality with over 210 MPa tensile strength is obtained. Also full melting of the micron-sized refractory powders with high melting temperature (above 3000 degree C) is achieved for the first time. 3D parts with shapes like ring and cube are fabricated. Not only does this study explore the feasibility of melting dissimilar and high melting temperature materials using fs lasers, but it also lays out a solid foundation for 3D printing of complex structure with designed compositions, microstructures and properties. This can greatly benefit the applications in automobile, aerospace and biomedical industries, by producing parts like nozzles, engines and miniaturized biomedical devices.

  10. 77 FR 73978 - Foreign-Trade Zone 148-Knoxville, TN, Toho Tenax America, Inc. (Carbon Fiber Manufacturing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-12

    ...), located in Rockwood, Tennessee, with authority to manufacture carbon fiber for export and oxidized polyacrylonitrile fiber (Board Order 1868, 77 FR 69435, 11/19/2012). Board Order 1868 did not include authority to... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 148--Knoxville, TN, Toho Tenax America, Inc. (Carbon...

  11. Utilization of Non -oven Jute felt - A natural Fiber as a Substitution of Wood Veneer for Manufacture of Plywood

    OpenAIRE

    Sahoo, S.C.; Mr. Amitava Sil; Mr. P.K.Khatua

    2012-01-01

    In this study the suitability of using core veneer made from renewable natural fiber i.e. Non-oven jute felt, which is the second most widely used natural fiber for manufacturing of plywood was investigated to minimize the gap between demand and supply of wood veneer. The renewable natural hard jute fibre was impregnated with phenolic resin and was used for the manufacture of plywood. Plywood of 4 mm, 6 mm, 12 mm and 18 mm thick were manufactured by using phenolic resin impregnated jute felt ...

  12. Microwave-assisted methyl esters synthesis of Kapok (Ceiba pentandra seed oil: parametric and optimization study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awais Bokhari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The depleting fossil fuel reserves and increasing environmental concerns have continued to stimulate research into biodiesel as a green fuel alternative produced from renewable resources. In this study, Kapok (Ceiba pentandra oil methyl ester was produced by using microwave-assisted technique. The optimum operating conditions for the microwave-assisted transesterification of Kapok seed oil including temperature, catalyst loading, methanol to oil molar ratio, and irradiation time were investigated by using Response Surface Methodology (RSM based on Central Composite Design (CCD. A maximum conversion of 98.9 % was obtained under optimum conditions of 57.09 C reaction temperature, 2.15 wt% catalyst (KOH loading, oil to methanol molar ratio of 1:9.85, and reaction time of 3.29 min. Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FT-IR spectroscopy was performed to verify the conversion of the fatty acid into methyl esters. The properties of Kapok oil methyl ester produced under the optimum conditions were characterized and found in agreement with the international ASTM D 6751 and EN 14214 standards.

  13. A Pilot-Scale System for Carbon Molecular Sieve Hollow Fiber Membrane Manufacturing

    KAUST Repository

    Karvan, O.

    2012-12-21

    Carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes offer advantages over traditional polymeric membrane materials, but scale-up of manufacturing systems has not received much attention. In the recent decade, there has been a dramatic increase in fundamental research on these materials with a variety of applications being studied. The results from a pilot-scale CMS production system are presented. This system was designed based on extensive laboratory research, and hollow fiber membranes produced in this system show similar performance compared to membranes produced using a smaller bench-scale system. After optimizing the system design, a 93% recovery of the precursor fibers for use in membrane module preparation were obtained. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF CARBON FIBER EMISSIONS FROM CURRENT AND PROJECTED ACTIVITIES FOR THE MANUFACTURE AND DISPOSAL OF CARBON FIBER PRODUCTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Composite materials formed by impregnating a carbon or graphite fiber mat with plastic binders are being used increasingly in military, aerospace, sports and automotive applications. Carbon fibers are formed primarily from synthetic fibers carbonized in the absence of oxygen. Pos...

  15. Studies on radiation resistance of fiber reinforced plastic composites featured by easiness of manufacturing, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical properties of glass fiber-reinforced plastics (GFRP) irradiated at room temperature with electron beams were studied in order to characterize the radiation resistance. Mechanical properties were tested by flexural strength and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) at room and low temperature, and flexural fatigue strength at room temperature. The GFRP used in the present study were manufactured trial with three kinds of epoxy matrices having excellent radiation resistance at room temperature and easiness of manufacturing. These composites prepared in selected curing condition were equipped with high flexural strength at low temperature, about two times at room temperature. GFRP composed of 4,4'-tetraglycidyl diamino diphenyl methane cured with 4,4'-diamino diphenyl methane showed the highest radiation resistance: the strength after irradiation up to 90 MGy were kept the initial value, that is, flexural strength of 1000 MPa at 77 K and ILSS of 70 MPa at 123 K. It was also confirmed that the flexural strength measured at 4.2 K were well agreed with the values tested at 77 K. On the effects of fiber-matrix bonding materials by using different kinds and/or amount of silane coupling agents, the pronounced difference were found in the degradation behavior but did not affect to the flexural strength of the GFRP. Flexural fatigue behavior showed rather well radiation degradation comparing with three point bending strength at room temperature. (author)

  16. Electrocoagulation pretreatment of wet-spun acrylic fibers manufacturing wastewater to improve its biodegradability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chenhao; Zhang, Zhongguo; Li, Haitao; Li, Duo; Wu, Baichun; Sun, Yuwei; Cheng, Yanjun

    2014-06-15

    The electrocoagulation (EC) process was used to pretreat wastewater from the manufacture of wet-spun acrylic fibers, and the effects of varying the operating parameters, including the electrode area/wastewater volume (A/V) ratio, current density, interelectrode distance and pH, on the EC treatment process were investigated. About 44% of the total organic carbon was removed using the optimal conditions in a 100 min procedure. The optimal conditions were a current density of 35.7 mA cm(-2), an A/V ratio of 0.28 cm(-1), a pH of 5, and an interelectrode distance of 0.8 cm. The biodegradability of the contaminants in the treated water was improved by the EC treatment (using the optimal conditions), increasing the five-day biological oxygen demand/chemical oxygen demand ratio to 0.35, which could improve the effectiveness of subsequent biological treatments. The improvement in the biodegradability of the contaminants in the wastewater was attributed to the removal and degradation of aromatic organic compounds, straight-chain paraffins, and other organic compounds, which we identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The EC process was proven to be an effective alternative pretreatment for wastewater from the manufacture of wet-spun acrylic fibers, prior to biological treatments. PMID:24813666

  17. Exposures to refractory ceramic fibers in manufacturing and related operations: a 10-year update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Carol H; Levin, Linda S; Borton, Eric K; Lockey, James E; Hilbert, Timothy J; Lemasters, Grace K

    2005-09-01

    Refractory ceramic fiber (RCF) is a man-made vitreous fiber used for its insulating properties. Since 1987, the work environment of approximately 800 persons employed in fiber manufacture or production operations directly related to manufacturing has been monitored to evaluate exposure levels. Samples were collected quarterly from the breathing zones of randomly selected workers. The measurements from those working in areas of similar activities and exposure controls (dust zones or homogeneous exposure groups) were used to calculate a mean exposure during identified time periods. Persons who spent all of their work time in one zone/group were assigned this mean exposure; those with responsibilities in more than one area were assigned an exposure based on a time-weighted formula. A total of 3213 measurements were used to estimate exposure for 130 job titles; because of the mobile jobs, many samples contribute to the estimates of exposure for multiple job titles. The majority of exposure estimates (53%) have remained stable over the operational history of the plant reported here. For 32 job titles (25%) exposures have decreased, and for 28 job titles (22%) exposures have increased. Of the 122 job titles active in 2001, 97 (79%) exposures were estimated to be at 0.25 f/cc or lower; 8 (7%) had an exposure exceeding 0.5 f/cc (range 0.51-0.80) and 17 (14%) of these exposure estimates were in the range of > 0.25 f/cc to 0.5 f/cc. The continuing program to measure exposure supports a respiratory health surveillance program in these facilities. PMID:16091350

  18. Highly porous oil sorbent based on hollow fibers as the interceptor for oil on static and running water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ting; Cao, Shengbin; Xu, Guangbiao

    2016-03-15

    Highly porous fibrous assembly made by kapok and hollow PET fibers was prepared by the air-laying-bonding method, and used as the interceptor for oils on static and running water. SEM showed that the vast majority of kapok and PET fibers in the assembly was intact and retained their hollow lumens, with the assembly's porosity high to 98.03%. Oil sorption tests exhibited that kapok/PET assembly could absorb 63.00g/g of vegetable oil and 58.50g/g of used motor oil, with high oil retention after 24h dripping. In static condition of oil interception, the two oils started to leak at around 20min for 10-mm thick kapok/PET wall. The time for that was prolonged with increasing the thickness of kapok/PET wall. After oil breakthrough, continuous oil leaking took place. The typical leakage was divided into three stages in which oils leaked separately in sharply increased rate, reduced rate and finally gently. In running condition, oils leaked in markedly quicker way than that in static condition, with initial leakage of oils shortened to less 6min when the water ran at 60.35ml/s. The leakage of oils was considerably accelerated with increasing running rates. PMID:26642440

  19. Carcass Characteristics of Kacang Goats Fed Ration Containing MH-1 Variety of Kapok Seed Meal (Ceiba pentandra, GAERTN.)

    OpenAIRE

    T. Hidjaz; N. Djuarnani

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to study the carcass characteristics of Kacang goats fed ration containing kapok seed meal (KSM) as a component of the concentrate. The experiment was conducted in two stages. The first stage was to find out the best variety of kapok that will be used in the second experiment; the second stage was to determine the benefits of KSM on carcass characteristics. Twenty-five, 8 months old Kacang goats with initial body weight of 11.711.08 kg, were used in this experiment. The a...

  20. Design optimization, manufacture and response measurements for fast-neutron radiography converters made of scintillator and wavelength-shifting fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hang; Wu, Yang; Cao, Chao; Huo, Heyong; Tang, Bin [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China)

    2014-10-21

    In order to improve the image quality of fast neutron radiography, a converter made of scintillator and wavelength-shifting fibers has been developed. The appropriate parameters of the converter such as fibers arrangement, distance between fibers are optimized theoretically, and manufacture of the converter are also optimized. Fast neutron radiography experiments by 14 MeV neutrons are used to test this converter and kinds of traditional converters. The experiments results matched the calculations. The novel converter's resolution is better than 1 mm and the light output is high.

  1. Design optimization, manufacture and response measurements for fast-neutron radiography converters made of scintillator and wavelength-shifting fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve the image quality of fast neutron radiography, a converter made of scintillator and wavelength-shifting fibers has been developed. The appropriate parameters of the converter such as fibers arrangement, distance between fibers are optimized theoretically, and manufacture of the converter are also optimized. Fast neutron radiography experiments by 14 MeV neutrons are used to test this converter and kinds of traditional converters. The experiments’ results matched the calculations. The novel converter's resolution is better than 1 mm and the light output is high

  2. Advanced treatment of acrylic fiber manufacturing wastewater with a combined microbubble-ozonation/ultraviolet irradiation process

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Tianlong

    2015-01-01

    This work investigated the effectiveness of a combination of microbubble-ozonation and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation for the treatment of secondary wastewater effluent of a wet-spun acrylic fiber manufacturing plant. Under reactor condition (ozone dosage of 48 mg L-1, UV fluence rate of 90 mW cm-2, initial pH of 8.0, and reaction time of 120 min), the biodegradability (represented as BOD5/CODcr) of the wastewater improved from 0.18 to 0.47. This improvement in biodegradability is related to the degradation of alkanes, aromatic compounds, and other bio-refractory organic compounds. The combination of microbubble-ozonation and UV irradiation synergistically improved treatment efficiencies by 228%, 29%, and 142% for CODcr, UV254 removal and BOD5/CODcr respectively after 120 min reaction time, as compared with the sum efficiency of microbubble-ozonation alone and UV irradiation alone. Hydroxyl radical production in the microbubble-ozonation/UV process was about 1.8 times higher than the sum production in microbubble-ozonation alone and UV irradiation alone. The ozone decomposition rate in the combined process was about 4.1 times higher than that in microbubble-ozonation alone. The microbubble-ozonation/UV process could be a promising technique for the treatment of bio-refractory organics in the acrylic fiber manufacturing industry. © 2015 Royal Society of Chemistry.

  3. Microbubble enhanced ozonation process for advanced treatment of wastewater produced in acrylic fiber manufacturing industry

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Tianlong

    2015-02-02

    This work investigated microbubble-ozonation for the treatment of a refractory wet-spun acrylic fiber wastewater in comparison to macrobubble-ozonation. CODcr, NH3-N, and UV254 of the wastewater were removed by 42%, 21%, and 42%, respectively in the microbubble-ozonation, being 25%, 9%, and 35% higher than the removal rates achieved by macrobubble-ozonation at the same ozone dose. The microbubbles (with average diameter of 45μm) had a high concentration of 3.9×105 counts/mL at a gas flow rate of 0.5L/min. The gas holdup, total ozone mass-transfer coefficient, and average ozone utilization efficiency in the microbubble-ozonation were 6.6, 2.2, and 1.5 times higher than those of the macrobubble-ozonation. Greater generation of hydroxyl radicals and a higher zeta potential of the bubbles were also observed in the microbubble ozonation process. The biodegradability of the wastewater was also significantly improved by microbubble-ozonation, which was ascribed to the enhanced degradation of alkanes, aromatic compounds, and the many other bio-refractory organic compounds in the wastewater. Microbubble-ozonation can thus be a more effective treatment process than traditional macrobubble-ozonation for refractory wastewater produced by the acrylic fiber manufacturing industry.

  4. 75 FR 34943 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Para-Aramid Fibers and Yarns Manufactured in a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... the Federal Register on December 18, 2008 (73 FR 76970). The comment period closed on February 17... Accordingly, the interim rule amending 48 CFR parts 225 and 252, which was published at 73 FR 76970 on... Regulation Supplement; Para-Aramid Fibers and Yarns Manufactured in a Qualifying Country AGENCY:...

  5. 78 FR 55057 - Authority To Manufacture Carbon Fiber for the U.S. Market Not Approved; Foreign-Trade Subzone...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-09

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Authority To Manufacture Carbon Fiber for the U.S. Market Not Approved; Foreign... comment has been given in the Federal Register (75 FR 61696, 10/6/2010; 75 FR 74002, 11/30/2010; 77 FR 73978, 12/12/2012; and 77 FR 75972, 12/26/2012) and the application has been processed pursuant to...

  6. Three-phase Coupling of Air, Droplets and Fibers for the Spray Molding Manufacturing Process of Polyurethane-Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffo, P.; Wulf, P.; Breuer, M.

    2011-09-01

    In the present paper the authors present a multiphase flow simulation model of the interaction of a droplet-laden air flow with flexible fibers. This highly complex flow is occurring during a manufacturing process of fiber reinforced polyurethane based composites, where the liquid plastic polyurethane (PUR) is sprayed with air assistance in a tool form or on a substrate. Simultaneously chopped fibers are laterally inserted in the polyurethane-air spray cone for wetting before the entire mixture deposits on the substrate, where it starts curing. This investigation aims to compute the statistical fiber orientation and density distribution in the final composite, which will help modeling its anisotropic material properties. It is presumed that the final position and orientation of a fiber on a substrate results from its dynamics and coupled interactions with air, PUR-droplets and other fibers within the spray cone. Therefore, we present a new approach simplifying the multiply coupled interaction of the three phases. In this paper a model of the process is built, that computes the transient, 4-way-coupled behavior of the air-liquid droplets mixture with the CFD code ANSYS Fluent and the 1-way-air- and 1-way-droplet-coupled dynamics of the fibers with an extra code called FIDYST. Two approaches for the coupling of fibers with the air-droplets-mixture are presented: One considers the mixture as a pseudo-fluid ("homogenization"), the other computes a force for each of the phases separately, wherein the average momentum transfer for the fiber-droplet collision is estimated based on the probability of local collision events.

  7. Mass-manufacturable polymer microfluidic device for dual fiber optical trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Coster, Diane; Ottevaere, Heidi; Vervaeke, Michael; Van Erps, Jürgen; Callewaert, Manly; Wuytens, Pieter; Simpson, Stephen H; Hanna, Simon; De Malsche, Wim; Thienpont, Hugo

    2015-11-30

    We present a microfluidic chip in Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) for optical trapping of particles in an 80µm wide microchannel using two counterpropagating single-mode beams. The trapping fibers are separated from the sample fluid by 70µm thick polymer walls. We calculate the optical forces that act on particles flowing in the microchannel using wave optics in combination with non-sequential ray-tracing and further mathematical processing. Our results are compared with a theoretical model and the Mie theory. We use a novel fabrication process that consists of a premilling step and ultraprecision diamond tooling for the manufacturing of the molds and double-sided hot embossing for replication, resulting in a robust microfluidic chip for optical trapping. In a proof-of-concept demonstration, we show the trapping capabilities of the hot embossed chip by trapping spherical beads with a diameter of 6µm, 8µm and 10µm and use the power spectrum analysis of the trapped particle displacements to characterize the trap strength. PMID:26698730

  8. Product stewardship and science: safe manufacture and use of fiber glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesterberg, Thomas W; Anderson, Robert; Bernstein, David M; Bunn, William B; Chase, Gerald A; Jankousky, Angela Libby; Marsh, Gary M; McClellan, Roger O

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes a proactive product stewardship program for glass fibers. That effort included epidemiological studies of workers, establishment of stringent workplace exposure limits, liaison with customers on safe use of products and, most importantly, a research program to evaluate the safety of existing glass fiber products and guide development of new even safer products. Chronic inhalation exposure bioassays were conducted with rodents and hamsters. Amosite and crocidolite asbestos produced respiratory tract cancers as did exposure to "biopersistent" synthetic vitreous fibers. "less biopersistent" glass fibers did not cause respiratory tract cancers. Corollary studies demonstrated the role of slow fiber dissolution rates and biopersistence in cancer induction. These results guided development of safer glass fiber products and have been used in Europe to regulate fibers and by IARC and NTP in classifying fibers. IARC concluded special purpose fibers and refractory ceramic fibers are "possibly carcinogenic to humans" and insulation glass wool, continuous glass filament, rock wool and slag wool are "not classifiable as to their carcinogenicity to human." The NTP's 12th report on carcinogens lists "Certain Glass Wool Fibers (Inhalable)" as "reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen." "Certain" in the descriptor refers to "biopersistent" glass fibers and excludes "less biopersistent" glass fibers. PMID:22266014

  9. Utilization of Non -oven Jute felt - A natural Fiber as a Substitution of Wood Veneer for Manufacture of Plywood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. S.C.Sahoo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study the suitability of using core veneer made from renewable natural fiber i.e. Non-oven jute felt, which is the second most widely used natural fiber for manufacturing of plywood was investigated to minimize the gap between demand and supply of wood veneer. The renewable natural hard jute fibre was impregnated with phenolic resin and was used for the manufacture of plywood. Plywood of 4 mm, 6 mm, 12 mm and 18 mm thick were manufactured by using phenolic resin impregnated jute felt having thickness 16mm of 1850 GSM (approx. as a core in place of the natural wood veneer. From the study, it can be inferred that PF Resin impregnated Non oven jute felt as a natural fibre can suitably replace the wooden glue core veneer to manufacture ply board up to 80% as an alternative substitute of wood. The physico-mechanical properties such as surface roughness, moisture content, density, water absorption, swelling, compressive strength, tensile strength, static bending strength, glue shear strength, of the plywood manufactured by using jute felt as core veneer with different resin dilution have been studied. Data revels that most of the physico-mechanical properties of the plywood showed satisfactory results meeting the requirement of different grades of plywood tested as per IS: 1734 - 1983. The accelerated study of the glued core after impregnation with jute felt have been carried out for three months before plywood manufacture after storing it in proper temperature and humidity. The data revealed that there is no appreciable change in bond quality and mechanical properties of the plyboard manufactured after storing the veneer up to 30 days. The study concluded that wood substituted jute composites could be an ideal solution with ever depleting forest reserves where utilization of renewable resources will be beneficiary for plywood industries to meet the challenges during scarcity of veneer by reducing the cost of imported veneer.

  10. Natural Fiber Composite Retting, Preform Manufacture and Molding (Project 18988/Agreement 16313)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Howe, Daniel T.; Laddha, Sachin; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2009-12-31

    Plant-based natural fibers can be used in place of glass in fiber reinforced automotive composites to reduce weight, cost and provide environmental benefits. Current automotive applications use natural fibers in injection molded thermoplastics for interior, non-structural applications. Compression molded natural fiber reinforced thermosets have the opportunity to extend natural fiber composite applications to structural and semi-structural parts and exterior parts realizing further vehicle weight savings. The development of low cost molding and fiber processing techniques for large volumes of natural fibers has helped in understanding the barriers of non-aqueous retting. The retting process has a significant effect on the fiber quality and its processing ability that is related to the natural fiber composite mechanical properties. PNNL has developed a compression molded fiber reinforced composite system of which is the basis for future preforming activities and fiber treatment. We are using this process to develop preforming techniques and to validate fiber treatment methods relative to OEM provided application specifications. It is anticipated for next fiscal year that demonstration of larger quantities of SMC materials and molding of larger, more complex components with a more complete testing regimen in coordination with Tier suppliers under OEM guidance.

  11. Premixed Combustion of Kapok (ceiba pentandra seed oil on Perforated Burner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.K.G. Wirawan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Availability of fossil fuels in the world decrease gradually due to excessive fuel exploitation. This situations push researcher to look for alternative fuels as a source of renewable energy, one of them is kapok (ceiba pentandra seed oil. The aim this study was to know the behavior of laminar burning velocity, secondary Bunsen flame with open tip, cellular and triple flame. Premixed combustion of kapok seed oil was studied experimentally on perforated burner with equivalence ratio (φ varied from 0.30 until 1.07. The results showed that combustion of glycerol requires a large amount of air so that laminar burning velocity (SL is the highest at very lean mixture (φ =0.36 in the form of individual Bunsen flame on each of the perforated plate hole.  Perforated and secondary Bunsen flame both reached maximum SL similar with that of ethanol and higher than that of hexadecane. Slight increase of φ decreases drastically SL of perforated and secondary Bunsen flame. When the mixture was enriched, secondary Bunsen and perforated flame disappears, and then the flame becomes Bunsen flame with open tip and triple flame (φ = 0.62 to 1.07. Flame was getting stable until the mixture above the stoichiometry. Being isolated from ambient air, the SL of perforated flame, as well as secondary Bunsen flame, becomes equal with non-isolated flame. This shows the decreasing trend of laminar burning velocity while φ is increasing. When the mixture was enriched island (φ = 0.44 to 0.48 and petal (φ = 0.53 to 0.62 cellular flame take place. Flame becomes more unstable when the mixture was changed toward stoichiometry.

  12. Development of extrusion processing technology for manufacture of fine-celled plastic/wood-fiber composite foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Ghaus Muhammad

    The main benefits of incorporating wood-fibers in plastics are the increased stiffness and lowered cost of the resulting composites. However, these improvements are usually accompanied by loss in the ductility and impact resistance of the composites. These shortcomings can be significantly improved by effectively foaming and incorporating a fine-cell structure in the composites. This thesis presents the development of the processing methodology for the manufacture of fine-celled plastic/wood-fiber composite (PWC) foams and focuses on the elucidation of the fundamental foaming mechanisms and the related issues involved. The volatiles evolved from the wood-fiber during extrusion processing play a dominant role in the foaming process, and can lead to gross deterioration of cell structure unless proper strategies are adopted to limit their contribution to foaming. Thermal analysis of wood-fibers (from pine wood) revealed that apart from moisture, a substantial part of the volatile emissions were evolved from the 'extractives', and hence can contribute to the foaming process as a blowing agent. A tandem extrusion system was developed which could effectively control the volatile wood-fiber emissions, and produce fine-celled PWC foams having the desired density and cell morphology. A series of critical experiments were performed to develop a suitable methodology for controlling the foam density and cell morphology. Fundamental foaming mechanisms for different foaming conditions are proposed.

  13. Floss release, seed fall and germination of kapok seeds (Ceiba pentandra) in an urban environment

    OpenAIRE

    Alfan A. Rija; Abubakari Said; Julius Mwita; Kuruthumu A. Mwamende

    2013-01-01

    The tropical forest kapok tree occurs widely in urban environments, dispersing thousands of floss during the fruiting season. However, its seedlings are rarely seen around human settlements, raising questions on what factorsmight be limiting its recruitment. We examined the pattern of floss release, seed fall post-dispersal and influences of watering frequency on germination ofCeiba pentandraseeds. Evening,overall, was associated with a significantlyhigher rate and quantit...

  14. Cryogenic fiber optic temperature sensor and method of manufacturing the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochergin, Vladimir (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    This invention teaches the fiber optic sensors temperature sensors for cryogenic temperature range with improved sensitivity and resolution, and method of making said sensors. In more detail, the present invention is related to enhancement of temperature sensitivity of fiber optic temperature sensors at cryogenic temperatures by utilizing nanomaterials with a thermal expansion coefficient that is smaller than the thermal expansion coefficient of the optical fiber but larger in absolute value than the thermal expansion coefficient of the optical fiber at least over a range of temperatures.

  15. ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS LIGNIN DERIVED FROM CORN STOVER AS AN INTRINSTIC BINDER FOR BIO-COMPOSITES MANUFACTURE: EFFECT OF FIBER MOISTURE CONTENT AND PRESSING TEMPERATURE ON BOARDS’ PROPERTIES

    OpenAIRE

    Guanben Du; Bijun Tang; Xueyuan Liu; Weidong Zhang; Chenglong Lv; Fei Zheng; Rong Zhang; Lijuan Tang,; Xiaoyan Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Binderless fiberboards from enzymatic hydrolysis lignin (EHL) and cotton stalk fibers were prepared under various manufacturing conditions, and their physico-mechanical properties were evaluated. Full factorial experimental design was used to assess the effect of fiber moisture content and pressing temperature on boards’ properties. In addition, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to obtain the glass transition temperature (Tg) of EHL. We found that both fiber moisture content an...

  16. Reduction of harmful emissions from a diesel engine fueled by kapok methyl ester using combined coating and SNCR technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Thermal barrier coating was accomplished by coating the engine components with PSZ. • Under-utilized kapok oil biodiesel was used as renewable fuel in a coated engine. • The BTE of the engine was improved by 9% with reduced BSFC. • CO, HC and smoke were reduced by 40%, 35.3% and 21.4%, respectively. • After implementing SCR assembly, the NOX emission was decreased by 13.4%. - Abstract: This research work has been formulated to reduce the stinging effect of NOX emission on atmospheric environment from a coated diesel engine fueled by biodiesel. As such, in the current study, we attempted to harness the renewable source of energy from in-edible kapok oil, which is normally under-utilized despite being a viable feedstock for biodiesel synthesis. Notably, steam treatment process followed by crushing of the kapok seeds in a mechanical expeller was done to extract large quantities of kapok oil for the application of diesel engine, which is quite distinct of a method adopted herein. The conventional trans-esterification process was availed to synthesize KME (kapok methyl ester) and the physical and thermal properties of it were estimated by ASTM standard methods. Subsequently, two blends of KME with diesel such as B25 (KME – 25% and diesel – 75%) and B50 (KME – 50% and diesel – 50%) were prepared and tested in a single cylinder diesel engine with thermal barrier coating. To help realize the coating process, PSZ (partially stabilized zirconia), a pertinent coating material in respect of its poor thermal conductivity and better durability, has been chosen as the coating material to be applied on engine components by plasma spray coating technique. As an outcome of the coating study, B50 was found to show improved BTE (brake thermal efficiency) than that in an uncoated engine, with notable decrease in major emissions such as HC (hydrocarbon), CO (carbon monoxide) and smoke. However, due to reduction in heat losses and increase in in-cylinder temperature, the NOX (oxides of nitrogen) emission was expected to be increased in a coated diesel engine. Therefore, in order to reduce the NOX emission, urea based SNCR system was incorporated in the exhaust pipe and by which, NOX emission was reduced

  17. Crosslinked hollow fiber membranes for natural gas purification and their manufacture from novel polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, David William

    Recent research has developed a class of crosslinkable polymers that can be used as effective membrane separators for carbon dioxide removal from natural gas. In asymmetric hollow fiber form, these materials provide significant cost and savings over traditional amine absorption towers. This work focuses on the development of a method for forming asymmetric hollow fibers membranes from novel polymers in general, with specific application to this group of crosslinkable polymers. The majority of current hollow fiber membranes for gas separations are formed from a relatively small class of hydrophobic polymers. As new materials are discovered, it is important that they be processable into asymmetric hollow fibers, a form which allows for maximum productivity with a relatively small unit operation. A process was developed in this work to first systematically characterize novel materials, and then to apply the characterization to hollow fiber formation. The process requires a minimal amount of material, and was validated using a crosslinkable polyimide. A closely related polyimide was used to show the effectiveness of crosslinked asymmetric hollow fiber membranes for the removal of CO2 from natural gas. Fibers were spun using the process described, then crosslinked in the solid state for stabilization against CO2-induced plasticization. Initial studies of the crosslinking reaction revealed that only moderate temperatures (180°C--200°C) are required for stabilization. The crosslinking reaction also happened relatively quickly (less than one hour), making the process reasonable for use in high-speed fiber production. Stability was shown upon exposure to both liquid solvents and high CO2 pressures, and the fibers were shown to be effective separators, maintaining high selectivity and productivity at high pressures over time.

  18. Carbon fiber/reaction-bonded carbide matrix for composite materials - Manufacture and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The processing of self-healing ceramic matrix composites by a short time and low cost process was studied. This process is based on the deposition of fiber dual inter-phases by chemical vapor infiltration and on the densification of the matrix by reactive melt infiltration of silicon. To prevent fibers (ex-PAN carbon fibers) from oxidation in service, a self-healing matrix made of reaction bonded silicon carbide and reaction bonded boron carbide was used. Boron carbide is introduced inside the fiber preform from ceramic suspension whereas silicon carbide is formed by the reaction of liquid silicon with a porous carbon xerogel in the preform. The ceramic matrix composites obtained are near net shape, have a bending stress at failure at room temperature around 300 MPa and have shown their ability to self-healing in oxidizing conditions. (authors)

  19. Manufacture of a weakly denatured collagen fiber scaffold with excellent biocompatibility and space maintenance ability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although collagen scaffolds have been used for regenerative medicine, they have insufficient mechanical strength. We made a weakly denatured collagen fiber scaffold from a collagen fiber suspension (physiological pH 7.4) through a process of freeze drying and denaturation with heat under low pressure (1 × 10−1 Pa). Heat treatment formed cross-links between the collagen fibers, providing the scaffold with sufficient mechanical strength to maintain the space for tissue regeneration in vivo. The scaffold was embedded under the back skin of a rat, and biocompatibility and space maintenance ability were examined after 2 weeks. These were evaluated by using the ratio of foreign body giant cells and thickness of the residual scaffold. A weakly denatured collagen fiber scaffold with moderate biocompatibility and space maintenance ability was made by freezing at −10 °C, followed by denaturation at 140 °C for 6 h. In addition, the direction of the collagen fibers in the scaffold was adjusted by cooling the suspension only from the bottom of the container. This process increased the ratio of cells that infiltrated into the scaffold. A weakly denatured collagen fiber scaffold thus made can be used for tissue regeneration or delivery of cells or proteins to a target site. (paper)

  20. Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - fiber; Roughage; Bulk ... Dietary fiber adds bulk to your diet. Because it makes you feel full faster, it can help with ... Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 213. National Research Council. ... Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and Amino Acids ( ...

  1. Characterization of Potential Exposures to Nanoparticles and Fibers during Manufacturing and Recycling of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polypropylene Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonruksa, Pongsit; Bello, Dhimiter; Zhang, Jinde; Isaacs, Jacqueline A; Mead, Joey L; Woskie, Susan R

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) polymer composites are widely used as raw materials in multiple industries because of their excellent properties. This expansion, however, is accompanied by realistic concerns over potential release of CNTs and associated nanoparticles during the manufacturing, recycling, use, and disposal of CNT composite products. Such data continue to be limited, especially with regards to post-processing of CNT-enabled products, recycling and handling of nanowaste, and end-of-life disposal. This study investigated for the first time airborne nanoparticle and fibers exposures during injection molding and recycling of CNT polypropylene composites (CNT-PP) relative to that of PP. Exposure characterization focused on source emissions during loading, melting, molding, grinding, and recycling of scrap material over 20 cycles and included real-time characterization of total particle number concentration and size distribution, nanoparticle and fiber morphology, and fiber concentrations near the operator. Total airborne nanoparticle concentration emitted during loading, melting, molding, and grinding of CNT-PP had geometric mean ranging from 1.210(3) to 4.310(5) particles cm(-3), with the highest exposures being up to 2.9 and 300.7 times above the background for injection molding and grinding, respectively. Most of these emissions were similar to PP synthesis. Melting and molding of CNT-PP and PP produced exclusively nanoparticles. Grinding of CNT-PP but not PP generated larger particles with encapsulated CNTs, particles with CNT extrusions, and respirable fiber (up to 0.2 fibers cm(-3)). No free CNTs were found in any of the processes. The number of recycling runs had no significant impact on exposures. Further research into the chemical composition of the emitted nanoparticles is warranted. In the meanwhile, exposure controls should be instituted during processing and recycling of CNT-PP. PMID:26447230

  2. Large-Scale Manufacturing of Bulk Metallic Glass Sheets and Fiber Metal Laminates Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Liquidmetal Technologies (LMT) and the University of Southern California (USC)'s M.C. Gill Composites Center team up to develop manufacturing processes for...

  3. Properties of SBS and sisal fiber composites: ecological material for shoe manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Krause de Verney

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide trend toward using cheap, atoxic and durable materials from renewable resources contributes to sustainable development. Thus, the investigation of the potential use of vegetal fibers as reinforcing agent in polymeric composites has gained new significance. Sisal fiber has emerged as a reinforcing material for polymers used in automobile, footwear and civil industries. In this work, properties such as hardness, tensile strength and tear strength of polymer composites composed by block copolymer styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS and 5, 10 and 20% by weight of sisal fiber were evaluated. The influence of conventional polymer processing techniques such as single-screw and double-screw extrusion, as well as the addition of coupling agent on the composite mechanical performance was investigated. Also, the morphology and thermal stability of the composites were analyzed. The addition of 2 wt. (% maleic anhydride as coupling agent between sisal fiber and SBS has improved the composite mechanical performance and the processing in a double-screw extruder has favored the sisal fiber distribution in the SBS matrix.

  4. Recycling of glass fibers from fiberglass polyester waste composite for manufacture glass-ceramic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Maximina Romero; Francisco Jose Alguacil; Olga Rodríguez; Irene García-Díaz; Maria Isabel Martín; Felix Antonio López

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the feasibility of reusing a glass fiber resulting from the thermolysis and gasification of waste composites to obtain glass-ceramic tiles. Polyester fiberglass (PFG) waste was treated at 550℃ for 3 h in a 9.6 dm3 thermolytic reactor. This process yielded an oil (≈24 wt%), a gas (≈8 wt%) and a solid residue (≈68 wt%). After the polymer has been removed, the solid residue is heated in air to oxidize residual char and remove surface contamination. The cleaning fibers were con...

  5. Panels Manufactured from Vegetable Fibers: An Alternative Approach for Controlling Noises in Indoor Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Leopoldo Pacheco Bastos; Gustavo da Silva Vieira de Melo; Newton Sure Soeiro

    2012-01-01

    Noise control devices such as panels and barriers, when of high efficiency, generally are of difficult acquisition due to high costs turning in many cases their use impracticable, mainly for limited budget small-sized companies. There is a huge requirement for new acoustic materials that have satisfactory performance, not only under acoustic aspect but also other relevant ones and are of low cost. Vegetable fibers are an alternative solution when used as panels since they promise satisfactory...

  6. Development of a Fiber Laser Welding Equipment for the LVDT Manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The instrumented fuel irradiation test at a research reactor is needed to evaluate the performance of the developed nuclear fuel. A LVDT(Linear Variable Differential Transformer) can be designed to measure the pressure level and elongation during the irradiation test by using various metals and MI cables. LVDT's parts were composed of MI cables and Inconel 600 materials. Laser welding technology is widely used to fabricate some products of nuclear fuel in the nuclear industry. Especially, micro-welding using Fiber laser is one of the key technologies to be developed to fabricate precise products of fuel irradiation test. We also have to secure micro-welding technology to perform various instrumentations for fuel irradiation test. Micro-welding technology was adopted to seal between seal tubes and MI cables with thickness of 0.15 mm. The soundness of welding area has to be confirmed to prevent fission gas of the fuel from leaking out of the fuel rods during the fuel irradiation test. In this report, fundamental data for welding technology using Fiber laser was proposed to seal Inconel 600 sheaths of LVDT instrumented capsules for the irradiation test. Moreover, It is expected that the use of fuel irradiation tests will be revitalized by the self-development of LVDT's parts using the Fiber laser welding technology

  7. A Comparative in Vitro Study of Power Output Deterioration over Time Between Ho:YAG Laser Fibers from Different Manufacturers as a Function of Deflection and Power Input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdoumis, Andreas; Christopoulos, Panagiotis; Raj, Nirmal; Fedder, Artemis; Buchholz, Noor

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the performance of laser fibers from 6 major manufacturers in vitro and to identify the effect of time and angulations (180° and 0°) on fiber power output. Materials and Methods Overall, 36 single-use fibers were used. Each was tested with an energy input of 0.8, 1.4 and 2.0 Joules. A power detector measured power output after 1, 5, 10 and 15 minutes for three 15-minute cycles of continuous use. For the first 2 cycles, the fiber was bent to 180° with the use of a pre fabricated mould. Analysis of the data was performed by ANOVA and Tukey's test when the results were significant amongst groups. Statistical significance was deemed p < 0.05. Results No fiber fracture occurred. There was no significant difference in output at 15 minutes of continuous use at 0° and 180°. The reduction in energy output at the 15th minute of continuous use at 180° was not significant for any fiber type or initial input. Only output differences between the fibers proved to be significant (p = 0.001). Conclusion Fiber fracture and decline in performance is not due to deflection and continuous use. Frictional forces that occur between the fiber tip and the stone fragments may be responsible. PMID:26989365

  8. Oxidative Activation of Bagasse Fibers Surfaces in Medium Density Fiberboard Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doosthoseini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the investigation of the effects of oxidant type (nitric acid and potassium dichromate, oxidant content (three different levels as 2, 4, and 6 percent and urea- formaldehyde (UF resin percentage (two levels as 5 and 7 percent on mechanical and physical properties of interior grade medium density fiberboard made from bagasse fibers. Some panel properties were studied, such as modulus of rupture (MOR and modulus of elasticity (MOE in bending, compression-shear strength (C.S sth., water absorption (WA and thickness swelling (TS after 2- and 24-hour immersion in cold water. In addition, the results indicated the best values for WA and TS after 2- and 24-hour immersion, and C.S. sth. was discerned at 7 percent UF resin content, together with 6 percent nitric acid. Furthermore, the greatest values for MOR and MOE were related to 7 percent UF resin content together with 4 percent nitric acid.

  9. Production and application of chemical fibers with special properties for manufacturing composite materials and goods of different usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levit, R.

    1993-01-01

    The development of modern technologies demands the creation of new nonmetallic, fibrous materials with specific properties. The fibers and materials developed by NII 'Chimvolokno', St. Petersburg, can be divided into two groups. The first group includes heat-resistant fibers, fire-resistant fibers, thermotropic fibers, fibers for medical application, and textile structures. The second group contains refractory fibers, chemoresistant and antifriction fibers, fibers on the basis of polyvinyl alcohol, microfiltering films, and paperlike and nonwoven materials. In cooperation with NPO 'Chimvolokno' MYTITSHI, we developed and started producing heat-resistant high-strength fibers on the base of polyhetarearilin and aromatic polyimides (SVM and terlon); heat-resistant fibers on the base of polyemede (aramid); fire-retardant fibers (togilen); chemoresistant and antifriction fibers on the basis of homo and copolymers of polytetrafluoroethylene (polyfen and ftorin); and water soluble, acetylated, and high-modulus fibers from polyvinyl alcohol (vylen). Separate reports will deal with textile structures and thermotropic fibers, as well as with medical fibers. One of the groups of refractory fibers carbon fibers (CF) and the corresponding paperlike nonwoven materials are discussed in detail. Also, composite materials (CM) and their base, which is the subject of the author's research since 1968, is discussed.

  10. Polyaniline-nanotube multifunctional fiber: capabilities toward the manufacturing of smart fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottaghitalab, Vahid; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Wallace, Gordon G.

    2004-02-01

    Smart fabrics are those with electronic devices embedded in the material structure. Metallic fibres are not compatible with a comfortable fabric and flexible fibres with electronic capabilities are desired. Polyaniline (PANi) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) show potential for application in different electronic devices such as conductive yarn, sensor, actuator, battery, capacitor and diode. The development of fibres from these materials can be considered as potentially useful for the manufacturing of smart fabric which embedded non metallic electronic devices. This paper describes the influence of CNT addition on the electronic, mechanical of PANi-CNT composite fibre which was fabricated by a wet spinning process. PANi(EB)-nanotube (SWNT, DWNT)- dimethyl propylene urea (DMPU) composite spinning solution have been prepared by an ex-situ process. The size distribution of nanotubes has been characterized by zeta sizer. Furthermore the rheological study has been conducted for optimization of PANi/CNT weight ratio to produce solutions with suitable fluidity for spinning process. In spite of the great impact of nanotubes on the mechanical and electrical properties of PANi composite fibre, the structure of the composite is far from ideal and it can be proposed that by proper ex-situ and in-situ solution preparation and processing techniques further improvements in properties are possible.

  11. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 4.1 Intelligent Manufacturing of Hybrid Carbon-Glass Fiber-Reinforced Composite Wind Turbine Blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janet M Twomey, PhD

    2010-04-30

    EXECUTIVE SUMARY In this subtask, the manufacturability of hybrid carbon-glass fiber-reinforced composite wind turbine blades using Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) was investigated. The objective of this investigation was to study the VARTM process and its parameters to manufacture cost-effective wind turbine blades with no defects (mainly eliminate dry spots and reduce manufacturing time). A 2.5-dimensional model and a 3-dimensional model were developed to simulate mold filling and part curing under different conditions. These conditions included isothermal and non-isothermal filling, curing of the part during and after filling, and placement of injection gates at different locations. Results from this investigation reveal that the process can be simulated and also that manufacturing parameters can be optimized to eliminate dry spot formation and reduce the manufacturing time. Using computer-based models is a cost-effective way to simulate manufacturing of wind turbine blades. The approach taken herein allows the design of the wind blade manufacturing processes without physically running trial-and-error experiments that are expensive and time-consuming; especially for larger blades needed for more demanding environmental conditions. This will benefit the wind energy industry by reducing initial design and manufacturing costs which can later be passed down to consumers and consequently make the wind energy industry more competitive.

