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Sample records for interfacial electron transfer

  1. Theory of plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luxia; May, Volkhard

    2015-04-01

    A particular attempt to improve the efficiency of a dye sensitized solar cell is it's decoration with metal nano-particles (MNP). The MNP-plasmon induced enhancement of the local field enlarges the photoexcitation of the dyes and a subsequent improvement of the charge separation efficiency may result. In a recent work (2014 J. Phys. Chem. C 118 2812) we presented a theory of plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer for perylene attached to a TiO2 surface and placed in the proximity of a spherical MNP. These earlier studies are generalized here to the coupling of to up to four MNPs and to the use of somewhat altered molecular parameters. If the MNPs are placed close to each other strong hybridization of plasmon excitations appears and a broad resonance to which molecular excitations are coupled is formed. To investigate this situation the whole charge injection dynamics is described in the framework of the density matrix theory. The approach accounts for optical excitation of the dye coupled to the MNPs and considers subsequent electron injection into the rutile TiO2-cluster. Using a tight-binding model for the TiO2-system with about 105 atoms the electron motion in the cluster is described. We again consider short optical excitation which causes an intermediate steady state with a time-independent overall probability to have the electron injected into the cluster. This probability is used to introduce an enhancement factor which rates the influence of the MNP. Values larger than 500 are obtained.

  2. Nanoscale and single-molecule interfacial electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik; Zhang, Jingdong; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Electrochemical science and technology in the 21st century have reached high levels of sophistication. A fundamental quantum mechanical theoretical frame for interfacial electrochemical electron transfer (ET) was introduced by Revaz Dogonadze. This frame has remained for four decades as a basis for comprehensive later theoretical work and data interpretation in many areas of chemistry, electrochemistry, and biology. We discuss here some new areas of theoretical electrochemical ET science, with f...

  3. Nanoscale and single-molecule interfacial electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Wackerbarth, Hainer

    2003-01-01

    Electrochemical science and technology in the 21st century have reached high levels of sophistication. A fundamental quantum mechanical theoretical frame for interfacial electrochemical electron transfer (ET) was introduced by Revaz Dogonadze. This frame has remained for four decades as a basis for comprehensive later theoretical work and data interpretation in many areas of chemistry, electrochemistry, and biology. We discuss here some new areas of theoretical electrochemical ET science, with focus on nanoscale electrochemical and bioelectrochemical sciences. Particular attention is given to in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and single-electron tunneling (SET, or Coulomb blockade) in electrochemical. systems directly in aqueous electrolyte solution and at room temperature. We illustrate the new theoretical formalism and its perspectives by recent cases of electrochemical SET, negative differential resistance patterns, and by ET dynamics of organized assemblies of biological macromolecules, such as redox metalloproteins and oligonucleotides on single-crystal Au(III)-electrode surfaces.

  4. The microwave-look into the photo electrode: What can we learn about interfacial electron transfer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By combining photo-electrochemical and photo-induced microwave conductivity measurements, information on potential dependent minority charge carrier accumulation, on interfacial minority carrier concentration and on interfacial charge transfer rates can be obtained. It suggests a correlation between electron transfer processes and accumulated charge carriers dominated by non-equilibrium conditions. This is inconsistent with the general assumptions leading to the classical Marcus-Gerischer electron transfer at electrodes, conceived for weak interaction, quasi-equilibrium and absence of polarisability effects. It is considered only to be applicable in special situations. A non-linear interfacial electron transfer theory, the properties of which are outlined, will on the other hand open the potential for new phenomena. They include faster (stimulated), and cooperative electron transfer. The latter, which is excluded by the classical theory, requires non linear dynamic feedback polarisability, which will have to be developed on the basis of structural-electronic considerations for semiconductor interfaces to become highly catalytic

  5. Adsorption and Interfacial Electron Transfer of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thanulov

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the adsorption and electron-transfer dynamics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) iso-l-cytochrome c adsorbed on Au(lll) electrodes in aqueous phosphate buffer media. This cytochrome possesses a thiol group dos e to the protein surface (Cysl02) suitable for linking the protein to gold without drastic protein unfolding. A comprehensive approach, based on linear sweep and differential pulse voltammetry, capacitance measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) , in situscann...

  6. Single-molecule interfacial electron transfer dynamics manipulated by external electric current

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Guofeng; Chen, Ruiyun; Gao, Yan; Wang, Xiaobo; Jia, Suotang

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial electron transfer (IET) dynamics in 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3, 3, 3', 3'-tetramethylindodicarbocyanine (DiD) dye molecules / indium tin oxide (ITO) film system have been probed at the ensemble and single-molecule level by recording the change of fluorescence emission intensity. By comparing the difference of the external electric current (EEC) dependence of lifetime and intensity for enambles and single molecules, it is shown that the single-molecule probe can effcienly demonstrate the IET dynamics. The backward electron transfer and electron transfer of ground state induce the single molecules fluorescence quenching when an EEC is applied to ITO film.

  7. Hafnium metallocene compounds used as cathode interfacial layers for enhanced electron transfer in organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Keunhee; Oh, Seungsik; Jung, Donggeun; Chae, Heeyeop; Kim, Hyoungsub; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    2012-01-01

    We have used hafnium metallocene compounds as cathode interfacial layers for organic solar cells [OSCs]. A metallocene compound consists of a transition metal and two cyclopentadienyl ligands coordinated in a sandwich structure. For the fabrication of the OSCs, poly[3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene]:poly(styrene sulfonate), poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) + [6, 6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, bis-(ethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium(IV) dichloride, and aluminum were deposited as a hole transport layer, an active layer, a cathode interfacial layer, and a cathode, respectively. The hafnium metallocene compound cathode interfacial layer improved the performance of OSCs compared to that of OSCs without the interfacial layer. The current density-voltage characteristics of OSCs with an interfacial layer thickness of 0.7 nm and of those without an interfacial layer showed power conversion efficiency [PCE] values of 2.96% and 2.34%, respectively, under an illumination condition of 100 mW/cm2 (AM 1.5). It is thought that a cathode interfacial layer of an appropriate thickness enhances the electron transfer between the active layer and the cathode, and thus increases the PCE of the OSCs.

  8. Hafnium metallocene compounds used as cathode interfacial layers for enhanced electron transfer in organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We have used hafnium metallocene compounds as cathode interfacial layers for organic solar cells [OSCs]. A metallocene compound consists of a transition metal and two cyclopentadienyl ligands coordinated in a sandwich structure. For the fabrication of the OSCs, poly[3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene]:poly(styrene sulfonate), poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) + [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, bis-(ethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium(IV) dichloride, and aluminum were deposited as a hole transport layer, an active layer, a cathode interfacial layer, and a cathode, respectively. The hafnium metallocene compound cathode interfacial layer improved the performance of OSCs compared to that of OSCs without the interfacial layer. The current density-voltage characteristics of OSCs with an interfacial layer thickness of 0.7 nm and of those without an interfacial layer showed power conversion efficiency [PCE] values of 2.96% and 2.34%, respectively, under an illumination condition of 100 mW/cm2 (AM 1.5). It is thought that a cathode interfacial layer of an appropriate thickness enhances the electron transfer between the active layer and the cathode, and thus increases the PCE of the OSCs. PMID:22230259

  9. Interfacial electronic charge transfer and density of states in short period Cu/Cr multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbee, T W; Bello, A F; Klepeis, J E; Van Buuren, T

    1999-07-01

    Nanometer period metallic multilayers are ideal structures to investigate electronic phenomena at interfaces between metal films since interfacial atoms comprise a large atomic fraction of the samples. The Cu/Cr binary pair is especially suited to study the interfaces in metals since these elements are mutually insoluble, thus eliminating mixing effects and compound formation and the lattice mismatch is very small. This allows the fabrication of high structural quality Cu/Cr multilayers that have a structure which can be approximated in calculations based on idealized atomic arrangements. The electronic structure of the Cu and the Cr layers in several samples of thin Cu/Cr multilayers were studied using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Total electron yield was measured and used to study the white lines at the Cu L{sub 2} and L{sub 3} absorption edges. The white lines at the Cu absorption edges are strongly related to the unoccupied d-orbitals and are used to calculate the amount of charge transfer between the Cr and Cu atoms in interfaces. Analysis of the Cu white lines show a charge transfer of 0.026 electrons/interfacial Cu atom to the interfacial Cr atoms. In the Cu XAS spectra we also observe a van Hove singularity between the L{sub 2} and L{sub 3} absorption edges as expected from the structural analysis. The absorption spectra are compared to partial density of states obtained from a full-potential linear muffin-tin orbital calculation. The calculations support the presence of charge transfer and indicate that it is localized to the first two interfacial layers in both Cu and Cr.

  10. Interfacial electronic charge transfer and density of states in short period Cu/Cr multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bello, A.F.; Van Buuren, T.; Kepesis, J.E.; Barbee, T.W., Jr.

    1998-04-01

    Nanometer period metallic multilayers are ideal structures to investigate electronic phenomena at interfaces between metal films since interfacial atoms comprise a large atomic fraction of the samples. The multilayers studied were fabricated by magnetron sputtering and consist of bilayers from 1.9 mn to 3.3 mn. X-ray diffraction, cross-section TEM and plan-view TEM show the Cu layers to have a BCC structure Cu in contrast to its equilibrium FCC structure. The electronic structure of the Cu and the Cr layers in several samples of thin Cu/Cr multilayers were studied using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Total electron yield was measured and used to study the white lines at the Cu L{sub 2} and L{sub 3} absorption edges. The white lines at the Cu absorption edges are strongly related to the unoccupied d-orbitals and are used to calculate the amount of charge transfer between the Cr and Cu atoms in interfaces. Analysis of the Cu white lines show a charge transfer of 0.026 electrons/interfacial Cu atom to the interfacial Cr atoms. In the Cu XAS spectra we also observe a van Hove singularity between the L{sub 2} and L{sub 3} absorption edges as expected from the structural analysis. The absorption spectra are compared to partial density of states obtained from a full-potential linear muffin-tin orbital calculation. The calculations confirm the presence of charge transfer and indicate that it is localized to the first two interfacial layers in both Cu and Cr.

  11. Application of Degenerately Doped Metal Oxides in the Study of Photoinduced Interfacial Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnum, Byron H; Morseth, Zachary A; Brennaman, M Kyle; Papanikolas, John M; Meyer, Thomas J

    2015-06-18

    Degenerately doped In2O3:Sn semiconductor nanoparticles (nanoITO) have been used to study the photoinduced interfacial electron-transfer reactivity of surface-bound [Ru(II)(bpy)2(4,4'-(PO3H2)2-bpy)](2+) (RuP(2+)) molecules as a function of driving force over a range of 1.8 eV. The metallic properties of the ITO nanoparticles, present within an interconnected mesoporous film, allowed for the driving force to be tuned by controlling their Fermi level with an external bias while their optical transparency allowed for transient absorption spectroscopy to be used to monitor electron-transfer kinetics. Photoinduced electron transfer from excited-state -RuP(2+*) molecules to nanoITO was found to be dependent on applied bias and competitive with nonradiative energy transfer to nanoITO. Back electron transfer from nanoITO to oxidized -RuP(3+) was also dependent on the applied bias but without complication from inter- or intraparticle electron diffusion in the oxide nanoparticles. Analysis of the electron injection kinetics as a function of driving force using Marcus-Gerischer theory resulted in an experimental estimate of the reorganization energy for the excited-state -RuP(3+/2+*) redox couple of ?* = 0.83 eV and an electronic coupling matrix element, arising from electronic wave function overlap between the donor orbital in the molecule and the acceptor orbital(s) in the nanoITO electrode, of Hab = 20-45 cm(-1). Similar analysis of the back electron-transfer kinetics yielded ? = 0.56 eV for the ground-state -RuP(3+/2+) redox couple and Hab = 2-4 cm(-1). The use of these wide band gap, degenerately doped materials provides a unique experimental approach for investigating single-site electron transfer at the surface of oxide nanoparticles. PMID:25668488

  12. Investigation of liquid-liquid interfacial electron transfer kinetics using multicenter ferrocenyl complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang Debo [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); Merbouh, Nabyl [Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); Shao Huibo [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Yu Huazhong, E-mail: hogan_yu@sfu.ca [Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada)

    2011-06-30

    The redox behavior of two novel multicenter redox molecules (triferrocenylmethane and triferrocenylmethanol) has been studied in a thin film of nitrobenzene (NB) imposed between a graphite electrode and an aqueous electrolyte. The well separated three sets of redox peaks indicate strong intramolecular electronic communications between the three ferrocene centers in each molecule. They were adapted as model compounds for the study of electron transfer kinetics across the liquid/liquid interface with varied overall driving force using only one-type redox couples in the organic and aqueous phase, respectively. It has been shown that in both cases the dependence of interfacial electron transfer rate on the increased overall driving force across the nitrobenzene/water interface is not monotonic.

  13. Interfacial electron transfer dynamics of ru(II)-polypy6ridine sensitized TiO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubikova, Elena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Snoeberger, Robert C [YALE UNIV.; Batista, Victor S [YALE UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dynamics simulations combined with density functional theory calculations are applied to study interfacial electron transfer (IET) from pyridine-4-phosphonic acid, [Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 2+} and [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)-Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 4+} into the (101) surface of anatase TiO{sub 2}. IET rate from pyridine-4-phosphonic acid attached to the nanoparticle in bidentate mode ({tau} {approx} 100 fs) is an order of magnitude faster than the IET rate of the adsorbate attached in the monodentate mode ({tau} {approx} 1 ps). Upon excitation with visible light, [Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 2+} attached to TiO{sub 2} in bidentate binding mode will undergo IET with the rate of {approx} 1-10 ps, which is competitive with the excited state decay into the ground state. The probability of electron injection from [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)-Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 4+} is rather low, as the excitation with visible light localizes the excited electron in the tpy-tpy bridge, which does not have favorable coupling with the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle. The results are relevant to better understanding of the adsorbate features important for promoting efficient interfacial electron transfer into the semiconductor.

  14. Ultrafast Interfacial Electron and Hole Transfer from CsPbBr3 Perovskite Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kaifeng; Liang, Guijie; Shang, Qiongyi; Ren, Yueping; Kong, Degui; Lian, Tianquan

    2015-10-14

    Recently reported colloidal lead halide perovskite quantum dots (QDs) with tunable photoluminescence (PL) wavelengths covering the whole visible spectrum and exceptionally high PL quantum yields (QYs, 50-90%) constitute a new family of functional materials with potential applications in light-harvesting and -emitting devices. By transient absorption spectroscopy, we show that the high PL QYs (?79%) can be attributed to negligible electron or hole trapping pathways in CsPbBr3 QDs: ?94% of lowest excitonic states decayed with a single-exponential time constant of 4.5 ± 0.2 ns. Furthermore, excitons in CsPbBr3 QDs can be efficiently dissociated in the presence of electron or hole acceptors. The half-lives of electron transfer (ET) to benzoquinone and subsequent charge recombination are 65 ± 5 ps and 2.6 ± 0.4 ns, respectively. The half-lives for hole transfer (HT) to phenothiazine and the subsequent charge recombination are 49 ± 6 ps and 1.0 ± 0.2 ns, respectively. The lack of electron and hole traps and fast interfacial ET and HT rates are key properties that may enable the development of efficient lead halide perovskite QDs-based light-harvesting and -emitting devices. PMID:26414242

  15. Gold nanoparticle assisted assembly of a heme protein for enhancement of long-range interfacial electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Chi, Qijin; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg; Abad, J.M.; Horsewell, Andy; Schiffrin, D.J.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Interfacial electron transfer (ET) of biological macromolecules such as metalloproteins is the key process in bioelectrochemistry, enzymatic electrocatalysis, artificial ET chains, single-molecule electronic amplification and rectification, and other phenomena associated with the area of bioelectronics. A key challenge in molecular bioelectronics is to improve the efficiency of long-range charge transfer. The present work shows that this can be achieved by nanoparticle (NP) assisted assembly of ...

  16. Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Tianquan

    2014-04-22

    The long-term goal of the proposed research is to understand electron transfer dynamics in nanoparticle/liquid interface. This knowledge is essential to many semiconductor nanoparticle based devices, including photocatalytic waste degradation and dye sensitized solar cells.

  17. Interfacial electrochemical electron transfer in biology – Towards the level of the single molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin

    2012-01-01

    Physical electrochemistry has undergone a remarkable evolution over the last few decades, integrating advanced techniques and theory from solid state and surface physics. Single-crystal electrode surfaces have been a core notion, opening for scanning tunnelling microscopy directly in aqueous electrolyte (in situ STM). Interfacial electrochemistry of metalloproteins is presently going through a similar transition. Electrochemical surfaces with thiol-based promoter molecular monolayers (SAMs) as biomolecular electrochemical environments and the biomolecules themselves have been mapped with unprecedented resolution, opening a new area of single-molecule bioelectrochemistry. We consider first in situ STM of small redox molecules, followed by in situ STM of thiol-based SAMs as molecular views of bioelectrochemical environments. We then address electron transfer metalloproteins, and multi-centre metalloenzymes including applied single-biomolecular perspectives based on metalloprotein/metallic nanoparticle hybrids.

  18. Gold nanoparticle assisted assembly of a heme protein for enhancement of long-range interfacial electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Chi, Qijin

    2007-01-01

    Interfacial electron transfer (ET) of biological macromolecules such as metalloproteins is the key process in bioelectrochemistry, enzymatic electrocatalysis, artificial ET chains, single-molecule electronic amplification and rectification, and other phenomena associated with the area of bioelectronics. A key challenge in molecular bioelectronics is to improve the efficiency of long-range charge transfer. The present work shows that this can be achieved by nanoparticle (NP) assisted assembly of cytochrome c (cyt c) on macroscopic single-crystalline electrode surfaces. We present the synthesis and characterization of water-soluble gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with core diameter 3-4 nm and their application for the enhancement of long-range interfacial ET of a heme protein. Gold nanoparticles were electrostatically conjugated with cyt c to form nanoparticle-protein hybrid ET systems with well-defined stoichiometry. The systems were investigated in homogeneous solution and at liquid/solid interface. Conjugation ofcyt c results in a small but consistent broadening of the nanoparticle plasmon band. This phenomenon can be explained in terms of long-range electronic interactions between the gold nanoparticle and the protein molecule. When the nanoparticle-protein conjugates are assembled on Au(111) surfaces, long-range interfacial ET across a physical distance of over 50 A via the nanoparticle becomes feasible. Moreover, significant enhancement of the interfacial ET rate by more than an order of magnitude compared with that of cyt c in the absence of AuNPs is observed. AuNPs appear to serve as excellent ET relays, most likely by facilitating the electronic coupling between the protein redox center and the electrode surface.

  19. Comparative study on the interfacial electron transfer of zinc porphyrins with meso-?-extension at a 2(n) pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yanru; Huang, Yu; Jiang, Yuan; Ning, Xingming; Wang, Xuemei; Shan, Duoliang; Lu, Xiaoquan

    2016-01-15

    Three zinc-tetraarylporphyrins were prepared in order to investigate the effects of systematic meso-?-extension on the redox behaviors and interfacial electron transfer kinetics. The meso-?-extension increased at a 2(n) pattern, where 2(n) was the benzene ring number in an aryl group and the aryl group represented phenyl, naphthyl and pyrenyl group, respectively. The structures of zinc-tetraarylporphyrins and hydroquinone were optimized by using density functional theory. The bimolecular reactions between zinc-tetraarylporphyrins and hydroquinone at the liquid-liquid interface were studied by using scanning electrochemical microscopy. There was an inverse electron transfer rate-overall driving force dependence by comparison of three bimolecular reactions. It was suggested that the formation of a precursor between zinc-tetraarylporphyrin cation and hydroquinone was deeply influenced by the increasing steric hindrance from phenyl group to pyrenyl group. The electron transfer rate constant depended strongly on the overall driving force for each bimolecular reaction, with transfer coefficients of 0.41, 0.37 and 0.39. PMID:26439289

  20. Dynamics and mechanisms of interfacial photoinduced electron transfer processes of third generation photovoltaics and photocatalysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, C.; Teuscher, J.; Brauer, JC; Punzi, A; Marchioro, A.; Ghadiri, E.; De Jonghe, J; Wielopolski, M.; Banerji, N; Moser, JE

    2011-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) across molecular/bulk interfaces has gained attention only recently and is still poorly understood. These interfaces offer an excellent case study, pertinent to a variety of photovoltaic systems, photo- and electrochemistry, molecular electronics, analytical detection, photography, and quantum confinement devices. They play in particular a key role in the emerging fields of third-generation photovoltaic energy converters and artificial photosynthetic syste...

  1. Adsorption and interfacial electron transfer of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cytochrome c monolayers on Au(111) electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Boisen, Anja; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Chorkendorff, Ib; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the adsorption and electron-transfer dynamics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) iso-1-cytochrome c adsorbed on Au(111) electrodes in aqueous phosphate buffer media. This cytochrome possesses a thiol group close to the protein surface (Cys102) suitable for linking the protein to gold without drastic protein unfolding. A comprehensive approach, based on linear sweep and differential pulse voltammetry, capacitance measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), in situ scann...

  2. Effect of strong coupling on interfacial electron transfer dynamics in dye-sensitized TiO2 semiconductor nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hirendra N Ghosh

    2007-03-01

    Dynamics of interfacial electron transfer (ET) in ruthenium polypyridyl complex [{bis-(2,2'-bpy)-(4-[2-(4'-methyl-[2,2']bipyridinyl-4-yl)-vinyl]-benzene-1,2-diol)}ruthenium(II) hexafluorophosphate] (Ru-cat) and 5,10,15-tris phenyl-20-(3,4-dihydroxy benzene) porphyrin (TPP-cat)-sensitized TiO2 nanoparticles have been investigated using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopic detection in the visible and near-infrared region. We have observed that both Ru-cat and TPP-cat are coupled strongly with the TiO2 nanoparticles through their pendant catechol moieties. We have observed a single exponential and pulse-width limited (<100 fs) electron injection from nonthermalized-excited states of Ru-complex. Here electron injection competes with the singlet-triplet manifold relaxation due to strong coupling of catecholate binding, which is a unique observation. Optical absorption measurements indicate that the catechol moiety interacts with TiO2 nanoparticles showing the characteristic pure catechol-TiO2 charge-transfer (CT) band in the visible region. Transient absorption studies on TPP-cat/TiO2 system exciting both the Soret band at 400 nm and the Q-band at 800 nm have been carried out to determine excitation wavelength-dependence on ET dynamics. The reaction channel for the electron-injection process has been found to be different for both the excitation wavelengths. Excitation at 800 nm, is found directly populate directly the excited CT state from where diffusion of electrons into the conduction band takes place. On the other hand, excitation at 400 nm light excites both the CT band of cat-TiO2 and also Soret band of TPP-cat.

  3. Hafnium metallocene compounds used as cathode interfacial layers for enhanced electron transfer in organic solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Keunhee; Oh, Seungsik; Jung, Donggeun; Chae, Heeyeop; Kim, Hyoungsub; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    2012-01-01

    We have used hafnium metallocene compounds as cathode interfacial layers for organic solar cells [OSCs]. A metallocene compound consists of a transition metal and two cyclopentadienyl ligands coordinated in a sandwich structure. For the fabrication of the OSCs, poly[3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene]:poly(styrene sulfonate), poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) + [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, bis-(ethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium(IV) dichloride, and aluminum were deposited as a hole transport ...

  4. Interfacial electrochemical electron transfer in biology – Towards the level of the single molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Salvatore, Princia; Ulstrup, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Physical electrochemistry has undergone a remarkable evolution over the last few decades, integrating advanced techniques and theory from solid state and surface physics. Single-crystal electrode surfaces have been a core notion, opening for scanning tunnelling microscopy directly in aqueous electrolyte (in situ STM). Interfacial electrochemistry of metalloproteins is presently going through a similar transition. Electrochemical surfaces with thiol-based promoter molecular monolayers (SAMs) as b...

  5. Long-Range Interfacial Electrochemical Electron Transfer of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Azurin-Gold Nanoparticle Hybrid Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Chi, Qijin

    2009-01-01

    We have prepared a "hybrid" of the blue copper protein azurin (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and a 3 nm gold nanoparticle (AuNP). The AuNP/azurin hybrid was assembled on a Au(111)-electrode surface in a two-step process. The AuNP was first attached to the Au(111) electrode via Au-S chemisorption of a 4,4'-biphenyidithiol (4,4'-BPDT) monolayer. This was followed by 1-decanethiol modification of the bound AuNP and hydrophobic binding of azurin to the AuNP. The Au(111)/AuNP/azurin system was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and in situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (in situ STM). AFM and STM point to the feasibility of preparing both dense and sparsely populated AuNP monolayers. CV shows two pairs of voltammetric peaks at high scan rates, both around the azurin equilibrium potential. One pair of redox peaks follows closely that of azurin hydrophobically immobilized directly on a Au(111)/1-tetradecanethiol reference surface. The other pair, tentatively assigned tothe AuNP/azurin hybrid, shows a 20-fold electron transfer rate enhancement over the reference system. This dual pattern is supported by in situ STM which shows two distinct contrasts. A strong contrast most likely arises either from azurin-free AuNPs or from AuNP-free azurin displaced onto the Au(111)/4,4'-BPDT surface. The other contrast, assigned to the AuNP/azurin hybrid, is weaker and fluctuates in time. Mechanisms of electronic conductivity of the AuNP/azurin system are discussed.

  6. Solvent Isotope Effects on Interfacial Protein Electron Transfer in Crystals and Electode Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang,S.; Hoke, K.; Crane, B.

    2006-01-01

    D{sub 2}O-grown crystals of yeast zinc porphyrin substituted cytochrome c peroxidase (ZnCcP) in complex with yeast iso-1-cytochrome c (yCc) diffract to higher resolution (1.7 Angstroms) and pack differently than H{sub 2}O-grown crystals (2.4-3.0 Angstroms). Two ZnCcP's bind the same yCc (porphyrin-to-porphyrin separations of 19 and 29 Angstroms), with one ZnCcP interacting through the same interface found in the H{sub 2}O crystals. The triplet excited-state of at least one of the two unique ZnCcP's is quenched by electron transfer (ET) to Fe(III)yCc (k{sub e} = 220 s{sup -1}). Measurement of thermal recombination ET between Fe(II)yCc and ZnCcP+ in the H{sub 2}O-treated crystals has both slow and fast components that differ by 2 orders of magnitude (k{sub eb}{sup 1}= 2200 s{sup -1}, k{sub eb}{sup 2}= 30 s{sup -1}). Back ET in H{sub 2}O-grown crystals is too fast for observation, but soaking H{sub 2}O-grown crystals in D{sub 2}O for hours generates slower back ET, with kinetics similar to those of the D{sub 2}O-grown crystals (k{sub eb}{sup 1} = 7000 s{sup -1}, k{sub eb}{sup 2}= 100 s{sup -1}). Protein-film voltammetry of yCc adsorbed to mixed alkanethiol monolayers on gold electrodes shows slower ET for D{sub 2}O-grown yCc films than for H{sub 2}O-grown films (k{sub H} = 800 s{sup -1}; k{sub D} = 540 s{sup -1} at 20 C). Soaking H{sub 2}O- or D{sub 2}O-grown films in the counter solvent produces an immediate inverse isotope effect that diminishes over hours until the ET rate reaches that found in the counter solvent. Thus, D{sub 2}O substitution perturbs interactions and ET between yCc and either CcP or electrode films. The effects derive from slow exchanging protons or solvent molecules that in the crystal produce only small structural changes.

  7. Interfacial Electrochemical Electron Transfer Processes in Bacterial Biofilm Environments on Au(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yifan; Zhang, Jingdong

    2010-01-01

    We have studied Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) biolilm growth and growth inhibition on Au(111)-surfaces using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and interfacial electrochemistry of a number of redox probe molecules. AFM of the biofilm growth and growth inhibition on both mica and Au(111)-surfaces was followed by sampling at given times, drying the samples naturally, and imaging. The electrochemical investigations were based on single-crystal Au(111)-electrode surfaces to exclude polycrystallinity as a cause of inhomogeneous voltammetric broadening on the biofilm covered electrode surfaces. The redox couples were chosen for their positive ([Ru(NH3)(6)](3+2+), [Co(terpy)(2)](3+/2+), terpy = 2,2',2 ''-terpyridine) or negative ([Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-), [IrCl6](3-)/(4-)) electrostatic charge, [Co(NH3)(6)](3+2+) and [Co(phen)(3)](3+2+) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) were other inhibition factors investigated. The positively and negatively charged redox probe couples displayed antagonistic inhibition and voltammetric patterns. [Ru(NH3)(6)](3+2+) and the homologous compound [Co(NH3)(6)](3+/2+) were the only probe compounds to effect growth inhibition. On the other hand, cyclic voltammetry (CV) of both [Ru(NH3)(6)](3+2+) (positively charged, biofilm growth inhibitor) and [Co(terpy)(2)](3+2+) (positively charged, no biofilm growth inhibition) displayed fully reversible CV on biofilm covered electrodes, almost indistinguishable from CV at bare Au(111)-electrode surfaces. In comparison, CVs of [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) and [IrCl6](3-/4-) (both negatively charged and no growth inhibition) were distorted from planar diffusion behavior on bare Au(111)-electrode surfaces toward spherical diffusion behavior on S. mutans biofilm covered Au(111)-electrode surfaces. DNAase teatment of the biofilm covered Au(111)-electrode surface partly restores planar diffusion CV of [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) and [IrCl6](3-/4-). This is reflected in a decrease of the growth rate and the appearance of molecular-scale structures near the bacterial edges as imaged by AFM after DNAase treatment. A rationale for the different voltammetric behavior of positively and negatively charged redox probe molecules based on electrostatic properties of the local surface environment is offered.

  8. Interfacial heat transfer - State of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interfacial heat exchanges control the interfacial mass exchange rate, depend on the interfacial area, and are tied to the prediction of thermal nonequilibrium. The nature of the problem usually requires the formulation of mechanistic laws and precludes the general use of universal correlations. This is partly due to the fact that the length scale controlling the interfacial exchanges varies widely from one situation to another and has a strong influence on the exchange coefficients. Within the framework of the ''two-fluid models'', the exchanges occurring at the interfaces are explicitly taken into consideration by the jump condition linking the volumetric mass exchange (evaporation) rate between the phases, to the interfacial energy transfer rates

  9. Autonomous control of interfacial electron transfer and the activation of DNA machines by an oscillatory pH system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiu-Juan; Lu, Chun-Hua; Liu, Xiaoqing; Shimron, Simcha; Yang, Huang-Hao; Willner, Itamar

    2013-10-01

    An oscillatory pH system is implemented to drive oscillatory pH-switchable DNA machines and to control pH-stimulated electron transfer at electrode surfaces. The oscillatory pH system drives the autonomous opening and closure of DNA tweezers and activates a DNA pendulum by the pH-stimulated formation and dissociation of i-motif structures. Also, a sequence-programmed nucleic acid monolayer-functionalized electrode undergoes autonomous oscillatory pH transitions between random coil and i-motif configurations, leading to the control of electron transfer at electrode surfaces. PMID:23988015

  10. Surface plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer and resonance Raman, surface-enhanced resonance Raman studies of cytochrome C mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Junwei

    1999-11-08

    Surface plasmon resonance was utilized to enhance the electron transfer at silver/solution interfaces. Photoelectrochemical reductions of nitrite, nitrate, and CO{sub 2} were studied on electrochemically roughened silver electrode surfaces. The dependence of the photocurrent on photon energy, applied potential and concentration of nitrite demonstrates that the photoelectrochemical reduction proceeds via photoemission process followed by the capture of hydrated electrons. The excitation of plasmon resonances in nanosized metal structures resulted in the enhancement of the photoemission process. In the case of photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO{sub 2}, large photoelectrocatalytic effect for the reduction of CO{sub 2} was observed in the presence of surface adsorbed methylviologen, which functions as a mediator for the photoexcited electron transfer from silver metal to CO{sub 2} in solution. Photoinduced reduction of microperoxidase-11 adsorbed on roughened silver electrode was also observed and attributed to the direct photoejection of free electrons of silver metal. Surface plasmon assisted electron transfer at nanostructured silver particle surfaces was further determined by EPR method.

  11. Investigations of the interfacial electron transfer of cytochrome c6 and cytochrome c by surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kranich, Anja

    2008-01-01

    Elucidating the mechanism and dynamics of electron transfer (ET) processes between redox proteins is one of the fundamental challenges in molecular biophysics. Surface enhanced resonance Raman (SERR) spectroelectrochemistry is a especially suitable technique for studying heterogeneous ET reactions as it selectively probes the redox sites solely of the adsorbed protein. SERR spectroscopy combines the advantages of the surface and resonance enhancement by exciting a heme protein immobilised on ...

  12. Approach to Interfacial and Intramolecular Electron Transfer of the Diheme Protein Cytochrome c(4) Assembled on Au(111) Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Zhang, Jingdong; Taner, Arslan; Borg, Lotte; Pedersen, G. W.; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager; Nazmudtinov, R. R.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between metal centers is a core feature of large protein complexes in photosynthesis, respiration, and redox enzyme catalysis. The number of microscopic redox potentials and ET rate constants is, however, prohibitive for experimental cooperative ET mapping, but two-center proteins are simple enough to offer complete communication networks. At the same time, multicenter redox proteins operate in membrane environments where conformational dynamics may lead to ...

  13. Interfacial stability with mass and heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simplified formulation is presented to deal with interfacial stability problems with mass and heat transfer. For Rayleigh-Taylor stability problems of a liquid-vapor system, it was found that the effect of mass and heat transfer tends to enhance the stability of the system when the vapor is hotter than the liquid, although the classical stability criterion is still valid. For Kelvin-Holmholtz stability problems, however, the classical stability criterion was found to be modified substantially due to the effect of mass and heat transfer

  14. Approach to Interfacial and Intramolecular Electron Transfer of the Diheme Protein Cytochrome c(4) Assembled on Au(111) Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Zhang, Jingdong

    2010-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between metal centers is a core feature of large protein complexes in photosynthesis, respiration, and redox enzyme catalysis. The number of microscopic redox potentials and ET rate constants is, however, prohibitive for experimental cooperative ET mapping, but two-center proteins are simple enough to offer complete communication networks. At the same time, multicenter redox proteins operate in membrane environments where conformational dynamics may lead to gated ET features different from conditions in homogeneous solution. The bacterial respiratory diheme protein Pseudomonas stutzeri cytochrome c(4) has been a target for intramolecular, interheme ET. We report here voltammetric and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) data for P. stutzeri cyt c(4) at single-crystal, atomically planar Au(111)-electrode surfaces modified by variable-length omega-mercapto-alkanoic carboxylic acids. As evidenced by in situ STM, the strongly dipolar protein is immobilized in a close to vertical orientation at this surface with the positively charged high-potential heme domain adjacent to the electrode. This orientation gives asymmetric voltammograms with two one-ET peaks in the cathodic direction and a single two-ET peak in the anodic direction. Intramolecular, interheme ET with high, 8,000-30,000 s(-1), rate constants is notably an essential part of this mechanism. The high rate constants are in striking contrast to ET reactions of P. stutzeri cyt c4 with small reaction partners in homogeneous solution for which kinetic analysis clearly testifies to electrostatic cooperative effects but no intramolecular, interheme ET higher than 0.1-10 s(-1). This difference suggests a strong gating feature of the process. On the basis of the three-dimensional structure of P. stutzeri cyt c(4), gating is understandable due to the through-space, hydrogen-bonded electronic contact between the heme propionates which is highly sensitive to environmental configurational fluctuations.

  15. Interfacial area and interfacial transfer in two-phase systems. DOE final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Mamoru; Hibiki, T.; Revankar, S.T.; Kim, S.; Le Corre, J.M.

    2002-07-01

    In the two-fluid model, the field equations are expressed by the six conservation equations consisting of mass, momentum and energy equations for each phase. The existence of the interfacial transfer terms is one of the most important characteristics of the two-fluid model formulation. The interfacial transfer terms are strongly related to the interfacial area concentration and to the local transfer mechanisms such as the degree of turbulence near interfaces. This study focuses on the development of a closure relation for the interfacial area concentration. A brief summary of several problems of the current closure relation for the interfacial area concentration and a new concept to overcome the problem are given.

  16. Increase in the coordination number of a cobalt porphyrin after photo-induced interfacial electron transfer into nanocrystalline TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achey, Darren; Ardo, Shane; Meyer, Gerald J

    2012-09-17

    Spectroscopic, electrochemical, and kinetic data provide compelling evidence for a coordination number increase initiated by interfacial electron transfer. Light excitation of Co(I)(meso-5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin) anchored to a nanocrystalline TiO(2) thin film, abbreviated Co(I)P/TiO(2), immersed in an acetonitrile:pyridine electrolyte resulted in rapid excited state injection, k(inj) > 10(8) s(-1), to yield Co(II)P/TiO(2)(e(-)), followed by axial coordination of pyridine to the Co(II)P and hence an increase in coordination number from four to five. The formal oxidation state and coordination environment of the Co metalloporphyrin on TiO(2) were assigned through comparative studies in fluid solution as well as by comparisons to previously reported data. The kinetics for pyridine coordination were successfully modeled with a pseudo-first order kinetic model that yielded a second-order rate constant of k(+py) = 2 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1). Spectro-electrochemical measurements showed that pyridine coordination resulted in a ?200 mV negative shift in the Co(II/I) reduction potential, E°(Co(II/I)/TiO(2)) = -0.72 V and E°(Co(II/I)(py)/TiO(2)) = -0.85 V vs NHE. With some assumptions, this indicated an equilibrium formation constant K(f) = 400 M(-1) for the Co(II)P(py)/TiO(2) compound. The kinetics for charge recombination were non-exponential under all conditions studied, but were successfully modeled by the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) function with observed rate constants that decreased by about a factor of 100 when pyridine was present. The possible mechanisms for charge recombination are discussed. PMID:22954468

  17. Interfacial structures - Thermodynamical and experimental studies of the interfacial mass transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first section, we put forward hypotheses concerning the structure of the interfacial regions between two immiscible liquid phases. It appears that the longitudinal structure is comparable with that of a crystallized solid and that the transversal structure is nearest of that of a liquid. In the second section, we present a thermodynamical treatment of the irreversible phenomena in the interfacial region. The equation of evolution of a system consisting of two immiscible liquid phases are deduced. The third part allows an experimental verification of the theoretical relations. We also make clear, in certain cases, the appearance of a great 'interfacial resistance' which slows down the interfacial mass transfer. (author)

  18. Structural effects in electron transfer reactions: Comparative interfacial electrochemical kinetics for cis- versus trans-dioxorhenium (V) (bi)pyridine oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao L.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Danzer, Gerald D.

    1993-05-01

    We have been exploring the proton-coupled reductions of various dioxorhenium (5) species because of the more general insights they provide into the kinetics and thermodynamics of multielectron transfer processes. The rhenium (5) complexes are also amenable, however, to proton-decoupled one-electron oxidation--both optically (via metal-to-ligand charge-transfer excitation) and electrochemically. Our prior studies of electron transfer (ET) thermodynamics revealed a strong dependence of the Re (6/5) formal potential on ligand substituent characteristics (most notably, substituent electron donating or withdrawing characteristics). The studies also showed--independent of ligand substituent identity--a strong dependence of E(sub f) on isomeric form cis versus trans coordination geometry. In all cases the cis form was more easily oxidized than the corresponding trans, generally by about 600mV.

  19. Interfacial electronic structure and charge transfer of hybrid graphene quantum dot and graphitic carbon nitride nanocomposites: insights into high efficiency for photocatalytic solar water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zuju; Sa, Rongjian; Li, Qiaohong; Wu, Kechen

    2016-01-14

    New metal-free carbon nanodot/carbon nitride (C3N4) nanocomposites have shown to exhibit high efficiency for photocatalytic solar water splitting. (J. Liu, et al., Science, 2015, 347, 970) However, the mechanism underlying the ultrahigh performance of these nanocomposites and consequently the possibilities for further improvements are not at present clear. In this work, we performed hybrid functional calculations and included long-range dispersion corrections to accurately characterize the interfacial electron coupling of the graphene quantum dot-graphitic carbon nitride composites (Gdot/g-C3N4). The results revealed that the band gap of Gdot/g-C3N4 could be engineered by changing the lateral size of Gdots. In particular, the C24H12/g-C3N4 composites present an ideal band gap of 1.92 eV to harvest a large part of solar light. More interestingly, a type-II heterojunction is formed at the interface of the Gdot/g-C3N4 composites, a desirable feature for enhanced photocatalytic activity. The charge redistribution at the interface leads to strong electron depletion above the Gdot sheet and electron accumulation below the g-C3N4 monolayer, potentially facilitating the separation of H2O oxidation and reduction reactions. Furthermore, we suggested that the photocatalytic performance of the Gdot/g-C3N4 nanocomposites can be further improved by decreasing the thickness of Gdots and tuning the size of Gdots. PMID:26659558

  20. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  1. Pressure transfer functions for interfacial fluid problems

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Robin Ming; Walsh, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    We make a consistent derivation, from the governing equations, of the pressure transfer function in the small-amplitude Stokes wave regime and the hydrostatic approximation in the small-amplitude solitary water wave regime, in the presence of a background shear flow. The results agree with the well-known formulae in the zero vorticity case,but they incorporate the effects of vorticity through solutions to the Rayleigh equation. We extend the results to permit continuous density stratification and to internal waves between two constant-density fluids. Several examples are discussed.

  2. Study of Interfacial Mass Transfer on Vapor Bubbles in Microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Straub

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of interfacial heat and mass transfer is important for environmental and technical applications, especially nowadays for numerical simulations of two phase problems. However, the data available up to now are inconsistent, because most experiments performed on earth suffer under buoyancy and convection, and thus the boundary conditions at the evaluation could not clearly be defined. Therefore, we seized the opportunity to investigate interfacial heat and mass transfer in microgravity environment. In these experiments the growth and collapse in the overall superheated and subcooled bubles, respectively, liquid or free vapor bubbles were observed at various liquid temperature and pressure states and over periods of from a few seconds up to 300 seconds. It was for the first time that such very long periods of bubble growth could be observed. The experimental set-up allowed the control of the liquid supersaturation before the bubbles were initiated by a short heat pulse at a miniaturized heater. Therefore it was possible to perform a systematic parametric study. The measured curves for vapor bubble growth are in good agreement with our numerical simulation. Based on this model the kinetic coefficients for the evaporation and condensation according to Hertz-Knudsen have been derived from the experimental data.

  3. Electron transfer in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable specificity. The electron transfer is attained through weak electronic interaction between the active sites, so that considerable research efforts are centered on resolving the factors that control th...

  4. Interfacial load transfer in polymer/carbon nanotube nanocomposites with a nanohybrid shish kebab modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Min; Kalyon, Dilhan M; Fisher, Frank T

    2014-09-10

    Interfacial properties are known to have a critical effect on the mechanical properties of a nanocomposite material system. Here, the interfacial load transfer in a carbon nanotube (CNT)/nylon-11 composite was studied with a CNT/nylon-11 nanohybrid shish kebab (NHSK) structure modification using Raman spectroscopy. Characterization of the polymer crystal in the NHSK using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) for the first time indicates that the NHSK structure formed a more perfect crystal structure than the bulk polymer. On the basis of transmission electron microscopy and DSC results, a new growth model for the NHSK crystal is hypothesized, indicating the formation of an initial uniform crystal layer on the CNT prior to the crystallization of the kebabs. Characterization of the nanocomposites using Raman spectroscopy, with the samples heated to introduce interfacial shear stress caused by thermal expansion mismatch, found that the D* band of the CNT in the NHSK/nylon-11 composite displayed a more pronounced shift with an increase in temperature, which is attributed to the NHSK structure being more effective at transferring load from the nylon matrix to the nanotube inclusions. The NHSK structure was also used to fabricate composites with two amorphous polymers, polycarbonate and poly(methyl methacrylate), to investigate the load transfer mechanism. It was found that when the compatibility between the polymer in the NHSK structure and the bulk polymer matrix at the molecular level is sufficiently high, the ensuing mechanical interlocking effect further enhances the interfacial load transfer for polymer nanocomposites. Additional mechanical characterization of polymer nanocomposites with 0.1 wt % NHSK reinforcement demonstrates how the moduli and ultimate tensile strength of the nanocomposites can be improved via this NHSK structure. PMID:25134606

  5. A Summary of Interfacial Heat Transfer Models and Correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A long term project has been launched in October 2006 to develop a plant safety analysis code. 5 organizations are joining together for the harmonious coworking to build up the code. In this project, KAERI takes the charge of the building up the physical models and correlations about the transport phenomena. The momentum and energy transfer terms as well as the mass are surveyed from the RELAP5/MOD3, RELAP5-3D, CATHARE, and TRAC-M does. Also the recent papers are surveyed. Among these resources, most of the CATHARE models are based on their own experiment and test results. Thus, the CATHARE models are only used as the comparison purposes. In this paper, a summary of the models and the correlations about the interfacial heat transfer are represented. These surveyed models and correlations will be tested numerically and one correlation is selected finally

  6. A Summary of Interfacial Heat Transfer Models and Correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sung Won; Cho, Hyung Kyu; Lee, Young Jin; Kim, Hee Chul; Jung, Young Jong; Kim, K. D. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    A long term project has been launched in October 2006 to develop a plant safety analysis code. 5 organizations are joining together for the harmonious coworking to build up the code. In this project, KAERI takes the charge of the building up the physical models and correlations about the transport phenomena. The momentum and energy transfer terms as well as the mass are surveyed from the RELAP5/MOD3, RELAP5-3D, CATHARE, and TRAC-M does. Also the recent papers are surveyed. Among these resources, most of the CATHARE models are based on their own experiment and test results. Thus, the CATHARE models are only used as the comparison purposes. In this paper, a summary of the models and the correlations about the interfacial heat transfer are represented. These surveyed models and correlations will be tested numerically and one correlation is selected finally.

  7. Interfacial heat transfer in countercurrent flows of steam and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to examine the departure from equilibrium conditions with respect to direct contact condensation. A simple analytical model, which used an equilibrium factor, K, was derived. The model was structured to represent the physical dimensions of a nuclear reactor downcomer annulus, water subcooling, wall temperature, and water flow rate. In a two step process the model was first used to isolate the average interfacial heat transfer coefficient from vertical countercurrent steam/water data of Cook et al., with the aid of a Stanton number correlation. In the second step the model was assessed by regeneration of measured steam flow rates in the experiments by Cook et al., and an additional experiment of Kim. This report documents the analytical model, the derived Stanton number correlation, and the comparison of the calculated and measured steam flow rates by which the accuracy of the model was assessed

  8. Wetting and Interfacial Characteristics of Mg AZ61 Alloy/Galvanized Steel in Cold Metal Transfer Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiaoli; Yang, Fan; Cao, Rui; Chen, Jianhong; Guo, Tingbiao

    2015-09-01

    The dynamic sessile drop method was used to study the wetting behavior of galvanized steel by molten Mg AZ61 alloy under cold metal transfer condition. The interfacial microstructures were also analyzed by using scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectrometry. The observed results showed that the wetting behavior was directly determined by the wire feed speed (or the heat input). The Al-Fe intermetallic layer and Zn-rich zone were observed both at the interface and at the close of triple line. The formations of these interfacial characteristics satisfy the thermodynamic characteristic of Mg-Al/Fe and Mg-Zn/Fe systems.

  9. Relationship Between Casting Distortion, Mold Filling, and Interfacial Heat Transfer in Sand Molds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. K. Parker; K. A. Woodbury; T. S. Piwonka; Y. Owusu

    1999-09-30

    This project sought to determine the relationship between casting dimensions and interfacial heat transfer in aluminum alloy sand castings. The program had four parts; measurement of interfacial heat transfer coefficients in resin bonded and green sand molds, the measurement of gap formation in these molds, the analysis of castings made in varying gatings, orientations and thicknesses, and the measurement of residual stresses in castings in the as-cast and gate removed condition. New values for interfacial heat transfer coefficients were measured, a novel method for gap formation was developed, and the variation of casting dimensions with casting method, gating, and casting orientation in the mold was documented.

  10. Effect of steam superheating on droplet interfacial heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interfacial heat transfer between water droplets and superheated steam in a dispersed flow regime is often calculated using a Lee and Ryley type correlation in loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) analysis. Inherent deficiency of the correlation when the steam superheating is high enough as in typical reflood situation is described and a modification of the correlation is proposed. A correction factor to Lee-Ryley Nusselt number is derived analytically from the simple heat balance across the interface and a slight modification of the Reynolds number is made according to its definition. New correlation can be represented by Nusselt number equation where the properties of non-dimensional numbers are evaluated at film temperature except the density of the Reynolds number, which is evaluated at ambient temperature. The correction factor is a ratio of the latent heat of evaporation to the enthalpy difference between superheated steam and saturated liquid. Implementing the modified correlation into RELAP5/MOD3.2, the improvement of steam and clad temperature prediction is confirmed using the experimental data of FLECHT-SEASET 31504. (J.P.N)

  11. Effect of electronic and nuclear factors on the dynamics of dye-to-semiconductor electron transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Wenger, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Dye-to-semiconductor electron transfer is the initial step in many processes where light is used for the storage of information (e. g. color photography) or converted into electricity as in dye-sensitized solar cells. In the latter, interfacial charge injection occurs on a timescale spanning from tens of femtoseconds (10-15 s) to several picoseconds (10-12 s), with an efficiency approaching 100 %. In standard electron transfer theory, the parameters controlling charge transfer dynamics are di...

  12. Electron transfer in biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. J. P.

    Electron transfer is one of the key reactions of biology not just in catalysis of oxidation/reduction reactions but in the conversion of sources of energy such as light to usable form for chemical transformations. There are then two intriguing problems. What is the nature of the matrix in which electrons flow in a biological cell after the initial charge separation due for example to the absorption of light. Here we are examining biological structures similar to man's electronic wires and the construction must be of low resistance in what are apparently insulators - organic polymers. It has been found that the electronic conduction system is largely made from metallo-proteins associated with lipid membranes. We understand much about these biological wires today. The second problem concerns the conversion of the energy captured from the light into usable chemical form. The major synthetic step in the production of biological polymers, including proteins, DNA, RNA, polysaccharides and fats, is condensation, i.e. the removal of water in the formation of amides, esters and so on. Now these condensation reactions are driven in biology by using a drying agent in water, namely the anhydride, pyrophosphate, in a special compound ATP, adenosine triphosphate. The central problem is to discover exactly how the flow of electrons can be related to the synthesis of (bound) pyrophosphate. (In a thermodynamic sense pyrophosphate is a water soluble kinetically stable drying agent comparable with solid P2O5.) In the biological systems the connection between these different classes of reaction, electron transfer and condensation, is known to be via the production of an energized gradient of protons across the biological membrane which arises from the flow of electrons across the same membrane in the electron transport wires of biology. However we do not understand thoroughly the steps which lead from electron flow in a membrane to proton gradients in that membrane, i.e. electron/proton coupling. Again we do not understand thoroughly how subsequently the proton gradient across a membrane makes ATP, pyrophosphate. Today there is good experimental evidence as to the likely answers in principle. These analyse the coupling devices in mechanical terms. In this article I describe at first the 'wires' of biology, uncoupled simple electron flow, and then go on to the ways in which electron flow could be transduced by mechanical devices, also proteins, into proton gradients and then ATP. This will be termed coupled electron flow. The objective of the article is to stimulate participation by physical chemists in the further description of biological energy capture from light or the oxidation of hydrocarbons to a form suitable for driving chemical syntheses in a controlled manner.

  13. A numerical investigation on the influence of liquid properties and interfacial heat transfer during microdroplet deposition onto a glass substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Attinger, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates the impingement of a liquid microdroplet onto a glass substrate at different temperatures. A finite-element model is applied to simulate the transient fluid dynamics and heat transfer during the process. Results for impingement under both isothermal and non-isothermal conditions are presented for four liquids: isopropanol, water, dielectric fluid (FC-72) and eutectic tin-lead solder (63Sn-37Pb). The objective of the work is to select liquids for a combined numerical and experimental study involving a high resolution, laser-based interfacial temperature measurement to measure interfacial heat transfer during microdroplet deposition. Applications include spray cooling, micro-manufacturing and coating processes, and electronics packaging. The initial droplet diameter and impact velocity are 80 {\\mu}m and 5 m/s, respectively. For isothermal impact, our simulations with water and isopropanol show very good agreement with experiments. The magnitude and rates of spreading for all four liquids ...

  14. Advances in electron transfer chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Mariano, Patrick S

    1993-01-01

    Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry, Volume 3 presents studies that discuss findings in the various aspects of electron chemistry. The book is comprised of four chapters; each chapter reviews a work that tackles an issue in electron transfer chemistry. Chapter 1 discusses the photoinduced electron transfer in flexible biaryl donor-acceptor molecules. Chapter 2 tackles light-induced electron transfer in inorganic systems in homogeneous and heterogeneous phases. The book also covers internal geometry relaxation effects on electron transfer rates of amino-centered systems. The sequential elec

  15. Probing interfacial electron dynamics with time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neppl, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Time-resolved core-level spectroscopy techniques using laser pulses to initiate and short X-ray pulses to probe photo-induced processes have the potential to provide electronic state- and atomic site-specific insight into fundamental electron dynamics at complex interfaces. We describe the implementation of femto- and picosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in order to follow light-driven electron dynamics at dye-semiconductor interfaces on femto- to nanosecond timescales, and from the perspective of individual atomic sites. A distinct transient binding-energy shift of the Ru3d photoemission lines originating from the metal centers of N3 dye-molecules adsorbed on nanoporous ZnO is observed 500 fs after resonant HOMO-LUMO excitation with a visible laser pulse. This dynamical chemical shift is accompanied by a characteristic surface photo-voltage response of the semiconductor substrate. The two phenomena and their correlation will be discussed in the context of electronic bottlenecks for efficient interfacial charge-transfer and possible charge recombination and relaxation pathways leading to the neutralization of the transiently oxidized dye following ultrafast electron injection. First steps towards in operando time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques to monitor interfacial chemical dynamics will be presented.

  16. A note on the standard electron transfer potential at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samec, Zden?k

    2009-01-01

    Ro?. 55, ?. 2 (2009), s. 75-81. ISSN 0034-6691 R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GA203/07/1257 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions * interfacial electron transfer * standard electron trasfer potential * homogeneous electron transfer Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  17. Intramolecular electron transfer rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupp, Joseph T.

    The initial goals of this project were: (1) to construct pulsed-accelerated-flow and pulsed-laser (transient absorbance) instruments for intramolecular electron-transfer rate measurements, (2) to design and synthesize appropriate molecules and perform such measurements, (3) to develop further an electrochemical method for gauging site-to-site electronic coupling, and (4) to apply time-dependent Raman scattering theory to the problem of inner-shell reorganization in charge-transfer reactions. Although all four goals were met, we also found it necessary to pursue studies in some unforeseen directions. For example, early on we discovered that medium effects (aggregation and ion pairing) could play a very large, and previously unrecognized, role in some optical intervalence reactions. Given the importance of the effects to the areas above, we chose to map them in a fairly complete fashion. Also, in anticipation of possible renewal we initiated studies in a new area: bimolecular photoredox kinetics in supercritical media. Finally, in a small project carried out largely by undergraduates we examined solvent tuning effects upon lifetimes of photo-excited ruthenium am(m)ine bipyridine complexes. The key new findings and other highlights of these studies are outlined.

  18. Implementation of a new interfacial mass and energy transfer model in RETRAN-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RETRAN-3D MOD002.0 best estimate code includes a five-equation flow field model developed to deal with situations in which thermodynamic non-equilibrium phenomena are important. Several applications of this model to depressurization and pressurization transients showed serious convergence problems. An analysis of the causes for the numerical instabilities identified the models for interfacial heat and mass transfer as the source of the problems. A new interfacial mass and energy transfer model has thus been developed and implemented in RETRAN-3D. The heat transfer for each phase is equal to the product of the interfacial area density, a heat transfer coefficient and the temperature difference between the interface at saturation and the bulk temperature of the respective phase. However, in the context of RETRAN-3D, the vapor remains saturated in a two-phase volume, and no vapor heat transfer is thus calculated. The values of interfacial area density and heat transfer coefficient are obtained based on correlations appropriate for different flow regimes. A flow regime map, based on the work of Taitel and Dukler, with void fraction and mixture mass flux as map coordinates, is used to identify the flow regime present in a given volume. The new model has performed well when assessed against data from four experimental facilities covering depressurization, condensation and steady state void distribution. The results also demonstrate the viability of the approach followed to develop the new model for a five-equation based code. (author)

  19. Study on heat transfer and interfacial stability in supersonic steam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supersonic steam injector is one of the most possible devices for Next-generation nuclear systems to achieve more simplified system and to enhance the safety and credibility of the systems. Supersonic steam injector has dual functions that are passive jet pump and high efficient heat exchanger. In order to design the supersonic steam injector, it is important to clarify the heat transfer and flow behavior of high-speed water jet in supersonic steam flow. However, thermal-hydraulic behaviors in the steam injector including the interfacial heat transfer behavior due to the direct contact condensation and interfacial stability of water jet are not clarified in detail yet. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the interfacial heat transfer behavior of high-speed water jet. The interface of water jet is observed by using high-speed video camera. From the observation results obtained, wave propagation on the interface is identified. The velocity of the wave propagation is estimated from the visual information. Radial distribution of the pressure and the temperature in the supersonic steam injector are also measured experimentally in order to investigate the dynamic behavior and the heat transfer due to the condensation. From the results, the interaction between the interfacial dynamic behavior and the heat transfer due to the condensation are discussed. (author)

  20. Electron transfer at nickel electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is considerable contemporary interest in the electron transfer reaction. at active (transition) metal electrodes. this work reports the electrochemical behavior of potassium ferrocyanide at nickel electrode in aqueous potassium nitrate solution. Potassium ferrocyanide is frequently employed to probe one-electron transfer reactions at solid, electrodes. It was found that the voltammetric oxidation of ferrocyanide at nickel is a simple electron transfer reaction. Normal pulse voltammetry revealed similar behavior. (author)

  1. Influence of Glass Coating Thickness on Interfacial Heat Transfer Coefficient during Forming of Nickel Based Superalloys

    OpenAIRE

    Busuttil, M; Lin, YP; Gebelin, JC; Reed, RC

    2013-01-01

    The influence of glass coating thickness on the interfacial heat transfer coefficient has been examined using numerical modeling. Temperature and heat flux during working of a Inconel 718 work-piece and colder H13 dies have been simulated. The thickness of the glass coating is found to have a significant influence on the forming characteristic. © (2013) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

  2. The effect of interfacial mass transfer on steady-state water radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of aqueous-gas interfacial transfer of volatile species on the ?-radiolysis of water was studied as a function of gas-to-liquid volume ratio at various solution pHs and cover gas compositions. Water samples with cover-gas headspace were irradiated at an absorbed dose rate of 2.5 Gy s-1 and the radiolytic productions of H2 in the cover gas and H2O2 in the water phase were monitored as a function of irradiation time. The experimental results were compared with computer simulations using a water radiolysis kinetics model that included primary radiolysis, subsequent reactions of the primary radiolysis products in the aqueous phase, and aqueous-gas interfacial transfer of the volatile species H2 and O2. This study shows that the impact of the interfacial mass transfer strongly depends on pH. At pH?8 (lower than the pKa of ·H of 9.6) the effect of aqueous-to-gas phase transfer of the volatile species on the steady-state concentrations of the other radiolysis products is negligible. At higher pHs (?8), radiolytic production of O2 is slow but considerable, which results in significant increase in the steady-state concentrations of H2 and H2O2 compared to those at lower pHs. Thus, in the presence of headspace, the interfacial transfer of both H2 and O2 becomes significant, and the aqueous concentrations of H2 and O2 are no longer independent of the interfacial surface area and water volume. Nevertheless, the accumulated mass of H2(g) in the headspace is proportional to the aqueous concentration of H2 at all pHs, and the gaseous concentration of H2 in the headspace can be used to infer the aqueous concentration of H2.

  3. Time-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques for real-time studies of interfacial charge transfer dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Hertlein, Marcus; Guo Jinghua; Tyliszczak, Tolek [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Cordones, Amy; Vura-Weis, Josh [Department of Chemistry, University of California Berkeley (United States); Siefermann, Katrin; Slaughter, Daniel; Sturm, Felix; Weise, Fabian; Khurmi, Champak; Belkacem, Ali; Weber, Thorsten; Gessner, Oliver [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Bluhm, Hendrik [Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Strader, Matthew; Cho, Hana; Coslovich, Giacomo; Kaindl, Robert A. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Lin, Ming-Fu [Department of Chemistry, University of California Berkeley (United States); Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); and others

    2013-04-19

    X-ray based spectroscopy techniques are particularly well suited to gain access to local oxidation states and electronic dynamics in complex systems with atomic pinpoint accuracy. Traditionally, these techniques are applied in a quasi-static fashion that usually highlights the steady-state properties of a system rather than the fast dynamics that often define the system function on a molecular level. Novel x-ray spectroscopy techniques enabled by free electron lasers (FELs) and synchrotron based pump-probe schemes provide the opportunity to monitor intramolecular and interfacial charge transfer processes in real-time and with element and chemical specificity. Two complementary time-domain xray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques are presented that are applied at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to study charge transfer processes in N3 dye-sensitized ZnO semiconductor nanocrystals, which are at the heart of emerging light-harvesting technologies.

  4. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinberg, Dave; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Hull, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christine Fecenko; Kent, Caleb A.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Paul, Amit; Ess, Daniel H; McCafferty, Dewey Granville; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-07-11

    Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) describes reactions in which there is a change in both electron and proton content between reactants and products. It originates from the influence of changes in electron content on acid-base properties and provides a molecular-level basis for energy transduction between proton transfer and electron transfer. Coupled electron-proton transfer or EPT is defined as an elementary step in which electrons and protons transfer from different orbitals on the donor to different orbitals on the acceptor. There is (usually) a clear distinction between EPT and H-atom transfer (HAT) or hydride transfer, in which the transferring electrons and proton come from the same bond. Hybrid mechanisms exist in which the elementary steps are different for the reaction partners. EPT pathways such as PhO•/PhOH exchange have much in common with HAT pathways in that electronic coupling is significant, comparable to the reorganization energy with H{sub DA} ~ ?. Multiple-Site Electron-Proton Transfer (MS-EPT) is an elementary step in which an electron-proton donor transfers electrons and protons to different acceptors, or an electron-proton acceptor accepts electrons and protons from different donors. It exploits the long-range nature of electron transfer while providing for the short-range nature of proton transfer. A variety of EPT pathways exist, creating a taxonomy based on what is transferred, e.g., 1e-/2H+ MS-EPT. PCET achieves “redox potential leveling” between sequential couples and the buildup of multiple redox equivalents, which is of importance in multielectron catalysis. There are many examples of PCET and pH-dependent redox behavior in metal complexes, in organic and biological molecules, in excited states, and on surfaces. Changes in pH can be used to induce electron transfer through films and over long distances in molecules. Changes in pH, induced by local electron transfer, create pH gradients and a driving force for long-range proton transfer in Photosysem II and through other biological membranes. In EPT, simultaneous transfer of electrons and protons occurs on time scales short compared to the periods of coupled vibrations and solvent modes. A theory for EPT has been developed which rationalizes rate constants and activation barriers, includes temperature- and driving force (?G)-dependences implicitly, and explains kinetic isotope effects. The distance-dependence of EPT is dominated by the short-range nature of proton transfer, with electron transfer being far less demanding.Changes in external pH do not affect an EPT elementary step. Solvent molecules or buffer components can act as proton donor acceptors, but individual H2O molecules are neither good bases (pKa(H3O+) = -1.74) nor good acids (pKa(H2O) = 15.7). There are many examples of mechanisms in chemistry, in biology, on surfaces, and in the gas phase which utilize EPT. PCET and EPT play critical roles in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of Photosystem II and other biological reactions by decreasing driving force and avoiding high-energy intermediates.

  5. Marcus Electron Transfer Reactions with Bulk Metallic Catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Widom, A; Srivastava, Y N

    2015-01-01

    Electron transfer organic reaction rates are considered employing the classic physical picture of Marcus wherein the heats of reaction are deposited as the energy of low frequency mechanical oscillations of reconfigured molecular positions. If such electron transfer chemical reaction events occur in the neighborhood of metallic plates, then electrodynamic interface fields must also be considered in addition to mechanical oscillations. Such electrodynamic interfacial electric fields in principle strongly effect the chemical reaction rates. The thermodynamic states of the metal are unchanged by the reaction which implies that metallic plates are purely catalytic chemical agents.

  6. Core-concrete molten pool dynamics and interfacial heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical models are derived for the heat transfer from molten oxide pools to an underlying concrete surface and from molten steel pools to a general concrete containment. To accomplish this, two separate effects models are first developed, one emphasizing the vigorous agitation of the molten pool by gases evolving from the concrete and the other considering the insulating effect of a slag layer produced by concrete melting. The resulting algebraic expressions, combined into a general core-concrete heat transfer representation, are shown to provide very good agreement with experiments involving molten steel pours into concrete crucibles

  7. A layer-by-layer ZnO nanoparticle-PbS quantum dot self-assembly platform for ultrafast interfacial electron injection

    KAUST Repository

    Eita, Mohamed Samir

    2014-08-28

    Absorbent layers of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are now used as material platforms for low-cost, high-performance solar cells. The semiconductor metal oxide nanoparticles as an acceptor layer have become an integral part of the next generation solar cell. To achieve sufficient electron transfer and subsequently high conversion efficiency in these solar cells, however, energy-level alignment and interfacial contact between the donor and the acceptor units are needed. Here, the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique is used to assemble ZnO nanoparticles (NPs), providing adequate PbS QD uptake to achieve greater interfacial contact compared with traditional sputtering methods. Electron injection at the PbS QD and ZnO NP interface is investigated using broadband transient absorption spectroscopy with 120 femtosecond temporal resolution. The results indicate that electron injection from photoexcited PbS QDs to ZnO NPs occurs on a time scale of a few hundred femtoseconds. This observation is supported by the interfacial electronic-energy alignment between the donor and acceptor moieties. Finally, due to the combination of large interfacial contact and ultrafast electron injection, this proposed platform of assembled thin films holds promise for a variety of solar cell architectures and other settings that principally rely on interfacial contact, such as photocatalysis. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Advances in electron transfer chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Mariano, Patrick S

    1995-01-01

    Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry, Volume 4 presents the reaction mechanisms involving the movement of single electrons. This book discusses the electron transfer reactions in organic, biochemical, organometallic, and excited state systems. Organized into four chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the photochemical behavior of two classes of sulfonium salt derivatives. This text then examines the parameters that control the efficiencies for radical ion pair formation. Other chapters consider the progress in the development of parameters that control the dynamics and reaction p

  9. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume III. Chapters 11-14)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  10. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume I. Chapters 1-5)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  11. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume II. Chapters 6-10)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  12. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume IV. Chapters 15-19)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  13. Direct correlation of charge transfer absorption with molecular donor:acceptor interfacial area via photothermal deflection spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Buchaca-Domingo, Ester

    2015-04-09

    We show that the Charge Transfer (CT) absorption signal in bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell blends, measured by photothermal deflection spectroscopy (PDS), is directly proportional to the density of molecular donor/acceptor interfaces. Since the optical transitions from ground state to the interfacial CT state are weakly allowed at photon energies below the optical gap of both donor and acceptor, we can exploit the use of this sensitive linear absorption spectroscopy for such quantification. Moreover, we determine the absolute molar extinction coefficient of the CT transition for an archetypical polymer-fullerene interface. The latter is ~100 times lower than the extinction coefficient of the donor chromophore involved, allowing us to experimentally estimate the transition dipole moment (0.3 D) and the electronic coupling between ground state and CT state to be on the order of 30 meV.

  14. An experimental investigation of the interfacial condensation heat transfer in steam/water countercurrent stratified flow in a horizontal pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, In Cheol; Yu, Seon Oh; Chun, Moon Hyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byong Sup; Kim, Yang Seok; Kim, In Hwan; Lee, Sang Won [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    An interfacial condensation heat transfer phenomenon in a steam/water countercurrent stratified flow in a nearly horizontal pipe has been experimentally investigated. The present study has been focused on the measurement of the temperature and velocity distributions within the water layer. In particular, the water layer thickness used in the present work is large enough so that the turbulent mixing is limited and the thermal stratification is established. As a result, the thermal resistance of the water layer to the condensation heat transfer is increased significantly. An empirical correlation of the interfacial condensation heat transfer has been developed. The present correlation agrees with the data within {+-} 15%. 5 refs., 6 figs. (Author)

  15. Interfacial electronic properties of the heterojunctions C60/rubrene/Au and rubrene/C60/Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using synchrotron-radiation photoemission, we have studied the electronic structures of rubrene:C60 heterojunctions on Au substrates. The photoelectron spectra show that the interfacial properties at the C60/rubrene/Au and rubrene/C60/Au interfaces are asymmetric and do not follow the commutation rule. In the C60/rubrene case, a gap state appearing in the initial deposition stage results from negative charges transferred from rubrene to C60, while in the inverse deposition process, no strong chemical reaction could be found. A significant shift of the vacuum level induced by alignment of the charge neutrality levels of the two materials was observed in both cases. Furthermore, the charge transfer strongly enhances the dipole potential of the C60/rubrene interface. The energy level diagrams show that the C60-on-rubrene process has a superior number of advantages in the photovoltaic applications.

  16. Interfacial electronic properties of the heterojunctions C{sub 60}/rubrene/Au and rubrene/C{sub 60}/Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Chiu-Ping; Chan, Yi-Wei; Hsueh, Chih-Feng [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiayi University, 300 University Road, Chiayi 60004, Taiwan (China); Pi, Tun-Wen [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

    2012-07-15

    Using synchrotron-radiation photoemission, we have studied the electronic structures of rubrene:C{sub 60} heterojunctions on Au substrates. The photoelectron spectra show that the interfacial properties at the C{sub 60}/rubrene/Au and rubrene/C{sub 60}/Au interfaces are asymmetric and do not follow the commutation rule. In the C{sub 60}/rubrene case, a gap state appearing in the initial deposition stage results from negative charges transferred from rubrene to C{sub 60}, while in the inverse deposition process, no strong chemical reaction could be found. A significant shift of the vacuum level induced by alignment of the charge neutrality levels of the two materials was observed in both cases. Furthermore, the charge transfer strongly enhances the dipole potential of the C{sub 60}/rubrene interface. The energy level diagrams show that the C{sub 60}-on-rubrene process has a superior number of advantages in the photovoltaic applications.

  17. Interfacial charge-transfer transitions in a TiO2-benzenedithiol complex with Ti-S-C linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Jun-Ichi; Muroga, Ryuki; Hanaya, Minoru

    2015-11-28

    Interfacial charge-transfer (ICT) transitions between organic materials and inorganic semiconductors are a new mechanism for light absorption at organic-semiconductor interfaces. ICT transitions cause one-step interfacial charge separation without loss of energy. This feature is potentially useful to realize efficient organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells. ICT transitions have been examined by employing titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles chemisorbed with ?-conjugated molecules via Ti-O-C linkages. Here, we report ICT transitions in a TiO2 and 1,2-benzenedithiol (BDT) complex with Ti-S-C linkages. BDT adsorbs on TiO2 by the bridging bidentate coordination of the sulfur atoms to surface titanium atoms. The TiO2-BDT complex shows ICT transitions from the BDT moiety to the conduction band of TiO2 in the visible region. The ICT transitions occur by orbital overlaps between the d orbitals of the surface titanium atoms and the ? orbitals of the benzene ring. Our density-functional-theory (DFT) analysis reveals that the 3p valence orbitals of the sulfur bridging atoms contribute to more than 50% of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the 3d-3p(sulfur)-? interaction via the Ti-S-C linkage enhances the electronic mixing between the titanium atoms and the benzene moiety as compared to the 3d-2p(oxygen)-?via the Ti-O-C linkage. This result indicates the important role of the heavier-atom linkers for strong organic-inorganic electronic couplings. PMID:26486297

  18. Engineering interfacial photo-induced charge transfer based on nanobamboo array architecture for efficient solar-to-chemical energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaotian; Liow, Chihao; Bisht, Ankit; Liu, Xinfeng; Sum, Tze Chien; Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Shuzhou

    2015-04-01

    Engineering interfacial photo-induced charge transfer for highly synergistic photocatalysis is successfully realized based on nanobamboo array architecture. Programmable assemblies of various components and heterogeneous interfaces, and, in turn, engineering of the energy band structure along the charge transport pathways, play a critical role in generating excellent synergistic effects of multiple components for promoting photocatalytic efficiency. PMID:25704499

  19. Inverse identification of interfacial heat transfer coefficient between the casting and metal mold using neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the heat transfer coefficient at the casting-mold interface is of prime importance to improve the casting quality, especially for castings in metal molds. However, it is difficult to determine the values of heat transfer coefficient from experiments due to the influence of various factors, such as contacting pressure, oxides on surfaces, roughness of surfaces, coating material, coating thickness and gap formation caused by the deformation of casting and mold, etc. In the present paper, the interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC) between the casting and metal mold is identified by using the method of inverse analysis based on measured temperatures, neural network with back-propagation algorithm and numerical simulation. Then, by applying the identified IHTC in finite element analysis, the comparison between numerical calculated and experimental results is made to verify the correctness of method. The results show that the numerical calculated temperatures are in good agreement with experimental ones. These demonstrate that the method of inverse analysis is a feasible and effective tool for determination of the casting-mold IHTC. In addition, it is found that the identified IHTC varies with time during the casting solidification and varies in the range of about 100-3200 Wm-2K-1. The characteristics of the time-varying IHTC have also been discussed.

  20. Interfacial electron and phonon scattering processes in high-powered nanoscale applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2011-10-01

    The overarching goal of this Truman LDRD project was to explore mechanisms of thermal transport at interfaces of nanomaterials, specifically linking the thermal conductivity and thermal boundary conductance to the structures and geometries of interfaces and boundaries. Deposition, fabrication, and post possessing procedures of nanocomposites and devices can give rise to interatomic mixing around interfaces of materials leading to stresses and imperfections that could affect heat transfer. An understanding of the physics of energy carrier scattering processes and their response to interfacial disorder will elucidate the potentials of applying these novel materials to next-generation high powered nanodevices and energy conversion applications. An additional goal of this project was to use the knowledge gained from linking interfacial structure to thermal transport in order to develop avenues to control, or 'tune' the thermal transport in nanosystems.

  1. Solar energy conversion dynamics of interfacial electron and excitation transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Piotrowiak, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    The importance of developing new, clean and renewable sources of energy will continue to grow in the foreseeable future and so will the need for the education of researchers in this field of research. The interest and challenges of the field continue to shift from simple homogeneous solutions to increasingly more complex heterogeneous systems and interfaces. Over the past decade there have been numerous theoretical and experimental breakthroughs many of which still exist only in the primary literature. The aim of this book is to gather in one volume the description of modern, sometimes explora

  2. Optical properties of poly(3-hexylthiophene) and interfacial charge transfer between poly(3-hexylthiophene) and titanium dioxide in composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Long; Zhang, Jianling [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials Engineering of China, Sichuan University, Polymer Research Institute of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wang, Weiwei [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials Engineering of China, Sichuan University, Polymer Research Institute of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, University of Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, 44322 Nantes (France); Yang, Haigang [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials Engineering of China, Sichuan University, Polymer Research Institute of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Reisdorffer, Frederic [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, University of Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, 44322 Nantes (France); Nguyen, Thien-Phap, E-mail: Thien-Phap.Nguyen@cnrs-imn.fr [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, University of Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, 44322 Nantes (France); Dan, Yi, E-mail: danyi@scu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials Engineering of China, Sichuan University, Polymer Research Institute of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2015-03-15

    The optical properties of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), in pristine form or with added anatase titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles have been investigated, and the interfacial charge transfer between P3HT and TiO{sub 2} have been studied by steady-state luminescence spectroscopy analysis. The photoluminescence results revealed that incorporation of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in concentrations up to 0.3 mM significantly enhanced the luminescence intensity of P3HT when exposing to light of energy higher than TiO{sub 2} bandgap. The observed variation suggested an energy transfer from TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles to P3HT. Meanwhile, when P3HT/TiO{sub 2} composites were exposed to light of energy below TiO{sub 2} bandgap, TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles gradually quench the fluorescence of P3HT, demonstrating the injection of excited electrons from lowest unoccupied molecular orbit of P3HT to the conduction band of TiO{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Optical properties of P3HT, in pristine form or with added TiO{sub 2} were investigated. • Excitation above TiO{sub 2} bandgap produces a remarkable increase in P3HT emission. • The enhancement is attributed to transfer of excitation energy from TiO{sub 2} to P3HT. • TiO{sub 2} quenches P3HT emission when composites are excited below TiO{sub 2} bandgap. • The quench is due to the injection of excitons from LUMO of P3HT to CB of TiO{sub 2}.

  3. Optical properties of poly(3-hexylthiophene) and interfacial charge transfer between poly(3-hexylthiophene) and titanium dioxide in composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optical properties of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), in pristine form or with added anatase titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles have been investigated, and the interfacial charge transfer between P3HT and TiO2 have been studied by steady-state luminescence spectroscopy analysis. The photoluminescence results revealed that incorporation of TiO2 nanoparticles in concentrations up to 0.3 mM significantly enhanced the luminescence intensity of P3HT when exposing to light of energy higher than TiO2 bandgap. The observed variation suggested an energy transfer from TiO2 nanoparticles to P3HT. Meanwhile, when P3HT/TiO2 composites were exposed to light of energy below TiO2 bandgap, TiO2 nanoparticles gradually quench the fluorescence of P3HT, demonstrating the injection of excited electrons from lowest unoccupied molecular orbit of P3HT to the conduction band of TiO2. - Highlights: • Optical properties of P3HT, in pristine form or with added TiO2 were investigated. • Excitation above TiO2 bandgap produces a remarkable increase in P3HT emission. • The enhancement is attributed to transfer of excitation energy from TiO2 to P3HT. • TiO2 quenches P3HT emission when composites are excited below TiO2 bandgap. • The quench is due to the injection of excitons from LUMO of P3HT to CB of TiO2

  4. Effect of binder polymer structures used in composite cathodes on interfacial charge transfer processes in lithium polymer batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of binder polymer structures used in composite cathodes on the interfacial charge transfer processes in lithium polymer batteries (LPB) has been studied in detail. A cross-linked comb-copolymer, consisting of ethylene oxide (EO), 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl glycidyl ether (MEEGE), and allyl glycidyl ether (AGE), was used as a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE). LiCoO2 composite cathodes were fabricated using binder comb-copolymers, consisting of EO and MEEGE with different compositions. Ionic conductivity of the SPE, and the interfacial charge transfer processes between the SPE and metallic lithium and between the SPE and the composite cathode at several cathode potentials versus Li/Li+, were electrochemically explored. With increasing MEEGE composition in the binder copolymers, the interfacial resistances between the SPE and the composite cathode appreciably decreased. As the result, discharge capacity of the LPB also enhanced with increasing the MEEGE composition. The introduction of the branched-side-chains to the polymer backbone to the binder polymers for the composite cathodes caused to facilitate the interfacial charge transport processes, while the introduction had also been found to be very effective in terms of the enhancement of ionic conductivity of SPE

  5. Ground and excited state electron transfer dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Brennan, Jennifer L.

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this work is the investigation of the factors controlling electron transfer in molecular electronic systems, in particular those affecting electron transfer to and from electronically excited states. To achieve this, a number of mono- and trimetallic osmium and ruthenium complexes were synthesised and characterised. Monolayers of an osmium polypyridyl complex bound to a platinum microelectrode via a ¿rara-l,2-bis-(4-pyridyl)ethylene bridge were formed to probe ground state electr...

  6. Surfactant transfer across a water/oil interface: A diffusion/kinetics model for the interfacial tension evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transfer of amphiphilic solutes through an interface between water and an organic solvent has been studied numerically by simulations based on a general diffusion/reaction model. This description predicts the evolution of the solute concentrations and the transfer across the liquid/liquid interface. It especially focuses on the dynamic interfacial tension evolution that can be measured by a pendant drop tensiometer. Both the bulk diffusion and the adsorption/desorption rate on both sides of the liquid interface are assumed to contribute to the global transfer kinetic. The calculations provide an understanding on how kinetic exchange at the interface and diffusion transport through the bulk determine the dynamic interfacial tension evolution. In particular, complex interfacial tension evolutions with a non-trivial behavior are predicted in some special cases when diffusion and kinetic exchange are of the same order of magnitude. Finally, this model is used to re-interpret experimental data about Triton X-100 transfer at a water-oil interface. (authors)

  7. Effect of solute transfer and interfacial instabilities on scalar and velocity field around a drop rising in quiescent liquid channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanwale, Makrand A.; Khadamkar, Hrushikesh P.; Mathpati, Channamallikarjun S.

    2015-11-01

    Physics of development of flow structures around the drop rising with solute transfer is highly influenced by the interfacial behaviour and is remarkably different than a particle rising under the same conditions. We report on the use of simultaneous particle image velocimetry-planar laser induced fluorescence technique to measure scalar and velocity fields around a drop rising in a quiescent liquid channel. The selected continuous phase is glycerol, and the drop consists of a mixture of toluene, acetone, and a dye rhodamine-6G, with acetone working as a interfacial tension depressant. The drop lies in the spherical region with Eötvös number, Eo = 1.95, Morton number, M = 78.20 and the particle Reynolds number being, Rep = 0.053. With Rep approaching that of creeping flow, we analyse the effect of interfacial instabilities solely, contrary to other investigations [M. Wegener et al., "Impact of Marangoni instabilities on the fluid dynamic behaviour of organic droplets," Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 52, 2543-2551 (2009); S. Burghoff and E. Y. Kenig, "A CFD model for mass transfer and interfacial phenomena on single droplets," AIChE J. 52, 4071-4078 (2006); J. Wang et al., "Numerical simulation of the Marangoni effect on transient mass transfer from single moving deformable drops," AIChE J. 57, 2670-2683 (2011); R. F. Engberg, M. Wegener, and E. Y. Kenig, "The impact of Marangoni convection on fluid dynamics and mass transfer at deformable single rising droplets—A numerical study," Chem. Eng. Sci. 116, 208-222 (2014)] which account for turbulence as well as interfacial instabilities with Rep in the turbulent range. The velocity and concentration fields obtained are subjected to scale-wise energy decomposition using continuous wavelet transform. Scale-wise probability distribution functions of wavelet coefficients are calculated to check intermittent non-Gaussian behaviour for simultaneous velocity and scalar statistics. Multi-fractal singularity spectra for scalar and velocity fields are calculated using wavelet transform modulus maxima methodology to analyse the distribution of non-Gaussian flow structures and their effect on scalar transport. Further, Fourier spectra based on velocity and concentration are also reported. We found that vorticity and concentration fields became progressively non-Gaussian, as one moved from large scales to small scales. This turbulence like behaviour is attributed to interfacial instabilities developed because of the non-uniform shear at the interface. The multi-fractal singularity spectra had their Hurst exponent H > 0.5, which showed high correlation in the hierarchy of the flow structures. A strong correlation between concentration and velocity multi-fractal spectra was also seen.

  8. Computer simulation of electron transfer in molecular electronic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Helena M. G.; Ramos, Marta M. D.

    2005-01-01

    The study of electron transfer through individual molecules bound to metal electrodes has become important due to the potential application in molecular electronic devices. Since the electronic and atomic motions in these molecules influence each other they need to be treated self-consistently. We have used self-consistent quantum chemistry molecular dynamics calculations to discuss some of the issues related to electron transfer through a spatially symmetric [9,10-Bis((2???-para-mercaptophen...

  9. Advances in electron transfer chemistry, v.6

    CERN Document Server

    Mariano, PS

    1999-01-01

    It is clear that electron transfer chemisty is now one of the most active areas of chemical study. Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry has been designed to allow scientists who are developing new knowledge in this rapidly expanding area to describe their most recent research findings. This volume will serve those interested in learning about current breakthroughs in this rapidly expanding area of chemical research.

  10. Medium effects in photoinduced electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transfer of an electron between two molecules is a fundamental chemical process of great significance in biochemistry as well as in general chemistry. Electron transfer reactions can be induced by the absorption of light - as in photosynthesis - so that one of the molecules reacts through an electronically excited state; a net storage of chemical energy may then take place. When electron transfer involves molecules in condensed phase, the role of the liquid or solid medium must be considered. In the first place, a polar solvent may promote electron transfer through the stabilization of ion pairs and the separation of ions; but if the polar solvent must reorganize prior to the reaction, then an activation barrier will exist against electron transfer in polar solvents. This article gives a citical review of this field, with some novel ideas concerning the role of the medium (liquid solvent or solid matrix) in the overall energy balance of electron transfer, in the kinetics of the reaction, and in the further process of charge separation. It is suggested in particular that no dielectric screening by a polar solvent can exist when ions are formed in direct contact; and that the extensive reorganization of the solvent prior to electron transfer is so unlikely as to be discounted. In these respects the model presented in this article diverges from the commonly accepted model of Weller and of Marcus and Hush. In the Conclusion section some areas of particular importance for further research in this field are outlined. (author) 28 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Frustrated Solvation Structures Can Enhance Electron Transfer Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsing, Richard C; McKendry, Ian G; Strongin, Daniel R; Klein, Michael L; Zdilla, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Polar surfaces can interact strongly with nearby water molecules, leading to the formation of highly ordered interfacial hydration structures. This ordering can lead to frustration in the hydrogen bond network, and, in the presence of solutes, frustrated hydration structures. We study frustration in the hydration of cations when confined between sheets of the water oxidation catalyst manganese dioxide. Frustrated hydration structures are shown to have profound effects on ion-surface electron transfer through the enhancement of energy gap fluctuations beyond those expected from Marcus theory. These fluctuations are accompanied by a concomitant increase in the electron transfer rate in Marcus's normal regime. We demonstrate the generality of this phenomenon-enhancement of energy gap fluctuations due to frustration-by introducing a charge frustrated XY model, likening the hydration structure of confined cations to topological defects. Our findings shed light on recent experiments suggesting that water oxidation rates depend on the cation charge and Mn-oxidation state in these layered transition metal oxide materials. PMID:26573339

  12. Interfacial electronic structure at the CH3NH3PbI3/MoOx interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interfacial electronic properties of the CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3)/MoOx interface are investigated using ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. It is found that the pristine MAPbI3 film coated onto the substrate of poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate)/indium tin oxide by two-step method behaves as an n-type semiconductor, with a band gap of ?1.7?eV and a valence band edge of 1.40?eV below the Fermi energy (EF). With the MoOx deposition of 64?Å upon MAPbI3, the energy levels of MAPbI3 shift toward higher binding energy by 0.25?eV due to electron transfer from MAPbI3 to MoOx. Its conduction band edge is observed to almost pin to the EF, indicating a significant enhancement of conductivity. Meanwhile, the energy levels of MoOx shift toward lower binding energy by ?0.30?eV, and an interface dipole of 2.13?eV is observed at the interface of MAPbI3/MoOx. Most importantly, the chemical reaction taking place at this interface results in unfavorable interface energy level alignment for hole extraction. A potential barrier of ?1.36?eV observed for hole transport will impede the hole extraction from MAPbI3 to MoOx. On the other hand, a potential barrier of ?0.14?eV for electron extraction is too small to efficiently suppress electrons extracted from MAPbI3 to MoOx. Therefore, such an interface is not an ideal choice for hole extraction in organic photovoltaic devices

  13. Interfacial bonding and electronic structure of GaN/GaAs interface: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Ruyue; Zhang, Zhaofu; Wang, Changhong; Li, Haobo; Dong, Hong; Liu, Hui; Wang, Weichao, E-mail: weichaowang@nankai.edu.cn [College of Electronic Information and Optical Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Xie, Xinjian [College of Materials Science, Hebei Technology University, Tianjin 300401 (China)

    2015-04-07

    Understanding of GaN interfacing with GaAs is crucial for GaN to be an effective interfacial layer between high-k oxides and III-V materials with the application in high-mobility metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) devices. Utilizing first principles calculations, here, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of the GaN/GaAs interface with respect to the interfacial nitrogen contents. The decrease of interfacial N contents leads to more Ga dangling bonds and As-As dimers. At the N-rich limit, the interface with N concentration of 87.5% shows the most stability. Furthermore, a strong band offsets dependence on the interfacial N concentration is also observed. The valance band offset of N7 with hybrid functional calculation is 0.51?eV. The electronic structure analysis shows that significant interface states exist in all the GaN/GaAs models with various N contents, which originate from the interfacial dangling bonds and some unsaturated Ga and N atoms. These large amounts of gap states result in Fermi level pinning and essentially degrade the device performance.

  14. Interfacial bonding and electronic structure of GaN/GaAs interface: A first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding of GaN interfacing with GaAs is crucial for GaN to be an effective interfacial layer between high-k oxides and III-V materials with the application in high-mobility metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) devices. Utilizing first principles calculations, here, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of the GaN/GaAs interface with respect to the interfacial nitrogen contents. The decrease of interfacial N contents leads to more Ga dangling bonds and As-As dimers. At the N-rich limit, the interface with N concentration of 87.5% shows the most stability. Furthermore, a strong band offsets dependence on the interfacial N concentration is also observed. The valance band offset of N7 with hybrid functional calculation is 0.51?eV. The electronic structure analysis shows that significant interface states exist in all the GaN/GaAs models with various N contents, which originate from the interfacial dangling bonds and some unsaturated Ga and N atoms. These large amounts of gap states result in Fermi level pinning and essentially degrade the device performance

  15. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  16. Molecular Computational Investigation of Electron Transfer Kinetics across Cytochrome-Iron Oxide Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interface between electron transfer proteins such as cytochromes and solid phase mineral oxides is central to the activity of dissimilatory-metal reducing bacteria. A combination of potential-based molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio electronic structure calculations are used in the framework of Marcus' electron transfer theory to compute elementary electron transfer rates from a well-defined cytochrome model, namely the small tetraheme cytochrome (STC) from Shewanella oneidensis, to surfaces of the iron oxide mineral hematite (a-Fe2O3). Room temperature molecular dynamics simulations show that an isolated STC molecule favors surface attachment via direct contact of hemes I and IV at the poles of the elongated axis, with electron transfer distances as small as 9 Angstroms. The cytochrome remains attached to the mineral surface in the presence of water and shows limited surface diffusion at the interface. Ab initio electronic coupling matrix element (VAB) calculations of configurations excised from the molecular dynamics simulations reveal VAB values ranging from 1 to 20 cm-1, consistent with nonadiabaticity. Using these results, together with experimental data on the redox potential of hematite and hemes in relevant cytochromes and calculations of the reorganization energy from cluster models, we estimate the rate of electron transfer across this model interface to range from 1 to 1000 s-1 for the most exothermic driving force considered in this work, and from 0.01 to 20 s-1 for the most endothermic. This fairly large range of electron transfer rates highlights the sensitivity of the rate upon the electronic coupling matrix element, which is in turn dependent on the fluctuations of the heme configuration at the interface. We characterize this dependence using an idealized bis-imidazole heme to compute from first principles the VAB variation due to porphyrin ring orientation, electron transfer distance, and mineral surface termination. The electronic matrix element and consequently the rate of electron transfer are found to be sensitive to all parameters considered. This work indicates that biomolecularly similar solvent-exposed bis-histidine hemes in outer-membrane cytochromes such as MtrC or OmcA are likely to have an affinity for the oxide surface in water governing the approach and interfacial conformation and, if allowed sufficient conformational freedom, will achieve distances and configurations required for direct interfacial electron transfer.

  17. Protein electron transfer: is biology (thermo)dynamic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2015-12-01

    Simple physical mechanisms are behind the flow of energy in all forms of life. Energy comes to living systems through electrons occupying high-energy states, either from food (respiratory chains) or from light (photosynthesis). This energy is transformed into the cross-membrane proton-motive force that eventually drives all biochemistry of the cell. Life's ability to transfer electrons over large distances with nearly zero loss of free energy is puzzling and has not been accomplished in synthetic systems. The focus of this review is on how this energetic efficiency is realized. General physical mechanisms and interactions that allow proteins to fold into compact water-soluble structures are also responsible for a rugged landscape of energy states and a broad distribution of relaxation times. Specific to a protein as a fluctuating thermal bath is the protein-water interface, which is heterogeneous both dynamically and structurally. The spectrum of interfacial fluctuations is a consequence of protein's elastic flexibility combined with a high density of surface charges polarizing water dipoles into surface nanodomains. Electrostatics is critical to the protein function and the relevant questions are: (i) What is the spectrum of interfacial electrostatic fluctuations? (ii) Does the interfacial biological water produce electrostatic signatures specific to proteins? (iii) How is protein-mediated chemistry affected by electrostatics? These questions connect the fluctuation spectrum to the dynamical control of chemical reactivity, i.e. the dependence of the activation free energy of the reaction on the dynamics of the bath. Ergodicity is often broken in protein-driven reactions and thermodynamic free energies become irrelevant. Continuous ergodicity breaking in a dense spectrum of relaxation times requires using dynamically restricted ensembles to calculate statistical averages. When applied to the calculation of the rates, this formalism leads to the nonergodic activated kinetics, which extends the transition-state theory to dynamically dispersive media. Releasing the grip of thermodynamics in kinetic calculations through nonergodicity provides the mechanism for an efficient optimization between reaction rates and the spectrum of relaxation times of the protein-water thermal bath. Bath dynamics, it appears, play as important role as the free energy in optimizing biology's performance. PMID:26558324

  18. Protein electron transfer: is biology (thermo)dynamic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2015-12-01

    Simple physical mechanisms are behind the flow of energy in all forms of life. Energy comes to living systems through electrons occupying high-energy states, either from food (respiratory chains) or from light (photosynthesis). This energy is transformed into the cross-membrane proton-motive force that eventually drives all biochemistry of the cell. Life’s ability to transfer electrons over large distances with nearly zero loss of free energy is puzzling and has not been accomplished in synthetic systems. The focus of this review is on how this energetic efficiency is realized. General physical mechanisms and interactions that allow proteins to fold into compact water-soluble structures are also responsible for a rugged landscape of energy states and a broad distribution of relaxation times. Specific to a protein as a fluctuating thermal bath is the protein-water interface, which is heterogeneous both dynamically and structurally. The spectrum of interfacial fluctuations is a consequence of protein’s elastic flexibility combined with a high density of surface charges polarizing water dipoles into surface nanodomains. Electrostatics is critical to the protein function and the relevant questions are: (i) What is the spectrum of interfacial electrostatic fluctuations? (ii) Does the interfacial biological water produce electrostatic signatures specific to proteins? (iii) How is protein-mediated chemistry affected by electrostatics? These questions connect the fluctuation spectrum to the dynamical control of chemical reactivity, i.e. the dependence of the activation free energy of the reaction on the dynamics of the bath. Ergodicity is often broken in protein-driven reactions and thermodynamic free energies become irrelevant. Continuous ergodicity breaking in a dense spectrum of relaxation times requires using dynamically restricted ensembles to calculate statistical averages. When applied to the calculation of the rates, this formalism leads to the nonergodic activated kinetics, which extends the transition-state theory to dynamically dispersive media. Releasing the grip of thermodynamics in kinetic calculations through nonergodicity provides the mechanism for an efficient optimization between reaction rates and the spectrum of relaxation times of the protein-water thermal bath. Bath dynamics, it appears, play as important role as the free energy in optimizing biology’s performance.