  12. Study of the Equivalent Electrical Capacity of a Thermal Insulating Kapok-plaster Material in Frequency Dynamic Regime Established

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoulaye Korka Diallo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The study of heat transfer in frequency dynamic regime established helped define the thermal impedance of the material. The material is a plane wall composed of kapok-plaster with thickness of 0.01 m and a thermal conductivity 0.1 W/mK. The thermal behavior of the studied material is highlighted by showing the influences of heat transfer coefficients and external excitation pulse. L'evolution de la capacity equivalent intérêt Donnée en fonction de la pulsation excitatrice Extérieure. The evolution of the equivalent capacitance is given as a function of the external excitation pulse; the influences of the depth of the material, his diffusivity and heat exchange coefficients are shown.

  13. Carcass Characteristics of Kacang Goats Fed Ration Containing MH-1 Variety of Kapok Seed Meal (Ceiba pentandra, GAERTN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hidjaz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to study the carcass characteristics of Kacang goats fed ration containing kapok seed meal (KSM as a component of the concentrate. The experiment was conducted in two stages. The first stage was to find out the best variety of kapok that will be used in the second experiment; the second stage was to determine the benefits of KSM on carcass characteristics. Twenty-five, 8 months old Kacang goats with initial body weight of 11.71±1.08 kg, were used in this experiment. The animals were housed individually based on completely randomized design (CRD with 5 treatments and 5 replications. The rations were based on forage:concentrate ratio of 50:50 dry matter basis. The ration contained concentrates, with increasing levels of KSM, i.e.: R0 (napier grass + concentrate: rice bran, coconut cake, corn, urea + 0% KSM; R5 (R0 + KSM 5%; R10 (R0 + KSM 10%; R15 (R0 + KSM 15%; and R20 (R0 + KSM 20%. Drinking water was provided ad libitum. The result of first stage showed that KSM variety of MH-1 would be used as a component of the concentrate on the second experiment. The increasing level of KSM in the rations had significant effect (P<0.05 on physical characteristics of the carcass, such as dressing percentage (44.35%, carcass length (54.006 cm, fleshing index (130.59 g/cm, plumpness of leg (87.48%, loin eye area (5.06 cm2, and percentage of carcass meat (64.69%. It is concluded that MH-1 variety of KSM can be used as a feed component up to 20 % in the goat ration.

  14. Optimization of catalyst-free production of biodiesel from Ceiba pentandra (kapok) oil with high free fatty acid contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalyst-free biodiesel production from non-edible Ceiba pentandra (kapok) oil via supercritical methanol transesterification was demonstrated in this work. The supercritical transesterification experiments were performed in a batch reactor at temperatures of 250–350 °C, pressures of 10–18 MPa, reaction times of 120–600 s, and methanol to oil molar ratios of 15:1–35:1. Response surface methodology (RSM) and four-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were applied for the design and optimization of the experiments with respect to temperature, pressure, reaction time, and molar ratio of methanol to oil simultaneously. The response (i.e., FAME yield) was fitted by a quadratic polynomial regression model using least square analysis in a five-level-four-factor central composite design (CCD). The optimum conditions were found as follows: methanol to oil molar ratio of 30:1, temperature of 322 °C, pressure of 16.7 MPa, and reaction time of 476 s with FAME (fatty acid methyl ester) yield of 95.5%. The significance of the reaction parameters toward FAME yield was in the order of methanol to oil molar ratio > reaction time > pressure > temperature. - Highlights: • Transesterification of non-edible kapok oil into biodiesel via a non-catalytic route. • Methanol to oil molar ratio, temperature, pressure, and reaction time were optimized. • Experimental design in a five-level-four-factor central composite design. • Application of quadratic polynomial model for fitting the response (FAME yield)

  15. Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more fiber. Spice up salads with berries and almonds, chickpeas, cooked artichokes, and beans (kidney, black, navy, or pinto). Use whole-grain (corn or whole wheat) soft-taco shells or tortillas to make burritos or wraps. Fill ...

  16. ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS LIGNIN DERIVED FROM CORN STOVER AS AN INTRINSTIC BINDER FOR BIO-COMPOSITES MANUFACTURE: EFFECT OF FIBER MOISTURE CONTENT AND PRESSING TEMPERATURE ON BOARDS’ PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanben Du

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Binderless fiberboards from enzymatic hydrolysis lignin (EHL and cotton stalk fibers were prepared under various manufacturing conditions, and their physico-mechanical properties were evaluated. Full factorial experimental design was used to assess the effect of fiber moisture content and pressing temperature on boards’ properties. In addition, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC was used to obtain the glass transition temperature (Tg of EHL. We found that both fiber moisture content and pressing temperature had significant effects on binderless fiberboards’ properties. High fiber moisture content and pressing temperature are suggested to contribute to the self-bonding improvement among fibers with lignin-rich surface mainly by thermal softening enzymatic hydrolysis lignin. In this experiment, the optimized pressing temperature applied in binderless fiberboard production should be as high as 190°C in accordance with the EHL Tg value of 189.4°C, and the fiber moisture content should be limited to less than 20% with a higher board density of 950 kg/m3 to avoid the delamination of boards during hot pressing.

  17. Study of Heat Transfer in a Kapok Material from the Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient and the Excitation Pulse of Solicitations External Climatic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dieng

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to characterize thermal insulating local material, kapok, from a study in 3 dimensions in Cartesian coordinate and in dynamic frequency regime. From a study a 3 dimensional the heat transfer through a material made of wool kapok (thermal conductivity: &lambda = 0,035 W/m/K; density: &rho = 12, 35 kg/m3; thermal diffusivity: &alpha = 17, 1.10-7 m2 /s is presented. The evolution curves of temperature versus convective heat transfer coefficient have helped highlight the importance of pulse excitation and the depth in the material. The thermal impedance is studied from representations of Nyquist and Bode diagrams allowing characterizing the thermal behavior from thermistors. The evolution of the thermal impedance with the thermal capacity of the material is presented.

  18. Evaluation of the chemical composition of different non-woody plant fibers used for pulp and paper manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Marques, Gisela; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutirrez Surez, Ana; Ro Andrade, Jos Carlos del

    2010-01-01

    The chemical composition of several non-woody plant fibers (bast fibers from flax, hemp, kenaf, jute; leaf fibers from sisal, abaca and curaua; and giant reed), which are used as raw materials for pulp and papermaking, has been evaluated. Particular attention was paid to the composition of the lipophilic compounds and the structure of the lignin polymer since they are important components of the fiber that strongly influence the pulping and bleaching performances.

  19. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Ti-TiB Based Short-Fiber Composite Materials Manufactured by Casting and Subjected to Deformation Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaisin, R. A.; Imayev, V. M.; Imayev, R. M.; Gaisina, É. R.

    2015-10-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-TiB based short-fiber composite materials manufactured by casting and subjected to deformation processing are investigated. Commercially pure VT1-0 titanium and two-phase VT8 alloys are used for matrix alloys. It is established that the short-fiber composite materials comprising about 10 vol.% of titanium monoboride can be successfully prepared by conventional casting. Regimes of deformation processing of the composite materials providing reorientation of titanium monoboride fibers with retention of a high length-to-diameter ratio are developed. The composite materials after deformation processing demonstrate higher strength characteristics and, as demonstrated for the VT8 based composite, high-temperature strength compared to the matrix material without a radical reduction of ductility.

  20. Natural fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural fibers have been used to reinforce materials for over 3,000 years. More recently they have been employed in combination with plastics. Many types of natural fi fibers have been investigated for use in plastics including Flax, hemp, jute, straw, wood fiber, rice husks, wheat, barley, oats, rye, cane (sugar and bamboo), grass reeds, kenaf, ramie, oil palm empty fruit bunch, sisal, coir, water hyacinth, pennywort, kapok, paper-mulberry, raphia, banana fiber, pineapple leaf fiber and papyrus. Natural fibers have the advantage that they are renewable resources and have marketing appeal. The Asian markets have been using natural fibers for many years e.g., jute is a common reinforcement in India. Natural fibers are increasingly used in automotive and packaging materials. Pakistan is an agricultural country and it is the main stay of Pakistan's economy. Thousands of tons of different crops are produced but most of their wastes do not have any useful utilization. Agricultural wastes include wheat husk, rice husk, and their straw, hemp fiber and shells of various dry fruits. These agricultural wastes can be used to prepare fiber reinforced polymer composites for commercial use. This report examines the different types of fibers available and the current status of research. Many references to the latest work on properties, processing and application have been cited in this review. (author)

  1. Development of manufacturing process for large-diameter composite monofilaments by pyrolysis of resin-impregnated carbon-fiber bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, W. G.; Pinoli, P. C.; Vidoz, A. E.

    1972-01-01

    Large diameter, carbon-carbon composite, monofilaments were produced from the pyrolysis of organic precursor resins reinforced with high-strenght carbon fibers. The mechanical properties were measured before and after pyrolysis and the results were correlated with the properties of the constituents. The composite resulting from the combination of Thornel 75 and GW-173 resin precursor produced the highest tensile strength. The importance of matching strain-to-failure of fibers and matrix to obtain all the potential reinforcement of fibers is discussed. Methods are described to reduce, within the carbonaceous matrix, pyrolysis flaws which tend to reduce the composite strength. Preliminary studies are described which demonstrated the feasibility of fiber-matrix copyrolysis to alleviate matrix cracking and provide an improved matrix-fiber interfacial bonding.

  2. Biodiesel Production from Kapok (Ceiba pentandra Seed Oil using Naturally Alkaline Catalyst as an Effort of Green Energy and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Handayani

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, energy that used to serve all the needs of community, mainly generated from fossil (conventional energy. Terrace in energy consumption is not balanced with adequate fossil fuel reserves and will be totally depleted in the near future. Indonesian Government through a Presidential Decree No. 5 year 2006 mandates an increased capacity in renewable energy production from 5 percent to 15 percent in 2025. C. pentandra seed oil has feasibility as a sustainable biodiesel feedstock in Indonesia. The aim of this paper was to investigate biodiesel production from ceiba petandra seed oil using naturally potassium hydroxide catalyst. Research designs are based on factorial design with 2 levels and 3 independent variables (temperature, reaction time and molar ratio of methanol to oil. According to data calculation, the most influential single variable is molar ratio of methanol to oil. Characterization of biodiesel products meet all the qualifications standardized by SNI 04-7182-2006. Keywords: biodiesel, kapok seed oil, c. pentandra, green technology

  3. Chemical characterization of lignin and lipid fractions in industrial hemp bast fibers used for manufacturing high-quality paper pulps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutirrez, Ana; Rodrguez, Isabel M; del Ro, Jos C

    2006-03-22

    The chemical composition of lignin and lipids of bast fibers from industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa) used for high-quality paper pulp production was studied. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) of fibers showed a lignin with a p-hydroxyphenyl:guaiacyl:syringyl unit (H:G:S) molar proportion of 13:53:34 (S/G ratio of 0.64). p-Hydroxycinnamic acids, namely, p-coumaric and ferulic acids, were found in only trace amounts. Among the lipids, the main compounds identified by GC/MS of the hemp fibers extracts were series of n-alkanes, free and esterified sterols and triterpenols, waxes, and long-chain n-fatty acids. Other compounds such as n-aldehydes, n-fatty alcohols, steroid hydrocarbons, and steroid and triterpenoid ketones as well as steryl glycosides were also found. PMID:16536588

  4. Chemical characterization of lignin and lipid fractions in industrial hemp bast fibers used for manufacturing high-quality paper pulps

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez Suárez, Ana; Rodríguez García, María Isabel; Río Andrade, José Carlos del

    2006-01-01

    The chemical composition of lignin and lipids of bast fibers from industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa) used for high-quality paper pulp production was studied. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) of fibers showed a lignin with a p-hydroxyphenyl:guaiacyl:syringyl unit (H: G:S) molar proportion of 13:53:34 (S/G ratio of 0.64). p-Hydroxycinnamic acids, namely, p-coumaric and ferulic acids, were found in only trace amounts. Among the lipids, the main compounds identified by ...

  5. Effects of manufactured soluble dietary fiber from Quercus mongolica on hepatic HMG-CoA reductase and lipoprotein lipase activities in epididymal adipose tissue of rats fed high cholesterol diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Young-Mi; Lim, Bu-Kug; Lee, Jong-Yoon; Kim, Mu-Nam; Park, Mo-Ra; Rhee, Soon-Jae

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of a manufactured soluble dietary fiber on lipid metabolism in rats fed high cholesterol diets. Soluble dietary fiber was prepared from wood chips of oak (Quercus mongolica). Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 100 +/- 10 g were randomly assigned to either a normal diet or five high cholesterol diets containing 1% cholesterol and different fiber supplements. The high cholesterol groups were subdivided into fiber-free diet (FF), 5% pectin (5P), 10% pectin (10P), 5% manufactured soluble dietary fiber (5QM), and 10% manufactured soluble dietary fiber (10QM) groups. Total serum cholesterol concentrations in all soluble dietary fiber-supplemented groups were lower than in the FF group. The high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration in the FF group was significantly lower, compared with the normal group, but was increased in groups supplemented with soluble dietary fiber. Low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels and the atherogenic index had the same tendency as total cholesterol concentration. Compared with the FF group, in the 5P, 5QM, 10P, and 10QM groups hepatic triglyceride concentrations were 12%, 16%, 20%, and 24% lower, respectively, and hepatic cholesterol concentrations were 48%, 52%, 52%, and 58% lower, respectively. Hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity in the soluble fiber groups was significantly higher than in the FF groups, but lower than the normal group. When hepatic tissue was observed under a light microscope, the FF group had completely formed lipomas in the hepatic tissue, which led to fat deposits and then a fatty liver. The size and number of lipomas were lower in the soluble dietary fiber-fed groups, as compared with the group not fed dietary fiber. In conclusion, improvements in lipid metabolism were observed as a result of the manufactured soluble dietary fiber from the oak chips, and were similar to that seen for pectin. The preparation method for the soluble dietary fiber from oak chips successfully produced a functional soluble fiber. PMID:14977441

  6. Chemical characterization of pitch deposits produced in the manufacturing of high-quality paper pulps from hemp fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez Suárez, Ana; Río Andrade, José Carlos del

    2005-01-01

    The composition of pitch deposits occurring in pulp sheets and mill circuits during soda/anthraquinone pulping and elemental chlorine-free pulp bleaching of bast fibers of industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa) has been studied. Pitch deposits were extracted with acetone, and the extracts analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Acetone extracts (15-25% of pitch deposits) were constituted by the defoamers used at the mill and by lipophilic extractives f...

  7. Synthesis of SnO2-activated carbon fiber hybrid catalyst for the removal of methyl violet from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A new biomass route for the synthesis of SnO2/ACF hybrid catalyst was proposed. • The original fibrous structure of kapok fiber was retained in the SnO2/ACF hybrid catalyst. • SnO2/ACF hybrid catalyst exhibited high BET surface area (647–897 m2/g) and large pore volume (0.36–0.56 cm3 g−1). • High microwave-induced catalytic activity for methyl violet degradation was obtained. - Abstract: SnO2/activated carbon fiber (ACF) hybrid catalyst was synthesized from kapok precursor via a two-step process involving pore-fabricating and self-assembly of SnO2 nanoparticles. The morphology and phase structure of the obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm. These results demonstrated that the synthesized SnO2/ACF retained the hollow-fiber structure of kapok fibers. SnO2 nanoparticles dispersed uniformly over the ACF support. The obtained hybrid catalyst showed porous structure with high surface area (647–897 m2/g) and large pore volume (0.36–0.56 cm3 g−1). In addition, the catalytic activities of the obtained samples for methyl violet degradation under microwave irradiation were also evaluated. It was found that the SnO2/ACF catalyst exhibited high catalytic activity for methyl violet degradation due to the synergistic effect of microwave and SnO2/ACF catalyst

  8. Three-dimensional architecture of lithium-anodes made from graphite fibers coated with thin-films of silicon oxycarbide: Design, performance and manufacturability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Ibrahim; Raj, Rishi

    2016-04-01

    Silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) is an amorphous molecular network of Sisbnd Csbnd O tetrahedra anchored to graphene-like carbon. The graphene forms a three dimensional cellular network with a domain size of ∼5 nm. Therefore nanometer thick films of SiCO grown on graphite may be expected to have unusual behavior. We grow these films on a bed of commercially available graphite fibers that serve the dual function of a current collector. The electrochemical behavior of the composite is measured as a function of the thickness of the SiCO films. Thick films approach the typical behavior of bulk SiCO (which has three times the capacity of graphite, but suffers from poor first cycle efficiency). However, films, approximately 100 nm thick, show high first cycle efficiency as well as high capacity. The composite performs better than the prediction from the rule-of-mixtures, which further substantiates the unusual behavior of the thin-film architecture. The Raman spectra of these thin films also differ from bulk SiCO. The development of thin graphite fibers, with a high surface to volume ratio that have the same capacity as the current graphite-powder technology, coupled with manufacturing of these thin-films by a liquid-polymer precursor based process, can propel these results toward commercialization.

  9. Fireblocking Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    PBI was originally developed for space suits. In 1980, the need for an alternative to asbestos and stricter government anti-pollution standards led to commercialization of the fire blocking fiber. PBI is used for auto racing driver suits and aircraft seat covers. The fiber does not burn in air, is durable and easily maintained. It has been specified by a number of airliners and is manufactured by Hoechst-Celanese Corporation.

  10. Fiber Singular Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Volyar

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The present review is devoted to the optical vortex behavior both in free space and optical fibers. The processes of the vortex transformations in perturbed optical fibers are analyzed on the base of the operator of the spin – orbit interaction in order to forecast the possible ways of manufacturing the vortex preserving fibers and their applications in supersensitive optical devices.

  11. The Fiber Optic Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the fiber optics programs at the Career and Technical Center in Berlin, Pennsylvania and the Charles S. Monroe Technology Center in Loudoun County, Virginia. Discusses the involvement of the Fiber Optic Association with education, research and development, manufacturing, sales, distribution, installation, and maintenance of fiber optic

  12. Fiber Singular Optics

    OpenAIRE

    A.V. Volyar

    2002-01-01

    The present review is devoted to the optical vortex behavior both in free space and optical fibers. The processes of the vortex transformations in perturbed optical fibers are analyzed on the base of the operator of the spin – orbit interaction in order to forecast the possible ways of manufacturing the vortex preserving fibers and their applications in supersensitive optical devices.

  13. Manufacturing Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Susan

    2007-01-01

    According to the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), "manufacturing is the engine that drives American prosperity". When NAM and its research and education arm, The Manufacturing Institute, released the handbook, "The Facts About Modern Manufacturing," in October 2006, NAM President John Engler noted, that manufacturing output in America…

  14. Miniature Spinning Enzyme-Retted Flax Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibers from flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) are stiff and strong and can be blended with other short staple fibers, such as cotton (Gossypium barbadense L. or Gossypium hirsutum L.), processed into a yarn and then manufactured into a fabric. Manufacturing yarns with natural flax fibers has traditional...

  15. Airclad fiber laser technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes; Mattsson, Kent; Nielsen, Martin D.; Nikolajsen, Thomas; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.; Srensen, Mads Hoy; Denninger, Mark; Jakobsen, Christian; Simonsen, Harald R.

    2008-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last five years, and many of the traditional manufactures of gas and solid-state lasers are pursuing the attractive fiber-based systems, which are now displacing the old technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser...... systems require specially designed fibers with large cores and good power handling capabilities - requirements that are all met by the airclad fiber technology. In the present paper we go through many of the building blocks needed to build high-power systems and we show an example of a complete airclad...... laser system. We present the latest advancements within airclad fiber technology including a new 70 ?m single-mode polarization-maintaining rod-type fiber capable of amplifying to MW power levels. Furthermore we describe the novel airclad based pump combiners and their use in a completely monolithic 350...

  16. Electrohydrodynamic Printing and Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor); Poon, Hak Fei (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-hua (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An stable electrohydrodynamic filament is obtained by causing a straight electrohydrodynamic filament formed from a liquid to emerge from a Taylor cone, the filament having a diameter of from 10 nm to 100.mu.m. Such filaments are useful in electrohydrodynamic printing and manufacturing techniques and their application in liquid drop/particle and fiber production, colloidal deployment and assembly, and composite materials processing.

  17. Airclad fiber laser technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes; Noordegraaf, Danny; Maack, Martin D.; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Laurila, Marko; Nikolajsen, Thomas; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.; Sørensen, Mads Hoy; Denninger, Mark; Jakobsen, Christian; Simonsen, Harald R.

    2011-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last 5 years. Many of the traditional manufacturers of gas and solid-state lasers are now pursuing the fiber-based systems, which are displacing the conventional technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser systems ...... monolithic 350 W cw fiber laser system with an M2 of less than 1.1. © 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).......High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last 5 years. Many of the traditional manufacturers of gas and solid-state lasers are now pursuing the fiber-based systems, which are displacing the conventional technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser systems...... laser system. We present the latest advancements within airclad fiber technology including a new 100 m single-mode polarization-maintaining rod-type fiber capable of amplifying to megawatt power levels. Furthermore, we describe the novel airclad-based pump combiners and their use in a completely...

  18. MANUFACTURING SIMULATORS

    OpenAIRE

    P.S. Kruger; C.S.L. Schutte

    2012-01-01

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Simulation modelling has been identified as one of the most powerful techniques available for the analysis and design of complex manufacturing systems. A number of manufacturing simulators have been designed in an effort to make it easier to use the simulation approach in the manufacturing environment. This paper will attempt to describe and ~valuate the characteristics of some of the available manufacturing simulators as well as possible ways to alleviate some of t...

  19. Fiber Lasers V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes; Mattsson, Kent; Nikolajsen, Thomas; Nielsen, Martin D.; Skovgaard, Peter M.W.; Sørensen, Mads Hoy; Denninger, Mark; Jakobsen, Christian; Simonsen, Harald R.

    2008-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last five years, and many of the traditional manufactures of gas and solid-state lasers are pursuing the attractive fiber-based systems, which are now displacing the old technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser...... laser system. We present the latest advancements within airclad fiber technology including a new 70 μm single-mode polarization-maintaining rod-type fiber capable of amplifying to MW power levels. Furthermore we describe the novel airclad based pump combiners and their use in a completely monolithic 350...... W CW fiber laser system with an M2 of less than 1.1. Finally, we briefly touch upon the subject of photo darkening and its origin....

  20. Airclad fiber laser technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim P.; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Broeng, Jes; Mattsson, Kent; Nielsen, Martin D.; Nikolajsen, Thomas; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.; Sørensen, Mads Hoy; Denninger, Mark; Jakobsen, Christian; Simonsen, Harald R.

    2008-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers and amplifiers have gained tremendous momentum in the last five years, and many of the traditional manufactures of gas and solid-state lasers are pursuing the attractive fiber-based systems, which are now displacing the old technology in many areas. High-power fiber laser...... laser system. We present the latest advancements within airclad fiber technology including a new 70 μm single-mode polarization-maintaining rod-type fiber capable of amplifying to MW power levels. Furthermore we describe the novel airclad based pump combiners and their use in a completely monolithic 350...... W CW fiber laser system with an M2 of less than 1.1. Finally, we briefly touch upon the subject of photo darkening and its origin....

  1. Precision manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Dornfeld, David

    2008-01-01

    Today there is a high demand for high-precision products. The manufacturing processes are now highly sophisticated and derive from a specialized genre called precision engineering. Precision Manufacturing provides an introduction to precision engineering and manufacturing with an emphasis on the design and performance of precision machines and machine tools, metrology, tooling elements, machine structures, sources of error, precision machining processes and precision process planning. As well as discussing the critical role precision machine design for manufacturing has had in technological developments over the last few hundred years. In addition, the influence of sustainable manufacturing requirements in precision processes is introduced. Drawing upon years of practical experience and using numerous examples and illustrative applications, David Dornfeld and Dae-Eun Lee cover precision manufacturing as it applies to: The importance of measurement and metrology in the context of Precision Manufacturing. Th...

  2. Using a Fiber Loop and Fiber Bragg Grating as a Fiber Optic Sensor to Simultaneously Measure Temperature and Displacement

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu-Chih Cheng; Yue-Shiun Wu; Chih-Ta Yen; Yao-Tang Chang

    2013-01-01

    This study integrated a fiber loop manufactured by using commercial fiber (SMF-28, Corning) and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) to form a fiber optic sensor that could simultaneously measure displacement and temperature. The fiber loop was placed in a thermoelectric cooling module with FBG affixed to the module, and, consequently, the center wavelength displacement of FBG was limited by only the effects of temperature change. Displacement and temperature were determined by measuring changes in th...

  3. Novel sensor and telecommunication applications of photonic crystal fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Ritari, Tuomo

    2006-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibers are novel optical waveguides containing a periodic array of air holes running along the fiber around a solid or hollow core. These fibers have recently attracted great interest in many research areas such as in nonlinear optics and measurement science as their manufacturing process allows for a high flexibility in the fiber design. Index-guiding photonic crystal fibers are commonly referred to as microstructured fibers whereas hollow-core photonic crystal fibers which ...

  4. Silica glass optical fibers. Sekiei kei hikari fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, K. (Furukawa Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Yokohama Lab.)

    1990-07-05

    A report is made on the structure, materials, basic characteristics and method of production of silica glass optical fibers for optical communication already put to practical use, as well as on recent optical fiber having new structures. Silica fiber consists of the core and clad made of silica glass, and various kinds of silica glasses are used for making the fibers. Standard transmission characteristics, structural dimensions, applications, etc. of the silica glass optical fibers are shown. The manufacturing processes of silica glass optical fibers can be divided into base material production process and drawing process for making the base material in fiber form, and there are 4 types of manufacturing methods. Optical fiber whose zero dispersion wave length is transferred near 1.55 {mu} m is called a dispersion shift single mode optical fiber, which can be used for large capacity and long distance transmission. Entire fluroine doped shift single mode optical fiber and hermetically coated optical fiber whose water resistance and hydrogen resistance are markedly improved are also outlined. 4 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Green insulation: hemp fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2011-09-15

    Indian hemp (Cannabis indica) is known for its psychotropic values and it is banned in most countries. However, industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa) is known for its tough fibers. Several manufactures in Europe including, small niche players, have been marketing hemp insulation products for several years. Hemp is a low environmental impact material. Neither herbicide nor pesticide is used during the growth of hemp. The fibers are extracted in a waste-free and chemical-free mechanical process. Hemp can consume CO2 during its growth. In addition, hemp fiber can be disposed of harmlessly by composting or incineration at the end of its life. Hemp fibers are processed and treated only minimally to resist rot and fungal activity. There is little health risk when producing and installing the insulation, thanks to the absence of toxic additive. Its thermal resistance is comparable to mineral wool. But the development and marketing of hemp fibers may be restricted in North America.

  6. Agave Americana Leaf Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Hulle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing environmental problems, the problem of waste disposal and the depletion of non-renewable resources have stimulated the use of green materials compatible with the environment to reduce environmental impacts. Therefore, there is a need to design products by using natural resources. Natural fibers seem to be a good alternative since they are abundantly available and there are a number of possibilities to use all the components of a fiber-yielding crop; one such fiber-yielding plant is Agave Americana. The leaves of this plant yield fibers and all the parts of this plant can be utilized in many applications. The “zero-waste” utilization of the plant would enable its production and processing to be translated into a viable and sustainable industry. Agave Americana fibers are characterized by low density, high tenacity and high moisture absorbency in comparison with other leaf fibers. These fibers are long and biodegradable. Therefore, we can look this fiber as a sustainable resource for manufacturing and technical applications. Detailed discussion is carried out on extraction, characterization and applications of Agave Americana fiber in this paper.

  7. Manufacturing technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is an integral part of Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California. Our Center is at the core of Sandia`s Advanced Manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process.

  8. Polyolefin fiber-reinforced concrete enhanced with steel-hooked fibers in low proportions

    OpenAIRE

    Alberti, M.G.; Enfedaque Diaz, Alejandro; Glvez Ruz, Jaime; Cnovas, M. F.; Osorio, I.R.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few years, polyolefin fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete has shown high performance in both fresh and hardened state. Its fracture behavior for small deformations could be enhanced with a small amount of steel-hooked fibers, obtaining a hybrid fiber-reinforced concrete well suited for structural use. Four types of conventional fiber-reinforced concrete with steel and polyolefin fibers were produced on the basis of the same self-compacting concrete also manufactured as ref...

  9. Feasible Workspace for Robotic Fiber Placement

    OpenAIRE

    Moutran, Serge Riad

    2002-01-01

    Online consolidation fiber placement is emerging as an automated manufacturing process for the fabrication of large composite material complex structures. While traditional composite manufacturing techniques limited the productsâ size, geometrical shapes and laminate patterns, robotic automation of the fiber placement process allows the manufacture of complex bodies with any desired surface pattern or towpregâ s direction. Therefore, a complete understanding of the robot kinematic capabili...

  10. Smart Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jim; Edgar, Thomas; Graybill, Robert; Korambath, Prakashan; Schott, Brian; Swink, Denise; Wang, Jianwu; Wetzel, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Historic manufacturing enterprises based on vertically optimized companies, practices, market share, and competitiveness are giving way to enterprises that are responsive across an entire value chain to demand dynamic markets and customized product value adds; increased expectations for environmental sustainability, reduced energy usage, and zero incidents; and faster technology and product adoption. Agile innovation and manufacturing combined with radically increased productivity become engines for competitiveness and reinvestment, not simply for decreased cost. A focus on agility, productivity, energy, and environmental sustainability produces opportunities that are far beyond reducing market volatility. Agility directly impacts innovation, time-to-market, and faster, broader exploration of the trade space. These changes, the forces driving them, and new network-based information technologies offering unprecedented insights and analysis are motivating the advent of smart manufacturing and new information technology infrastructure for manufacturing. PMID:25898070

  11. Micro Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturing deals with systems that include products, processes, materials and production systems. These systems have functional requirements, constraints, design parameters and process variables. They must be decomposed in a systematic manner to achieve the best possible system performance. If a...... micro manufacturing system isn’t designed rationally and correctly, it will be high-cost, unreliable, and not robust. For micro products and systems it is a continuously increasing challenge to create the operational basis for an industrial production. As the products through product development...... processes are made applicable to a large number of customers, the pressure in regard to developing production technologies that make it possible to produce the products at a reasonable price and in large numbers is growing. The micro/nano manufacturing programme at the Department of Manufacturing...

  12. Manufacturing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Contractor's work for Lewis Research Center on "thermal barrier" coatings designed to improve aircraft engine efficiency resulted in two related but separate spinoffs. The Materials and Manufacturing Technology Center of TRW, Inc. invented a robotic system for applying the coating, and in the course of that research found it necessary to develop a new, extremely accurate type of optical gage that offers multiple improvements in controlling the quality of certain manufactured parts.

  13. 78 FR 16247 - Approval for Export-Only Manufacturing Authority, Foreign-Trade Zone 203, SGL Automotive Carbon...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... Automotive Carbon Fibers, LLC, (Carbon Fiber Manufacturing), Moses Lake, Washington Pursuant to its authority... requested export-only manufacturing authority on behalf of SGL Automotive Carbon Fibers, LLC, within FTZ 203... within FTZ 203-Site 3, on behalf of SGL Automotive Carbon Fibers, LLC, as described in the...

  14. Preliminary characterization of glass fiber sizing

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Kusano, Yukihiro; Brøndsted, Povl; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2013-01-01

    Glass fiber surfaces are treated with sizing during manufacturing. Sizing consists of several components, including a film former and a silane coupling agent that is important for adhesion between glass fibers and a matrix. Although the sizing highly affects the composite interface and thus the strength of the composites, little is known about the structure and chemistry of the sizing. A part of sizing was extracted by soxhlet extraction. The fibers were subsequently burned and some fibers we...

  15. Study of fiber optics standardization, reliability, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The use of fiber optics in space applications is investigated. Manufacturers and users detailed the problems they were having with the use or manufacture of fiber optic components. The general consensus of all the companies/agencies interviewed is that fiber optics is a maturing technology and will definitely have a place in future NASA system designs. The use of fiber optics was found to have two main advantages - weight savings and increased bandwidth.

  16. Computing fibers: A novel fiber for intelligent fabrics?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemens, F.; Wegmann, M.; Graule, T. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA), Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Mathewson, A.; Healy, T.; Donnelly, J. [National Microelectronic Research Center (NMRC), Cork (Ireland); Ullsperger, A.; Hartmann, W. [Klaus Steilmann Institut, D-44866 Bochum (Germany); Papadas, C. [ISD, GR-815233 Athens (Greece)

    2003-09-01

    This communication describes a possible path for transition from a wearable computer to a fiber computer in which digital processing power is integrated directly into textiles via circuits on individual fibers. Three different classes of computing fiber substrate (active, passive, and intermediate) are discussed and some technologies for their manufacture are reviewed. It is shown here that with two of these techniques it is possible to develop new substrates for the semiconductor industry. Using an silicon-on-insulator (SOI) process, polycrystalline silicon fibers with a length of 42 mm have been successfully produced at NMRC in Ireland. These fibers are 35 {mu}m wide and 1 {mu}m thick. Silicon carbide (SiC) and silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) endless fibers (subsequently cut in to 20 cm lengths) have also been produced by extrusion. After sintering, this method yielded polycrystalline SiC fibers and pure amorphous SiO{sub 2} glass fibers. For many future applications, fiber computing appears to be a possible key to success. The computing power offered by such fibers may be combined with additional in- and output functions by weaving fiber-based sensors and piezoelectric materials into textiles. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Manufacturing and properties of aramid-reinforced composites

    OpenAIRE

    Denchev, Z.; Dencheva, Nadya Vasileva

    2012-01-01

    The functional properties of the aramid-reinforced polymer composites depend primarily on the properties of the aramid reinforcing fibers, since the fraction of the fiber constituent in FRP is quite high, usually well above 30% by volume. The properties of the aramid fibers, in turn, depend on their chemical composition and manufacturing conditions: both of these determine the fibers physical structure and mechanical properties. The chapter will focus on these issues. Some specific proble...

  18. 77 FR 69435 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status and Partial Approval of Manufacturing Authority; Toho Tenax...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    ... Authority; Toho Tenax America, Inc. (Oxidized Polyacrylonitrile Fiber and Carbon Fiber), Rockwood, TN... polyacrylonitrile fiber (OPF) and carbon fiber manufacturing and distribution facilities of Toho Tenax America, Inc... carbon fiber for export; and Whereas, at this time, the Board is unable to approve authority...

  19. Manufacturing Today

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Curated by Cristina Ricupero and Will Bradley 'Manufacturing Today' is conceived as a five year research project and exhibition based in Norway but created, in collaboration between art academies in Norway, Finland, Lithuania and the UK. This research is publicly manifested in formal workshop sessions, a symposium, a publication, an exhibition and a series of commissions, all in an effort to address the question of how art and art education might resist instrumentalisation by the art mark...

  20. 76 FR 1599 - Foreign-Trade Zone 203-Moses Lake, Washington; Application for Manufacturing Authority, SGL...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-11

    ... Authority, SGL Automotive Carbon Fibers, LLC, (Carbon Fiber Manufacturing), Moses Lake, WA An application... Carbon Fibers, LLC (SGL Automotive), located in Moses Lake, Washington. The application was submitted... of carbon fiber, all of which will be exported for the exclusive use of BMW Group in its new...

  1. Green Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patten, John

    2013-12-31

    Green Manufacturing Initiative (GMI): The initiative provides a conduit between the university and industry to facilitate cooperative research programs of mutual interest to support green (sustainable) goals and efforts. In addition to the operational savings that greener practices can bring, emerging market demands and governmental regulations are making the move to sustainable manufacturing a necessity for success. The funding supports collaborative activities among universities such as the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Purdue University and among 40 companies to enhance economic and workforce development and provide the potential of technology transfer. WMU participants in the GMI activities included 20 faculty, over 25 students and many staff from across the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences; the College of Arts and Sciences' departments of Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Geology; the College of Business; the Environmental Research Institute; and the Environmental Studies Program. Many outside organizations also contribute to the GMI's success, including Southwest Michigan First; The Right Place of Grand Rapids, MI; Michigan Department of Environmental Quality; the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth; and the Michigan Manufacturers Technical Center.

  2. Fiber coupler end face wavefront surface metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compertore, David C.; Ignatovich, Filipp V.; Marcus, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Despite significant technological advances in the field of fiber optic communications, one area remains surprisingly `low-tech': fiber termination. In many instances it involves manual labor and subjective visual inspection. At the same time, high quality fiber connections are one of the most critical parameters in constructing an efficient communication link. The shape and finish of the fiber end faces determines the efficiency of a connection comprised of coupled fiber end faces. The importance of fiber end face quality becomes even more critical for fiber connection arrays and for in the field applications. In this article we propose and demonstrate a quantitative inspection method for the fiber connectors using reflected wavefront technology. The manufactured and polished fiber tip is illuminated by a collimated light from a microscope objective. The reflected light is collected by the objective and is directed to a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. A set of lenses is used to create the image of the fiber tip on the surface of the sensor. The wavefront is analyzed by the sensor, and the measured parameters are used to obtain surface properties of the fiber tip, and estimate connection loss. For example, defocus components in the reflected light indicate the presence of bow in the fiber end face. This inspection method provides a contact-free approach for quantitative inspection of fiber end faces and for estimating the connection loss, and can potentially be integrated into a feedback system for automated inspection and polishing of fiber tips and fiber tip arrays.

  3. Investigation of the photosensitivity, temperature sustainability and fluorescence characteristics of several Er-doped photosensitive fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Y.H.; Pal, S.; Mandal, J; Sun, T; K. T. V. Grattan; Wade, S. A.; Collins, Stephen F.; Baxter, Gregory; Dussardier, Bernard; Monnom, Gérard

    2004-01-01

    Three different types of Er doped photosensitive fibers, germanium/erbium (Ge/Er) fiber, tin/germanium/erbium fiber (Sn/Er) and antimony/germanium/erbium fiber (Sb/Er) have been manufactured and studied for use in optical sensor systems. Their characteristics of photosensitivity, the temperature sustainability of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) written into these fibers and the fluorescence emission from the Er dopant were investigated and compared. It has been shown in this work that these fiber...

  4. Photosensitivity, chemical composition gratings and optical fiber based components

    OpenAIRE

    Fokine, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The different topics of this thesis include high-temperaturestable fiber Bragg gratings, photosensitivity and fiber basedcomponents. Fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) are wavelength dispersiverefractive index structures manufactured through UV exposure ofoptical fibers. Their applications range from WDM filters,dispersion compensators and fiber laser resonators fortelecommunication applications to different types of point ordistributed sensors for a variety of applications. One aim of this thesis ha...

  5. Small Business Innovations (Fiber Optics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Foster-Miller, Inc. Waltham, MA developed the In-Situ Fiber Optic Polymer Reaction Monitor which could lead to higher yields and lower costs in complex composite manufacturing. The monitor, developed under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with Langley Research Center, uses an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. It is the first analytical system capable of directly measuring the chemistry of advanced composite materials.

  6. Influence of fiber type, fiber mat orientation, and process time on the properties of a wood fiber/polymer composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plackett, David; Torgilsson, R.; Løgstrup Andersen, T.

    2002-01-01

    A rapid press consolidation technique was used to produce composites from two types of air-laid wood fiber mat, incorporating either mechanically refined or bleached chemi-thermomechanically refined Norway Spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst] and a bicomponent polymer fiber. The manufacturing technique...... rapidly and showed changes in thickness with fluctuations in relative humidity. Porosity was higher in composites containing mechanically refined (MDF) fibers than in composites containing bleached chemi-thermomechanically refined (CTMP) fibers. Tensile test results suggessted that fiber wetting by the...

  7. Using a Fiber Loop and Fiber Bragg Grating as a Fiber Optic Sensor to Simultaneously Measure Temperature and Displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu-Chih Cheng

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study integrated a fiber loop manufactured by using commercial fiber (SMF-28, Corning and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG to form a fiber optic sensor that could simultaneously measure displacement and temperature. The fiber loop was placed in a thermoelectric cooling module with FBG affixed to the module, and, consequently, the center wavelength displacement of FBG was limited by only the effects of temperature change. Displacement and temperature were determined by measuring changes in the transmission of optical power and shifts in Bragg wavelength. This study provides a simple and economical method to measure displacement and temperature simultaneously.

  8. Manufacturing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaedel, K L

    1998-01-01

    The mission of the Manufacturing Technology thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been to have an adequate base of manufacturing technology, not necessarily resident at LLNL, to conduct their future business. The specific goals were (1) to develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes; (2) to construct general purpose process models that have wide applicability; (3) to document their findings and models in journals; (4) to transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues; and (5) to develop continuing relationships with the industrial and academic communities to advance their collective understanding of fabrication processes. In support of this mission, two projects were reported here, each of which explores a way to bring higher precision to the manufacturing challenges that we face over the next few years. The first, ''A Spatial-Frequency-Domain Approach to Designing a Precision Machine Tools,'' is an overall view of how they design machine tools and instruments to make or measure workpieces that are specified in terms of the spatial frequency content of the residual errors of the workpiece surface. This represents an improvement of an ''error budget,'' a design tool that saw significant development in the early 1980's, and has been in active use since then. The second project, ''Micro-Drilling of ICF Capsules,'' is an attempt to define the current state in commercial industry for drilling small holes, particularly laser-drilling. The report concludes that 1-{micro}m diameter holes cannot currently be drilled to high aspect ratios, and then defines the engineering challenges that will have to be overcome to machine holes small enough for NIF capsules.

  9. Manufacturing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, J. A.; Floyd, H. L.; Goetsch, B.; Doran, L.

    1993-08-01

    This bulletin depicts current research on manufacturing technology at Sandia laboratories. An automated, adaptive process removes grit overspray from jet engine turbine blades. Advanced electronic ceramics are chemically prepared from solution for use in high-voltage varistors. A selective laser sintering process automates wax casting pattern fabrication. Numerical modeling improves the performance of a photoresist stripper (a simulation on a Cray supercomputer reveals the path of a uniform plasma). Improved mathematical models will help make the dream of low-cost ceramic composites come true.

  10. Simple method of fabrication tapered fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Fabio; Torres, Cesar; Diaz, Leonardo; Mattos, L.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a simple method for manufacturing fiber tapered through elongation, by the combination of heating with a butane torch and controlled stretch. Reducing the diameter of the multimode fiber of 100 microns to 10 microns, the displacement of the fiber is performed through bipolar stepping motors with one driver L293B and one PIC16F628A microcontroller for controlling movement. The system allows control of the desired fiber diameter up to 10 microns; the results are seen in a microscope and a rule of separation 2.5μm micrometer to calculate the diameter of the fiber.