  19. Interfacial spin-filter assisted spin transfer torque effect in Co/BeO/Co magnetic tunnel junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Y.-H., E-mail: yhtang@cc.ncu.edu.tw; Chu, F.-C. [Department of Physics, National Central University, Jung-Li 32001, Taiwan (China)

    2015-03-07

    The first-principles calculation is employed to demonstrate the spin-selective transport properties and the non-collinear spin-transfer torque (STT) effect in the newly proposed Co/BeO/Co magnetic tunnel junction. The subtle spin-polarized charge transfer solely at O/Co interface gives rise to the interfacial spin-filter (ISF) effect, which can be simulated within the tight binding model to verify the general expression of STT. This allows us to predict the asymmetric bias behavior of non-collinear STT directly via the interplay between the first-principles calculated spin current densities in collinear magnetic configurations. We believe that the ISF effect, introduced by the combination between wurtzite-BeO barrier and the fcc-Co electrode, may open a new and promising route in semiconductor-based spintronics applications.

  20. Photoinduced electron transfer in some photosensitive molecules-incorporated semiconductor/zeolites: New photocatalytic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Minjoong Yoon; Devendra P S Negi

    2002-12-01

    An intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) molecule, -N,N-dimethylaminobenzoic acid (DMABA) has been studied in zeolite and colloidal media. The ratio of ICT to normal emission (ICT/LE) is greatly enhanced in zeolites compared to that in polar solvents. The ICT emission of DMABA was quenched by increasing the concentration of TiO2 colloids, while the normal emission was slightly enhanced. Upon illumination of the heteropoly acid (HPA) incorporated TiO2 colloids, interfacial electron transfer takes place from the conduction band of TiO2 to the incorporated HPA which is also excited to catalyze the photoreduction of Methyl Orange. It is found that the interfacial electron transfer mechanism of HPA/TiO2 is quite analogous to the Z-scheme mechanism for plant photosynthetic systems. In DMABA-adsorbed TiO2/Y-zeolite the ICT/LE ratio of DMABA is quite small implying that electron transfer takes place from DMABA to the conduction band of TiO2. This results in drastic enhancement in the photocatalytic activity of DMABA-adsorbed TiO2/Y-zeolite compared to free TiO2/Y-zeolite.

  1. Promoting Knowledge Transfer with Electronic Note Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Andrew D.; Shambaugh, R. Neal; Doctor, Tasneem

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the differences between (a) copying and pasting text versus typed note-taking methods of constructing study notes simultaneously with (b) vertically scaffolded versus horizontally scaffold notes on knowledge transfer. Forty-seven undergraduate educational psychology students participated. Materials included 2 electronic

  2. Quantum effects in biological electron transfer.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de la Lande, A.; Babcock, N. S.; ?ezá?, Jan; Levy, B.; Sanders, B. C.; Salahub, D.

    2012-01-01

    Ro?. 14, ?. 17 (2012), s. 5902-5918. ISSN 1463-9076 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : electron transfer * tunnelling * decoherence * semi-classical molecular dynamics * density functional theory Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.829, year: 2012

  3. Vibrational control of electron-transfer reactions: a feasibility study for the fast coherent transfer regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, P; Ma, Z; Zhang, P; Beratan, D N; Skourtis, S S

    2015-11-18

    Molecular vibrations and electron-vibrational interactions are central to the control of biomolecular electron and energy-transfer rates. The vibrational control of molecular electron-transfer reactions by infrared pulses may enable the precise probing of electronic-vibrational interactions and of their roles in determining electron-transfer mechanisms. This type of electron-transfer rate control is advantageous because it does not alter the electronic state of the molecular electron-transfer system or irreversibly change its molecular structure. For bridge-mediated electron-transfer reactions, infrared (vibrational) excitation of the bridge linking the electron donor to the electron acceptor was suggested as being capable of influencing the electron-transfer rate by modulating the bridge-mediated donor-to-acceptor electronic coupling. This kind of electron-transfer experiment has been realized, demonstrating that bridge-mediated electron-transfer rates can be changed by exciting vibrational modes of the bridge. Here, we use simple models and ab initio computations to explore the physical constraints on one's ability to vibrationally perturb electron-transfer rates using infrared excitation. These constraints stem from the nature of molecular vibrational spectra, the strengths of the electron-vibrational coupling, and the interaction between molecular vibrations and infrared radiation. With these constraints in mind, we suggest parameter regimes and molecular architectures that may enhance the vibrational control of electron transfer for fast coherent electron-transfer reactions. PMID:25909507

  4. Interfacial charge-transfer resistance at ionizable thiol monolayer-modified gold electrodes as studied by impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komura, T.; Yamaguchi, T.; Shimatani, H.; Okushio, R

    2004-02-15

    This paper examines the influences of ionizable thiol monolayers on the interfacial charge-transfer rates for redox-active ions by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Whereas short-chain thiols such as 4-aminothiophenol hardly affected the charge-transfer resistance for Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 3+} having a high standard heterogeneous rate constant, the 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid monolayer raised this resistance to 3x10{sup 4} times that observed at a bare electrode in acidic solutions. As the terminal carboxyl group ionized, the charge-transfer resistance decreased by a factor of 300 because of a double-layer effect. When 3-mercaptopropionic acid was mixed with 1-hexadecanethiol, the charge-transfer resistance varied over four orders of magnitude with the composition of the two-component monolayer. The apparent rate constant for indigotetrasulfonate at 4-aminothiophenol-modified electrodes decreased by a factor of 25-30 as the solution pH varied from 4 to 2. This decrease was opposite to the change expected from protonation of the terminal amino group. It can be ascribed to a strong binding interaction between the redox anion and the positively charged monolayer.

  5. Tomography based determination of permeability, Dupuit-Forchheimer coefficient, and interfacial heat transfer coefficient in reticulate porous ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer tomography based methodology is applied to determine the transport properties of fluid flow across porous media. A 3D digital representation of a 10-ppi reticulate porous ceramic (RPC) sample was generated by X-ray tomographic scans. Structural properties such as the porosity, specific interfacial surface area, pore-size distribution, mean survival time, two-point correlation function s2, and local geometry distribution of the RPC sample are directly extracted from the tomographic data. Reference solutions of the fluid flow governing equations are obtained for Re = 0.2-200 by applying finite volume direct pore-level numerical simulation (DPLS) using unstructured, body-fitted, tetrahedral mesh discretization. The permeability and the Dupuit-Forchheimer coefficient are determined from the reference solutions by DPLS, and compared to the values predicted by selected porous media flow models, namely: conduit-flow, hydraulic radius theory, drag models, mean survival time bound, s2-bound, fibrous bed correlations, and local porosity theory-based models. DPLS is further employed to determine the interfacial heat transfer coefficient and to derive a corresponding Nu-correlation, which is compared to empirical correlations

  6. Ultrafast electron and energy transfer in dye-sensitized iron oxide and oxyhydroxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Katz, Jordan E.

    2013-01-01

    An emerging area in chemical science is the study of solid-phase redox reactions using ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy. We have used molecules of the photoactive dye 2?,7?-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) anchored to the surface of iron(iii) oxide nanoparticles to create iron(ii) surface atoms via photo-initiated interfacial electron transfer. This approach enables time-resolved study of the fate and mobility of electrons within the solid phase. However, complete analysis of the ultrafast processes following dye photoexcitation of the sensitized iron(iii) oxide nanoparticles has not been reported. We addressed this topic by performing femtosecond transient absorption (TA) measurements of aqueous suspensions of uncoated and DCF-sensitized iron oxide and oxyhydroxide nanoparticles, and an aqueous iron(iii)–dye complex. Following light absorption, excited state relaxation times of the dye of 115–310 fs were found for all samples. Comparison between TA dynamics on uncoated and dye-sensitized hematite nanoparticles revealed the dye de-excitation pathway to consist of a competition between electron and energy transfer to the nanoparticles. We analyzed the TA data for hematite nanoparticles using a four-state model of the dye-sensitized system, finding electron and energy transfer to occur on the same ultrafast timescale. The interfacial electron transfer rates for iron oxides are very close to those previously reported for DCF-sensitized titanium dioxide (for which dye–oxide energy transfer is energetically forbidden) even though the acceptor states are different. Comparison of the alignment of the excited states of the dye and the unoccupied states of these oxides showed that the dye injects into acceptor states of different symmetry (Ti t2g vs. Fe eg).

  7. Electronic transfer between low-dimensional nanosystems.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Karel

    Hoboken : Wiley, 2011 - (Nair, K.; Priya, S.; Jia, Q.), s. 33-40 ISBN 9781118059999. - (Ceramic Transactions. vol. 226). [Materials Science and Technology meeting 2010 (MS&T'10). Dielectric Ceramic Materials and Electronic Devices .. Houston (US), 17.10.2010-21.10.2010] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC10007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : electron transfer * nanostructures quantum dots Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118059999,descCd-tableOfContents.html

  8. Interfacial electron-shuttling processes across KolliphorEL monolayer grafted electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekoueian, Khadijeh; Hotchen, Christopher E; Amiri, Mandana; Sillanpää, Mika; Nelson, Geoffrey W; Foord, John S; Holdway, Philip; Buchard, Antoine; Parker, Stephen C; Marken, Frank

    2015-07-22

    Covalently grafted KolliphorEL (a poly(ethylene glycol)-based transporter molecule for hydrophobic water-insoluble drugs; MW, ca. 2486; diameter, ca. 3 nm) at the surface of a glassy-carbon electrode strongly affects the rate of electron transfer for aqueous redox systems such as Fe(CN)6(3-/4-). XPS data confirm monolayer grafting after electrochemical anodization in pure KolliphorEL. On the basis of voltammetry and impedance measurements, the charge transfer process for the Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) probe molecule is completely blocked after KolliphorEL grafting and in the absence of a "guest". However, in the presence of low concentrations of suitable ferrocene derivatives as guests, mediated electron transfer across the monolayer via a shuttle mechanism is observed. The resulting amplification of the ferrocene electroanalytical signal is investigated systematically and compared for five ferrocene derivatives. The low-concentration electron shuttle efficiency decreases in the following sequence: (dimethylaminomethyl)ferrocene > n-butyl ferrocene > ferrocene dimethanol > ferroceneacetonitrile > ferroceneacetic acid. PMID:26104182

  9. Promoting interspecies electron transfer with biochar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Liu, Fanghua; Fan, Wei; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    Biochar, a charcoal-like product of the incomplete combustion of organic materials, is an increasingly popular soil amendment designed to improve soil fertility. We investigated the possibility that biochar could promote direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in a manner similar to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Ge...

  10. Resonant electron transfer between quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Openov, Leonid A.

    1999-01-01

    An interaction of electromagnetic field with a nanostructure composed of two quantum dots is studied theoretically. An effect of a resonant electron transfer between the localized low-lying states of quantum dots is predicted. A necessary condition for such an effect is the existence of an excited bound state whose energy lies close to the top of the barrier separating the quantum dots. This effect may be used to realize the reversible quantum logic gate NOT if the superposi...

  11. Electron transfer in branched expanded pyridinium molecules.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hromadová, Magdaléna; Lachmanová, Št?pánka; Pospíšil, Lubomír; Fortage, J.; Dupeyre, G.; Perruchot, Ch.; Lainé, P. P.

    Aveiro : DEMAC - Universidade de Aveiro, 2014. s. 99-99. [Meeting of the Portuguese Electrochemical Society /19./. Iberian Meeting of Electrochemistry /16./. 30.06.2014-02.07.2014, Aveiro] R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GA14-05180S Grant ostatní: Rada Programu interní porpory projekt? mezinárodní spolupráce AV ?R M200401202 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : electron transfer * electrochemistry * pyridinium Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  12. Quantum coherent contributions in biological electron transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Dorner, Ross; Goold, John; Heaney, Libby; Farrow, Tristan; Roberts, Philippa G.; Hirst, Judy; Vedral, Vlatko

    2011-01-01

    Many biological electron transfer (ET) reactions are mediated by metal centres in proteins. NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) contains an intramolecular chain of seven iron-sulphur (FeS) clusters, one of the longest chains of metal centres in biology and a test case for physical models of intramolecular ET. In biology, intramolecular ET is commonly described as a diffusive hopping process, according to the semi-classical theories of Marcus and Hopfield. However, rec...

  13. Promoting Interspecies Electron Transfer with Biochar

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Nikhil S. Malvankar; Liu, Fanghua; Fan, Wei; Nevin, Kelly P; Derek R. Lovley

    2014-01-01

    Biochar, a charcoal-like product of the incomplete combustion of organic materials, is an increasingly popular soil amendment designed to improve soil fertility. We investigated the possibility that biochar could promote direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in a manner similar to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with...

  14. Interfacial Redox Catalysis on Gold Nanofilms at Soft Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Evgeny; Peljo, Pekka; Scanlon, Micheál D; Girault, Hubert H

    2015-06-23

    Soft or "liquid-liquid" interfaces were functionalized by roughly half a monolayer of mirror-like nanofilms of gold nanoparticles using a precise interfacial microinjection method. The surface coverage of the nanofilm was characterized by ion transfer voltammetry. These gold nanoparticle films represent an ideal model system for studying both the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of interfacial redox catalysis. The electric polarization of these soft interfaces is easily controllable, and thus the Fermi level of the electrons in the interfacial gold nanoparticle film can be easily manipulated. Here, we study interfacial redox catalysis between two redox couples located in adjacent immiscible phases and highlight the catalytic properties of a gold nanoparticle film toward heterogeneous electron transfer reactions. PMID:26039934

  15. Electron transfer and reaction mechanism of laccases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephen M; Solomon, Edward I

    2015-03-01

    Laccases are part of the family of multicopper oxidases (MCOs), which couple the oxidation of substrates to the four electron reduction of O2 to H2O. MCOs contain a minimum of four Cu's divided into Type 1 (T1), Type 2 (T2), and binuclear Type 3 (T3) Cu sites that are distinguished based on unique spectroscopic features. Substrate oxidation occurs near the T1, and electrons are transferred approximately 13 Å through the protein via the Cys-His pathway to the T2/T3 trinuclear copper cluster (TNC), where dioxygen reduction occurs. This review outlines the electron transfer (ET) process in laccases, and the mechanism of O2 reduction as elucidated through spectroscopic, kinetic, and computational data. Marcus theory is used to describe the relevant factors which impact ET rates including the driving force, reorganization energy, and electronic coupling matrix element. Then, the mechanism of O2 reaction is detailed with particular focus on the intermediates formed during the two 2e(-) reduction steps. The first 2e(-) step forms the peroxide intermediate, followed by the second 2e(-) step to form the native intermediate, which has been shown to be the catalytically relevant fully oxidized form of the enzyme. PMID:25572295

  16. Promoting interspecies electron transfer with biochar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena

    2014-01-01

    Biochar, a charcoal-like product of the incomplete combustion of organic materials, is an increasingly popular soil amendment designed to improve soil fertility. We investigated the possibility that biochar could promote direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in a manner similar to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Geobacter sulfurreducens or Methanosarcina barkeri in which ethanol was the electron donor. Cells were attached to the biochar, yet not in close contact, suggesting that electrons were likely conducted through the biochar, rather than biological electrical connections. The finding that biochar can stimulate DIET may be an important consideration when amending soils with biochar and can help explain why biochar may enhance methane production from organic wastes under anaerobic conditions.

  17. 77 FR 34127 - Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Transfer Account...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ...Collection of Information: Electronic Transfer Account...on a continuing information collection. By...FMS-111, ``Electronic Transfer Account...collection of information described below: Title: Electronic Transfer...

  18. Electronic Structure and Ferromagnetism Modulation in Cu/Cu2O Interface: Impact of Interfacial Cu Vacancy and Its Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao-Bo; Wang, Weichao; Xie, Xinjian; Cheng, Yahui; Zhang, Zhaofu; Dong, Hong; Zheng, Rongkun; Wang, Wei-Hua; Lu, Feng; Liu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Cu/Cu2O composite structures have been discovered to show sizable ferromagnetism (FM) with the potential applications in spintronic devices. To date, there is no consensus on the FM origin in Cu/Cu2O systems. Here, first principles calculations are performed on the interface structure to explore the microscopic mechanism of the FM. It is found that only the Cu vacancy (VCu) adjacent to the outermost Cu2O layer induces a considerable magnetic moment, mostly contributed by 2p orbitals of the nearest-neighbor oxygen atom (ONN) with two dangling bonds and 3d orbitals of the Cu atoms bonding with the ONN. Meanwhile, the charge transfer from Cu to Cu2O creates higher density of states at the Fermi level and subsequently leads to the spontaneous FM. Furthermore, the FM could be modulated by the amount of interfacial VCu, governed by the interfacial Cu diffusion with a moderate energy barrier (~1.2?eV). These findings provide insights into the FM mechanism and tuning the FM via interfacial cation diffusion in the Cu/Cu2O contact. PMID:26478505

  19. Electronic Structure and Ferromagnetism Modulation in Cu/Cu2O Interface: Impact of Interfacial Cu Vacancy and Its Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao-Bo; Wang, Weichao; Xie, Xinjian; Cheng, Yahui; Zhang, Zhaofu; Dong, Hong; Zheng, Rongkun; Wang, Wei-Hua; Lu, Feng; Liu, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Cu/Cu2O composite structures have been discovered to show sizable ferromagnetism (FM) with the potential applications in spintronic devices. To date, there is no consensus on the FM origin in Cu/Cu2O systems. Here, first principles calculations are performed on the interface structure to explore the microscopic mechanism of the FM. It is found that only the Cu vacancy (VCu) adjacent to the outermost Cu2O layer induces a considerable magnetic moment, mostly contributed by 2p orbitals of the nearest-neighbor oxygen atom (ONN) with two dangling bonds and 3d orbitals of the Cu atoms bonding with the ONN. Meanwhile, the charge transfer from Cu to Cu2O creates higher density of states at the Fermi level and subsequently leads to the spontaneous FM. Furthermore, the FM could be modulated by the amount of interfacial VCu, governed by the interfacial Cu diffusion with a moderate energy barrier (~1.2?eV). These findings provide insights into the FM mechanism and tuning the FM via interfacial cation diffusion in the Cu/Cu2O contact.

  20. Identification of interfacial heat transfer between molten metal and green sand by inverse heat conduction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Quanpeng

    Heat flux and heat transfer coefficients at the interfaces of castings and molds are important parameters in the mold design and computer simulations of the solidification process in foundry operations. A better understanding of the heat flux and heat transfer coefficient between the solidifying casting and its mold can promote model design and improve the accuracy of computer simulation. The main purpose of the present dissertation involves the estimation of the heat flux and heat transfer coefficient at the interface of the molten metal and green sand. Since the inverse heat conduction method requires temperature measurement data to deduce the missing surface information, it is suitable for the present research. However, heat transfer inside green sand is complicated by the migration of water vapor and zonal temperature distribution results. This makes the solution of the inverse heat conduction problem more challenging. In this dissertation, Galerkin's method of Weighted Residual together with the front tracking technique is used in the development of a forward solver. Beck's future time step method incorporated with the Gaussian iterative minimization method is used as the inverse solver. The mathematical descriptions of the sensitivity coefficient for both the direct heat flux and direct heat transfer coefficient estimation are derived. The variations of the sensitivity coefficients with time are revealed. From the analysis of sensitivity coefficients, the concept of blank time period is proposed. This blank time period makes the inverse problem much more difficult. A total energy balance criterion is used to combat this. Numerical experiments confirmed the accuracy and robustness of both the direct heat flux estimation algorithm and the direct heat transfer coefficient estimation algorithm. Finally, some pouring experiments are carried out. The inverse algorithms are applied to the estimation of the heat flux and heat transfer coefficient at the interface of the molten metal and green sand with the input of measured temperature data from field experiments. The heat flux and heat transfer coefficient history at the interface of molten metal and green sand are obtained.

  1. Analysis of anodic current transient measured on Pd electrode with fractal surface: Hydrogen diffusion coupled with interfacial charge transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen transport through Pd electrode with fractally rough surface was investigated in 0.1 M NaOH solution by analysis of the anodic current transient. The Pd electrode surfaces were electrochemically modified to be rough by redox cycling in 1 M H2SO4 solution. From the triangulation analysis of the atomic force microscopy images, it was found that the modified electrode surfaces exhibited self-similar scaling properties with different fractal dimensions, depending upon the number of redox cycles. The anodic current transient measured on the surface-modified fractal electrode subjected to the hydrogen discharging potentials of 0.3-0.7 V reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) showed the non-generalised Cottrell behaviour, which resulted from the constraint of hydrogen diffusion mixed with interfacial charge transfer during hydrogen transport. Especially, it displayed an inflexion point at the time that corresponds to the temporal outer cut-off of fractality, i.e. the crossover time required for the fractal to flat transition. In addition, the temporal outer cut-off under the constraint of mixed control was observed to be shortened with increasing hydrogen discharging potential, which could be accounted for by the increased growth rate of diffusion layer in the electrode accompanying the facilitated charge transfer kinetics at the electrode/electrolyte interface

  2. Direct heterogeneous electron transfer of theophylline oxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Christenson, Andreas; Dock, Eva; Gorton, Lo; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas

    2004-01-01

    Direct electron transfer (DET) was shown between the heme containing enzyme theophylline oxidase (ThO) and the surface of both graphite and gold electrodes. As proof on graphite a steady state current for theophylline was recorded using the electrode modified with adsorbed ThO. The electrode showed a Michaelis–Menten-like response to theophylline with a detection limit of 0.2 mM and a Michaelis–Menten constant equal to 3.2 mM. These initial results open up a possibility for the development of...

  3. An approach for an advanced anode interfacial layer with electron-blocking ability to achieve high-efficiency organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Jun-Seok; Yun, Jin-Mun; Kang, Minji; Khim, Dongyoon; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Seok-Soon; Na, Seok-In; Kim, Dong-Yu

    2014-11-26

    The interfacial properties of PEDOT:PSS, pristine r-GO, and r-GO with sulfonic acid (SR-GO) in organic photovoltaic are investigated to elucidate electron-blocking property of PEDOT:PSS anode interfacial layer (AIL), and to explore the possibility of r-GO as electron-blocking layers. The SR-GO results in an optimized power conversion efficiency of 7.54% for PTB7-th:PC71BM and 5.64% for P3HT:IC61BA systems. By combining analyses of capacitance-voltage and photovoltaic-parameters dependence on light intensity, it is found that recombination process at SR-GO/active film is minimized. In contrast, the devices using r-GO without sulfonic acid show trap-assisted recombination. The enhanced electron-blocking properties in PEDOT:PSS and SR-GO AILs can be attributed to surface dipoles at AIL/acceptor. Thus, for electron-blocking, the AIL/acceptor interface should be importantly considered in OPVs. Also, by simply introducing sulfonic acid unit on r-GO, excellent contact selectivity can be realized in OPVs. PMID:25343490

  4. Quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process in Lorentzian plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process between a positive ion and a neutral atom collision is investigated in nonthermal generalized Lorentzian plasmas. The result shows that the nonthermal effect enhances the resonant electron transfer cross section in Lorentzian plasmas. It is found that the nonthermal effect on the classical resonant electron transfer cross section is more significant than that on the quantum tunneling resonant charge transfer cross section. It is shown that the nonthermal effect on the resonant electron transfer cross section decreases with an increase of the Debye length. In addition, the nonthermal effect on the quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer cross section decreases with increasing collision energy. The variation of nonthermal and plasma shielding effects on the quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process is also discussed

  5. Electron transfer pathways in microbial oxygen biocathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freguia, Stefano, E-mail: stefano@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan); Tsujimura, Seiya, E-mail: seiya@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan); Kano, Kenji, E-mail: kkano@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    The ability of some bacteria to enhance the rate of cathodic oxygen reduction to water has been recently discovered, opening the way to an entirely renewable and environmentally friendly concept of biocathode. In this study we reveal that several mechanisms may induce catalytic effects by bacteria. These comprise mechanisms that are putatively beneficial to the bacteria as well as mechanisms which are merely side effects, including quinone autoxidation and direct O{sub 2} reduction by heme compounds. Here we showed that 1 muM of ACNQ is able to generate a significant catalytic wave for oxygen reduction, with onset at approximately 0 V vs. SHE. Similarly, adsorption of hemin on a carbon surface catalyses O{sub 2} reduction to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with an onset of +0.2 V vs. SHE. To evaluate the catalytic pathways of live cells on cathodic oxygen reduction, two species of electrochemically active bacteria were selected as pure cultures, namely Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Shewanella putrefaciens. The former appears to exploit a self-excreted redox compound with redox characteristics matching those of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) for extracellular electron transfer. The latter appears to utilise outer membrane-bound redox compounds. Interaction of quinones and cytochromes with the membrane-bound electron transfer chain is yet to be proven.

  6. Transfer line TT70 (electrons from PS to SPS)

    CERN Multimedia

    1981-01-01

    As injectors for LEP, PS and SPS had to be converted to the acceleration of electrons and positrons. So far, only positively charged particles had been transferred from the PS to the SPS, for the negatively charged electrons a new transfer line, TT70, had to be built. Due to the difference in level of the two machines, the transfer line slopes and tilts.

  7. Proton transfer across a liquid/liquid interface facilitated by phospholipid interfacial films.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holub, Karel; Jänchenová, Hana; Štulík, Karel; Mare?ek, Vladimír

    Ústí nad Labem : BEST servis, 2010 - (Navrátil, T.; Barek, J.), s. 70-72 ISBN 978-80-254-6710-7. [Modern Electroanalytical Methods /30./. Jet?ichovice (CZ), 24.05.2010-28.05.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ?R IAA400400806; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : liquid-liquid interface * proton transfer * phospholipid layers Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  8. Study on interfacial heat transfer coefficient at metal/die interface during high pressure die casting process of AZ91D alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUO Zhi-peng

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The high pressure die casting (HPDC process is one of the fastest growing and most efficient methods for the production of complex shape castings of magnesium and aluminum alloys in today’s manufacturing industry.In this study, a high pressure die casting experiment using AZ91D magnesium alloy was conducted, and the temperature profiles inside the die were Measured. By using a computer program based on solving the inverse heat problem, the metal/die interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC was calculated and studied. The results show that the IHTC between the metal and die increases right after the liquid metal is brought into the cavity by the plunger,and decreases as the solidification process of the liquid metal proceeds until the liquid metal is completely solidified,when the IHTC tends to be stable. The interfacial heat transfer coefficient shows different characteristics under different casting wall thicknesses and varies with the change of solidification behavior.

  9. Studies of interfacial heat transfer resistances and characterization of strip microstructures for Al-Mg alloys cast on a single belt casting simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interfacial heat transfer resistances during the solidification of aluminum-magnesium alloy strips were measured using the IHCP (Inverse Heat Conduction Problem) method. For these experiments, a small simulator of a single belt caster was used and interfacial heat fluxes and heat transfer coefficients were obtained assuming unidirectional heat flow. The influence of thermophysical properties of substrate, melt superheat and roughness of substrates on strip microstructures in the longitudinal and transverse directions were also investigated. Experimental studies revealed that low superheats (? 2 oC) produced finer grain sizes (?40?m) and homogeneous microstructures were obtained. High thermal conductivity substrates such as copper resulted in strips that were more uniform in thickness and had improved surface quality. It was also found that there was a critical substrate roughness which provided more nucleation sites at the metal/substrate interface resulting in a fine grain distribution throughout the strip produced. (author)

  10. Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Charge and Excitation Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piotr Piotrowiak

    2004-09-28

    We report the and/or state of several subprojects of our DOE sponsored research on Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Electron and Excitation Transfer: (1) Construction of an ultrafast Ti:sapphire amplifier. (2) Mediation of electronic interactions in host-guest molecules. (3) Theoretical models of electrolytes in weakly polar media. (4) Symmetry effects in intramolecular excitation transfer.

  11. Analytical model for rates of electron attachment and intramolecular electron transfer in electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Jack

    2010-05-26

    A new physical model is put forth to allow the prediction of electron transfer rates and distances for (i) intramolecular transfer from an n > or = 3 Rydberg orbital on a positive site to a disulfide or amide bond site and (ii) intermolecular transfer from an anion donor to an n > or = 3 Rydberg orbital of a positively charged polypeptide. Although ab initio methods have proven capable of handling such electron transfer events when the Rydberg orbital has principal quantum number n = 3, they have proven to be incapable of handling Rydberg states having quantum number n > 3, so having a new tool capable of handling n > 3 Rydberg states is important. The model (i) focuses on each Rydberg orbital's large peak of high amplitude, (ii) approximates the electron density within this peak as constant within a radial shell characterized by a radius and thickness T both of which depend on the quantum number n, and (iii) assumes that strong coupling (either with an orbital of an anion donor or to a disulfide sigma* or a backbone amide pi* orbital) occurs when the valence orbital penetrates fully within the radial shell of the Rydberg orbital. These assumptions permit a derivation of the ratios of rates of electron transfer for n > 3 to those for n = 3. Combining these ratios with ab initio rates for n = 3 allows one to make rate predictions for inter- and intramolecular electron transfer involving Rydberg orbitals appropriate to the electron transfer dissociation process. One important prediction of this model is that the combination of large-penetration and Landau-Zener surface-crossing conditions places very severe limitations on which Rydberg levels can initially be populated in electron transfer dissociation. Another prediction is that a Rydberg orbital of a given principal quantum number n has a limited range of distances over which it can transfer an electron; sigma* or pi* orbitals either too far from or too close to a given Rydberg orbital cannot accept an electron from that orbital. PMID:20438123

  12. Direct electron transfer based enzymatic fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this mini-review we briefly describe some historical developments made in the field of enzymatic fuel cells (FCs), discussing important design considerations taken when constructing mediator-, cofactor-, and membrane-less biological FCs (BFCs). Since the topic is rather extensive, only BFCs utilizing direct electron transfer (DET) reactions on both the anodic and cathodic sides are considered. Moreover, the performance of mostly glucose/oxygen biodevices is analyzed and compared. We also present some unpublished results on mediator-, cofactor-, and membrane-less glucose/oxygen BFCs recently designed in our group and tested in different human physiological fluids, such as blood, plasma, saliva, and tears. Finally, further perspectives for BFC applications are highlighted.

  13. Plugging in or going wireless: strategies for interspecies electron transfer

    OpenAIRE

    PravinMallaShrestha; Amelia-ElenaRotaru

    2014-01-01

    Interspecies exchange of electrons enables a diversity of microbial communities to gain energy from reactions that no one microbe can catalyze. The first recognized strategies for interspecies electron transfer were those that relied on chemical intermediates that are recycled through oxidized and reduced forms. Well-studied examples are interspecies H2 transfer and the cycling of sulfur intermediates in anaerobic photosynthetic communities. Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in whi...

  14. Sandwiched confinement of quantum dots in graphene matrix for efficient electron transfer and photocurrent production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Nan; Zheng, Kaibo; Karki, Khadga J; Abdellah, Mohamed; Zhu, Qiushi; Carlson, Stefan; Haase, Dörthe; Žídek, Karel; Ulstrup, Jens; Canton, Sophie E; Pullerits, Tõnu; Chi, Qijin

    2015-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) and graphene are both promising materials for the development of new-generation optoelectronic devices. Towards this end, synergic assembly of these two building blocks is a key step but remains a challenge. Here, we show a one-step strategy for organizing QDs in a graphene matrix via interfacial self-assembly, leading to the formation of sandwiched hybrid QD-graphene nanofilms. We have explored structural features, electron transfer kinetics and photocurrent generation capacity of such hybrid nanofilms using a wide variety of advanced techniques. Graphene nanosheets interlink QDs and significantly improve electronic coupling, resulting in fast electron transfer from photoexcited QDs to graphene with a rate constant of 1.3 × 10(9) s(-1). Efficient electron transfer dramatically enhances photocurrent generation in a liquid-junction QD-sensitized solar cell where the hybrid nanofilm acts as a photoanode. We thereby demonstrate a cost-effective method to construct large-area QD-graphene hybrid nanofilms with straightforward scale-up potential for optoelectronic applications. PMID:25996307

  15. Sandwiched confinement of quantum dots in graphene matrix for efficient electron transfer and photocurrent production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Nan; Zheng, Kaibo

    2015-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) and graphene are both promising materials for the development of new-generation optoelectronic devices. Towards this end, synergic assembly of these two building blocks is a key step but remains a challenge. Here, we show a one-step strategy for organizing QDs in a graphene matrix via interfacial self-assembly, leading to the formation of sandwiched hybrid QD-graphene nanofilms. We have explored structural features, electron transfer kinetics and photocurrent generation capacity of such hybrid nanofilms using a wide variety of advanced techniques. Graphene nanosheets interlink QDs and significantly improve electronic coupling, resulting in fast electron transfer from photoexcited QDs to graphene with a rate constant of 1.3?×?109 s?1. Efficient electron transfer dramatically enhances photocurrent generation in a liquid-junction QD-sensitized solar cell where the hybrid nanofilm acts as a photoanode. We thereby demonstrate a cost-effective method to construct large-area QD-graphene hybrid nanofilms with straightforward scale-up potential for optoelectronic applications.

  16. Sandwiched confinement of quantum dots in graphene matrix for efficient electron transfer and photocurrent production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Nan; Zheng, Kaibo; Karki, Khadga J.; Abdellah, Mohamed; Zhu, Qiushi; Carlson, Stefan; Haase, Dörthe; Žídek, Karel; Ulstrup, Jens; Canton, Sophie E.; Pullerits, Tõnu; Chi, Qijin

    2015-05-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) and graphene are both promising materials for the development of new-generation optoelectronic devices. Towards this end, synergic assembly of these two building blocks is a key step but remains a challenge. Here, we show a one-step strategy for organizing QDs in a graphene matrix via interfacial self-assembly, leading to the formation of sandwiched hybrid QD-graphene nanofilms. We have explored structural features, electron transfer kinetics and photocurrent generation capacity of such hybrid nanofilms using a wide variety of advanced techniques. Graphene nanosheets interlink QDs and significantly improve electronic coupling, resulting in fast electron transfer from photoexcited QDs to graphene with a rate constant of 1.3?×?109 s-1. Efficient electron transfer dramatically enhances photocurrent generation in a liquid-junction QD-sensitized solar cell where the hybrid nanofilm acts as a photoanode. We thereby demonstrate a cost-effective method to construct large-area QD-graphene hybrid nanofilms with straightforward scale-up potential for optoelectronic applications.

  17. Electron transfer reactions of metal complexes in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A few representative electron-transfer reactions are selected and their kinetic parameters compared with the predictions of activated complex models. Since Taube has presented an elegant treatment of intramolecular electron-transfer reactions, emphasis is on bimolecular reactions. The latter electron-transfer reactions are more complicated to treat theoretically since the geometries of their activated complexes are not as well known as for the intramolecular case. In addition in biomolecular reactions, the work required to bring the two reactants together needs to be calculated. Since both reactants generally carry charges this presents a non-trivial problem at the ionic strengths usually used to study bimolecular electron transfer

  18. Interfacial electronic transport phenomena in single crystalline Fe-MgO-Fe thin barrier junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangineni, R. B., E-mail: rameshg.phy@pondiuni.edu.in [Department of Physics, School of Physical, Chemical and Applied Sciences, Pondicherry University, R. V. Nagar, Kalapet, Pondicherry 605 014 (India); SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CEA/CNRS/UJF-Grenoble 1/Grenoble INP, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex (France); Bellouard, C., E-mail: christine.bellouard@ijl.nancy-universite.fr; Duluard, A. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Negulescu, B. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); UFR de Sciences et Techniques, Matériaux, microélectronique, acoustique, nanotechnologies (GREMAN), University François Rabelais, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); Baraduc, C.; Gaudin, G. [SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CEA/CNRS/UJF-Grenoble 1/Grenoble INP, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex (France); Tiusan, C., E-mail: coriolan.tiusan@phys.utcluj.ro [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Department of Physics and Chemistry, Center of Superconductivity, Spintronics and Surface Science, Technical University of Cluj Napoca, Str. Memorandumului No. 28, RO-400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2014-05-05

    Spin filtering effects in nano-pillars of Fe-MgO-Fe single crystalline magnetic tunnel junctions are explored with two different sample architectures and thin MgO barriers (thickness: 3–8 monolayers). The two architectures, with different growth and annealing conditions of the bottom electrode, allow tuning the quality of the bottom Fe/MgO interface. As a result, an interfacial resonance states (IRS) is observed or not depending on this interface quality. The IRS contribution, observed by spin polarized tunnel spectroscopy, is analyzed as a function of the MgO barrier thickness. Our experimental findings agree with theoretical predictions concerning the symmetry of the low energy (0.2?eV) interfacial resonance states: a mixture of ?{sub 1}-like and ?{sub 5}-like symmetries.

  19. 77 FR 71035 - Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-28

    ...Collection of Information: Electronic Funds Transfer...on a continuing information collection. By...concerning the ``Electronic Funds Transfer...collection of information described below: Title: Electronic Funds...

  20. 77 FR 22066 - Proposed Collection of Information: “Notice of Reclamation Electronic Funds Transfer, Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    ...Collection of Information: ``Notice of Reclamation Electronic Funds Transfer...continuing information collection...Reclamation. Electronic Funds Transfer...collection of information described...Reclamation, Electronic Funds...

  1. Vectorial electron transfer in spatially ordered arrays. Progress report, August 1994--January 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    With DOE support from August 1994 to August 1997, this project sought to identify methods for controlled placement of light absorbers, relays, and multielectron catalysts at defined sites from a fixed semiconductor or metal surface and, thus, to develop methods for preparing chemically modified photoactive surfaces as artificial photosynthetic units. These designed materials have been evaluated as efficient light collection devices and as substrates for defining the key features that govern the efficiency of long distance electron transfer and energy migration. The authors have synthesized several different families of integrated chemical systems as soluble arrays, as solid thin films, and as adsorbates on solid electrodes, seeking to establish how spatial definition deriving from covalent attachment to a helical polymer backbone, from self assembly of functionalized tethers on gold or metal oxide surfaces, and from rigid or layered block polymers can lead to controlled electron and energy transfer. The authors have also conducted physical characterization of semiconductor-containing composites active in controlled interfacial electron transfer, with charge transport in these materials having been evaluated by photophysical and electrochemical methods.

  2. Electromagnetically induced electron transfer between quantum dots via conduction band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Stark-like mechanism of electron transfer between quantum dots under the influence of electromagnetic field is considered. Analytical estimations and numerical simulation results clarifying the special role of conduction band are adduced. Two-photon mechanism of electron transfer between quantum dots via conduction band is suggested

  3. Photoinduced Electron-transfer Reaction of Pentafluoroiodobenzene with Alkenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Yun Chen

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Irradiation of pentafluoroiodobenzene and alkenes gave the corresponding adducts. The presence of single electron-transfer scavengers, (p-dinitrobenzene and t-Bu2NO and the free radical inhibitor (hydroquinone suppressed the reaction. A photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism is proposed.

  4. Computer Simulation of Electron Transfer at Hematite Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics simulations in combination with ab initio calculations were carried out to determine the rate of electron transfer in bulk hematite (?-Fe2O3) and at two low-index surfaces, namely the (012) and (001) surfaces. The electron transfer reactions considered here involve the II/III valence interchange between nearest-neighbor iron atoms. Two electron transfer directions were investigated namely the basal plane and c direction charge transfers. Electron transfer rates obtained in bulk hematite were in good agreement with ab initio electronic structure calculations thus validating the potential model. The surfaces were considered both in vacuum and in contact with an equilibrated aqueous solution. The reorganization energy is found to increase significantly at the first surface layer and this value is little affected by the presence of water. In addition, in the case of the (012) surface, the electronic coupling matrix element for the topmost basal plane transfer was calculated at the Hartree-Fock level and was found to be weak compared to the corresponding charge transfer in the bulk. Therefore, most surfaces show a decrease in the rate of charge transfer at the surface. However, where iron atoms involved in the charge transfer reaction are directly coordinated to water molecules, water lowers the free energy of activation to a great extent and provides a large driving force for electrons to diffuse toward the bulk thus opposing the intrinsic surface effect. The surfaces considered in this work show different charge transfer properties. Hematite has been shown to exhibit anisotropic conductivity and thus different surfaces will show different intra- and inter-layer rates depending on their orientation. Moreover, the calculations of charge transfers at the hydroxyl- and iron-terminated (001) surfaces revealed that surface termination has a significant effect on the charge transfer parameters in the vicinity of the surface. Finally, our findings indicate that undercoordinated terminal iron atoms could act as electron traps at the surface

  5. Electronic transfer of sensitive patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detterbeck, A M W; Kaiser, J; Hirschfelder, U

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop decision-making aids and recommendations for dental practitioners regarding the utilization and sharing of sensitive digital patient data. In the current environment of growing digitization, healthcare professionals need detailed knowledge of secure data management to maximize confidentiality and minimize the risks involved in both archiving patient data and sharing it through electronic channels. Despite well-defined legal requirements, an all-inclusive technological solution does not currently exist. The need for a preliminary review and critical appraisal of common practices of data transfer prompted a search of the literature and the Web to identify viable methods of secure data exchange and to develop a flowchart. A strong focus was placed on the transmission of datasets both smaller than and larger than 10 MB, and on secure communication by smartphone. Although encryption of patient-related data should be routine, it is often difficult to implement. Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) and Secure/Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (S/MIME) are viable standards for secure e-mail encryption. Sharing of high-volume data should be accomplished with the help of file encryption. Careful handling of sensitive patient data is mandatory, and it is the end-user's responsibility to meet any requirements for encryption, preferably by using free, open-source (and hence transparent) software. PMID:25911828

  6. Quantum coherent contributions in biological electron transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Dorner, Ross; Heaney, Libby; Farrow, Tristan; Roberts, Philippa G; Hirst, Judy; Vedral, Vlatko

    2011-01-01

    Many biological electron transfer (ET) reactions are mediated by metal centres in proteins. NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) contains an intramolecular chain of seven iron-sulphur (FeS) clusters, one of the longest chains of metal centres in biology and a test case for physical models of intramolecular ET. In biology, intramolecular ET is commonly described as a diffusive hopping process, according to the semi-classical theories of Marcus and Hopfield. However, recent studies have raised the possibility that non-trivial quantum mechanical effects play a functioning role in certain biomolecular processes. Here, we extend the semi-classical model for biological ET to incorporate both semi-classical and coherent quantum phenomena using a quantum master equation based on the Holstein Hamiltonian. We test our model on the structurally-defined chain of FeS clusters in complex I. By exploring a wide range of realistic parameters we and that, when the energy profile for ET along the chain is relatively at, ...

  7. Electron Transfer Dissociation of Milk Oligosaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Liang; Costello, Catherine E.

    2011-06-01

    For structural identification of glycans, the classic collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra are dominated by product ions that derived from glycosidic cleavages, which provide only sequence information. The peaks from cross-ring fragmentation are often absent or have very low abundances in such spectra. Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) is being applied to structural identification of carbohydrates for the first time, and results in some new and detailed information for glycan structural studies. A series of linear milk sugars was analyzed by a variety of fragmentation techniques such as MS/MS by CID and ETD, and MS3 by sequential CID/CID, CID/ETD, and ETD/CID. In CID spectra, the detected peaks were mainly generated via glycosidic cleavages. By comparison, ETD generated various types of abundant cross-ring cleavage ions. These complementary cross-ring cleavages clarified the different linkage types and branching patterns of the representative milk sugar samples. The utilization of different MS3 techniques made it possible to verify initial assignments and to detect the presence of multiple components in isobaric peaks. Fragment ion structures and pathways could be proposed to facilitate the interpretation of carbohydrate ETD spectra, and the main mechanisms were investigated. ETD should contribute substantially to confident structural analysis of a wide variety of oligosaccharides.

  8. Influence of the electron-phonon interfacial conductance on the thermal transport at metal/dielectric interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, J; Detcheverry, F; Merabia, S

    2015-01-14

    Thermal boundary conductance at a metal-dielectric interface is a quantity of prime importance for heat management at the nanoscale. While the boundary conductance is usually ascribed to the coupling between metal phonons and dielectric phonons, in this work we examine the influence of a direct coupling between the metal electrons and the dielectric phonons. The effect of electron-phonon processes is generally believed to be resistive and tends to decrease the overall thermal boundary conductance as compared to the phonon-phonon conductance ?(p). Here, we find that the effect of a direct electron-phonon interfacial coupling ?(e) is to enhance the effective thermal conductance between the metal and the dielectric. Resistive effects turn out to be important only for thin films of metals that have a low electron-phonon coupling strength. Two approaches are explored to reach these conclusions. First, we present an analytical solution of the two-temperature model to compute the effective conductance which accounts for all the relevant energy channels, as a function of ?(e), ?(p) and the electron-phonon coupling factor G. Second, we use numerical resolution to examine the influence of ?(e) on two realistic cases: a gold film on silicon or silica substrates. We point out the implications for the interpretation of time-resolved thermoreflectance experiments. PMID:25425559

  9. Computational Approach to Electron Charge Transfer Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Elvar Örn

    2013-01-01

    The step from ab initio atomic and molecular properties to thermodynamic - or macroscopic - properties requires the combination of several theoretical tools. This dissertation presents constant temperature molecular dynamics with bond length constraints, a hybrid quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics scheme, and tools to analyse statistical data and generate relative free energies and free energy surfaces. The methodology is applied to several charge transfer species and reactions in chemical environments - chemical in the sense that solvent, counter ions and substrate surfaces are taken in to account - which directly influence the reactants and resulting reaction through both physical and chemical interactions. All methods are though general and can be applied to different types of chemistry. First, the basis of the various theoretical tools is presented and applied to several test systems to show general (or expected) properties. Properties such as in the physical and (semi-)chemical interface between classical and quantum systems and the effects of molecular bond length constraints on the temperature during simulations. As a second step the methodology is applied to the symmetric and asymmetric charge transfer reactions between several first-row transition metals in water. The results are compared to experiments and rationalised with classical analytic expressions. Shortcomings of the methods are accounted for with clear steps towards improved accuracy. Later the analysis is extended to more complex systems composed of a larger osmium complex in solution and at the solute-substrate interfaces, where in particular the redox state of the complex is controlled through chemical means. The efficiency of the hybrid-classical and quantum mechanics method is used to generate adequate statistics and a simple post-sampling scheme used to generate free energy surfaces - which compare to full ab initio calculations. In the last part both the molecular dynamics and hybrid classical and quantum mechanics method are used to generate a vast data set for the accurate analysis of dynamical structure modes. This is for a large iridium-iridium dimer complex which shows a dramatic structural (and vibrational) change upon electronic excitation.