  11. Method of manufacturing fibrous hemostatic bandages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Gustavo; Spretz, Ruben; Velarde-Ortiz, Raffet

    2012-09-04

    A method of manufacturing a sturdy and pliable fibrous hemostatic dressing by making fibers that maximally expose surface area per unit weight of active ingredients as a means for aiding in the clot forming process and as a means of minimizing waste of active ingredients. The method uses a rotating object to spin off a liquid biocompatible fiber precursor, which is added at its center. Fibers formed then deposit on a collector located at a distance from the rotating object creating a fiber layer on the collector. An electrical potential difference is maintained between the rotating disk and the collector. Then, a liquid procoagulation species is introduced at the center of the rotating disk such that it spins off the rotating disk and coats the fibers.

  12. Photovoltaic fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optoelectronically active optical fiber is demonstrated in this work. This fiber consists of dye sensitized solar cell (DSC) structure deposited on claddingless optical fiber. Both silica and plastic optical fibers are used as a substrate. Such a fiber converts light modes propagating in the modified cladding into electrical signal. DSC structure consisting of ZnO:Al transparent current collector layer, TiO2 photoelectrode sensitized with ruthenium dye, gelatinized iodine electrolyte, and carbon-based counter electrode was deposited layer by layer on top of the optical fiber. Current density-voltage curves of photovoltaic (PV) fibers of different diameters are presented. Maximum obtained short circuit current, Isc, was 26 nA/cm2 and maximum open circuit voltage, Voc, was 0.44 V. The fabrication issues and applications of the PV fiber are discussed in the article

  13. Preliminary characterization of glass fiber sizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Kusano, Yukihiro; Brøndsted, Povl; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2013-01-01

    Glass fiber surfaces are treated with sizing during manufacturing. Sizing consists of several components, including a film former and a silane coupling agent that is important for adhesion between glass fibers and a matrix. Although the sizing highly affects the composite interface and thus the...

  14. Fabrication and Mechanical Performance Investigation of Sisal and Sugarcane Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.E.Narentharan*

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers, such as sisal, flax and jute, possess good reinforcing capability when properly compounded with polymers. These fibers are relatively inexpensive, originate from renewable resources and possess favorable values of specific strength and specific modulus. Thermoplastic polymers have a shorter cycle time as well as reprocessability despite problems with high viscosities and poor fiber wetting. The renewability of natural fibers and the recyclability of thermoplastic polymers provide an attractive ecofriendly quality to the resulting natural fiberreinforced thermoplastic composite materials. Common methods for manufacturing natural fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites, injection moulding and extrusion, tend to degrade the fibers during processing. Development of a simple manufacturing technique for sisal fiber, sugarcane baggage-reinforced polypropylene composites, that minimizes fiber degradation and can be used in developing countries, is the main objective of this study. Combination of sisal and sugarcane baggage fibers possesses good reinforcing capability when properly compounded with polymers.

  15. Fiber Bragg grating arrays for high resolution manometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Martin; Rothhardt, Manfred; Voigt, Sebastian; Teubner, Andreas; Lpke, Thomas; Thieroff, Christoph; Chojetzki, Christoph; Bartelt, Hartmut

    2009-10-01

    We demonstrate the application of a fiber Bragg grating based sensor system as a distributed pressure sensing catheter for the human esophagus. It allows space-time resolved measurements of the peristaltic waves of the gullet. The sensor system comprises 30 fiber-optic pressure sensors in a single fiber with a spatial distance below 10 mm each. The sensors are fiber Bragg gratings that are manufactured during the drawing process of the fiber and therefore show enhanced mechanical stability compared to fiber Bragg gratings with local recoating. A well designed soft plastic coating wand will be used to convert local pressure variations into strain variations of the optical fiber core.

  16. Dietary Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiber is a substance in plants. Dietary fiber is the kind you eat. It's a type of carbohydrate. You may also see it listed on a food label as soluble ... types have important health benefits. Good sources of dietary fiber include Whole grains Nuts and seeds Fruit and ...

  17. Effects on the Physical and Mechanical Properties of Porous Concrete for Plant Growth of Blast Furnace Slag, Natural Jute Fiber, and Styrene Butadiene Latex Using a Dry Mixing Manufacturing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang-Hee Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effects of industrial by-products materials on the performance of porous concrete for plant growth, this study investigated the physical, strength, and freeze/thaw resistances of porous concrete for plant growth, prepared by replacing cement with blast furnace slag powder at 60% by weight, and replacing natural stone aggregates with coarse blast furnace slag aggregates at rates of 0%, 20%, 40%, 60% and 100% by weight. In addition, the effects of adding natural jute fiber and styrene butadiene (SB latex to these concrete mixtures were evaluated. The void ratio, compressive strength, and freeze/thaw resistance of the samples were measured. With increasing replacement rate of blast furnace aggregates, addition of latex, and mixing of natural jute fiber the void ratio of the concrete was increased. Compressive strength decreased as the replacement rate of blast-furnace slag aggregates increased. The compressive strength decreased after 100 freeze/thaw cycles, regardless of the replacement rate of blast furnace slag aggregates or of the addition of natural jute fiber and latex. The addition of natural jute fiber and latex decreased the compressive strength after 100 freeze/thaw cycles. The test results indicate that the control mixture satisfied the target compressive strength of 10 MPa and the target void ratio of 25% at replacement rates of 0% and 20% for blast furnace aggregates, and that the mixtures containing latex satisfied the criteria up to an aggregate replacement rate of 60%. However, the mixtures containing natural jute fiber did not satisfy these criteria. The relationship between void ratio and residual compressive strength after 100 freeze/thaw cycles indicates that the control mixture and the mixtures containing jute fiber at aggregate replacement rates of 20% and 40% satisfied the target void ratio of 25% and the target residual compressive strength of over 80% after 100 freeze/thaw cycles. The mixtures containing latex and aggregate replacement rates up to 60% satisfied the target void ratio and compressive strength.

  18. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilden, K. S.; Harris, C. G.; Flynn, B. W.; Gessel, M. G.; Scholz, D. B.; Stawski, S.; Winston, V.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program is to develop the technology required for cost-and weight-efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements, and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of stringer-stiffened and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant-section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements cocured to skin structures. Significant process development efforts included AFP, braiding, RTM, autoclave cure, and core blanket fabrication for both sandwich and stiffened-skin structure. Outer-mold-line and inner-mold-line tooling was developed for sandwich structures and stiffened-skin structure. The effect of design details, process control and tool design on repeatable, dimensionally stable, structure for low cost barrel assembly was assessed. Subcomponent panels representative of crown, keel, and side quadrant panels were fabricated to assess scale-up effects and manufacturing anomalies for full-scale structures. Manufacturing database including time studies, part quality, and manufacturing plans were generated to support the development of designs and analytical models to access cost, structural performance, and dimensional tolerance.

  19. Hybrid fiber and nanopowder reinforced composites for wind turbine blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikoloz M. Chikhradze

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of an investigation into the production of wind turbine blades manufactured using polymer composites reinforced by hybrid (carbon, basalt, glass fibers and strengthened by various nanopowders (oxides, carbides, borides are presented. The hybrid fiber-reinforced composites (HFRC were manufactured with prepreg technology by molding pre-saturated epoxy-strengthened matrix-reinforced fabric. Performance of the manufactured composites was estimated with values of the coefficient of operating condition (COC at a moderate and elevated temperature.

  20. Hybrid fiber and nanopowder reinforced composites for wind turbine blades

    OpenAIRE

    Nikoloz M. Chikhradze; Marquis, Fernand D.S.; Guram S. Abashidze

    2015-01-01

    The results of an investigation into the production of wind turbine blades manufactured using polymer composites reinforced by hybrid (carbon, basalt, glass) fibers and strengthened by various nanopowders (oxides, carbides, borides) are presented. The hybrid fiber-reinforced composites (HFRC) were manufactured with prepreg technology by molding pre-saturated epoxy-strengthened matrix-reinforced fabric. Performance of the manufactured composites was estimated with values of the coefficient of ...

  1. Carbon fiber resin matrix interphase: effect of carbon fiber surface treatment on composite performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon fibers are supplied by various manufacturers with a predetermined level of surface treatment and matrix compatible sizings. Surface treatment of the carbon fiber increases the active oxygen content, the polarity and the total free surface energy of the fiber surface. This study is directed toward determining the effect of varying carbon fiber surface treatment on the composite performance of thermoset matrix resins. The effect of varying fiber surface treatment on performance of a promising proprietary sizing is also presented. 6 references, 11 figures

  2. 76 FR 30908 - Foreign-Trade Zone 203-Moses Lake, Washington, Export-Only Manufacturing Authority, SGL...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ... Authority, SGL Automotive Carbon Fibers, LLC, (Carbon Fiber); Notice of Temporary Approval On January 4...-Trade Zone (FTZ) 203, requesting authority on behalf of SGL Automotive Carbon Fibers, LLC (SGL) to manufacture carbon fiber under FTZ procedures solely for export within Site 3 of FTZ 203 in Moses...

  3. V1.6 Development of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Low Cost Hydrogen Storage Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leavitt, Mark; Lam, Patrick; Nelson, Karl M.; johnson, Brice A.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Ruiz, Antonio; Adams, Jesse

    2012-10-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an innovative manufacturing process for Type IV high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels, with the intent to significantly lower manufacturing costs. Part of the development is to integrate the features of high precision AFP and commercial FW. Evaluation of an alternative fiber to replace a portion of the baseline fiber will help to reduce costs further.

  4. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Petersen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p < 10−8 and 0.8 mm at 41.6% vs. 19.5% (p < 10−4, respectively. The review focuses on carbon fiber properties that increased PBA for enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration.

  5. Embedded sensors in layered manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaochun

    Layered Manufacturing can be applied to build ``smart'' parts with sensors, integrated circuits, and actuators placed within the component. Embedded sensors can be used to gain data for validating or improving designs during the prototype stage or to obtain information on the performance and structural integrity of components in service. Techniques for embedding fiber optic sensors in metals, polymers, and ceramics have been investigated. Embedding optical fibers into metals is especially challenging because engineering alloys tend to exhibit high melting temperatures. In the present research an embedding sequence was developed capable of embedding fiber sensors into parts made of metal alloys with high melting temperatures. Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors were selected as the most promising sensor candidate. The embedded FBG sensors were characterized for temperature and strain measurements. The embedded FBG sensors in nickel and stainless steel provided high sensitivity, good accuracy, and high temperature capacity for temperature measurements. Temperature sensitivity approximately 100% higher than that of bare FBGs was demonstrated. For strain measurements, the sensors embedded in metal and polyurethane yielded high sensitivity, accuracy, and linearity. The sensitivity of the embedded FBGs was in good agreement with that of bare FBGs. Moreover, a decoupling technique for embedded FBG sensors was developed to separate temperature and strain effects. The embedded FBG sensors were used to monitor the accumulation of residual stresses during the laser- assisted Layered Manufacturing, to measure the strain field in layered materials, to measure pressure, and to monitor temperature and strain simultaneously. New techniques have been developed for temperature and strain measurements of rotating components with FBG sensors embedded or attached to the surface. Tunable laser diodes were incorporated into the sensing system for monitoring the Bragg grating wavelength, and thus the temperature or strain was determined. The non-contact sensing system provides a new sensing tool that is superior to slip rings. Moreover, the new techniques provide a new health monitoring methodology for rotating structures, especially those exposed to hostile environments, such as blades in gas turbine engines. For laser-assisted Layered Manufacturing, residual stresses caused by the temperature gradient and material property mismatches result in part inaccuracy, warpage, or even delamination. Thus, material issues have been investigated, and a new class of metal matrix composites of INVAR and TiC were designed and fabricated. The materials can reduce deformation caused by residual stresses and improve mechanical properties significantly compared to other materials used in Layered Manufacturing.

  6. Tapering of Polymer Optical Fibers for Compound Parabolic Concentrator Fiber Tip Fabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Hafeez Ul; Fasano, Andrea; Nielsen, Kristian; Aasmul, Søren; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Bang, Ole

    2015-01-01

    We propose a process for Polymer Optical Fiber (POF) Compound Parabolic Compound (CPC) tip manufacturing using a heat and pull fiber tapering technique. The POF, locally heated above its glass transition temperature, is parabolically tapered down in diameter, after which it is cut to the desired...

  7. Smart Cellulose Fibers Coated with Carbon Nanotube Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Haisong Qi; Jianwen Liu; Edith Mäder

    2014-01-01

    Smart multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-coated cellulose fibers with a unique sensing ability were manufactured by a simple dip coating process. The formation of electrically-conducting MWCNT networks on cellulose mono- and multi-filament fiber surfaces was confirmed by electrical resistance measurements and visualized by scanning electron microscopy. The interaction between MWCNT networks and cellulose fiber was investigated by Raman spectroscopy. The piezoresistivity of these fibers fo...

  8. Effects on the Physical and Mechanical Properties of Porous Concrete for Plant Growth of Blast Furnace Slag, Natural Jute Fiber, and Styrene Butadiene Latex Using a Dry Mixing Manufacturing Process

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang-Hee Kim; Chun-Soo Kim; Ji-Hong Jeon; Chan-Gi Park

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of industrial by-products materials on the performance of porous concrete for plant growth, this study investigated the physical, strength, and freeze/thaw resistances of porous concrete for plant growth, prepared by replacing cement with blast furnace slag powder at 60% by weight, and replacing natural stone aggregates with coarse blast furnace slag aggregates at rates of 0%, 20%, 40%, 60% and 100% by weight. In addition, the effects of adding natural jute fiber and s...

  9. Optical Fiber Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    F&S Inc. developed and commercialized fiber optic and microelectromechanical systems- (MEMS) based instrumentation for harsh environments encountered in the aerospace industry. The NASA SBIR programs have provided F&S the funds and the technology to develop ruggedized coatings and coating techniques that are applied during the optical fiber draw process. The F&S optical fiber fabrication facility and developed coating methods enable F&S to manufacture specialty optical fiber with custom designed refractive index profiles and protective or active coatings. F&S has demonstrated sputtered coatings using metals and ceramics and combinations of each, and has also developed techniques to apply thin coatings of specialized polyimides formulated at NASA Langley Research Center. With these capabilities, F&S has produced cost-effective, reliable instrumentation and sensors capable of withstanding temperatures up to 800? C and continues building commercial sales with corporate partners and private funding. More recently, F&S has adapted the same sensing platforms to provide the rapid detection and identification of chemical and biological agents

  10. Tribology in Manufacturing Technology

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The present book aims to provide research advances on tribology in manufacturing technology for modern industry. This book can be used as a research book for final undergraduate engineering course (for example, mechanical, manufacturing, materials, etc) or as a subject on manufacturing at the postgraduate level. Also, this book can serve as a useful reference for academics, manufacturing and tribology researchers, mechanical, mechanical, manufacturing and materials engineers, professionals in related industries with manufacturing and tribology.

  11. Mechanical Properties of Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Fergyanto E.; Homma, Hiroomi; Brodjonegoro, Satryo S.; Hudin, Afzer Bin Baseri; Zainuddin, Aryanti Binti

    In tropical countries such as Indonesia and Malaysia, the empty fruit bunches are wastes of the oil palm industry. The wastes are abundantly available and has reached a level that severely threats the environment. Therefore, it is a great need to find useful applications of those waste materials; but firstly, the mechanical properties of the EFB fiber should be quantified. In this work, a small tensile test machine is manufactured, and the tensile test is performed on the EFB fibers. The results show that the strength of the EFB fiber is strongly affected by the fiber diameter; however, the fiber strength is relatively low in comparison to other natural fibers.

  12. Scintillating optical fibers for fine-grained hodoscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast detectors with fine spatial resolution will be needed to exploit high event rates at ISABELLE. Scintillating optical fibers for fine grained hodoscopes have been developed by the authors. A commercial manufacturer of optical fibers has drawn and clad PVT scintillator. Detection efficiencies greater than 99% have been achieved for a 1 mm fiber with a PMT over lengths up to 60 cm. Small diameter PMT's and avalanche photodiodes have been tested with the fibers. Further improvements are sought for the fiber and for the APD's sensitivity and coupling efficiency with the fiber

  13. Optimization of laser fibers for high pump light absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierlich, Jörg; Kobelke, Jens; Jetschke, Sylvia; Grimm, Stephan; Unger, Sonja; Schuster, Kay

    2014-03-01

    For the implementation of novel fiber laser concepts, such as extra-large mode area (X-LMA) fiber lasers or multi-core fiber lasers alternative manufacturing processes for highly-doped silica glasses and the laser fibers fabricated from it are required. For efficient laser operation a high absorption of pump power in the active fiber core is a necessary condition. To increase the pump light absorption the fiber development aimed at the preparation of laser-active and adapted passive single-large core fibers up to multi-core structures with 7 large cores showing broken circular fiber symmetry. The optimization of the optical fibers which will be shown in detail is based on the combination of several innovative manufacturing methods such as the powder sintering technology (REPUSIL), the preform preparation by stack-and-draw technique and the fiber drawing process. The described procedure is particularly suitable to produce multifilament glass preforms resp. laser fibers with large cores in which the radial and lateral indices of refraction can be adjusted homogeneously and reproducibly. Due to the realized increase of the laser-active core volume in these fibers the pump light absorption could be considerably increased and the resulting shorter fiber length allows the use of fibers with a moderate attenuation. The results concerning the characterization of materials science and the optical aspects e. g. the dopant concentration distributions and related refractive index profiles as well attenuation and pump absorption spectra will be presented.

  14. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA) to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration. PMID:26966555

  15. Status of fiber lasers study of on ytterbium doped fiber laser and laser spectroscopy of doped fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work shows all the advantages and drawbacks of the rare-earth-doped fiber lasers and fiber optical amplifiers, pointing out their potential use for instrumentation and optical fiber sensor technology. The theory of light propagation in optical fibers is presented in order to understand the manufacturing methods. A comparative study of preform surface and concentration analysis is performed. The gain behaviour is also thoroughly examined. A synthesis of all technological parameters of the fiber laser is then established and all technologies of the constituting integrated components are reviewed and compared. The experimental techniques mainly involve: site selective excitation tunability, cooperative luminescence, oxidation state changes induced by gamma irradiation, ytterbium-doped mono-mode continuous wave tunable three-level fiber laser. (TEC). 622 refs., 176 figs

  16. Two Fiber Optical Fiber Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mathew R.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Breeding, Shawn P.

    2000-01-01

    An optical fiber thermometer consists of an optical fiber whose sensing tip is given a metallic coating. The sensing tip of the fiber is essentially an isothermal cavity, so the emission from this cavity will be approximately equal to the emission from a blackbody. Temperature readings are obtained by measuring the spectral radiative heat flux at the end of the fiber at two wavelengths. The ratio of these measurements and Planck's Law are used to infer the temperature at the sensing tip. Optical fiber thermometers have high accuracy, excellent long-term stability and are immune to electromagnetic interference. In addition, they can be operated for extended periods without requiring re-calibration. For these reasons. it is desirable to use optical fiber thermometers in environments such as the International Space Station. However, it has recently been shown that temperature readings are corrupted by emission from the fiber when extended portions of the probe are exposed to elevated temperatures. This paper will describe several ways in which the reading from a second fiber can be used to correct the corrupted temperature measurements. The accuracy and sensitivity to measurement uncertainty will be presented for each method.

  17. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Jen

    Long fibers are generally preferred for reinforcing foams for performance reasons. However, uniform dispersion is difficult to achieve because they must be mixed with liquid resin prior to foam expansion. New approaches aiming to overcome such problem have been developed at USC's Composites Center. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams with long fibers (over 6 mm in length) manufactured at USC's Composites Center have achieved promising mechanical properties and demonstrated lower density relative to conventional composite foams. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were synthesized from thermosetting polymeric microspheres (amino and phenolic microspheres), as well as thermoplastic PVC heat expandable microspheres (HEMs). Carbon and/or aramid fibers were used to reinforce the syntactic foams. Basic mechanical properties, including shear, tensile, and compression, were measured in syntactic foams and fiber-reinforced syntactic foams. Microstructure and crack propagation behavior were investigated by scanning electron microscope and light microscopy. Failure mechanisms and reinforcing mechanisms of fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were also analyzed. As expected, additions of fiber reinforcements to foams enhanced both tensile and shear properties. However, only limited enhancement in compression properties was observed, and fiber reinforcement was of limited benefit in this regard. Therefore, a hybrid foam design was explored and evaluated in an attempt to enhance compression properties. HEMs were blended with glass microspheres to produce hybrid foams, and hybrid foams were subsequently reinforced with continuous aramid fibers to produce fiber-reinforced hybrid foams. Mechanical properties of these foams were evaluated. Findings indicated that the production of hybrid foams was an effective way to enhance the compressive properties of syntactic foams, while the addition of fiber reinforcements enhanced the shear and tensile performance of syntactic foams. Another approach to produce ultralight sandwich core materials was explored in which towpreg (fiber bundles impregnated with resin) were configured to produce 3D pyramidal truss structures. The composite truss structures were subsequently filled with foam to improve resistance to buckling. Mechanical properties of the foam-filled truss structures were measured and contrasted with analytical predictions based on simple truss theory. Results indicated that combination of foams and carbon fiber truss structures had synergistic effects that enhanced the capacity to carry compressive and shear loads.

  18. Preliminary characterization of glass fiber sizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noergaard Petersen, H.; Almdal, K. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Nanotech, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Kusano, Y.; Broendsted, P. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Wind Energy, Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2013-09-01

    Glass fiber surfaces are treated with sizing during manufacturing. Sizing consists of several components, including a film former and a silane coupling agent that is important for adhesion between glass fibers and a matrix. Although the sizing highly affects the composite interface and thus the strength of the composites, little is known about the structure and chemistry of the sizing. A part of sizing was extracted by soxhlet extraction. The fibers were subsequently burned and some fibers were merely burned for analysis of glass fiber and sizing. The results showed that the analyzed fibers had amounts of bonded and physisorbed sizing similar to what has been presented in literature. An estimated sizing thickness was found to be approximately 100 nm. It is indicated that an epoxy-resin containing film former and a polyethylene oxide lubricant are present, yet no silanes or other sizing components were identified in the extractant. (Author)

  19. Fiber Optic Sensing: Prototype Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz Martin, Jesus; Gonzalez Torres, Jose

    2015-09-01

    Airbus DS Crisa has been developing an interrogator of Fiber Bragg Grating sensors [1], aimed at measuring, mainly, temperature and strain by means of fiber optic links. This activity, funded by Airbus DS Crisa, ESA and HBM Fibersensing, finalizes with the manufacturing of a prototype. The present paper describes in detail the main outcomes of the testing activities of this prototype. At the moment of writing the paper all the functional tests have been concluded. The environmental tests, thermal and mechanical, will be conducted with the FOS interrogator forming part of the RTU2015, described in [2].

  20. Manufacturing network evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Cheng; Farooq, Sami; Johansen, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – This paper examines the effect of changes at the manufacturing plant level on other plants in the manufacturing network and also investigates the role of manufacturing plants on the evolution of a manufacturing network. Design/methodology/approach –The research questions are developed by...... identifying the gaps in the reviewed literature. The paper is based on three case studies undertaken in Danish manufacturing companies to explore in detail their manufacturing plants and networks. The cases provide a sound basis for developing the research questions and explaining the interaction between...... different manufacturing plants in the network and their impact on network transformation. Findings – The paper highlights the dominant role of manufacturing plants in the continuously changing shape of a manufacturing network. The paper demonstrates that a product or process change at one manufacturing...

  1. Radiation resistance characteristics of image fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of optical fibers and image fibers to the maintenance and inspection systems for nuclear power plants is actively investigated. Multi-picture elements and small size are required for image fibers because the resolution, flexibility and environmental endurance as well as transmittance are required for them. The authors acknowledged the dependence of the radiation resistance characteristics of image fibers on their core diameter by experiment and considered the cause. Pure quartz core, doped clad image fibers, whose core diameter/image fiber outside diameter ratio was the same, were selected, but their outside diameter was changed to 1.3, 1.4 and 1.8 mm. Their transmission loss increase was measured at 0.7 ?m wavelength, 1.2 x 105 R/h dose rate, and the number of picture elements being 12,000. As the outside diamter was larger, the increase of loss by irradiation was smaller. Since image fiber materials and manufacturing conditions also seemed to be the causes, three elemental fibers with different core diameter were fabricated into a single image fiber (three-section fiber) to make the material and manufacturing condition same, and this image fiber was irradiated at 1.2 x 105 R/h up to total 8.6 x 106 R. The change of transmittance or the deterioration was smaller in the larger core diameter fiber. The transmission loss was calculated numerically based on the past theoretical analysis. In comparison of the calculated results with the experimental results, the dependence of radiation characteristics on core diameter seemed to be mainly caused by the increase of loss in the clad due to ?-ray irradiation. (Wakatsuki, Y)

  2. Robots in manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz Monge, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Manufacturing is a wide concept, as the use of Robots in Manufacturing is. In a general way, we call manufacturing to the use of machines, tools and labor produce goods for use or sell. Actually, must be taken into account, then manufacturing covers also every process, although unproductive, that have any influence in the production. Every move of material, layout planning or quality control task has important effects in the cycle of manufacturing as well as the most basic process of the fiel...

  3. Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT): Manufacturing Initiative Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASA supports the Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office (AMNPO).Hosted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) the AMNPO is...

  4. Industrial applications of fiber optic sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desforges, Francois X.; Blocksidge, Robert

    1996-08-01

    Thanks to the growth of the fiber optics telecommunication industry, fiber optic components have become less expensive, more reliable and well known by potential fiber optic sensor users. LEDs, optical fibers, couplers and connectors are now widely distributed and are the building blocks for the fiber optic sensor manufacturer. Additionally, the huge demand in consumer electronics of the past 10 years has provided the manufacturer with cheap and powerful programmable logic components which reduce the development time as well as the cost of the associated instrumentation. This market trend has allowed Photonetics to develop, manufacture and sell fiber optic sensors for the last 10 years. The company contribution in the fields of fiber optic gyros (4 licenses sold world wide), white light interferometry and fiber optic sensor networks is widely recognized. Moreover, its 1992 acquisition of some of the assets of Metricor Inc., greatly reinforced its position and allowed it to pursue new markets. Over the past four years, Photonetics has done an important marketing effort to better understand the need of its customers. The result of this research has fed R&D efforts towards a new generation instrument, the Metricor 2000, better adapted to the expectations of fiber optic sensors users, thanks to its unique features: (1) universality -- the system can accept more than 20 different sensors (T, P, RI, . . .). (2) scalability -- depending on the customer needs, the system can be used with 1 to 64 sensors. (3) performance -- because of its improved design, overall accuracies of 0.01% FS can be reached. (4) versatility -- its modular design enables a fast and easy custom design for specific applications. This paper presents briefly the Metricor 2000 and its family of FO probes. Then, it describes two fiber optic sensing (FOS) applications/markets where FOS have proven to be very useful.

  5. Assessment of fiber optic pressure sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a six-month Phase 1 study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing and describes the design and principle of operation of various fiber optic pressure sensors. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. In addition, current requirements for environmental and seismic qualification of sensors for nuclear power plants were reviewed to determine the extent of the qualification tests that fiber optic pressure sensors may have to meet before they can be used in nuclear power plants. This project has concluded that fiber optic pressure sensors are still in the research and development stage and only a few manufacturers exist in the US and abroad which supply suitable fiber optic pressure sensors for industrial applications. Presently, fiber optic pressure sensors are mostly used in special applications for which conventional sensors are not able to meet the requirements

  6. Strategic Roles of Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Cheng

    Addressing three development trends of manufacturing, this thesis aims to explore: (1) facing challenges on manufacturing (globalisation, knowledge-based manufacturing and servitisation of manufacturing), what kinds of roles does manufacturing play within industrial companies; (2) along with the...... trend of globalisation, how do industrial companies develop their global manufacturing networks? These two questions are actually interlinked. On the one hand, facing increasing offshoring and outsourcing of production activities, industrial companies have to understand how to develop their global...... manufacturing networks. On the other hand, ongoing globalisation also brings tremendous impacts to post-industrial economies (e.g. Denmark). A dilemma therefore arises, i.e. whether it is still necessary to keep manufacturing in these post-industrial economies; if yes, what kinds of roles manufacturing should...

  7. Radiation resistive properties of optical fibers, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation resistive properties of optical fibers largely depend on the manufacturing methods and conditions because the properties are related to the types and quantity of imperfections in the cores. In this study, the properties of pure silica base fibers and SiO2-GeO2 base fibers were investigated. As the pure silica base fibers, three kinds of the fibers different in base materials were prepared all into SI type pure quartz core, boron and fluorine containing clad fibers, one of which having deuterated OD radicals. As the SiO2-GeO2 base fibers, two kinds of the GI fibers deuterated and treated with chlorine were used. In both types, the dependence of photo bleaching effect on light power and the dependence of loss increasing property on radiation dose rate were examined. The results are as follows: (1) the dependence on light power in three kinds of pure silica core fibers was the most in the fiber of OH radical 800 ppm and chlorine content 100 ppm, and the least in the fiber of OH radical 800 ppm and chlorine content 0 ppm; (2) the radiation resistance of deuterated silica core fiber was good in spite of a small amount of total OH radical (OH + OD); (3) photo bleaching effect was large when the total radiation dose was small, and radiation hardening effect became larger as the total dose increased, in the light power dependence in a long time continuous irradiation; (4) deuterated SiO2-GeO2 fibers had a little photo bleaching effect, and showed an equivalent radiation resistance to that of pure silica fibers at high radiation dose rate and in low light power condition in about 104 R total dose. (Wakatsuki, Y)

  8. The Effects of Fiber Inclusion on Pet Food Sensory Characteristics and Palatability

    OpenAIRE

    Kadri Koppel; Mariana Monti; Michael Gibson; Sajid Alavi; Brizio Di Donfrancesco; Aulus Cavalieri Carciofi

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine (a) the influence of fiber on the sensory characteristics of dry dog foods; (b) differences of coated and uncoated kibbles for aroma and flavor characteristics; (c) palatability of these dry dog foods; and (d) potential associations between palatability and sensory attributes. A total of eight fiber treatments were manufactured: a control (no fiber addition), guava fiber (3%, 6%, and 12%), sugar cane fiber (9%; large and small particle size), and...

  9. Numerical prediction of fiber orientation in injection-molded short-fiber/thermoplastic composite parts with experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical prediction of the fiber orientation in the short-glass fiber (GF) reinforced polyamide 6 (PA6) composites with the fiber weight concentration of 30%, 50%, and 70% manufactured by the injection molding process is presented. And the fiber orientation was also directly observed and measured through X-ray computed tomography. During the injection molding process of the short-fiber/thermoplastic composite, the fiber orientation is produced by the flow states and the fiber-fiber interaction. Folgar and Tucker equation is the well known for modeling the fiber orientation in a concentrated suspension. They included into Jeffrey’s equation a diffusive type of term by introducing a phenomenological coefficient to account for the fiber-fiber interaction. Our developed model for the fiber-fiber interaction was proposed by modifying the rotary diffusion term of the Folgar-Tucker equation. This model was presented in a conference paper of the 29th International Conference of the Polymer Processing Society published by AIP conference proceeding. For modeling fiber interaction, the fiber dynamic simulation was introduced in order to obtain a global fiber interaction coefficient, which is sum function of the fiber concentration, aspect ratio, and angular velocity. The fiber orientation is predicted by using the proposed fiber interaction model incorporated into a computer aided engineering simulation package C-Mold. An experimental program has been carried out in which the fiber orientation distribution has been measured in 100 x 100 x 2 mm injection-molded plate and 100 x 80 x 2 mm injection-molded weld by analyzed with a high resolution 3D X-ray computed tomography system XVA-160α, and calculated by X-ray computed tomography imaging. The numerical prediction shows a good agreement with experimental validation. And the complex fiber orientation in the injection-molded weld was investigated

  10. Numerical prediction of fiber orientation in injection-molded short-fiber/thermoplastic composite parts with experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thi, Thanh Binh Nguyen; Morioka, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Atsushi [Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Hamanaka, Senji; Yamashita, Katsuhisa; Nonomura, Chisato [Research Center, Toyobo Co., LTD, 2-1-1 Katata, Otsu, Shiga 520-0292 (Japan)

    2015-05-22

    Numerical prediction of the fiber orientation in the short-glass fiber (GF) reinforced polyamide 6 (PA6) composites with the fiber weight concentration of 30%, 50%, and 70% manufactured by the injection molding process is presented. And the fiber orientation was also directly observed and measured through X-ray computed tomography. During the injection molding process of the short-fiber/thermoplastic composite, the fiber orientation is produced by the flow states and the fiber-fiber interaction. Folgar and Tucker equation is the well known for modeling the fiber orientation in a concentrated suspension. They included into Jeffrey’s equation a diffusive type of term by introducing a phenomenological coefficient to account for the fiber-fiber interaction. Our developed model for the fiber-fiber interaction was proposed by modifying the rotary diffusion term of the Folgar-Tucker equation. This model was presented in a conference paper of the 29{sup th} International Conference of the Polymer Processing Society published by AIP conference proceeding. For modeling fiber interaction, the fiber dynamic simulation was introduced in order to obtain a global fiber interaction coefficient, which is sum function of the fiber concentration, aspect ratio, and angular velocity. The fiber orientation is predicted by using the proposed fiber interaction model incorporated into a computer aided engineering simulation package C-Mold. An experimental program has been carried out in which the fiber orientation distribution has been measured in 100 x 100 x 2 mm injection-molded plate and 100 x 80 x 2 mm injection-molded weld by analyzed with a high resolution 3D X-ray computed tomography system XVA-160α, and calculated by X-ray computed tomography imaging. The numerical prediction shows a good agreement with experimental validation. And the complex fiber orientation in the injection-molded weld was investigated.

  11. Numerical prediction of fiber orientation in injection-molded short-fiber/thermoplastic composite parts with experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi, Thanh Binh Nguyen; Morioka, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Hamanaka, Senji; Yamashita, Katsuhisa; Nonomura, Chisato

    2015-05-01

    Numerical prediction of the fiber orientation in the short-glass fiber (GF) reinforced polyamide 6 (PA6) composites with the fiber weight concentration of 30%, 50%, and 70% manufactured by the injection molding process is presented. And the fiber orientation was also directly observed and measured through X-ray computed tomography. During the injection molding process of the short-fiber/thermoplastic composite, the fiber orientation is produced by the flow states and the fiber-fiber interaction. Folgar and Tucker equation is the well known for modeling the fiber orientation in a concentrated suspension. They included into Jeffrey's equation a diffusive type of term by introducing a phenomenological coefficient to account for the fiber-fiber interaction. Our developed model for the fiber-fiber interaction was proposed by modifying the rotary diffusion term of the Folgar-Tucker equation. This model was presented in a conference paper of the 29th International Conference of the Polymer Processing Society published by AIP conference proceeding. For modeling fiber interaction, the fiber dynamic simulation was introduced in order to obtain a global fiber interaction coefficient, which is sum function of the fiber concentration, aspect ratio, and angular velocity. The fiber orientation is predicted by using the proposed fiber interaction model incorporated into a computer aided engineering simulation package C-Mold. An experimental program has been carried out in which the fiber orientation distribution has been measured in 100 x 100 x 2 mm injection-molded plate and 100 x 80 x 2 mm injection-molded weld by analyzed with a high resolution 3D X-ray computed tomography system XVA-160α, and calculated by X-ray computed tomography imaging. The numerical prediction shows a good agreement with experimental validation. And the complex fiber orientation in the injection-molded weld was investigated.

  12. Carbon fibers from SRC pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greskovich, Eugene J. (Allentown, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved method of manufacturing carbon fibers from a coal derived pitch. The improvement resides in the use of a solvent refined coal which has been hydrotreated and subjected to solvent extraction whereby the hetero atom content in the resulting product is less than 4.0% by weight and the softening point is between about 100.degree.-250.degree. F.

  13. Robust, Low Loss Approach for Fiber to Waveguide Coupling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA Phase I SBIR effort proposes to establish the feasibility of significantly improving coupling at fiber to waveguide interfaces for the manufacture of low...

  14. METHOD FOR MEASURING CARBON FIBER EMISSIONS FROM STATIONARY SOURCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon fibers are highly conductive, lightweight and of small dimensions. When released as emissions from production, manufacturing, processing and disposal sources they may become airborne and disperse over wide areas. If they settle onto electronic or electrical components they...

  15. Chemical Modification Effect on the Mechanical Properties of Coir Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Sultana Mir

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural fiber has a vital role as a reinforcing agent due to its renewable, low cost, biodegradable, less abrasive and eco-friendly nature. Whereas synthetic fibers like glass, boron, carbon, metallic, ceramic and inorganic fibers are expensive and not eco-friendly. Coir is one of the natural fibers easily available in Bangladesh and cheap. It is derived from the husk of the coconut (Cocos nucifera. Coir has one of the highest concentrations of lignin, which makes it stronger. In recent years, wide range of research has been carried out on fiber reinforced polymer composites [4-13].The aim of the present research is to characterize brown single coir fiber for manufacturing polymer composites reinforced with characterized fibers. Adhesion between the fiber and polymer is one of factors affecting the strength of manufactured composites. In order to increase the adhesion, the coir fiber was chemically treated separately in single stage (with Cr2(SO43•12(H2O and double stages (with CrSO4 and NaHCO3. Both the raw and treated fibers were characterized by tensile testing, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopic analysis, scanning electron microscopic analysis. The result showed that the Young’s modulus increased, while tensile strength and strain to failure decreased with increase in span length. Tensile properties of chemically treated coir fiber was found higher than raw coir fiber, while the double stage treated coir fiber had better mechanical properties compared to the single stage treated coir fiber. Scanning electron micrographs showed rougher surface in case of the raw coir fiber. The surface was found clean and smooth in case of the treated coir fiber. Thus the performance of coir fiber composites in industrial application can be improved by chemical treatment.

  16. Mechanically induced long period fiber gratings on single mode tapered optical fiber for structure sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido-Navarro, Mara. G.; Marrujo-Garca, Sigifredo; lvarez-Chvez, Jos A.; Velzquez-Gonzlez, Jess S.; Martnez-Pin, Fernando; Escamilla-Ambrosio, Ponciano J.

    2015-08-01

    The modal characteristics of tapered single mode optical fibers and its strain sensing characteristics by using mechanically induced long period fiber gratings are presented in this work. Both Long Period Fiber Gratings (LPFG) and fiber tapers are fiber devices that couple light from the core fiber into the fiber cladding modes. The mechanical LPFG is made up of two plates, one flat and the other grooved. For this experiment the grooved plate was done on an acrylic slab with the help of a computer numerical control machine. The manufacturing of the tapered fiber is accomplished by applying heat using an oxygen-propane flame burner and stretching the fiber, which protective coating has been removed. Then, a polymer-tube-package is added in order to make the sensor sufficiently stiff for the tests. The mechanical induced LPFG is accomplished by putting the tapered fiber in between the two plates, so the taper acquires the form of the grooved plate slots. Using a laser beam the transmission spectrum showed a large peak transmission attenuation of around -20 dB. The resultant attenuation peak wavelength in the transmission spectrum shifts with changes in tension showing a strain sensitivity of 2pm/??. This reveals an improvement on the sensitivity for structure monitoring applications compared with the use of a standard optical fiber. In addition to the experimental work, the supporting theory and numerical simulation analysis are also included.

  17. Manufacturing in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Johannes; Boer, Henrike Engele Elisabeth; Boer, Harry

    This report compares the manufacturing strategies, practices, performances and improvement activities of 39 companies that are representative for the Danish assembly industry with those of 804 companies from 19 other countries. The data supporting this report were collected in 2013 and concern......: • Manufacturing strategies pursued and implemented between 2010 and 2012. • Performance improvements achieved during that period. • Actual manufacturing practices and performances as well as competitive priorities in 2012. • Manufacturing strategies pursued for the years 2010-2012....

  18. Design for Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Bertran Comellas, Martí

    2012-01-01

    This Thesis, Design for Additive Manufacturing, has been mainly focused on the design process and the considerations to be taken into account when designing parts for Additive Manufacturing. It starts with an introduction to Additive Manufacturing, the different technologies and processes are described to let the readers understand their operating principle, materials used and their strengths and weaknesses. The applications of Additive manufacturing are also explained in the introductory ...

  19. Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Stewart W.; Martina, Filomeno; Addison, Adrian C.; Ding, Jialuo; Pardal, Goncalo; Colegrove, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Depositing large components (>10 kg) in titanium, aluminium, steel and other metals is possible using Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing. This technology adopts arc welding tools and wire as feedstock for additive manufacturing purposes. High deposition rates, low material and equipment costs, and good structural integrity make Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing a suitable candidate for replacing the current method of manufacturing from solid billets or large forgings, especially with regards to ...

  20. Wood versus plant fibers: Similarities and differences in composite applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bo; Gamstedt, E. Kristofer

    2013-01-01

    The work on cellulose fiber composites is typically strictly divided into two separated research fields depending on the fiber origin, that is, from wood and from annual plants, representing the two different industries of forest and agriculture, respectively. The present paper evaluates in...... parallel wood fibers and plant fibers to highlight their similarities and differences regarding their use as reinforcement in composites and to enable mutual transfer of knowledge and technology between the two research fields. The paper gives an introduction to the morphology, chemistry, and...... ultrastructure of the fibers, the modeling of the mechanical properties of the fibers, the fiber preforms available for manufacturing of composites, the typical mechanical properties of the composites, the modeling of the mechanical properties with focus on composites having a random fiber orientation and a non...

  1. Workforce Development for Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Rosalie

    2007-01-01

    In a recent skills gap report, the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) noted some disturbing trends in the gap between the demand for highly skilled manufacturing workers and the potential supply. The NAM report notes that smaller manufacturers rank finding qualified workers ahead of energy costs, taxes and government regulations on the…

  2. Photovoltaic fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiana, Russell; Eckert, Robert; Cardone, John; Ryan, James; Montello, Alan

    2006-08-01

    It was realized early in the history of Konarka that the ability to produce fibers that generate power from solar energy could be applied to a wide variety of applications where fabrics are utilized currently. These applications include personal items such as jackets, shirts and hats, to architectural uses such as awnings, tents, large covers for cars, trucks and even doomed stadiums, to indoor furnishings such as window blinds, shades and drapes. They may also be used as small fabric patches or fiber bundles for powering or recharging batteries in small sensors. Power generating fabrics for clothing is of particular interest to the military where they would be used in uniforms and body armor where portable power is vital to field operations. In strong sunlight these power generating fabrics could be used as a primary source of energy, or they can be used in either direct sunlight or low light conditions to recharge batteries. Early in 2002, Konarka performed a series of proof-of-concept experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of building a photovoltaic cell using dye-sensitized titania and electrolyte on a metal wire core. The approach taken was based on the sequential coating processes used in making fiber optics, namely, a fiber core, e.g., a metal wire serving as the primary electrode, is passed through a series of vertically aligned coating cups. Each of the cups contains a coating fluid that has a specific function in the photocell. A second wire, used as the counter electrode, is brought into the process prior to entering the final coating cup. The latter contains a photopolymerizable, transparent cladding which hardens when passed through a UV chamber. Upon exiting the UV chamber, the finished PV fiber is spooled. Two hundred of foot lengths of PV fiber have been made using this process. When the fiber is exposed to visible radiation, it generates electrical power. The best efficiency exhibited by these fibers is 6% with an average value in the 4-5 % range.