  10. A Simple Marcus-Theory Type Model for Hydrogen Atom Transfer/Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    MAYER, JAMES M.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen atom transfer reactions are the simplest class of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes. These reactions involve transfer of one electron and one proton from one reagent to another, in the same kinetic step: XH + Y ? X + HY. A predictive model for these reactions based on the Marcus cross relation is described. The model predicts rate constants within one or two orders of magnitude in most cases, over a very wide range of reactants and solvents. This remarkable result imp...

  11. Electronic Transport properties of SET and REST states of interfacial phase-change memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hisao; Tominaga, Junji; Asai, Yoshihiro; Rungger, Ivan; Narayan, Awadhesh; Sanvito, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    The phase change memory (PCM) is one of most promising nonvolatile information storage technologies. Recently, the superlattice structure of GeTe/Sb2Te3 is proposed as PCM to reduce the restive switching energy. This PCM is called interfacial PCM (iPCM) and it is considered that SET and RESET states are realized only by the flip-flop transition of Ge atoms in crystal phase because of small loss of entropy. Furthermore, the GeTe is sandwiched by Sb2Te3 topological insulator. In this study, we performed the first principles electric transport calculations including spin-orbit interactions. We presents the mechanism of resistive switch by the transition of Ge atoms as well as the volume change effect and the role of spin-orbit interaction to resistance ration of SET and RESE states.

  12. A molecular shift register based on electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfield, J J; Onuchic, J N; Beratan, D N

    1988-08-12

    An electronic shift-register memory at the molecular level is described. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron-transfer molecules and the information is shifted by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. This device integrates designed electronic molecules onto a very large scale integrated (silicon microelectronic) substrate, providing an example of a "molecular electronic device" that could actually be made. The design requirements for such a device and possible synthetic strategies are discussed. Devices along these lines should have lower energy usage and enhanced storage density. PMID:17829175

  13. Electron transfer in SmHfCo alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rare-earth electron-transfer concept in the rare-earth--transition-metal compounds was evaluated for the binary compounds Sm2Co17 and Sm1Co5 from published data. The cobalt moment was found to be consistent with a two-transferred-electron rigid-band model. These results were verified by saturation magnetization measurements on the mixed-valence pseudobinary Sm/sub 2(1-x)/Hf/sub 2x/Co17 alloys where the moment per cobalt atom was consistent with a tetravalent-hafnium divalent-samarium electron-transfer mechanism

  14. Long-range protein electron transfer observed at the single-molecule level: In situ mapping of redox-gated tunneling resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Farver, O; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    A biomimetic long-range electron transfer (ET) system consisting of the blue copper protein azurin, a tunneling barrier bridge, and a gold single-crystal electrode was designed on the basis of molecular wiring self-assembly principles. This system is sufficiently stable and sensitive in a quasi-biological environment, suitable for detailed observations of long-range protein interfacial ET at the nanoscale and single-molecule levels. Because azurin is located at clearly identifiable fixed sites i...

  15. Freezing hot electrons. Electron transfer and solvation dynamics at D{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3}-metal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staehler, A.J.

    2007-05-15

    The present work investigates the electron transfer and solvation dynamics at the D{sub 2}O/Cu(111), D{sub 2}O/Ru(001), and NH{sub 3}/Cu(111) interfaces using femtosecond time-resolved two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy. Within this framework, the influence of the substrate, adsorbate structure and morphology, solvation site, coverage, temperature, and solvent on the electron dynamics are studied, yielding microscopic insight into the underlying fundamental processes. Transitions between different regimes of ET, substrate-dominated, barrier-determined, strong, and weak coupling are observed by systematic variation of the interfacial properties and development of empirical model descriptions. It is shown that the fundamental steps of the interfacial electron dynamics are similar for all investigated systems: Metal electrons are photoexcited to unoccupied metal states and transferred into the adlayer via the adsorbate's conduction band. The electrons localize at favorable sites and are stabilized by reorientations of the surrounding polar solvent molecules. Concurrently, they decay back two the metal substrate, as it offers a continuum of unoccupied states. However, the detailed characteristics vary for the different investigated interfaces: For amorphous ice-metal interfaces, the electron transfer is initially, right after photoinjection, dominated by the substrate's electronic surface band structure. With increasing solvation, a transient barrier evolves at the interface that increasingly screens the electrons from the substrate. Tunneling through this barrier becomes the rate-limiting step for ET. The competition of electron decay and solvation leads to lifetimes of the solvated electrons in the order of 100 fs. Furthermore, it is shown that the electrons bind in the bulk of the ice layers, but on the edges of adsorbed D{sub 2}O clusters and that the ice morphology strongly influences the electron dynamics. For the amorphous NH{sub 3}/Cu(111) interface, two isomers of solvated electrons are found. One exhibits electron dynamics on femtosecond, the other one on picosecond timescales. A similar transition between ET regimes is observed as for ice, but, furthermore, it is shown that - depending on layer thickness - the weak coupling limit is reached, where ET is mediated by thermally activated rearrangement of the solvent. Upon crystallization, the electron dynamics change significantly. Instead of femto- or picoseconds, the electrons reside for minutes in the adlayer. The observation of their formation dynamics allows analysis of their energetic stabilization over 17 orders of magnitude in time. It is shown that their high degree of screening is achieved by localization at orientational defects at the adsorbate-vacuum interface. (orig.)

  16. 76 FR 35219 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; Payment by Electronic Fund Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ...Regulation; Information Collection; Payment by Electronic Fund Transfer...previously approved information collection...payment by electronic fund transfer...contract by electronic fund transfer (EFT). The information necessary...

  17. 48 CFR 52.232-38 - Submission of Electronic Funds Transfer Information with Offer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...false Submission of Electronic Funds Transfer Information with Offer. 52...232-38 Submission of Electronic Funds Transfer Information with Offer. As... Submission of Electronic Funds Transfer Information With Offer...

  18. 76 FR 709 - Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ...Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes; Correction AGENCY: Internal...guidance relating to Federal tax deposits (FTDs) by Electronic...202) 622-4910 (not a toll-free number). SUPPLEMENTARY...Subjects 26 CFR Part 40 Excise taxes, Reporting and...

  19. Combining UV photodissociation with electron transfer for peptide structure analysis.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shaffer, C. J.; Marek, Aleš; Pepin, R.; Slováková, K.; Ture?ek, F.

    2015-01-01

    Ro?. 50, ?. 3 (2015), s. 470-475. ISSN 1076-5174 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : electron transfer dissociation * laser photodissociation * peptide ions * cation radical * chromophores * isomer distinction Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.379, year: 2014

  20. Electron-Transfer Acceleration Investigated by Time Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vl?ek Jr., Antonín; Kvapilová, Hana; Towrie, M.; Záliš, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Ro?. 48, ?. 3 (2015), s. 868-876. ISSN 0001-4842 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : electron transfer * infrared spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 22.323, year: 2014

  1. Theoretical aspects of electron transfer reactions of complex molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2001-01-01

    Features of electron transfer involving complex molecules are discussed. This notion presently refers to molecular reactants where charge transfer is accompanied by large molecular reorganization, and commonly used displaced harmonic oscillator models do not apply. It is shown that comprehensive theory of charge transfer in polar media offers convenient tools for the treatment of experimental data for such systems, with due account of large-amplitude strongly anharmonic intramolecular reorganiza...

  2. Frontier orbital symmetry control of intermolecular electron transfer. Final report, September 15, 1988--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, B.

    1997-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics: the recovery of intermolecular transfer parameters from fluorescence quenching in liquids; photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer in flexible donor/space/acceptor systems containing an extended unsaturated spacer; electron transfer sensitized reaction; the recovery of solute and fractal dimensions from electron transfer quenching data; and frontier orbital symmetry control of back electron transfer.

  3. A study of the dispersed flow interfacial heat transfer model of RELAP5/MOD2.5 and RELAP5/MOD3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreani, M. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Analytis, G.T.; Aksan, S.N. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-09-01

    The model of interfacial heat transfer for the dispersed flow regime used in the RELAP5 computer codes is investigated in the present paper. Short-transient calculations of two low flooding rate tube reflooding experiments have been performed, where the hydraulic conditions and the heat input to the vapour in the post-dryout region were controlled for the predetermined position of the quench front. Both RELAP5/MOD2.5 and RELAP5/MOD3 substantially underpredicted the exit vapour temperature. The mass flow rate and quality, however, were correct and the heat input to the vapour was larger than the actual one. As the vapour superheat at the tube exit depends on the balance between the heat input from the wall and the heat exchange with the droplets, the discrepancy between the calculated and the measured exit vapour temperature suggested that the inability of both codes to predict the vapour superheat in the dispersed flow region is due to the overprediction of the interfacial heat transfer rate.

  4. Theory of interrelated electron and proton transfer processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    A simple theory of elementary act of interrelated reactions of electron and proton transfer is developed. Mechanisms of synchronous and multistage transfer and coherent transitions via a dynamically populated intermediate state are discussed. Formulas for rate constants of adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions are derived.

  5. Transcriptomic and genetic analysis of direct interspecies electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Summers, Zarath M; Shrestha, Minita; Liu, Fanghua; Lovley, Derek R

    2013-01-01

    The possibility that metatranscriptomic analysis could distinguish between direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) and H2 interspecies transfer (HIT) in anaerobic communities was investigated by comparing gene transcript abundance in cocultures in which Geobacter sulfurreducens was the electron-accepting partner for either Geobacter metallireducens, which performs DIET, or Pelobacter carbinolicus, which relies on HIT. Transcript abundance for G. sulfurreducens uptake hydrogenase genes was 7...

  6. A kinetic model for evaluating the dependence of the quantum yield of nano-TiO{sub 2} based photocatalysis on light intensity, grain size, carrier lifetime, and minority carrier diffusion coefficient: Indirect interfacial charge transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Baoshun, E-mail: liubaoshun@126.co [Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China) and School of Material Science and Technology, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Zhao Xiujian [Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China)

    2010-04-30

    A model based on spherical TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was developed to study heterogeneous photocatalysis based on TiO{sub 2} in the case of indirect interfacial charge transfer. In this model, the effect of light intensity (I{sub 0}), grain size (r{sub 0}), carrier lifetime (tau{sub p}), and minority carrier diffusion coefficient (D{sub p}) on the quantum yield (QY) of photocatalytic reactions was investigated in detail. Under conditions of sufficiently low incident-light intensity, the QY was found to be propor toI{sub 0}, while it decreased rapidly with an increase in I{sub 0}. In addition, the QY went to zero at a critically high light intensity. Furthermore, the QY was found to decrease with increasing r{sub 0} due to the bulk-recombination loss, and the effect of r{sub 0} on the QY became increasingly stronger with the increase in I{sub 0}. The QY decreased with the decrease in tau{sub p} and D{sub p}, which was more apparent at the critically high I{sub 0}. Under conditions of low [(RH{sub 2}){sub aq}], the QY increased with an increase in [(RH{sub 2}){sub aq}], while it remained nearly constant at high [(RH{sub 2}){sub aq}] due to the fact that the photoinduced electron interfacial transfer became the limiting step for photocatalytic reactions in the case of high [(RH{sub 2}){sub aq}].

  7. Structural and interfacial characteristics of thin (2 films grown by electron cyclotron resonance plasma oxidation on [100] Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of fabricating ultra-thin SiO2 films on the order of a few nanometer thickness has been demonstrated. SiO2 thin films of approximately 7 nm thickness have been produced by ion flux-controlled Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasma oxidation at low temperature on [100] Si substrates, in reproducible fashion. Electrical measurements of these films indicate that they have characteristics comparable to those of thermally grown oxides. The thickness of the films was determined by ellipsometry, and further confirmed by cross-sectional High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. Comparison between the ECR and the thermal oxide films shows that the ECR films are uniform and continuous over at least a few microns in lateral direction, similar to the thermal oxide films grown at comparable thickness. In addition, HRTEM images reveal a thin (1--1.5 nm) crystalline interfacial layer between the ECR film and the [100] substrate. Thinner oxide films of approximately 5 nm thickness have also been attempted, but so far have resulted in nonuniform coverage. Reproducibility at this thickness is difficult to achieve

  8. Electronic reorganization triggered by electron transfer: the intervalence charge transfer of a Fe³?/Fe²? bimetallic complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Alex; Angeli, Celestino; de Graaf, Coen; Robert, Vincent

    2015-04-30

    The key role of the molecular orbitals in describing electron transfer processes is put in evidence for the intervalence charge transfer (IVCT) of a synthetic nonheme binuclear mixed-valence Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) compound. The electronic reorganization induced by the IVCT can be quantified by controlling the adaptation of the molecular orbitals to the charge transfer process. We evaluate the transition energy and its polarization effects on the molecular orbitals by means of ab initio calculations. The resulting energetic profile of the IVCT shows strong similarities to the Marcus' model, suggesting a response behaviour of the ensemble of electrons analogue to that of the solvent. We quantify the extent of the electronic reorganization induced by the IVCT process to be 11.74 eV, a very large effect that induces the crossing of states reducing the total energy of the transfer to 0.89 eV. PMID:25739890

  9. Determining the effect of solid and liquid vectors on the gaseous interfacial area and oxygen transfer rates in two-phase partitioning bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quijano, Guillermo [Departmento de Ingenieria Quimica y Tecnologia del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo del Prado de la Magdalena, s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Departamento de Biotecnologia y Bioingenieria, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios, Avanzados del IPN (Cinvestav), Apdo. Postal 14-740, 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Rocha-Rios, Jose [Departmento de Ingenieria Quimica y Tecnologia del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo del Prado de la Magdalena, s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica (IPH), Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Hernandez, Maria; Villaverde, Santiago [Departmento de Ingenieria Quimica y Tecnologia del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo del Prado de la Magdalena, s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Revah, Sergio [Departamento de Procesos y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, c/o IPH, UAM-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Munoz, Raul, E-mail: mutora@iq.uva.es [Departmento de Ingenieria Quimica y Tecnologia del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo del Prado de la Magdalena, s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Thalasso, Frederic [Departamento de Biotecnologia y Bioingenieria, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios, Avanzados del IPN (Cinvestav), Apdo. Postal 14-740, 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-03-15

    The effect of liquid and solid transfer vectors (silicone oil and Desmopan, respectively) on the gaseous interfacial area (a{sub g}) was evaluated in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) using fresh mineral salt medium and the cultivation broth of a toluene degradation culture (Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E cultures continuously cultivated with and without silicone oil at low toluene loading rates). Higher values of a{sub g} were recorded in the presence of both silicone oil and Desmopan compared to the values obtained in the absence of a vector, regardless of the aqueous medium tested (1.6 and 3 times higher, respectively, using fresh mineral salt medium). These improvements in a{sub g} were well correlated to the oxygen mass transfer enhancements supported by the vectors (1.3 and 2.5 for liquid and solid vectors, respectively, using fresh medium). In this context, oxygen transfer rates of 2.5 g O{sub 2} L{sup -1} h{sup -1} and 1.3 g O{sub 2} L{sup -1} h{sup -1} were recorded in the presence of Desmopan and silicone oil, respectively, which are in agreement with previously reported values in literature. These results suggest that mass transfer enhancements in TPPBs might correspond to an increase in a{sub g} rather than to the establishment of a high-performance gas/vector/water transfer pathway.

  10. Determining the effect of solid and liquid vectors on the gaseous interfacial area and oxygen transfer rates in two-phase partitioning bioreactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of liquid and solid transfer vectors (silicone oil and Desmopan, respectively) on the gaseous interfacial area (ag) was evaluated in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) using fresh mineral salt medium and the cultivation broth of a toluene degradation culture (Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E cultures continuously cultivated with and without silicone oil at low toluene loading rates). Higher values of ag were recorded in the presence of both silicone oil and Desmopan compared to the values obtained in the absence of a vector, regardless of the aqueous medium tested (1.6 and 3 times higher, respectively, using fresh mineral salt medium). These improvements in ag were well correlated to the oxygen mass transfer enhancements supported by the vectors (1.3 and 2.5 for liquid and solid vectors, respectively, using fresh medium). In this context, oxygen transfer rates of 2.5 g O2 L-1 h-1 and 1.3 g O2 L-1 h-1 were recorded in the presence of Desmopan and silicone oil, respectively, which are in agreement with previously reported values in literature. These results suggest that mass transfer enhancements in TPPBs might correspond to an increase in ag rather than to the establishment of a high-performance gas/vector/water transfer pathway.

  11. Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation of the Characteristics of Jute Fibers and the Interfacial Properties of Jute/PLA Green Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellulose-based natural fibers such as jute, knife and hemp have promising potential as a replacement for glass fibers in a polymer composite system because of their many advantages like natural abundance, low cost, light weight, biodegradability, carbon dioxide reduction in nature and acceptable mechanical properties. However, natural fibers need an appropriate surface treatment modifying their surface characteristics in order to effectively improve the interfacial properties as well as the mechanical and thermal properties. Electron beam irradiation technique is particularly interesting as it may offer the possibility to modify the surfaces and to enhance the properties of polymer materials such as fibers, films and composites. In addition, electron beam processing has a merit because it is a dry, solvent free and eco-friendly method with a fast throughput rate. In the present study, Jute fibers were irradiated at different dosages of electron beam from 10 to 100 kGy. The result was compared with raw jute fibers un-irradiated, showing the effect on the interfacial shear strength between jute fibers and PLA in terms of single fiber tensile property, fiber surface topology, and chemical composition occurring in jute fibers upon irradiation. It has been found that the surface topology and chemical characteristics of jute fibers significantly depended on the electron beam dosage irradiated, directly influencing the interfacial shear strength and interlaminar shear strength of jute-PLA green composites. It was concluded that electron beam irradiation played a contributing role not only in physically modifying the jute fiber surfaces but also in improving the interfacial properties between jute fibers and poly in the green composite, exhibiting the most effectiveness at a low electron beam energy of 10 kGy

  12. Electron Transfer Dissociation: Effects of Cation Charge State on Product Partitioning in Ion/Ion Electron Transfer to Multiply Protonated Polypeptides

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jian; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of cation charge state on product partitioning in the gas-phase ion/ion electron transfer reactions of multiply protonated tryptic peptides, model peptides, and relatively large peptides with singly charged radical anions has been examined. In particular, partitioning into various competing channels, such as proton transfer (PT) versus electron transfer (ET), electron transfer with subsequent dissociation (ETD) versus electron transfer with no dissociation (ET,noD), and fragmentati...

  13. Electron and proton transfer in chemistry and biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book constitutes the proceedings of an international meeting held in September 19-21, 1990, at Zentrum fuer Interdisziplinaere Forschung, Universitaet Bielefeld, Germany. It describes various aspects of electron and proton transfer in chemistry and biology. The book starts with a survey of physiochemical principles of electron transfer in the gas and the solid phase, with thermodynamic and photochemical driving force. Inner and outer sphere mechanisms and the coupling of electron transfer to nuclear rearrangements are reviewed. These principles are applied to construct artificial photosynthesis. This leads to biological electron transfer involving proteins with transition metal and/or organic redox centres. The tuning of the free energy profile on the reaction trajectory through the protein by single amino acids or by the larger ensemble that determines the electrostatic properties of the reaction path is one major issue. Another one is the transformation of one-electron to paired-electron steps with protection against hazardous radical intermediates. The diversity of electron transport systems is represented in some chapters with emphasis on photosynthesis, respiration and nitrogenases. In photosynthesis of green plants light driven vectorial electron transfer is coupled to protolytic reactions, with about one quarter of the useful work derived from light quanta utilized for proton pumping across a coupling membrane. That is where the interchange of electrochemical (Dm) and chemical (ATP) forms of free energy storage and transfer in cellular energetics starts. The proton is distinguished from other reactants by an extremely small diameter and the ability of tunneling at reasonable rates. This is the basis for particular polarization, solvent and isotope effects as well as for hydrogen-bonded networks that are suited to long-range proton-transfer. (author). refs.; figs.; tabs

  14. Long-Range Electron Transfer Across Cytochrome-Hematite (a-Fe2O3) Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wigginton, Nicholas S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Stack, Andrew G.; Hochella, Michael F.

    2009-02-12

    Electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (EC-STM) was used to assess the distance dependence of electron tunneling facilitated by a bacterial multiheme cytochrome to a single crystal iron oxide surface. We measured tunneling current-distance (I-s) profiles across the nanoscale space between insulated Au STM tips and the basal (001) surface of a hematite (?-Fe2O3) crystal, and compared them to the case in which an intervening small tetraheme cytochrome (STC) from Shewanella oneidensis covalently linked to the Au tip surface. Tunneling profiles were collected at constant surface potentials in solutions having a range of ionic strengths. At short tip-sample separation, the distance dependece of the tunneling current shows a quasi-linear behavior. At longer distances it shows an exponential decay. The different regions are discussed in terms of ordering of interfacial water and ion layers in the electrical double layer associated with the hematite surface. The effective tunneling range and its rate of decay are substantially increased when STC is present in the tunneling junction, suggesting that cytochrome molecules provide enhanced tunneling pathways and stronger electronic coupling to the hematite surface. Based on these results, cytochrome-mediated electron transfer during bacterial metal reduction may be possible at distances further than originally thought. Also, as multiheme cytochromes and other similar molecules gain attention for their promising role in fuel cells and molecular electronics, we show that the solution conditions and surface properties of the substrate must be carefully considered.

  15. Direct simulation of electron transfer reactions in DNA radical cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrecher, Thomas; Koslowski, Thorsten; Case, David A

    2008-12-25

    The electron transfer properties of DNA radical cations are important in DNA damage and repair processes. Fast long-range charge transfer has been demonstrated experimentally, but the subtle influences that experimental conditions as well as DNA sequences and geometries have on the details of electron transfer parameters are still poorly understood. In this work, we employ an atomistic QM/MM approach, based on a one-electron tight binding Hamiltonian and a classical molecular mechanics forcefield, to conduct nanosecond length MD simulations of electron holes in DNA oligomers. Multiple spontaneous electron transfer events were observed in 100 ns simulations with neighboring adenine or guanine bases. Marcus parameters of charge transfer could be extracted directly from the simulations. The reorganization energy lambda for hopping between neighboring bases was found to be ca. 25 kcal/mol and charge transfer rates of 4.1 x 10(9) s(-1) for AA hopping and 1.3 x 10(9) s(-1) for GG hopping were obtained. PMID:19049302

  16. Electron transfer in the Hf1Co6 magnetic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cobalt atomic magnetic moment in Hf1Co6 was determined from the measured saturation magnetization and compared with predictions of an electron transfer model. Good agreement was found when hafnium contributes only two of its four valence electrons to the empty states in the minority spin band of cobalt

  17. Lewis Acid Coupled Electron Transfer of Metal-Oxygen Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Ohkubo, Kei; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-12-01

    Redox-inactive metal ions and Brønsted acids that function as Lewis acids play pivotal roles in modulating the redox reactivity of metal-oxygen intermediates, such as metal-oxo and metal-peroxo complexes. The mechanisms of the oxidative C?H bond cleavage of toluene derivatives, sulfoxidation of thioanisole derivatives, and epoxidation of styrene derivatives by mononuclear nonheme iron(IV)-oxo complexes in the presence of triflic acid (HOTf) and Sc(OTf)3 have been unified as rate-determining electron transfer coupled with binding of Lewis acids (HOTf and Sc(OTf)3 ) by iron(III)-oxo complexes. All logarithms of the observed second-order rate constants of Lewis acid-promoted oxidative C?H bond cleavage, sulfoxidation, and epoxidation reactions of iron(IV)-oxo complexes exhibit remarkably unified correlations with the driving forces of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and metal ion-coupled electron transfer (MCET) in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer when the differences in the formation constants of precursor complexes were taken into account. The binding of HOTf and Sc(OTf)3 to the metal-oxo moiety has been confirmed for Mn(IV) -oxo complexes. The enhancement of the electron-transfer reactivity of metal-oxo complexes by binding of Lewis acids increases with increasing the Lewis acidity of redox-inactive metal ions. Metal ions can also bind to mononuclear nonheme iron(III)-peroxo complexes, resulting in acceleration of the electron-transfer reduction but deceleration of the electron-transfer oxidation. Such a control on the reactivity of metal-oxygen intermediates by binding of Lewis acids provides valuable insight into the role of Ca(2+) in the oxidation of water to dioxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem?II. PMID:26404482

  18. Computational Approach to Electron Charge Transfer Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Elvar Örn

    2013-01-01

    The step from ab initio atomic and molecular properties to thermodynamic - or macroscopic - properties requires the combination of several theoretical tools. This dissertation presents constant temperature molecular dynamics with bond length constraints, a hybrid quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics scheme, and tools to analyse statistical data and generate relative free energies and free energy surfaces. The methodology is applied to several charge transfer species and reactions in chemical en...

  19. Electron transfer from nucleobase electron adducts to 5-bromouracil: a radiation chemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron transfer to 5-bromouracil from their nucleobase electron adducts and their protonated forms has been studied by product analysis. When an electron is transferred to 5-bromouracil, the ensuing 5-bromouracil radical anion rapidly loses a bromide ion. The uracilyl radical thus formed reacts with added t-butanol, yielding uracil. From the uracil yields measured as a function of (N)/(5-BrU) after ?-radiolysis of Ar-saturated solutions it is concluded that the hetero atom protonated forms transfer electron quantitatively to 5-bromouracil. (author). 3 refs., 1 fig

  20. Electron transfer reactions in microporous solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouk, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    Basic thrust the research program involves use of microporous solids (zeolites, clays, layered and tunnel structure oxide semiconductors) as organizing media for artificial photosynthetic systems. Purpose of the microporous solid is twofold. First, it induces spatial organization of photoactive and electroactive components (sensitizers, semiconductor particles, electron relays, and catalysts) at the solid-solution interface, enhancing the quantum efficiency of charge separation and separating physically the ultimate electron donor and acceptor in the electron transport chain. Second, since the microcrystalline solid admits only molecules of a certain charge and size, it is possible to achieve permanent charge separation by sieving chemical photoproducts (e.g., H[sub 2] and I[sub 3][sup [minus

  1. Interfacial electronic structure at the CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}/MoO{sub x} interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Peng; Liu, Xiaoliang, E-mail: xl-liu@csu.edu.cn, E-mail: ygao@pas.rochester.edu; Lyu, Lu; Xie, Haipeng; Zhang, Hong; Niu, Dongmei; Huang, Han [Institute of Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, College of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Bi, Cheng; Xiao, Zhengguo; Huang, Jinsong [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering and Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0656 (United States); Gao, Yongli, E-mail: xl-liu@csu.edu.cn, E-mail: ygao@pas.rochester.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2015-05-11

    Interfacial electronic properties of the CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} (MAPbI{sub 3})/MoO{sub x} interface are investigated using ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. It is found that the pristine MAPbI{sub 3} film coated onto the substrate of poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate)/indium tin oxide by two-step method behaves as an n-type semiconductor, with a band gap of ?1.7?eV and a valence band edge of 1.40?eV below the Fermi energy (E{sub F}). With the MoO{sub x} deposition of 64?Å upon MAPbI{sub 3}, the energy levels of MAPbI{sub 3} shift toward higher binding energy by 0.25?eV due to electron transfer from MAPbI{sub 3} to MoO{sub x}. Its conduction band edge is observed to almost pin to the E{sub F}, indicating a significant enhancement of conductivity. Meanwhile, the energy levels of MoO{sub x} shift toward lower binding energy by ?0.30?eV, and an interface dipole of 2.13?eV is observed at the interface of MAPbI{sub 3}/MoO{sub x}. Most importantly, the chemical reaction taking place at this interface results in unfavorable interface energy level alignment for hole extraction. A potential barrier of ?1.36?eV observed for hole transport will impede the hole extraction from MAPbI{sub 3} to MoO{sub x}. On the other hand, a potential barrier of ?0.14?eV for electron extraction is too small to efficiently suppress electrons extracted from MAPbI{sub 3} to MoO{sub x}. Therefore, such an interface is not an ideal choice for hole extraction in organic photovoltaic devices.

  2. Plugging in or Going Wireless: Strategies for Interspecies Electron Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PravinMallaShrestha

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Interspecies exchange of electrons enables a diversity of microbial communities to gain energy from reactions that no one microbe can catalyze. The first recognized strategies for interspecies electron transfer were those that relied on chemical intermediates that are recycled through oxidized and reduced forms. Well-studied examples are interspecies H2 transfer and the cycling of sulfur intermediates in anaerobic photosynthetic communities. Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET in which two species establish electrical contacts is an alternative. Electrical contacts documented to date include electrically conductive pili, as well as conductive iron minerals and conductive carbon moieties such as activated carbon and biochar. It seems likely that there are additional alternative strategies for interspecies electrical connections that have yet to be discovered. Interspecies electron transfer is central to the functioning of methane-producing microbial communities. The importance of interspecies H2 transfer in many methanogenic communities is clear, but under some circumstances DIET predominates. It is expected that further mechanistic studies and broadening investigations to a wider range of environments will help elucidate the factors that favor specific forms of interspecies electron exchange under different environmental conditions.

  3. Plugging in or going wireless: strategies for interspecies electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena

    2014-01-01

    Interspecies exchange of electrons enables a diversity of microbial communities to gain energy from reactions that no one microbe can catalyze. The first recognized strategies for interspecies electron transfer were those that relied on chemical intermediates that are recycled through oxidized and reduced forms. Well-studied examples are interspecies H2 transfer and the cycling of sulfur intermediates in anaerobic photosynthetic communities. Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in which two species establish electrical contact is an alternative. Electrical contacts documented to date include electrically conductive pili, as well as conductive iron minerals and conductive carbon moieties such as activated carbon and biochar. Interspecies electron transfer is central to the functioning of methane-producing microbial communities. The importance of interspecies H2 transfer in many methanogenic communities is clear, but under some circumstances DIET predominates. It is expected that further mechanistic studies and broadening investigations to a wider range of environments will help elucidate the factors that favor specific forms of interspecies electron exchange under different environmental conditions. PMID:24904551

  4. Plugging in or Going Wireless : Strategies for Interspecies Electron Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrestha, Pravin; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena

    2014-01-01

    Interspecies exchange of electrons enables a diversity of microbial communities to gain energy from reactions that no one microbe can catalyze. The first recognized strategies for interspecies electron transfer were those that relied on chemical intermediates that are recycled through oxidized and reduced forms. Well-studied examples are interspecies H2 transfer and the cycling of sulfur intermediates in anaerobic photosynthetic communities. Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in which two species establish electrical contact is an alternative. Electrical contacts documented to date include electrically conductive pili, as well as conductive iron minerals and conductive carbon moieties such as activated carbon and biochar. Interspecies electron transfer is central to the functioning of methane-producing microbial communities. The importance of interspecies H2 transfer in many methanogenic communities is clear, but under some circumstances DIET predominates. It is expected that further mechanistic studies and broadening investigations to a wider range of environments will help elucidate the factors that favor specific forms of interspecies electron exchange under different environmental conditions.

  5. Probing Interfacial Electronic States in CdSe Quantum Dots using Second Harmonic Generation Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doughty, Benjamin L [ORNL; Ma, Yingzhong [ORNL; Shaw, Robert W [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and rationally controlling the properties of nanomaterial surfaces is a rapidly expanding field of research due to the dramatic role they play on the optical and electronic properties vital to light harvesting, emitting and detection technologies. This information is essential to the continued development of synthetic approaches designed to tailor interfaces for optimal nanomaterial based device performance. In this work, closely spaced electronic excited states in model CdSe quantum dots (QDs) are resolved using second harmonic generation (SHG) spectroscopy, and the corresponding contributions from surface species to these states are assessed. Two distinct spectral features are observed in the SHG spectra, which are not readily identified in linear absorption and photoluminescence excitation spectra. These features include a weak band at 395 6 nm, which coincides with transitions to the 2S1/2 1Se state, and a much more pronounced band at 423 4 nm arising from electronic transitions to the 1P3/2 1Pe state. Chemical modification of the QD surfaces through oxidation resulted in disappearance of the SHG band corresponding to the 1P3/2 1Pe state, indicating prominent surface contributions. Signatures of deep trap states localized on the surfaces of the QDs are also observed. We further find that the SHG signal intensities depend strongly on the electronic states being probed and their relative surface contributions, thereby offering additional insight into the surface specificity of SHG signals from QDs.

  6. Optical Spectroscopy of the Bulk and Interfacial Hydrated Electron from Ab Initio Calculations.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlig, Frank; Herbert, J. M.; Coons, M. P.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 118, ?. 35 (2014), s. 7507-7515. ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ?R GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : hydrated electron * optical spectrum * ab initio molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.693, year: 2014

  7. CRADA Final Report for CRADA No. ORNL99-0544, Interfacial Properties of Electron Beam Cured Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, C.J.

    2005-10-17

    Electron beam (EB) curing is a technology that promises, in certain applications, to deliver lower cost and higher performance polymer matrix composite (PMC) structures compared to conventional thermal curing processes. PMCs enhance performance by making products lighter, stronger, more durable, and less energy demanding. They are essential in weight- and performance-dominated applications. Affordable PMCs can enhance US economic prosperity and national security. US industry expects rapid implementation of electron beam cured composites in aircraft and aerospace applications as satisfactory properties are demonstrated, and implementation in lower performance applications will likely follow thereafter. In fact, at this time and partly because of discoveries made in this project, field demonstrations are underway that may result in the first fielded applications of electron beam cured composites. Serious obstacles preventing the widespread use of electron beam cured PMCs in many applications are their relatively poor interfacial properties and resin toughness. The composite shear strength and resin toughness of electron beam cured carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites were about 25% and 50% lower, respectively, than those of thermally cured composites of similar formulations. The essential purpose of this project was to improve the mechanical properties of electron beam cured, carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites, with a specific focus on composite shear properties for high performance aerospace applications. Many partners, sponsors, and subcontractors participated in this project. There were four government sponsors from three federal agencies, with the US Department of Energy (DOE) being the principal sponsor. The project was executed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), NASA and Department of Defense (DOD) participants, eleven private CRADA partners, and two subcontractors. A list of key project contacts is provided in Appendix A. In order to properly manage the large project team and properly address the various technical tasks, the CRADA team was organized into integrated project teams (IPT's) with each team focused on specific research areas. Early in the project, the end user partners developed ''exit criteria'', recorded in Appendix B, against which the project's success was to be judged. The project team made several important discoveries. A number of fiber coatings or treatments were developed that improved fiber-matrix adhesion by 40% or more, according to microdebond testing. The effects of dose-time and temperature-time profiles during the cure were investigated, and it was determined that fiber-matrix adhesion is relatively insensitive to the irradiation procedure, but can be elevated appreciably by thermal postcuring. Electron beam curable resin properties were improved substantially, with 80% increase in electron beam 798 resin toughness, and {approx}25% and 50% improvement, respectively, in ultimate tensile strength and ultimate tensile strain vs. earlier generation electron beam curable resins. Additionally, a new resin electron beam 800E was developed with generally good properties, and a very notable 120% improvement in transverse composite tensile strength vs. earlier generation electron beam cured carbon fiber reinforced epoxies. Chemical kinetics studies showed that reaction pathways can be affected by the irradiation parameters, although no consequential effects on material properties have been noted to date. Preliminary thermal kinetics models were developed to predict degree of cure vs. irradiation and thermal parameters. These models are continually being refined and validated. Despite the aforementioned impressive accomplishments, the project team did not fully realize the project objectives. The best methods for improving adhesion were combined with the improved electron beam 3K resin to make prepreg and uni-directional test laminates from which composite properties could be determined. Nevertheless, only minor improvements in the composite shear strengt

  8. Photocurrent generation by direct electron transfer using photosynthetic reaction centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photosynthetic reaction centres (RCs) convert light into separated charges with nearly perfect quantum efficiency, and have been used to generate photocurrent. Previous work has shown that electron tunnelling rates between redox centres in proteins depend exponentially on the tunnelling distance. In this work the RC from Rhodobacter sphaeroides was genetically modified with the aim of achieving the shortest tunnelling distances yet demonstrated between the RC's electron-accepting P site and underlying graphite and gold electrodes, and between the electron donor Q site and graphite electrodes. Opposite charges are carried to counter electrodes using mobile mediators, as in dye-sensitised solar cells. Native RCs are bound to graphite surfaces through N-(1-pyrene)iodoacetamide. Although the linker's length is only 4 Å, the electron transfer pathway between the Q electron donor site on the RC and the electrode surface is still too large for current to be significant. A mutant version with the electron acceptor P side close to the graphite surface produced currents of 15 nA cm?2 upon illumination. Direct binding of RCs to a gold surface is shown, resulting in currents of 5 nA cm?2. In both cases the current was unaffected by mediator concentration but increased with illumination, suggesting that direct electron transfer was achieved. The engineering of an RC to achieve direct electron transfer will help with long term efforts to demonstrate RC-based photovoltaic devices

  9. Heavy particle interference and diffraction in fast electron transfer collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Gudmundsson, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents experimental results from the synchrotron cooler and storage ring CRYRING on charge transfer processes in fast electron transfer collisions using high-resolution cold target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy. The main focus of these studies was to investigate a key concept of quantum mechanics: the wave-particle duality. One series of experiments has been dedicated to the study of heavy particle de Broglie wave interference due to scattering on a molecular ’double slit’. T...

  10. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic atomic-collision processes at intermediate and high energies are being studied theoretically at Penn State by Alston and Winter. In the high velocity regime, single-electron capture is treated using a high order multiple-scattering approach; extensive comparison with experiment and analysis of mechanisms have been made. Fitting the calculated amplitude with a simple analytic form, the asymptotic velocity dependence of the cross section is obtained. The effect on the capture amplitude of altering the inner part of the internuclear potential has also been explored. In the intermediate velocity regime, earlier work on collisions between protons and hydrogenic-ion targets using a coupled-state approach is being extended to the two-electron helium target. 29 refs

  11. Numerical modeling of fast electron energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper methods of calculating energy transport by fast electrons that are currently used in the ''Diana'' program are described; this program is intended to address issues in laser thermonuclear fusion. A method is proposed for solving a kinetic equation which has the following properties: conservativeness, the absence of constraints on the grid spacing relation, monitonicity, and second order approximation. The applicability of a ''front-back'' approximation is analyzed

  12. Coupling of narrow and wide band-gap semiconductors on uniform films active in bacterial disinfection under low intensity visible light: Implications of the interfacial charge transfer (IFCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rtimi, S., E-mail: sami.rtimi@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, EPFL-SB-ISIC-GPAO, Station 6, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); UR Catalyse/Matériaux pour l‘Environnement et les Procédés (URCMEP), Faculté des Sciences de Gabès, Université de Gabès, 6072 Gabès (Tunisia); Sanjines, R. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, EPFL-SB-IPMC-LNNME, Bat PH, Station 3, CH1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Pulgarin, C., E-mail: cesar.pulgarin@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, EPFL-SB-ISIC-GPAO, Station 6, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Houas, A. [UR Catalyse/Matériaux pour l‘Environnement et les Procédés (URCMEP), Faculté des Sciences de Gabès, Université de Gabès, 6072 Gabès (Tunisia); Lavanchy, J.-C. [Université de Lausanne, IMG, Centre d’Analyse Minérale, Bat Anthropole, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Kiwi, J. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, EPFL-SB-ISIC-LPI, Bat Chimie, Station 6, CH1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Design, preparation, testing and characterization of uniform sputtered films. • Interfacial charge transfer from the Ag{sub 2}O (cb) to the lower laying Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} (cb). • The optical absorption of TaON and TaON/Ag was proportional to E. coli inactivation. • Self-cleaning of the TaON/Ag polyester enables repetitive E. coli inactivation. -- Abstract: This study reports the design, preparation, testing and surface characterization of uniform films deposited by sputtering Ag and Ta on non-heat resistant polyester to evaluate the Escherichia coli inactivation by TaON, TaN/Ag, Ag and TaON/Ag polyester. Co-sputtering for 120 s Ta and Ag in the presence of N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} led to the faster E. coli inactivation by a TaON/Ag sample within ?40 min under visible light irradiation. The deconvolution of TaON/Ag peaks obtained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) allowed the assignment of the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and Ag-species. The shifts observed for the XPS peaks have been assigned to AgO to Ag{sub 2}O and Ag{sup 0}, and are a function of the applied sputtering times. The mechanism of interfacial charge transfer (IFCT) from the Ag{sub 2}O conduction band (cb) to the lower laying Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} (cb) is discussed suggesting a reaction mechanism. The optical absorption of the TaON and TaON/Ag samples found by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) correlated well with the kinetics of E. coli inactivation. The TaON/Ag sample microstructure was characterized by contact angle (CA) and by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Self-cleaning of the TaON/Ag polyester after each disinfection cycle enabled repetitive E. coli inactivation.

  13. Coupling of narrow and wide band-gap semiconductors on uniform films active in bacterial disinfection under low intensity visible light: Implications of the interfacial charge transfer (IFCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Design, preparation, testing and characterization of uniform sputtered films. • Interfacial charge transfer from the Ag2O (cb) to the lower laying Ta2O5 (cb). • The optical absorption of TaON and TaON/Ag was proportional to E. coli inactivation. • Self-cleaning of the TaON/Ag polyester enables repetitive E. coli inactivation. -- Abstract: This study reports the design, preparation, testing and surface characterization of uniform films deposited by sputtering Ag and Ta on non-heat resistant polyester to evaluate the Escherichia coli inactivation by TaON, TaN/Ag, Ag and TaON/Ag polyester. Co-sputtering for 120 s Ta and Ag in the presence of N2 and O2 led to the faster E. coli inactivation by a TaON/Ag sample within ?40 min under visible light irradiation. The deconvolution of TaON/Ag peaks obtained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) allowed the assignment of the Ta2O5 and Ag-species. The shifts observed for the XPS peaks have been assigned to AgO to Ag2O and Ag0, and are a function of the applied sputtering times. The mechanism of interfacial charge transfer (IFCT) from the Ag2O conduction band (cb) to the lower laying Ta2O5 (cb) is discussed suggesting a reaction mechanism. The optical absorption of the TaON and TaON/Ag samples found by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) correlated well with the kinetics of E. coli inactivation. The TaON/Ag sample microstructure was characterized by contact angle (CA) and by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Self-cleaning of the TaON/Ag polyester after each disinfection cycle enabled repetitive E. coli inactivation

  14. Electron transfer statistics and thermal fluctuations in molecular junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We derive analytical expressions for probability distribution function (PDF) for electron transport in a simple model of quantum junction in presence of thermal fluctuations. Our approach is based on the large deviation theory combined with the generating function method. For large number of electrons transferred, the PDF is found to decay exponentially in the tails with different rates due to applied bias. This asymmetry in the PDF is related to the fluctuation theorem. Statistics of fluctuations are analyzed in terms of the Fano factor. Thermal fluctuations play a quantitative role in determining the statistics of electron transfer; they tend to suppress the average current while enhancing the fluctuations in particle transfer. This gives rise to both bunching and antibunching phenomena as determined by the Fano factor. The thermal fluctuations and shot noise compete with each other and determine the net (effective) statistics of particle transfer. Exact analytical expression is obtained for delay time distribution. The optimal values of the delay time between successive electron transfers can be lowered below the corresponding shot noise values by tuning the thermal effects

  15. Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry of Hemoglobin on Clinical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho Graça, Didia; Lescuyer, Pierre; Clerici, Lorella; Tsybin, Yury O.; Hartmer, Ralf; Meyer, Markus; Samii, Kaveh; Hochstrasser, Denis F.; Scherl, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    A mass spectrometry-based assay combining the specificity of selected reaction monitoring and the protein ion activation capabilities of electron transfer dissociation was developed and employed for the rapid identification of hemoglobin variants from whole blood without previous proteolytic cleavage. The analysis was performed in a robust ion trap mass spectrometer operating at nominal mass accuracy and resolution. Subtle differences in globin sequences, resulting with mass shifts of about one Da, can be unambiguously identified. These results suggest that mass spectrometry analysis of entire proteins using electron transfer dissociation can be employed on clinical samples in a workflow compatible with diagnostic applications.

  16. Long-Range Interfacial Electrochemical Electron Transfer of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Azurin-Gold Nanoparticle Hybrid Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Chi, Qijin; Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens

    2009-01-01

    We have prepared a "hybrid" of the blue copper protein azurin (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and a 3 nm gold nanoparticle (AuNP). The AuNP/azurin hybrid was assembled on a Au(111)-electrode surface in a two-step process. The AuNP was first attached to the Au(111) electrode via Au-S chemisorption of a 4,4'-biphenyidithiol (4,4'-BPDT) monolayer. This was followed by 1-decanethiol modification of the bound AuNP and hydrophobic binding of azurin to the AuNP. The Au(111)/AuNP/azurin system was characterize...

  17. Photoinduced interfacial electron transfer and lateral charge transport in molecular donor–acceptor photovoltaic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Punzi, Angela; Brauer, Jan C.; Marchioro, Arianna; Ghadiri, Elham; De Jonghe, Jelissa; Moser, Jacques-E.

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured liquid|solid and solid|solid bulk heterojunctions designed for the conversion of solar energy offer ideal models for the investigation of light-induced ET dynamics at surfaces. Despite significant study of processes leading to charge generation in third-generation solar cells, a conclusive picture of the photophysics of these photovoltaic converters is still missing. More specifically searched is the link between the molecular structure of the interface and the kinetics of surf...

  18. Electronic and Interfacial Properties of PD/6H-SiC Schottky Diode Gas Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Bansal, Gaurav; Petit, Jeremy B.; Knight, Dak; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Qinghai

    1996-01-01

    Pd/SiC Schottky diodes detect hydrogen and hydrocarbons with high sensitivity. Variation of the diode temperature from 100 C to 200 C shows that the diode sensitivity to propylene is temperature dependent. Long-term heat treating at 425 C up to 140 hours is carried out to determine the effect of extended heat treating on the diode properties and gas sensitivity. The heat treating significantly affects the diode's capacitive characteristics, but the diode's current carrying characteristics are much more stable with a large response to hydrogen. Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Spectrometry studies of the Pd surface after the heating show cluster formation and background regions with grain structure observed in both regions. The Pd and Si concentrations vary between grains. Auger Electron Spectroscopy depth profiles revealed that the heat treating promoted interdiffusion and reaction between the Pd and SiC dw broadened the interface region. This work shows that Pd/SiC Schottky diodes have significant potential as high temperature gas sensors, but stabilization of the structure is necessary to insure their repeatability in long-term, high temperature applications.