  3. STUDY ON BICO FIBERS

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Tărăboanţă

    2013-01-01

    Bico fibers include bicomponent and biconstituent fibers.Bicomponent fibers are synthetic fibers made from two polymers of different chemical and physical structure.They are produced by common melt-drawing processes similar to conventional synthetic fibers.[1]. The biconstituent fiber consists of a continuous matrix of one polymer in which a different fiber-forming polymer is dispersed as a second distinct discontinuous phase; it as mix-polymer fiber or fascicular microfiber because the micro...

  4. Fiber Optics Technician. Curriculum Research Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Herschel K.

    A study examined the role of technicians in the fiber optics industry and determined those elements that should be included in a comprehensive curriculum to prepare fiber optics technicians for employment in the Texas labor market. First the current literature, including the ERIC database and equipment manufacturers' journals were reviewed. After…

  5. Curved Piezoelectric Actuators for Stretching Optical Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Assemblies containing curved piezoceramic fiber composite actuators have been invented as means of stretching optical fibers by amounts that depend on applied drive voltages. Piezoceramic fiber composite actuators are conventionally manufactured as sheets or ribbons that are flat and flexible, but can be made curved to obtain load-carrying ability and displacement greater than those obtainable from the flat versions. In the primary embodiment of this invention, piezoceramic fibers are oriented parallel to the direction of longitudinal displacement of the actuators so that application of drive voltage causes the actuator to flatten, producing maximum motion. Actuator motion can be transmitted to the optical fiber by use of hinges and clamp blocks. In the original application of this invention, the optical fiber contains a Bragg grating and the purpose of the controlled stretching of the fiber is to tune the grating as part of a small, lightweight, mode-hop-free, rapidly tunable laser for demodulating strain in Bragg-grating strain-measurement optical fibers attached to structures. The invention could also be used to apply controllable tensile force or displacement to an object other than an optical fiber.

  6. Utilization of Faraday Mirror in Fiber Optic Current Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Fiala, P.; Drexler, P.

    2008-01-01

    Fiber optic sensors dispose of some advantages in the field of electrical current and magnetic field measurement, like large bandwidth, linearity, light transmission possibilities. Unfortunately, they suffer from some parasitic phenomena. The crucial issue is the presence of induced and latent linear birefringence, which is imposed by the fiber manufacture imperfections as well as mechanical stress by fiber bending. In order to the linear birefringence compensation a promising method was chos...

  7. Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC) 2015 Research Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodhouse, Michael; Mone, Christopher; Chung, Donald; Elgqvist, Emma; Das, Sujit; Mann, Margaret; Gossett, Scott

    2016-03-01

    CEMAC has conducted four major studies on the manufacturing of clean energy technologies. Three of these focused on the end product: solar photovoltaic modules, wind turbines, and automotive lithium-ion batteries. The fourth area focused on a key material for manufacturing clean energy technologies, carbon fiber. This booklet summarizes key findings of CEMAC work to date, describes CEMAC's research methodology, and describes work to come.

  8. Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing for Composite Part Molds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duty, Chad E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Springfield, Robert M. [Tru Design, LLC, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The ORNL Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) collaborated with Tru-Design to test the quality and durability of molds used for making fiber reinforced composites using additive manufacturing. The partners developed surface treatment techniques including epoxy coatings and machining to improve the quality of the surface finish. Test samples made using the printed and surface finished molds demonstrated life spans suitable for one-of-a-kind and low-volume applications, meeting the project objective.

  9. Gene-rich islands for fiber development in the cotton genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton fiber is an economically important seed trichome and the world's leading natural fiber used in the manufacture of textiles. As a step towards elucidating the genomic organization and distribution of gene networks responsible for cotton fiber development, we investigated the distribution of f...

  10. Design of Natural Fiber Composites Chemical Container Using Resin Flow Simulation of VARTML Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changduk Kong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an investigation on mechanical properties of flax natural fiber composite is performed as a precedent study on the design of eco-friendly structure using flax natural fiber composite. The Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding-Light (VARTML manufacturing method is adopted for manufacturing the flax fiber composite panel. The VARTML is a manufacturing process that the resin is injected into the dry layered up fibers enclosed by a rigid mold tool under vacuum. In this work, the resin flow analysis of VARTM manufacturing method is performed. A series of flax composite panels are manufactured, and several kinds of specimens cut out from the panels are tested to obtain mechanical performance data. Based on this, structural design of chemical storage tank for agricultural vehicle was performed using flax/vinyl ester. After structural design and analysis, the resin flow analysis of VARTM manufacturing method was performed

  11. Permeability characterization of stitched carbon fiber preforms by fiber optic sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Antonucci, V.; Esposito, M.(INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli, Italy); M. R. Ricciardi; M. Raffone; Zarrelli, M.; Giordano, M.

    2011-01-01

    The in-plane and through thickness permeability of unidirectional stitched carbon fiber preforms have been determined through vacuum infusion tests. The impregnation of various dry preforms with different stitching characteristics has been monitored by fiber optic sensors that have been stitched together with the dry tow to manufacture the dry preform. The experimental infusion times have been fitted by a numerical procedure based on Finite Element (FE) processing simulations. A good agreemen...

  12. High-brightness power delivery for fiber laser pumping: simulation and measurement of low-NA fiber guiding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanson, Dan; Levy, Moshe; Peleg, Ophir; Rappaport, Noam; Shamay, Moshe; Dahan, Nir; Klumel, Genady; Berk, Yuri; Baskin, Ilya

    2015-02-01

    Fiber laser manufacturers demand high-brightness laser diode pumps delivering optical pump energy in both a compact fiber core and narrow angular content. A pump delivery fiber of a 105 μm core and 0.22 numerical aperture (NA) is typically used, where the fiber NA is under-filled to ease the launch of laser diode emission into the fiber and make the fiber tolerant to bending. At SCD, we have developed multi-emitter fiber-coupled pump modules that deliver 50 W output from a 105 μm, 0.15 NA fiber at 915, 950 and 976 nm wavelengths enabling low-NA power delivery to a customer's fiber laser network. In this work, we address the challenges of coupling and propagating high optical powers from laser diode sources in weakly guiding step-index multimode fibers. We present simulations of light propagation inside the low-NA multimode fiber for different launch conditions and fiber bend diameters using a ray-racing tool and demonstrate how these affect the injection of light into cladding-bounded modes. The mode filling at launch and source NA directly limit the bend radius at which the fiber can be coiled. Experimentally, we measure the fiber bend loss using our 50 W fiber-coupled module and establish a critical bend diameter in agreement with our simulation results. We also employ thermal imaging to investigate fiber heating caused by macro-bends and angled cleaving. The low mode filling of the 0.15 NA fiber by our brightness-enhanced laser diodes allows it to be coiled with diameters down to 70 mm at full operating power despite the low NA and further eliminates the need for mode-stripping at fiber combiners and splices downstream from our pump modules.

  13. Manufacturing knowledge management strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, Duncan; Edwards, John

    2006-01-01

    Abstract The study sought to understand the components of knowledge management strategy from the perspective of staff in UK manufacturing organisations. To analyse this topic we took an empirical approach and collaborated with two manufacturing organisations. Our main finding centres on the key components of a knowledge management strategy, and the relationships between it and manufacturing strategy and corporate strategy. Other findings include: the nature of knowledge in manufact...

  14. Microelectronics manufacturing diagnostics handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Landzberg, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Foreword; Preface; Author's biographies; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Manufacturing yield; Problem diagnosis; Manufacturing defect classification system; Product dimensional metrology and pattern defect inspection; Process and tool monitoring; Contamination monitoring; Repair and rework; Test sites and vehicles for yield and process monitoring; In-line electrical test; Traceability; Failure analysis of semiconductor devices; Materials and chemical analysis of electronic devices; Modeling for manufacturing diagnostics; Artificial intelligence techniques for analysis: expert systems an

  15. Cloud agile manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Maci Prez, Francisco; Bern Martnez, Jos Vicente; Marcos Jorquera, Diego; Lorenzo Fonseca, Iren; Ferrndiz Colmeiro, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new manufacturing paradigm, we call Cloud Agile Manufacturing, and whose principal objective is to offer industrial production systems as a service. Thus users can access any functionality available in the cloud of manufacturing (process design, production, management, business integration, factories virtualization, etc.) without knowledge or at least without having to be experts in managing the required resources. The proposal takes advantage of many of the benefits...

  16. A Prediction Method for In-Plane Permeability and Manufacturing Applications in the VARTM Process

    OpenAIRE

    Ya-Jung Lee; Yu-Ti Jhan; Cheng-Hsien Chung; Yao Hsu

    2011-01-01

    VARTM (Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding) is a popular method for manufacturing large-scaled, single-sided mold composite structures, such as wind turbine blades and yachts. Simulation to find the proper infusion scenario before manufacturing is essential to avoid dry spots as well as incomplete saturation and various fiber weaves with different permeability affect numerical simulation tremendously. This study focused on deriving the in-plane permeability prediction method for FRP (Fiber...

  17. Fiber bragg gratings in polymer optical fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Harbach, Nico Gérard; Salathé, René-Paul

    2009-01-01

    Polymer optical fibers (POF) have received increased attention in recent years in the fields of data communication and sensing applications. The lower cost and higher flexibility are the main advantages of POF compared to silica fibers and make them interesting candidates for Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor applications. FBG are convenient measurement devices for strain and temperature measurements, as they can be multiplexed within one fiber yielding a sensor array and the fiber can be embe...

  18. Fiber bragg gratings in polymer optical fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Harbach, Nico Gérard

    2008-01-01

    Polymer optical fibers (POF) have received increased attention in recent years in the fields of data communication and sensing applications. The lower cost and higher flexibility are the main advantages of POF compared to silica fibers and make them interesting candidates for Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor applications. FBG are convenient measurement devices for strain and temperature measurements, as they can be multiplexed within one fiber yielding a sensor array and the fiber can be embe...

  19. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Department of Energy Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a collaborative, shared infrastructure to...

  20. Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility specializes in the design, analysis, fabrication and testing of advanced composite structures and materials for both...

  1. Controlling Fiber Morphology in Simultaneous Centrifugal Spinning and Photopolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yichen; Dulaney, Austin; Ellison, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    Current synthetic fiber manufacturing technologies use either solvent or heat to transform a solid preformed polymer into a liquid before applying a force to draw the liquid into fiber. While the use of solvent poses concerns regarding process safety and environmental impact, the use of heat may also lead to polymer degradation and excessive energy consumption. To address these critical challenges, here we present an alternative fiber manufacturing method that encompasses extruding a monomer solution through an orifice, drawing it using centrifugal Forcespinning and polymerizing the monomer jet into solid fiber in flight using UV initiated thiol-ene chemistry. This method not only negates the use of both heat and solvent, but also produces fibers that are highly crosslinked, mechanically robust, and thermally stable. In this process, the balance between curing kinetics, fiber flight time, and solution viscoelasticity is essential. Studies were conducted to quantitatively investigate the effect of these factors on fiber formation and morphology. An operating diagram was developed to show how the intricate interplay of these factors led to the formation of smooth fibers and other undesirable fiber defects, such as beads-on-string, fused fibers, and droplets.

  2. Dental fiber-post resin base material: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamichhane, Aashwini; Xu, Chun; Zhang, Fu-Qiang

    2014-02-01

    Teeth that have short clinical crown, which are not alone enough to support the definitive restoration can be best treated using the post and core system. The advantages of fiber post over conventional metallic post materials have led to its wide acceptance. In addition to that the combination of aesthetic and mechanical benefits of fiber post has provided it with a rise in the field of dentistry. Also the results obtained from some clinical trials have encouraged the clinicians to use the fiber posts confidently. Fiber posts are manufactured from pre-stretched fibers impregnated within a resin matrix. The fibers could that be of carbon, glass/silica, and quartz, whereas Epoxy and bis-GMA are the most widely used resin bases. But recently studies are also found to be going on for polyimide as possible material for the fiber post resin base as a substitute for the conventional materials. PMID:24605208

  3. Permeability characterization of stitched carbon fiber preforms by fiber optic sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Antonucci

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The in-plane and through thickness permeability of unidirectional stitched carbon fiber preforms have been determined through vacuum infusion tests. The impregnation of various dry preforms with different stitching characteristics has been monitored by fiber optic sensors that have been stitched together with the dry tow to manufacture the dry preform. The experimental infusion times have been fitted by a numerical procedure based on Finite Element (FE processing simulations. A good agreement between the numerical and experimental infusion times has been found demonstrating the potentiality of the fiber sensor system as suitable tool to evaluate impregnation times and permeability characteristics.

  4. Paradigm Shift from Current Manufacturing to Social Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Mohajeri, Babak

    2015-01-01

    The emergent phenomenon of social manufacturing is disrupting industries all over the world. Social manufacturing represents a new collaborative manufacturing paradigm. The shift from the current manufacturing paradigm to social manufacturing is facilitated by rapid development of mobile technologies, new digital manufacturing, and online social networks. There are already successful businesses that build upon the social manufacturing paradigm, e.g., in finance, hospitality, and transportatio...

  5. Aligning carbon fibers in micro-extruded composite ink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Chaitanya G.

    Direct write processes include a wide range of additive manufacturing techniques with the ability to fabricate structures directly onto planar and non-planar surfaces. Most additive manufacturing techniques use unreinforced polymers to produce parts. By adding carbon fiber as a reinforcing material, properties such as mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity can be enhanced. Carbon fibers can be long and continuous, or short and discontinuous. The strength of carbon fiber composite parts is greatly increased when the fibers are preferentially aligned. This research focuses on increasing the strength of additively manufactured parts reinforced using discontinuous carbon fibers that have been aligned during the micro extrusion process. A design of experiments (DOE) approach was used to identify significant process parameters affecting fiber alignment. Factors such as the length of carbon fibers, nozzle diameter, fiber loading fraction, air pressure, translational speed and standoff distance were considered. A two dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (2D FFT) was used to quantify the degree of fiber alignment in the extruded composite inks. ImageJ software supported by an oval profile plugin was used with micrographs of printed samples to obtain the carbon fiber alignment values. The optimal value for the factors was derived by identifying the significant main and interaction effects. Based on the results of the DOE, tensile test samples were printed with fibers aligned parallel and perpendicular to the tensile axis. A standard test method for tensile properties of plastic revealed that the extruded parts with fibers aligned along the tensile axis were better in tensile strength and modulus.

  6. A Review on the Mechanical Modeling of Composite Manufacturing Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baran, Ismet; Cinar, Kenan; Ersoy, Nuri; Akkerman, Remko; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    The increased usage of fiber reinforced polymer composites in load bearing applications requires a detailed understanding of the process induced residual stresses and their effect on the shape distortions. This is utmost necessary in order to have more reliable composite manufacturing since the...

  7. Advanced stabilization of PAN fibers for fabrication of carbon fibers by e-beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, the carbon fiber industry has been growing rapidly to meet the demand from efferent industries such as aerospace, military, turbine blades, light weight cylinders and pressure vessels. Generally, carbon fibers are manufactured by a controlled pyrolysis of stabilized precursor fiber such as polyacrylonitrile (PAN). In the stabilization step, the linear PAN molecules are first converted to cyclic structure. However, cyclization is a very complicated process and there are still differences of opinion on the reaction mechanisms. Photo-induced crosslinking and stabilization of PAN via ion beam, X-ray, gamma ray and UV irradiation has been reported in the literature. However, the process required a long stabilization time. In this work, a new and highly effective method of pretreatment PAN precursor fiber was described. The effect of the e-beam on the stabilization process of the fibers was investigated using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement

  8. General Tips Concerning What Has Been Learned About Cotton Processing in Traditional Textile Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article, under the following sub-headings, briefly describes a few important practical tips involving processing of cotton in traditional textile manufacturing: (1)Bale Selection and Fiber Mixing, (2) Fiber Opening and Cleaning, (3) Carding, (4) Drawing, (5) Combing (if necessary), (6) Roving, ...

  9. Improving Project Manufacturing Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korpivaara Ville

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to develop firms’ project manufacturing coordination. The development will be made by centralizing the manufacturing information flows in one system. To be able to centralize information, a deep user need assessment is required. After user needs have been identified, the existing system will be developed to match these needs. The theoretical background is achieved through exploring the literature of project manufacturing, development project success factors and different frameworks and tools for development project execution. The focus of this research is rather in customer need assessment than in system’s technical expertise. To ensure the deep understanding of customer needs this study is executed by action research method. As a result of this research the information system for project manufacturing coordination was developed to respond revealed needs of the stakeholders. The new system improves the quality of the manufacturing information, eliminates waste in manufacturing coordination processes and offers a better visibility to the project manufacturing. Hence it provides a solid base for the further development of project manufacturing.

  10. Manufacturing and ISO 9000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on ISO 9000 or ANSI Q 90 which is here and American manufacturing is now behind the rest of our counterparts. As people have had to change to metric system, so shall this change occur, if the manufacturing in the U.S. wants to participate in the global market

  11. Modern manufacturing engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book covers recent research and trends in Manufacturing Engineering. The chapters emphasize different aspects of the transformation from materials to products. It provides the reader with fundamental materials treatments and the integration of processes. Concepts such as green and lean manufacturing are also covered in this book.

  12. Effect of Fiber Surface Structure on Absorption Properties of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QIAN Xin, ZHI Jian-Hai, WANG Xue-Fei, ZHANG Yong-Gang, YANG Jian-Xing

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fibers with different surface structures were obtained through changing the treatment intensities in the process of electrochemical oxidation, and then oxidized carbon fibers were used as reinforcements to manufacture carbon fiber/epoxy composites. The relationship between fiber surface structure and the moisture absorption of carbon fiber/epoxy composites after hygrothermal aging treatment was studied. Results show that a significant increase happen to the surface activity of carbon fiber after electrochemical oxidation, and there is also a large extent of elevation in the relative content of oxygen-containing functional groups especially OH group which increases from 18.62% to 34.84%. The moisture absorption mechanism of carbon fiber/epoxy composites varies with the change of hygrothermal aging conditions. Temperature is considered to be a leading factor in the moisture absorption process. Results also indicate that the higher the surface activity of carbon fiber, the greater composite materials get the equilibrium moisture content. There is an obvious decline in the ILSS values of carbon fiber/epoxy composites with the increase of moisture uptake content.

  13. Genome Regions Associated with Functional Performance of Soybean Stem Fibers in Polypropylene Thermoplastic Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Reinprecht, Yarmilla; Arif, Muhammad; Simon, Leonardo C.; Pauls, K. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Plant fibers can be used to produce composite materials for automobile parts, thus reducing plastic used in their manufacture, overall vehicle weight and fuel consumption when they replace mineral fillers and glass fibers. Soybean stem residues are, potentially, significant sources of inexpensive, renewable and biodegradable natural fibers, but are not curretly used for biocomposite production due to the functional properties of their fibers in composites being unknown. The current study was ...

  14. A novel carbon fiber based porous carbon monolith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T.D.; Klett, J.W.; Weaver, C.E.

    1995-06-01

    A novel porous carbon material based on carbon fibers has been developed. The material, when activated, develops a significant micro- or mesopore volume dependent upon the carbon fiber type utilized (isotropic pitch or polyacrylonitrile). The materials will find applications in the field of fluid separations or as a catalyst support. Here, the manufacture and characterization of our porous carbon monoliths are described. A novel adsorbent carbon composite material has been developed comprising carbon fibers and a binder. The material, called carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS), was developed through a joint research program between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research (UKCAER).

  15. Thermophysical ESEM Characterization of Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sue, Jiwoong; Ochoa, Ozden O.; Effinger, Michael R.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of carbon fibers create residual stresses in aggressive manufacturing and service environments. In this effort, environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) is used for in situ observations of a carbon fiber cross-section up to 1000 C in order to evaluate the much neglected transverse CTE. The perimeter of fiber cross-section is calculated with the Scion image processing program from images that were taken at every 100 C increments. CTE values are calculated by linear regression of the strain data based on the perimeter changes. Furthermore, through SEM, WDS and TEM observations, we are in the process of bringing an interactive rationale between CTE, crystallinity and surface roughness of carbon fibers.

  16. Additive Manufacturing of Ultem Polymers and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Grady, Joseph E.; Draper, Robert D.; Shin, Euy-Sik E.; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this project was to conduct additive manufacturing to produce aircraft engine components by Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM), using commercially available polyetherimdes Ultem 9085 and experimental Ultem 1000 filled with 10 chopped carbon fiber. A property comparison between FDM-printed and injection molded coupons for Ultem 9085, Ultem 1000 resin and the fiber-filled composite Ultem 1000 was carried out. Furthermore, an acoustic liner was printed from Ultem 9085 simulating conventional honeycomb structured liners and tested in a wind tunnel. Composite compressor inlet guide vanes were also printed using fiber-filled Ultem 1000 filaments and tested in a cascade rig. The fiber-filled Ultem 1000 filaments and composite vanes were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and acid digestion to determine the porosity of FDM-printed articles which ranged from 25-31. Coupons of Ultem 9085, experimental Ultem 1000 composites and XH6050 resin were tested at room temperature and 400F to evaluate their corresponding mechanical properties.

  17. 77 FR 75972 - Foreign-Trade Zone 148-Knoxville, Tennessee, Toho Tenax America, Inc., Subzone 148C (Carbon Fiber...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... 148C (Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Authority); Extension of Comment Period on New Evidence The comment... preliminary recommendation not to authorize TTA to manufacture carbon fiber for the U.S. market at this time... comment (77 FR 73978, 12/12/2012). Rebuttal comments may be submitted during the subsequent 15-day...

  18. Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkou, Stig Eigil; Broeng, Jes; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    Photonic bandgap fibers are describes using a new Kagomé cladding structure. These fibers may potentially guide light in low-index regions. Such fibers offer new dispersion properties, and large design flexibility.......Photonic bandgap fibers are describes using a new Kagomé cladding structure. These fibers may potentially guide light in low-index regions. Such fibers offer new dispersion properties, and large design flexibility....

  19. Manufacture of disposal canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolvi, L.

    2009-12-15

    The report summarizes the development work carried out in the manufacturing of disposal canister components, and present status, in readiness for manufacturing, of the components for use in assembly of spent nuclear fuel disposal canister. The disposal canister consist of two major components: the nodular graphite cast iron insert and overpack of oxygen-free copper. The manufacturing process for copper components begins with a cylindrical cast copper billet. Three different manufacturing processes i.e. pierce and draw, extrusion and forging are being developed, which produce a seamless copper tube or a tube with an integrated bottom. The pierce and draw process, Posiva's reference method, makes an integrated bottom possible and only the lid requires welding. Inserts for BWR-element are cast with 12 square channels and inserts for VVER 440-element with 12 round channels. Inserts for EPR-elements have four square channels. Casting of BWR insert type has been studied so far. Experience of casting inserts for PWR, which is similar to the EPR-type, has been got in co-operation with SKB. The report describes the processes being developed for manufacture of disposal canister components and some results of the manufacturing experiments are presented. Quality assurance and quality control in manufacture of canister component is described. (orig.)

  20. Strong fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Che-Yu.

    1991-03-01

    This program was directed to a new and generic approach to the development of new materials with novel and interesting properties, and to the precision fabrication of these materials in one and two-dimensional forms. Advanced deposition processes and microfabrication technology were used to produce fibers and grids of metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and mixtures of controlled composition and structure, and with new and interesting mechanical and physical properties. Deposition processes included electron beam evaporation, co-deposition of mixtures by dual electron beam evaporation, thermal evaporation, sputtering of a single element or compound, sputtering of a single element in a gaseous atmosphere to produce compounds, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD), and selective tungsten chemical vapor deposition (W-CVD). The approach was to use the deposition processes in coordination with patterns generated by optical lithography to produce fibers with transverse dimensions in the micron range, and lengths from less than a millimeter to several centimeters. The approach is also applicable to the production of two-dimensional grids and particulates of controlled sizes and geometries.

  1. Reduced toxicity polyester resins and microvascular pre-preg tapes for advanced composites manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poillucci, Richard

    Advanced composites manufacturing broadly encapsulates topics ranging from matrix chemistries to automated machines that lay-up fiber-reinforced materials. Environmental regulations are stimulating research to reduce matrix resin formulation toxicity. At present, composites fabricated with polyester resins expose workers to the risk of contact with and inhalation of styrene monomer, which is a potential carcinogen, neurotoxin, and respiratory irritant. The first primary goal of this thesis is to reduce the toxicity associated with polyester resins by: (1) identification of potential monomers to replace styrene, (2) determination of monomer solubility within the polyester, and (3) investigation of approaches to rapidly screen a large resin composition parameter space. Monomers are identified based on their ability to react with polyester and their toxicity as determined by the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) and a green screen method. Solubilities were determined by the Hoftyzer -- Van Krevelen method, Hansen solubility parameter database, and experimental mixing of monomers. A combinatorial microfluidic mixing device is designed and tested to obtain distinct resin compositions from two input chemistries. The push for safer materials is complemented by a thrust for multifunctional composites. The second primary goal of this thesis is to design and implement the manufacture of sacrificial fiber materials suitable for use in automated fiber placement of microvascaular multifunctional composites. Two key advancements are required to achieve this goal: (1) development of a roll-to-roll method to place sacrificial fibers onto carbon fiber pre-preg tape; and (2) demonstration of feasible manufacture of microvascular carbon fiber plates with automated fiber placement. An automated method for placing sacrificial fibers onto carbon fiber tapes is designed and a prototype implemented. Carbon fiber tows with manual placement of sacrificial fibers is implemented within an automated fiber placement machine and the successful fabrication of a carbon fiber plate with an integrated microvascular channel is demonstrated.

  2. Competitive Manufacturing Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rymaszewska, Anna; Christensen, Irene; Karlsson, Christer

    The increasing complexity of business environments and the pressure for organizations on delivering new products faster while maintaining the superior quality of their products, has forced manufacturing organizations to rethink their operations. Managers responsible for manufacturing ramp-up need...... to constantly improve this process in terms of time to volume, according to predefined cost and quality measures. The importance of the success of this process can lead to a significant creation of competitive advantage. This paper addresses the challenges of the manufacturing ramp-up process in the...... context of lean improvements as well as organizational learning....

  3. Continuous fiber ceramic composites for energy related applications. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-07

    The US Department of Energy has established the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) program to develop technology for the manufacture of CFCC`s for use in industrial applications where a reduction in energy usage or emissions could be realized. As part of this program, the Dow Chemical Company explored the manufacture of a fiber reinforced/self reinforced silicon nitride for use in industrial chemical processing. In Dow`s program, CFCC manufacturing technology was developed around traditional, cost effective, tape casting routes. Formulations were developed and coupled with unique processing procedures which enabled the manufacture of tubular green laminates of the dimension needed for the application. An evaluation of the effect of various fibers and fiber coatings on the properties of a fiber reinforced composites was also conducted. Results indicated that fiber coatings could provide composites exhibiting non-catastrophic failure and substantially improved toughness. However, an evaluation of these materials in industrial process environments showed that the material system chosen by Dow did not provide the required performance improvements to make replacement of current metallic components with CFCC components economically viable.

  4. Many Manufactured Nanosats Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To achieve the capability to affordably produce scores of nano-spacecraft for envisioned constellation missions, a new manufacturing process is needed to reduce the...

  5. Manufacturing parabolic mirrors

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The photo shows the construction of a vertical centrifuge mounted on an air cushion, with a precision of 1/10000 during rotation, used for the manufacture of very high=precision parabolic mirrors. (See Annual Report 1974.)

  6. MEDICAL MANUFACTURING INNOVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosma Sorin Cosmin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of these studies was to improve the design and manufacturing process by selective laser melting, of new medical implants. After manufacturing process, the implants were measured, microscopically and mechanical analyzed. Implants manufactured by AM can be an attractive option for surface coatings to improve the osseointegration process. The main advantages of customized implants made by AM process are: the precise adaptation to the region of implantation, better cosmesis, reduced surgical times and better performance over their generic counterparts. These medical manufacturing changes the way that the surgeons are planning surgeries and engineers are designing custom implant. AM process has eliminated the constraints of shape, size, internal structure and mechanical properties making it possible for fabrication of implants that conform to the physical and mechanical requirements of implantation according to CT images. This article will review some custom implants fabricated in DME using biocompatible titanium.

  7. Integrating manufacturing process capabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Rafolls Llusa, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Manufacturing processs costs models are key buiding blocks for developing component family template cost models and whole engine cost models in Rolls-Royce. THe process cost models should be generic and be driven by relevant process variables. EDM (Electro Discharge Machining) ias a key process in manufacturing of film cooling holes for Turbine Blades and NGV's. Development of this process cost model will be done by interfacing with the manufactoring process owner and turbine cooling community.

  8. Manufacturing technology acquisition

    OpenAIRE

    Mallon, Michael John

    2002-01-01

    This thesis concerns the acquisition of newly developed production equipment in factories. Types of Manufacturing Technology Acquisition (MTA) can range from in-house development through to outright purchase from a supplier. MTA projects often fail because the new equipment fails to perform well enough or the expected financial benefits are not achieved. The purpose of this research has been to find out how to select the right manufacturing technology acquisition projects, a...

  9. Durability of pulp fiber-cement composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Benjamin J.

    Wood pulp fibers are a unique reinforcing material as they are non-hazardous, renewable, and readily available at relatively low cost compared to other commercially available fibers. Today, pulp fiber-cement composites can be found in products such as extruded non-pressure pipes and non-structural building materials, mainly thin-sheet products. Although natural fibers have been used historically to reinforce various building materials, little scientific effort has been devoted to the examination of natural fibers to reinforce engineering materials until recently. The need for this type of fundamental research has been emphasized by widespread awareness of moisture-related failures of some engineered materials; these failures have led to the filing of national- and state-level class action lawsuits against several manufacturers. Thus, if pulp fiber-cement composites are to be used for exterior structural applications, the effects of cyclical wet/dry (rain/heat) exposure on performance must be known. Pulp fiber-cement composites have been tested in flexure to examine the progression of strength and toughness degradation. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), a three-part model describing the mechanisms of progressive degradation has been proposed: (1) initial fiber-cement/fiber interlayer debonding, (2) reprecipitation of crystalline and amorphous ettringite within the void space at the former fiber-cement interface, and (3) fiber embrittlement due to reprecipitation of calcium hydroxide filling the spaces within the fiber cell wall structure. Finally, as a means to mitigate kraft pulp fiber-cement composite degradation, the effects of partial portland cement replacement with various supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) has been investigated for their effect on mitigating kraft pulp fiber-cement composite mechanical property degradation (i.e., strength and toughness losses) during wet/dry cycling. SCMs have been found to be effective in mitigating composite degradation through several processes, including a reduction in the calcium hydroxide content, stabilization of monosulfate by maintaining pore solution pH, and a decrease in ettringite reprecipitation accomplished by increased binding of aluminum in calcium aluminate phases and calcium in the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) phase.

  10. Plastic Strength Member For Nonmetallic Optical Fiber Cables Used In Fiber Optic Local Area Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunk, Jonah; Conforti, Evandro

    1989-02-01

    The nonmetallic optical fibers cables have been required in several applications of optoelectronic communication systems. The dielectric fiber lightguide attends the environment characteristics described above and the nonmetallic optical fiber cables meets the optical fiber features (lightwave weight, ground loop free ...). Strength member is the most important component for optical cables. It's responsable to keep the optical fibers free of stress during cable installation. The strength member must not only have a high modulus but must be compatible with the other components of the cable, specially during processing of these materials in cable manufacture. The coefficient of thermal expansion is very important because various plastic materials are typically extruded during cable fabrication, and dimensional changes can cause serious problems during manufacture or subsequent environment temperature extremes if the cable is not properly designed. Cost has been the barrier to using fiber optic links in low and moderate data rate, short and moderate haul applications. KevlarR and F.R.P. are imported materials in Brazil, therefore they are expensive. We have developed a plastic strength member to meet the economic viability of the optoelectronic system. The application of this plastic strength member in tight structure and loose structure are described. The reliability of this composite material as strength member in optical cables as well as the comparison with various imported FRP are shown.

  11. Method of making a continuous ceramic fiber composite hot gas filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Charles A. (Lynchburg, VA); Wagner, Richard A. (Lynchburg, VA); Komoroski, Ronald G. (Lynchburg, VA); Gunter, Greg A. (Lynchburg, VA); Barringer, Eric A. (Lynchburg, VA); Goettler, Richard W. (Lynchburg, VA)

    1999-01-01

    A ceramic fiber composite structure particularly suitable for use as a hot gas cleanup ceramic fiber composite filter and method of making same from ceramic composite material has a structure which provides for increased strength and toughness in high temperature environments. The ceramic fiber composite structure or filter is made by a process in which a continuous ceramic fiber is intimately surrounded by discontinuous chopped ceramic fibers during manufacture to produce a ceramic fiber composite preform which is then bonded using various ceramic binders. The ceramic fiber composite preform is then fired to create a bond phase at the fiber contact points. Parameters such as fiber tension, spacing, and the relative proportions of the continuous ceramic fiber and chopped ceramic fibers can be varied as the continuous ceramic fiber and chopped ceramic fiber are simultaneously formed on the porous vacuum mandrel to obtain a desired distribution of the continuous ceramic fiber and the chopped ceramic fiber in the ceramic fiber composite structure or filter.

  12. Manufacturing of Nanocomposite Carbon Fibers and Composite Cylinders Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lightweight structures has enormous potential for space vehicles applications as the reduction of weight from metallic structures add to vehicle performance, reduce...

  13. Silkworms transformed with chimeric silkworm/spider silk genes spin composite silk fibers with improved mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teul, Florence; Miao, Yun-Gen; Sohn, Bong-Hee; Kim, Young-Soo; Hull, J Joe; Fraser, Malcolm J; Lewis, Randolph V; Jarvis, Donald L

    2012-01-17

    The development of a spider silk-manufacturing process is of great interest. However, there are serious problems with natural manufacturing through spider farming, and standard recombinant protein production platforms have provided limited progress due to their inability to assemble spider silk proteins into fibers. Thus, we used piggyBac vectors to create transgenic silkworms encoding chimeric silkworm/spider silk proteins. The silk fibers produced by these animals were composite materials that included chimeric silkworm/spider silk proteins integrated in an extremely stable manner. Furthermore, these composite fibers were, on average, tougher than the parental silkworm silk fibers and as tough as native dragline spider silk fibers. These results demonstrate that silkworms can be engineered to manufacture composite silk fibers containing stably integrated spider silk protein sequences, which significantly improve the overall mechanical properties of the parental silkworm silk fibers. PMID:22215590

  14. Energetics Manufacturing Technology Center (EMTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Manufacturing Technology Center (EMTC), established in 1994 by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Manufacturing Technology (ManTech) Program, is Navy...

  15. High-fiber foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary fiber - self-care ... Dietary fiber adds bulk to your diet. Because it makes you feel full faster, it can help you ... Grains are another important source of dietary fiber. Eat more: ... Whole-grain breads Brown rice Popcorn High-fiber cereals, such ...

  16. Photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Hansen, K P; Nielsen, M D; Hansen, Theis Peter; Riishede, Jesper; Hougaard, Kristian G.; Sørensen, T; Larsen, T T; Mortensen, N A; Broeng, Jes; Jensen, Jesper Bevensee; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2003-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibers having a complex microstructure in the transverse plane constitute a new and promising class of optical fibers. Such fibers can either guide light through total internal reflection or the photonic bandgap effect, In this paper, we review the different types and applications...... of photonic crystal fibers with particular emphasis on recent advances in the field....

  17. Fibered F-Algebra

    OpenAIRE

    Kleyn, Aleks

    2007-01-01

    The concept of F-algebra and its representation can be extended to an arbitrary bundle. We define operations of fibered F-algebra in fiber. The paper presents the representation theory of of fibered F-algebra as well as a comparison of representation of F-algebra and of representation of fibered F-algebra.

  18. Fiber optic connector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajic, Slobodan (Knoxville, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenior City, TN)

    1996-01-01

    A fiber optic connector and method for connecting composite materials within which optical fibers are imbedded. The fiber optic connector includes a capillary tube for receiving optical fibers at opposing ends. The method involves inserting a first optical fiber into the capillary tube and imbedding the unit in the end of a softened composite material. The capillary tube is injected with a coupling medium which subsequently solidifies. The composite material is machined to a desired configuration. An external optical fiber is then inserted into the capillary tube after fluidizing the coupling medium, whereby the optical fibers are coupled.

  19. 75 FR 104 - Manufacturing & Services' Sustainable Manufacturing Initiative; Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-04

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing & Services' Sustainable Manufacturing Initiative; Update ACTION: Notice and request for input on proposed new areas of work for the Sustainable Manufacturing Initiative... (ITA) Manufacturing & Services Unit held a Sustainability and U.S. Competitiveness Summit on October...

  20. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  1. Fiber optic monitoring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samborsky, James K. (605 Groves Blvd., N. Augusta, SC 29841)

    1993-01-01

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  2. Scintillator manufacture at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellott, K.; Bross, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-08-01

    A decade of research into plastic scintillation materials at Fermilab is reviewed. Early work with plastic optical fiber fabrication is revisited and recent experiments with large-scale commercial methods for production of bulk scintillator are discussed. Costs for various forms of scintillator are examined and new development goals including cost reduction methods and quality improvement techniques are suggested.

  3. Implementation of hierarchical design for manufacture rules in manufacturing processes

    OpenAIRE

    Parvez, Masud

    2008-01-01

    In order to shorten the product development cycle time, minimise overall cost and smooth transition into production, early consideration of manufacturing processes is important. Design for Manufacture (DFM) is the practice of designing products with manufacturing issues using an intelligent system, which translates 3D solid models into manufacturable features. Many existing and potential applications, particularly in the field of manufacturing, require various aspects of features technology. ...

  4. Robust Manufacturing Control

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This contributed volume collects research papers, presented at the CIRP Sponsored Conference Robust Manufacturing Control: Innovative and Interdisciplinary Approaches for Global Networks (RoMaC 2012, Jacobs University, Bremen, Germany, June 18th-20th 2012). These research papers present the latest developments and new ideas focusing on robust manufacturing control for global networks. Today, Global Production Networks (i.e. the nexus of interconnected material and information flows through which products and services are manufactured, assembled and distributed) are confronted with and expected to adapt to: sudden and unpredictable large-scale changes of important parameters which are occurring more and more frequently, event propagation in networks with high degree of interconnectivity which leads to unforeseen fluctuations, and non-equilibrium states which increasingly characterize daily business. These multi-scale changes deeply influence logistic target achievement and call for robust planning and control ...

  5. FIBERBOARD MANUFACTURED WITHOUT RESIN USING THE FENTON REACTION

    OpenAIRE

    JUAN RIQUELME-VALDÉS; ESTEBAN RAMÍREZ; DAVID CONTRERAS; JUANITA FREER; JAIME RODRÍGUEZ

    2008-01-01

    Resin-free fiberboards were manufactured using industrial fiber from Pinus radiata activated by an oxidative treatment using the Fenton reaction (H(2)0(2)/ Fe(II)). A multivariate analysis was used to study the effect of fiber moisture content (MC), press temperature (T), and the H(2)0(2)/Fe(II) ratio on the board internal bond strength (IB). Using response surface methodology, a set of máximum IB conditions was obtained. Validation of these conditions which included 25% MC, 170°C press tempe...

  6. Flexibility in fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From its inception Exxon Nuclear has produced both BWR and PWR fuels. This is reflected in a product line that, to date, includes over 20 fuel designs. These range from 6x6 design at one end of the spectrum to the recently introduced 17x17 design. The benefits offered include close tailoring of the fuel design to match the customer's requirements, and the ability to rapidly introduce product changes, such as the axial blanket design, with a minimal impact on manufacturing. This flexibility places a number of demands on the manufacturing organization. Close interfaces must be established, and maintained, between the marketing, product design, manufacturing, purchasing and quality organizations, and the information flows must be immediate and accurate. Production schedules must be well planned and must be maintained or revised to reflect changing circumstances. Finally, the manufacturing facilities must be designed to allow rapid switchover between product designs with minor tooling changes and/or rerouting of product flows to alternate work stations. Among the tools used to manage the flow of information and to maintain the tight integration necessary between the various manufacturing, engineering and quality organizations is a commercially available, computerized planning and tracking system, AMAPS. A real-time production data collection system has been designed which gathers data from each production work station for use by the shop floor control module of AMAPS. Accuracy of input to the system is improved through extensive use of bar codes to gather information on the product as it moves through and between work stations. This computerized preparation of material tracing has an impact on direct manufacturing records, quality control records, nuclear material records and accounting and inventory records. This is of benefit to both Exxon Nuclear and its customers

  7. Blowable glass fiber thermal insulation product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process and apparatus for manufacturing a blowable glass fiber insulation product is disclosed. The product resulting from the process and apparatus is also disclosed. This process includes the steps of cutting unbonded glass fiber matting and lengths of twisted glass fiber yarn raw material into predetermined relatively large size pieces. The pieces are mixed together and the mixture is fluffed to decrease its density. The mixture is then hammermilled into relatively smaller size pieces suitable for use as blowable insulation. In accordance with the apparatus according to this invention, a cutter cuts glass fiber matting and lengths of twisted glass fiber yarn into relatively large size pieces which are mixed and then fluffed and further cut in a fluffer. A hammermill is used for reducing the mixture into relatively smaller size pieces suitable for use as blowable insulation. The blowable insulation product comprises loose, irregularly formed and separate clumps of glass fiber material approximately one inch (215 cm.) in diameter and having a density of 1 lb./cu./ft. (16 kg./cu./m.) and has a thermal resistance value of 3.3 per inch (2.5 cm.) of thickness

  8. Fiber Optics Physics and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Mitschke, Fedor

    2010-01-01

    Telephone, telefax, email and internet -- the key ingredient of the inner workings is the conduit: the line which is designed to carry massive amounts of data at breakneck speed. In their data-carrying capacity optical fiber lines beat other technologies (copper cable, microwave beacons, satellite links) hands down, at least in the long haul. This book tells you all you want to know about optical fibers: Their structure, their light-guiding mechanism, their material and manufacture, their use. Several effects tend to degrade the signal as it travels down the fiber: they are spelled out in detail. Nonlinear processes are given due consideration for a twofold reason: On the one hand they are fundamentally different from the more familiar processes in electrical cable. On the other hand, they form the basis of particularly interesting and innovative applications, provided they are understood well enough. A case in point is the use of so-called solitons, i.e. special pulses of light which have the wonderful prope...

  9. 78 FR 67117 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an Opportunity to Apply for Membership on the Manufacturing Council.... manufacturing industry to fill five vacant positions on the Manufacturing Council (Council). The purpose of...