  19. Electron transfer and fragmentation in fullerene collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Zettergren, Henning

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, we present results from detailed gas phase studies of intrinsic properties of fullerenes (C60) and clusters of fullerenes as probed by slow multiply charged (atomic or cluster) ions in combination with coincidence time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We have investigated the structures, stabilities, and the electron mobilities of multiply charged clusters of fullerenes, (C60)nr+ (r=2-5). We found that the (C60)nr+ cluster ions are weakly bound by van der Waals forces and the elec...

  20. Enhanced Electronic Properties of Pt@Ag Heterostructured Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Koichi Higashimine; Shinya Maenosono; Derrick M. Mott; Anh Thi Ngoc Dao

    2013-01-01

    Platinum coated by silver nanoparticles was synthesized, which displays a unique structure where polycrystalline platinum particles are completely encapsulated in continuous monocrystalline silver shells. These particles display accentuated electronic properties, where the silver shells gain electron density from the platinum cores, imparting enhanced properties such as oxidation resistance. This electron transfer phenomenon is highly interfacial in nature, and the degree of electron transfer...

  1. Quantum Mechanical Hysteresis and the Electron Transfer Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Etchegoin, P G

    2004-01-01

    We study a simple quantum mechanical symmetric donor-acceptor model for electron transfer (ET) with coupling to internal deformations. The model contains several basic properties found in biological ET in enzymes and photosynthetic centers; it produces tunnelling with hysteresis thus providing a simple explanation for the slowness of the reversed rate and the near 100% efficiency of ET in many biological systems. The model also provides a conceptual framework for the development of molecular electronics memory elements based on electrostatic architectures.

  2. Carboxylate Shifts Steer Interquinone Electron Transfer in Photosynthesis*

    OpenAIRE

    Chernev, Petko; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Dau, Holger; Haumann, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of electron transfer (ET) in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) may inspire novel catalysts for sunlight-driven fuel production. The electron exit pathway of type II RCs comprises two quinone molecules working in series and in between a non-heme iron atom with a carboxyl ligand (bicarbonate in photosystem II (PSII), glutamate in bacterial RCs). For decades, the functional role of the iron has remained enigmatic. We tracked the iron site using microsecond-resolu...

  3. Study of the interfacial reactions between a bioactive apatite-mullite glass-ceramic coating and titanium substrates using high angle annular dark field transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Kenneth T; O'Flynn, Kevin P; Nakahara, Shohei; Vanhumbeeck, Jean-François; Delucca, John M; Hooghan, Bobby

    2009-04-01

    Glass of generic composition SiO(2) . Al(2)O(3) . P(2)O(5) . CaO . CaF(2) will crystallise predominantly to apatite and mullite upon heat-treatment. Such ceramics are bioactive, osseoconductive, and have a high resistance to fracture. As a result, they are under investigation for use as biomedical device coatings, and in particular for orthopaedic implants. Previous work has shown that the material can be successfully enamelled to titanium with an interfacial reaction zone produced during heat treatment. The present study uses high angle annular dark field transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-TEM) to conduct a detailed examination of this region. Results show evidence of complex interfacial reactions following the diffusion of titanium into an intermediate layer and the production of titanium silicides and titanium phosphides. These results confirm previously hypothesised mechanisms for the bonding of silicate bioceramics with titanium alloys. PMID:19034617

  4. Transmission electron microscopy and ab initio calculations to relate interfacial intermixing and the magnetism of core/shell nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, C.-C.; Hsiao, C.-H.; Ouyang, Chuenhou, E-mail: houyang@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Skoropata, E.; Lierop, J. van [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2015-05-07

    Significant efforts towards understanding bi-magnetic core-shell nanoparticles are underway currently as they provide a pathway towards properties unavailable with single-phased systems. Recently, we have demonstrated that the magnetism of ?-Fe2O3/CoO core-shell nanoparticles, in particular, at high temperatures, originates essentially from an interfacial doped iron-oxide layer that is formed by the migration of Co{sup 2+} from the CoO shell into the surface layers of the ?-Fe2O3 core [Skoropata et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 024410 (2014)]. To examine directly the nature of the intermixed layer, we have used high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and first-principles calculations to examine the impact of the core-shell intermixing at the atomic level. By analyzing the HRTEM images and energy dispersive spectra, the level and nature of intermixing was confirmed, mainly as doping of Co into the octahedral site vacancies of ?-Fe2O3. The average Co doping depths for different processing temperatures (150?°C and 235?°C) were 0.56?nm and 0.78?nm (determined to within 5% through simulation), respectively, establishing that the amount of core-shell intermixing can be altered purposefully with an appropriate change in synthesis conditions. Through first-principles calculations, we find that the intermixing phase of ?-Fe2O3 with Co doping is ferromagnetic, with even higher magnetization as compared to that of pure ?-Fe2O3. In addition, we show that Co doping into different octahedral sites can cause different magnetizations. This was reflected in a change in overall nanoparticle magnetization, where we observed a 25% reduction in magnetization for the 235?°C versus the 150?°C sample, despite a thicker intermixed layer.

  5. Transmission electron microscopy and ab initio calculations to relate interfacial intermixing and the magnetism of core/shell nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant efforts towards understanding bi-magnetic core-shell nanoparticles are underway currently as they provide a pathway towards properties unavailable with single-phased systems. Recently, we have demonstrated that the magnetism of ?-Fe2O3/CoO core-shell nanoparticles, in particular, at high temperatures, originates essentially from an interfacial doped iron-oxide layer that is formed by the migration of Co2+ from the CoO shell into the surface layers of the ?-Fe2O3 core [Skoropata et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 024410 (2014)]. To examine directly the nature of the intermixed layer, we have used high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and first-principles calculations to examine the impact of the core-shell intermixing at the atomic level. By analyzing the HRTEM images and energy dispersive spectra, the level and nature of intermixing was confirmed, mainly as doping of Co into the octahedral site vacancies of ?-Fe2O3. The average Co doping depths for different processing temperatures (150?°C and 235?°C) were 0.56?nm and 0.78?nm (determined to within 5% through simulation), respectively, establishing that the amount of core-shell intermixing can be altered purposefully with an appropriate change in synthesis conditions. Through first-principles calculations, we find that the intermixing phase of ?-Fe2O3 with Co doping is ferromagnetic, with even higher magnetization as compared to that of pure ?-Fe2O3. In addition, we show that Co doping into different octahedral sites can cause different magnetizations. This was reflected in a change in overall nanoparticle magnetization, where we observed a 25% reduction in magnetization for the 235?°C versus the 150?°C sample, despite a thicker intermixed layer

  6. Transmission electron microscopy and ab initio calculations to relate interfacial intermixing and the magnetism of core/shell nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, C.-C.; Hsiao, C.-H.; Skoropata, E.; van Lierop, J.; Ouyang, Chuenhou Hao

    2015-05-01

    Significant efforts towards understanding bi-magnetic core-shell nanoparticles are underway currently as they provide a pathway towards properties unavailable with single-phased systems. Recently, we have demonstrated that the magnetism of ?-Fe2O3/CoO core-shell nanoparticles, in particular, at high temperatures, originates essentially from an interfacial doped iron-oxide layer that is formed by the migration of Co2+ from the CoO shell into the surface layers of the ?-Fe2O3 core [Skoropata et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 024410 (2014)]. To examine directly the nature of the intermixed layer, we have used high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and first-principles calculations to examine the impact of the core-shell intermixing at the atomic level. By analyzing the HRTEM images and energy dispersive spectra, the level and nature of intermixing was confirmed, mainly as doping of Co into the octahedral site vacancies of ?-Fe2O3. The average Co doping depths for different processing temperatures (150 °C and 235 °C) were 0.56 nm and 0.78 nm (determined to within 5% through simulation), respectively, establishing that the amount of core-shell intermixing can be altered purposefully with an appropriate change in synthesis conditions. Through first-principles calculations, we find that the intermixing phase of ?-Fe2O3 with Co doping is ferromagnetic, with even higher magnetization as compared to that of pure ?-Fe2O3. In addition, we show that Co doping into different octahedral sites can cause different magnetizations. This was reflected in a change in overall nanoparticle magnetization, where we observed a 25% reduction in magnetization for the 235 °C versus the 150 °C sample, despite a thicker intermixed layer.

  7. A unified diabatic description for electron transfer reactions, isomerization reactions, proton transfer reactions, and aromaticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Hush, Noel S

    2015-09-23

    While diabatic approaches are ubiquitous for the understanding of electron-transfer reactions and have been mooted as being of general relevance, alternate applications have not been able to unify the same wide range of observed spectroscopic and kinetic properties. The cause of this is identified as the fundamentally different orbital configurations involved: charge-transfer phenomena involve typically either 1 or 3 electrons in two orbitals whereas most reactions are typically closed shell. As a result, two vibrationally coupled electronic states depict charge-transfer scenarios whereas three coupled states arise for closed-shell reactions of non-degenerate molecules and seven states for the reactions implicated in the aromaticity of benzene. Previous diabatic treatments of closed-shell processes have considered only two arbitrarily chosen states as being critical, mapping these states to those for electron transfer. We show that such effective two-state diabatic models are feasible but involve renormalized electronic coupling and vibrational coupling parameters, with this renormalization being property dependent. With this caveat, diabatic models are shown to provide excellent descriptions of the spectroscopy and kinetics of the ammonia inversion reaction, proton transfer in N2H7(+), and aromaticity in benzene. This allows for the development of a single simple theory that can semi-quantitatively describe all of these chemical phenomena, as well as of course electron-transfer reactions. It forms a basis for understanding many technologically relevant aspects of chemical reactions, condensed-matter physics, chemical quantum entanglement, nanotechnology, and natural or artificial solar energy capture and conversion. PMID:26193994

  8. CORRELATING ELECTRONIC AND VIBRATIONAL MOTIONS IN CHARGE TRANSFER SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Munira

    2014-06-27

    The goal of this research program was to measure coupled electronic and nuclear motions during photoinduced charge transfer processes in transition metal complexes by developing and using novel femtosecond spectroscopies. The scientific highlights and the resulting scientific publications from the DOE supported work are outlined in the technical report.

  9. Heterogeneous electron transfer of pesticides. Current trends and applications.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sokolová, Romana; Hromadová, Magdaléna; Pospíšil, Lubomír

    Kerala : Transworld Research Network, 2008 - (Colombini, M.; Tassi, L.), s. 43-76 ISBN 978-81-7895-343-4 R&D Projects: GA AV ?R IAA400400505; GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk OC 140 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : heterogeneous electron transfer * pesticides * redox reactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  10. Electron transfer reactions involving porphyrins and chlorophyll a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron transfer reactions involving porphyrins (P) and quinones (Q) have been studied by pulse radiolysis. The porphyrins used were tetraphenylporphyrin (H2TPP), its tetracarboxy derivative (H2TCPP), the sodium and zinc compounds (Na2TPP and ZnTPP), and chlorophyll a (Chl a). These compounds were found to be rapidly reduced by electron transfer from (CH3)2CO-. Reduction by (CH3)2COH was rapid in aqueous solutions but relatively slow in i-PrOH solutions. Transient spectra of the anion radicals were determined and, in the case of H2TCPP-., a pK = 9.7 was derived for its protonation. Electron-transfer reactions from the anion radical of H2TCPP to benzoquinone, duroquinone, 9,10-anthraquinone 2-sulfonate, and methylviologen occur in aqueous solutions with rate constants approx. 107-109 M-1 s-1 which depend on the pH and the quinone reduction potential. Reactions of Na2TPP-., ZnTPP-., and Chl a-. with anthraquinone in basic i-PrOH solutions occur with rate constants approx. 109 M-1 s-1. The spectral changes associated with these electron-transfer reactions as observed over a period of approx. 1 ms indicated, in some cases, the formation of an intermediate complex [P...Q-.]. 8 figures, 2 tables

  11. Electronic excitation energy transfer between quasi-zero-dimensional systems.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav

    Ostrava : Tanger, 2013. ISBN 978-80-87294-44-4. [International Conference NANOCON 2013 /5./. Brno (CZ), 16.10.2013-18.10.2013] R&D Pro jects: GA MŠk LH12236; GA MŠk LH12186 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : quantum dots * energy transfer * electron-phonon interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  12. 77 FR 6310 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... would complete the rulemaking process. 76 FR 29902 (May 23, 2011). This proposal has two parts. First... information on whether it should revise these threshold numbers in Regulation Z. See 76 FR 75825 (Dec. 5, 2011... PROTECTION 12 CFR Part 1005 RIN 3170-AA15 Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E) AGENCY: Bureau of...

  13. Graphene field effect transistor as a probe of electronic structure and charge transfer at organic molecule-graphene interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervenka, Jiri; Budi, Akin; Dontschuk, Nikolai; Stacey, Alastair; Tadich, Anton; Rietwyk, Kevin J; Schenk, Alex; Edmonds, Mark T; Yin, Yuefeng; Medhekar, Nikhil; Kalbac, Martin; Pakes, Chris I

    2015-01-28

    The electronic structure of physisorbed molecules containing aromatic nitrogen heterocycles (triazine and melamine) on graphene is studied using a combination of electronic transport, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The interfacial electronic structure and charge transfer of weakly coupled molecules on graphene is found to be governed by work function differences, molecular dipole moments and polarization effects. We demonstrate that molecular depolarization plays a significant role in these charge transfer mechanisms even at submonolayer coverage, particularly for molecules which possess strong dipoles. Electronic transport measurements show a reduction of graphene conductivity and charge carrier mobility upon the adsorption of the physisorbed molecules. This effect is attributed to the formation of additional electron scattering sites in graphene by the molecules and local molecular electric fields. Our results show that adsorbed molecules containing polar functional groups on graphene exhibit different coverage behaviour to nonpolar molecules. These effects open up a range of new opportunities for recognition of different molecules on graphene-based sensor devices. PMID:25502349

  14. Photoinduced electron transfer of chlorophyll in lipid bilayer system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D K Lee; K W Seo; Y S Kang

    2002-12-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer from chlorophyll- through the interface of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) headgroup of the lipid bilayers was studied with electron magnetic resonance (EMR). The photoproduced radicals were identified with electron spin resonance (ESR) and radical yields of chlorophyll- were determined by double integration ESR spectra. The formation of vesicles was identified by changes in measured $\\lambda_{\\max}$ values from diethyl ether solutions to vesicles solutions indirectly, and observed directly with SEM and TEM images. The efficiency of photosynthesis in model system was determined by measuring the amount of chlorophyll-a radical yields which were obtained from integration of ESR spectra.

  15. Protein dynamics modulated electron transfer kinetics in early stage photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Prasanta; Dua, Arti

    2013-01-01

    A recent experiment has probed the electron transfer kinetics in the early stage of photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides for the reaction center of wild type and different mutants [Science 316, 747 (2007)]. By monitoring the changes in the transient absorption of the donor-acceptor pair at 280 and 930 nm, both of which show non-exponential temporal decay, the experiment has provided a strong evidence that the initial electron transfer kinetics is modulated by the dynamics of protein backbone. In this work, we present a model where the electron transfer kinetics of the donor-acceptor pair is described along the reaction coordinate associated with the distance fluctuations in a protein backbone. The stochastic evolution of the reaction coordinate is described in terms of a non-Markovian generalized Langevin equation with a memory kernel and Gaussian colored noise, both of which are completely described in terms of the microscopics of the protein normal modes. This model provides excellent fits to the transient absorption signals at 280 and 930 nm associated with protein distance fluctuations and protein dynamics modulated electron transfer reaction, respectively. In contrast to previous models, the present work explains the microscopic origins of the non-exponential decay of the transient absorption curve at 280 nm in terms of multiple time scales of relaxation of the protein normal modes. Dynamic disorder in the reaction pathway due to protein conformational fluctuations which occur on time scales slower than or comparable to the electron transfer kinetics explains the microscopic origin of the non-exponential nature of the transient absorption decay at 930 nm. The theoretical estimates for the relative driving force for five different mutants are in close agreement with the experimental estimates obtained using electrochemical measurements.

  16. Effect of gold nanoparticles on the structure and electron-transfer characteristics of glucose oxidase redox polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, M Lorena; Marmisollé, Waldemar; Pallarola, Diego; Pietrasanta, Lía I; Murgida, Daniel H; Ceolín, Marcelo; Azzaroni, Omar; Battaglini, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    Efficient electrical communication between redox proteins and electrodes is a critical issue in the operation and development of amperometric biosensors. The present study explores the advantages of a nanostructured redox-active polyelectrolyte-surfactant complex containing [Os(bpy)2Clpy](2+) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, py= pyridine) as the redox centers and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as nanodomains for boosting the electron-transfer propagation throughout the assembled film in the presence of glucose oxidase (GOx). Film structure was characterized by grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), GOx incorporation was followed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), whereas Raman spectroelectrochemistry and electrochemical studies confirmed the ability of the entrapped gold nanoparticles to enhance the electron-transfer processes between the enzyme and the electrode surface. Our results show that nanocomposite films exhibit five-fold increase in current response to glucose compared with analogous supramolecular AuNP-free films. The introduction of colloidal gold promotes drastic mesostructural changes in the film, which in turn leads to a rigid, amorphous interfacial architecture where nanoparticles, redox centers, and GOx remain in close proximity, thus improving the electron-transfer process. PMID:25171096

  17. [Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions]: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom collisions are being studied. These collision processes are treated in the context of simple one- or two-electron systems in order to provide unambiguous results and reveal more clearly the collisional mechanisms. As outlined in the original proposal, three coupled-state calculations are being carried out over the present three-year period: a Sturmian-pseudostate study of ionization in collisions between protons and the hydrogenic ions He+, Li2+, Be3+, ...; a triple-center, atomic-state study of ionization in collisions between ? particles and H(ls) atoms and between protons and He+(ls) ions; and an atomic-state study of electron transfer and excitation in collisions between protons and neutral He atoms. 12 refs

  18. Electronic structure of the interfacial LaAlO3/SrTiO3 2D electron gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triscone, Jean-Marc

    2012-02-01

    The interface between LaAlO3 and SrTiO3, two good band insulators, was found in 2004 to be conducting with a high mobility [1] and, in some doping range, superconducting with a maximum critical temperature of about 200 mK [2,3]. I will describe recent experiments aiming at determining the origin of the electron gas. I will then discuss the transport properties of high mobility samples that display Shubnikov de Haas (SdH) oscillations [4]. In such high mobility samples, electric field tuning of the carrier density allows the electronic structure to be followed through analysis of the evolution of the SdH oscillations. [4pt] [1] A. Ohtomo, H. Y. Hwang, Nature 427, 423 (2004).[0pt] [2] N. Reyren, S. Thiel, A. D. Caviglia, L. Fitting Kourkoutis, G. Hammerl, C. Richter, C. W. Schneider, T. Kopp, A.-S. Ruetschi, D. Jaccard, M. Gabay, D. A. Muller, J.-M. Triscone and J. Mannhart, Science 317, 1196 (2007).[0pt] [3] A. Caviglia, S. Gariglio, N. Reyren, D. Jaccard, T. Schneider, M. Gabay, S. Thiel, G. Hammerl, J. Mannhart, and J.-M. Triscone, Nature 456, 624 (2008).[0pt] [4] A.D. Caviglia, S. Gariglio, C. Cancellieri, B. Sac'ep'e, A. Fête, N. Reyren, M. Gabay, A.F. Morpurgo, J.-M. Triscone, Physical Review Letters 105, 236802 (2010).

  19. Microstructure, phase transition, and interfacial chemistry of Gd2O3/Si(111) grown by electron-beam physical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of growth temperature, film thickness, and oxygen flux on the microstructure, phase transition, and interfacial chemistry of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) films grown on Si(111) substrates by electron-beam physical vapor deposition were investigated using a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction, scanning TEM, x-ray energy dispersive spectrometry, and electron energy loss spectrometry. The authors find that a low growth temperature (250 °C) and a high oxygen flux (200 sccm) led to a small grain size and a high porosity of the Gd2O3 film. Lowering the oxygen flux to 50 sccm led to reduced film porosity, presumably due to the increased diffusion length of the Gd atoms on the surface. Increasing the growth temperature to 650 °C resulted in a film with large columnar grains and elongated pores at the grain boundaries. Thin films grown at 250 °C consisted of cubic Gd2O3, but thermodynamically less stable monoclinic phase formed as the film thickness increased. Lowering the oxygen flux apparently further promoted the formation of the monoclinic phase. Furthermore, monoclinic phase dominated in the films grown at 650 °C. Such phase transitions may be related to the stress evolution of the films at different temperatures, thicknesses, and oxygen fluxes. Enhanced Gd2O3/Si interfacial reaction was observed as the growth temperature, film thickness, and oxygen flux increased. Moreover, oxygen was found to play a crucial role in the Gd2O3/Si interfacial reaction and the formation of Gd-Si-O interface layers, which proceeded by the reaction of excess oxygen with Si followed by the intermixing of SiOx and Gd2O3.

  20. Simulations of charge transfer in Electron Multiplying Charge Coupled Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, N.; Stefanov, K.; Hall, D.; Jordan, D.; Holland, A.

    2014-12-01

    Electron Multiplying Charge Coupled Devices (EMCCDs) are a variant of traditional CCD technology well suited to applications that demand high speed operation in low light conditions. On-chip signal amplification allows the sensor to effectively suppress the noise introduced by readout electronics, permitting sub-electron read noise at MHz pixel rates. The devices have been the subject of many detailed studies concerning their operation, however there has not been a study into the transfer and multiplication process within the EMCCD gain register. Such an investigation has the potential to explain certain observed performance characteristics, as well as inform further optimisations to their operation. In this study, the results from simulation of charge transfer within an EMCCD gain register element are discussed with a specific focus on the implications for serial charge transfer efficiency (CTE). The effects of operating voltage and readout speed are explored in context with typical operating conditions. It is shown that during transfer, a small portion of signal charge may become trapped at the semiconductor-insulator interface that could act to degrade the serial CTE in certain operating conditions.

  1. Hydrogen-bond relays in concerted proton-electron transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Julien; Costentin, Cyrille; Robert, Marc; Savéant, Jean-Michel; Tard, Cédric

    2012-03-20

    Reaction mechanisms in which electron and proton transfers are coupled are central to a huge number of processes, both natural and synthetic. Moreover, most of the new approaches to address modern energy challenges involve proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET). Recent research has focused on the possibility that the two steps are concerted, that is, concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) reactions, rather than stepwise pathways in which proton transfer precedes (PET) or follows (EPT) electron transfer. CPET pathways have the advantage of bypassing the high-energy intermediates of stepwise pathways, although this thermodynamic benefit may have a kinetic cost. Concerted processes require short distances between the group being oxidized and the proton acceptor (and vice versa for a reduction process), which usually involves the formation of a hydrogen bond. Unlike the electron in outer-sphere electron-transfer reactions, the distance a proton may travel in a CPET is therefore rather limited. The idea has recently emerged, however, that this distance may be substantially increased via a H-bond relay located between the electron-transfer-triggered proton source and the proton acceptor. Generally speaking, the relay is a group bearing a H atom able to accept a H-bond from the moiety being oxidized and, at the same time, to form a H-bond with the proton-accepting group without going through a protonated intermediate. Although these molecules do not retain all the properties of chains of water molecules engaged in Grotthuss-type transport of a proton, the OH group in these molecules does possess a fundamental property of water molecules: namely, it is both a hydrogen-bond acceptor and a hydrogen-bond donor. Despite centuries of study, the mechanisms of proton movement in water remain active experimental and theoretical research areas, but so far with no connection to CPET reactions. In this Account, we bring together recent results concerning (i) the oxidative response of molecules containing a H-bond relay and (ii) the oxidation of phenol with water (in water) as the proton acceptor. In the first case, a nondestructive electrochemical method (cyclic voltammetry) was used to investigate the oxidation of phenol molecules containing one H-bond relay and an amine proton acceptor compared with a similar amino phenol deprived of relay. In the second, the kinetics of phenol oxidation with water (in water) as proton acceptor is contrasted with that of conventional proton acceptors (such as hydrogen phosphate and pyridine) to afford evidence of the concerted nature of Grotthuss-type proton displacement with electron transfer. First indications were provided by the same electrochemical method, whereas a more complete kinetic characterization was obtained from laser flash photolysis. Older electrochemical results concerning the reduction of superoxide ion in the presence of water are also examined. The result is a timely picture of current insight into concerted mechanisms involving electron transfer coupled with proton transport over simple H-bond relays and over H-bond networks. PMID:22029773

  2. Mediated Electron Transfer at Vertically Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Electrodes During Detection of DNA Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallen, Rachel; Gokarn, Nirmal; Bercea, Priscila; Grzincic, Elissa; Bandyopadhyay, Krisanu

    2015-06-01

    Vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (VASWCNT) assemblies are generated on cysteamine and 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME)-functionalized gold surfaces through amide bond formation between carboxylic groups generated at the end of acid-shortened single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and amine groups present on the gold surfaces. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging confirms the vertical alignment mode of SWCNT attachment through significant changes in surface roughness compared to bare gold surfaces and the lack of any horizontally aligned SWCNTs present. These SWCNT assemblies are further modified with an amine-terminated single-stranded probe-DNA. Subsequent hybridization of the surface-bound probe-DNA in the presence of complementary strands in solution is followed using impedance measurements in the presence of Fe(CN)6 3-/4- as the redox probe in solution, which show changes in the interfacial electrochemical properties, specifically the charge-transfer resistance, due to hybridization. In addition, hybridization of the probe-DNA is also compared when it is attached directly to the gold surfaces without any intermediary SWCNTs. Contrary to our expectations, impedance measurements show a decrease in charge-transfer resistance with time due to hybridization with 300 nM complementary DNA in solution with the probe-DNA attached to SWCNTs. In contrast, an increase in charge-transfer resistance is observed with time during hybridization when the probe-DNA is attached directly to the gold surfaces. The decrease in charge-transfer resistance during hybridization in the presence of VASWCNTs indicates an enhancement in the electron transfer process of the redox probe at the VASWCNT-modified electrode. The results suggest that VASWCNTs are acting as mediators of electron transfer, which facilitate the charge transfer of the redox probe at the electrode-solution interface.

  3. Vibrationally Assisted Electron Transfer Mechanism of Olfaction: Myth or Reality?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Chang, Po-Yao

    2012-01-01

    Smell is a vital sense for animals. The mainstream explanation of smell is based on recognition of the odorant molecules through characteristics of their surface, e.g., shape, but certain experiments suggest that such recognition is complemented by recognition of vibrational modes. According to this suggestion an olfactory receptor is activated by electron transfer assisted through odorant vibrational excitation. The hundreds to thousands of different olfactory receptors in an animal recognize odorants over a discriminant landscape with surface properties and vibrational frequencies as the two major dimensions. In the present paper we introduce the vibrationally assisted mechanism of olfaction and demonstrate for several odorants that, indeed, a strong enhancement of an electron tunneling rate due to odorant vibrations can arise. We discuss in this regard the influence of odorant deuteration and explain, thereby, recent experiments performed on Drosophila melanogaster. Our demonstration is based on known physical properties of biological electron transfer and on ab initio calculations on odorants carried out for the purpose of the present study. We identify a range of physical characteristics which olfactory receptors and odorants must obey for the vibrationally assisted electron transfer mechanism to function. We argue that the stated characteristics are feasible for realistic olfactory receptors, noting, though, that the receptor structure presently is still unknown, but can be studied through homology modeling.

  4. Alternating electron and proton transfer steps in photosynthetic water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauss, André; Haumann, Michael; Dau, Holger

    2012-10-01

    Water oxidation by cyanobacteria, algae, and plants is pivotal in oxygenic photosynthesis, the process that powers life on Earth, and is the paradigm for engineering solar fuel-production systems. Each complete reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation requires the removal of four electrons and four protons from the catalytic site, a manganese-calcium complex and its protein environment in photosystem II. In time-resolved photothermal beam deflection experiments, we monitored apparent volume changes of the photosystem II protein associated with charge creation by light-induced electron transfer (contraction) and charge-compensating proton relocation (expansion). Two previously invisible proton removal steps were detected, thereby filling two gaps in the basic reaction-cycle model of photosynthetic water oxidation. In the S(2) ? S(3) transition of the classical S-state cycle, an intermediate is formed by deprotonation clearly before electron transfer to the oxidant (Y Z OX). The rate-determining elementary step (?, approximately 30 µs at 20?°C) in the long-distance proton relocation toward the protein-water interface is characterized by a high activation energy (E(a) = 0.46 ± 0.05 eV) and strong H/D kinetic isotope effect (approximately 6). The characteristics of a proton transfer step during the S(0) ? S(1) transition are similar (?, approximately 100 µs; E(a) = 0.34 ± 0.08 eV; kinetic isotope effect, approximately 3); however, the proton removal from the Mn complex proceeds after electron transfer to . By discovery of the transient formation of two further intermediate states in the reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation, a temporal sequence of strictly alternating removal of electrons and protons from the catalytic site is established. PMID:22988080

  5. A Dynamical Theory of Electron Transfer: Crossover from Weak to Strong Electronic Coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Stockburger, Juergen T.; Mak, C H

    1996-01-01

    We present a real-time path integral theory for the rate of electron transfer reactions. Using graph theoretic techniques, the dynamics is expressed in a formally exact way as a set of integral equations. With a simple approximation for the self-energy, the rate can then be computed analytically to all orders in the electronic coupling matrix element. We present results for the crossover region between weak (nonadiabatic) and strong (adiabatic) electronic coupling and show t...

  6. Neutral histidine and photoinduced electron transfer in DNA photolyases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domratcheva, Tatiana

    2011-11-16

    The two major UV-induced DNA lesions, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and (6-4) pyrimidine-pyrimidone photoproducts, can be repaired by the light-activated enzymes CPD and (6-4) photolyases, respectively. It is a long-standing question how the two classes of photolyases with alike molecular structure are capable of reversing the two chemically different DNA photoproducts. In both photolyases the repair reaction is initiated by photoinduced electron transfer from the hydroquinone-anion part of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH(-)) cofactor to the photoproduct. Here, the state-of-the-art XMCQDPT2-CASSCF approach was employed to compute the excitation spectra of the respective active site models. It is found that protonation of His365 in the presence of the hydroquinone-anion electron donor causes spontaneous, as opposed to photoinduced, coupled proton and electron transfer to the (6-4) photoproduct. The resulting neutralized biradical, containing the neutral semiquinone and the N3'-protonated (6-4) photoproduct neutral radical, corresponds to the lowest energy electronic ground-state minimum. The high electron affinity of the N3'-protonated (6-4) photoproduct underlines this finding. Thus, it is anticipated that the (6-4) photoproduct repair is assisted by His365 in its neutral form, which is in contrast to the repair mechanisms proposed in the literature. The repair via hydroxyl group transfer assisted by neutral His365 is considered. The repair involves the 5'base radical anion of the (6-4) photoproduct which in terms of electronic structure is similar to the CPD radical anion. A unified model of the CPD and (6-4) photoproduct repair is proposed. PMID:21970417

  7. 77 FR 10373 - Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program: Electronics Manufacturing: Revisions to Heat Transfer Fluid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ...Electronics Manufacturing: Revisions to Heat Transfer Fluid Provisions AGENCY: Environmental...Reporting Rule related to fluorinated heat transfer fluids. More specifically, EPA...the definition of fluorinated heat transfer fluids and to the provisions...

  8. Ligand reorganization and activation energies in nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activation energy and ligand reorganization energy for nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions in chemical and biological systems are investigated in this paper. The free energy surfaces and the activation energy are derived exactly in the general case in which the ligand vibration frequencies are not equal. The activation energy is derived by free energy minimization at the transition state. Our formulation leads to the Marcus-Hush [J. Chem. Phys. 24, 979 (1956); 98, 7170 (1994); 28, 962 (1958)] results in the equal-frequency limit and also generalizes the Marcus-Sumi [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] model in the context of studying the solvent dynamic effect on electron transfer reactions. It is found that when the ligand vibration frequencies are different, the activation energy derived from the Marcus-Hush formula deviates by 5%-10% from the exact value. If the reduced reorganization energy approximation is introduced in the Marcus-Hush formula, the result is almost exact

  9. Ligand reorganization and activation energies in nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianjun; Wang, Jianji; Stell, George

    2006-10-01

    The activation energy and ligand reorganization energy for nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions in chemical and biological systems are investigated in this paper. The free energy surfaces and the activation energy are derived exactly in the general case in which the ligand vibration frequencies are not equal. The activation energy is derived by free energy minimization at the transition state. Our formulation leads to the Marcus-Hush [J. Chem. Phys. 24, 979 (1956); 98, 7170 (1994); 28, 962 (1958)] results in the equal-frequency limit and also generalizes the Marcus-Sumi [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] model in the context of studying the solvent dynamic effect on electron transfer reactions. It is found that when the ligand vibration frequencies are different, the activation energy derived from the Marcus-Hush formula deviates by 5%-10% from the exact value. If the reduced reorganization energy approximation is introduced in the Marcus-Hush formula, the result is almost exact.

  10. Intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd(1) nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca; Rinaldo, Serena; Wherland, Scot; Pecht, Israel

    2009-01-01

    The cd(1) nitrite reductases, which catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, are homodimers of 60 kDa subunits, each containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1). Heme-c is the electron entry site, whereas heme-d(1) constitutes the catalytic center. The 3D structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa nitrite reductase has been determined in both fully oxidized and reduced states. Intramolecular electron transfer (ET), between c and d(1) hemes is an essential step in the catalytic cycle. In earlier s...

  11. Two-photon electron transfer between quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective Hamiltonian of a system describing electrons of two quantum dots in a two-frequency electromagnetic field upon Raman resonance of the field with a pair of the electronic levels of different dots is obtained by the method of equivalent transformation. The states of the continuous spectrum (conduction bands) are correctly taken into account. The role of the terms describing the dynamic Stark effect in a two-body system is analysed. A new mechanism of particle transfer between quantum wells in a non-resonance electromagnetic field is proposed, which is free from disadvantages of previous models. (fourth seminar to the memory of d.n. klyshko)

  12. Electron transfer between quasi-zero-dimensional nanostructures.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav

    Munich : IEEE, 2010, s. 1-5. ISBN 978-1-4244-7799-9. [International Conference on Transparent Optical Networks /12./. Mnichov (DE), 27.06.2010-01.07.2010] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC10007; GA MŠk ME 866 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : electron transfer * quantum dots * electron-phonon interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ICTON.2010.5548991

  13. 76 FR 35219 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; Payment by Electronic Fund Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL...; Information Collection; Payment by Electronic Fund Transfer AGENCY: Department of Defense (DOD), General... previously approved information collection requirement concerning payment by electronic fund transfer....

  14. 77 FR 22067 - Proposed Collection of Information: Trace Request for Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) Payment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    ...Proposed Collection of Information: Trace Request for Electronic Funds Transfer...on a continuing information collection. By...Trace Request for Electronic Funds Transfer...Highway, Records and Information Management...

  15. Crossed Andreev reflection versus electron transfer in graphene nanoribbons

    OpenAIRE

    Haugen, Håvard; Huertas-Hernando, Daniel; Brataas, Arne; Waintal, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the transport properties of three-terminal graphene devices, where one terminal is superconducting and two are normal metals. The terminals are connected by nanoribbons. Electron transfer (ET) and crossed Andreev reflection (CAR) are identified via the non-local signal between the two normal terminals. Analytical expressions for ET and CAR in symmetric devices are found. We compute ET and CAR numerically for asymmetric devices. ET dominates CAR in symmetric de...

  16. Photoinduced electron transfer in singly labeled thiouredopyrenetrisulfonate azurin derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borovok, N; Kotlyar, A B; Pecht, I; Skov, L K; Farver, O

    1999-01-01

    A novel method for the initiation of intramolecular electron transfer reactions in azurin is reported. The method is based on laser photoexcitation of covalently attached thiouredopyrenetrisulfonate (TUPS), the reaction that generates the low potential triplet state of the dye with high quantum efficiency. TUPS derivatives of azurin, singly labeled at specific lysine residues, were prepared and purified to homogeneity by ion exchange HPLC. Transient absorption spectroscopy was used to directly m...

  17. Diffusion, spin and reaction control in geminate reverse electron transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Anatoly I. Burshtein; Krissinel, Evgenii B.; Steiner, Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    Kinetic analyses of geminate radical escape yields in terms of a simple (exponential) reaction scheme with first-order rate constants of separation and geminate recombination have been widely used in the literature, e.g. to evaluate rate constants of reverse electron transfer (k et). Here we demonstrate the limited value of such rate constants by formally analysing, in terms of the exponential model, the diffusion coefficient (?iz. viscosity) dependence of the radical escape yield as theoreti...

  18. Promoting direct interspecies electron transfer with activated carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fanghua; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin M.; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) is added to methanogenic digesters to enhance conversion of wastes to methane, but the mechanism(s) for GAC’s stimulatory effect are poorly understood. GAC has high electrical conductivity and thus it was hypothesized that one mechanism for GAC stimulation of methanogenesis might be to facilitate direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) between bacteria and methanogens. Metabolism was substantially accelerated when GAC was added to co-cultures of Geobacter met...

  19. Electrochemical studies on small electron transfer proteins using membrane electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Moura, José J G; Santos, M.M. Correia dos; Sousa, P. M. Paes de; Gonçalves, M.L. Simões; Krippahl, L.; Lojou, É.; Bianco, P

    2003-01-01

    Membrane electrodes (ME) were constructed using gold, glassy carbon and pyrolytic graphite supports and a dialysis membrane, and used to study the electrochemical behavior of small size electron transfer proteins: monohemic cytochrome c522 from Pseudomonas nautica and cytochrome c533 as well as rubredoxin from Desulfovibrio vulgaris . Different electrochemical techniques were used including cyclic voltammetry (CV), square wave voltammetry (SW) and differential pulse voltammetry (DP). A ...

  20. Low activation barriers characterize intramolecular electron transfer in ascorbate oxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1992-01-01

    Anaerobic reduction kinetics of the zucchini squash ascorbate oxidase (AO; L-ascorbate:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.10.3.3) by pulse radiolytically produced CO2- radical ions were investigated. Changes in the absorption bands of type 1 [Cu(II)] (610 nm) and type 3 [Cu(II)] (330 nm) were monitored over a range of reactant concentrations, pH, and temperature. The direct bimolecular reduction of type 1 [Cu(II)] [(1.2 +/- 0.2) x 10(9) M-1.s-1] was followed by its subsequent reoxidation in three distinct phases, all found to be unimolecular processes with the respective specific rates of 201 +/- 8, 20 +/- 4, and 2.3 +/- 0.2 s-1 at pH 5.5 and 298 K. While at this pH no direct bimolecular reduction was resolved in the 330-nm band, at pH 7.0 such a direct process was observed [(6.5 +/- 1.2) x 10(8) M-1.s-1]. In the same slower time domains where type 1 [Cu(I)] reoxidation was monitored, reduction of type 3 [Cu(II)] was observed, which was also concentration independent and with identical rate constants and amplitudes commensurate with those of type 1 [Cu(II)] reoxidation. These results show that after electron uptake by type 1 [Cu(II)], its reoxidation takes place by intramolecular electron transfer to type 3 [Cu(II)]. The observed specific rates are similar to values reported for the limiting-rate constants of AO reduction by excess substrate, suggesting that internal electron transfer is the rate-determining step of AO activity. The temperature dependence of the intramolecular electron transfer rate constants was measured from 275 to 308 K at pH 5.5 and, from the Eyring plots, low activation enthalpies were calculated--namely, 9.1 +/- 1.1 and 6.8 +/- 1.0 kJ.mol-1 for the fastest and slowest phases, respectively. The activation entropies observed for these respective phases were -170 +/- 9 and -215 +/- 16 J.K-1.mol-1. The exceptionally low enthalpy barriers imply the involvement of highly optimized electron transfer pathways for internal electron transfer.

  1. Photoinduced electron transfer in singly labeled thiouredopyrenetrisulfonate azurin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovok, N; Kotlyar, A B; Pecht, I; Skov, L K; Farver, O

    1999-08-27

    A novel method for the initiation of intramolecular electron transfer reactions in azurin is reported. The method is based on laser photoexcitation of covalently attached thiouredopyrenetrisulfonate (TUPS), the reaction that generates the low potential triplet state of the dye with high quantum efficiency. TUPS derivatives of azurin, singly labeled at specific lysine residues, were prepared and purified to homogeneity by ion exchange HPLC. Transient absorption spectroscopy was used to directly monitor the rates of the electron transfer reaction from the photoexcited triplet state of TUPS to Cu(II) and the back reaction from Cu(I) to the oxidized dye. For all singly labeled derivatives, the rate constants of copper ion reduction were one or two orders of magnitude larger than for its reoxidation, consistent with the larger thermodynamic driving force for the former process. Using 3-D coordinates of the crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and molecular structure calculation of the TUPS modified proteins, electron transfer pathways were calculated. Analysis of the results revealed a good correlation between separation distance from donor to Cu ligating atom (His-N or Cys-S) and the observed rate constants of Cu(II) reduction. PMID:10471793

  2. Photoinduced electron transfer in singly labeled thiouredopyrenetrisulfonate azurin derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borovok, N; Kotlyar, A B

    1999-01-01

    A novel method for the initiation of intramolecular electron transfer reactions in azurin is reported. The method is based on laser photoexcitation of covalently attached thiouredopyrenetrisulfonate (TUPS), the reaction that generates the low potential triplet state of the dye with high quantum efficiency. TUPS derivatives of azurin, singly labeled at specific lysine residues, were prepared and purified to homogeneity by ion exchange HPLC. Transient absorption spectroscopy was used to directly monitor the rates of the electron transfer reaction from the photoexcited triplet state of TUPS to Cu(II) and the back reaction from Cu(I) to the oxidized dye. For all singly labeled derivatives, the rate constants of copper ion reduction were one or two orders of magnitude larger than for its reoxidation, consistent with the larger thermodynamic driving force for the former process. Using 3-D coordinates of the crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and molecular structure calculation of the TUPS modified proteins, electron transfer pathways were calculated. Analysis of the results revealed a good correlation between separation distance from donor to Cu ligating atom (His-N or Cys-S) and the observed rate constants of Cu(II) reduction.

  3. The electron transfer system of syntrophically grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, C.B.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.K.; Ringbauer, Jr., J.A.; He, Q.; Zhou, J.; Voordouw, G.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Hazen, T.C.; Stolyar, S.; Stahl, D.A.

    2009-05-01

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  4. The Electron Transfer System of Syntrophically Grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PBD; ENIGMA; GTL; VIMSS; Walker, Christopher B.; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin K.; Ringbauer Jr., Joseph A.; He, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D.; Arkin, Adam P.; Hazen, Terry C.; Stolyar, Sergey; Stahl, David A.

    2009-06-22

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  5. Probing the nature of electron transfer in metalloproteins on graphene-family materials as nanobiocatalytic scaffold using electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanju; Irihamye, Aline

    2015-03-01

    Graphene-based nanomaterials have shown great promise not only in nanoelectronics due to ultrahigh electron mobility but also as biocatalytic scaffolds owing to irreversible protein surface adsorption and facilitating direct electron transfer. In this work, we synthesized stable dispersions of graphene using liquid-phase exfoliation approach based on non-covalent interactions between graphene and 1-pyrenesulfonic acid sodium salt (Py-1SO3), 1-pyrenemethylamine salt (Py - Me-NH2) and Pluronic® P-123 surfactant using only water as solvent compatible with biomolecules. The resulting graphene nanoplatelets (Gr_LPE) are characterized by a combination of analytical (microscopy and spectroscopy) techniques revealing mono- to few-layer graphene displaying that the exfoliation efficiency strongly depends upon the type of pyrene-based salts and organic surfactants. Moreover being completely water-based approach, we build robust nanoscaffolds of graphene-family nanomaterials (GFNs) namely, monolayer graphene, Gr_LPE (the one prepared with Pluronic® P-123), graphene oxide (GO) and its reduced form (rGO) on glassy carbon electrode surface with three important metalloproteins include cytochrome c (Cyt c) [for electron transfer], myoglobin (Mb) [for oxygen storage] and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) [for catalyzing the biochemical reaction]. In order to demonstrate the nanobiocatalytical activity of these proteins, we used electrochemical interfacial direct electron transfer (DET) kinetics and attempt to determine the rate constant (kET) using two different analytical approaches namely, linear sweep voltammetry and Laviron's theory. We elucidated that all of the metalloproteins retain their structural integrity (secondary structure) upon forming mixtures with GFNs confirmed through optical and vibrational spectroscopy and biological activity using electrochemistry. Among the GFNs studied, Gr-LPE, GO and rGO support the efficient electrical wiring of the redox centers (with an increase in catalytic efficiency of Cyt c and Mb in the presence of GFNs attributed partially to the surface functional (carboxyl, epoxide and hydroxyl) groups on GO and rGO facilitating rapid charge transfer.

  6. Immobilization, hybridization, and oxidation of synthetic DNA on gold surface: Electron transfer investigated by electrochemistry and scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwen, Gerald D.; Chen Fan [Biological Engineering Program, Department of Biological and Irrigation Engineering, Utah State University, 4105 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322-4105 (United States); Zhou Anhong, E-mail: Anhong.Zhou@usu.edu [Biological Engineering Program, Department of Biological and Irrigation Engineering, Utah State University, 4105 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322-4105 (United States)

    2009-06-08

    Fundamental understanding of interfacial electron transfer (ET) among electrolyte/DNA/solid-surface will facilitate the design for electrical detection of DNA molecules. In this report, the electron transfer characteristics of synthetic DNA (sequence from pathogenic Cryptosporidium parvum) self-assembled on a gold surface was electrochemically studied. The effects of immobilization order on the interface ET related parameters such as diffusion coefficient (D{sub 0}), surface coverage ({theta}{sub R}), and monolayer thickness (d{sub i}) were determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). DNA surface density ({Gamma}{sub DNA}) was determined by the integration of the charge of the electro-oxidation current peaks during the initial cyclic voltammetry scans. It was found that the DNA surface densities at different modifications followed the order: {Gamma}{sub DNA} (dsS-DNA/Au) > {Gamma}{sub DNA} (MCH/dsS-DNA/Au) > {Gamma}{sub DNA} (dsS-DNA/MCH/Au). It was also revealed that the electro-oxidation of the DNA modified gold surface would involve the oxidation of nucleotides (guanine and adenine) with a 5.51 electron transfer mechanism and the oxidative desorption of DNA and MCH molecules by a 3 electron transfer mechanism. STM topography and current image analysis indicated that the surface conductivity after each surface modification followed the order: dsS-DNA/Au < MCH/dsS-DNA/Au < oxidized MCH/dsS-DNA/Au < Hoechst/oxidized MCH/dsS-DNA/Au. The results from this study suggested a combination of variations in immobilization order may provide an alternative approach for the optimization of DNA hybridization and the further development for electrical detection of DNA.

  7. Immobilization, hybridization, and oxidation of synthetic DNA on gold surface: Electron transfer investigated by electrochemistry and scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fundamental understanding of interfacial electron transfer (ET) among electrolyte/DNA/solid-surface will facilitate the design for electrical detection of DNA molecules. In this report, the electron transfer characteristics of synthetic DNA (sequence from pathogenic Cryptosporidium parvum) self-assembled on a gold surface was electrochemically studied. The effects of immobilization order on the interface ET related parameters such as diffusion coefficient (D0), surface coverage (?R), and monolayer thickness (di) were determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). DNA surface density (?DNA) was determined by the integration of the charge of the electro-oxidation current peaks during the initial cyclic voltammetry scans. It was found that the DNA surface densities at different modifications followed the order: ?DNA (dsS-DNA/Au) > ?DNA (MCH/dsS-DNA/Au) > ?DNA (dsS-DNA/MCH/Au). It was also revealed that the electro-oxidation of the DNA modified gold surface would involve the oxidation of nucleotides (guanine and adenine) with a 5.51 electron transfer mechanism and the oxidative desorption of DNA and MCH molecules by a 3 electron transfer mechanism. STM topography and current image analysis indicated that the surface conductivity after each surface modification followed the order: dsS-DNA/Au < MCH/dsS-DNA/Au < oxidized MCH/dsS-DNA/Au < Hoechst/oxidized MCH/dsS-DNA/Au. The results from this study suggested a combination of variations in immobilization order may provide an alternative approach for the optimization of DNA hybridization and the further development for electrical detection of DNA.

  8. Probing the nature of electron transfer in metalloproteins on graphene-family materials as nanobiocatalytic scaffold using electrochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanju Gupta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Graphene-based nanomaterials have shown great promise not only in nanoelectronics due to ultrahigh electron mobility but also as biocatalytic scaffolds owing to irreversible protein surface adsorption and facilitating direct electron transfer. In this work, we synthesized stable dispersions of graphene using liquid-phase exfoliation approach based on non-covalent interactions between graphene and 1-pyrenesulfonic acid sodium salt (Py–1SO3, 1-pyrenemethylamine salt (Py ? Me-NH2 and Pluronic® P-123 surfactant using only water as solvent compatible with biomolecules. The resulting graphene nanoplatelets (Gr_LPE are characterized by a combination of analytical (microscopy and spectroscopy techniques revealing mono- to few-layer graphene displaying that the exfoliation efficiency strongly depends upon the type of pyrene-based salts and organic surfactants. Moreover being completely water-based approach, we build robust nanoscaffolds of graphene-family nanomaterials (GFNs namely, monolayer graphene, Gr_LPE (the one prepared with Pluronic® P-123, graphene oxide (GO and its reduced form (rGO on glassy carbon electrode surface with three important metalloproteins include cytochrome c (Cyt c [for electron transfer], myoglobin (Mb [for oxygen storage] and horseradish peroxidase (HRP [for catalyzing the biochemical reaction]. In order to demonstrate the nanobiocatalytical activity of these proteins, we used electrochemical interfacial direct electron transfer (DET kinetics and attempt to determine the rate constant (kET using two different analytical approaches namely, linear sweep voltammetry and Laviron’s theory. We elucidated that all of the metalloproteins retain their structural integrity (secondary structure upon forming mixtures with GFNs confirmed through optical and vibrational spectroscopy and biological activity using electrochemistry. Among the GFNs studied, Gr-LPE, GO and rGO support the efficient electrical wiring of the redox centers (with an increase in catalytic efficiency of Cyt c and Mb in the presence of GFNs attributed partially to the surface functional (carboxyl, epoxide and hydroxyl groups on GO and rGO facilitating rapid charge transfer.

  9. Intercellular wiring enables electron transfer between methanotrophic archaea and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Gunter; Krukenberg, Viola; Riedel, Dietmar; Tegetmeyer, Halina E; Boetius, Antje

    2015-10-22

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate controls the emission of the greenhouse gas methane from the ocean floor. In marine sediments, AOM is performed by dual-species consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) inhabiting the methane-sulfate transition zone. The biochemical pathways and biological adaptations enabling this globally relevant process are not fully understood. Here we study the syntrophic interaction in thermophilic AOM (TAOM) between ANME-1 archaea and their consortium partner SRB HotSeep-1 (ref. 6) at 60 °C to test the hypothesis of a direct interspecies exchange of electrons. The activity of TAOM consortia was compared to the first ANME-free culture of an AOM partner bacterium that grows using hydrogen as the sole electron donor. The thermophilic ANME-1 do not produce sufficient hydrogen to sustain the observed growth of the HotSeep-1 partner. Enhancing the growth of the HotSeep-1 partner by hydrogen addition represses methane oxidation and the metabolic activity of ANME-1. Further supporting the hypothesis of direct electron transfer between the partners, we observe that under TAOM conditions, both ANME and the HotSeep-1 bacteria overexpress genes for extracellular cytochrome production and form cell-to-cell connections that resemble the nanowire structures responsible for interspecies electron transfer between syntrophic consortia of Geobacter. HotSeep-1 highly expresses genes for pili production only during consortial growth using methane, and the nanowire-like structures are absent in HotSeep-1 cells isolated with hydrogen. These observations suggest that direct electron transfer is a principal mechanism in TAOM, which may also explain the enigmatic functioning and specificity of other methanotrophic ANME-SRB consortia. PMID:26490622

  10. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Grubb, Mikala

    2003-01-01

    Redox metalloproteins immobilized on metallic surfaces in contact with aqueous biological media are important in many areas of pure and applied sciences. Redox metalloprotein films are currently being addressed by new approaches where biotechnology including modified and synthetic proteins is combined with state-of-the-art physical electrochemistry with emphasis on single-crystal, atomically planar electrode surfaces, in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and other surface techniques. These approaches have brought bioelectrochemistry important steps forward towards the nanoscale and single-molecule levels.We discuss here these advances with reference to two specific redox metalloproteins, the blue single-copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and the single-haem protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cytochrome c, and a short oligonucleotide. Both proteins can be immobilized on Au(111) by chemisorption via exposed sulfur-containing residues. Voltammetric, interfacial capacitance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and microcantilever sensor data, together with in situ STM with single-molecule resolution, all point to a coherent view of monolayer organization with protein electron transfer (ET) function retained. In situ STM can also address the microscopic mechanisms for electron tunnelling through the biomolecules and offers novel notions such as coherent multi-ET between the substrate and tip via the molecular redox levels. This differs in important respects from electrochemical ET at a single metal/electrolyte interface. Similar data for a short oligonucleotide immobilized on Au(111) show that oligonucleotides can be characterized with comparable detail, with novel perspectives for addressing DNA electronic conduction mechanisms and for biological screening towards the single-molecule level.

  11. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redox metalloproteins immobilized on metallic surfaces in contact with aqueous biological media are important in many areas of pure and applied sciences. Redox metalloprotein films are currently being addressed by new approaches where biotechnology including modified and synthetic proteins is combined with state-of-the-art physical electrochemistry with emphasis on single-crystal, atomically planar electrode surfaces, in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and other surface techniques. These approaches have brought bioelectrochemistry important steps forward towards the nanoscale and single-molecule levels. We discuss here these advances with reference to two specific redox metalloproteins, the blue single-copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and the single-haem protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cytochrome c, and a short oligonucleotide. Both proteins can be immobilized on Au(111) by chemisorption via exposed sulfur-containing residues. Voltammetric, interfacial capacitance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and microcantilever sensor data, together with in situ STM with single-molecule resolution, all point to a coherent view of monolayer organization with protein electron transfer (ET) function retained. In situ STM can also address the microscopic mechanisms for electron tunnelling through the biomolecules and offers novel notions such as coherent multi-ET between the substrate and tip via the molecular redox levels. This differs in important respects from electrochemical ET at a single metal/electrolyte interface. Similar data for a short oligonucleotide immobilized on Au(111) show that oligonucleotides can be characterized with comparable detail, with novel perspectives for addressing DNA electronic conduction mechanisms and for biological screening towards the single-molecule level

  12. Overpotential-induced lability of the electronic overlap factor in long-range electrochemical electron transfer: charge and distance dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornyshev, A. A.; Kuznetsov, A. M.; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik; Ulstrup, Jens

    2000-01-01

    Long-distance electrochemical electron transfer exhibits approximately exponential dependence on the electron transfer distance. On the basis of a jellium model of the metal surface we show that the slope of the logarithm of the current vs. the transfer distance also depends strongly on the electrode charge. The slope is smaller the more negative the charge density due to enhanced extension of the surface electronic density profile on the solution side, and thereby better electronic overlap with...

  13. Coupling of narrow and wide band-gap semiconductors on uniform films active in bacterial disinfection under low intensity visible light: implications of the interfacial charge transfer (IFCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rtimi, S; Sanjines, R; Pulgarin, C; Houas, A; Lavanchy, J-C; Kiwi, J

    2013-09-15

    This study reports the design, preparation, testing and surface characterization of uniform films deposited by sputtering Ag and Ta on non-heat resistant polyester to evaluate the Escherichia coli inactivation by TaON, TaN/Ag, Ag and TaON/Ag polyester. Co-sputtering for 120 s Ta and Ag in the presence of N? and O? led to the faster E. coli inactivation by a TaON/Ag sample within ?40 min under visible light irradiation. The deconvolution of TaON/Ag peaks obtained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) allowed the assignment of the Ta?O? and Ag-species. The shifts observed for the XPS peaks have been assigned to AgO to Ag?O and Ag(0), and are a function of the applied sputtering times. The mechanism of interfacial charge transfer (IFCT) from the Ag?O conduction band (cb) to the lower laying Ta?O? (cb) is discussed suggesting a reaction mechanism. The optical absorption of the TaON and TaON/Ag samples found by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) correlated well with the kinetics of E. coli inactivation. The TaON/Ag sample microstructure was characterized by contact angle (CA) and by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Self-cleaning of the TaON/Ag polyester after each disinfection cycle enabled repetitive E. coli inactivation. PMID:23867967

  14. Electron Transfer Dissociation (ETD) of Peptides Containing Intrachain Disulfide Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Scott R.; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Xinrong; Xia, Yu

    2012-02-01

    The fragmentation chemistry of peptides containing intrachain disulfide bonds was investigated under electron transfer dissociation (ETD) conditions. Fragments within the cyclic region of the peptide backbone due to intrachain disulfide bond formation were observed, including: c (odd electron), z (even electron), c-33 Da, z + 33 Da, c + 32 Da, and z-32 Da types of ions. The presence of these ions indicated cleavages both at the disulfide bond and the N-C? backbone from a single electron transfer event. Mechanistic studies supported a mechanism whereby the N-C? bond was cleaved first, and radical-driven reactions caused cleavage at either an S-S bond or an S-C bond within cysteinyl residues. Direct ETD at the disulfide linkage was also observed, correlating with signature loss of 33 Da (SH) from the charge-reduced peptide ions. Initial ETD cleavage at the disulfide bond was found to be promoted amongst peptides ions of lower charge states, while backbone fragmentation was more abundant for higher charge states. The capability of inducing both backbone and disulfide bond cleavages from ETD could be particularly useful for sequencing peptides containing intact intrachain disulfide bonds. ETD of the 13 peptides studied herein all showed substantial sequence coverage, accounting for 75%-100% of possible backbone fragmentation.

  15. Coherence Transfer by Passage Pulses in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Gunnar; Pribitzer, Stephan; Doll, Andrin

    2015-10-29

    Linear passage pulses provide a simple approach to ultra-wideband electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. We show by numerical simulations that the efficiency of inversion of polarization or coherence order on a single transition by idealized passage pulses is an exponential function of critical adiabaticity during passage, which allows for defining an effective flip angle for fast passage. This result is confirmed by experiments on E' centers in Herasil glass. Deviations from the exponential law arise due to relaxation and a distribution of the adiabaticity parameter that comes from inhomogeneity of the irradiation field. Such inhomogeneity effects as well as edge effects in finite sweep bands cause a distribution of dynamic phase shifts, which can be partially refocused in echo experiments. In multilevel systems, passage of several transitions leads to generation of coherence on formally forbidden transitions that can also be described by the concept of an effective flip angle. On the one hand, such transfer to coherence on forbidden transitions is a significant magnetization loss mechanism for dipole-dipole coupled electron spin pairs at distances below about 2 nm. On the other hand, it can potentially be harnessed for electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) experiments, where matching of the irradiation field strength to the nuclear Zeeman frequency leads to efficient generation of nuclear coherence and efficient back transfer to electron coherence on allowed transitions at high adiabaticity. PMID:25941897

  16. 48 CFR 52.232-35 - Designation of Office for Government Receipt of Electronic Funds Transfer Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...Government Receipt of Electronic Funds Transfer Information. 52.232-35...Government Receipt of Electronic Funds Transfer Information. As prescribed...Government Receipt of Electronic Funds Transfer Information (MAY 1999)...

  17. Electron transfer. 88. Cobalt(III)-bound phosphite and hypophosphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphite and hypophosphite coordinate to cobalt(III) in (NH3)5Co/sup III/ through oxygen, rather than through phosphorus. The resulting complexes undergo electron-transfer reactions with Ru(NH3)62+ much more slowly than with Eu2+ or V2+, indicating that the latter two reactants preferentially utilize ligand bridging. Reductions with Cr2+ are shown to accompanied by transfer of the phosphorus-containing ligands, and reaction of the protonated phosphito (biphosphito) derivative (pK/sub A/ = 3.06 at 230C) proceeds through a combination of acid-independent and inverse-acid paths, both routes yielding the same phosphito-bound Cr(III) product. The hypophosphito, but not the biphosphito, complex reacts with Ce(IV), producing Co2+ in an induced electron-transfer process. The yield of Co2+ falls off progressively as [Ce/sup IV/] is increased, pointing to a sequence in which a Co(III)-bound P(II) radical is formed in initial attack by Ce(IV) but subsequently undergoes partition between competing reaction paths, i.e. internal electron transfer to Co(III) vs external oxidation by a second Ce(IV) center. The hypophosphito complex, but not the biphosphito complex, smoothly decomposes in basic media via an internal redox reaction, yielding Co(II) quantitatively, along with a 1:1 mixture of phosphite, and hypophosphite. This transformation, which fails with mixtures of (NH3)5Co(H2O)3+ and H2PO2- appears to be catalyzed specifically by OH-. Deuterium-labeling experiments disclose a solvent isotope effect. Reaction mechanisms are suggested for all the observed results. 54 references, 5 tables

  18. Noise-assisted quantum electron transfer in photosynthetic complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterov, Alexander I; Martínez, José Manuel Sánchez; Sayre, Richard T

    2013-01-01

    Electron transfer (ET) between primary electron donors and acceptors is modeled in the photosystem II reaction center (RC). Our model includes (i) two discrete energy levels associated with donor and acceptor, interacting through a dipole-type matrix element and (ii) two continuum manifolds of electron energy levels ("sinks"), which interact directly with the donor and acceptor. Namely, two discrete energy levels of the donor and acceptor are embedded in their independent sinks through the corresponding interaction matrix elements. We also introduce classical (external) noise which acts simultaneously on the donor and acceptor (collective interaction). We derive a closed system of integro-differential equations which describes the non-Markovian quantum dynamics of the ET. A region of parameters is found in which the ET dynamics can be simplified, and described by coupled ordinary differential equations. Using these simplified equations, both sharp and flat redox potentials are analyzed. We analytically and nu...

  19. Effects of electrostatic interactions on electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fast reactions of electron transfer are studied by pulse radiolysis. This technique allows the creation in about 10-8 second radicals and radical ions with high redox potentials. For solvated electrons electrostatic interaction on the kinetics of reactions limited by diffusion is described by Debye's equation when ion mobility is known. Deviation from theory can occur in ion pairs formation. This is evidenced experimentally for anions by cation complexation with a cryptate. Relatively slow reactions are more sensitive to electrostatic interactions than limited by diffusion. If ion pairs are not formed kinetics constant depends on dielectric constant of solvent and reaction radius. Experimentally is studied the effect of electrostatic interaction on the rate constants of solvated electrons with anions and cations in water-ethanol mixtures where the dielectric constant change from 80 to 25 at room temperature. 17 refs

  20. Electron-transfer reactions of tryptophan and tyrosine derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidation of tryptophan, tyrosine, and derivatives by oxidizing radicals was studied by pulse radiolysis in aqueous solutions at 20 0C. Rate constants for the oxidation of tryptophan derivatives with .N3 and Br2-. radicals vary from 8 x 108 to 4.8 and 109 M-1 s-1 and oxidation goes to completion; no pH dependence was observed. Oxidation rate constants for tyrosine derivatives increase upon deprotonation of the phenolic residue at higher pH. Redox potentials for the indolyl and phenoxyl radicals were derived from the measured equilibrium constants by using p-methoxyphenol (E/sub 7.5/ = 0.6 and E13 = 0.4 V), bisulfite (E3 = 0.84 V), and guanosine (E7 = 0.91 V) redox couples as reference systems. Redox potentials of tryptophan derivatives were found to be in dependent on the nature of the side chain and higher than the redox potentials of tryptophan derivatives. Electron transfer from tyrosine to tryptophyl radical was found to be slow in neutral media and is suggested to proceed via multiple steps, one of which is proton transfer from tyrosine to tryptophyl radical followed by electron transfer. 26 references, 2 figures, 4 tables

  1. Modeling biofilms with dual extracellular electron transfer mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-11-28

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as their terminal electron acceptor for metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce components requisite for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates both diffusion- and conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found the literature. Our simulation results showed that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct measurements and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that cyclic and squarewave voltammetry are currently not good tools to determine the specific percentage of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms used by biofilms. The developed model will be a critical tool in designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms.

  2. Controlling time scales for electron transfer through proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scot Wherland

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Electron transfer processes within proteins constitute key elements in biological energy conversion processes as well as in a wide variety of biochemical transformations. Pursuit of the parameters that control the rates of these processes is driven by the great interest in the latter reactions. Here, we review a considerable body of results emerging from investigation of intramolecular electron transfer (ET reactions in two types of proteins, all done by the use of the pulse-radiolysis method: first are described results of extensive studies of a model system, the bacterial electron mediating protein azurin, where an internal ET between the disulfide radical ion and the Cu(II is induced. Impact of specific structural changes introduced into azurin on the reaction rates and the parameters controlling it are discussed. Then, the presentation is extended to results of investigations of intra-protein ET reactions that are part of catalytic cycles of multi-copper containing enzymes. Again, the rates and the parameters controlling them are presented and discussed in the context of their efficacy and possible constraints set on their evolution.

  3. Single Electron Transfer Living Radical Polymerization via a New Initiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiongxiong; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Xu; Ai, Lingling; Cheng, Chuanjie

    2014-08-01

    Research and development of novel initiating system such as single electron transfer living radical polymerization (SET-LRP) is of high importance in polymer chemistry. A new SET-LRP initiator was synthesized and applied to prepare end-functionalized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in this study. ?-Trichloromethyl benzyl alcohol was firstly synthesized, followed by preparation of PMMA under SET-LRP conditions. Conversion of MMA was 81.9%, and the molecular weight of PMMA was about 2.5 kDa at 60 °C for 1 h. Consistency of the number-average molecular weight of PMMA from NMR, GPC and theoretical calculation indicated that the polymerization featured controllable property. Broad molecular weight distribution (MWD) may be ascribed to branched polymers formed by initiation and chain transfer.

  4. A stochastic reorganizational bath model for electronic energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The fluctuations of optical gap induced by the environment play crucial roles in electronic energy transfer dynamics. One of the simplest approaches to incorporate such fluctuations in energy transfer dynamics is the well known Haken-Strobl-Reineker model, in which the energy-gap fluctuation is approximated as a white noise. Recently, several groups have employed molecular dynamics simulations and excited-state calculations in conjunction to take the thermal fluctuation of excitation energies into account. Here, we discuss a rigorous connection between the stochastic and the atomistic bath models. If the phonon bath is treated classically, time evolution of the exciton-phonon system can be described by Ehrenfest dynamics. To establish the relationship between the stochastic and atomistic bath models, we employ a projection operator technique to derive the generalized Langevin equations for the energy-gap fluctuations. The stochastic bath model can be obtained as an approximation of the atomistic Ehrenfest equ...

  5. Local operator partitioning of electronic energy for electronic energy transfer: An efficient algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Brumer, Paul

    2013-01-01

    An efficient computational algorithm to implement a local operator approach to partitioning electronic energy in general molecular systems is presented. This approach, which rigorously defines the electronic energy on any subsystem within a molecule, gives a precise meaning to the subsystem ground and excited electronic energies, which is crucial for investigating electronic energy transfer from first principles. We apply the technique to the $9-$(($1-$naphthyl)$-$methyl)-anthracene (A1N) molecule by partitioning A1N into anthracenyl and CH$_2-$naphthyl groups as subsystems, and examine their electronic energies and populations for several excited states using Configuration Interaction Singles method. The implemented approach shows a wide variety of different behaviors amongst these excited electronic states.

  6. Electronic excitation energy transfer between quasi-zero-dimensional systems.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav; Mao, H.

    Tokyo : The Surface Science Society of Japan, 2014, s. 11-17. ISSN 1348-0391. [International Conference on Atomically Controlled Surfaces, Interfaces and Nanostructures /12/ - International Colloquium on Scanning Probe Microscopy /21./. Tsukuba (JP), 04.11.2013-08.11.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12236; GA MŠk LH12186 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : quantum dots * energy transfer * electron-phonon interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/result?item1=4&word1=Atomically+Controlled+Surfaces+AND+kral

  7. Photoinduced electron transfer from phycoerythrin to colloidal metal semiconductor nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiravan, A.; Chandramohan, M.; Renganathan, R.; Sekar, S.

    2009-04-01

    Phycoerythrin is a water soluble pigment which absorbs in the visible region at 563 nm. The interaction of phycoerythrin with colloidal metal semiconductors was studied by absorption, FT-IR and fluorescence spectroscopy. Phycoerythrin adsorbed strongly on the surface of TiO 2 nanoparticles, the apparent association constant for the association between colloidal metal-TiO 2 nanoparticles and phycoerythrin was determined from fluorescence quenching data. The free energy change (? Get) for electron transfer process has been calculated by applying Rehm-Weller equation.

  8. Photoinduced Electron Transfer Based Ion Sensing within an Optical Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya M. Monro

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We combine suspended-core microstructured optical fibers with the photoinduced electron transfer (PET effect to demonstrate a new type of fluorescent optical fiber-dip sensing platform for small volume ion detection. A sensor design based on a simple model PET-fluoroionophore system and small core microstructured optical fiber capable of detecting sodium ions is demonstrated. The performance of the dip sensor operating in a high sodium concentration regime (925 ppm Na+ and for lower sodium concentration environments (18.4 ppm Na+ is explored and future approaches to improving the sensor’s signal stability, sensitivity and selectivity are discussed.

  9. The intramolecular electron transfer between copper sites of nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Eady, R R; Abraham, Z H; Pecht, I

    1998-01-01

    The intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the type 1 Cu(I) and the type 2 Cu(II) sites of Alcaligenes xylosoxidans dissimilatory nitrite reductase (AxNiR) has been studied in order to compare it with the analogous process taking place in ascorbate oxidase (AO). This internal process is induced following reduction of the type 1 Cu(II) by radicals produced by pulse radiolysis. The reversible ET reaction proceeds with a rate constant kET = k(1-->2) + k(2-->1) of 450 +/- 30 s(-1) at pH 7.0 a...

  10. Computer simulation studies of electron transfer in methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Teresa; Ladanyi, Branka M.

    1994-02-01

    We describe the results of our molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of intramolecular electron transfer reactions in methanol. We consider the reactions of the type DA?D+A- in which the reactant state is nonpolar and the product state polar. Equilibrium MD is used to construct the solvent-dependent reaction free energy profiles and nonequilibrium MD simulations are used to calculate the reaction dynamics for barrierless and low barrier photochemical reactions. The roles of solute size, hydrogen-bonding, solvation dynamics for solutes of different polarity, and reaction driving force are investigated.

  11. Light induced electron transfer reactions of metal complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Properties of the excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of chromium(III), iron(II), ruthenium(II), osmium(II), rhodium(III), and iridium(III) are described. The electron transfer reactions of the ground and excited states are discussed and interpreted in terms of the driving force for the reaction and the distortions of the excited states relative to the corresponding ground states. General considerations relevant to the conversion of light into chemical energy are presented and progress in the use of polypyridine complexes to effect the light decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen is reviewed

  12. Effect of electrostatic interactions on electron-transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast reactions of electron transfer are studied by pulsed radiolysis. By this technique radicals and ionic radicals with high redox potentials are created homogeneously in the solution in about 10-8 second. For solvated electron effect of electrostatic interaction on kinetics of reactions limited by diffusion is obtained with a good approximation by the Debye equation when ion mobility is known. Deviation from the theory occurs in ion pair formation, which is evidenced experimentally in reactions between anions when cations are complexed by a cryptate. Slow reactions k 8 M-1 s-1 are more sensitive to electrostatic interactions than reactions limited by diffusion. When there is no ion pair formation the velocity constant depends upon dielectric constant of the solvent and reaction distance. 17 refs

  13. The electronic transfer of information and aerospace knowledge diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Bishop, Ann P.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Increasing reliance on and investment in information technology and electronic networking systems presupposes that computing and information technology will play a motor role in the diffusion of aerospace knowledge. Little is known, however, about actual information technology needs, uses, and problems within the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. The authors state that the potential contributions of information technology to increased productivity and competitiveness will be diminished unless empirically derived knowledge regarding the information-seeking behavior of the members of the social system - those who are producing, transferring, and using scientific and technical information - is incorporated into a new technology policy framework. Research into the use of information technology and electronic networks by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists, collected as part of a research project designed to study aerospace knowledge diffusion, is presented in support of this assertion.

  14. Generalized Holstein model for spin-dependent electron transfer reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Li-Ping; Sun, C P

    2011-01-01

    Some chemical reactions are described by electron transfer (ET) processes. The underlying mechanism could be modeled as a polaron motion in the molecular crystal-the Holstein model. By taking spin degrees of freedom into consideration, we generalize the Holstein model (molecular crystal model) to microscopically describe an ET chemical reaction. In our model, the electron spins in the radical pair simultaneously interact with a magnetic field and their nuclear-spin environments. By virtue of the perturbation approach, we obtain the chemical reaction rates for different initial states. It is discovered that the chemical reaction rate of the triplet state demonstrates its dependence on the direction of the magnetic field while the counterpart of the singlet state does not. This difference is attributed to the explicit dependence of the triplet state on the direction when the axis is rotated. Our model may provide a possible candidate for the microscopic origin of avian compass.

  15. Analysis of electron transfer processes across liquid/liquid interfaces: estimation of free energy of activation using diffuse boundary model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harinipriya, S; Sangaranarayanan, M V

    2006-01-31

    The evaluation of the free energy of activation pertaining to the electron-transfer reactions occurring at liquid/liquid interfaces is carried out employing a diffuse boundary model. The interfacial solvation numbers are estimated using a lattice gas model under the quasichemical approximation. The standard reduction potentials of the redox couples, appropriate inner potential differences, dielectric permittivities, as well as the width of the interface are included in the analysis. The methodology is applied to the reaction between [Fe(CN)6](3-/4-) and [Lu(biphthalocyanine)](3+/4+) at water/1,2-dichloroethane interface. The rate-determining step is inferred from the estimated free energy of activation for the constituent processes. The results indicate that the solvent shielding effect and the desolvation of the reactants at the interface play a central role in dictating the free energy of activation. The heterogeneous electron-transfer rate constant is evaluated from the molar reaction volume and the frequency factor. PMID:16430304

  16. A semiclassical theory of electron transfer reactions in Condon approximation and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Sokolov, V. V.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the modulation of the electronic wave functions by configurational fluctuations of the molecular environment on the kinetic parameters of electron transfer reactions is discussed. A self-consistent algorithm for the calculation of the potential profile along the reaction coordinate of adiabatic electron transfer reactions is elaborated. A new formula for the transition probability of non-adiabatic electron transfer reactions is obtained in an improved Condon approximation A regular...

  17. Photoinduced electron transfer in rhenium(I)-oligotriarylamine molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonn, Annabell G; Neuburger, Markus; Wenger, Oliver S

    2014-10-20

    Two molecular triads with an oligotriarylamine multielectron donor were synthesized and investigated with a view to obtaining charge-separated states in which the oligotriarylamine is oxidized 2-fold. Such photoinduced accumulation of multiple redox equivalents is of interest for artificial photosynthesis. The first triad was comprised of the oligotriarylamine and two rhenium(I) tricarbonyl diimine photosensitizers each of which can potentially accept one electron. In the second triad the oligotriarylamine was connected to anthraquinone, in principle an acceptor of two electrons, via a rhenium(I) tricarbonyl diimine unit. With nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy (using an ordinary pump-probe technique) no evidence for the generation of 2-fold oxidized oligotriarylamine or 2-fold reduced anthraquinone was found. The key factors limiting the photochemistry of the new triads to simple charge separation of one electron and one hole are discussed, and the insights gained from this study are useful for further research in the area of charge accumulation in purely molecular (nanoparticle-free) systems. An important problem of the rhenium-based systems considered here is the short wavelength required for photoexcitation. In the second triad, photogenerated anthraquinone monoanion is protonated by organic acids, and the resulting semiquinone species leads to an increase in lifetime of the charge-separated state by about an order of magnitude. This shows that the proton-coupled electron transfer chemistry of quinones could be beneficial for photoinduced charge accumulation. PMID:25271567

  18. Electron emission and electron transfer processes in proton-naphthalene collisions at intermediate velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, P. M.; Rajput, J.; Safvan, C. P.; Vig, S.; Kadhane, U.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the fragmentation and ionization of naphthalene by protons at intermediate velocities (between 1.41 and 2.68 a.u.). Relative cross sections for electron capture (EC), electron emission (EE), and capture ionization are measured. The EC cross sections decrease rapidly over the energy range under consideration (50-150 keV) and are lower than EE cross sections. The EE cross sections, on the other hand, change very slowly in this energy range. The energetics of interactions is quantified by comparing the mass spectra with the photodissociation breakdown curves from literature. In the case of single capture, resonant electron transfer to n = 1 state in H+ is seen to dominate the interaction but is shown to be accompanied by a small amount of electronic energy loss. In the EE mode, two mechanisms are shown to be active in the collision process: large impact parameter plasmon excitation mode, and closer encounters with higher amounts of electronic energy loss.

  19. Determination of the electronics transfer function for current transient measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Scharf, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We describe a straight-forward method for determining the transfer function of the readout of a sensor for the situation in which the current transient of the sensor can be precisely simulated. The method relies on the convolution theorem of Fourier transforms. The specific example is a planar silicon pad diode connected with a 50 $\\Omega $ cable to an amplifier followed by a 5 GS/s sampling oscilloscope. The charge carriers in the sensor were produced by picosecond lasers with light of wavelengths of 675 and 1060 nm. The transfer function is determined from the 1060 nm data with the pad diode biased at 1000 V. It is shown that the simulated sensor response convoluted with this transfer function provides an excellent description of the measured transients for the laser light of both wavelengths, at voltages 50 V above the depletion voltage of about 90 V up to the maximum applied voltage of 1000 V. The method has been developed for the precise measurement of the dependence of the drift velocity of electrons an...

  20. Electron-transfer functionality of synthetic coiled-coil metalloproteins

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Michael Y., Ogawa; Jiufeng, Fan; Anna, Fedorova; Jing, Hong; Olesya A., Kharenko; Anna Y., Kornilova; Robin C., Lasey; Fei, Xie.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available O campo emergente da engenharia molecular de metaloproteínas visa preparar proteínas artificiais, cujas propriedades podem imitar e talvez até mesmo melhorar várias características encontradas nas metaloenzimas naturais. Este artigo de revisão resume nossos esforços recentes na preparação de metalop [...] roteínas sintéticas, construídas a partir de "coiled-coils" alfa-hélices, e na incorporação de grupos de transferência de elétrons nesses sistemas. Recentemente, concebemos uma cisteína contendo um peptídeo com hélice randômica, o qual forma uma estrutura "coiled-coil" alfa-helicoidal ao se ligar a vários metais. O aduto de CuI pode atuar como agente fotoindutor de transferência de elétrons para receptores exógenos, e transfere elétrons por colisão na região invertida de Marcus para várias aminas de rutênio, as quais atuam como receptores. Especula-se que este resultado inesperado advenha do posicionamento do cofator de CuI no interior da porção hidrofóbica da proteína, o qual proíbe a aproximação entre o doador e o receptor, diminuindo a velocidade de transferência eletrônica daquelas reações termodinamicamente muito favorecidas, para velocidades inferiores à do limite difusional. Abstract in english The emerging field of metalloprotein design seeks to prepare artificial proteins whose properties can mimic, enhance, and perhaps improve upon many features found in natural metalloenzymes. This review summarizes our recent efforts to prepare synthetic metalloproteins built from alpha-helical coiled [...] -coils and to incorporate electron-transfer functionality within these systems. We have recently designed a cysteine-containing random-coil peptide which forms a alpha-helical coiled-coil upon binding various metals. The CuI adduct can serve as photoinduced electron-transfer agent to exogenous acceptors and undergoes collisional electron-transfer in the inverted Marcus region to various ruthenium ammine acceptors. It is speculated that this unexpected result might be due to the positioning of the CuI cofactor within the hydrophobic core of the protein which prohibits close approach between the donor and acceptor to slow the high driving force reaction rates below the diffusion limit.

  1. Concerted Proton-Electron Transfers: Fundamentals and Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2014-06-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfers (PCET) are ubiquitous in natural and synthetic processes. This review focuses on reactions where the two events are concerted. Semiclassical models of such reactions allow their kinetic characterization through activation versus driving force relationships, estimates of reorganization energies, effects of the nature of the proton acceptor, and H/D kinetic isotope effect as well as their discrimination from stepwise pathways. Several homogeneous reactions (through stopped-flow and laser flash-quench techniques) and electrochemical processes are discussed in this framework. Once the way has been rid of the improper notion of pH-dependent driving force, water appears as a remarkable proton acceptor in terms of reorganization energy and pre-exponential factor, thanks to its H-bonded and H-bonding properties, similarly to purposely synthesized “H-bond train” molecules. The most recent developments are in modeling and description of emblematic concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) reactions associated with the breaking of a heavy-atom bond in an all-concerted process.

  2. ELECTRONIC FUNDS TRANSFER: EXPLORING THE DIFFICULTIES OF SECURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MPAKWANA ANNASTACIA MTHEMBU

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Generally the banking laws, regulations and supervision were designed primarily to address the fundamental principle relating to safe and sound business practices by financial institutions. In order to maintain safe and sound business practice it is of outmost importance that customers are protected against losses resulting from inadequate remedies available to them. Banking by its very nature is a high risk business. However, the major risks associated with banking are legal risks, credit interest rates and liquidity. Internet banking has increased some of these risks by creating new ones. Electronic funds transfers are based on technology which by its nature is designed to extend the geographical reach of banks and customers. This kind of a market expansion extend beyond borders, therefore there will be problems which banks will try to avoid like regulation and supervision. Other regulatory and legal risks include, the uncertainty about legal requirements in some countries and jurisdiction ambiguities regarding the responsibilities of different national authorities. Customers and banks may be exposed to legal risks associated with non-compliance with different national laws and regulations including consumer protection laws, record keeping and report requirements. Due to insecurity created by electronic funds transfer, it of importance to analyse measures under South African Law and whether these measures can effectively prevent insecurity and what lessons can be learned from abroad.

  3. Promoting direct interspecies electron transfer with activated carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fanghua; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena

    2012-01-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) is added to methanogenic digesters to enhance conversion of wastes to methane, but the mechanism(s) for GAC’s stimulatory effect are poorly understood. GAC has high electrical conductivity and thus it was hypothesized that one mechanism for GAC stimulation of methanogenesis might be to facilitate direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) between bacteria and methanogens. Metabolism was substantially accelerated when GAC was added to co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens and Geobacter sulfurreducens grown under conditions previously shown to require DIET. Cells were attached to GAC, but did not aggregate as they do when making biological electrical connections between cells. Studies with a series of gene deletion mutants eliminated the possibility that GAC promoted electron exchange via interspecies hydrogen or formate transfer and demonstrated that DIET in the presence of GAC did not require the electrically conductive pili and associated c-type cytochrome involved in biological interspecies electrical connections. GAC also greatly stimulated ethanol metabolism and methane production in co-cultures of G. metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri. Cells were attached to GAC, but not closely aggregated, suggesting little opportunity for biological electrical contacts between the species. GAC also enhanced methane production in samples from a methanogenic digester in which Methanosaeta were the predominant methanogens. The results demonstrate that GAC can promote DIET and suggest that stimulation of metabolism in methanogenic digesters can be attributed, at least in part, to the high conductivity of GAC providing better interspecies electrical connections than those that can be forged biologically.

  4. MD studies of electron transfer at ambient and elevated pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Alex; Spooner, Jacob; Weinberg, Noham

    2013-06-01

    The effect of pressure on the rate constants of outer-sphere electron transfer reactions has often been described using the Marcus-Hush theory. This theory agrees well with experiment when internal reorganization of the ionic system is negligible, however it does not offer a recipe for calculation of the effects that result from significant solute restructuring. We have recently developed a molecular dynamics technique that accurately describes structural dependence of molecular volumes in non-polar and weakly polar systems. We are now extending this approach to the case of highly polar ionic systems where both solvent and solute restructuring components are important. For this purpose we construct pressure-dependent two-dimensional surfaces for electron transfer reactions in coordinate system composed of interionic distance and Marcus-type solvent polarization coordinate, and use these surfaces to describe pressure effects on reaction kinetics. R.A. Marcus. J. Chem. Phys. 24, 966 (1956); 24, 979 (1956); 26, 867 (1957). Discuss. Faraday Soc. 29, 21 (1960). Faraday Discuss. Chem. Soc. 74, 7 (1982); N.S. Hush. Trans. Faraday Soc. 57, 557 (1961).

  5. Hydrogen transfer between sulfuric acid and hydroxyl radical in the gas phase: competition among hydrogen atom transfer, proton-coupled electron-transfer, and double proton transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglada, Josep M; Olivella, Santiago; Solé, Albert

    2006-02-01

    In an attempt to assess the potential role of the hydroxyl radical in the atmospheric degradation of sulfuric acid, the hydrogen transfer between H2SO4 and HO* in the gas phase has been investigated by means of DFT and quantum-mechanical electronic-structure calculations, as well as classical transition state theory computations. The first step of the H2SO4 + HO* reaction is the barrierless formation of a prereactive hydrogen-bonded complex (Cr1) lying 8.1 kcal mol(-1) below the sum of the (298 K) enthalpies of the reactants. After forming Cr1, a single hydrogen transfer from H2SO4 to HO* and a degenerate double hydrogen-exchange between H2SO4 and HO* may occur. The single hydrogen transfer, yielding HSO4* and H2O, can take place through three different transition structures, the two lowest energy ones (TS1 and TS2) corresponding to a proton-coupled electron-transfer mechanism, whereas the higher energy one (TS3) is associated with a hydrogen atom transfer mechanism. The double hydrogen-exchange, affording products identical to reactants, takes place through a transition structure (TS4) involving a double proton-transfer mechanism and is predicted to be the dominant pathway. A rate constant of 1.50 x 10(-14) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 298 K is obtained for the overall reaction H2SO4 + HO*. The single hydrogen transfer through TS1, TS2, and TS3 contributes to the overall rate constant at 298 K with a 43.4%. It is concluded that the single hydrogen transfer from H2SO4 to HO* yielding HSO4* and H2O might well be a significant sink for gaseous sulfuric acid in the atmosphere. PMID:16451034

  6. Interfacial microstructure and defect analysis in Cu(In,Ga)Se([sub]2)-based multilayered film by analytical transmission electron microscopy and focused ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interfacial microstructures of Cu(In,Ga)Se2(CIGS)-based multilayered film are closely characterized by TEM (transmission electron microscopy), SEM (scanning electron microscopy) and FIB (focused ion beam). A cross-sectional TEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and energy-filtered TEM reveal that a pronounced Cu diffusion occurs across the interface of the CdS/CIGS, which leads to a large amount of Cu rich in the CdS layer and a Cu-deficient sub-surface in the CIGS layer as well as a rough interfacial structure. TEM studies further reveal that the interface microstructures in the multilayered film are dissimilar, both ZnO/CdS and CdS/CIGS interfaces are strongly bonded whereas the CIGS/Mo interface is weakly bonded and interface separation occasionally occurs. Mo back contact layer shows a well adhesion to glass substrate. Detailed observation on defects in the CIGS-based multilayered film is carried out by 3D (3-dimensional) FIB and SEM techniques. Sequential 2D (2-demensional) cross-sectioning shows that dominant growth-defects in the CIGS and top SiO2 layers are micro-scale crack, appearing as diversified morphologies. The micro-scale crack in the CIGS layer is possibly released by propagating into the adjacent layer while the crack in the SiO2 layer is relieved usually by forming a small particle behind. It is noted that in the multilayered film the interface frequently acts as crack initiation sites due to distinct thermal expansion coefficients.

  7. Electron transfer collision of neon ions with Ne in a RF ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pulsed electron beam rf ion storage system is used to study neon ions electron transfer. The rate coefficients for electron transfer of the neon ions with the neon gas are measured. The results are better than those in other ion storage system

  8. Correlation properties of surface and percolation transfer of electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work was received equation, connecting correlatively properties of surface with electrons distribution function. Usually for equilibrium is necessary a large number of collisions. Collisions are 'destroying' correlations. In case rare collisions large importance have correlations and 'memory' effects. Non-Markov's character of emitting particles by surface lead to strongly nonequilibrium condition of 'gas'. Here kinetic equation of diffusive form does not apply. Classical kinetic equation are described only conditions near to equilibrium. This work offers to use ideas anomal diffusion in phase-space. The correlation properties of surface describe by correlations of velocities of emitting electrons: B(t). We offer to use functional equation for probability collision instead of kinetic equation: ?0?0WnoncollF(?) dv = 1 - B(t). This functional allow to consider 'memory' effects. It is important for consideration of electrons and clusters near surfaces. Distribution function become direct connected with correlations. In classical Kubo-Mory theory of transfer is necessary to get nondivergences integral: D ? ?0?B(t). In considering case we can use even 'power function'. It was used 'slow' correlation function as Kohlraush in calculations. The information about kinetics and correlations properties are containing in one functional equation. It was received solution of this equation in form Levy function: F(?) ? 1/?? exp(-1/?). The solution of this form can not be get with help asymptotic methods of kinetic theory. Asymptotics of solution have scale-invariant character F(V) ? 1/V?. This indicate on fractal properties phase-space. (author)

  9. Electron transfer dynamics of triphenylamine dyes bound to TiO2 nanoparticles from femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Hoffman, David P.

    2013-04-11

    Interfacial electron transfer between sensitizers and semiconducting nanoparticles is a crucial yet poorly understood process. To address this problem, we have used transient absorption (TA) and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) to investigate the photoexcited dynamics of a series of triphenylamine-coumarin dye/TiO2 conjugates. The TA decay is multiexponential, spanning time scales from 100 fs to 100 ps, while the characteristic transient Raman spectrum of the radical cation decays biexponentially with a dominant ?3 ps component. To explain these observations, we propose a model in which the decay of the TA is due to hot electrons migrating from surface trap states to the conduction band of TiO 2 while the decay of the Raman signature is due to internal conversion of the dye molecule. Furthermore, the S1 Raman spectrum of TPAC3, a dye wherein a vinyl group separates the triphenylamine and coumarin moieties, is similar to the S1 Raman spectrum of trans-stilbene; we conclude that their S1 potential energy surfaces and reactivity are also similar. This correlation suggests that dyes containing vinyl linkers undergo photoisomerization that competes with electron injection. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  10. In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of redox molecules. Coherent electron transfer at large bias voltages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Kuznetsov, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Theories of in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) of molecules with redox levels near the substrate and tip Fermi levels point to 'spectroscopic' current-overpotential features. Prominent features require a narrow 'probing tip', i.e. a small bias voltage, eV(bias), compared with the molecular and solvent reorganisation Gibbs energy, E-r. However, a large V-bias is frequently needed for stable imaging. This applies particularly to in situ STM of redox metalloproteins, emerging as a new approach to imaging of biological processes directly in aqueous medium. We provide first an extension of previous theoretical work on in situ STM of redox molecules, to large bias voltages, \\eV(bias)\\ > E-r. Large bias voltages give tunnelling contrasts independent of the overpotential over a broad range, as both the oxidised and reduced redox levels are located within the 'energy tip' between the substrate and tip Fermi levels. STM here involves coherent two-step interfacial electron transfer between the redox level and the enclosing substrate and tip. We have also extended previous experimental in situ STM studies of the blue copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin, adsorbed on Au(111), to cover a broad tunnelling current-overpotential range at a constant (large) bias voltage of +0.2 V. The current is found to be constant over a 0.25 V overpotential range, which covers roughly the range where the oxidised and reduced redox levels are located within the energy tip. STM contrast and apparent adsorbate coverage decrease outside this range. This could reflect in part redox processes of azurin, but also tip-induced disassembly of the azurin monolayer.

  11. Electron Transfer Reactions: Generalized Spin-Boson Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Merkli, Marco

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a mathematically rigorous analysis of a generalized spin-boson system for the treatment of a donor-acceptor (reactant-product) quantum system coupled to a thermal quantum noise. The donor/acceptor probability dynamics describes transport reactions in chemical processes in presence of a noisy environment -- such as the electron transfer in a photosynthetic reaction center. Besides being rigorous, our analysis has the advantages over previous ones that (1) we include a general, non energy-conserving system-environment interaction, and that (2) we allow for the donor or acceptor to consist of multiple energy levels lying closely together. We establish explicit expressions for the rates and the efficiency (final donor-acceptor population difference) of the reaction. In particular, we show that the rate increases for a multi-level acceptor, but the efficiency does not.