  10. Reconfigurable manufacturing system: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra V.; Raj T.; Arora A

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the review of Reconfigurable manufacturing system. That aims at achievingcost effective and rapid system changes needed, by incorporating principle of modularity, integrability andscalability as this new manufacturing system. Reconfigurable manufacturing system promises customizedflexibility in a short time, while the other manufacturing system provides generalized flexibility designed foranticipation variations.This paper shows the definition and background of reconfigura...

  11. Boron carbide manufacturing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention relates to the manufacture of boron carbide powder. It is well known that boron carbide, formula B4C, has many industrial applications because of its hardness. It is thus used in powder form as an abrasive, especially for lapping and polishing hard metals and carbides, whereas in the pressed and sintered condition it is very suitable for manufacturing parts subjected to a high rate of wear, e.g., sanding nozzles, dies, or bearings. Other applications exist in the nuclear field, when the B 10 isotope, which is a neutron absorber, is present

  12. Developments in fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BNFL has a long tradition of willingness to embrace technological challenge and a dedication to quality. This paper describes advances in the overall manufacturing philosophy at BNFL's Fuel Business Group and then covers how some new technologies are currently being employed in BNFL Fuel Business Group's flagship oxide complex (OFC), which is currently in its final stages of commissioning. This plant represents a total investment of some Pound 200 million. This paper also describes how these technologies are also being deployed in BNFL's MOX plant now being built at Sellafield and, finally, covers some new processes being developed for advanced fuel manufacture. (author)

  13. ATS materials/manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnitz, M.A.; Wright, I.G.; Ferber, M.K. [and others

    1997-11-01

    The Materials/Manufacturing Technology subelement is a part of the base technology portion of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program. The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from national laboratories and universities. The projects in this subelement are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines. Work is currently ongoing on thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), the scale-up of single crystal airfoil manufacturing technologies, materials characterization, and technology information exchange. This paper presents highlights of the activities during the past year. 12 refs., 24 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Laser in manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Davim, J Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Generally a laser (light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) is defined as "a device which uses a quantum mechanical effect, stimulated emission, to generate a coherent beam of light from a lasing medium of controlled purity, size, and shape". Laser material processing represents a great number of methods, which are rapidly growing in current and different industrial applications as new alternatives to traditional manufacturing processes. Nowadays, the use of lasers in manufacturing is an emerging area with a wide variety of applications, for example, in electronics, molds an

  15. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easoz, J. R.; Herlocher, R. H.

    1991-12-01

    This report examines the cost-effective manufacture of dendritic-web-based photovoltaic modules. It explains how process changes can increase production and reduce manufacturing costs. Long-range benefits of these improved processes are also discussed. Problems are identified that could impede increasing production and reducing costs; approaches to solve these problems are presented. These approaches involve web growth throughput, cell efficiency, process yield, silicon use, process control, automation, and module efficiency. Also discussed are the benefits of bifacial module design, unique to the dendritic web process.

  16. Time for a forum on terms used for textile fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Zawistoski, P. S.

    2012-01-01

    The advances in manufactured fibers and textiles have garnered interest and excitement of textile artists and consumers alike for a myriad of reasons, including health, environmental, and fashion. The chemical and molecular nature of these advances, however leads to confusion and misunderstanding of the new fibers in the materials. This is exacerbated by the current climate of distrust for chemical words and desire for "green" products and the unregulated (mis)information and marketing on the...

  17. OEM fiber laser rangefinder for long-distance measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corman, Alexandre; Chiquet, Frédéric; Avisse, Thomas; Le Flohic, Marc

    2015-05-01

    SensUp designs and manufactures electro-optical systems based on laser technology, in particular from fiber lasers. Indeed, that kind of source enables us to get a significant peak power with huge repetition rates at the same time, thus combining some characteristics of the two main technologies on the telemetry field today: laser diodes and solid-state lasers. The OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) fiber Laser RangeFinder (LRF) set out below, aims to fit the SWaP (Size Weight and Power) requirements of military markets, and might turn out to be a real alternative to other technologies usually used in range finding systems.

  18. Optical Fiber Fusion Splicing

    CERN Document Server

    Yablon, Andrew D

    2005-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date treatment of optical fiber fusion splicing incorporating all the recent innovations in the field. It provides a toolbox of general strategies and specific techniques that the reader can apply when optimizing fusion splices between novel fibers. It specifically addresses considerations important for fusion splicing of contemporary specialty fibers including dispersion compensating fiber, erbium-doped gain fiber, polarization maintaining fiber, and microstructured fiber. Finally, it discusses the future of optical fiber fusion splicing including silica and non-silica based optical fibers as well as the trend toward increasing automation. Whilst serving as a self-contained reference work, abundant citations from the technical literature will enable readers to readily locate primary sources.

  19. CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES IN HIGH VOLUME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Charles David [ORNL; Das, Sujit [ORNL; Jeon, Dr. Saeil [Volvo Trucks North America

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle lightweighting represents one of several design approaches that automotive and heavy truck manufacturers are currently evaluating to improve fuel economy, lower emissions, and improve freight efficiency (tons-miles per gallon of fuel). With changes in fuel efficiency and environmental regulations in the area of transportation, the next decade will likely see considerable vehicle lightweighting throughout the ground transportation industry. Greater use of carbon fiber composites and light metals is a key component of that strategy. This paper examines the competition between candidate materials for lightweighting of heavy vehicles and passenger cars. A 53-component, 25 % mass reduction, body-in-white cost analysis is presented for each material class, highlighting the potential cost penalty for each kilogram of mass reduction and then comparing the various material options. Lastly, as the cost of carbon fiber is a major component of the elevated cost of carbon fiber composites, a brief look at the factors that influence that cost is presented.

  20. Cost analysis of advanced turbine blade manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, C. F.; Blake, D. E.; Stelson, T. S.

    1977-01-01

    A rigorous analysis was conducted to estimate relative manufacturing costs for high technology gas turbine blades prepared by three candidate materials process systems. The manufacturing costs for the same turbine blade configuration of directionally solidified eutectic alloy, an oxide dispersion strengthened superalloy, and a fiber reinforced superalloy were compared on a relative basis to the costs of the same blade currently in production utilizing the directional solidification process. An analytical process cost model was developed to quantitatively perform the cost comparisons. The impact of individual process yield factors on costs was also assessed as well as effects of process parameters, raw materials, labor rates and consumable items.

  1. UTILIZATION OF OLIVE MILL SLUDGE IN THE MANUFACTURE OF FIBERBOARD

    OpenAIRE

    Nadir Ayrilmis; Umit Buyuksari

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the utilization of olive mill sludge (OMS) as an alternative to wood in the manufacture of the medium density fiberboard (MDF). The MDF panels were manufactured using standardized procedures that simulated industrial production at the laboratory. Six panel types were made from various mixtures of hardwood fiber/dried OMS flour, 100/0, 90/10, 80/20, 70/30, 60/40, and 50/50 (by weight) percents, respectively. With increasing OMS flour content, t...

  2. Cladding tube manufacturing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives an overview of the manufacturing routine of PWR cladding tubes. The routine essentially consists of a series of deformation and annealing processes which are necessary to transform the ingot geometry to tube dimensions. By changing shape, microstructure and structure-related properties are altered simultaneously. First, a short overview of the basics of that part of deformation geometry is given which is related to tube reducing operations. Then those processes of the manufacturing routine which change the microstructure are depicted, and the influence of certain process parameters on microstructure and material properties are shown. The influence of the resulting microstructure on material properties is not discussed in detail, since it is described in my previous report Alloy Development for High Burnup Cladding. Because of their paramount importance still up to now, and because manufacturing data and their influence on properties for other alloys are not so well established or published, the descriptions are mostly related to Zry4 tube manufacturing, and are only in short for other alloys. (author). 9 refs., 46 figs

  3. Transfer of manufacturing units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Skov; Riis, Jens Ove; Sørensen, Brian Vejrum

    2008-01-01

    The ongoing and unfolding relocation of activities is one of the major trends, that calls for attention in the domain of operations management. In particular, prescriptive models outlining: stages of the process, where to locate, and how to establish the new facilities have been studied, while th...... and dilemmas to be addressed when transferring manufacturing units....

  4. Manufacturing halal in Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    2016-01-01

    production, trade and consumption. Based on fieldwork in Malaysia, this article explores how manufacturing companies understand and practise halal certification, standards and technoscience. I argue that while existing studies of halal overwhelmingly explore micro-social aspects such as the everyday...

  5. Nuclear fuel manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technologies used to manufacture nuclear fuel from uranium ore are outlined, with particular reference to the light water reactor fuel cycle. Capital and operating cost estimates for the processing stages are given, and the relevance to a developing uranium industry in Australia is discussed

  6. Cladding tube manufacturing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, R. [Kraftwerk Union AG, Mulheim (Germany); Jeong, Y.H.; Baek, B.J.; Kim, K.H.; Kim, S.J.; Choi, B.K.; Kim, J.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    This report gives an overview of the manufacturing routine of PWR cladding tubes. The routine essentially consists of a series of deformation and annealing processes which are necessary to transform the ingot geometry to tube dimensions. By changing shape, microstructure and structure-related properties are altered simultaneously. First, a short overview of the basics of that part of deformation geometry is given which is related to tube reducing operations. Then those processes of the manufacturing routine which change the microstructure are depicted, and the influence of certain process parameters on microstructure and material properties are shown. The influence of the resulting microstructure on material properties is not discussed in detail, since it is described in my previous report 'Alloy Development for High Burnup Cladding.' Because of their paramount importance still up to now, and because manufacturing data and their influence on properties for other alloys are not so well established or published, the descriptions are mostly related to Zry4 tube manufacturing, and are only in short for other alloys. (author). 9 refs., 46 figs.

  7. Manufacturing and Merchandising Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Peter J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Anyone with a flair for business, product development, or promotion might consider a manufacturing or merchandising occupation. The music industry offers many career opportunities for administrators, salespersons, marketing specialists--the record industry offers positions from promotion manager to rack jobber. Describes instrument company

  8. Drug development and manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.

    2015-10-13

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry has been used for detecting binding events and measuring binding selectivities between chemicals and receptors. XRF may also be used for estimating the therapeutic index of a chemical, for estimating the binding selectivity of a chemical versus chemical analogs, for measuring post-translational modifications of proteins, and for drug manufacturing.

  9. Reusing Old Manufacturing Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an interesting design challenge for students, one that will certainly let them integrate subject matter and get a sense of pride for doing something useful in their own community. The author would be willing to bet that the average town or city has some old red brick manufacturing building(s) that have seen much better days.

  10. Photonic crystal fibers -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Libori, Stig E. Barkou

    2002-01-01

    possibilities, the thesis will attempot to offer a proof of concept, rather than an in-depth analysis, thus reflecting the present state of the art within the area of micro-structured fibers. Another important sub-class of micro-structured fibers is photonic bandgap fibers. Photonic bandgap fibers are far more......-structured fibers that guide light by simple index effects. However, photonic bandgap fibers offer more radical possibilities, such as core regions with an effective index that is lower than the surrounding effective cladding index one may guide light in air- and dispersion qualities that differ from both those of...

  11. Sensory and adaptive access of manufacturing equipment resources in cloud manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Mingli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensory and adaptive access of manufacturing equipment (ME is the key of physical resources virtualization in cloud manufacturing (CM. Three aspects including status sensory of ME, Internet of Things (IoT and adaptive access of CM service platform were elaborated to analyze the characteristics and to investigate the related technologies. The importance of fiber Bragg grating sensing technology for ME sensory was analyzed. The heterogeneous fusion system and fusion access method as well as device of equipment resources were discussed. The access of ME resources for CM service platform was investigated based on three aspects including information fusion, description and retrieval and service release. Taking the realization of intelligent sensory and adaptive access for typical ME resources as an example, the prototype system, the sensory of ME resources and the realization of IoT of ME resources as well as the adaptive access method for CM service platform were expounded.

  12. NOVEL USE OF WASTE KERATIN AND COTTON LINTER FIBERS FOR PROTOTYPE TISSUE PAPERS AND THEIR EVALUATION

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Shi; Tom G. Shannon; Ellen Pelky

    2010-01-01

    Corporate environmental sustainability calls for sustainable product manufacturing with less creation of waste material or increased reuse of waste materials. One example is the use of keratin fiber from the poultry industry and cotton linter from the textile industry for paper and tissue manufacturing. In this paper, the feasibility of using these waste fibers to make paper was demonstrated in handsheets. The properties of these handsheets were compared to the properties of handsheets made w...

  13. Fibers as carriers of microbial particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał L. Górny

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to assess the ability of natural, synthetic and semi-synthetic fibers to transport microbial particles. Material and Methods: The simultaneously settled dust and aerosol sampling was carried out in 3 industrial facilities processing natural (cotton, silk, flax, hemp, synthetic (polyamide, polyester, polyacrylonitrile, polypropylene and semi-synthetic (viscose fibrous materials; 2 stables where horses and sheep were bred; 4 homes where dogs or cats were kept and 1 zoo lion pavilion. All samples were laboratory analyzed for their microbiological purity. The isolated strains were qualitatively identified. To identify the structure and arrangement of fibers that may support transport of microbial particles, a scanning electron microscopy analysis was performed. Results: Both settled and airborne fibers transported analogous microorganisms. All synthetic, semi-synthetic and silk fibers, present as separated threads with smooth surface, were free from microbial contamination. Natural fibers with loose packing and rough surface (e.g., wool, horse hair, sheaf packing and septated surface (e.g., flax, hemp or present as twisted ribbons with corrugated surface (cotton were able to carry up to 9×105 cfu/g aerobic bacteria, 3.4×104 cfu/g anaerobic bacteria and 6.3×104 cfu/g of fungi, including pathogenic strains classified by Directive 2000/54/EC in hazard group 2. Conclusions: As plant and animal fibers are contaminated with a significant number of microorganisms, including pathogens, all of them should be mechanically eliminated from the environment. In factories, if the manufacturing process allows, they should be replaced by synthetic or semi-synthetic fibers. To avoid unwanted exposure to harmful microbial agents on fibers, the containment measures that efficiently limit their presence and dissemination in both occupational and non-occupational environments should be introduced. Med Pr 2015;66(4:511–523

  14. Lunar preform manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Gregory N.; Nease, Sandra; Lager, Vicky; Yaghjian, Raffy; Waller, Chris

    A design for a machine to produce hollow, continuous fiber-reinforced composite rods of lunar glass and a liquid crystalline matrix using the pultrusion process is presented. The glass fiber will be produced from the lunar surface, with the machine and matrix being transported to the moon. The process is adaptable to the low gravity and near-vacuum environment of the moon through the use of a thermoplastic matrix in fiber form as it enters the pultrusion process. With a power consumption of 5 kW, the proposed machine will run unmanned continuously in fourteen-day cycles, matching the length of lunar days. A number of dies could be included that would allow the machine to produce rods of varying diameter, I-beams, angles, and other structural members. These members could then be used for construction on the lunar surface or transported for use in orbit. The benefits of this proposal are in the savings in weight of the cargo each lunar mission would carry. The supply of glass on the moon is effectively endless, so enough rods would have to be produced to justify its transportation, operation, and capital cost. This should not be difficult as weight on lunar mission is at a premium.

  15. Steel fiber reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel-Fiber Reinforced Concrete is constructed by adding short fibers of small cross-sectional size .to the fresh concrete. These fibers reinforce the concrete in all directions, as they are randomly oriented. The improved mechanical properties of concrete include ductility, impact-resistance, compressive, tensile and flexural strength and abrasion-resistance. These uniqlte properties of the fiber- reinforcement can be exploited to great advantage in concrete structural members containing both conventional bar-reinforcement and steel fibers. The improvements in mechanical properties of cementitious materials resulting from steel-fiber reinforcement depend on the type, geometry, volume fraction and material-properties of fibers, the matrix mix proportions and the fiber-matrix interfacial bond characteristics. Effects of steel fibers on the mechanical properties of concrete have been investigated in this paper through a comprehensive testing-programme, by varying the fiber volume fraction and the aspect-ratio (Lid) of fibers. Significant improvements are observed in compressive, tensile, flexural strength and impact-resistance of concrete, accompanied by marked improvement in ductility. optimum fiber-volume fraction and aspect-ratio of steel fibers is identified. Test results are analyzed in details and relevant conclusions drawn. The research is finally concluded with future research needs. (author)

  16. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, David P. (Knoxville, TN); McLaughlin, Jerry C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lowden, Richard A. (Powell, TN)

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  17. Fundamentals of Digital Manufacturing Science

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Zude; Chen, Dejun

    2012-01-01

    The manufacturing industry will reap significant benefits from encouraging the development of digital manufacturing science and technology. Digital Manufacturing Science uses theorems, illustrations and tables to introduce the definition, theory architecture, main content, and key technologies of digital manufacturing science. Readers will be able to develop an in-depth understanding of the emergence and the development, the theoretical background, and the techniques and methods of digital manufacturing science. Furthermore, they will also be able to use the basic theories and key technologies described in Digital Manufacturing Science to solve practical engineering problems in modern manufacturing processes. Digital Manufacturing Science is aimed at advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students, academic researchers and researchers in the manufacturing industry. It allows readers to integrate the theories and technologies described with their own research works, and to propose new ideas and new methods to...

  18. Single Fiber Star Couplers. [optical waveguides for spacecraft communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asawa, C. K.

    1979-01-01

    An ion exchange process was developed and used in the fabrication of state-of-the-art planar star couplers for distribution of optical radiation between optical fibers. An 8 x 8 planar transmission star coupler was packaged for evaluation purposes with sixteen fiber connectors and sixteen pigtails. Likewise a transmission star coupler and an eight-port reflection star coupler with eight-fiber ribbons rigidly attached to these couplers, and a planar coupler with silicon guides and a parallel channel guide with pigtails were also fabricated. Optical measurements of the transmission star couplers are included with a description of the manufacturing process.

  19. Ytterbium-Phosphate Glass for Microstructured Fiber Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Ryszard Stępień; Marcin Franczyk; Dariusz Pysz; Ireneusz Kujawa; Mariusz Klimczak; Ryszard Buczyński

    2014-01-01

    In the paper, we report on the development of a synthesis and melting method of phosphate glasses designed for active microstructured fiber manufacturing. Non-doped glass synthesized in a P2O5-Al2O3-BaO-ZnO-MgO-Na2O oxide system served as the matrix material; meanwhile, the glass was doped with 6 mol% (18 wt%) of Yb2O3, as fiber core. The glasses were well-fitted in relation to optical (refractive index) and thermal proprieties (thermal expansion coefficient, rheology). The fiber with the Yb3...

  20. Electrical anisotropy in multiscale nanotube/fiber hybrid composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This letter reports an experimental and theoretical study on the electrical properties of carbon nanotube/glass fiber composites. Experimental measurements on unidirectional glass fiber composites with nanotubes dispersed in the polymer matrix show a high degree of anisotropy. The composites, manufactured with a vacuum infusion technique, do not show any significant process-induced anisotropy. Theoretical modeling reveals that the microstructure of the fiber composite plays a dominant role in the electrical behavior due to alteration of percolating paths in the carbon nanotube network.

  1. Electrical anisotropy in multiscale nanotube/fiber hybrid composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thostenson, Erik T.; Gangloff, John J.; Li, Chunyu; Byun, Joon-Hyung

    2009-08-01

    This letter reports an experimental and theoretical study on the electrical properties of carbon nanotube/glass fiber composites. Experimental measurements on unidirectional glass fiber composites with nanotubes dispersed in the polymer matrix show a high degree of anisotropy. The composites, manufactured with a vacuum infusion technique, do not show any significant process-induced anisotropy. Theoretical modeling reveals that the microstructure of the fiber composite plays a dominant role in the electrical behavior due to alteration of percolating paths in the carbon nanotube network.

  2. Templated growth of II-VI semiconductor optical fiber devices and steps towards infrared fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazio, Pier J. A.; Sparks, Justin R.; He, Rongrui; Krishnamurthi, Mahesh; Fitzgibbons, Thomas C.; Chaudhuri, Subhasis; Baril, Neil F.; Peacock, Anna C.; Healy, Noel; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Badding, John V.

    2015-02-01

    ZnSe and other zinc chalcogenide semiconductor materials can be doped with divalent transition metal ions to create a mid-IR laser gain medium with active function in the wavelength range 2 - 5 microns and potentially beyond using frequency conversion. As a step towards fiberized laser devices, we have manufactured ZnSe semiconductor fiber waveguides with low (less than 1dB/cm at 1550nm) optical losses, as well as more complex ternary alloys with ZnSxSe(1-x) stoichiometry to potentially allow for annular heterostructures with effective and low order mode corecladding waveguiding.

  3. Radiation curing of composites for vehicle component and vehicle manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some traditional uses of metals in vehicle component and vehicle manufacture, such as steel (specific gravity 7.8) or aluminum (specific gravity 2.7), can be replaced by carbon-fiber composites (specific gravity 1.6) to provide significant weight savings while maintaining structural integrity. The aerospace and aircraft industries have adopted this approach. The auto or motor vehicle industries have explored the use of composites, but have been reluctant to widely adopt this technology because of concerns over manufacturing processes. A typical steel auto body weighing ∼ 750 kilos would weigh only ∼ 155 kilos if replaced with carbon-fiber composites. Structural members, as the vehicle chassis, could also be fabricated out of carbon-fiber composites. With only 20% of the body weight, smaller, lower horse-power and more fuel efficient engines could be used to power such vehicles. Commercial aircraft manufacturers that have adopted carbon-fiber structures in lieu of aluminum (a 40% weight savings) estimate a 20% savings in fuel costs for large planes. These are still made with conventional materials being used for motors, tires, interiors, and the like. A fuel efficient auto now running at ∼ 10 kilometers/liter would more than double its fuel efficiency given the nearly 80% weight savings attainable by use of carbon-fiber composites just for the vehicle body. As with aircraft, conventional systems for propulsion (motors), braking, tires and interiors could still be used. Radiation curing can simplify the manufacture of carbon-fiber composite vehicle components. Highly penetrating X-rays derived from high current, high energy electron beam (EB) accelerators can be used to cure structural composites while they are constrained within inexpensive molds; thus reducing cure cycles, eliminating heat transfer concerns and concerns over potentially hazardous emissions during the curing process. Since X-rays can penetrate mold walls, the curing process is quite versatile, enabling diverse components with varying designs to be cured using a common X-ray source or multiple parts of the same design could be cured at once. Since the energy output of an EB unit can be tightly controlled, EB processing itself can be used to produce 'B' staged fiber-reinforced composite materials for sheet molding (SMC) and prepregs. Such materials can significantly reduce the time-to-cure should alternative energy sources or even subsequent X-ray curing be used. In the EB mode, SMC materials can be made in excess of 100 meters/minute. The matrix systems are proprietary formulations based on common radiation responsive materials used in a variety of radiation curing applications. (author)

  4. Effects of wood fiber surface chemistry on strength of wood-plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migneault, Sébastien; Koubaa, Ahmed; Perré, Patrick; Riedl, Bernard

    2015-07-01

    Because wood-plastic composites (WPC) strength relies on fiber-matrix interaction at fiber surface, it is likely that fiber surface chemistry plays an important role in WPC strength development. The objective of the present study is to investigate the relationships between fiber surface chemical characteristics and WPC mechanical properties. Different fibers were selected and characterized for surface chemical characteristics using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). WPC samples were manufactured at 40% fiber content and with six different fibers. High density polyethylene was used as matrix and maleated polyethylene (MAPE) was used as compatibility agent. WPC samples were tested for mechanical properties and fiber-matrix interface was observed with scanning electron microscope. It was found WPC strength decreases as the amount of unoxidized carbon (assigned to lignin and extractives) measured with XPS on fiber surface increases. In the opposite case, WPC strength increases with increasing level of oxidized carbon (assigned to carbohydrates) on fiber surface. The same conclusions were found with FTIR where WPC strength decreases as lignin peaks intensity increases. Esterification reaction of fibers with MAPE occurs on polar sites of carbohydrates, such as hydroxyls (Osbnd H). Thus, fibers with carbohydrates-rich surface, such as cellulose pulp, produced stronger WPC samples. Other factors such as mechanical interlocking and fiber morphology interfered with the effects of fiber surface chemistry.

  5. Characterization of new natural cellulosic fiber from Cissus quadrangularis root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indran, S; Raj, R Edwin; Sreenivasan, V S

    2014-09-22

    Fiber reinforced polymer composites are replacing many metallic structures due to its high specific strength and modulus. However commonly used man-made E-glass fibers are hazardous for health and carcinogenic by nature. Comprehensive characterization of Cissus quadrangularis root fiber such as anatomical study, chemical analysis, physical analysis, FTIR, XRD, SEM analysis and thermo gravimetric analysis are done. The results are very encouraging for its application in fiber industries, composite manufacturing, etc. Due to its light weight and the presence of high cellulose content (77.17%) with very little wax (0.14%) provide high specific strength and good bonding properties. The flaky honeycomb outer surface and low microfibril angle revealed through electron microscopy contributes for its high modulus. The thermo gravimetric analysis indicates better thermal stability of the fiber up to 230C, which is well within the polymerization process temperature. PMID:24906775

  6. Characterization of new natural cellulosic fiber from Cissus quadrangularis stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indran, S; Raj, R Edwin

    2015-03-01

    Polymer composite has contributed tremendously for energy efficient technologies in automotive and aero industries. Environmental and health concerns related to the carcinogenic nature of artificial fiber in polymer composite needs a retrofit. Eco friendly natural cellulosic fiber extract from the stem of Cissus quadrangularis plant is extensively characterized to consider as a viable alternative for man-made hazardous fibers. Anatomical study, chemical analysis, physical analysis, FTIR, XRD, SEM analysis and thermo gravimetric analysis were done to establish the certainty of using them as reinforcement fiber. Its light weight and the presence of high cellulose content (82.73%) with very little wax (0.18%) provide high specific strength and good bonding properties in composite manufacturing. The flaky honeycomb outer surface revealed through electron microscopy contributes for high modulus in CQ stem fiber and thermo gravimetric analysis ensures thermal stability up to 270 C, which is within the polymerization process temperature. PMID:25498651

  7. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites for environmental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, R.; Grulke, E. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Activated carbon fiber composites show great promise as fixed-bed catalytic reactors for use in environmental applications such as flue gas clean-up and ground water decontamination. A novel manufacturing process produces low density composites from chopped carbon fibers and binders. These composites have high permeability, can be activated to have high surface area, and have many potential environmental applications. This paper reports the mechanical and flow properties of these low density composites. Three point flexural strength tests were used to measure composite yield strength and flexural moduli. Composites containing over 10 pph binder had an adequate yield strength of about 200 psi at activations up to 40% weight loss. The composites were anisotropic, having along-fiber to cross-fiber yield strength ratios between 1.2 and 2.0. The friction factor for flow through the composites can be correlated using the fiber Reynolds number, and is affected by the composite bulk density.

  8. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  9. Nonlinear Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Per

    2004-01-01

    Despite the general recession in the global economy and the collapse of the optical telecommunication market, research within specialty fibers is thriving. This is, more than anything else, due to the technology transition from standard all-glass fibers to photonic crystal fibers, which, instead of...... doping, use a microstructure of air and glass to obtain a refractive index difference between the core and the cladding. This air/glass microstructure lends the photonic crystal fibers a range of unique and highly usable properties, which are very different from those found in solid standard fibers. The......, leading to reduced mode confinement and dispersion flexibility. In this thesis, we treat the nonlinear photonic crystal fiber – a special sub-class of photonic crystal fibers, the core of which has a diameter comparable to the wavelength of the light guided in the fiber. The small core results in a large...

  10. Fiber Optics Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, William E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses various applications of fiber optics technology: information systems, industrial robots, medicine, television, transportation, and training. Types of jobs that will be available with fiber optics training (such as electricians and telephone cable installers and splicers) are examined. (CT)

  11. Amplitude-modulated fiber-ring laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caputo, J. G.; Clausen, Carl A. Balslev; Sørensen, Mads Peter; Bischoff, Svend

    2000-01-01

    Soliton pulses generated by a fiber-ring laser are investigated by numerical simulation and perturbation methods. The mathematical modeling is based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with perturbative terms. We show that active mode locking with an amplitude modulator leads to a self...

  12. New bend insensitive fiber products enabled deep penetration in MDU and FTTP inside wiring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David Z.

    2008-11-01

    The emergent of True-Bend-Insensitive-Fiber product is a major triumph for the fiber optics industry. By defining the requirements and understanding the trade-offs in optical performance, large-scale manufacturing compatibility, standards compliance, mechanical performance, compatibility with field equipments and installation procedures will be critical to identify the most cost effective alternative.

  13. 16 CFR 303.30 - Textile fiber products in form for consumer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Textile fiber products in form for consumer... products in form for consumer. A textile fiber product shall be considered to be in the form intended for sale or delivery to, or for use by, the ultimate consumer when the manufacturing or processing of...

  14. Fiber optical parametric oscillator

    OpenAIRE

    García Sánchez, Enric

    2015-01-01

    The parametric gain of a four-wave mixing (FWM) process in a configuration of a fiber optical parametric oscillator (FOPO) is one option to achieve the conversion of high peak power pulses at frequencies reachable with rare-earth doped fibers. The point is that rare-earth doped fiber lasers and amplifiers have restrictions in the wavelength coverage due to the available dopants and their electronic transitions. Thus, to extend this coverage, silica fibers are being used as nonlinear media to ...

  15. Rayleigh fiber optics gyroscope

    OpenAIRE

    Kung, A.; Budin, J.; Thévenaz, Luc; Robert, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    A novel kind of fiber-optic gyroscope based on Rayleigh backscattering in a fiber-ring resonator is presented in this letter. Information on the rotation rate is obtained from the composed response of the fiber ring to an optical time-domain reflectometry (OTDR) instrument. The developed model based on the coherence properties of the Rayleigh scattering yields a polarization-insensitive and low-cost gyroscope

  16. Identifying the Small Apparel Manufacturer: A Typology of Manufacturing Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Michelle R

    1999-01-01

    IDENTIFYING THE SMALL APPAREL MANUFACTURER: A TYPOLOGY OF MANUFACTURING STRATEGIES Michelle R. Jones (ABSTRACT) The purpose of this study was to develop a typology of small apparel manufacturers (SAMs), firms classified between SIC 2310 to 2389 and less than 50 employees. The objectives were to (a) determine if distinct manufacturing strategies existed among SAMs, (b) develop a profile of these groups using environmental factors known to affect the apparel industry ...

  17. Optimized manufacturable porous materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Erik; Andreasen, Casper Schousboe; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    of the manufacturing method can be exploited to achieve exotic material properties. An example of this is how the SLM/S causes softer regions in the structure due to insufficient heating of the metal powder. If the goal is to design a material, which to some degree is compliant, such as negative...... Poisson’s ratio material, softer regions are desirable. Another example is closedcell materials, e.g. maximum bulk modulus material, where the cells will be filled by metal powder if manufactured using SLM/S. This is considered as a drawback, because it makes the structure heavier. However, it also......Topology optimization has been used to design two-dimensional material structures with specific elastic properties, but optimized designs of three-dimensional material structures are more scarsely seen. Partly because it requires more computational power, and partly because it is a major challenge...

  18. Manufacturing tolerant topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigmund, Ole

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an extension of the topology optimization method to include uncertainties during the fabrication of macro, micro and nano structures. More specifically, we consider devices that are manufactured using processes which may result in (uniformly) too thin (eroded) or too thic...... method provides manufacturing tolerant designs with little decrease in performance. As a positive side effect the robust design formulation also eliminates the longstanding problem of one-node connected hinges in compliant mechanism design using topology optimization....... approach, under- and over-etching is modelled by image processing-based "erode" and "dilate" operators and the optimization problem is formulated as a worst case design problem. Applications of the method to the design of macro structures for minimum compliance and micro compliant mechanisms show that the...

  19. Fundamentals of fiber lasers and fiber amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Ter-Mikirtychev, Valerii (Vartan)

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the fundamental aspects of fiber lasers and fiber amplifiers, and includes a wide range of material from laser physics fundamentals to state-of-the-art topics in this rapidly growing field of quantum electronics. Emphasis is placed on the nonlinear processes taking place in fiber lasers and amplifiers, their similarities, differences to, and their advantages over other solid-state lasers. The reader will learn basic principles of solid-state physics and optical spectroscopy of laser active centers in fibers, main operational laser regimes, and practical recommendations and suggestions on fiber laser research, laser applications, and laser product development. The book will be useful for students, researchers, and professionals who work with lasers, in the optical communications, chemical and biological industries, etc.

  20. Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Prices

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Based on arguments of the `reference- dependent' theory of consumer choice we assume that a retailer's discount of a manufacturer's suggested retail price changes consumers' demand. We can show that the producer benefits from suggesting a retail price. If consumers are additionally sufficiently `loss averse', e.g. consumers' disappointment from higher than suggested retail prices is sufficiently high, the producer can force the retailer to take the suggested price in equilibrium and thus capt...

  1. Manufacturing employment cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Claro, Sebastián

    2002-01-01

    The paper demonstrates that two relatively unknown features of the employment cycle in U.S. manufacturing industries can provide a clue to understanding the role of sectorial shocks in the evolution of aggregate employment. First, interindustry wage differentials rise in expansions and fall in contractions. Second, periods of increasing aggregate employment are associated with relatively good price and productivity shocks to capital-intensive sectors. The paper presents a simple general-equil...

  2. Additive Manufactured Material

    OpenAIRE

    Ek, Kristofer

    2014-01-01

    This project treats Additive Manufacturing (AM) for metallic material and the question if it is suitable to be used in the aeronautics industry. AM is a relatively new production method where objects are built up layer by layer from a computer model. The art of AM allows in many cases more design freedoms that enables production of more weight optimized and functional articles. Other advantages are material savings and shorter lead times which have a large economic value. An extensive literat...

  3. Analysis of process-induced defects on steered-fiber panels for aeronautical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Falcó Salcines, Olben

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the use of Automated Fiber Placement technology allows, large composite aircraft components to be manufactured with high quality materials and introduce new laminate concepts. Among such concepts are the tow-steered panels with curved fibers improved the structural efficiency by means variable stiffness and loading redistribution. However, despite these advantages, conventional laminates with straight fiber architectures are still preferred by designers. The main reason that limits...

  4. Influence of thermal treatment on porosity formation on carbon fiber from textile PAN

    OpenAIRE

    Jossano Saldanha Marcuzzo; Choyu Otani; Heitor Aguiar Polidoro; Satika Otani

    2013-01-01

    Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) are known as an excellent adsorbent material due to their particular characteristics such as their high speed adsorption rate and for being easy to handle. The ACFs are commercially manufactured from carbon fibers (CF) which receive an additional activation process and can be produced from celluloses, phenolic resin, pitch and Polyacrylonitrile (PAN). In the present work, the oxidized 5.0 dtex textile PAN fiber was carbonized to CFs formation. During the carboni...

  5. Kinetic Study of Resin-Curing on Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Resin Composites by Microwave Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Daisuke Shimamoto; Yusuke Imai, Yuji Hotta

    2014-01-01

    Microwave processing has great potential for improving composite manufacturing such as reduction of curing time, energy requirements and operational costs. In this paper, the effects of microwave irradiation for resin-curing of carbon fiber/epoxy resin composite that was composed of discontinuous carbon fibers of 130 ?m or 3 mm were investigated. The mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy resin composite cured by microwave irradiation for 20 min at 120C were si...

  6. SURFACE CHARACTERISTICS AND OVERLAYING PROPERTIES OF MDF PANELS MADE FROM THERMALLY TREATED RUBBERWOOD FIBERS

    OpenAIRE

    Songklod Jarusombuti; Nadir Ayrilmis; Piyawade Bauchongkol; Vallayuth Fueangvivat

    2010-01-01

    he objectives of this research were to investigate surface characteristics and overlaying properties of medium density fiberboard (MDF) panels, as affected by thermal treatment of the fibers. MDF panels were manufactured from untreated rubberwood fibers and fibers treated at three different temperatures (120, 150, or 180°C) for 15 or 30 min. Contact angle measurements were obtained by using a goniometer connected with a digital camera and computer system. Roughness measurements, average rough...

  7. Array fiber welding on micro optical glass substrates for chip-to-fiber coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrder, Henning; Neitz, Marcel; Brusberg, Lars; Queiser, Marco; Arndt-Staufenbiel, Norbert; Lang, K.-D.

    2014-03-01

    High bandwidth parallel optical transceivers are highly demanded for optical interconnects in data centers and in high performance computing. Such transceivers are composed of VCSEL- and photodiode components which have to be fiber coupled, and the appropriate driving and amplifying circuitry. For high density fiber optical connectors lens arrays for improved coupling efficiency have to be used. We propose an advantageous adhesive free method to interconnect optical fibers with such kind of lens arrays. Common approaches using adhesive bonding have high challenges in terms of yield, reliability and optical performance. We introduce our novel fiber welding approach for joining directly fused silica fibers on borosilicate glass substrates with integrated micro optics, e.g. lenses and lens arrays. It is a thermal process with a precise heat input by CO2-laser processing, which is combinable with sequential passive or active alignment of each single fiber to the substrate causing flexibility and highest coupling efficiencies. Since the fiber is accessed only from one side, a two dimensional high-density fiber array can be realized. The manufacturing time of such an interconnection is very short. Due to the adhesive free interface high power transmission is enabled and the occurrence of polymer caused misalignment and degradation are prevented. The paper presents current results in thin glass-based opto-electronic packaging. In particular our laboratory setup for array fiber welding and experimental results of such connections will be discussed and compared to UV-adhesive joining. Also further investigation, for example optical characterization and reliability tests are included. Finally a machine concept, which is under development, will be discussed.

  8. Mineral Fiber Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical and physical properties of different forms of mineral fibers impact biopersistence and pathology in the lung. Fiber chemistry, length, aspect ratio, surface area and dose are critical factors determining mineral fiber-associated health effects including cancer and as...

  9. Resonant filtered fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Laurila, Marko; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Weirich, Johannes; Lyngs, Jens K.; Noordegraaf, Danny; Petersen, Sidsel Rbner; Johansen, Mette Marie; Hansen, Kristian Rymann; Lgsgaard, Jesper; Maack, Martin D.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present our recent result on utilizing resonant/bandgap fiber designs to achieve high performance ytterbium doped fiber amplifers for achieving diffraction limited beam quality in large mode area fibers, robust bending performance and gain shaping for long wavelength operation of...

  10. Oxynitride glass fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Parimal J.; Messier, Donald R.; Rich, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Research at the Army Materials Technology Laboratory (AMTL) and elsewhere has shown that many glass properties including elastic modulus, hardness, and corrosion resistance are improved markedly by the substitution of nitrogen for oxygen in the glass structure. Oxynitride glasses, therefore, offer exciting opportunities for making high modulus, high strength fibers. Processes for making oxynitride glasses and fibers of glass compositions similar to commercial oxide glasses, but with considerable enhanced properties, are discussed. We have made glasses with elastic moduli as high as 140 GPa and fibers with moduli of 120 GPa and tensile strengths up to 2900 MPa. AMTL holds a U.S. patent on oxynitride glass fibers, and this presentation discusses a unique process for drawing small diameter oxynitride glass fibers at high drawing rates. Fibers are drawn through a nozzle from molten glass in a molybdenum crucible at 1550 C. The crucible is situated in a furnace chamber in flowing nitrogen, and the fiber is wound in air outside of the chamber, making the process straightforward and commercially feasible. Strengths were considerably improved by improving glass quality to minimize internal defects. Though the fiber strengths were comparable with oxide fibers, work is currently in progress to further improve the elastic modulus and strength of fibers. The high elastic modulus of oxynitride glasses indicate their potential for making fibers with tensile strengths surpassing any oxide glass fibers, and we hope to realize that potential in the near future.

  11. Fuel manufacturing and utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficient utilisation of nuclear fuel requires manufacturing facilities capable of making advanced fuel types, with appropriate quality control. Once made, the use of such fuels requires a proper understanding of their behaviour in the reactor environment, so that safe operation for the design life can be achieved. The International Atomic Energy Agency supports Member States to improve in-pile fuel performance and management of materials; and to develop advanced fuel technologies for ensuring reliability and economic efficiency of the nuclear fuel cycle. It provides assistance to Member States to support fuel-manufacturing capability, including quality assurance techniques, optimization of manufacturing parameters and radiation protection. The IAEA supports the development fuel modelling expertise in Member States, covering both normal operation and postulated and severe accident conditions. It provides information and support for the operation of Nuclear Power Plant to ensure that the environment and water chemistry is appropriate for fuel operation. The IAEA supports fuel failure investigations, including equipment for failed fuel detection and for post-irradiation examination and inspection, as well as fuel repair, it provides information and support research into the basic properties of fuel materials, including UO2, MOX and zirconium alloys. It further offers guidance on the relationship with back-end requirement (interim storage, transport, reprocessing, disposal), fuel utilization and management, MOX fuels, alternative fuels and advanced fuel technology

  12. Advanced manufacturing: Technology diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesar, A.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper we examine how manufacturing technology diffuses rom the developers of technology across national borders to those who do not have the capability or resources to develop advanced technology on their own. None of the wide variety of technology diffusion mechanisms discussed in this paper are new, yet the opportunities to apply these mechanisms are growing. A dramatic increase in technology diffusion occurred over the last decade. The two major trends which probably drive this increase are a worldwide inclination towards ``freer`` markets and diminishing isolation. Technology is most rapidly diffusing from the US In fact, the US is supplying technology for the rest of the world. The value of the technology supplied by the US more than doubled from 1985 to 1992 (see the Introduction for details). History shows us that technology diffusion is inevitable. It is the rates at which technologies diffuse to other countries which can vary considerably. Manufacturers in these countries are increasingly able to absorb technology. Their manufacturing efficiency is expected to progress as technology becomes increasingly available and utilized.

  13. Manufacturing a Superconductor in School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, John

    1989-01-01

    Described is the manufacture of a superconductor from a commercially available kit using equipment usually available in schools or easily obtainable. The construction is described in detail including equipment, materials, safety procedures, tolerances, and manufacture. (Author/CW)

  14. 77 FR 66179 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-02

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S... manufacturing council. SUMMARY: On September 14, 2012, the Department of Commerce's International Trade Administration published a notice in the Federal Register (77 FR 56811) soliciting applications for...

  15. 77 FR 69794 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S... Manufacturing Council. SUMMARY: On September 14, 2012, the Department of Commerce's International Trade Administration (ITA) published a notice in the Federal Register (77 FR 56811) soliciting applications...

  16. 75 FR 80040 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S... Manufacturing Council. SUMMARY: On November 23, 2010, the Department of Commerce's International Trade Administration published a notice in the Federal Register (75 FR 71417) soliciting applications to fill...

  17. 75 FR 30781 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S... Manufacturing Council. SUMMARY: On March 16, 2010, the Department of Commerce's International Trade Administration published a notice in the Federal Register (75 FR 12507) soliciting applications for membership...