  12. Electrostatic orientation during electron transfer between flavodoxin and cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew, J B; Weber, P C; Salemme, F R; Richards, F M

    1983-01-13

    Various studies have shown that reaction rates between reversibly binding electron transfer proteins depend strongly on solution ionic strength. These observations suggest that intermolecular electrostatic interactions are important in facilitating the formation of a productive reaction complex. A recently examined system involves the reduction of vertebrate cytochrome c by bacterial flavodoxin. Although this is a nonphysiological reaction, it proceeds with rates typical for natural partners and is similarly inhibited at high ionic strengths. Here we describe computational studies which examine the role of electrostatics in the formation of a putative reaction complex between flavodoxin and cytochrome c. The results suggest that electrostatic interactions preorient the molecules before they make physical contact, facilitating the formation of an optimal reaction complex. PMID:6296691

  13. Facile direct electron transfer in glucose oxidase modified electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Dan [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Chen Liwei [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Suzhou Institute of Nano Tech and Nano Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 398 Ruoshui Road, Suzhou Industrial Park, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215125 (China)], E-mail: lwchen2008@sinano.ac.cn

    2009-07-15

    Glucose oxidase (GOx) is widely used in the glucose biosensor industry. However, mediatorless direct electron transfer (DET) from GOx to electrode surfaces is very slow. Recently, mediatorless DET has been reported via the incorporation of nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles in the modification of electrodes. Here we report GOx electrodes showing DET without the need for any nanomaterials. The enzyme after immobilization with poly-L-lysine (PLL) and Nafion retains the biocatalytic activities and oxidizes glucose efficiently. The amperometric response of Nafion-PLL-GOx modified electrode is linearly proportional to the concentration of glucose up to 10 mM with a sensitivity of 0.75 {mu}A/mM at a low detection potential (-0.460 V vs. Ag/AgCl). The methodology developed in this study will have impact on glucose biosensors and biofuel cells and may potentially simplify enzyme immobilization in other biosensing systems.

  14. Electron transfer of rare earth impurities in liquid tin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electric transfer of the admixtures of rare earths in liquid tin has been investigated. Tin - r.e.e. alloys were prepared at the temperature of 400 deg C in the vacuum of about 1O-5 to 10-6 mm Hg, the proportion of each rare earth being equal to about 0.01 to 1 wt.%. The effective charges of the admixtures of rare earths were determined in liquid tin at the temperature of about 400 deg C. Presented is a dependence of the effective charge of the admixtures of rare earths on the serial number of an element of the periodic chart. The data testify to a considerable part played by the atomic 4 f-states in the scattering of the conduction electrons

  15. Electron-proton scattering at very small momentum transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electron scattering experiment is described to determine the ratio ?Gsub(E)/Gsub(M) of the form factors of the proton at small momentum transfer. In the region 0.09 2 -2, an average value of four measured points was found to be ?Gsub(E)/Gsub(M) = 1.01 +- 0.02. An analysis of all available data at present of Gsub(E) for q2 -2 gave a rms radius of the charge distribution of the proton of Rsub(m)(E) = 0.85 +- 0.02 fm. Deviations from the proportionality rule of ?Gsub(E)/Gsub(m) = 1 in the region q2 -2 were not found for the ratio ?Gsub(E)/Gsub(M). (orig./LH)

  16. Photoinduced charge accumulation by metal ion-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonn, Annabell G; Wenger, Oliver S

    2015-10-01

    An oligotriarylamine (OTA) unit, a Ru(bpy)3(2+) photosensitizer moiety (Ru), and an anthraquinone (AQ) entity were combined to a molecular dyad (Ru-OTA) and a molecular triad (AQ-Ru-OTA). Pulsed laser excitation at 532 nm led to the formation of charge-separated states of the type Ru(-)-OTA(+) and AQ(-)-Ru-OTA(+) with lifetimes of ?10 ns and 2.4 ?s, respectively, in de-aerated CH3CN at 25 °C. Upon addition of Sc(OTf)3, very long-lived photoproducts were observed. Under steady-state irradiation conditions using a flux of (6.74 ± 0.21) × 10(15) photons per second at 450 nm, the formation of twofold oxidized oligotriarylamine (OTA(2+)) was detected in aerated CH3CN containing 0.02 M Sc(3+), as demonstrated unambiguously by comparison with UV-Vis absorption spectra obtained in the course of chemical oxidation with Cu(2+). Photodriven charge accumulation on the OTA unit of Ru-OTA and AQ-Ru-OTA is possible due to the lowering of the O2 reduction potential caused by the interaction of superoxide with the strong Lewis acid Sc(3+). The presence of the anthraquinone unit in AQ-Ru-OTA accelerates the rate-determining reaction step for charge accumulation by a factor of 10 compared to the Ru-OTA dyad. This is attributed to the formation of Sc(3+)-stabilized anthraquinone radical anion intermediates in the triad. Possible mechanistic pathways leading to charge accumulation are discussed. Photodriven charge accumulation is of key importance for solar fuels because their production will have to rely on multi-electron chemistry rather than single-electron reaction steps. Our study is the first to demonstrate that metal ion-coupled electron transfer (MCET) can be exploited to accumulate charges on a given molecular unit using visible light as an energy input. The approach of using a combination of intra- and intermolecular electron transfer reactions which are enabled by MCET is conceptually novel, and the fundamental insights gained from our study are relevant in the greater context of solar energy conversion. PMID:26312416

  17. Photoinduced Electron Transfer Between Conjugated Polymers and a Homologous Series of TCNQ Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Heeger, Alan; Wudl, Fred; Serdar Sariciftci, N.; Janssen, Rene A. J.; Martin, Nazario

    1996-01-01

    The results of photoinduced absorption (PIA) and photoluminescence studies of the photoinduced electron transfer reactions from conjugated polymer donors onto a series of acceptors based on TCNQ and benzoquinone derivatives containing fused aromatic rings are summarized. The results are compared to the well-defined photoinduced electron transfer demonstrated from conjugated polymer donors onto buckminsterfullerene, C60. For the TCNQ derivatives, the efficiency of the electron transfer process...

  18. Ab initio study on electron excitation and electron transfer in tryptophan-tyrosine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article, ab initio calculation has been performed to evaluate the transition energy of electronic excitation in tryptophan and tyrosine by using semiempirical molecular orbital method AM1 and complete active space self-consistent field method. The solvent effect has been considered by means of the conductor-like screening model. After geometric optimizations of isolated tryptophan and tyrosine, and their corresponding radicals and cations, reaction heat of these electron transfer reactions have been obtained by the means of complete active space self-consistent field method. The transition energies from the ground state, respectively, to the lowest excited state and to the lowest triplet state of these two amino acids are also calculated and compared with the experimentally observed values. The ionization potential and electron affinity are also calculated for tryptophan and tyrosine employing Koopmans' theorem and ab initio calculation. Compared with the experimental measurements, the theoretical results are found satisfactory. Theoretical results give good explanations on the experimental phenomena that N3· can preferably oxide the side chain of tryptophan residue and then the electron transfer from tyrosine residue to tryptophan residue follows in peptides involving tryptophan and tyrosine

  19. Human ceruloplasmin. Intramolecular electron transfer kinetics and equilibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Bendahl, L

    1999-01-01

    Pulse radiolytic reduction of disulfide bridges in ceruloplasmin yielding RSSR(-) radicals induces a cascade of intramolecular electron transfer (ET) processes. Based on the three-dimensional structure of ceruloplasmin identification of individual kinetically active disulfide groups and type 1 (T1) copper centers, the following is proposed. The first T1 copper(II) ion to be reduced in ceruloplasmin is the blue copper center of domain 6 (T1A) by ET from RSSR(-) of domain 5. The rate constant is 28 +/- 2 s(-1) at 279 K and pH 7.0. T1A is in close covalent contact with the type 3 copper pair and indeed electron equilibration between T1A and the trinuclear copper center in the domain 1-6 interface takes place with a rate constant of 2.9 +/- 0.6 s(-1). The equilibrium constant is 0.17. Following reduction of T1A Cu(II), another ET process takes place between RSSR(-) and T1B copper(II) of domain 4 with a rate constant of 3.9 +/- 0.8. No reoxidation of T1B Cu(I) could be resolved. It appears that the third T1 center(T1C of domain 2) is not participating in intramolecular ET, as it seems to be in a reduced state in the resting enzyme.

  20. Theory of Electron-Transfer Reactions and of Related Phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on electronexchange reactions have provided insight into factors influencing rates of electron-transfer reactions in solution. The present paper has the twofold purpose of discussing some of these factors and of describing applications of these exchange data and theory to other phenomena. The reaction rate depends upon the extent of reorganization of bond lengths (angles) in the reactants and of solvent reorientation outside them. The reorganization is facilitated or hindered in a comparatively simple way by a favorable or unfavorable standard free energy of reaction. The rate depends, too, on coulombic and other interactions, as evidenced perhaps by certain salt effects, though probably only by a few orders of magni - tude typically. The observed variation of rates of some 15 orders of magnitude is best attributed primarily to differences in the vibrational reorganization term, a factor calculable from bond lengths and force constants when known. A remaining factor, non-adiabaticity, is at present of uncertain importance. Arrhenius frequency factors in chemical and electrochemical exchange rate constants would provide the most direct information, but can be complicated or even dwarfed by solvent reordering effects in the coulombic interaction. Available data are few. They provide examples where a non-adiabatic effect is minor. There appear to be no known examples where it is major (Fe2+ - Fe3+, could be a candidate but its mechanism is apparently uncertain). Reorganization in reactants and in solvent occurs in a variety of related phenomena, and related concepts will be applied to treat them. In turn, chemical exchange data have useful applications to the latter. These areas include electrochemical exchange reactions, chemiluminescent electron-transfer reactions (between positive and negative aromatic ions, for example), and redox reactions of the solvated electron. An explanation for the chemiluminescent reactions will be based on the possible ''inverse ?F°'' effect, discussed several years ago by the author. A related phenomenon involving solvent 'orientation strain' occurs in light absorption or emission by polar solutes in polar solvents, and the theoretical approach used by the author for treating it is closely related to that used for the exchange reactions. (author)

  1. Poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) promotes direct electron transfer at the interface between Shewanella loihica and the anode in a microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Wu, Wenguo; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-03-01

    Anode modification is an effective method for enhancing extracellular electron transportation and improving the power density of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this study, a new conductive polymer called poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) is electrochemically polymerized to modify the anode. The surface of the electrochemically polymerized PEDOT layer has a widespread porous structure. Both the anode electrochemical discharge experiment and MFC discharge test demonstrate the improved performance of the PEDOT-modified anode compared with a plain anode. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analyses show that the PEDOT modification increases the availability of redox active sites and reduces the interfacial electron transfer resistance of the anode. Compared with the unmodified anode, the PEDOT anodic modification improves the power density by 43%-140 mW m-2. Possible mechanisms are proposed to help understand the function of the PEDOT-modified anodic layer.

  2. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  3. Intramolecular electron transfer in cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase from Pseudomonas stutzeri; kinetics and thermodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Kroneck, Peter M H; Zumft, Walter G; Pecht, Israel

    2002-01-01

    Cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase from Pseudomonas stutzeri catalyzes the one electron reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. It is a homodimer, each monomer containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1), the former being the electron uptake site while the latter is the nitrite reduction site. Hence, internal electron transfer between these sites is an inherent element in the catalytic cycle of this enzyme. We have investigated the internal electron transfer reaction employing pulse radiolytically pro...

  4. Modeling of ultrafast electron-transfer processes: Validity of multilevel Redfield theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capability of multilevel Redfield theory to describe ultrafast photoinduced electron-transfer reactions is investigated. Adopting a standard model of photoinduced electron transfer in a condensed-phase environment, we consider electron-transfer reactions in the normal and inverted regimes, as well as for different values of the electron-transfer parameters, such as reorganization energy, electronic coupling, and temperature. Based on the comparison with numerically exact reference results, obtained using the self-consistent hybrid method, we discuss in some detail the advantages and shortcomings of two different versions of Redfield theory, which employ the time-dependent and stationary Redfield tensor, respectively. The results of the study demonstrate that multilevel Redfield theory, if applied in the appropriate parameter regime, is well suited to describe the ultrafast coherent dynamics of photoinduced electron-transfer reactions

  5. A bifurcated molecular pentad capable of sequential electronic energy transfer and intramolecular charge transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriman, Anthony; Stachelek, Patrycja; Sutter, Alexandra; Ziessel, Raymond

    2015-10-21

    An extended molecular array, comprising three distinct types of chromophores and two additional redox-active subunits, that harvests photons over most of the visible spectral range has been synthesized and characterised. The array exhibits a rich variety of electrochemical waves when examined by cyclic voltammetry but assignment can be made on the basis of control compounds and molecular orbital calculations. Stepwise electronic energy transfer occurs along the molecular axis, corresponding to a gradient of excitation energies, to populate the lowest-energy excited state of the ultimate acceptor. The latter species, which absorbs and emits in the far-red region, enters into light-induced charge transfer with a terminal amine group. The array is relatively stable under illumination with white light but degrades slowly via a series of well-defined steps, the first of which is autocatalytic. One of the main attributes of this system is the capability to harvest an unusually high fraction of sunlight while providing protection against exposure to UV light. PMID:26381219

  6. Light-induced electron transfer vs. energy transfer in molecular thin-film systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quenching of fluoranthene (FA) singlets by tetrabromo-o-benzoquinone (TBBQ) and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) was studied both in xylene solutions and in spin-cast polystyrene (PS) films. Emphasis was placed on time-resolved fluorescence transients resulting from pulsed excitation. Linear Stern-Volmer plots were obtained for quenching in solution and gave diffusion-controlled rate constants, of 1.45 x 1010 M-1 sec-1 and 1.53 x 1010 M-1 sec-1 for TBBQ and TMPD, respectively. TBBQ was found to quench FA singlets in PS over the studied concentration range 12 mM 0 was experimentally determined to be 24.3 A, which is in good agreement with the theoretical value of 23 A calculated from spectral data. Quenching of FA singlets in PS films was found to be independent of FA concentration over a 300 mM to 1200 mM FA concentration range for a constant TBBQ concentration of 24.0 mM. TMPD was only slightly effective as a quencher of FA singlets in PS because it apparently behaves strictly as a contact quencher based on reversible charge transfer. The implications of these results for the design of systems intended to exploit light-induced electron transfer are discussed

  7. Dynamic modeling of interfacial structures via interfacial area transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows:In the current thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes using the two-fluid model, the empirical correlations that are based on the two-phase flow regimes and regime transition criteria are being employed as closure relations for the interfacial transfer terms. Due to its inherent shortcomings, however, such static correlations are inaccurate and present serious problems in the numerical analysis. In view of this, a new dynamic approach employing the interfacial area transport equation has been studied. The interfacial area transport equation dynamically models the two-phase flow regime transitions and predicts continuous change of the interfacial area concentration along the flow field. Hence, when employed in the thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes, it eliminates artificial bifurcations stemming from the use of the static flow regime transition criteria. Therefore, the interfacial area transport equation can make a leapfrog improvement in the current capability of the two-fluid model from both scientific and practical point of view. Accounting for the substantial differences in the transport phenomena of various sizes of bubbles, the two-group interfacial area transport equations have been developed. The group 1 equation describes the transport of small-dispersed bubbles that are either distorted or spherical in shapes, and the group 2 equation describes the transport of large cap, slug or churn-turbulent bubbles. The source and sink terms in the right hand-side of the transport equations have been established by mechanistically modeling the creation and destruction of bubbles due to major bubble interaction mechanisms. The coalescence mechanisms include the random collision driven by turbulence, and the entrainment of trailing bubbles in the wake region of the preceding bubble. The disintegration mechanisms include the break-up by turbulence impact, shearing-off at the rim of large cap bubbles and the break-up of large cap bubbles due to surface instability. In the present paper, the interfacial area transport equations currently available are reviewed to address the feasibility and reliability of the model. Results from extensive benchmark experiments for the model evaluation are also present. These include the data from adiabatic upward air-water two-phase flow in round tubes of various sizes, from a rectangular duct, and from adiabatic co-current downward air-water two-phase flow in round pipes of two different sizes. Furthermore, some guidelines for the future study on interfacial area transport equation are discussed. (authors)

  8. Electron transfer reactions of macrocyclic compounds of cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckman, R.A.

    1978-08-01

    The kinetics and mechanisms of reduction of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/, and I/sub 2/ by various macrocyclic tetraaza complexes of cobalt(II), including Vitamin B/sub 12r/, were studied. The synthetic macrocycles studied were all 14-membered rings which varied in the degree of unsaturation,substitution of methyl groups on the periphery of the ring, and substitution within the ring itself. Scavenging experiments demonstrated that the reductions of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ produce free hydroxyl radicals only in the case of Co((14)ane)/sup 2 +/ but with none of the others. In the latter instances apparently H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ simultaneously oxidizes the metal center and the ligand. The reductions of Br/sub 2/ and I/sub 2/ produce an aquohalocobalt(III) product for all reductants (except B/sub 12r/ + Br/sub 2/, which was complicated by bromination of the corrin ring). The mechanism of halogen reduction was found to involve rate-limiting inner-sphere electron transfer from cobalt to halogen to produce a dihalide anion coordinated to the cobalt center. This intermediate subsequently decomposes in rapid reactions to halocobalt(III) and halogen atom species or reacts with another cobalt(II) center to give two molecules of halocobalt(III). The reductions of halomethylcobaloximes and related compounds and diamminecobaloxime by Cr/sup 2 +/ were also studied. The reaction was found to be biphasic in all cases with the reaction products being halomethane (for the halomethylcobaloximes), Co/sup 2 +/ (in less than 100 percent yield), a Cr(III)-dimethylglyoxime species, a small amount of free dmgH/sub 2/, and a highly-charged species containing both cobalt and chromium. The first-stage reaction occurs with a stoichiometry of 1:1 producing an intermediate with an absorption maximum at 460 nm for all starting reagents. The results were interpreted in terms of inner-sphere coordination of the cobaloxime to the Cr(II) and electron transfer through the oxime N-O bond.

  9. ELECTRONIC FUNDS TRANSFER: EXPLORING THE DIFFICULTIES OF SECURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MPAKWANA ANNASTACIA MTHEMBU

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman";} Generally the banking laws, regulations and supervision were designed primarily to address the fundamental principle relating to safe and sound business practices by financial institutions. In order to maintain safe and sound business practice it is of outmost importance that customers are protected against losses resulting from inadequate remedies available to them. Banking by its very nature is a high risk business. However, the major risks associated with banking are legal risks, credit interest rates and liquidity. Internet banking has increased some of these risks by creating new ones. Electronic funds transfers are based on technology which by its nature is designed to extend the geographical reach of banks and customers. This kind of a market expansion extend beyond borders, therefore there will be problems which banks will try to avoid like regulation and supervision. Other regulatory and legal risks include, the uncertainty about legal requirements in some countries and jurisdiction ambiguities regarding the responsibilities of different national authorities. Customers and banks may be exposed to legal risks associated with non-compliance with different national laws and regulations including consumer protection laws, record keeping and report requirements. Due to insecurity created by electronic funds transfer, it of importance to analyse measures under South African Law and whether these measures can effectively prevent insecurity and what lessons can be learned from abroad.

  10. 77 FR 10373 - Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program: Electronics Manufacturing: Revisions to Heat Transfer Fluid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ...The EPA is finalizing technical revisions to the electronics manufacturing source category of the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule related to fluorinated heat transfer fluids. More specifically, EPA is finalizing amendments to the definition of fluorinated heat transfer fluids and to the provisions to estimate and report emissions from fluorinated heat transfer fluids. This final rule is narrow......

  11. Photoinduced energy and electron transfer in rubrene-benzoquinone and rubrene-porphyrin systems

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Jafar Iqbal

    2014-11-01

    Excited-state electron and energy transfer from singlet excited rubrene (Ru) to benzoquinone (BQ) and tetra-(4-aminophenyl) porphyrin (TAPP) were investigated by steady-state absorption and emission, time-resolved transient absorption, and femtosecond (fs)-nanosecond (ns) fluorescence spectroscopy. The low reduction potential of BQ provides the high probability of electron transfer from the excited Ru to BQ. Steady-state and time-resolved results confirm such an excited electron transfer scenario. On the other hand, strong spectral overlap between the emission of Ru and absorption of TAPP suggests that energy transfer is a possible deactivation pathway of the Ru excited state.

  12. Coherent phonons in CdSe quantum dots triggered by ultrafast electron transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wachtveitl J.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The origin of coherent oscillations in CdSe quantum dots and in the CdSe/methylviologen electron transfer system is studied. In CdSe/methylviologen coherent phonons are triggered by the electron transfer from the quantum dot to methylviologen.

  13. 27 CFR 41.63 - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...IMPORTATION OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED...Taxes § 41.63 Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer. (a) Each importer...in taxes on cigars, cigarettes, cigarette papers, and cigarette tubes combining tax liabilities...commercial bank in making payment by electronic fund transfer (EFT) of...

  14. Selective electron transfer between the quantum dots under the resonant pulse

    OpenAIRE

    Tsukanov, A. V.; Openov, L. A.

    2004-01-01

    The coherent quantum dynamics of an electron in the quantum-dot ring structure under the resonant electromagnetic pulse is studied theoretically. A possibility of the selective electron transfer between any two dots is demonstrated. The transfer probability as a function of the pulse and dot parameters is calculated. It is shown that this probability can be close to unity. The factors lowering the transfer probability in real systems are discussed. The results obtained may b...

  15. A short comparison of electron and proton transfer processes in biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, Patrick [Laboratoire de Bioenergetique et Ingenierie des Proteines, CNRS-IBSM, 31, chemin Joseph-Aiguier, 13402 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Universite de Provence, 3, place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseille Cedex 3 (France)]. E-mail: bertrand@ibsm.cnrs-mrs.fr

    2005-02-01

    The main differences between electron and proton transfers that take place in biological systems are examined. The relation between the distance dependence of the rate constant and the mass of the transferred particle is analyzed in detail. Differences between the two processes have important consequences at the experimental level, which are discussed. The various mechanisms that ensure the coupling between electron and proton transfers are briefly described.

  16. Combined influences of electronic structure, solvent energetics and solvent dynamics on electron transfer kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms of electron transfer reactions are analyzed theoretically, with particular emphasis on the role of electronic structure and the manner in which its influence may be affected by energetic and dynamical properties of the medium in which the reaction occurs. Theoretical techniques are developed both for calculating and interpreting the extent of donor/acceptor coupling in terms of superexchange models. The role of solvent is studied in a variety of ways, including the use of (1) supermolecule clusters containing inner-shell solvent, (2) continuum reaction field models, and (3) classical molecular dynamics simulation of solvated ions. Electronic structure computations based on ab initio or semi-empirical (INDO) orbital models have been applied to redox processes involving metal ions complexed to various ligends, including the porphyrin macrocyle. Studies of metallocene/metallocinium (Cp2M/Cp2M+) redox pairs have identified an interesting mechanistic contrast for the cases of M = Fe and M = Co, which are found to be controlled, respectively, by superxchange mechanisms of the electron and hole type. The electronic coupling was demonstrated to conform quantiatively (to within 95%) to a 1-electron model. The electronic coupling is also strongly-dependent on relative orientation of reactants, and the relative energetics of these oreintations are in turn, strongly influenced by the nature of the medium. Analysis of the properties of aqueous ferrous and ferric ions in terms of equilibrium H/D isotope effects have been carried out by exploiting classical molecular dynamics techniques, in conjunction with the MFE supercomputing facilities

  17. Single cell activity reveals direct electron transfer in methanotrophic consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlynn, Shawn E; Chadwick, Grayson L; Kempes, Christopher P; Orphan, Victoria J

    2015-10-22

    Multicellular assemblages of microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature, and the proximity afforded by aggregation is thought to permit intercellular metabolic coupling that can accommodate otherwise unfavourable reactions. Consortia of methane-oxidizing archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria are a well-known environmental example of microbial co-aggregation; however, the coupling mechanisms between these paired organisms is not well understood, despite the attention given them because of the global significance of anaerobic methane oxidation. Here we examined the influence of interspecies spatial positioning as it relates to biosynthetic activity within structurally diverse uncultured methane-oxidizing consortia by measuring stable isotope incorporation for individual archaeal and bacterial cells to constrain their potential metabolic interactions. In contrast to conventional models of syntrophy based on the passage of molecular intermediates, cellular activities were found to be independent of both species intermixing and distance between syntrophic partners within consortia. A generalized model of electric conductivity between co-associated archaea and bacteria best fit the empirical data. Combined with the detection of large multi-haem cytochromes in the genomes of methanotrophic archaea and the demonstration of redox-dependent staining of the matrix between cells in consortia, these results provide evidence for syntrophic coupling through direct electron transfer. PMID:26375009

  18. Electron transfer of peroxidase assemblies at tailored nanocarbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In bioelectrochemistry, the catalytic function of redox enzymes depends largely upon the nature of the working electrode material. One major example of this phenomenon is the improvement of biogenic analyte detection at graphitic carbon with increased edge plane character in the graphene lattice. In our laboratories, we have found that the edge plane character of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) prepared using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) can be tuned via selective doping with nitrogen, termed N-CNTs. In this report, we extend these studies to investigate the influence of N-doping of nanocarbons on the electron transfer of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) using spectrophotometric enzyme activity assays and electrochemical measurements. Our findings demonstrate that HRP adsorption at N-CNTs increases by a factor of two relative to that of nondoped CNTs, with surface coverages, ?m, of 75 ± 4 and 33 ± 5 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) U/mg, respectively. Surprisingly, however, only ?40% of the HRP adsorbed at N-CNTs is electroactive, as assessed by voltammetry of the HRP Fe2+/3+ redox response. By contrast, HRP adsorbed at nondoped CNTs is nearly 100% electroactive, suggesting that the nature of the HRP adsorption (e.g., electrostatic, van der Waals) and geometric factors of heme orientation affect the biocatalytic performance. We also describe studies that utilize the properties of both nondoped CNTs and N-CNTs with adsorbed HRP for unmediated, quantitative H2O2 sensing

  19. Stereoselectivity in electron-transfer reactions in chiral media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Deborah; Hua, Xaio; Osvath, Peter; Lappin, A Graham

    2010-02-01

    The oxidation of [Co(edta)](2-) by [IrCl(6)](2-) proceeds by both inner-sphere and outer-sphere electron-transfer pathways. In the presence of added [Co(en)(3)](3+), the outer-sphere pathway is enhanced. When optically active [Co(en)(3)](3+) is used, the [Co(edta)](-) formed is optically active, reflecting a 1.5% DeltaLambda selectivity. It is proposed that the selectivity arises from preferential formation and reactivity of the DeltaLambda ion pair, {[Co(edta)](2-),[Co(en)(3)](3+)}. Direct reaction of [Co(edta)](-) with [Co(en)(3)](2+) has also been investigated in the optically active solvent, (S)-(-)-1,2-propylene carbonate. The induction is small, forming 0.75% Delta-[Co(en)(3)](3+), consistent with the important role for hydrogen bonding in determining the precursor stereoselectivity to the exclusion of solvent. PMID:20104365

  20. Multiple electron transfer in slow collisions of very high-charged Xe-ions and atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured absolute cross sections for processes of one and multi-electron capture in slow (0.1--0.2 a.u.) Xeq+-Xe collisions in the charge state regime 15?q?37. The transfer of two to six electrons from the target to the projectile, where two electrons stay on the projectile after deexcitation is studied. We find that the probability for keeping two electrons on the projectile (i.e. radiative stabilization of two electrons) increases rapidly with q and with the number of electrons initially transferred

  1. Multiple electron transfer in slow collisions of very high-charged Xe-ions and atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermann, C.; Cederquist, H.; Selberg, N. (Manne Siegbahn Institute of Physics, S-10405 Stockholm (Sweden)); Hutton, R. (Manne Siegbahn Institute of Physics, S-10405 Stockholm (Sweden) University of Lund, S-22362 Lund (Sweden)); Levin, J.C. (Manne Siegbahn Institute of Physics, S-10405 Stockholm (Sweden) The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1200 (United States)); Beebe, E.; Liljeby, L.; Engestroem, A. (Manne Siegbahn Institute of Physics, S-10405 Stockholm (Sweden))

    1993-06-05

    We have measured absolute cross sections for processes of one and multi-electron capture in slow (0.1--0.2 a.u.) Xe[sup q+]-Xe collisions in the charge state regime 15[le]q[le]37. The transfer of two to six electrons from the target to the projectile, where two electrons stay on the projectile after deexcitation is studied. We find that the probability for keeping two electrons on the projectile (i.e. radiative stabilization of two electrons) increases rapidly with q and with the number of electrons initially transferred.

  2. Role of Information Technologies in Electronic Information Transfer and in Providing Value-Added Information Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sreenivasulu

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available information technology plays an important role in electronic. message transfer, electronic data interchange (EDI, electronic files transfer protocols, transfer of voice, text and images through ISDN, remote electronic information access and retrieval, and the enforcement of research, education and distance learning through 'virtual global university'. In future, these information technologies can engage in interactive TV, picture phones and TV/PCs purchase. Findings of a survey, conducted to determine the potential. use, non-use and non-availability of IT service in different libraries/documentation centres are also given.

  3. Organization of adenine on Ag(111) and correlated interfacial electronic structure measured with low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Thomas P.; Andrews, Katie M.; Davis, Bryce F.

    2010-03-01

    Low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy has been used to observe the organization of the nucleobase adenine on the Ag(111) surface as well as to resolve modifications to Ag(111) surface electronic structure. Multiple hydrogen bonding interactions between adenine adsorbates dictate the formation of dimers on the surface as well as long range order of molecular domains, which have limited commensuration with the Ag(111) lattice. Differential conductance spectroscopy recorded at 15 K reveals an upward energetic shift of the Shockley-type surface state native to Ag(111) from a band edge of -67 meV on the clean surface to+82.5 meV recorded over adenine islands. Differential conductance maps show free-electron like scattering in the adenine domains. Dispersion of the parallel wave vector of scattered electrons in the adenine domains is compared to the dispersion for electron scattering in bare silver and the ratio of effective masses for electrons in those bands is 1.1 ± 0.05. It is hypothesized that this shift occurs due to a combination of effects brought on by the adsorption of adenine including changes in work function and dipole-induced screening of the first image potential.

  4. Photoinduced bimolecular electron transfer kinetics in small unilamellar vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoinduced electron transfer (ET) from N,N-dimethylaniline to some coumarin derivatives has been studied in small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) of the phospholipid, DL-?-dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine, using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching, both below and above the phase transition temperature of the vesicles. The primary interest was to examine whether Marcus inversion [H. Sumi and R. A. Marcus, J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] could be observed for the present ET systems in these organized assemblies. The influence of the topology of SUVs on the photophysical properties of the reactants and consequently on their ET kinetics has also been investigated. Absorption and fluorescence spectral data of the coumarins in SUVs and the variation of their fluorescence decays with temperature indicate that the dyes are localized in the bilayer of the SUVs. Time-resolved area normalized emission spectra analysis, however, reveals that the dyes are distributed in two different microenvironments in the SUVs, which we attribute to the two leaflets of the bilayer, one toward bulk water and the other toward the inner water pool. The microenvironments in the two leaflets are, however, not indicated to be that significantly different. Time-resolved anisotropy decays were biexponential for all the dyes in SUVs, and this has been interpreted in terms of the compound motion model according to which the dye molecules can experience a fast wobbling-in-cone type of motion as well as a slow overall rotating motion of the cone containing the molecule. The expected bimolecular diffusion-controlled rates in SUVs, as estimated by comparing the microviscosities in SUVs (determined from rotational correlation times) and that in acetonitrile solution, are much slower than the observed fluorescence quenching rates, suggesting that reactant diffusion (translational) does not play any role in the quenching kinetics in the present systems. Accordingly, clear inversions are observed in the correlation of the fluorescence quenching rate constants kq with the free energy change, ?G0 of the reactions. However, the coumarin dyes, C152 and C481 (cf. Scheme 1), show unusually high kq values and high activation barriers, which is not expected from Marcus ET theory. This unusual behavior is explained on the basis of participation of the twisted intramolecular charge transfer states of these two dyes in the ET kinetics

  5. Photoinduced bimolecular electron transfer kinetics in small unilamellar vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Sharmistha Dutta; Kumbhakar, Manoj; Nath, Sukhendu; Pal, Haridas

    2007-11-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer (ET) from N,N-dimethylaniline to some coumarin derivatives has been studied in small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) of the phospholipid, DL-?-dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine, using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching, both below and above the phase transition temperature of the vesicles. The primary interest was to examine whether Marcus inversion [H. Sumi and R. A. Marcus, J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] could be observed for the present ET systems in these organized assemblies. The influence of the topology of SUVs on the photophysical properties of the reactants and consequently on their ET kinetics has also been investigated. Absorption and fluorescence spectral data of the coumarins in SUVs and the variation of their fluorescence decays with temperature indicate that the dyes are localized in the bilayer of the SUVs. Time-resolved area normalized emission spectra analysis, however, reveals that the dyes are distributed in two different microenvironments in the SUVs, which we attribute to the two leaflets of the bilayer, one toward bulk water and the other toward the inner water pool. The microenvironments in the two leaflets are, however, not indicated to be that significantly different. Time-resolved anisotropy decays were biexponential for all the dyes in SUVs, and this has been interpreted in terms of the compound motion model according to which the dye molecules can experience a fast wobbling-in-cone type of motion as well as a slow overall rotating motion of the cone containing the molecule. The expected bimolecular diffusion-controlled rates in SUVs, as estimated by comparing the microviscosities in SUVs (determined from rotational correlation times) and that in acetonitrile solution, are much slower than the observed fluorescence quenching rates, suggesting that reactant diffusion (translational) does not play any role in the quenching kinetics in the present systems. Accordingly, clear inversions are observed in the correlation of the fluorescence quenching rate constants kq with the free energy change, ?G0 of the reactions. However, the coumarin dyes, C152 and C481 (cf. Scheme 1), show unusually high kq values and high activation barriers, which is not expected from Marcus ET theory. This unusual behavior is explained on the basis of participation of the twisted intramolecular charge transfer states of these two dyes in the ET kinetics.

  6. Structural, dynamic, and energetic aspects of long-range electron transfer in photosynthetic reaction centers

    OpenAIRE

    Kriegl, Jan M.; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer within proteins plays an essential role in biological energy transduction. Electron donor and acceptor cofactors are bound in the protein matrix at specific locations, and protein–cofactor interactions as well as protein conformational changes can markedly influence the electron transfer rates. To assess these effects, we have investigated charge recombination from the primary quinone acceptor to the special pair bacteriochlorophyll dimer in wild-type reaction...

  7. Preferred sites and pathways for electron transfer in blue copper proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1988-01-01

    Long-range electron transfer reactions proceed within and between metalloproteins at relatively fast rates and with marked specificities. The blue single copper proteins are well known electron carriers with their redox center being of limited accessibility to solvent and solutes. The question of where and how electrons are transferred to and from the copper-ion have been investigated. One experimental approach developed in order to pursue these problems is that of reductively labeling several r...

  8. Photoinduced electron and proton transfer in the hydrogen-bonded pyridine-pyrrole system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frutos, Luis Manuel; Markmann, Andreas; Sobolewski, Andrzej L; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2007-06-01

    We present here a detailed analysis of the mechanism of photoinduced electron and proton transfer in the planar pyrrole-pyridine hydrogen-bonded system, a model for the photochemistry of hydrogen bonds in DNA base pairs. Two different crossings, an avoided crossing and a conical intersection, are the key steps for forward and backward electron and proton transfer providing to the system photostability against UV radiation by restoring the system in its initial electronic and geometric structure. PMID:17503807

  9. Studies on electron transfer reactions of Keggin-type mixed addenda heteropolytungstovanadophosphates with NADH

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ponnusamy Sami; Kasi Rajasekaran

    2009-03-01

    The coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) undergoes facile electron transfer reaction with vanadium (V) substituted Keggin-type heteropolyanions (HPA) [PVVW11O40]4- (PV1) and [PV$^V_2$W10O40]5- (PV2) in aqueous phosphate buffer of pH 6 at ambient temperature. Electrochemical and optical studies show that the stoichiometry of the reaction is 1 : 2 (NADH : HPA). EPR and optical studies show that HPA act as one electron acceptor and the products of electron transfer reactions are one electron reduced heteropoly blues (HPB), viz. [PVIVW11O40]5- and [PVIVVVW10O40]6-. Oxygraph measurements show that there is no uptake of molecular oxygen during the course of reaction. The reaction proceeds through multi-step electron-proton-electron transfer mechanism, with rate limiting initial one electron transfer from NADH to HPA by outer sphere electron transfer process. Bimolecular rate constant for electron transfer reaction between NADH and PV2 in phosphate buffer of pH = 6 has been determined spectrophotometrically.

  10. A transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of annealing induced ?-phase nucleation, clustering, and interfacial dynamics in reactively sputtered amorphous alumina thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A. K. Nanda, E-mail: aknk27@yahoo.com; Subramanian, B. [ECMS Division, Central Electro Chemical Research Institute, Karaikudi (India); Prasanna, S. [Department of Physics, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore (India); Jayakumar, S. [Department of Physics, PSG Institute of Technology and Applied Research, Coimbatore (India); Rao, G. Mohan [Department of Instrumentation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India)

    2015-03-28

    Pure ?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibits a very high degree of thermodynamical stability among all metal oxides and forms an inert oxide scale in a range of structural alloys at high temperatures. We report that amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films sputter deposited over crystalline Si instead show a surprisingly active interface. On annealing, crystallization begins with nuclei of a phase closely resembling ?-Alumina forming almost randomly in an amorphous matrix, and with increasing frequency near the substrate/film interface. This nucleation is marked by the signature appearance of sharp (400) and (440) reflections and the formation of a diffuse diffraction halo with an outer maximal radius of ?0.23?nm enveloping the direct beam. The microstructure then evolves by a cluster-coalescence growth mechanism suggestive of swift nucleation and sluggish diffusional kinetics, while locally the Al ions redistribute slowly from chemisorbed and tetrahedral sites to higher anion coordinated sites. Chemical state plots constructed from XPS data and simple calculations of the diffraction patterns from hypothetically distorted lattices suggest that the true origins of the diffuse diffraction halo are probably related to a complex change in the electronic structure spurred by the a-? transformation rather than pure structural disorder. Concurrent to crystallization within the film, a substantially thick interfacial reaction zone also builds up at the film/substrate interface with the excess Al acting as a cationic source.

  11. Dynamic recrystallization in the particle/particle interfacial region of cold-sprayed nickel coating: Electron backscatter diffraction characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron Backscatter diffraction was used to investigate the microstructural evolution of nickel powder particles during the high-velocity impact in the cold spray process. Ultrafine grains in the scale of 100-200 nm were observed in the particle bonding region. The formation of these nanometer-sized grains is interpreted in terms of dynamic recrystallization by lattice and subgrain rotation.

  12. Vibrational coherence in electron transfer: an exactly solvable model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exact solution for a transition probability in vibrationally modulated electron transfer is found by employing three independent methods based on: (a) a path integral technique, (b) direct diagonalization of the Hamiltonian by a unitary transformation, and (c) Keldysh-Green's function techniques. We also consider a solution in the noninteracting blip approximation (NIBA). The comparative analysis reveals that the NIBA is valid at longer times, small reorganization energy, high temperatures, and for small transition matrix elements, ?0, while at large ?0 the NIBA provides relaxation rates as much as twice greater. When ?0=0, the NIBA transition probability difference oscillates in time with the frequency ??(ErkT/(h/2?)) exhibiting incorrect behavior. At low temperatures, the exact solution yields power-law evolution. The NIBA solution exhibits incorrect behavior at small values of ?0. At larger transition matrix elements, the NIBA practically yields a correct description, i.e. the decay in accordance with the exact solution while the coherent oscillations reveal some phase shift at longer times. An important case of several mode modulation is also studied. The Fourier analysis of the transition probability provides useful information of the vibrational couplings and frequencies. In general, the Fourier spectrum of the transition probability is the sum of the contributions from the harmonics with the frequencies vertical bar ?0+?i=0n(±)ki?i vertical bar (ki=0,1,2,3,...), where ?i is a modulating frequency. Thus, a generally used assumption about coincidence of coherence and vibrational frequencies appears to be incorrect

  13. Demonstration of Lignin-to-Peroxidase Direct Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Pogni, Rebecca; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Santos, José Ignacio; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is a high redox-potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest that is able to oxidize phenolic and non-phenolic aromatics, Mn2+, and different dyes. The ability of VP from Pleurotus eryngii to oxidize water-soluble lignins (softwood and hardwood lignosulfonates) is demonstrated here by a combination of directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic techniques, among others. In addition, direct electron transfer between the peroxidase and the lignin macromolecule was kinetically characterized using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. VP variants were used to show that this reaction strongly depends on the presence of a solvent-exposed tryptophan residue (Trp-164). Moreover, the tryptophanyl radical detected by EPR spectroscopy of H2O2-activated VP (being absent from the W164S variant) was identified as catalytically active because it was reduced during lignosulfonate oxidation, resulting in the appearance of a lignin radical. The decrease of lignin fluorescence (excitation at 355 nm/emission at 400 nm) during VP treatment under steady-state conditions was accompanied by a decrease of the lignin (aromatic nuclei and side chains) signals in one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra, confirming the ligninolytic capabilities of the enzyme. Simultaneously, size-exclusion chromatography showed an increase of the molecular mass of the modified residual lignin, especially for the (low molecular mass) hardwood lignosulfonate, revealing that the oxidation products tend to recondense during the VP treatment. Finally, mutagenesis of selected residues neighboring Trp-164 resulted in improved apparent second-order rate constants for lignosulfonate reactions, revealing that changes in its protein environment (modifying the net negative charge and/or substrate accessibility/binding) can modulate the reactivity of the catalytic tryptophan. PMID:26240145

  14. High throughput electron transfer from carbon dots to chloroplast: a rationale of enhanced photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sourov; Pradhan, Saheli; Mitra, Shouvik; Patra, Prasun; Bhattacharya, Ankita; Pramanik, Panchanan; Goswami, Arunava

    2014-03-01

    A biocompatible amine functionalized fluorescent carbon dots were developed and isolated for gram scale applications. Such carbogenic quantum dots can strongly conjugate over the surface of the chloroplast and due to that strong interaction the former can easily transfer electrons towards the latter by assistance of absorbed light or photons. An exceptionally high electron transfer from carbon dots to the chloroplast can directly effect the whole chain electron transfer pathway in a light reaction of photosynthesis, where electron carriers play an important role in modulating the system. As a result, carbon dots can promote photosynthesis by modulating the electron transfer process as they are capable of fastening the conversion of light energy to the electrical energy and finally to the chemical energy as assimilatory power (ATP and NADPH).A biocompatible amine functionalized fluorescent carbon dots were developed and isolated for gram scale applications. Such carbogenic quantum dots can strongly conjugate over the surface of the chloroplast and due to that strong interaction the former can easily transfer electrons towards the latter by assistance of absorbed light or photons. An exceptionally high electron transfer from carbon dots to the chloroplast can directly effect the whole chain electron transfer pathway in a light reaction of photosynthesis, where electron carriers play an important role in modulating the system. As a result, carbon dots can promote photosynthesis by modulating the electron transfer process as they are capable of fastening the conversion of light energy to the electrical energy and finally to the chemical energy as assimilatory power (ATP and NADPH). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06079a

  15. Role of ligand substitution on long-range electron transfer in azurins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Jeuken, L J

    2000-01-01

    Azurin contains two potential redox sites, a copper centre and, at the opposite end of the molecule, a cystine disulfide (RSSR). Intramolecular electron transfer between a pulse radiolytically produced RSSR- radical anion and the blue Cu(II) ion was studied in a series of azurins in which single-site mutations were introduced into the copper ligand sphere. In the Met121His mutant, the rate constant for intramolecular electron transfer is half that of the corresponding wild-type azurin. In the His46Gly and His117Gly mutants, a water molecule is co-ordinated to the copper ion when no external ligands are added. Both these mutants also exhibit slower intramolecular electron transfer than the corresponding wild-type azurin. However, for the His117Gly mutant in the presence of excess imidazole, an azurin-imidazole complex is formed and the intramolecular electron-transfer rate increases considerably, becoming threefold faster than that observed in the native protein. Activation parameters for all these electron-transfer processes were determined and combined with data from earlier studies on intramolecular electron transfer in wild-type and single-site-mutated azurins. A linear relationship between activation enthalpy and activation entropy was observed. These results are discussed in terms of reorganization energies, driving force and possible electron-transfer pathways.

  16. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes grafted from cellulose nanocrystals via surface-initiated single-electron transfer living radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoppe, Justin O; Habibi, Youssef; Rojas, Orlando J; Venditti, Richard A; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Efimenko, Kirill; Osterberg, Monika; Laine, Janne

    2010-10-11

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) or nanowhiskers produced from sulfuric acid hydrolysis of ramie fibers were used as substrates for surface chemical functionalization with thermoresponsive macromolecules. The CNCs were grafted with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes via surface-initiated single-electron transfer living radical polymerization (SI-SET-LRP) under various conditions at room temperature. The grafting process was confirmed via Fourier transform IR spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the different molecular masses of the grafts were quantified and found to depend on the initiator and monomer concentrations used. No observable damage occurred to the CNCs after grafting, as determined by X-ray diffraction. Size exclusion chromatography analyses of polymer chains cleaved from the cellulose nanocrystals indicated that a higher degree of polymerization was achieved by increasing initiator or monomer loading, most likely caused by local heterogeneities yielding higher rates of polymerization. It is expected that suspension stability, interfacial interactions, friction, and other properties of grafted CNCs can be controlled by changes in temperature and provide a unique platform for further development of stimuli-responsive nanomaterials. PMID:20843063

  17. Enhancing interfacial conductivity and spatial charge confinement of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures via strain engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explored the possibility of enhancing interfacial conductivity and spatial charge confinement of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) heterostructure (HS) via strain engineering using first-principles electronic structure calculations. We found that applying a tensile strain on the STO substrate along the ab-plane can significantly enhance the interfacial conductivity, magnetic moments, and the spatial charge confinement of the HS system. In contrast, a compressive strain can dilute the interfacial charge carrier density, make the mobile charges transfer to deep STO substrate, and weaken the spatial charge confinement along the c-axis. Hence, we propose that applying a tensile strain can be an effective way to enhance the interfacial conductivity and magnetism of STO-based HS systems.

  18. Impact of electron delocalization on the nature of the charge-transfer states in model pentacene/C60 Interfaces: A density functional theory study

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Bing

    2014-12-04

    Electronic delocalization effects have been proposed to play a key role in photocurrent generation in organic photovoltaic devices. Here, we study the role of charge delocalization on the nature of the charge-transfer (CT) states in the case of model complexes consisting of several pentacene molecules and one fullerene (C60) molecule, which are representative of donor/acceptor heterojunctions. The energies of the CT states are examined by means of time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) using the long-range-corrected functional, ?B97X, with an optimized range-separation parameter, ?. We provide a general description of how the nature of the CT states is impacted by molecular packing (i.e., interfacial donor/acceptor orientations), system size, and intermolecular interactions, features of importance in the understanding of the charge-separation mechanism.