  18. Green Manufacturing Fundamentals and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Green Manufacturing: Fundamentals and Applications introduces the basic definitions and issues surrounding green manufacturing at the process, machine and system (including supply chain) levels. It also shows, by way of several examples from different industry sectors, the potential for substantial improvement and the paths to achieve the improvement. Additionally, this book discusses regulatory and government motivations for green manufacturing and outlines the path for making manufacturing more green as well as making production more sustainable. This book also: • Discusses new engineering approaches for manufacturing and provides a path from traditional manufacturing to green manufacturing • Addresses regulatory and economic issues surrounding green manufacturing • Details new supply chains that need to be in place before going green • Includes state-of-the-art case studies in the areas of automotive, semiconductor and medical areas as well as in the supply chain and packaging areas Green Manufactu...

  19. Additive Manufacturing for Large Products

    OpenAIRE

    Leirvåg, Roar Nelissen

    2013-01-01

    This thesis researches the possibility and feasibility of applying additive manufacturing technology in the manufacturing of propellers. The thesis concerns the production at the foundry Oshaug Metall AS. Their products consist of propellers and other large products cast in Nickel-Aluminium Bronze. This report looks at three approaches and applications for additive manufacturing at the foundry. These are additively manufactured pattern, sand mold and end metal parts. The available \\emph{State...

  20. Fiber optic laser rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  1. A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing, Part II: Additive Manufacturing and Characterization of Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Grady, Joseph E.; Arnold, Steven M.; Draper, Robert D.; Shin, Eugene; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Tom; Lao, Chao; Rhein, Morgan; Mehl, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    This publication is the second part of the three part report of the project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing" funded by NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI). The objective of this project was to conduct additive manufacturing to produce aircraft engine components by Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM), using commercially available polyetherimides-Ultem 9085 and experimental Ultem 1000 mixed with 10% chopped carbon fiber. A property comparison between FDM-printed and injection molded coupons for Ultem 9085, Ultem 1000 resin and the fiber-filled composite Ultem 1000 was carried out. Furthermore, an acoustic liner was printed from Ultem 9085 simulating conventional honeycomb structured liners and tested in a wind tunnel. Composite compressor inlet guide vanes were also printed using fiber-filled Ultem 1000 filaments and tested in a cascade rig. The fiber-filled Ultem 1000 filaments and composite vanes were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and acid digestion to determine the porosity of FDM-printed articles which ranged from 25 to 31%. Coupons of Ultem 9085, experimental Ultem 1000 composites and XH6050 resin were tested at room temperature and 400F to evaluate their corresponding mechanical properties. A preliminary modeling was also initiated to predict the mechanical properties of FDM-printed Ultem 9085 coupons in relation to varied raster angles and void contents, using the GRC-developed MAC/GMC program.

  2. 76 FR 33244 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an Opportunity To Apply for Membership on the Manufacturing Council... Manufacturing Council (Council). The purpose of the Council is to advise the Secretary of Commerce on...

  3. 77 FR 56811 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an Opportunity to Apply for Membership on the Manufacturing Council... ] Manufacturing Council (Council) for a two-year term to begin in fall 2012. The purpose of the Council is...

  4. 77 FR 2275 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an opportunity to apply for membership on the Manufacturing Council... Manufacturing Council (Council). The purpose of the Council is to advise the Secretary of Commerce on...

  5. Exploring manufacturing solutions for SMEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radziwon, Agnieszka; Blichfeldt, Henrik; Bilberg, Arne; Madsen, Erik Skov; Bogers, Marcel

    This exploratory study provides an overview over current state of manufacturing solutions in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) in region of Southern Denmark. Building on manufacturing paradigms, this paper reveals relevant aspects for the development and implementation of improving SMEs...... manufacturing solutions, which are required to increase their competitiveness and assure sustainable growth....

  6. Design for Manufacturing of Composite Structures for Commercial Aircraft : The Development of a DFM strategy at SAAB Aerostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Frida; Hagqvist, Astrid; Sundin, Erik; Björkman, Mats

    2014-01-01

    Within the aircraft industry, the use of composite materials such as carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs) is steadily increasing, especially in structural parts. Manufacturability needs to be considered in aircraft design to ensure a cost-effective manufacturing process. The aim of this paper is to describe the development of a new strategy for how SAAB Aerostructures addressing manufacturability issues during the development of airframe composite structures. Through literature review, be...

  7. Utilization of Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) Pruning Residues as Raw Material for MDF Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Hosseinkhani; Markus Euring; Alireza Kharazipour

    2014-01-01

    Fiber of Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L) pruning residues are a potential source for the production Medium Density Fiberboard (MDF). Dry process was employed to produce MDF in pilot plant scale using three categories of manufacturing parameters, i.e., two resin types, two resin content levels and three pressing times. Due to the availability of the materials in the pilot plant, Date palm and also soft wood fibers (Pinus silvestries L.) as reference were used for the MDF production under the...

  8. Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Stromswold, David C.

    2009-10-23

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Reported here are the results of tests of the 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT).

  9. Manufacturing development of pultruded composite panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, L. E.

    1989-01-01

    The weight savings potential, of graphite-epoxy composites for secondary and medium primary aircraft structures, was demonstrated. One of the greatest challenges facing the aircraft industry is to reduce the acquisition costs for composite structures to a level below that of metal structures. The pultrusion process, wherein reinforcing fibers, after being passed through a resin bath are drawn through a die to form and cure the desired cross-section, is an automated low cost manufacturing process for composite structures. The Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company (LASC) Composites Development Center designed, characterizated materials for, fabricated and tested a stiffened cover concept compatible with the continuous pultrusion process. The procedures used and the results obtained are presented.

  10. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Joseph B. (Harriman, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Tobin, Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  11. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  12. TENCEL / LENZING FIBER, A NEW FIBER

    OpenAIRE

    Porav Viorica

    2012-01-01

    Tencel is a new fiber made in a process that is similar to the creation of rayon. As with rayon, cellulose, primarily from wood pulp, is used to make the fiber. Whether this creates a natural product is open to discussion. The process involves dissolving wood pulp with a solvent which unlike the process for rayon orcupra, is a relatively non-toxic amine. The dissolved pulp is then forced through tiny holes called spinnerettes creating long, smooth, lusterous fibers much like silk in appearanc...

  13. MONITORING TECHNIQUES FOR CARBON FIBER EMISSIONS: EVALUATION A

    Science.gov (United States)

    An investigation was carried out of methods and techniques applicable to the detection and monitoring of carbon fibers as they are emitted in processes involving their manufacture or their use. The specific activities of these programs were: (a) to perform a detailed literature s...

  14. Qualification and Lessons Learned with Space Flight Fiber Optic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    This presentation covers lessons learned during the design, development, manufacturing and qualification of space flight fiber optic components. Changes at NASA, including short-term projects and decreased budgets have brought about changes to vendors and parts. Most photonics for NASA needs are now commercial off the shelf (COTS) products. The COTS Tecnology Assurance approach for space flight and qualification plans are outlined.

  15. Recent developments in optical fibers and how defense, security, and sensing can benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régnier, E.; Burov, E.; Pastouret, A.; Boivin, D.; Kuyt, G.; Gooijer, F.; Bergonzo, A.; Berkers, A.; Signoret, P.; Troussellier, L.; Storaasli, O.; Nouchi, P.

    2009-05-01

    For many years, fiber manufacturers have devoted research efforts to develop fibers with improved radiation resistance, keeping the same advantages and basic properties as standard fibers. Today, both single-mode (SMF) and multimode (MMF) RadHard (for Radiation-Hardened) fibers are available; some of them are MIL-49291 certified and are already used, for example in military applications and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in CERN or in certain nuclear power plants. These RadHard fibers can be easily connected to standard optical networks for classical data transfer or they can also be used for command control. Using some specific properties (Raman or Brillouin scattering, Bragg gratings...), such fibers can also be used as distributed sensing (temperature or strain sensors, etc) in radiation environments. At least, optical fibers can also be used for signal amplification, either in telecom networks, or in fiber lasers. This last category of fibers is called active fibers, in opposition to passive fibers used for simple signal transmission. Draka has also recently worked to improve the radiation-resistance of these active fibers, so that Draka can now offer RadHard fibers for full optical systems.

  16. Development of high performance refractory fibers with enhanced insulating properties and longer service lifetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P.C.; DePoorter, G.L.; Munoz, D.R.

    1991-02-01

    We have initiated a three phase investigation of the development of high performance refractory fibers with enhanced insulating properties and longer usable lifetimes. This report presents the results of the first phase of the study, performed from Aug. 1989 through Feb. 1991, which shows that significant energy saving are possible through the use of high temperature insulating fibers that better retain their efficient insulating properties during the service lifetime of the fibers. The remaining phases of this program include the pilot scale development and then full scale production feasibility development and evaluation of enhanced high temperature refractory insulting fibers. This first proof of principle phase of the program presents a summary of the current use patterns of refractory fibers, a laboratory evaluation of the high temperature performance characteristics of selected typical refractory fibers and an analysis of the potential energy savings through the use of enhanced refractory fibers. The current use patterns of refractory fibers span a wide range of industries and high temperature furnaces within those industries. The majority of high temperature fiber applications are in furnaces operating between 2000 and 26000{degrees}F. The fibers used in furnaces operating within this range provide attractive thermal resistance and low thermal storage at reasonable cost. A series of heat treatment studies performed for this phase of the program has shown that the refractory fibers, as initially manufactured, have attractive thermal conductivities for high temperature applications but the fibers go through rapid devitrification and subsequent crystal growth upon high temperature exposure. Development of improved fibers, maintaining the favorable characteristics of the existing as-manufactured fibers, could save between 1 and 4% of the energy consumed in high temperature furnaces using refractory fibers.

  17. Radiation curing of composites for vehicle component and vehicle manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some ordinary uses of metals in vehicle components and vehicle manufacture, such as steel (specific gravity 7.8) or aluminum (specific gravity 2.7), can be replaced by carbon fiber composites (specific gravity 1.6) to provide significant weight savings while still maintaining structural integrity. The aircraft and aerospace industries have adopted this concept. The motor vehicle industry is using composite materials for some nonstructural components in automobiles, but have been reluctant to widely adopt this technology because of concerns about thermal curing times and other issues in high-volume manufacturing processes. A typical steel auto body weighing ∼750 kilograms would weigh only ∼155 kilograms if replaced with carbon fiber composites. Structural members, such as the vehicle chassis and body frame, could also be made out of carbon fiber composites. With only 20% of the typical body weight, smaller, lighter, less powerful and more fuel efficient engines could be used in such vehicles. Commercial aircraft manufacturers have adopted large carbon fiber structures in lieu of aluminum for a 40% weight reduction and estimate a 20% savings in fuel costs for large planes. These aircraft still use conventional materials for motors, tires and interior components. The fuel efficiency of an automobile could be doubled with an 80% weight reduction. As with aircraft, conventional motors, tires and interior components could be used in automobiles. Radiation curing can simplify the manufacture of carbon fiber composites. Penetrating X-rays generated with high-energy, high-power electron beam (EB) accelerators can cure structural composites while they are constrained within inexpensive molds; thus reducing cure times, eliminating heat transfer concerns and potentially hazardous volatile emissions during the curing process. Since X-rays can penetrate mold walls, the curing process is quite versatile, enabling diverse components with varying designs to be cured using a common X-ray generator or multiple parts of the same design could be cured at the same time. Since the power output of an EB accelerator can be tightly controlled, EB processing can be used to produce 'B' staged, fiber-reinforced composite materials for sheet molding compounds (SMC) and prepregs. Such materials can significantly reduce the time-to-cure should alternative energy sources or subsequent X-ray curing be used. In the EB mode, SMC materials can be made at more than 100 meters per minute. The polymeric matrix systems are proprietary formulations based on common radiation responsive materials which are used in a variety of radiation curing applications. (author)

  18. Manufacturing Consent revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Burawoy, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Cet article présente rapidement Manufacturing Consent publié en 1979 dans lequel la direction d’Allis Chalmer organisait la discipline du travail ouvrier par la coercition et par le consentement, en particulier à travers l’établissement des quotas de production qui fondait une sorte de jeu social entre ouvriers (the game of making out). L’auteur revient sur la méthode ethnographique utilisée alors pour la critiquer et il propose de la remplacer par « l’étude de cas élargie » (the extented cas...

  19. Good manufacturing practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation author deals with the Implementation of good manufacturing practice for radiopharmaceuticals. The presentation is divided into next parts: Batch size; Expiration date; QC Testing; Environmental concerns; Personnel aspects; Radiation concerns; Theoretical yields; Sterilizing filters; Control and reconciliation of materials and components; Product strength; In process sampling and testing; Holding and distribution; Drug product inspection; Buildings and facilities; Renovations at BNL for GMP; Aseptic processing and sterility assurance; Process validation and control; Quality control and drug product stability; Documentation and other GMP topics; Building design considerations; Equipment; and Summary

  20. Concepts in syngas manufacture

    CERN Document Server

    Rostrup-Nielsen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a general overview of syngas technologies as well as an in-depth analysis of the steam reforming process. Syngas is a mixture of hydrogen and carbon oxides which can be made from hydrocarbons, coal and biomass. It is an important intermediate in the chemical industry for manufacture of ammonia, methanol and other petrochemicals as well as hydrogen for refineries and fuel cells. Syngas is playing a growing role in the energy sector, because it can be converted into a number of important energy carriers and fuels. Syngas catalysis creates new options and flexibility in the com

  1. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, William E.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of an important, rapidly emerging, manufacturing technology that is alternatively called additive manufacturing (AM), direct digital manufacturing, free form fabrication, or 3D printing, etc. A broad contextual overview of metallic AM is provided. AM has the potential to revolutionize the global parts manufacturing and logistics landscape. It enables distributed manufacturing and the productions of parts-on-demand while offering the potential to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. This paper explores the material science, processes, and business consideration associated with achieving these performance gains. It is concluded that a paradigm shift is required in order to fully exploit AM potential.

  2. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  3. Three-Axis Distributed Fiber Optic Strain Measurement in 3D Woven Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading. Keywords: fiber optic, distributed strain sensing, Rayleigh scatter, optical frequency domain reflectometry

  4. INTEGRATED AUTOMOTIVE MANUFACTURING SUPPLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.J.S. Van Dyk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Supply planning and traffic flow planning are major activities in the automotive manufacturing environment worldwide. Traditionally, the impact of supply planning strategies on plant traffic is rarely considered. This paper describes the development of a Decision Support System (DSS that will assist automotive manufacturers to analyse the effect of supply planning decisions on plant traffic during the supply planning phase of their logistics planning process. In essence, this DSS consists of a Supply Medium Decision Support Tool (SMDST (an interactive MS-Excel model with Visual Basic interfacing and a traffic flow simulation model tool (using eMPlant simulation software.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Verskaffingsbeplanning en verkeersvloeibeplanning is belangrike aktiwiteite in die motorvervaardigingsbedryf wêreldwyd. Tradisioneel word die uitwerking van verskaffings-beplanningsstrategië op aanlegverkeer selde in ag geneem. Hierdie artikel beskryf die ontwikkeling van ’n Besluitnemings Ondersteuningstelsel (DSS wat motorvervaardigers sal ondersteun in die analise van die effek van verskaffingsbeplanningbesluite op aanlegverkeer tydens die verskaffingsbeplanningsfase van hulle logistieke beplanningsproses. Hierdie DSS bestaan hoofsaaklik uit ’n Verskaffings-vervoermiddel Besluitnemingshulpmiddel (SMDST (’n interaktiewe MS-Excel model met “Visual Basic” koppelling asook ’n simulasiemodel van verkeersvloei (met eM-Plant simulasiesagteware.

  5. OPINION: Safe exponential manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, Chris; Drexler, Eric

    2004-08-01

    In 1959, Richard Feynman pointed out that nanometre-scale machines could be built and operated, and that the precision inherent in molecular construction would make it easy to build multiple identical copies. This raised the possibility of exponential manufacturing, in which production systems could rapidly and cheaply increase their productive capacity, which in turn suggested the possibility of destructive runaway self-replication. Early proposals for artificial nanomachinery focused on small self-replicating machines, discussing their potential productivity and their potential destructiveness if abused. In the light of controversy regarding scenarios based on runaway replication (so-called 'grey goo'), a review of current thinking regarding nanotechnology-based manufacturing is in order. Nanotechnology-based fabrication can be thoroughly non-biological and inherently safe: such systems need have no ability to move about, use natural resources, or undergo incremental mutation. Moreover, self-replication is unnecessary: the development and use of highly productive systems of nanomachinery (nanofactories) need not involve the construction of autonomous self-replicating nanomachines. Accordingly, the construction of anything resembling a dangerous self-replicating nanomachine can and should be prohibited. Although advanced nanotechnologies could (with great difficulty and little incentive) be used to build such devices, other concerns present greater problems. Since weapon systems will be both easier to build and more likely to draw investment, the potential for dangerous systems is best considered in the context of military competition and arms control.

  6. Stacked macro fiber piezoelectric composite generator for a spinal fusion implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobaben, Eric J.; Goetzinger, Nathan C.; Domann, John P.; Barrett-Gonzalez, Ronald; Arnold, Paul M.; Friis, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    A manufacturing method was developed to create a piezoelectric 3-layer stacked, macro fiber composite generator operating in d33 mode to promote bone growth in spinal fusion surgeries. A specimen of 9 17 9 mm thick was constructed from 800 ?m diameter PZT fibers and medical grade epoxy. Electromechanical testing was performed at three stages of manufacturing to determine the influence of these processes on power generation. An average peak power of over 335 ?W was generated in the heat-treated specimen during simulated human body loads. The work provides insights into manufacturing methods for lowered source impedance power generation for a variety of applications.

  7. A fiber-optic cure monitoring technique with accuracy improvement of distorted embedded sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Umesh; Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Dae-gil; Song, Minho

    2015-07-01

    A fiber-optic epoxy cure monitoring technique for efficient wind turbine blade manufacturing and monitoring is presented. To optimize manufacturing cycle, fiber-optic sensors are embedded in composite materials of wind turbine blades. The reflection spectra of the sensors indicate the onset of gelification and the completion of epoxy curing. After manufacturing process, the same sensors are utilized for in-field condition monitoring. Because of residual stresses and strain gradients from the curing process, the embedded sensors may experience distortions in reflection spectra, resulting in measurement errors. We applied a Gaussian curve-fitting algorithm to the distorted spectra, which substantially improved the measurement accuracy.

  8. Method of manufacturing of details from composite materials impregnation solution binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ?.?. ?????

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Among a good deal of ways of part manufacturing from composite materials using of infusion methods of impregnation of a fiber reinforcement on/into the mold very increasing now. For eliminating this gap and piling up a knowledge about peculiarities of a process of infusion impregnation under vacuum bag and part manufacturing with infusion ways a method of part making of impregnation by solution of licensed resin on the mold under a vacuum bag is offered.

  9. Properties and optimal manufacturing conditions of chicken feathers/poly(lactic acid) biocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Cañavate Ávila, Francisco Javier; Aymerich Amorós, Jordi; Garrido Soriano, Núria; Colom Fajula, Xavier; Macanás de Benito, Jorge; Molins Durán, Gemma; Álvarez del Castillo, María Dolores; Carrillo Navarrete, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Chicken feathers waste from poultry industry was incorporated in poly(lactic acid) matrix to obtain an environmental friendly biocomposite taking advantage of the unique properties of chicken feathers, such as low density, biodegradability and good thermal and acoustic properties, and of the biodegradability of the poly(lactic acid). The effect of manufacturing conditions on the final properties of the composite and on the matrix–fiber compatibility was studied. Optimal manufacturing conditio...

  10. Hierarchically Structured Electrospun Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole E. Zander

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional electrospun nanofibers have a myriad of applications ranging from scaffolds for tissue engineering to components of biosensors and energy harvesting devices. The generally smooth one-dimensional structure of the fibers has stood as a limitation to several interesting novel applications. Control of fiber diameter, porosity and collector geometry will be briefly discussed, as will more traditional methods for controlling fiber morphology and fiber mat architecture. The remainder of the review will focus on new techniques to prepare hierarchically structured fibers. Fibers with hierarchical primary structures—including helical, buckled, and beads-on-a-string fibers, as well as fibers with secondary structures, such as nanopores, nanopillars, nanorods, and internally structured fibers and their applications—will be discussed. These new materials with helical/buckled morphology are expected to possess unique optical and mechanical properties with possible applications for negative refractive index materials, highly stretchable/high-tensile-strength materials, and components in microelectromechanical devices. Core-shell type fibers enable a much wider variety of materials to be electrospun and are expected to be widely applied in the sensing, drug delivery/controlled release fields, and in the encapsulation of live cells for biological applications. Materials with a hierarchical secondary structure are expected to provide new superhydrophobic and self-cleaning materials.

  11. [INVITED] Tilted fiber grating mechanical and biochemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tuan; Liu, Fu; Guan, Bai-Ou; Albert, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    The tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) is a new kind of fiber-optic sensor that possesses all the advantages of well-established Bragg grating technology in addition to being able to excite cladding modes resonantly. This device opens up a multitude of opportunities for single-point sensing in hard-to-reach spaces with very controllable cross-sensitivities, absolute and relative measurements of various parameters, and an extreme sensitivity to materials external to the fiber without requiring the fiber to be etched or tapered. Over the past five years, our research group has been developing multimodal fiber-optic sensors based on TFBG in various shapes and forms, always keeping the device itself simple to fabricate and compatible with low-cost manufacturing. This paper presents a brief review of the principle, fabrication, characterization, and implementation of TFBGs, followed by our progress in TFBG sensors for mechanical and biochemical applications, including one-dimensional TFBG vibroscopes, accelerometers and micro-displacement sensors; two-dimensional TFBG vector vibroscopes and vector rotation sensors; reflective TFBG refractometers with in-fiber and fiber-to-fiber configurations; polarimetric and plasmonic TFBG biochemical sensors for in-situ detection of cell, protein and glucose.

  12. Energy Absorption in Chopped Carbon Fiber Compression Molded Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starbuck, J.M.

    2001-07-20

    In passenger vehicles the ability to absorb energy due to impact and be survivable for the occupant is called the ''crashworthiness'' of the structure. To identify and quantify the energy absorbing mechanisms in candidate automotive composite materials, test methodologies were developed for conducting progressive crush tests on composite plate specimens. The test method development and experimental set-up focused on isolating the damage modes associated with the frond formation that occurs in dynamic testing of composite tubes. Quasi-static progressive crush tests were performed on composite plates manufactured from chopped carbon fiber with an epoxy resin system using compression molding techniques. The carbon fiber was Toray T700 and the epoxy resin was YLA RS-35. The effect of various material and test parameters on energy absorption was evaluated by varying the following parameters during testing: fiber volume fraction, fiber length, fiber tow size, specimen width, profile radius, and profile constraint condition. It was demonstrated during testing that the use of a roller constraint directed the crushing process and the load deflection curves were similar to progressive crushing of tubes. Of all the parameters evaluated, the fiber length appeared to be the most critical material parameter, with shorter fibers having a higher specific energy absorption than longer fibers. The combination of material parameters that yielded the highest energy absorbing material was identified.

  13. Energy Absorption in Chopped Carbon Fiber Compression Molded Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In passenger vehicles the ability to absorb energy due to impact and be survivable for the occupant is called the ''crashworthiness'' of the structure. To identify and quantify the energy absorbing mechanisms in candidate automotive composite materials, test methodologies were developed for conducting progressive crush tests on composite plate specimens. The test method development and experimental set-up focused on isolating the damage modes associated with the frond formation that occurs in dynamic testing of composite tubes. Quasi-static progressive crush tests were performed on composite plates manufactured from chopped carbon fiber with an epoxy resin system using compression molding techniques. The carbon fiber was Toray T700 and the epoxy resin was YLA RS-35. The effect of various material and test parameters on energy absorption was evaluated by varying the following parameters during testing: fiber volume fraction, fiber length, fiber tow size, specimen width, profile radius, and profile constraint condition. It was demonstrated during testing that the use of a roller constraint directed the crushing process and the load deflection curves were similar to progressive crushing of tubes. Of all the parameters evaluated, the fiber length appeared to be the most critical material parameter, with shorter fibers having a higher specific energy absorption than longer fibers. The combination of material parameters that yielded the highest energy absorbing material was identified

  14. Improvement of physico-mechanical properties of coir-polypropylene biocomposites by fiber chemical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Coir-polypropylene biocomposites were manufactured using hot press technique. • OH groups in raw coir cellulose were converted to OH−Cr groups during treatment. • SEM indicates improved interfacial adhesion between coir and PP upon treatment. • Chemically treated composites yielded the best set of mechanical properties. - Abstract: In preparing polymer–matrix composites, natural fibers are widely used as “reinforcing agents” because of their biodegradable characteristic. In present research, coir fiber reinforced polypropylene biocomposites were manufactured using hot press method. In order to increase the compatibility between the coir fiber and polypropylene matrix, raw coir fiber was chemically treated with basic chromium sulfate and sodium bicarbonate salt in acidic media. Both raw and treated coir at different fiber loading (10, 15 and 20 wt%) were utilized during composite manufacturing. During chemical treatment, hydrophilic –OH groups in the raw coir cellulose were converted to hydrophobic –OH−Cr groups. Microstructural analysis and mechanical tests were conducted. Scanning electron microscopic analysis indicates improvement in interfacial adhesion between the coir and polypropylene matrix upon treatment. Chemically treated specimens yielded the best set of mechanical properties. On the basis of fiber loading, 20% fiber reinforced composites had the optimum set of mechanical properties among all composites manufactured

  15. Amplitude-modulated fiber-ring laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caputo, J. G.; Clausen, Carl A. Balslev; Sørensen, Mads Peter; Bischoff, Svend

    2000-01-01

    Soliton pulses generated by a fiber-ring laser are investigated by numerical simulation and perturbation methods. The mathematical modeling is based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with perturbative terms. We show that active mode locking with an amplitude modulator leads to a self-starting......Soliton pulses generated by a fiber-ring laser are investigated by numerical simulation and perturbation methods. The mathematical modeling is based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with perturbative terms. We show that active mode locking with an amplitude modulator leads to a self......-starting of stable solitonic pulses from small random noise, provided the modulation depth is small. The perturbative analysis leads to a nonlinear coupled return map for the amplitude, phase, and position of the soliton pulses circulating in the fiber-ring laser. We established the validity of this approach...... by comparison with the full numerical simulations. Finally, we discuss possible sources of instability that are due to resonances in the device....

  16. NICE3: Dyebath reuse in carpet manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, P.

    1999-09-29

    Fact sheet on an analysis system for dyebath processes in the carpet manufacturing industry written for the NICE3 Program. The Georgia Institute of Technology (G.I.T.) has developed an effective automated dyebath analysis and reuse system that improves the energy, environmental, and economic performance of dyehouse batch operations. The new system enables dyeing solutions to be accurately monitored and adjusted for reuse. According to industry estimates, 160 pounds of water are used to produce each pound of textile product. The current wasteful batch dyeing process requires all water and residual chemicals, as well as the energy required to heat the mixture for dyeing, to be dumped after one application. Spent dyebaths can only be reused after they are sampled, analyzed, and reconstituted, a process requiring labor and expertise that are unavailable in the dyehouses. Therefore, successful commercial reuse depends on an automated analysis system that precisely analyzes dyebath samples in real-time and provides for reconstitution and reuse. If fully implemented throughout the carpet industry, this innovation is expected to reduce energy consumption by 3.6 trillion Btu/year. Waste and cost savings will also be substantial. Though this project was developed for nylon carpet dyeing, the technology holds promise for widespread implementation in carpet manufacturing. In addition, it offers several opportunities involving other textile products, fiber types, dye classes, and dyeing equipment.

  17. Cloud manufacturing distributed computing technologies for global and sustainable manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Mehnen, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    Global networks, which are the primary pillars of the modern manufacturing industry and supply chains, can only cope with the new challenges, requirements and demands when supported by new computing and Internet-based technologies. Cloud Manufacturing: Distributed Computing Technologies for Global and Sustainable Manufacturing introduces a new paradigm for scalable service-oriented sustainable and globally distributed manufacturing systems.   The eleven chapters in this book provide an updated overview of the latest technological development and applications in relevant research areas.  Following an introduction to the essential features of Cloud Computing, chapters cover a range of methods and applications such as the factors that actually affect adoption of the Cloud Computing technology in manufacturing companies and new geometrical simplification method to stream 3-Dimensional design and manufacturing data via the Internet. This is further supported case studies and real life data for Waste Electrical ...

  18. Additive Manufacturing Technology Potential: A Cleaner Manufacturing Alternative

    OpenAIRE

    Kianian, Babak; LARSSON, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on an emerging manufacturing technology called Additive Manufacturing (AM) and its potential to become a more efficient and cleaner manufacturing alternative. This work is built around selected case companies, where the benefit of AM compared to other more traditional technologies is studied through the comparison of resource consumption. The resource consumption is defined as raw materials and energy input. The scope of this work is the application of AM in the scale model...

  19. Capillary stretching of fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duprat, C.; Protiere, S.

    2015-09-01

    We study the interaction of a finite volume of liquid with two parallel thin flexible fibers. A tension along the fibers is imposed and may be varied. We report two morphologies, i.e. two types of wet adhesion: a weak capillary adhesion, where a liquid drop bridges the fibers, and a strong elastocapillary adhesion where the liquid is spread between two collapsed fibers. We show that geometry, capillarity and stretching are the key parameters at play. We describe the collapse and detachment of the fibers as a function of two nondimensional parameters, arising from the geometry of the system and a balance between capillary and stretching energies. In addition, we show that the morphology, thus the capillary adhesion, can be controlled by changing the tension within the fibers.

  20. WHAT HAPPENS TO CELLULOSIC FIBERS DURING PAPERMAKING AND RECYCLING? A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando J. Rojas

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Both reversible and irreversible changes take place as cellulosic fibers are manufactured into paper products one or more times. This review considers both physical and chemical changes. It is proposed that by understanding these changes one can make better use of cellulosic fibers at various stages of their life cycles, achieving a broad range of paper performance characteristics. Some of the changes that occur as a result of recycling are inherent to the fibers themselves. Other changes may result from the presence of various contaminants associated with the fibers as a result of manufacturing processes and uses. The former category includes an expected loss of swelling ability and decreased wet-flexibility, especially after kraft fibers are dried. The latter category includes effects of inks, de-inking agents, stickies, and additives used during previous cycles of papermaking.

  1. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  2. Fiber optic micro accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swierkowski, Steve P.

    2005-07-26

    An accelerometer includes a wafer, a proof mass integrated into the wafer, at least one spring member connected to the proof mass, and an optical fiber. A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially reflective surface on the proof mass and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. The two partially reflective surfaces are used to detect movement of the proof mass through the optical fiber, using an optical detection system.

  3. Fiber optics in SHIVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHIVA is a twenty arm laser which is controlled with a network of fifty computers, interconnected with digital fiber optic links. Three different fiber optic systems employed on the Shiva laser will be described. Two of the systems are for digital communications, one at 9600 baud and the other at 1 megabaud. The third system uses fiber optics to distribute diagnostic triggers with subnanosecond jitter

  4. Turbine airfoil manufacturing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortovich, C. [PCC Airfoils, Inc., Beachwood, OH (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The efficiency and effectiveness of the gas turbine engine is directly related to the turbine inlet temperatures. The ability to increase these temperatures has occurred as a result of improvements in materials, design, and processing techniques. A generic sequence indicating the relationship of these factors to temperature capability is schematically shown in Figure 1 for aircraft engine and land based engine materials. A basic contribution that is not captured by the Figure is the significant improvement in process and manufacturing capability that has accompanied each of these innovations. It is this capability that has allowed the designs and innovations to be applied on a high volume, cost effective scale in the aircraft gas turbine market.

  5. Manufacturing firsts in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First collisions at particle accelerators tend to be carefully managed public-relations exercises rather than scientifically important events. Many newspapers reported about first collisions on the initial operation of the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in the USA. The problem is that the detectors were not ready to record such events. This procedure happened also at other accelerators. The first moments in science- as in other human endeavours- are often manufactured, defined by social and political forces. The working practice, values and interests of science administrators, politicians and scientists are usually so far apart that they are effectively quite different cultures. In this one artifice, these groups have found finally an opportunity that jointly satisfies their need without requiring any group to compromise. This opportunity may well be a, ah, first. (U.K.)

  6. Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing (ECM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kansas City Plant (KCP) is operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) as the Kansas City Division of Allied-Signal Inc. The KCP produces and procures non-nuclear electrical, electronic, electromechanical, plastic, and metal components for nuclear weapons. Environmental goals at the KCP are to clean up, maintain, and operate the governmental facilities in the most environmentally advantageous manner consistent with regulations. New environmental technologies that are developed by the design laboratories and the KCP are incorporated into the DOE manufacturing facilities, and information is shared with the outside industry through meetings, publications, and seminars. This booklet presents current projects on solvent waste streams, polymer waste streams, plating waste streams, and miscellaneous waste stream minimization projects

  7. Manufacture of Probiotic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for many years as natural biopreservatives in fermented foods. A small group of LAB are also believed to have beneficial health effects on the host, so called probiotic bacteria. Probiotics have emerged from the niche industry from Asia into European and American markets. Functional foods are one of the fastest growing markets today, with estimated growth to 20 billion dollars worldwide by 2010 (GIA, 2008). The increasing demand for probiotics and the new food markets where probiotics are introduced, challenges the industry to produce high quantities of probiotic cultures in a viable and stable form. Dried concentrated probiotic cultures are the most convenient form for incorporation into functional foods, given the ease of storage, handling and transport, especially for shelf-stable functional products. This chapter will discuss various aspects of the challenges associated with the manufacturing of probiotic cultures.

  8. Maintenance in sustainable manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Stuchly

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sustainable development is about reaching a balance between economic, social, and environmental goals, as well as people's participation in the planning process in order to gain their input and support. For a company, sustainable development means adoption of such business strategy and actions that contribute to satisfying present needs of company and stakeholders, as well as simultaneous protection, maintenance and strengthening of human and environmental potential which will be needed in the future. This new approach forces manufacturing companies to change their previous management paradigms. New management paradigm should include new issues and develop innovative methods, practices and technologies striving for solving problem of shortages of resources, softening environment overload and enabling development of environment-friendly lifecycle of products. Hence, its realization requires updating existing production models as they are based on previously accepted paradigm of unlimited resources and unlimited regeneration capabilities. Maintenance plays a crucial role because of its impact on availability, reliability, quality and life cycle cost, thus it should be one of the main pillars of new business running model.  Material and methods: The following paper is a result of research on the literature and observation of practices undertaken by a company within maintenance area. Results and conclusions: The main message is that considering sustainable manufacturing requires considerable expanding range of analysis and focusing on supporting processes. Maintenance offers numerous opportunities of decreasing influence of business processes on natural environment and more efficient resources utilization. The goal of maintenance processes realizing sustainable development strategy is increased profitability of exploitation and optimization of total lifecycle cost without disturbing safety and environmental issues. 

  9. Biotechnological manufacture of lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferle, Walter; Möckel, Bettina; Bathe, Brigitte; Marx, Achim

    2003-01-01

    L-Lysine has been manufactured using Corynebacterium glutamicum for more than 40 years. Nowadays production exceeds 600,000 tons per year. Based on conventionally bred strains, further improvement of lysine productivity has been achieved by genetic engineering. Pyruvate carboxylase, aspartate kinase, dihydrodipicolinate synthase, homoserine dehydrogenase and the specific lysine exporter were shown to be key enzymes for lysine production and were characterized in detail. Their combined engineering led to a striking increase in lysine formation. Pathway modeling with data emerging from 13C-isotope experiments revealed a coordinated flux through pentose phosphate cycle and tricarboxylic acid cycle and intensive futile cycling between C3 compounds of glycolysis and C4 compounds of tricarboxylic acid cycle. Process economics have been optimized by developing repeated fed-batch techniques and technical continuous fermentations. In addition, on-line metabolic pathway analysis or flow cytometry may help to improve the fermentation performance. Finally, the availability of the Corynebacterium glutamicum genome sequence has a major impact on the improvement of the biotechnological manufacture of lysine. In this context, all genes of the carbon flow from sugar uptake to lysine secretion have been identified and are accessible to manipulation. The whole sequence information gives access to post genome technologies such as transcriptome analysis, investigation of the proteome and the active metabolic network. These multi-parallel working technologies will accelerate the generation of knowledge. For the first time there is a chance of understanding the overall picture of the physiological state of lysine overproduction in a technical environment. PMID:12523389

  10. 75 FR 38078 - Manufacturing and Services' Manufacture America Initiative and Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing and Services' Manufacture America Initiative and Events ACTION... manufacturing. SUMMARY: The International Trade Administration's Manufacturing and Services Unit is launching a... government agencies as well as universities. To address these challenges, the Manufacturing and...

  11. Bond characteristics of steel fiber and deformed reinforcing steel bar embedded in steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Farhad; Nejadi, Shami

    2012-09-01

    Steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC) is a relatively new composite material which congregates the benefits of the self-compacting concrete (SCC) technology with the profits derived from the fiber addition to a brittle cementitious matrix. Steel fibers improve many of the properties of SCC elements including tensile strength, ductility, toughness, energy absorption capacity, fracture toughness and cracking. Although the available research regarding the influence of steel fibers on the properties of SFRSCC is limited, this paper investigates the bond characteristics between steel fiber and SCC firstly. Based on the available experimental results, the current analytical steel fiber pullout model (Dubey 1999) is modified by considering the different SCC properties and different fiber types (smooth, hooked) and inclination. In order to take into account the effect of fiber inclination in the pullout model, apparent shear strengths (? (app)) and slip coefficient (?) are incorporated to express the variation of pullout peak load and the augmentation of peak slip as the inclined angle increases. These variables are expressed as functions of the inclined angle (?). Furthurmore, steel-concrete composite floors, reinforced concrete floors supported by columns or walls and floors on an elastic foundations belong to the category of structural elements in which the conventional steel reinforcement can be partially replaced by the use of steel fibers. When discussing deformation capacity of structural elements or civil engineering structures manufactured using SFRSCC, one must be able to describe thoroughly both the behavior of the concrete matrix reinforced with steel fibers and the interaction between this composite matrix and discrete steel reinforcement of the conventional type. However, even though the knowledge on bond behavior is essential for evaluating the overall behavior of structural components containing reinforcement and steel fibers, information is hardly available in this area. In this study, bond characteristics of deformed reinforcing steel bars embedded in SFRSCC is investigated secondly.

  12. ZBLAN, Silica Fiber Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This graph depicts the increased signal quality possible with optical fibers made from ZBLAN, a family of heavy-metal fluoride glasses (fluorine combined zirconium, barium, lanthanum, aluminum, and sodium) as compared to silica fibers. NASA is conducting research on pulling ZBLAN fibers in the low-g environment of space to prevent crystallization that limits ZBLAN's usefulness in optical fiber-based communications. In the graph, a line closer to the black theoretical maximum line is better. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  13. Manufacturing consumption of energy 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the U.S. economy based on data from the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey. The sample used in this report represented about 250,000 of the largest manufacturing establishments which account for approximately 98 percent of U.S. economic output from manufacturing, and an expected similar proportion of manufacturing energy use. The amount of energy use was collected for all operations of each establishment surveyed. Highlights of the report include profiles for the four major energy-consuming industries (petroleum refining, chemical, paper, and primary metal industries), and an analysis of the effects of changes in the natural gas and electricity markets on the manufacturing sector. Seven appendices are included to provide detailed background information. 10 figs., 51 tabs.

  14. Using startup of steady shear flow in a sliding plate rheometer to determine material parameters for the purpose of predicting long fiber orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Ortman, K.; Baird, D; Wapperom, P; Whittington, A.

    2012-01-01

    The properties of long glass fiber reinforced parts, such as those manufactured by means of injection molding and compression molding, are highly dependent on the fiber orientation generated during processing. A sliding plate rheometer was used to understand the transient stress and orientation development of concentrated long glass fibers during the startup of steady shear flow. An orientation model and stress tensor combination, based on semiflexible fibers, was assessed in its ability to p...

  15. Manufacturing consumption of energy 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the US economy. These estimates are based on data from the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This survey--administered by the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Information Administration (EIA)--is the most comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries.

  16. Method of manufacturing powder particles :

    OpenAIRE

    Borra, J.P.D.

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of manufacturing a dry powder particle, preferably using electro-hydrodynamic spraying, wherein two oppositely charged aerosol streams are contacted. The invention allows for the manufacture of powders having various, controllable compositions and shapes. In particular the method according to the invention may be used to perform physical and chemical reactions and allows for the manufacture of powders not previously obtainable. In addition, the invention rela...

  17. The evolution of manufacturing SPECIES

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, James Scott; Rose-Anderssen, Christen; RIDGWAY, Keith; Bttinger, Fabian; Michen, Marcus; Agyapong-Kodua, Kwabena; Brencsics, Ivan; Nemeth, Istvan; Krain, Roland

    2013-01-01

    This research aims to develop hierarchical and cladistic classifications of manufacturing system evolution, incorporating evolving and interacting product, process and production system features. The objectives then are to systematically organise manufacturing systems and their characteristics in classifications Forty-six candidate species of manufacturing systems have been identified and organised in a 4th generation hierarchical classification with 14 'genera', 6 'families' 3 'orders' and 1...

  18. A Review of Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Kaufui V.; Aldo Hernandez

    2012-01-01

    Additive manufacturing processes take the information from a computer-aided design (CAD) file that is later converted to a stereolithography (STL) file. In this process, the drawing made in the CAD software is approximated by triangles and sliced containing the information of each layer that is going to be printed. There is a discussion of the relevant additive manufacturing processes and their applications. The aerospace industry employs them because of the possibility of manufacturing light...

  19. Low-coherence interferometric measurements of optical losses in autoclave cured composite samples with embedded optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sante, Raffaella; Bastianini, Filippo; Donati, Lorenzo

    2013-05-01

    In this work a high-performance optical low-coherence reflectometer (OLCR) has been used to estimate the optical losses in optical fibers and fiber Bragg grating sensors embedded into CFRP material samples. An ASE tunable narrowband light source coupled to a Michelson interferometer allowed the high spatial resolution localization of both the concentrated and the distributed loss for different fiber coatings and type. In particular, acrylate- and polyimidecoated fibers and bend-insensitive fibers were tested. By using the OLCR it was possible to locate and identify the sources of optical loss introduced by the CFRP manufacturing process, therefore obtaining useful information on the efficiency of the embedding process.

  20. All-solid microstructured fiber with flat normal chromatic dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynkien, Tadeusz; Pysz, Dariusz; St?pie?, Ryszard; Buczy?ski, Ryszard

    2014-04-15

    We present a new approach for the development of all-solid microstructured fiber with flat all-normal dispersion in the broadband range of 1550-2500nm. The use of two soft glasses gives additional degrees of freedom in the design of microstructured fibers. As a result, we have designed and developed a fiber optimized for supercontinuum generation with 1550nm pulsed lasers in the all-normal dispersion regime within an infrared range, beyond the fused silica glass limit. The measurement of the chromatic dispersion of the manufactured fibers was performed with a white light interferometric method in the spectral range 900-1650nm. We demonstrate very good agreement between the full vector finite element simulations and the measurement results. PMID:24978988

  1. Natural-fiber-reinforced polymer composites in automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbery, James; Houston, Dan

    2006-11-01

    In the past decade, natural-fiber composites with thermoplastic and thermoset matrices have been embraced by European car manufacturers and suppliers for door panels, seat backs, headliners, package trays, dashboards, and interior parts. Natural fibers such as kenaf, hemp, flax, jute, and sisal offer such benefits as reductions in weight, cost, and CO2, less reliance on foreign oil sources, and recyclability. However, several major technical considerations must be addressed before the engineering, scientific, and commercial communities gain the confidence to enable wide-scale acceptance, particularly in exterior parts where a Class A surface finish is required. Challenges include the homogenization of the fiber's properties and a full understanding of the degree of polymerization and crystallization, adhesion between the fiber and matrix, moisture repellence, and flame-retardant properties, to name but a few.

  2. Production of carbon fibers from Castilla's crude oil deasphalted bottoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obtaining raw materials for the manufacturing of carbon fibers from Castilla's crude-oil deasphalted bottoms was achieved through thermal treatments carried out in inert atmosphere, at temperatures ranging from 573 k to 673 k. the deasphalted bottoms displayed isotropic characteristics. deasphalted bottoms and thermally-treated fractions were characterized using elemental and thermo-gravimetric analyses, the softening point was also defined. The thermal treatment increases the C/H ratio, which is reflected in the softening temperatures. Thermally treated fractions showed excellent behavior in the threading process and the obtained fibers were stabilized through air-driven oxidation. Once the fibers were stabilized, they were carbonized in inert atmosphere, at 1073 k and 1273 k. results showed that when this raw material is processed, it has a performance rating of over 65%, and produces compact. Infusible structures that may be classified as general use carbon fibers

  3. Mode profiling of optical fibers at high laser powers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Carøe; Pedersen, David Bue; Simonsen, R.B.; Erschens, D.N.; Lilbæk, M.F.; Eskildsen, Lars; Rottwitt, Karsten; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2008-01-01

    obtained. Choosing a highly reflective rod material and a sufficiently high rotation speed, these measurements can be done with high laser powers, without any additional optical elements between the fiber and analyzer. The performance of the analyzer was evaluated by coupling laser light into different......This paper describes the development of a measuring equipment capable of analysing the beam profile at high optical powers emitted by delivery fibers used in manufacturing processes. Together with the optical delivery system, the output beam quality from the delivery fiber and the shape of the...... focused spot can be determined. The analyser is based on the principle of a rotating wire being swept though the laser beam, while the reflected signal is recorded [1]. By changing the incident angle of the rotating rod from 0° to 360° in relation to the fiber, the full profile of the laser beam is...

  4. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites for environmental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, R.; Grulke, E.; Kimber, G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Activated carbon fiber composites show great promise as fixed-bed catalytic reactors for use in environmental applications such as flue gas clean-up and ground water decontamination. A novel manufacturing process produces low density composites from chopped carbon fibers and binders. These composites have high permeability, can be activated to have high surface area, and have many potential environmental applications. This paper reports the mechanical and flow properties of these low density composites. Three point flexural strength tests were used to measure composite yield strength and flexural moduli. Composites containing over 10 pph binder had an adequate yield strength of about 200 psi at activations up to 40% weight loss. The composites were anisotropic, having along-fiber to cross-fiber yield strength ratios between 1.2 and 2.0. The pressure drop of air through the composites correlated with the gas velocity, and showed a dependence on sample density.

  5. Silkworms transformed with chimeric silkworm/spider silk genes spin composite silk fibers with improved mechanical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Teul, Florence; Miao, Yun-Gen; Sohn, Bong-Hee; Kim, Young-Soo; Hull, J. Joe; Fraser, Malcolm J; Lewis, Randolph V; Jarvis, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    The development of a spider silk-manufacturing process is of great interest. However, there are serious problems with natural manufacturing through spider farming, and standard recombinant protein production platforms have provided limited progress due to their inability to assemble spider silk proteins into fibers. Thus, we used piggyBac vectors to create transgenic silkworms encoding chimeric silkworm/spider silk proteins. The silk fibers produced by these animals were composite materials t...

  6. SPIRou @ CFHT: fiber links and pupil slicer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheau, Yoan; Bouchy, Franois; Pepe, Francesco; Chazelas, Bruno; Kouach, Driss; Pars, Laurent; Donati, Jean-Franois; Barrick, Gregory; Rabou, Patrick; Thibault, Simon; Saddlemyer, Leslie; Perruchot, Sandrine; Delfosse, Xavier; Striebig, Nicolas; Gallou, Grard; Loop, David; Pazder, John

    2012-09-01

    SPIRou is a near-IR (0.98-2.35?m), echelle spectropolarimeter / high precision velocimeter being designed as a next-generation instrument for the 3.6m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, with the main goal of detecting Earth-like planets around low mass stars and magnetic fields of forming stars. The unique scientific and technical capabilities of SPIRou are described in a series of seven companion papers. In this paper, the fiber links which connects the polarimeter unit to the cryogenic spectrograph unit (35 meter apart) are described. The pupil slicer which forms a slit compatible with the spectrograph entrance specifications is also discussed in this paper. Some challenging aspects are presented. In particular this paper will focus on the manufacturing of 35 meter fibers with a very low loss attenuation (< 13dB/km) in the non-usual fiber spectral domain from 0.98 ?m to 2.35 ?m. Other aspects as the scrambling performance of the fiber links to reach high accuracy radial velocity measurements (1m/s) and the design of the pupil slicer exposed at a cryogenic and vacuum environment will be discussed.

  7. Durable fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to produce thin precast elements, a self-compacting concrete was prepared. When manufacturing these elements, homogenously dispersed steel fibers instead of ordinary steel-reinforcing mesh were added to the concrete mixture at a dosage of 10% by mass of cement. An adequate concrete strength class was achieved with a water to cement ratio of 0.40. Compression and flexure tests were carried out to assess the safety of these thin concrete elements. Moreover, serviceability aspects were taken into consideration. Firstly, drying shrinkage tests were carried out in order to evaluate the contribution of steel fibers in counteracting the high concrete strains due to a low aggregate-cement ratio. Secondly, the resistance to freezing and thawing cycles was investigated on concrete specimens in some cases superficially treated with a hydrophobic agent. Lastly, both carbonation and chloride penetration tests were carried out to assess durability behavior of this concrete mixture

  8. Soluble and insoluble fiber (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary fiber is the part of food that is not affected by the digestive process in the body. ... of the stool. There are two types of dietary fiber, soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber retains water and ...

  9. Soliton mode fiber direction couplers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Andrushko

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of working towards fiber couplers in the nonlinear regime. The results can be used in the design of the main lines on the optical fibers and fiber optic sensors to create physical quantities.

  10. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittenber, David B.

    The objective of this work was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of natural fiber reinforced polymer (NFRP)'s ability to act as a structural material. As a chemical treatment, aligned kenaf fibers were treated with sodium hydroxide (alkalization) in different concentrations and durations and then manufactured into kenaf fiber / vinyl ester composite plates. Single fiber tensile properties and composite flexural properties, both in dry and saturated environments, were assessed. Based on ASTM standard testing, a comparison of flexural, tensile, compressive, and shear mechanical properties was also made between an untreated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a chemically treated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a glass fiber reinforced composite, and oriented strand board (OSB). The mechanical properties were evaluated for dry samples, samples immersed in water for 50 hours, and samples immersed in water until saturation (~2700 hours). Since NFRPs are more vulnerable to environmental effects than synthetic fiber composites, a series of weathering and environmental tests were conducted on the kenaf fiber composites. The environmental conditions studied include real-time outdoor weathering, elevated temperatures, immersion in different pH solutions, and UV exposure. In all of these tests, degradation was found to be more pronounced in the NFRPs than in the glass FRPs; however, in nearly every case the degradation was less than 50% of the flexural strength or stiffness. Using a method of overlapping and meshing discontinuous fiber ends, large mats of fiber bundles were manufactured into composite facesheets for structural insulated panels (SIPs). The polyisocyanurate foam cores proved to be poorly matched to the strength and stiffness of the NFRP facesheets, leading to premature core shear or delamination failures in both flexure and compressive testing. The NFRPs were found to match well with the theoretical stiffness prediction methods of classical lamination theory, finite element method, and Castigliano's method in unidirectional tension and compression, but are less accurate for the more bond-dependent flexural and shear properties. With the acknowledged NFRP matrix bonding issues, the over-prediction of these theoretical models indicates that the flexural stiffness of the kenaf composite may be increased by up to 40% if a better bond between the fiber and matrix can be obtained. The sustainability of NFRPs was examined from two perspectives: environmental and socioeconomic. While the kenaf fibers themselves possess excellent sustainability characteristics, costing less while possessing a lesser environmental impact than the glass fibers, the vinyl ester resin used in the composites is environmentally hazardous and inflated the cost and embodied energy of the composite SIPs. Consistent throughout all the designs was a correlation between the respective costs of the raw materials and the respective environmental impacts. The socioeconomic study looked at the sustainability of natural fiber reinforced composite materials as housing materials in developing countries. A literature study on the country of Bangladesh, where the fibers in this study were grown, showed that the jute and kenaf market would benefit from the introduction of a value-added product like natural fiber composites. The high rate of homeless and inadequately housed in Bangladesh, as well as in the US and throughout the rest of the world, could be somewhat alleviated if a new, affordable, and durable material were introduced. While this study found that natural fiber composites possess sufficient mechanical properties to be adopted as primary structural members, the two major remaining hurdles needing to be overcome before natural fiber composites can be adopted as housing materials are the cost and sustainability of the resin system and the moisture resistance/durability of the fibers. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  11. Manufacturing strategy issues in selected Indian manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahender Singh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some findings of Indian manufacturing sectors viz. automobile (especially two-wheeler, tractor and general manufacturing industry. Various manufacturing strategy issues such as competitive priorities, improvement activities, and performance measures, have been identified and assessed in Indian context. Sector wise comparison of competitive priorities, improvement activities i.e. advanced manufacturing technology (AMT, integrated information systems (IIS, and advanced management systems (AMS, and performance measure, is provided. Our results showed that most of the Indian companies are still emphasizing on quality. However, automobile sector has set to compete globally with high innovation rate, faster new product development, and continuous improvement. It is also observed that Indian companies are investing more in AMS as compared to IIS and AMT. Manufacturing competence index is also computed for each sector.

  12. A Manufacturing Informatics Framework for Manufacturing Sustainability Assessment. In : Re-engineering Manufacturing for Sustainability, Springer

    OpenAIRE

    ZHAO, Yaoyao Fiona; Perry, Nicolas; ANDRIANKAJA, Hery

    2013-01-01

    Manufacturing firms that wish to improve their environmental performance of their product, process, and systems are faced with a complex task because manufacturing systems are very complex and they come in many forms and life expectancies. To achieve desired product functionalities, different design and material can be selected; thus the corresponding manufacturing processes are also changed accordingly. There is direct need of assessment tools to monitor and estim...

  13. Quartz fiber calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akchurin, N. [Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States); Doulas, S. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Ganel, O. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Gershtein, Y. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gavrilov, V. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kolosov, V. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuleshov, S. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Litvinsev, D. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Merlo, J.-P. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Onel, Y. [Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States); Osborne, D. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Rosowsky, A. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Stolin, V. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sulak, L. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Sullivan, J. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Ulyanov, A. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Wigmans, R. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Winn, D. [Fairfield Univ., CT (United States)

    1996-09-21

    A calorimeter with optical quartz fibers embedded into an absorber matrix was proposed for the small angle region of the CMS detector at LHC (CERN). This type of calorimeter is expected to be radiation hard and to produce extremely fast signal. Some results from beam tests of the quartz fiber calorimeter prototype are presented. (orig.).

  14. Fiber Sensor Technology Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotate, Kazuo

    2006-08-01

    Fiber sensor technologies are overviewed. Since the early 1970s, this field has been developed, on the basis of the same devices and photonic principles as fiber communication technologies. Besides simple configurations, in which the fiber acts only as a data transmission line, sophisticated configurations have also been developed, in which the fiber is used as a device to realize unique sensing mechanisms. The fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) is a good example, and has been developed as an absolute rotation sensor used, for example, for navigation and/or attitude control applications. Compared with traditional spinning-mass gyroscopes, the FOG has advantages, such as a short warming-up time, a light weight, and easy handling. A Japanese satellite, which was launched in August 2005 with a mission to observe the aurora, is controlled with a FOG. The FOG has also been used in consumer applications, such as the camera stabilizer, radio-controlled (RC) helicopter navigation, and the control of humanoid robots. Recently, distributed and multiplexed sensing schemes, in particular, have been studied and developed, in which a long fiber acts like a nerve for feeling the strain and/or the temperature distribution along the fiber. Performances of artificial nerve systems have markedly improved within the last couple of years, in spatial resolution and measurement speed. By embedding the fiber-optic nerve system in aircraft wings, bridges and tall buildings, these materials and structures can sense damage to prevent disasters.

  15. Laser Cutting of Carbon Fiber Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, A. N.; Schoeberl, M.; Tremmer, J.; Zaeh, M. F.

    Due to their high weight-specific mechanical stiffness and strength, parts made from carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) are increasingly used as structural components in the aircraft and automotive industry. However, the cutting of preforms, as with most automated manufacturing processes for CFRP components, has not yet been fully optimized. This paper discusses laser cutting, an alternative method to the mechanical cutting of preforms. Experiments with remote laser cutting and gas assisted laser cutting were carried out in order to identify achievable machining speeds. The advantages of the two different processes as well as their fitness for use in mass production are discussed.

  16. General Tips of What Little This Author has Learned of Cotton Processing in Traditional Textile Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article, under the following sub-headings, only lists a few very important tips that the author has experienced in his career involving processing of cotton in the traditional textile manufacturing: (1) Fiber Opening and Cleaning (2) Carding (3) Drawing (4) Combing, if necessary (5) Roving (6)...

  17. Improving the Value Chain of Biofuel Manufacturing Operations by Enhancing Coproduct Transportation and Logistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofuels, including corn-based ethanol, can partially meet the increasing demand for transportation fuels. The production of ethanol in the U.S. has dramatically increased; so too has the quantity of manufacturing coproducts. These nonfermentable residues (i.e., proteins, fibers, oils) are sold as...

  18. Ply-based Optimization of Laminated Composite Shell Structures under Manufacturing Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rene; Lund, Erik

    2012-01-01

    This work concerns a new ply-based parameterization for performing simultaneous material selection and topology optimization of fiber reinforced laminated composite structures while ensuring that a series of different manufacturing constraints are fulfilled. The material selection can either be......) with an additional constraint on the maximum allowable amount mass....

  19. NOVEL USE OF WASTE KERATIN AND COTTON LINTER FIBERS FOR PROTOTYPE TISSUE PAPERS AND THEIR EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Shi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Corporate environmental sustainability calls for sustainable product manufacturing with less creation of waste material or increased reuse of waste materials. One example is the use of keratin fiber from the poultry industry and cotton linter from the textile industry for paper and tissue manufacturing. In this paper, the feasibility of using these waste fibers to make paper was demonstrated in handsheets. The properties of these handsheets were compared to the properties of handsheets made with standard bleached eucalyptus tropical hardwood fibers. A blend of cotton linter and keratin fibers at 80/20 and 60/40 ratios showed a 59% and 73% improvement in sheet bulk, respectively, compared to eucalyptus handsheets. Similarly, air permeability of the cotton / keratin fiber handsheets improved 414% and 336%, respectively, versus the eucalyptus. However, the tensile index of the cotton and keratin fiber blends was lower than the eucalyptus sheets. There was no remarkable difference in water absorbency up to 20% keratin fiber. Above 20% of keratin fibers the water absorbency started to decrease, which is likely attributable to the hydrophobic nature of the protein-based keratin fiber.

  20. Intelligent modelling in manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Balic

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Modeling of production systems is very important and makes optimization of complicated relation in production system possible. The purpose of this paper is introducing artificial techniques, like Genetic Algorithms in modeling and optimization of job shop scheduling in production environment and in programming of CNC machine tools.Design/methodology/approach: Conventional methods are not suitable for solving such complicated problems. Therefore Artificial Intelligent method was used. We apply Genetic Algorithm method. Genetic Algorithms are computation methods owing their power in particular to autonomous mechanisms in biological evolution, such as selection, “survival of the fittest” (competition, and recombination.Findings: In example solutions are developed for an optimization problem of job shop scheduling by natural selection. Thus no explicit knowledge was required about how to create a good solution: the evolutionary algorithm itself implicitly builds up knowledge about good solutions, and autonomously absorbs knowledge. CNC machining time was significant shorter by using GA method for NC programming.Research limitations/implications: The system was developed for PC and tested in simulation process. It needs to be tested more in detail in the real manufacturing environment.Practical implications: It is suitable for small and medium-sized companies. Human errors are avoid or at lover level. It is important for engineers in job – shops.Originality/value: The present paper is a contribution to more intelligent systems in production environment. It used genetic based methods to solve engineering problem.

  1. Balances instruments, manufacturers, history

    CERN Document Server

    Robens, Erich; Kiefer, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    The book deals mainly with direct mass determination by means of a conventional balances. It covers the history of the balance from the beginnings in Egypt earlier than 3000 BC to recent developments. All balance types are described with emphasis on scientific balances. Methods of indirect mass determination, which are applied to very light objects like molecules and the basic particles of matter and celestial bodies, are included.  As additional guidance, today’s manufacturers are listed and the profile of important companies is reviewed. Several hundred photographs, reproductions and drawings show instruments and their uses. This book includes commercial weighing instruments for merchandise and raw materials in workshops as well as symbolic weighing in the ancient Egyptian’s ceremony of ‘Weighing of the Heart’, the Greek fate balance, the Roman  Justitia, Juno Moneta and Middle Ages scenes of the Last Judgement with Jesus or St. Michael and of modern balances. The photographs are selected from the...

  2. Precision manufacturing using LIGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective is the fabrication of small high-precision parts using LIGA, which can be used in a variety of industrial applications. LIGA is a combination of deep x-ray lithography, electroplating, and replication processes that enables the fabrication of microstructures with vertical dimensions several millimeters high, lateral dimensions in the micrometer range, and submicron tolerances. On beamline 10.3.2, at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), the Center for X-ray Optics (CXRO) has built an end station suitable for LIGA. The ALS is an excellent source of radiation for this application. The CXRO, in close collaboration with Sandia National Laboratory and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, has developed the other essential process steps of mask making, resist development, x-ray exposure, and electroplating. This technology provides a powerful tool for mass production and miniaturization of mechanical systems into a dimensional regime not accessible by traditional manufacturing operations. We will present several applications that exploit the characteristics of the LIGA process: the fabrication of magnetic laminations for a high precision stepping motor; miniature octopole lens for advanced e-beam lithography; high-aspect-ratio x-ray collimating grids for astronomy; and microscopic tumblers for nuclear security. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  3. Fiber optic hydrophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, Paul J. (Livermore, CA); Davis, Donald T. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optic fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends.

  4. Birefringent hollow core fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    increased overlap between the polarization modes at the glass interfaces. The interplay between these effects leads to a wavelength for optimum polarization maintenance, lambda(PM), which is detuned from the wavelength of highest birefringence. By a suitable fiber design involving antiresonance of the core......Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF), fabricated according to a nominally non-birefringent design, shows a degree of un-controlled birefringence or polarization mode dispersion far in excess of conventional non polarization maintaining fibers. This can degrade the output pulse in many...... applications, and places emphasis on the development of polarization maintaining (PM) HC-PCF. The polarization cross-coupling characteristics of PM HC-PCF are very different from those of conventional PM fibers. The former fibers have the advantage of suffering far less from stress-field fluctuations, but the...

  5. Yttria-alumina fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A continuous ceramic oxide fiber is described comprising Al, Y, and 0, wherein said fiber comprises at least one of an amorphous region or a polycrystalline region, wherein said fiber has a total Y203 content in the range from 28.5 to 90.7% by weight and a total A1203 content in the range from 71.5 to 9.3% by weight, and wherein the sum of said total Y203 content and said total A1203 content is at least 80.0 percent by weight, based on the total oxide content of the fiber, said fiber having an average tensile strength of at least 0.35 GPa

  6. Fiber optic attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzetti, Mike F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fiber optic attenuator of the invention is a mandrel structure through which a bundle of optical fibers is wrapped around in a complete circle. The mandrel structure includes a flexible cylindrical sheath through which the bundle passes. A set screw on the mandrel structure impacts one side of the sheath against two posts on the opposite side of the sheath. By rotating the screw, the sheath is deformed to extend partially between the two posts, bending the fiber optic bundle to a small radius controlled by rotating the set screw. Bending the fiber optic bundle to a small radius causes light in each optical fiber to be lost in the cladding, the amount depending upon the radius about which the bundle is bent.

  7. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-10-04

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  8. Fiber-Reinforced Reactive Nano-Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wei-Hong

    2011-01-01

    An ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene/ matrix interface based on the fabrication of a reactive nano-epoxy matrix with lower surface energy has been improved. Enhanced mechanical properties versus pure epoxy on a three-point bend test include: strength (25 percent), modulus (20 percent), and toughness (30 percent). Increased thermal properties include higher Tg (glass transition temperature) and stable CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion). Improved processability for manufacturing composites includes faster wetting rates on macro-fiber surfaces, lower viscosity, better resin infusion rates, and improved rheological properties. Improved interfacial adhesion properties with Spectra fibers by pullout tests include initial debonding force of 35 percent, a maximum pullout force of 25 percent, and energy to debond at 65 percent. Improved mechanical properties of Spectra fiber composites (tensile) aging resistance properties include hygrothermal effects. With this innovation, high-performance composites have been created, including carbon fibers/nano-epoxy, glass fibers/nano-epoxy, aramid fibers/ nano-epoxy, and ultra-high-molecularweight polyethylene fiber (UHMWPE).

  9. Training for New Manufacturing Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, James

    1988-01-01

    Examines the effects of computer-based manufacturing technologies on employment opportunities and job skills. Describes the establishment of the Industrial Technology Institute in Michigan to develop and utilize advanced manufacturing technologies, and the institute's relationship to the state's community colleges. Reviews lessons learned from…

  10. 75 FR 12507 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-16

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an opportunity to apply for membership on the Manufacturing Council. SUMMARY: The Department of Commerce is currently seeking applications for membership on the...

  11. Job Prospects for Manufacturing Engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basta, Nicholas

    1985-01-01

    Coming from a variety of disciplines, manufacturing engineers are keys to industry's efforts to modernize, with demand exceeding supply. The newest and fastest-growing areas include machine vision, composite materials, and manufacturing automation protocols, each of which is briefly discussed. (JN)

  12. Servitisation in Danish Manufacturing Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slepniov, Dmitrij; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum; Johansen, John

    ; Neely, 2008; Schmenner, 2009), and is perceived by many traditional manufacturers as a strategy for survival. Based on multiple cases of Danish companies, this paper discusses the main reasons and strategic implications of servitisation. Furthermore, it outlines the strategies for how traditional...... manufacturers can recoup the desired level of return from the developments associated with servitisation....

  13. DFM for manufacturers and designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurat, Philippe; Cote, Michel

    2005-11-01

    At 90nm and 65nm, the semiconductor industry is condemned to use 193nm steppers and an overwhelming amount of resolution enhancement techniques (RET). Even when using the best RET solution available, some designs are more amenable to manufacturing than others and their initial yield or startup yield is higher. Design for manufacturing (DFM) has been a hotly discussed topic in both electronic design automation (EDA) and manufacturing communities, and to date much debate remains regarding its precise definition, let alone the solution. However, it is rather intuitive that, whatever the solution is, DFM needs to simultaneously satisfy several objectives in terms of optimizing yield, manufacturing cost and manufacturing friendliness; being transparent to the designer; protecting manufacturing intellectual property (IP); and having a sensible implementation. In this paper, we will describe a suitable technology that satisfies the data information sharing to ensure that both designers and manufacturers fulfill the expected initial and volume yield expectations. We describe how this technology may be applied pre- and post-tapeout to fulfill both designer and manufactures requirements.

  14. Graphical simulation for aerospace manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babai, Majid; Bien, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    Simulation software has become a key technological enabler for integrating flexible manufacturing systems and streamlining the overall aerospace manufacturing process. In particular, robot simulation and offline programming software is being credited for reducing down time and labor cost, while boosting quality and significantly increasing productivity.

  15. Solar array manufacturing industry simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, R. G.; Firnett, P. J.; Kleine, B.

    1980-01-01

    Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Simulation (SAMIS) program is a standardized model of industry to manufacture silicon solar modules for use in electricity generation. Model is used to develop financial reports that detail requirements, including amounts and prices for materials, labor, facilities, and equipment required by companies.

  16. Grafting on polyester fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acrylic acid (AA) and acrylonitrile (AN) were used to carry out grafting on polyester (PE) fibers using the techniques of initiation by γ-radiation as well as benzoyl peroxide. Extent of grafting depended upon the time, concentration of the initiator, and the monomer as well as on the irradiation dose. AA grafted fibers were rendered more hydrophilic than AN grafted fibers for equivalent amount of grafts. Considerable improvement in dyeability of the PE fibers was possible through grafting. About 50 percent to 100 percent improvement with disperse dyes was observed in case of PE fibers containing 22.4 percent and 9.0 percent graft of AA and AN, respectively. Intense fast dyeing with direct and basic (cationic) dyes was also possible, and the dye content was proportional to the extent of graft introduced in the fiber. The CN groups were reduced to NH2 groups in the AN graft on the fiber. With the increased amount of AA graft, the maxima in the zeta potential curve shifted toward higher acidic pH as greater amounts of alkali were utilized by the --COOH groups in the graft. In this respect, CN groups were less sensitive due to their lesser polarity as compared to the carboxylic groups. Surface charge density (S.C.D.) studies showed that the effective surface area of the fiber decreased with the increase in the amount of graft. Surface conductivity (S.C.) studies revealed that with increase in the number of polar groups (--COOH) on the surface of the fiber, the S.C. increased with the increase in the amount of AA graft. In case of AN grafts, the reduction in effective surface area of the fiber played a more important role than the contribution by the CN groups to surface conductivity. (U.S.)

  17. Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, and carbon fibers made thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Amit Kumar; Hunt, Marcus Andrew; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-08-04

    Methods for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, wherein the polyolefin fiber precursor is partially sulfonated and then carbonized to produce carbon fiber. Methods for producing hollow carbon fibers, wherein the hollow core is circular- or complex-shaped, are also described. Methods for producing carbon fibers possessing a circular- or complex-shaped outer surface, which may be solid or hollow, are also described.

  18. Manufacturing best practices and performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szász, Levente; Demeter, Krisztina; Boer, Harry

    2014-01-01

    There is an impressive body of literature about best manufacturing practices. The question is whether these practices are always best, in every situation. Aimed at investigating the effects of home and host country characteristics on the “goodness” of manufacturing practices, the paper tests...... the International Manufacturing Strategy Survey (IMSS V). The IMSS V database includes data from 725 plants from manufacturing and assembly industries covering 21 different (host) countries. The Global Competitiveness Report of the World Economic Forum is used to operationalize country characteristics...... regression analyses for each group of companies, bundles of manufacturing practices are identified that lead to best-in-class performance improvements. A range of control variables is introduced to help interpret the results. The study shows that home and host country context does affect the association...

  19. Collaborative Network Learning in Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wee Hock Quik

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the antecedents of collaborative networked learning (CNL, to develop an integrative CNL framework and to bridge the gap between theory and praxis in manufacturing. It provides a holistic perspective of CNL within the complexity of the manufacturing environment, including empirical investigation using survey questionnaires. The findings and discussions draw upon socio-technical systems (STS theory, and present the theoretical context and interpretations through the lens of manufacturing employees. Results of the study show the existence of significant positive influences of organizational support, promotive interactions, positive interdependence, internal-external learning, perceived effectiveness and perceived usefulness of CNL among manufacturing employees. The study offers a basis for empirical validity for measuring CNL in organizational learning, knowledge and information sharing in manufacturing.

  20. ISS Fiber Optic Failure Investigation Root Cause Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidecker, Henning; Plante, Jeannette

    2000-01-01

    In August of 1999, Boeing Corporation (Boeing) engineers began investigating failures of optical fiber being used on International Space Station flight hardware. Catastrophic failures of the fiber were linked to a defect in the glass fiber. Following several meetings of Boeing and NASA engineers and managers, Boeing created and led an investigation team, which examined the reliability of the cable installed in the U.S. Lab. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Components Technologies and Radiation Effects Branch (GSFC) led a team investigating the root cause of the failures. Information was gathered from: regular telecons and other communications with the investigation team, investigative trips to the cable distributor's plant, the cable manufacturing plant and the fiber manufacturing plant (including a review of build records), destructive and non-destructive testing, and expertise supplied by scientists from Dupont, and Lucent-Bell Laboratories. Several theories were established early on which were not able to completely address the destructive physical analysis and experiential evidence. Lucent suggested hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching of the glass and successfully duplicated the "rocket engine" defect. Strength testing coupled with examination of the low strength break sites linked features in the polyimide coating with latent defect sites. The information provided below explains what was learned about the susceptibility of the pre-cabled fiber to failure when cabled as it was for Space Station and the nature of the latent defects.

  1. Beryllium Manufacturing Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, A

    2006-06-30

    This report is one of a number of reports that will be combined into a handbook on beryllium. Each report covers a specific topic. To-date, the following reports have been published: (1) Consolidation and Grades of Beryllium; (2) Mechanical Properties of Beryllium and the Factors Affecting these Properties; (3) Corrosion and Corrosion Protection of Beryllium; (4) Joining of Beryllium; (5) Atomic, Crystal, Elastic, Thermal, Nuclear, and other Properties of Beryllium; and (6) Beryllium Coating (Deposition) Processes and the Influence of Processing Parameters on Properties and Microstructure. The conventional method of using ingot-cast material is unsuitable for manufacturing a beryllium product. Beryllium is a highly reactive metal with a high melting point, making it susceptible to react with mold-wall materials forming beryllium compounds (BeO, etc.) that become entrapped in the solidified metal. In addition, the grain size is excessively large, being 50 to 100 {micro}m in diameter, while grain sizes of 15 {micro}m or less are required to meet acceptable strength and ductility requirements. Attempts at refining the as-cast-grain size have been unsuccessful. Because of the large grain size and limited slip systems, the casting will invariably crack during a hot-working step, which is an important step in the microstructural-refining process. The high reactivity of beryllium together with its high viscosity (even with substantial superheat) also makes it an unsuitable candidate for precision casting. In order to overcome these problems, alternative methods have been developed for the manufacturing of beryllium. The vast majority of these methods involve the use of beryllium powders. The powders are consolidated under pressure in vacuum at an elevated temperature to produce vacuum hot-pressed (VHP) blocks and vacuum hot-isostatic-pressed (HIP) forms and billets. The blocks (typically cylindrical), which are produced over a wide range of sizes (up to 183 cm dia. by 61 cm high), may be cut or machined into parts or be thermomechanically processed to develop the desired microstructure, properties, and shapes. Vacuum hot-isostatic pressing and cold-isostatic pressing (CIP) followed by sintering and possibly by a final HIP'ing (CIP/Sinter/HIP) are important in their use for the production of near net-shaped parts. For the same starting powder, a HIP'ed product will have less anisotropy than that obtained for a VHP'ed product. A schematic presentation illustrating the difference between VHP'ing and HIP'ing is shown in Figure I-1. The types of powders and the various beryllium grades produced from the consolidated powders and their ambient-temperature mechanical properties were presented in the consolidation report referred to above. Elevated-temperature properties and the effect of processing variables on mechanical properties are described in the mechanical properties report. Beryllium can also be deposited as coatings as well as freestanding forms. The microstructure, properties, and various methods used that are related to the deposition of beryllium are discussed in the report on beryllium coatings.

  2. Developing engineering model Cobra fiber positioners for the Subaru Telescope's prime focus spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Charles; Morantz, Chaz; Braun, David; Seiffert, Michael; Aghazarian, Hrand; Partos, Eamon; King, Matthew; Hovland, Larry E.; Schwochert, Mark; Kaluzny, Joel; Capocasale, Christopher; Houck, Andrew; Gross, Johannes; Reiley, Daniel; Mao, Peter; Riddle, Reed; Bui, Khanh; Henderson, David; Haran, Todd; Culhane, Robert; Piazza, Daniele; Walkama, Eric

    2014-07-01

    The Cobra fiber positioner is being developed by the California Institute of Technology (CIT) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) instrument that will be installed at the Subaru Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. PFS is a fiber fed multi-object spectrometer that uses an array of Cobra fiber positioners to rapidly reconfigure 2394 optical fibers at the prime focus of the Subaru Telescope that are capable of positioning a fiber to within 5?m of a specified target location. A single Cobra fiber positioner measures 7.7mm in diameter and is 115mm tall. The Cobra fiber positioner uses two piezo-electric rotary motors to move a fiber optic anywhere in a 9.5mm diameter patrol area. In preparation for full-scale production of 2550 Cobra positioners an Engineering Model (EM) version was developed, built and tested to validate the design, reduce manufacturing costs, and improve system reliability. The EM leveraged the previously developed prototype versions of the Cobra fiber positioner. The requirements, design, assembly techniques, development testing, design qualification and performance evaluation of EM Cobra fiber positioners are described here. Also discussed is the use of the EM build and test campaign to validate the plans for full-scale production of 2550 Cobra fiber positioners scheduled to begin in late-2014.

  3. Additive Manufacturing and Characterization of Ultem Polymers and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Grady, Joseph E.; Draper, Robert D.; Shin, Euy-Sik E.; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this project was to conduct additive manufacturing to produce aircraft engine components by Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM), using commercially available polyetherimides - Ultem 9085 and experimental Ultem 1000 mixed with 10 percent chopped carbon fiber. A property comparison between FDM-printed and injection-molded coupons for Ultem 9085, Ultem 1000 resin and the fiber-filled composite Ultem 1000 was carried out. Furthermore, an acoustic liner was printed from Ultem 9085 simulating conventional honeycomb structured liners and tested in a wind tunnel. Composite compressor inlet guide vanes were also printed using fiber-filled Ultem 1000 filaments and tested in a cascade rig. The fiber-filled Ultem 1000 filaments and composite vanes were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and acid digestion to determine the porosity of FDM-printed articles which ranged from 25-31 percent. Coupons of Ultem 9085 and experimental Ultem 1000 composites were tested at room temperature and 400 degrees Fahrenheit to evaluate their corresponding mechanical properties.

  4. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel, Roger [University of Arizona

    2014-12-17

    The main project objective has been to develop an advanced gravity sag method for molding large glass solar reflectors with either line or point focus, and with long or short focal length. The method involves taking standard sized squares of glass, 1.65 m x 1.65 m, and shaping them by gravity sag into precision steel molds. The method is designed for high volume manufacture when incorporated into a production line with separate pre-heating and cooling. The performance objectives for the self-supporting glass mirrors made by this project include mirror optical accuracy of 2 mrad root mean square (RMS), requiring surface slope errors <1 mrad rms, a target not met by current production of solar reflectors. Our objective also included development of new methods for rapidly shaping glass mirrors and coating them for higher reflectivity and soil resistance. Reflectivity of 95% for a glass mirror with anti-soil coating was targeted, compared to the present ~94% with no anti-soil coating. Our mirror cost objective is ~$20/m2 in 2020, a significant reduction compared to the present ~$35/m2 for solar trough mirrors produced for trough solar plants. During the first year a custom batch furnace was built to develop the method with high power radiative heating to simulate transfer of glass into a hot slumping zone in a production line. To preserve the original high polish of the float glass on both front and back surfaces, as required for a second surface mirror, the mold surface is machined to the required shape as grooves which intersect the glass at cusps, reducing the mold contact area to significantly less than 1%. The mold surface is gold-plated to reflect thermal radiation. Optical metrology of glass replicas made with the system has been carried out with a novel, custom-built test system. This test provides collimated, vertically-oriented parallel beams from a linear array of co-aligned lasers translated in a perpendicular direction across the reflector. Deviations of each reflected beam from the paraboloid focus give a direct measure of surface slope error. Key findings • A gravity sag method for large (2.5 m2) second surface glass solar reflectors has been developed and demonstrated to a uniquely high level of accuracy. Mirror surface slope accuracy of 0.65 mrad in one dimension, 0.85 mrad in 2 dimensions (point focus) has been demonstrated by commercial partner REhnu using this process. This accuracy exceeds by a factor of two current solar reflector accuracy. Our replicas meet the Sunshot accuracy objective of 2 mrad optical, which requires better than 1 mrad rms slope error. • Point-focus as well as line-focus mirrors have been demonstrated at 1.65 m x 1.65 m square – a unique capability. • The new process using simple molds is economical. The molds for the 1.65 m square reflectors are bent and machined steel plates on a counter-weighted flotation support. To minimize thermal coupling by radiative heat transfer, the mold surface is grooved and gilded. The molds are simple to manufacture, and have minimal thermal stresses and distortion in use. Lapping and bending techniques have been developed to obtain better than 1 mrad rms surface mold accuracy. Float glass is sagged into the molds by rapid radiative heating, using a custom high power (350 kW) furnace. The method of manufacture is well suited for small as well as large volume production, and as it requires little capital investment and no high technology, it could be used anywhere in the world to make solar concentrating reflectors. • A novel slope metrology method for full 1.65 aperture has been demonstrated, with 25 mm resolution across the face of the replicas. The method is null and therefore inherently accurate: it can easily be reproduced without high-tech equipment and does not need sophisticated calibration. We find by cross calibration with reference trough reflectors from RioGlass that our null-test laser system yields a measurement accuracy better than 0.4 mrad rms slope error. Our system is inexpensive and could have broad application for test and alignment of trough or dish reflectors. • Ten full size (2.5 m2) cylindrically curved reflectors, molded in 950 seconds and measured with the laser test facility, show shape repeatability to 0.5 mrad rms. These replicas met the Phase I Go/No-Go targets for speed (1000 sec), accuracy (< 5 mrad) and reproducibility (< 2 mrad). • Our research and tests show that the hoped-for improvements in mirror reflectivity achievable with titania antisoil coatings are not very effective in dry climates and are therefore unlikely to be economically worthwhile, and that glass with iron in the Fe+3 state to achieve very low absorption cannot be made economically by the float process.

  5. FIBERBOARD MANUFACTURED WITHOUT RESIN USING THE FENTON REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN RIQUELME-VALDÉS

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Resin-free fiberboards were manufactured using industrial fiber from Pinus radiata activated by an oxidative treatment using the Fenton reaction (H(20(2/ Fe(II. A multivariate analysis was used to study the effect of fiber moisture content (MC, press temperature (T, and the H(20(2/Fe(II ratio on the board internal bond strength (IB. Using response surface methodology, a set of máximum IB conditions was obtained. Validation of these conditions which included 25% MC, 170°C press temperature and a H(20(2/Fe(II relation of 25 produced an optimal board with an IB strength of 0.888 MPa. Without the addition of sizing agents or other additives, the dimensional stability properties were 16% of thickness swell and 40% of the water absorption of control boards.

  6. Specially fibers and relevant technologies for fiber optic sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiber optic sensing is one of the most important technologies in phonic sensing. Novel specially fibers and relevant technologies have been developed for various application fields, such as avionics, infrastructures, atomic plants and oil and gas industries. In this paper, recent progress in the fiber optic sensing is reviewed with a focus on the specialty fibers. (author)

  7. Cellulosic fibers and nonwovens from solutions: Processing and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Atul

    Cellulose is a renewable and bio-based material source extracted from wood that has the potential to generate value added products such as composites, fibers, and nonwoven textiles. This research was focused on the potential of cellulose as the raw material for fiber spinning and melt blowing of nonwovens. The cellulose was dissolved in two different benign solvents: the amine oxide 4-N-methyl morpholine oxide monohydrate (NMMOH2O) (lyocell process); and the ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C 4MIM]Cl). The solvents have essentially no vapor pressure and are biologically degradable, making them environmentally advantageous for manufacturing processes. The objectives of this research were to: (1) characterize solutions of NMMO and [C4MIM]Cl; (2) develop processing techniques to melt blow nonwoven webs from cellulose using NMMO as a solvent; (3) electrospin cellulosic fibers from the [C4MIM]Cl solvent; (4) spin cellulosic single fibers from the [C4MIM]Cl solvent. Different concentration solutions of cellulose in NMMO and [C4MIM]Cl were initially characterized rheologically and thermally to understand their behavior under different conditions of stress, strain, and temperature. Results were used to determine processing conditions and concentrations for the melt blowing, fiber spinning, and electrospinning experiments. The cellulosic nonwoven webs and fibers were characterized for their physical and optical properties such as tensile strength, water absorbency, fiber diameter, and fiber surface. Thermal properties were also measured by thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. Lyocell webs were successfully melt blown from the 14% cellulose solution. Basis weights of the webs were 27, 79, and 141 g/m2 and thicknesses ranged from 0.3-0.9 mm, depending on die temperatures and die to collector distance. The average fiber diameter achieved was 2.3 microns. The 6% lyocell solutions exhibited poor spinability and did not form nonwoven webs. The electrospun nonwoven webs obtained were evaluated for fiber diameter and surface/web structure using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The fibers obtained were in the range of 17-25 microns and the fiber surfaces and shapes varied with spinning conditions. A capillary rheometer was used to spin single fibers from [C 4MIM]Cl. Circular fibers in diameter ranging from 12-84 microns were obtained.

  8. Fiber Pulling Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.; OBrien, Sue; Adcock, Leonard

    1998-01-01

    The fiber optics industry has grown into a multi-billion marketplace that will continue to grow into the 21st century. Optical fiber communications is currently dominated by silica glass technology. Successful efforts to improve upon the low loss transmission characteristics of silica fibers have propelled the technology into the forefront of the communications industry. However, reaching the theoretical transmission capability of silica fiber through improved processing has still left a few application areas in which other fiber systems can provide an influential role due to specific characteristics of high theoretical transmission in the 2 - 3 micron wavelength region. One of the other major materials used for optical fibers is the systems based upon Heavy Metal Fluoride Glass (HMFG). Commercial interest is driven primarily by the potential for low loss repeaterless infrared fibers. An example of the major communications marketplace which would benefit from the long distance repeaterless capability of infrared fibers is the submarine cables which link the continents. When considering commercial interests, optical fiber systems provide a healthy industrial position which continues to expand. Major investments in the systems used for optical fiber communications have continued to increase each year and are predicted to continue well into the next century. Estimates of 8.5% compounded annually are predicted through 1999 for the North American market and 1 1 % worldwide. The growth for the optical fiber cable itself is expected to continue between 44 and 50 per cent of the optical fiber communications budget through 1999. The total budget in 1999 world-wide is expected to be in the neighborhood of $9 billion. Another survey predicts that long haul telecommunications represents 15% of a world-wide fiber optics market in 1998. The actual amount allotted to cable was not specified. However, another market research had predicted that the cable costs alone represents more than 50% of the total budget each year through 1998. A newly emerging activity is the commercial development of doped optical fibers which can be pumped by laser diodes to provide amplification of the communication signals. This technology is newly emerging and will be developed for commercial interests in the United States by Galileo Electro-optical Incorporated in Sturbridge, MA on a license from British Telecom. Long repeaterless communication links provide the biggest stimulus for this technology. As an example of the of the revenues involved in the optical fiber communications 3 industry, the current trade journal lists that for the fiscal years, 1991 - 1994, 185 separate undersea links were established. In addition, another 105 links are planned through 1998. The distribution of revenues involved in the undersea installations is roughly $8.5 billion through 1993 and another $13 billion planned through 1998. A large portion of the future activity (34%) is planned for Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region. Other examples of the commercial utility of optical fiber networks is given in a recent scientific symposium in which the outlook for HMFG infrared fiber was determined to be very bright.Another area of interest lies in the use of fiber optics for laser surgery delivery systems.

  9. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Bruce R. (1985 Willis, Batesburg, SC 29006); Prather, William S. (2419 Dickey Rd., Augusta, GA 30906)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer.

  10. Fabrication of multiple parallel suspended-core optical fibers by sheet-stacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jindan; Feng, Xian; Lian, Zhenggang; White, Nicholas; Loh, Wei H.; Poletti, Francesco; Horak, Peter

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of a novel type of optical fibers with multiple parallel air-suspended cores by the sheet-stacking method. Using this technique we have constructed optical fibers with up to 10 parallel micron-size suspended cores. No extra scattering loss from the fabrication process was observed in a fabricated dual air-suspended core fiber. The sheet-stacking method opens the way towards using a wide range of optical glasses for manufacturing multiple parallel suspended-core specialty optical fibers with novel optical functionalities such as dispersion tunability. Fusion splicing has also been successfully used to connect such a multiple core fiber with a conventional silica fiber.

  11. Optimization of Connector Position Offset for Bandwidth Enhancement of a Multimode Optical Fiber Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Banmali

    2000-01-01

    The multimode fiber bandwidth enhancement techniques to meet the Gigabit Ethernet standards for local area networks (LAN) of the Kennedy Space Center and other NASA centers have been discussed. Connector with lateral offset coupling between single mode launch fiber cable and the multimode fiber cable has been thoroughly investigated. An optimization of connector position offset for 8 km long optical fiber link at 1300 nm with 9 micrometer diameter single mode fiber (SMF) and 50 micrometer diameter multimode fiber (MMF) coupling has been obtained. The optimization is done in terms of bandwidth, eye-pattern, and bit pattern measurements. It is simpler, is a highly practical approach and is cheaper as no additional cost to manufacture the offset type of connectors is involved.

  12. Characterization of Optical Fiber Strength Under Applied Tensile Stress and Bending Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.E. Klingsporn

    2011-08-01

    Various types of tensile testing and bend radius tests were conducted on silica core/silica cladding optical fiber of different diameters with different protective buffer coatings, fabricated by different fiber manufacturers. The tensile tests were conducted to determine not only the average fiber strengths at failure, but also the distribution in fracture strengths, as well as the influence of buffer coating on fracture strength. The times-to-failure of fiber subjected to constant applied bending stresses of various magnitudes were measured to provide a database from which failure times of 20 years or more, and the corresponding minimum bend radius, could be extrapolated in a statistically meaningful way. The overall study was done to provide an understanding of optical fiber strength in tensile loading and in applied bending stress as related to applications of optical fiber in various potential coizfgurations for weapons and enhanced surveillance campaigns.

  13. Implementation Challenges for Sintered Silicon Carbide Fiber Bonded Ceramic Materials for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.

    2011-01-01

    During the last decades, a number of fiber reinforced ceramic composites have been developed and tested for various aerospace and ground based applications. However, a number of challenges still remain slowing the wide scale implementation of these materials. In addition to continuous fiber reinforced composites, other innovative materials have been developed including the fibrous monoliths and sintered fiber bonded ceramics. The sintered silicon carbide fiber bonded ceramics have been fabricated by the hot pressing and sintering of silicon carbide fibers. However, in this system reliable property database as well as various issues related to thermomechanical performance, integration, and fabrication of large and complex shape components has yet to be addressed. In this presentation, thermomechanical properties of sintered silicon carbide fiber bonded ceramics (as fabricated and joined) will be presented. In addition, critical need for manufacturing and integration technologies in successful implementation of these materials will be discussed.

  14. Evaluation of tensile strength of hybrid fiber (jute/gongura) reinforced hybrid polymer matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, G.; Gautham Shankar, A.; Vijay, Kumar V.; Chandan, Byral R.; Prabaharan, G. P.; Raghav, Dasarath

    2015-07-01

    The polymer matrix composites attract many industrial applications due to its light weight, less cost and easy for manufacturing. In this paper, an attempt is made to prepare and study of the tensile strength of hybrid (two natural) fibers reinforced hybrid (Natural + Synthetic) polymer matrix composites. The samples were prepared with hybrid reinforcement consists of two different fibers such as jute and Gongura and hybrid polymer consists of polyester and cashew nut shell resins. The hybrid composites tensile strength is evaluated to study the influence of various fiber parameters on mechanical strength. The parameters considered here are the duration of fiber treatment, the concentration of alkali in fiber treatment and nature of fiber content in the composites.

  15. Incorporation of waste and fiber kaolin caroa panels in Medium Density Fiberboard - MDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medium-density panels are composites molded under high temperature and pressure which have physical and mechanical properties similar to those of solid wood. Their composition includes eucalyptus grandis fibers and pinus elliotii fibers, but other fibers can be used such as caroa fibers. The goal of this work was to manufacture panels which kaolin waste and caroa fibers and compare their physical, chemical and mechanical of these panels with a others. Both residue and the fibers were characterized by: differential thermal analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis and Xray diffraction. Through the process of pressing the test specimens were fabricated, test samples were evaluated by three point bending, internal bond, water absorption and swelling in thickness. The samples have low levels of thickness swelling, flexural strength and higher tensile and absorption content relative to commercial MDF. (author)

  16. Influence of thermal treatment on porosity formation on carbon fiber from textile PAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jossano Saldanha Marcuzzo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon fibers (ACFs are known as an excellent adsorbent material due to their particular characteristics such as their high speed adsorption rate and for being easy to handle. The ACFs are commercially manufactured from carbon fibers (CF which receive an additional activation process and can be produced from celluloses, phenolic resin, pitch and Polyacrylonitrile (PAN. In the present work, the oxidized 5.0 dtex textile PAN fiber was carbonized to CFs formation. During the carbonization process in different heating rates, the topographic features changes on fibers were monitored in order to determine the best carbonization condition for CFs production to be used as raw material for ACF. Different heating rates and maximum temperature of treatment were tested and the results indicated that it is possible to produce poorly activated carbon fiber, directly from oxidized textile PAN fiber, by one single step production process.

  17. Influence of thermal treatment on porosity formation on carbon fiber from textile PAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jossano Saldanha Marcuzzo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon fibers (ACFs are known as an excellent adsorbent material due to their particular characteristics such as their high speed adsorption rate and for being easy to handle. The ACFs are commercially manufactured from carbon fibers (CF which receive an additional activation process and can be produced from celluloses, phenolic resin, pitch and Polyacrylonitrile (PAN. In the present work, the oxidized 5.0 dtex textile PAN fiber was carbonized to CFs formation. During the carbonization process in different heating rates, the topographic features changes on fibers were monitored in order to determine the best carbonization condition for CFs production to be used as raw material for ACF. Different heating rates and maximum temperature of treatment were tested and the results indicated that it is possible to produce poorly activated carbon fiber, directly from oxidized textile PAN fiber, by one single step production process.

  18. Treatment and characterization of fiber licuri for synthesis of polymeric composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural fibers are materials of increasing use of polymeric composites, due to several advantageous properties compared to synthetic fibers: low cost, density, toxicity and excellent biodegradability. Licuri fiber is widely used in the manufacture of handicrafts, with a wide range of possible applications. Before this, characterize the properties of the fiber is of great interest economic, technological and social. This study characterized the fibers in nature, which were washed with water, treated with 5% H2SO4 or 5% NaOH. Techniques were used FTIR, DSC, TGA and XRD, as well as analysis of surface reactivity of the acid and base. All treatments altered the surface of licuri, exposing reactive sites. It was observed that sodium hydroxide licuri changed significantly, as expected. These results are very significant for the recovery of a natural fiber (licuri), abundant in poor regions of the country. (author)

  19. Fiber mode converter incorporated fiber ring-down strain sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Huiye; Qiu, Yishen; Chen, Zhihao; Fu, Baoyu; Li, Gaoming

    2007-07-01

    We present a fiber mode converter incorporated fiber-loop ring-down system for strain measurement. The sensing system consists of a fiber mode converter and a typical fiber-loop ring-down system including a pulsed VCSEL laser diode at 850 nm, multimode fiber couplers, multimode fiber loop, photo-receiver and high-speed data acquisition and signal processing. The bending multimode fiber-loop ring-down strain sensor is demonstrated with a resolution of 0.28 μ\\Vegr over a range of 767 μ\\Vegr.

  20. Ultrashort pulsed fiber laser welding and sealing of transparent materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Liu, Jian

    2012-05-20

    In this paper, methods of welding and sealing optically transparent materials using an ultrashort pulsed (USP) fiber laser are demonstrated which overcome the limit of small area welding of optical materials. First, the interaction of USP fiber laser radiation inside glass was studied and single line welding results with different laser parameters were investigated. Then multiline scanning was used to obtain successful area bonding. Finally, complete four-edge sealing of fused silica substrates with a USP laser was demonstrated and the hermetic seal was confirmed by water immersion test. This laser microwelding technique can be extended to various applications in the semiconductor industry and precision optic manufacturing. PMID:22614601

  1. Fiber-optical systems in physical experiment technique. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of fiber-optic systems (FOS) application in modern physical experiment automatization systems mainly oriented to functional monitoring electrophysical installations (EPI), beams, plasma, targets diagnostics as well as experiment environment investigation is considering. Questions of the FOS functioning in high and low pressure; high and cryogenic temperature; pulsed, SHF and radiational fields, high potentials are discussed. Attention is attached to designing, manufacturing and servicing FOS, their metrological support. There are functioning concepts of FOS, and modern component base: fiber and optical cabels, connectors, and couplers, spectral devices, optical sources and photodetectors, transmitter and receiver devices. 191 refs.; 19 figs.; 9 tabs

  2. Ship Effect Measurements With Fiber Optic Neutron Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Kenneth L.; Dean, Rashe A.; Akbar, Shahzad; Kouzes, Richard T.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-08-10

    The main objectives of this research project was to assemble, operate, test and characterize an innovatively designed scintillating fiber optic neutron radiation detector manufactured by Innovative American Technology with possible application to the Department of Homeland Security screening for potential radiological and nuclear threats at US borders (Kouzes 2004). One goal of this project was to make measurements of the neutron ship effect for several materials. The Virginia State University DOE FaST/NSF summer student-faculty team made measurements with the fiber optic radiation detector at PNNL above ground to characterize the ship effect from cosmic neutrons, and underground to characterize the muon contribution.

  3. Characterisation of pulsed Carbon fiber illuminators for FIR instrument calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Henrot-Versill, S; Couchot, F

    2007-01-01

    We manufactured pulsed illuminators emitting in the far infrared for the Planck-HFI bolometric instrument ground calibrations. Specific measurements have been conducted on these light sources, based on Carbon fibers, to understand and predict their properties. We present a modelisation of the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity and the calorific capacitance of the fibers. A comparison between simulations and bolometer data is given, that shows the coherence of our model. Their small time constants, their stability and their emission spectrum pointing in the submm range make these illuminators a very usefull tool for calibrating FIR instruments.

  4. Time for a forum on terms used for textile fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zawistoski, P. S.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The advances in manufactured fibers and textiles have garnered interest and excitement of textile artists and consumers alike for a myriad of reasons, including health, environmental, and fashion. The chemical and molecular nature of these advances, however leads to confusion and misunderstanding of the new fibers in the materials. This is exacerbated by the current climate of distrust for chemical words and desire for "green" products and the unregulated (misinformation and marketing on the web. Textile artists, consumers, and the clothing and household textile industry need clear names and labels to identify the materials they are using.

  5. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivakumar, Kunigal; Argade, Shyam

    2003-01-01

    This report presents a critical review of the processing techniques for fabricating continuous fiber-reinforced CMCs for possible applications at elevated temperatures. Some of the issues affecting durability of the composite materials such as fiber coatings and cracking of the matrix because of shrinkage in PIP-process are also examined. An assessment of the potential inexpensive processes is also provided. Finally three potential routes of manufacturing C/SiC composites using a technology that NC A&T developed for carbon/carbon composites are outlined. Challenges that will be encountered are also listed.

  6. SERIAL SECTIONS THROUGH A CONTINUOUS FIBER-REINFORCED POLYMER COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Bizet

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of a unidirectional glass-fiber composite material is described seeking especially for the influence of the stitching perpendicular to the reinforcement. Serial cuts are performed through the composite and the microstructure is quantified using global parameters and linear morphological analysis. A key result is that the stitching induces variations in fibers spacing within the yarns and in the matrix volume between the yarns. This can affect noticeably the flow of the resin during the manufacturing process and also the mechanical properties of the composite.

  7. ICPOES and SEM-EDX analysis of metal fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Composition of metal fiber is important because it influences mechanical, chemical and physical properties of materials. Metal fibers are present in clothing but also in different composites used for manufacturing concrete, strings, airplanes, space crafts and other items. In this work results of direct analysis of solid samples by scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive x-ray analysis system (SEM-EDX) and results obtained by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICPOES) after solid samples dissolution in acidic solutions are presented. ICPOES offered lower LOD and better precision, while SEM-EDX provided important information about the sample layer compositions. (author)

  8. Kinetics of stress fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress fibers are contractile cytoskeletal structures, tensile actomyosin bundles which allow sensing and production of force, provide cells with adjustable rigidity and participate in various processes such as wound healing. The stress fiber is possibly the best characterized and most accessible multiprotein cellular contractile machine. Here we develop a quantitative model of the structure and relaxation kinetics of stress fibers. The principal experimentally known features are incorporated. The fiber has a periodic sarcomeric structure similar to muscle fibers with myosin motor proteins exerting contractile force by pulling on actin filaments. In addition the fiber contains the giant spring-like protein titin. Actin is continuously renewed by exchange with the cytosol leading to a turnover time of several minutes. In order that steady state be possible, turnover must be regulated. Our model invokes simple turnover and regulation mechanisms: actin association and dissociation occur at filament ends, while actin filament overlap above a certain threshold in the myosin-containing regions augments depolymerization rates. We use the model to study stress fiber relaxation kinetics after stimulation, as observed in a recent experimental study where some fiber regions were contractile and others expansive. We find that two distinct episodes ensue after stimulation: the turnover-overlap system relaxes rapidly in seconds, followed by the slow relaxation of sarcomere lengths in minutes. For parameter values as they have been characterized experimentally, we find the long time relaxation of sarcomere length is set by the rate at which actin filaments can grow or shrink in response to the forces exerted by the elastic and contractile elements. Consequently, the stress fiber relaxation time scales inversely with both titin spring constant and the intrinsic actin turnover rate. The model's predicted sarcomere velocities and contraction-expansion kinetics are in good quantitative agreement with experiment

  9. [INVITED] Lasers in additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing is a topic of considerable ongoing interest, with forecasts predicting it to have major impact on industry in the future. This paper focusses on the current status and potential future development of the technology, with particular reference to the role of lasers within it. It begins by making clear the types and roles of lasers in the different categories of additive manufacturing. This is followed by concise reviews of the economic benefits and disadvantages of the technology, current state of the market and use of additive manufacturing in different industries. Details of these fields are referenced rather than expanded in detail. The paper continues, focusing on current indicators to the future of additive manufacturing. Barriers to its development, trends and opportunities in major industrial sectors, and wider opportunities for its development are covered. Evidence indicates that additive manufacturing may not become the dominant manufacturing technology in all industries, but represents an excellent opportunity for lasers to increase their influence in manufacturing as a whole.

  10. Optical fiber spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method called 'Two Arm's Photo out and Electricity Send-back' is introduced. UV-365 UV/VIS/NIR spectrophotometer has been reequipped by this way with 5 meters long optical fiber. Another method called 'One Arm's Photo out and Photo Send-back' is also introduced. λ19 UV/VIS/NIR spectrophotometer has been reequipped by this way with 10 meters long optical fiber. Optical fiber spectrophotometer can work as its main set. So it is particularly applicable to radio activity work

  11. Random Fiber Laser

    CERN Document Server

    de Matos, Christiano J S; Brito-Silva, Antônio M; Gámez, M A Martinez; Gomes, Anderson S L; de Araújo, Cid B

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the effects of two dimensional confinement on the lasing properties of a classical random laser system operating in the incoherent feedback (diffusive) regime. A suspension of 250nm rutile (TiO2) particles in a Rhodamine 6G solution was inserted into the hollow core of a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) generating the first random fiber laser and a novel quasi-one-dimensional RL geometry. Comparison with similar systems in bulk format shows that the random fiber laser presents an efficiency that is at least two orders of magnitude higher.

  12. Broadband multimode fiber spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Liew, Seng Fatt; Choma, Michael A; Tagare, Hemant D; Cao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    A general-purpose all-fiber spectrometer is demonstrated to overcome the trade-off between spectral resolution and bandwidth. By integrating a wavelength division multiplexer with five multimode optical fibers, we have achieved 100 nm bandwidth with 0.03 nm resolution at wavelength 1500 nm. An efficient algorithm is developed to reconstruct the spectrum from the speckle pattern produced by interference of guided modes in the multimode fibers. Such algorithm enables a rapid, accurate reconstruction of both sparse and dense spectra in the presence of noise.

  13. The mechanics of manufacturing processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, P.; Stori, J. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; King, C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Economic pressures, particularly related to the quality of manufactured goods and `time-to-market` are forcing designers to think not only in terms of product design but also in terms of integrated product and process design, and finally in terms of deterministic manufacturing planning and control. As a result of these three high level needs, there is now an even greater need for comprehensive simulations that predict material behavior during a manufacturing process, the stresses and/or temperatures on associated tooling, and the final-product integrity. The phrase `manufacturing processes` of course covers a broad scope; it includes semiconductor manufacturing, injection molding of polymers, metal machining and precision lapping, wood and textile production, and the final assembly of piece-parts into a consumer product. It can be seen from this partial listing that the fields of fluid mechanics, solid mechanics, dynamics and tribology can all play a role. The introduction to the paper will contain a review of manufacturing processes and describe where simulations have been successfully applied, and where simulations are still lacking. The best of the simulations are those where the models accurately fit the physical phenomena, where accurate constitutive equations are available, and where boundary conditions are realistic. Thus, the body of the paper will focus on the results from one of these more successful simulations. It has been used to predict the deflections of tooling and the most appropriate operating conditions for the manufacturing process under study. A new method for manufacturing planning is described. In this method, closed form, somewhat simplified, analytical models are used to determine manufacturing planning parameters and then the results from these simpler models are refined by the fuller simulations. A case study in machining parameter selection for peripheral finish milling operations is developed.

  14. Process simulations for manufacturing of thick composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempner, Evan A.

    The availability of manufacturing simulations for composites can significantly reduce the costs associated with process development. Simulations provide a tool for evaluating the effect of processing conditions on the quality of parts produced without requiring numerous experiments. This is especially significant in parts that have troublesome features such as large thickness. The development of simulations for thick walled composites has been approached by examining the mechanics of resin flow and fiber deformation during processing, applying these evaluations to develop simulations, and evaluating the simulation with experimental results. A unified analysis is developed to describe the three-dimensional resin flow and fiber preform deformation during processing regardless of the manufacturing process used. It is shown how the generic governing evaluations in the unified analysis can be applied to autoclave molding, compression molding, pultrusion, filament winding, and resin transfer molding. A comparison is provided with earlier models derived individually for these processes. The evaluations described for autoclave curing were used to produce a one-dimensional cure simulation for autoclave curing of thick composites. The simulation consists of an analysis for heat transfer and resin flow in the composite as well as bleeder plies used to absorb resin removed from the part. Experiments were performed in a hot press to approximate curing in an autoclave. Graphite/epoxy laminates of 3 cm and 5 cm thickness were cured while monitoring temperatures at several points inside the laminate and thickness. The simulation predicted temperatures fairly closely, but difficulties were encountered in correlation of thickness results. This simulation was also used to study the effects of prepreg aging on processing of thick composites. An investigation was also performed on filament winding with prepreg tow. Cylinders were wound of approximately 12 mm thickness with pressure gages at the mandrel-composite interface. Cylinders were hoop wound with tensions ranging from 13-34 N. An analytical model was developed to calculate change in stress due to relaxation during winding. Although compressive circumferential stresses occurred throughout each of the cylinders, the magnitude was fairly low.

  15. THEORETICAL ESTIMATION OF FIBER DISTRIBUTION IN FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETES

    OpenAIRE

    A. N. Tkachenko; S. D. Nikolenko; D. V. Fedulov

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement. Theory of fiber reinforcement of concrete materials calls for the construction of appropriate mathematical models. The article describes the mathematical basis for calculating the density of intersections of reinforcing fibers in cross section of fiber concrete element as well as average cross sectional area of fibers.Results and conclusions. The problems of geometric probability are taken as the basis for con-struction of the model of reinforcing fiber distribution in conc...

  16. Cloud Manufacturing Service Paradigm for Group Manufacturing Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Jingtao Zhou; Mingwei Wang

    2014-01-01

    The continuous refinement of specialization requires that the group manufacturing company must be constantly focused on how to concentrate its core resources in special sphere to form its core competitive advantage. However, the resources in enterprise group are usually distributed in different subsidiary companies, which means they cannot be fully used, constraining the competition and development of the enterprise. Conducted as a response to a need for cloud manufacturing studies, systemati...

  17. Organizational training in manufacturing firms and advanced manufacturing technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Diéguez, Isabel; Cantorna, Ana; Canto, Ana

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of new microelectronic technologies in the manufacturing process forces companies to adapt human resource strategy to the changes in the workplace. While this subject has been widely researched from an operations management perspective, research from a human resource management viewpoint has been less frequent. The aim of this article is to gain insight into some of the factors that determine personnel training efforts in companies introducing advanced manufacturing technolog...

  18. Let others manufacture! Towards a new manufacturing framework

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Rodriguez Monroy; José Ramón Vilana Arto

    2009-01-01

    Global manufacturing virtual networks (GMVNs) constitute a new type of vertical and horizontal relations between independent companies or even competitors where it is not needed to maintain internal manufacturing resources but to manage and share the network resources. The fluid relations that exist within the GMVNs allow them a very permeable organization easy to connect and disconnect from one to each other as well as to choose a set of partners with specific attributes. The result is a hig...

  19. Design methodology to manufacture parts in additive manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Boyard, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to propose a design methodology to produce parts using additivemanufacturing (AM). Compared to standard manufacturing processes, as machining, forming, casting ormolding, AM processes have new features for manufacturing multi-material parts, nondetachableassemblies or complex shapes. The arrival of this new technology involves a paradigm shift that requiressupport to designers to develop quality products. Also the mechanical and finishing specifications of theparts o...

  20. MEDIUM DENSITY FIBERBOARD (MDF MANUFACTURING FROM WHEAT STRAW (Triticum aestivum L. AND STRAW WOOD MIXTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüdaverdi EROĞLU

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study wheat straw was taken from Ankara province. In order to produce dry process MDF, urea formaldehyde resin was used at the ratio of 8 %, 10 % and 12 %, 1 % ammonium chloride was used as hardening agent on the basis of dry fiber weight. On the other hand, 5, 6 and 7 min. pressing times were applied. Alcohol benzene, cold water, hot water and 1 % NaOH solubility of wheat straw were 5.15 %, 7.31 %, 9.84 % and 40.79 % respectively. In addition, holocellulose, cellulose, lignin and ash contents were found as 74.79 %, 52.67 %, 20.17% and 4.21 % respectively. Optimum fiber morphology values were as follow; fiber length 1.2-1.5 mm, fiber width 12-16 µm, lumen diameter 4-6 µm and double wall thickness 7.5 -11.5 µm Optimum fiber production conditions for MDF manufacturing were as follows; Vapor pressure : 10.5 atm, steaming time : 4 minutes, defibration time : 2 minutes. 0.700 g/cm 3 , 0.800 g/cm 3 density straw MDF boards and 0.800 g/cm 3 density wood fiber MDF boards were manufactured. On the other hand, 0.800 g/cm 3 straw-wood fiber mixture MDF boards were produced at the rates of 70% -30%, 50%-50% and 30%-70%. Modulus of rupture (MOR, modulus of elasticity (MOE, internal bonding (IB, thickness swelling and water absorption of the boards were measured. After the evaluations of the results obtained, optimum straw MDF boards manufacturing conditions were as follows; Adhesive ratio : 12 %, pressing time : 6 minutes, press temperature : 150 °C, pressure : 200-220 kp/cm 2 , hardening agent : 1 % and straw - wood ratio 50 %- 50 %.

  1. Muscle Fiber Types and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Jason R.

    2001-01-01

    The specific types of fibers that make up individual muscles greatly influence how people will adapt to their training programs. This paper explains the complexities of skeletal muscles, focusing on types of muscle fibers (slow-twitch and fast-twitch), recruitment of muscle fibers to perform a motor task, and determining fiber type. Implications…

  2. Reduced Gravity Zblan Optical Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    2000-01-01

    Two optical fiber pullers have been designed for pulling ZBLAN optical fiber in reduced gravity. One fiber puller was designed, built and flown on board NASA's KC135 reduced gravity aircraft. A second fiber puller has been designed for use on board the International Space Station.

  3. Muscle Fiber Types and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Jason R.

    2001-01-01

    The specific types of fibers that make up individual muscles greatly influence how people will adapt to their training programs. This paper explains the complexities of skeletal muscles, focusing on types of muscle fibers (slow-twitch and fast-twitch), recruitment of muscle fibers to perform a motor task, and determining fiber type. Implications

  4. Molded optics design and manufacture

    CERN Document Server

    Schaub, Michael

    2007-01-01

    While several available texts discuss molded plastic optics, none provide information on all classes of molded optics. Filling this gap, Molded Optics: Design and Manufacture presents detailed descriptions of molded plastic, glass, and infrared optics. Since an understanding of the manufacturing process is necessary to develop cost-effective, producible designs, the book extensively covers various manufacturing methods, design guidelines, trade-offs, best practices, and testing of critical parameters. It also discusses topics that often arise when designing systems with molded optics, such as

  5. Micro manufacturing techniques and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Ruxu; Li, Zifu

    2013-01-01

    Micro/meso-scale manufacturing has been developed in research fields of machining, forming, materials and others, but its potential to industries are yet to be fully realized. The theme of the current volume was to build a bridge joining academic research and industrial needs in micro manufacturing. Among the 12 papers selected for publication are three keynote addresses onmicro and desktop factories for micro/meso-scale manufacturing applicationsand future visions, tissue cutting mechanics and applications for needlecore biopsy and guidance, and micro-texturing onto amorphous carbonmaterials

  6. Support given by the manufacturer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As regards German NPP, the purchaser has the control function and the manufacturer the role of a general planner binding together all supply lots. Therefore the manufacturer possesses a very broad and thorough detailed knowledge of the plant functioning and becomes a life-long important partner of the plant. Such partnership requires from the manufacturer to provide continuously available and economical services to the plant; he must work purposefully in a quality-conscious and innovative way. This is his vision, and he will comply with it over the whole service life of the plant. The importance of services is illustrated by a large number of examples. (orig./DG)

  7. Attracting young talents to manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perini, Stefano; Oliveira, Manuel; Costa, Joao; Kiritis, Dimitris; Hansen, Poul H. Kyvsgård; Rentzos, Loukas; Skevi, Afroditi; Szigeti, Hadrien; Taisch, Marco

    In the last years, despite the global economic crisis, manufacturing is facing a serious difficulty in the recruitment of the brightest high-skilled human resources. National and international institutions have provided important guidelines to combat this skills mismatch and several innovations...... strong integrated strategy towards attracting young talent to manufacturing, by raising the aware-ness and providing the acquisition of new manufacturing skills. The key-concepts and the strategy to achieve learning objectives are presented. Finally, ManuSkills Five Pillars, i.e. Interaction with the...

  8. Genome Regions Associated with Functional Performance of Soybean Stem Fibers in Polypropylene Thermoplastic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinprecht, Yarmilla; Arif, Muhammad; Simon, Leonardo C.; Pauls, K. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Plant fibers can be used to produce composite materials for automobile parts, thus reducing plastic used in their manufacture, overall vehicle weight and fuel consumption when they replace mineral fillers and glass fibers. Soybean stem residues are, potentially, significant sources of inexpensive, renewable and biodegradable natural fibers, but are not curretly used for biocomposite production due to the functional properties of their fibers in composites being unknown. The current study was initiated to investigate the effects of plant genotype on the performance characteristics of soybean stem fibers when incorporated into a polypropylene (PP) matrix using a selective phenotyping approach. Fibers from 50 lines of a recombinant inbred line population (169 RILs) grown in different environments were incorporated into PP at 20% (wt/wt) by extrusion. Test samples were injection molded and characterized for their mechanical properties. The performance of stem fibers in the composites was significantly affected by genotype and environment. Fibers from different genotypes had significantly different chemical compositions, thus composites prepared with these fibers displayed different physical properties. This study demonstrates that thermoplastic composites with soybean stem-derived fibers have mechanical properties that are equivalent or better than wheat straw fiber composites currently being used for manufacturing interior automotive parts. The addition of soybean stem residues improved flexural, tensile and impact properties of the composites. Furthermore, by linkage and in silico mapping we identified genomic regions to which quantitative trait loci (QTL) for compositional and functional properties of soybean stem fibers in thermoplastic composites, as well as genes for cell wall synthesis, were co-localized. These results may lead to the development of high value uses for soybean stem residue. PMID:26167917

  9. Genome Regions Associated with Functional Performance of Soybean Stem Fibers in Polypropylene Thermoplastic Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinprecht, Yarmilla; Arif, Muhammad; Simon, Leonardo C; Pauls, K Peter

    2015-01-01

    Plant fibers can be used to produce composite materials for automobile parts, thus reducing plastic used in their manufacture, overall vehicle weight and fuel consumption when they replace mineral fillers and glass fibers. Soybean stem residues are, potentially, significant sources of inexpensive, renewable and biodegradable natural fibers, but are not curretly used for biocomposite production due to the functional properties of their fibers in composites being unknown. The current study was initiated to investigate the effects of plant genotype on the performance characteristics of soybean stem fibers when incorporated into a polypropylene (PP) matrix using a selective phenotyping approach. Fibers from 50 lines of a recombinant inbred line population (169 RILs) grown in different environments were incorporated into PP at 20% (wt/wt) by extrusion. Test samples were injection molded and characterized for their mechanical properties. The performance of stem fibers in the composites was significantly affected by genotype and environment. Fibers from different genotypes had significantly different chemical compositions, thus composites prepared with these fibers displayed different physical properties. This study demonstrates that thermoplastic composites with soybean stem-derived fibers have mechanical properties that are equivalent or better than wheat straw fiber composites currently being used for manufacturing interior automotive parts. The addition of soybean stem residues improved flexural, tensile and impact properties of the composites. Furthermore, by linkage and in silico mapping we identified genomic regions to which quantitative trait loci (QTL) for compositional and functional properties of soybean stem fibers in thermoplastic composites, as well as genes for cell wall synthesis, were co-localized. These results may lead to the development of high value uses for soybean stem residue. PMID:26167917

  10. The Effects of Fiber Inclusion on Pet Food Sensory Characteristics and Palatability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Kadri; Monti, Mariana; Gibson, Michael; Alavi, Sajid; Donfrancesco, Brizio Di; Carciofi, Aulus Cavalieri

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine (a) the influence of fiber on the sensory characteristics of dry dog foods; (b) differences of coated and uncoated kibbles for aroma and flavor characteristics; (c) palatability of these dry dog foods; and (d) potential associations between palatability and sensory attributes. A total of eight fiber treatments were manufactured: a control (no fiber addition), guava fiber (3%, 6%, and 12%), sugar cane fiber (9%; large and small particle size), and wheat bran fiber (32%; large and small particle size). The results indicated significant effects of fibers on both flavor and texture properties of the samples. Bitter taste and iron and stale aftertaste were examples of flavor attributes that differed with treatment, with highest intensity observed for 12% guava fiber and small particle size sugar cane fiber treatments. Fracturability and initial crispness attributes were lowest for the sugar cane fiber treatments. Flavor of all treatments changed after coating with a palatant, increasing in toasted, brothy, and grainy attributes. The coating also had a masking effect on aroma attributes such as stale, flavor attributes such as iron and bitter taste, and appearance attributes such as porosity. Palatability testing results indicated that the control treatment was preferred over the sugar cane or the wheat bran treatment. The treatment with large sugarcane fiber particles was preferred over the treatment with small particles, while both of the wheat bran treatments were eaten at a similar level. Descriptive sensory analysis data, especially textural attributes, were useful in pinpointing the underlying characteristics and were considered to be reasons that may influence palatability of dog foods manufactured with inclusion of different fibers. PMID:26479141

  11. The Effects of Fiber Inclusion on Pet Food Sensory Characteristics and Palatability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadri Koppel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to determine (a the influence of fiber on the sensory characteristics of dry dog foods; (b differences of coated and uncoated kibbles for aroma and flavor characteristics; (c palatability of these dry dog foods; and (d potential associations between palatability and sensory attributes. A total of eight fiber treatments were manufactured: a control (no fiber addition, guava fiber (3%, 6%, and 12%, sugar cane fiber (9%; large and small particle size, and wheat bran fiber (32%; large and small particle size. The results indicated significant effects of fibers on both flavor and texture properties of the samples. Bitter taste and iron and stale aftertaste were examples of flavor attributes that differed with treatment, with highest intensity observed for 12% guava fiber and small particle size sugar cane fiber treatments. Fracturability and initial crispness attributes were lowest for the sugar cane fiber treatments. Flavor of all treatments changed after coating with a palatant, increasing in toasted, brothy, and grainy attributes. The coating also had a masking effect on aroma attributes such as stale, flavor attributes such as iron and bitter taste, and appearance attributes such as porosity. Palatability testing results indicated that the control treatment was preferred over the sugar cane or the wheat bran treatment. The treatment with large sugarcane fiber particles was preferred over the treatment with small particles, while both of the wheat bran treatments were eaten at a similar level. Descriptive sensory analysis data, especially textural attributes, were useful in pinpointing the underlying characteristics and were considered to be reasons that may influence palatability of dog foods manufactured with inclusion of different fibers.

  12. Integrated flexible manufacturing program for manufacturing automation and rapid prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, S. L.; Brown, C. W.; King, M. S.; Simons, W. R.; Zimmerman, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    The Kansas City Division of Allied Signal Inc., as part of the Integrated Flexible Manufacturing Program (IFMP), is developing an integrated manufacturing environment. Several systems are being developed to produce standards and automation tools for specific activities within the manufacturing environment. The Advanced Manufacturing Development System (AMDS) is concentrating on information standards (STEP) and product data transfer; the Expert Cut Planner system (XCUT) is concentrating on machining operation process planning standards and automation capabilities; the Advanced Numerical Control system (ANC) is concentrating on NC data preparation standards and NC data generation tools; the Inspection Planning and Programming Expert system (IPPEX) is concentrating on inspection process planning, coordinate measuring machine (CMM) inspection standards and CMM part program generation tools; and the Intelligent Scheduling and Planning System (ISAPS) is concentrating on planning and scheduling tools for a flexible manufacturing system environment. All of these projects are working together to address information exchange, standardization, and information sharing to support rapid prototyping in a Flexible Manufacturing System (FMS) environment.

  13. An Assessment of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies Implementation in Manufacturing Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Yasin Shaikh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of AMTs (Advanced Manufacturing Technologies has always been the high interest and core issue for the manufacturing enterprises to get rapid production for global market place. The developed countries have achieved its competitive advantage by implementing this unique model of technologies with full range of systems. In developing countries, the implementation of such technologies is not much common due to so many reasons, (political, social, economical and technical but entrepreneurs of growing economies are contemplating to reshape long term strategy to adopt Computer systems oriented technologies in their manufacturing companies to meet the growing needs of their indigenous market on one hand and to make a place in the international market on the other. Although, very few manufacturing organization do meet the global market requirements. But there is still lot of efforts to be taken for world class competition. An attempt has been made in this paper to develop a conceptual model taking in to account the three parameters such as, Direct, Indirect and Administrative AMTs. This research work further attempts to present an empirical data analysis conducted in the manufacturing enterprises in province of Sindh, Pakistan. The overall indigenous progress of manufacturing enterprises as according to the data collected from 60 companies reveals that the AMTs systems are partially understood and practiced that is also one of the cause towards slow progress of national exchequer.

  14. Fiber optics: A research paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drone, Melinda M.

    1987-01-01

    Some basic aspects concerning fiber optics are examined. Some history leading up to the development of optical fibers which are now used in the transmission of data in many areas of the world is discussed. Basic theory of the operation of fiber optics is discussed along with methods for improving performance of the optical fiber through much research and design. Splices and connectors are compared and short haul and long haul fiber optic networks are discussed. Fiber optics plays many roles in the commercial world. The use of fiber optics for communication applications is emphasized.

  15. All-glass optical fibers derived from sapphire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragic, Peter D.; Hawkins, Thomas; Foy, Paul; Morris, Stephanie; Ballato, John

    2013-02-01

    Increasing power levels and novel applications are demanding from fibers performance capabilities that have, to date, not been realized. One such example arises from the nascent push towards the 10-kW power threshold for narrow linewidth fiber lasers designed for applications including coherently-phased laser arrays and spectroscopic lidars. It is well-known that Brillouin scattering still restricts continued power scaling in these systems, despite several recent advances in acoustic-wave Brillouin management. Accordingly, novel fibers possessing a Brillouin gain coefficient 10 dB or more less than previously demonstrated would be of great practical benefit if they comprise novel materials in simple geometries and are manufactured using industry-accepted methods. Introducing a new and effective approach to the management of Brillouin scattering, we present on all-glass optical fibers derived from silica-clad sapphire with alumina concentrations up to 55 mole percent; considerably greater than conventionally possible enabling the design of optical fiber possessing a series of essential properties. Markedly, a Brillouin gain coefficient of 3.1 × 10-13 m/W was measured for a fiber with an average alumina concentration of 54 mole percent. This value is nearly 100 times lower than standard commercial single-mode fiber and is likely the lowest ever specified value. This reduction in Brillouin gain is enabled by a number of key material properties of the alumina-silica system, amazingly even leading to a predicted, but not yet demonstrated, composition with zero Brillouin gain. Optical fiber materials with these and other crucial properties will be discussed in the context high energy fiber laser systems.

  16. Fiber bundle phase conjugate mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Benjamin G.

    2012-05-01

    An improved method and apparatus for passively conjugating the phases of a distorted wavefronts resulting from optical phase mismatch between elements of a fiber laser array are disclosed. A method for passively conjugating a distorted wavefront comprises the steps of: multiplexing a plurality of probe fibers and a bundle pump fiber in a fiber bundle array; passing the multiplexed output from the fiber bundle array through a collimating lens and into one portion of a non-linear medium; passing the output from a pump collection fiber through a focusing lens and into another portion of the non-linear medium so that the output from the pump collection fiber mixes with the multiplexed output from the fiber bundle; adjusting one or more degrees of freedom of one or more of the fiber bundle array, the collimating lens, the focusing lens, the non-linear medium, or the pump collection fiber to produce a standing wave in the non-linear medium.

  17. Physicochemical and sorption characteristics of Malaysian Ceiba pentandra (L.) Gaertn. as a natural oil sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, M A; Rahmah, Anisa Ur; Man, Z

    2010-05-15

    Ceiba pentandra (L.) Gaertn (kapok) is a natural sorbent that exhibits excellent hydrophobic-oleophilic characteristics. The effect of packing density, the oil types and solvent treatment on the sorption characteristics of kapok was studied in a batch system. Oil sorption capacity, retention capacity, entrapment stability and kapok reusability were evaluated. Based on SEM and FTIR analyses, kapok fiber was shown to be a lignocellulosic material with hydrophobic waxy coating over the hollow structures. Higher packing density at 0.08 g/ml showed lower sorption capacity, but higher percentage of dynamic oil retention, with only 1% of oil drained out from the test cell. Kapok remained stable after fifteen cycles of reuse with only 30% of sorption capacity reduction. The oil entrapment stability at 0.08 g/ml packing was high with more than 90% of diesel and used engine oil retained after horizontal shaking. After 8h of chloroform and alkali treatment, 2.1% and 26.3% reduction in sorption capacity were observed, respectively, as compared to the raw kapok. The rigid hollow structure was reduced to flattened-like structure after alkali treatment, though no major structural difference was observed after chloroform treatment. Malaysian kapok has shown great potential as an effective natural oil sorbent, owing to high sorption and retention capacity, structural stability and high reusability. PMID:20060641

  18. Fiber optics standard dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Weik, Martin H

    1997-01-01

    Fiber Optics Vocabulary Development In 1979, the National Communications System published Technical InfonnationBulle­ tin TB 79-1, Vocabulary for Fiber Optics and Lightwave Communications, written by this author. Based on a draft prepared by this author, the National Communications System published Federal Standard FED-STD-1037, Glossary of Telecommunications Terms, in 1980 with no fiber optics tenns. In 1981, the first edition of this dictionary was published under the title Fiber Optics and Lightwave Communications Standard Dictionary. In 1982, the then National Bureau of Standards, now the National Institute of Standards and Technology, published NBS Handbook 140, Optical Waveguide Communications Glossary, which was also published by the General Services Admin­ istration as PB82-166257 under the same title. Also in 1982, Dynamic Systems, Inc. , Fiberoptic Sensor Technology Handbook, co-authored and edited by published the this author, with an extensive Fiberoptic Sensors Glossary. In 1989, the handbook w...

  19. Fiber and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more fiber. Spice up salads with berries and almonds, chickpeas, artichoke hearts, and beans (kidney, black, navy, or pinto). Use whole-grain (corn or whole wheat) soft-taco shells or tortillas to make burritos or wraps. Fill ...

  20. Fiber optics engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Azadeh, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Covering fiber optics from an engineering perspective, this text emphasizes data conversion between electrical and optical domains. Techniques to improve the fidelity of this conversion (from electrical to optical domain, and vice versa) are also covered.