  19. Final Report for completed IPP-0110 and 0110A Projects: 'High Energy Ion Technology of Interfacial Thin Film Coatings for Electronic, Optical and Industrial Applications'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DOE-supported IPP (Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention) Project, IPP-0110, and its accompanying 'add-on project' IPP-0110A, entitled 'High Energy Ion Technology of Interfacial Thin Film Coatings for Electronic, Optical and Industrial Applications' was a collaborative project involving the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) as the U.S. DOE lab; the US surface modification company, Phygen, Inc., as the US private company involved; and the High Current Electronics Institute (HCEI) of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Siberia, Russia, as the NIS Institute involved. Regular scientific research progress meetings were held to which personnel came from all participating partners. The meetings were held mostly at the Phygen facilities in Minneapolis, Minnesota (with Phygen as host) with meetings also held at Tomsk, Russia (HCEI as host), and at Berkeley, California (LBNL as host) In this way, good exposure of all researchers to the various different laboratories involved was attained. This report contains the Final Reports (final deliverables) from the Russian Institute, HCEI. The first part is that for IPP-0110A (the 'main part' of the overall project) and the second part is that for the add-on project IPP-0110A. These reports are detailed, and contain all aspects of all the research carried out. The project was successful in that all deliverables as specified in the proposals were successfully developed, tested, and delivered to Phygen. All of the plasma hardware was designed, made and tested at HCEI, and the performance was excellent. Some of the machine and performance parameters were certainly of 'world class'. The goals and requirements of the IPP Project were well satisfied. I would like to express my gratitude to the DOE IPP program for support of this project throughout its entire duration, and for the unparalleled opportunity thereby provided for all of the diverse participants in the project to join in this collaborative research. The benefits are superb, as measured in quite a number of different ways.

  20. Rates and Routes of Electron Transfer of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase in an Enzymatic Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Alexander; Stein, Matthias

    2015-10-29

    Hydrogenase enzymes are being used in enzymatic fuel cells immobilized on a graphite or carbon electrode surface, for example. The enzyme is used for the anodic oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2) to produce protons and electrons. The association and orientation of the enzyme at the anode electrode for a direct electron transfer is not completely resolved. The distal FeS-cluster in [NiFe]-hydrogenases contains a histidine residue which is known to play a critical role in the intermolecular electron transfer between the enzyme and the electrode surface. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase graphite electrode association was investigated using Brownian Dynamics simulations. Residues that were shown to be in proximity to the electrode surface were identified (His184, Ser196, Glu461, Glu464), and electron transfer routes connecting the distal FeS-cluster with the surface residues were investigated. Several possible pathways for electron transfer between the distal FeS-cluster and the terminal amino acid residues were probed in terms of their rates of electron transfer using DFT methods. The reorganization energies ? of the distal iron-sulfur cluster and coronene as a molecular model for graphite were calculated. The reorganization energy of the distal (His)(Cys)3 cluster was found to be not very different from that of a standard cubane clusters with a (Cys)4 coordination. Electronic coupling matrix elements and rates of electron transfer for the different pathways were calculated according to the Marcus equation. The rates for glutamate-mediated electrode binding were found to be incompatible with experimental data. A direct electron transfer from the histidine ligand of the distal FeS-cluster to the electrode yielded rates of electron transfer in excellent agreement with experiment. A second pathway, however, from the distal FeS-cluster to the Ser196 residue was found to be equally efficient and feasible. PMID:26218232

  1. Modulation transfer function and detective quantum efficiency of electron bombarded charge coupled device detector for low energy electrons.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horá?ek, Miroslav

    2005-01-01

    Ro?. 76, ?. 9 (2005), 093704:1-6. ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GA202/03/1575 Keywords : electron bombarded CCD * modulation transfer function * detective quantum efficiency Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.235, year: 2005

  2. 78 FR 66251 - Electronic Fund Transfers(Regulation E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ...date of availability for a transfer involving a currency exchange. The Final Rule explains that a remittance...the list when the sender funds a transfer in a currency other than the local currency (i.e., not the Aruban florin and the...

  3. Long-range protein electron transfer observed at the single-molecule level: In situ mapping of redox-gated tunneling resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Farver, O

    2005-01-01

    A biomimetic long-range electron transfer (ET) system consisting of the blue copper protein azurin, a tunneling barrier bridge, and a gold single-crystal electrode was designed on the basis of molecular wiring self-assembly principles. This system is sufficiently stable and sensitive in a quasi-biological environment, suitable for detailed observations of long-range protein interfacial ET at the nanoscale and single-molecule levels. Because azurin is located at clearly identifiable fixed sites in well controlled orientation, the ET configuration parallels biological ET. The ET is nonadiabatic, and the rate constants display tunneling features with distance-decay factors of 0.83 and 0.91 angstrom(-1) in H2O and D2O, respectively. Redox-gated tunneling resonance is observed in situ at the single-molecule level by using electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy, exhibiting an asymmetric dependence on the redox potential. Maximum resonance appears around the equilibrium redox potential of azurin with an on/off current ratio of approximate to 9. Simulation analyses, based on a two-step interfacial ET model for the scanning tunneling microscopy redox process, were performed and provide quantitative information for rational understanding of the ET mechanism

  4. Electron transfer rate of redox ion controlled by electrostatic interaction with bilayer films assembled using thiolate-copper ion-carboxylate bridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Sakai, Rei; Takahashi, Kohshin; Komura, Teruhisa

    2003-01-15

    11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) monolayer and MUA-copper ion-MUA bilayer assembled using thiolate-coppcr ion-carboxylate bridges on MUA monolayer electrode were prepared, and tried to control electron transfer rate of redox ions. The soaking solution to assemble MUA on gold electrode changed from ethanolic MUA solution to 1-butanolic one, then the differential interfacial capacitance decreased from 2.5{+-}0.1 {mu}F cm{sup -2} to 1.6{+-}0.2 {mu}F cm{sup -2}, and electron rate constant, k{sup 0} of [Co(phen){sub 3}]{sup 3+} decreased from 20x10{sup -6} cm s{sup -1} to 8.3x10{sup -6} cm s{sup -1}. These results show that highly ordered MUA monolayer can be obtained only changing soaking solvent to assemble MUA, Obtained highly ordered MUA monolayer electrode was block off completely redox anion by electrostatic repulsion and MUA film thickness. Moreover using MUA-copper ion-MUA bilayer electrode, k{sup 0} of [Co(phen){sub 3}]{sup 3+} decreased under 1/400 against using MUA monolayer electrode, that value become to under 0.02x10{sup -6} cm s{sup -1}. This study shows that the combination of electrode surface charge and length of insulating spacers is able to control electron transfer rate of various electroactive ions.

  5. Effects of anharmonicity on diffusive-controlled symmetric electron transfer rates: From the weak to the strong electronic coupling regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenjuan; Zhao, Yi

    2008-11-01

    The approach for the diffusive-controlled electron transfer rates [W. Zhu and Y. Zhao, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 184105 (2007)], which is modeled after the Sumi-Marcus theory, is applied to symmetric electron-transfer reactions in a solvent environment with anharmonic potential functions. The electron-transfer rates are evaluated using the quantum R-matrix theory for dealing with the intramolecular vibrational motions and imaginary-time split operator technique for solving the diffusive equations, thereby taking explicit account of the weak-to-strong electronic couplings. The effect of anharmonicity for both the solvent and intramolecular vibrational degrees of freedom are investigated. It is found that the anharmonicity of the intramolecular modes always enhances the rate while the solvent anharmonicity decreases the rate, compared with the harmonic modes. The possible mechanisms have been clarified.

  6. Experimental insights on the electron transfer and energy transfer processes between Ce3+-Yb3+ and Ce3+-Tb3+ in borate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A facile method to describe the electron transfer and energy transfer processes among lanthanide ions is presented based on the temperature dependent donor luminescence decay kinetics. The electron transfer process in Ce3+-Yb3+ exhibits a steady rise with temperature, whereas the Ce3+-Tb3+ energy transfer remains nearly unaffected. This feature has been investigated using the rate equation modeling and a methodology for the quantitative estimation of interaction parameters is presented. Moreover, the overall consequences of electron transfer and energy transfer process on donor-acceptor luminescence behavior, quantum efficiency, and donor luminescence decay kinetics are discussed in borate glass host. The results in this study propose a straight forward approach to distinguish the electron transfer and energy transfer processes between lanthanide ions in dielectric hosts, which is highly advantageous in view of the recent developments on lanthanide doped materials for spectral conversion, persistent luminescence, and related applications

  7. The Role of Protein Fluctuation Correlations in Electron Transfer in Photosynthetic Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterov, Alexander I

    2014-01-01

    We consider the dependence of the electron transfer in photosynthetic complexes on correlation properties of random fluctuations of the protein environment. The electron subsystem is modeled by a finite network of connected electron (exciton) sites. The fluctuations of the protein environment are modeled by random telegraph processes, which act either collectively (correlated) or independently (uncorrelated) on the electron sites. We derived an exact closed system of first-order linear differential equations with constant coefficients, for the average density matrix elements and for their first moments. Under some conditions, we obtain analytic expressions for the electron transfer rates. We compare the correlated and uncorrelated regimes, and demonstrated numerically that the uncorrelated fluctuations of the protein environment can, under some conditions, either increase or decrease the electron transfer rates.

  8. Pulse radiolytic studies of electron transfer processes and applications to solar photochemistry. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neta, P.

    1995-02-01

    The pulse radiolysis technique is applied to the study of electron transfer processes in a variety of chemical systems. Reactive intermediates are produced in solution by electron pulse irradiation and the kinetics of their reactions are followed by time resolved absorption spectrophotometry. Complementary experiments are carried out with excimer laser flash photolysis. These studies are concerned with mechanisms, kinetics, and thermodynamics of reactions of organic and inorganic radicals and unstable oxidation states of metal ions. Reactions are studied in both aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. The studies focus on the unique ability of pulse radiolysis to provide absolute rate constants for reactions of many inorganic radicals and organic peroxyl radicals, species that are key intermediates in many chemical processes. A special concern of this work is the study of electron transfer reactions of metalloporphyrins, which permits evaluation of these molecules as intermediates in solar energy conversion. Metalloporphyrins react with free radicals via electron transfer, involving the ligand or the metal center, or via bonding to the metal, leading to a variety of chemical species whose behavior is also investigated. The highlights of the results during the past three years are summarized below under the following sections: (a) electron transfer reactions of peroxyl radicals, concentrating on the characterization of new peroxyl radicals derived from vinyl, phenyl, other aryl, and pyridyl; (b) solvent effects on electron transfer reactions of inorganic and organic peroxyl radicals, including reactions with porphyrins, and (c) electron transfer and alkylation reactions of metalloporphyrins and other complexes.

  9. Ultrafast tryptophan-to-heme electron transfer in myoglobins revealed by UV 2D spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consani, Cristina; Auböck, Gerald; van Mourik, Frank; Chergui, Majed

    2013-03-29

    Tryptophan is commonly used to study protein structure and dynamics, such as protein folding, as a donor in fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) studies. By using ultra-broadband ultrafast two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopy in the ultraviolet (UV) and transient absorption in the visible range, we have disentangled the excited state decay pathways of the tryptophan amino acid residues in ferric myoglobins (MbCN and metMb). Whereas the more distant tryptophan (Trp(7)) relaxes by energy transfer to the heme, Trp(14) excitation predominantly decays by electron transfer to the heme. The excited Trp(14)?heme electron transfer occurs in edge-to-edge distance below ~10 angstroms, outcompeting the FRET process. Our results raise the question of whether such electron transfer pathways occur in a larger class of proteins. PMID:23393092

  10. Bi-directional magnetic resonance based wireless power transfer for electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Durga P.; Nayak, Praveen P.; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan; Mishra, Debasish

    2015-09-01

    In order to power or charge electronic devices wirelessly, a bi-directional wireless power transfer method has been proposed and experimentally investigated. In the proposed design, two receiving coils are used on both sides of a transmitting coil along its central axis to receive the power wirelessly from the generated magnetic fields through strongly coupled magnetic resonance. It has been observed experimentally that the maximum power transfer occurs at the operating resonant frequency for optimum electric load connected across the receiving coils on both side. The optimum wireless power transfer efficiency is 88% for the bi-directional power transfer technique compared 84% in the one side receiver system. By adopting the developed bi-directional power transfer method, two electronic devices can be powered up or charged simultaneously instead of a single device through usual one side receiver system without affecting the optimum power transfer efficiency.

  11. 78 FR 30661 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ...specifically related to a remittance transfer. For organizational purposes, the December Proposal divided comment...Similarly, there are limited data on consumer behavior, which would be essential for quantifying the benefits or costs to...

  12. Model-free Investigation of Ultrafast Bimolecular Chemical Reactions: Bimolecular Photo Induced Electron Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Rosspeintner Arnulf; Lang Bernhard; Vauthey Eric

    2013-01-01

    Using photoinduced bimolecular electron transfer reactions as example we demonstrate how diffusion controlled bimolecular chemical reactions can be studied in a model-free manner by quantitatively combining different ultrafast spectroscopical tools.

  13. Facilitation of Electron Transfer in the Presence of Mitochondria-Targeting Molecule SS31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosach, Tetiana; Ebrahim, Mark; Ren, Yuhang; Darrah, Shaun; Szeto, Hazel

    2010-03-01

    Electron transfer (ET) processes in mitochondria are very important for the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the common source of the chemical energy. The inability to transfer electrons efficiently in mitochondrial ET chain plays a major role in age associated diseases, including diabetes and cancer. In this work, we used the time dependent absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy to study the electron transfer kinetics along the ET chain of mitochondria. Our spectroscopic results suggest that SS31, a small peptide molecule targeting to the mitochondrial inner membrane, can facilitate electron transfer and increase ATP production. We show that SS31 targets cytochrome c to both increase the availability of state and also potentially reduce the energy barrier required to reduce cytochrome c.

  14. Electrode assemblies composed of redox cascades from microbial respiratory electron transfer chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, Andrew J.; Marritt, Sophie; Bradley, Justin; Shi, Liang; McMillan, Duncan G.; Jeuken, Lars J.; Richardson, David; Butt, Julea N.

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory and photosynthetic electron transfer chains are dependent on vectorial electron transfer through a series of redox proteins. Examples include electron transfer from NapC to NapAB nitrate reductase in Paracoccus denitrificans and from CymA to Fcc3 (flavocytochrome c3) fumarate reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In the present article, we demonstrate that graphite electrodes can serve as surfaces for the stepwise adsorption of NapC and NapAB, and the stepwise adsorption of CymA and Fcc3. Aspects of the catalytic properties of these assemblies are different from those of NapAB and Fcc3 adsorbed in isolation. We propose that this is due to the formation of NapC-NapAB and of CymA-Fcc3 complexes that are capable of supporting vectorial electron transfer.

  15. Thermodynamic, kinetic and electronic structure aspects of a charge-transfer active bichromophoric organofullerene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Senthil Kumar; Archita Patnaik

    2013-03-01

    Our recent work on charge transfer in the electronically push-pull dimethylaminoazobenzene-fullerene C60 donor-bridge-acceptor dyad through orbital picture revealed charge displacement from the n$_{\\text{(N=N)}}$ (non-bonding) and $\\pi_{\\text{(N=N)}}$ type orbitals centred on the donor part to the purely fullerene centred LUMOs and (LUMO+n) orbitals, delocalized over the entire molecule. Consequently, this investigation centres around the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters involved in the solvent polarity dependent intramolecular photo-induced electron transfer processes in the dyad, indispensable for artificial photosynthetic systems. A quasi-reversible electron transfer pathway was elucidated with electrode-specific heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants.

  16. 12 CFR 205.15 - Electronic fund transfer of government benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...15 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM ELECTRONIC FUND TRANSFERS (REGULATION...as through automated teller machines or point-of-sale terminals, but does not include an...

  17. Synthesis of 3-Alkenyl-1-azaanthraquinones via Diels-Alder and Electron Transfer Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Vanelle

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A convenient route to 3-alkenyl-1-azaanthraquinones via a hetero Diels-Alder reaction between an azadiene and naphthoquinone, a free radical chlorination and an electron transfer reaction is reported.

  18. Synthesis of 3-Alkenyl-1-azaanthraquinones via Diels-Alder and Electron Transfer Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Patrice Vanelle; Vincent Rémusat; Pascal Rathelot

    2002-01-01

    A convenient route to 3-alkenyl-1-azaanthraquinones via a hetero Diels-Alder reaction between an azadiene and naphthoquinone, a free radical chlorination and an electron transfer reaction is reported.

  19. Time-bin state transfer to electron spin coherence in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate that a coherent superposition state of two temporally separated optical pulses, called a time-bin state, can be transferred to that of up/down electron spins in a semiconductor by synchronizing the time separation to the precession period of either electrons or holes. The time-bin transfer scheme does not require polarization mode degeneracy and can map the time-bin state to the electron spin state that is not accessible directly using only polarization. The scheme offers a new approach for quantum interfaces between photons and electron spins

  20. Quantized orbital angular momentum transfer and magnetic dichroism in the interaction of electron vortices with matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Sophia; Babiker, Mohamed; Yuan, Jun

    2012-02-17

    Following the very recent experimental realization of electron vortices, we consider their interaction with matter, in particular, the transfer of orbital angular momentum in the context of electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and the recently observed dichroism in thin film magnetized iron samples. We show here that orbital angular momentum exchange does indeed occur between electron vortices and the internal electronic-type motion, as well as center-of-mass motion of atoms in the electric dipole approximation. This contrasts with the case of optical vortices where such transfer only occurs in transitions involving multipoles higher than the dipole. The physical basis of the observed dichroism is explained. PMID:22401214

  1. Time-bin state transfer to electron spin coherence in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosaka, Hideo; Inagaki, Takahiro; Hitomi, Ryuta; Izawa, Fumishige; Mitsumori, Yasuyoshi; Edamatsu, Keiichi [Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Rikitake, Yoshiaki [Sendai National College of Technology, Sendai 989-3128 (Japan); Imamura, Hiroshi [Nanosystem Research Institute, AIST, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-12-04

    We demonstrate that a coherent superposition state of two temporally separated optical pulses, called a time-bin state, can be transferred to that of up/down electron spins in a semiconductor by synchronizing the time separation to the precession period of either electrons or holes. The time-bin transfer scheme does not require polarization mode degeneracy and can map the time-bin state to the electron spin state that is not accessible directly using only polarization. The scheme offers a new approach for quantum interfaces between photons and electron spins.

  2. Electron excitation and energy transfer rates for H2O in the upper atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Brunger Michael; Campbell Laurence; Thorn Penny

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Recent measurements of the cross sections for electronic state excitations in H2O have made it possible to calculate rates applicable to these excitation processes. We thus present here calculations of electron energy transfer rates for electronic and vibrational state excitations in H2O, as well as rates for excitation of some of these states by atmospheric thermal and auroral secondary electrons. The calculation of these latter rates is an important first step towards our aim of in...

  3. Deterministic quantum state transfer from an electronic charge qubit to a photonic polarization qubit

    CERN Document Server

    Ament, L J P

    2006-01-01

    Building on an earlier proposal for the production of polarization-entangled microwaves by means of intraband transitions in a pair of quantum dots, we show how this device can be used to transfer an unknown single-qubit state from electronic charge to photonic polarization degrees of freedom. No postselection is required, meaning that the quantum state transfer happens deterministically. Decoherence of the charge qubit causes a non-monotonic decay of the fidelity of the transferred state with increasing decoherence rate.

  4. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems: what interactions play the major role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjulstok, Emil; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov’yov, Ilia A.

    2015-01-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment to deduce the driving force for the electron transfer reaction and to establish those interactions that play the major role in propelling the electron. The suggested approach is seen as a general recipe to treat electron transfer events in biological systems computationally, and we utilize it to describe specifically the electron transfer reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome–a signaling photoreceptor protein that became attractive recently due to its possible function as a biological magnetoreceptor. PMID:26689792

  5. Modelling the effect of contact formation on electron transfer in single-molecule device

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Marta M. D.; Correia, Helena M. G.

    2010-01-01

    The electric properties of single-molecule devices are very sensitive to details of contact formation between the molecule and the metallic electrodes. However the factors that control the electron transfer through the molecule in these devices, corresponding to slightly different molecule-metal attachments, are not well understood. In this work, we used a self-consistent molecular dynamics method to study the effect of symmetric and asymmetric contact realizations on electron transfer betwee...

  6. Charge transfer in quasi-one-electron systems at 'high' energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have made absolute and relative measurements of differential cross sections for single-electron transfer in collisions between Mg+ (30-150 keV) and Be+ (56.25 keV) ions and He atoms. The behaviour of transfer probability as a function of impact parameter can be understood qualitatively from recent molecular orbital calculations of quasi-one-electron systems. (author)

  7. Enhanced ionization of embedded clusters by Electron Transfer Mediated Decay in helium nanodroplets

    CERN Document Server

    LaForge, A C; Gokhberg, K; von Vangerow, J; Kryzhevoi, N; O'Keeffe, P; Ciavardini, A; Krishnan, S R; Coreno, M; Prince, K C; Richter, R; Moshammer, R; Pfeifer, T; Cederbaum, L; Stienkemeier, F; Mudrich, M

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the observation of electron transfer mediated decay For Mg clusters embedded in He nanodroplets. The process is mediated by the initial ionization of helium followed by an autoionization process by electron transfer in the Mg clusters. The photoelectron spectrum (PES) reveal a low energy ETMD peak. For Mg clusters larger than 7 atoms, we observe the formation of stable doubly ionized clusters. The process is shown to be the primamry ionization mechanism for embedded clusters.

  8. Observation of orientation-dependent electron transfer in molecule–surface collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Bartels, Nils; Golibrzuch, Kai; Bartels, Christof; Chen, Li; Auerbach, Daniel J.; Wodtke, Alec M.; Schäfer, Tim

    2013-01-01

    How molecules point in space—that is, their spatial orientation—determines how they interact with their environment. Exchange of energy, photons, and particles as well as chemical reactions are all elementary processes that depend on orientation. Electron transfer reactions are of particular interest because of their importance in a remarkably wide range of phenomena. In this work, we examine electron transfer reactions at surfaces, which control the change of oxidation state in surface chemi...

  9. Precursor charge state prediction for electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Vagisha; Eng, Jimmy K.; Feldman, Sergey; Von Haller, Priska D.; MacCoss, Michael J; Noble, William S.

    2010-01-01

    Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) induces fragmentation along the peptide backbone by transferring an electron from a radical anion to a protonated peptide. In contrast with collision induced dissociation, side chains and modifications such as phosphorylation are left intact through the ETD process. Because the precursor charge state is an important input to MS/MS sequence database search tools, the ability to accurately determine the precursor charge is helpful for the identification proc...

  10. Experimental and Theoretical Demonstrations for the Mechanism behind Enhanced Microbial Electron Transfer by CNT Network

    OpenAIRE

    Xian-Wei Liu; Jie-Jie Chen; Yu-Xi Huang; Xue-Fei Sun; Guo-Ping Sheng; Dao-Bo Li; Lu Xiong; Yuan-Yuan Zhang; Feng Zhao; Han-Qing Yu

    2014-01-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) share the principle of the microbially catalyzed anodic substrate oxidation. Creating an electrode interface to promote extracellular electron transfer from microbes to electrode and understanding such mechanisms are crucial for engineering BESs. In this study, significantly promoted electron transfer and a 10-times increase in current generation in a BES were achieved by the utilization of carbon nanotube (CNT) network, compared with carbon paper. The mechan...

  11. Near-interfacial thermal donor generation during processing of (100)Si/low-? Si-oxycarbide insulator structures revealed by electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stesmans, A.; Iacovo, S.; Nguyen, S.; Afanas'ev, V. V.; Baklanov, M. R.; Urbanowicz, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    A low-temperature multifrequency electron spin resonance (ESR) study has been carried out on Cz-(110)Si/insulator structures with organosilicate films of low dielectric constant ? grown at 300 °C using the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method (PECVD). After subjection to a short-term UV-irradiation-assisted thermal curing treatment at 430 °C to remove the organic component from the low-? film and obtain optimal porosity, the NL8 ESR spectrum of C2v symmetry is observed, characterized by g1 (//[100] = 1.999 83(8), g2(//[011] = 1.992 74(8), g3 = (//[1\\bar{1}0]) = 2.001 15(8). Based on previous insight, this reveals the generation in the c-Si substrate of singly ionized thermal double donor (TDD) defects with a core containing oxygen atoms. Remarkably, the generation is found to be highly nonuniform, and the defect density depth profile shows an exponential-like decay (decay length ˜3.8 ?m) from the oxide/Si interface inward the Si substrate, thus exposing the defect formation as an interface-administered effect. Upon analysis, the strain induced by interfacial stress in the c-Si beneath the interface is suggested as the major driving component in the enhancement of TDD formation during thermal treatment, suggesting that substantial stress is involved with PECVD organosilicate low-? glasses. The result represents a different and affirmative illustration of the influence of strain on TDD formation. Based on the principal g values, the observed TDD is closest to the NL81 type, the one formed first in bulk c-Si through oxygen agglomeration during short-term thermal treatment.

  12. Amplified electron transfer at poly-ethylene-glycol (PEG) grafted electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotchen, Christopher E; Maybury, Ian J; Nelson, Geoffrey W; Foord, John S; Holdway, Philip; Marken, Frank

    2015-05-01

    "Amplified" electron transfer is observed purely based on electron transfer kinetic effects at modified carbon surfaces. An anodic attachment methodology is employed to modify the surface of glassy carbon or boron doped diamond electrodes with poly-ethylene glycols (PEGs) for polymerisation degrees of n = 4.5 to 9.1 (PEG200 to PEG400). Voltammetry and impedance data for aqueous Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) suggest systematic PEG structure-dependent effects on the standard rate constant for heterogeneous electron transfer as a function of PEG deposition conditions and average polymer chain length. Tunnel distance coefficients are polymerisation degree dependent and estimated for shorter PEG chains, ? = 0.17 Å(-1) for aqueous Fe(CN)6(3-/4-), consistent with a diffuse water-PEG interface. In contrast, electron transfer to 1,1'-ferrocene-dimethanol (at 1 mM concentration) appears un-impeded by PEG grafts. Mediated or "amplified" electron transfer to Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) based on the 1,1'-ferrocene-dimethanol redox shuttle is observed for both oxidation and reduction with estimated bimolecular rate constants for homogeneous electron transfer of kforward = 4 × 10(5) mol dm(3) s(-1) and kbackward = 1 × 10(5) mol dm(3) s(-1). Digital simulation analysis suggests an additional resistive component within the PEG graft double layer. PMID:25836325

  13. Dependence of Vibronic Coupling on Molecular Geometry and Environment: Bridging Hydrogen Atom Transfer and Electron-Proton Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshan, Aparna Karippara; Yu, Tao; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-10-28

    The rate constants for typical concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions depend on the vibronic coupling between the diabatic reactant and product states. The form of the vibronic coupling is different for electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, which are associated with hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and electron-proton transfer (EPT) mechanisms, respectively. Most PCET rate constant expressions rely on the Condon approximation, which assumes that the vibronic coupling is independent of the nuclear coordinates of the solute and the solvent or protein. Herein we test the Condon approximation for PCET vibronic couplings. The dependence of the vibronic coupling on molecular geometry is investigated for an open and a stacked transition state geometry of the phenoxyl-phenol self-exchange reaction. The calculations indicate that the open geometry is electronically nonadiabatic, corresponding to an EPT mechanism that involves significant electronic charge redistribution, while the stacked geometry is predominantly electronically adiabatic, corresponding primarily to an HAT mechanism. Consequently, a single molecular system can exhibit both HAT and EPT character. The dependence of the vibronic coupling on the solvent or protein configuration is examined for the soybean lipoxygenase enzyme. The calculations indicate that this PCET reaction is electronically nonadiabatic with a vibronic coupling that does not depend significantly on the protein environment. Thus, the Condon approximation is shown to be valid for the solvent and protein nuclear coordinates but invalid for the solute nuclear coordinates in certain PCET systems. These results have significant implications for the calculation of rate constants, as well as mechanistic interpretations, of PCET reactions. PMID:26412613

  14. What are the benefits of bound (protonation) states for the electron-transfer kinetics?

    OpenAIRE

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a model of electron transfer reactions affected by local binding to the donor or acceptor sites of a particle in equilibrium with the solution. The statistics of fluctuations of the donor-acceptor energy gap caused by binding/unbinding events are non-Gaussian, and the resulting free energy surfaces of electron transfer are non-parabolic. The band-width of the charge-transfer optical transition is predicted to pass through a maximum as a function of the concentrat...

  15. Excess Electron Trapping in Duplex DNA: Long Range Transfer via Stacked Adenines

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Paul J.; Bernhard, William A.

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of charge transfer (CT) in DNA lies at the root of assessing the risks and benefits of exposure to ionizing radiation. Energy deposition by high-energy photons and fast charged particles creates holes and excess electrons (EE) in DNA and the subsequent reactions determine the complexity of DNA damage and ultimately the risk of disease. Further interest in CT comes from the possibility that hole transfer and/or excess electron transfer (EET) in DNA might be used to develop nan...

  16. Effect of the excitation pulse frequency on the ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dependence of the ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer dynamics in donor-acceptor complexes on the excitation pulse carrier frequency (spectral effect) has been investigated in the framework of a model involving three electronic state. The spectral effect has been shown to strongly depend on the angle ? between the reaction coordinate directions corresponding to optical and charge transfer transitions. Describing the solvent as a linear homogenous polar medium and accounting for Coulombic interaction of the transferred charge with the medium polarization fluctuations, the angle ? has been found out to be typically in the area 40 deg. -85 deg. Exactly in this area of ? the spectral effect is predicted to be most pronounced

  17. Study on electron transfer mechanism in surface enhanced Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Raman intensity from the pyridine on the silver electrode is measured as the function of electrode potential. The charge transfer mechanism can be confirmed by measuring the potential dependence of peak value of Raman intensity as varying the incident photon energy. In order to find the potential dependence of resonent Raman Scattering intensity through the charge transfer process, the Herzberg-Teller terms of polarization tensor is in the theoritical study and this is compared with experimental value. During the potential range of constant surface complex concentration, the experimental result of Raman intensity profile is coincide quite well with theoritical calculation.(Author)

  18. An Implementation of Interfacial Transport Equation into the CUPID code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ik Kyu; Cho, Heong Kyu; Yoon, Han Young; Jeong, Jae Jun

    2009-11-15

    A component scale thermal hydraulic analysis code, CUPID (Component Unstructured Program for Interfacial Dynamics), is being developed for the analysis of components for a nuclear reactor, such as reactor vessel, steam generator, containment, etc. It adopted a three-dimensional, transient, two phase and three-field model. In order to develop the numerical schemes for the three-field model, various numerical schemes have been examined including the SMAS, semi-implicit ICE, SIMPLE. The governing equations for a 2-phase flow are composed of mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations for each phase. These equation sets are closed by the interfacial transfer rate of mass, momentum, and energy. The interfacial transfer of mass, momentum, and energy occurs through the interfacial area, and this area plays an important role in the transfer rate. The flow regime based correlations are used for calculating the interracial area in the traditional style 2-phase flow model. This is dependent upon the flow regime and is limited to the fully developed 2-phase flow region. Its application to the multi-dimensional 2-phase flow has some limitation because it adopts the measured results of 2-phase flow in the 1-dimensional tube. The interfacial area concentration transport equation had been suggested in order to calculate the interfacial area without the interfacial area correlations. The source terms to close the interfacial area transport equation should be further developed for a wide ranger usage of it. In this study, the one group interfacial area concentration transport equation has been implemented into the CUPID code. This interfacial area concentration transport equation can be used instead of the interfacial area concentration correlations for the bubbly flow region.

  19. Concerted electron-proton transfer in the optical excitation of hydrogen-bonded dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westlake, Brittany C.; Brennaman, Kyle M; Concepcion, Javier J; Paul, Jared J.; Bettis, Stephanie E; Hampton, Shaun D; Miller, Stephen A.; Lebedeva, Natalia V.; Forbes, Malcolm D. E.; Moran, Andrew M.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Papanikolas, John M.

    2011-05-24

    The simultaneous, concerted transfer of electrons and protons—electron-proton transfer (EPT)—is an important mechanism utilized in chemistry and biology to avoid high energy intermediates. There are many examples of thermally activated EPT in ground-state reactions and in excited states following photoexcitation and thermal relaxation. Here we report application of ultrafast excitation with absorption and Raman monitoring to detect a photochemically driven EPT process (photo-EPT). In this process, both electrons and protons are transferred during the absorption of a photon. Photo-EPT is induced by intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) excitation of hydrogen-bonded-base adducts with either a coumarin dye or 4-nitro-4'-biphenylphenol. Femtosecond transient absorption spectral measurements following ICT excitation reveal the appearance of two spectroscopically distinct states having different dynamical signatures. One of these states corresponds to a conventional ICT excited state in which the transferring H? is initially associated with the proton donor. Proton transfer to the base (B) then occurs on the picosecond time scale. The other state is an ICT-EPT photoproduct. Upon excitation it forms initially in the nuclear configuration of the ground state by application of the Franck–Condon principle. However, due to the change in electronic configuration induced by the transition, excitation is accompanied by proton transfer with the protonated base formed with a highly elongated ?H–B bond. Coherent Raman spectroscopy confirms the presence of a vibrational mode corresponding to the protonated base in the optically prepared state.

  20. FinalReport for completed IPP-0110 and 0110A Projects:"High Energy Ion Technology of Interfacial Thin Film Coatings for Electronic, Optical and Industrial Applications"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Ian

    2009-09-01

    The DOE-supported IPP (Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention) Project, IPP-0110, and its accompanying 'add-on project' IPP-0110A, entitled 'High Energy Ion Technology of Interfacial Thin Film Coatings for Electronic, Optical and Industrial Applications' was a collaborative project involving the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) as the U.S. DOE lab; the US surface modification company, Phygen, Inc., as the US private company involved; and the High Current Electronics Institute (HCEI) of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Siberia, Russia, as the NIS Institute involved. Regular scientific research progress meetings were held to which personnel came from all participating partners. The meetings were held mostly at the Phygen facilities in Minneapolis, Minnesota (with Phygen as host) with meetings also held at Tomsk, Russia (HCEI as host), and at Berkeley, California (LBNL as host) In this way, good exposure of all researchers to the various different laboratories involved was attained. This report contains the Final Reports (final deliverables) from the Russian Institute, HCEI. The first part is that for IPP-0110A (the 'main part' of the overall project) and the second part is that for the add-on project IPP-0110A. These reports are detailed, and contain all aspects of all the research carried out. The project was successful in that all deliverables as specified in the proposals were successfully developed, tested, and delivered to Phygen. All of the plasma hardware was designed, made and tested at HCEI, and the performance was excellent. Some of the machine and performance parameters were certainly of 'world class'. The goals and requirements of the IPP Project were well satisfied. I would like to express my gratitude to the DOE IPP program for support of this project throughout its entire duration, and for the unparalleled opportunity thereby provided for all of the diverse participants in the project to join in this collaborative research. The benefits are superb, as measured in quite a number of different ways.

  1. Fabrication of nanowire electronics on nonconventional substrates by water-assisted transfer printing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi Hwan; Kim, Dong Rip; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2015-06-01

    We report a simple, versatile, and wafer-scale water-assisted transfer printing method (WTP) that enables the transfer of nanowire devices onto diverse nonconventional substrates that were not easily accessible before, such as paper, plastics, tapes, glass, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), aluminum foil, and ultrathin polymer substrates. The WTP method relies on the phenomenon of water penetrating into the interface between Ni and SiO2. The transfer yield is nearly 100%, and the transferred devices, including NW resistors, diodes, and field effect transistors, maintain their original geometries and electronic properties with high fidelity.

  2. Transferred metal electrode films for large-area electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaporation of metal-film gate electrodes for top-gate organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) limits the minimum thickness of the polymer gate dielectric to typically more than 300?nm due to deep hot metal atom penetration and damage of the dielectric. We show here that the self-release layer transfer method recently developed for high-quality graphene transfer is also capable of giving high-quality metal thin-film transfers to produce high-performance capacitors and OFETs with superior dielectric breakdown strength even for ultrathin polymer dielectric films. Dielectric breakdown strengths up to 5–6 MV cm?1 have been obtained for 50-nm thin films of polystyrene and a cyclic olefin copolymer TOPAS® (Zeon). High-quality OFETs with sub-10?V operational voltages have been obtained this way using conventional polymer dielectrics and a high-mobility polymer semiconductor poly[2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophene-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-2,5-diyl]. The transferred metal films can make reliable contacts without damaging ultrathin polymer films, self-assembled monolayers and graphene, which is not otherwise possible from evaporated or sputtered metal films

  3. 77 FR 50243 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ...1005.31 to add new paragraphs (a...regarding the content and format of the disclosures...transfer provider sets a retail exchange rate. Thus...estimation methodology. New comment 32(d...must give senders new pre-payment disclosures before accepting payment if...

  4. 77 FR 77187 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ..., originating providers (whether depository or non-depository) using open networks or other systems that deposit... published February 7, 2012 (77 FR 6194) and August 20, 2012 (77 FR 50244) must be received by January 15... transfer; (ii) cancellation and refund rights; (iii) the investigation and remedy of errors by...

  5. Transferred metal electrode films for large-area electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jin-Guo [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore S117543 (Singapore); NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering (NGS), National University of Singapore, Medical Drive, Singapore S117456 (Singapore); Kam, Fong-Yu [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore S117543 (Singapore); Chua, Lay-Lay [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore S117543 (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore S117543 (Singapore)

    2014-11-10

    The evaporation of metal-film gate electrodes for top-gate organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) limits the minimum thickness of the polymer gate dielectric to typically more than 300?nm due to deep hot metal atom penetration and damage of the dielectric. We show here that the self-release layer transfer method recently developed for high-quality graphene transfer is also capable of giving high-quality metal thin-film transfers to produce high-performance capacitors and OFETs with superior dielectric breakdown strength even for ultrathin polymer dielectric films. Dielectric breakdown strengths up to 5–6 MV cm{sup ?1} have been obtained for 50-nm thin films of polystyrene and a cyclic olefin copolymer TOPAS{sup ®} (Zeon). High-quality OFETs with sub-10?V operational voltages have been obtained this way using conventional polymer dielectrics and a high-mobility polymer semiconductor poly[2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophene-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-2,5-diyl]. The transferred metal films can make reliable contacts without damaging ultrathin polymer films, self-assembled monolayers and graphene, which is not otherwise possible from evaporated or sputtered metal films.

  6. What are the benefits of bound (protonation) states for the electron-transfer kinetics?

    CERN Document Server

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2007-01-01

    We describe a model of electron transfer reactions affected by local binding to the donor or acceptor sites of a particle in equilibrium with the solution. The statistics of fluctuations of the donor-acceptor energy gap caused by binding/unbinding events are non-Gaussian, and the resulting free energy surfaces of electron transfer are non-parabolic. The band-width of the charge-transfer optical transition is predicted to pass through a maximum as a function of the concentration of binding particles in the solution. The model is used to rationalize recent observations of pH-dependence of electron transfer rates involving changes in the protonation state of the donor-acceptor complex.

  7. Observation of proton transfer in 2-aminopyridine dimer by electron and mass spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylova, Elena; Radloff, Wolfgang; Ritze, Hans-Hermann; Schultz, Thomas

    2009-07-23

    A photoinitiated intermolecular electron-proton transfer reaction in 2-aminopyridine dimer was investigated by femtosecond pump-probe electron-ion coincidence spectroscopy and accompanying theory. Excited-state population dynamics were observed in real time by time-resolved mass spectroscopy, and the respective excited-state character of locally excited and proton/hydrogen transfer states was identified in coincident electron spectra. Two reaction channels for an ultrafast (sub-50 fs) and a slower (approximately 75 ps) proton/hydrogen transfer were observed and indicate that vibrational energy redistribution may lead to efficient population trapping in the excited state. Spectroscopic evidence of an unexpected hydrogen-transfer reaction in photoexcited aminopyridine monomer is also presented. PMID:19569694

  8. ESR studies of radiation induced electron transfer between myosin and caffeic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of radiation induced electron transfer within a series of binary molecular aggregates, which were composed of myosin and caffeic acid with varied molar ratios (r) of amino acid residues in myosin to caffeic acid, has been studied by resolution of composite ESR spectra recorded at 77 K. A series of spin transfer ratios (RST) defined as the spin concentration ratios of caffeic acid anion radical arising from transfer of captured electron by peptide chain of myosin to that from directly trapping of secondary electrons by caffeic acid were obtained. A series of RST were plotted against r varied from 1:1 to 100:1. A linear relationship between RSt and r demonstrates that RSt increase linearly with decrease of caffeic acid content. The capture of radiation induced secondary electrons depend on the electron affinities of components including electron affinitive amino acid residues and peptide carbonyl of myosin and caffeic acid. The process of electron transfer along peptide chain and trapping on caffeic acid finally has been elucidated based on the comparison of the energies of lowest empty molecular orbital (ELUMO) of the electron affinitive components and reaction rate constants of eaq- with these components respectively using pulse radiolysis techniques

  9. Modeling time-coincident ultrafast electron transfer and solvation processes at molecule-semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic models based on Fermi's Golden Rule are commonly employed to understand photoinduced electron transfer dynamics at molecule-semiconductor interfaces. Implicit in such second-order perturbative descriptions is the assumption that nuclear relaxation of the photoexcited electron donor is fast compared to electron injection into the semiconductor. This approximation breaks down in systems where electron transfer transitions occur on 100-fs time scale. Here, we present a fourth-order perturbative model that captures the interplay between time-coincident electron transfer and nuclear relaxation processes initiated by light absorption. The model consists of a fairly small number of parameters, which can be derived from standard spectroscopic measurements (e.g., linear absorbance, fluorescence) and/or first-principles electronic structure calculations. Insights provided by the model are illustrated for a two-level donor molecule coupled to both (i) a single acceptor level and (ii) a density of states (DOS) calculated for TiO2 using a first-principles electronic structure theory. These numerical calculations show that second-order kinetic theories fail to capture basic physical effects when the DOS exhibits narrow maxima near the energy of the molecular excited state. Overall, we conclude that the present fourth-order rate formula constitutes a rigorous and intuitive framework for understanding photoinduced electron transfer dynamics that occur on the 100-fs time scale

  10. A systematic study of electron or hole transfer along DNA dimers, trimers and polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We systematically study carrier transfer along DNA dimers, trimers and polymers. • We define max transfer percentage, pure max transfer rate, pure mean transfer rate. • For exponential (power-law) fit, the inverse decay length ? (exponent ?) is computed. • The results are compared with theoretical and experimental works. • The method assesses the extent a specific DNA segment can serve for charge transfer. - Abstract: A systematic study of carrier transfer along DNA dimers, trimers and polymers including poly(dG)–poly(dC), poly(dA)–poly(dT), GCGCGC…, ATATAT… is presented allowing to determine the spatiotemporal evolution of electrons or holes along a N base-pair DNA segment. Physical quantities are defined including maximum transfer percentage p and pure maximum transfer rate p/T when a period T is defined; pure mean transfer rate k and speed u=kd, where d is the charge transfer distance. The inverse decay length ? for the exponential fit k=k0exp(-?d) and the exponent ? for the power-law fit k=k0?N-? are computed. ?? 0.2–2 ??1, k0 is usually 10?2–10?1 PHz, generally ?10?4–10 PHz. ??1.7–17, k0? is usually 10?2–10?1 PHz, generally ?10?4–103 PHz. The results are compared with theoretical and experimental works. This method allows to assess the extent at which a specific DNA segment can serve for charge transfer

  11. Excitation of the ligand-to-metal charge transfer band induces electron tunnelling in azurin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldacchini, Chiara [Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, DEB-CNISM, Università della Tuscia, I-01100 Viterbo (Italy); Institute of Agro-environmental and Forest Biology, National Research Council, I-05010 Porano (Italy); Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore, E-mail: cannistr@unitus.it [Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, DEB-CNISM, Università della Tuscia, I-01100 Viterbo (Italy)

    2014-03-03

    Optical excitation of azurin blue copper protein immobilized on indium-tin oxide, in resonance with its ligand-to-metal charge transfer absorption band, resulted in a light-induced current tunnelling within the protein milieu. The related electron transport rate is estimated to be about 10{sup 5}?s{sup ?1}. A model based on resonant tunnelling through an azurin excited molecular state is proposed. The capability of controlling electron transfer processes through light pulses opens interesting perspectives for implementation of azurin in bio-nano-opto-electronic devices.

  12. Electron transfer and ionization from the K shell of neon by proton impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross sections are being calculate or electron transfer and ionization from the K shell of neutral neon atoms by 250-1500 keV proton impact. As an extension of work recently published for carbon targets, a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach is taken using a central potentials to represent the interaction of the active electron with the ion core. After a binding energy correction is made, preliminary results show excellent agreement with experimental results for ionization, as for carbon targets. The smaller electron-transfer cross section is more sensitive to basis size, particularly so for neon targets, but agreement with experimental results is satisfactory

  13. Metal Bridging for Directing and Accelerating Electron Transfer as Exemplified by Harnessing the Reactivity of AIBN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yinjun; Guo, Shengmei; Wu, Longmin; Xia, Chungu; Huang, Hanmin

    2015-05-11

    A new strategy for tuning the electron transfer between radicals and enolates has been developed. This method elicits the innate reactivity of AIBN with a copper catalyst and enables a cascade reaction with cinnamic acids. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies and control experiments indicate that the redox-active copper species not only activates the radical by coordination, but also serves as a bridge to bring the radical and nucleophile within close proximity to facilitate electron transfer. By exploiting possible combinations of redox-active metals and radical entities with suitable coordinating functional groups, this strategy should contribute to the development of a broad range of radical-based reactions. PMID:25809686

  14. Electron transfer from sulfate-reducing becteria biofilm promoted by reduced graphene sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yi; Zhang, Dun; Wang, Yi; Wu, Jiajia

    2012-01-01

    Reduced graphene sheets (RGSs) mediate electron transfer between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and solid electrodes, and promote the development of microbial fuel cells (MFC). We have investigated RSG-promoted electron transfer between SRB and a glassy carbon (GC) electrode. The RGSs were produced at high yield by a chemical sequence involving graphite oxidation, ultrasonic exfoliation of nanosheets, and N2H4 reduction. Cyclic voltammetric testing showed that the characteristic anodic peaks (around 0.3 V) might arise from the combination of bacterial membrane surface cytochrome c3 and the metabolic products of SRB. After 6 d, another anodic wave gradually increased to a maximum current peak and a third anodic signal became visible at around 0 V. The enhancements of two characteristic anodic peaks suggest that RSGs mediate electron-transfer kinetics between bacteria and the solid electrode. Manipulation of these recently-discovered electron-transport mechanisms will lead to significant advances in MFC engineering.

  15. Double K-shell-to-K-shell electron transfer in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present the first study of the role of double K-shell-to-K-shell electron transfer in heavy-ion--atom collisions. Consistent analysis procedures for obtaining total cross sections for both single and double K-shell-to-K-shell electron transfer are outlined based on the charge-state dependence of the total x-ray-production cross sections for K-shell satellite and hypersatellite x rays, respectively. Theoretical calculations for the single and double electron-transfer cross sections based on the two-state atomic expansion model and the independent-electron approximation are presented and are found to be in excellent agreement with experiment

  16. Modulating the electronic structure of chromophores by chemical substituents for efficient energy transfer: application to fluorone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Andrew M; Liu, Claire; Valentine, Andrew J S; Mazziotti, David A

    2014-08-01

    Strong electron correlation within a quasi-spin model of chromophores was recently shown to enhance exciton energy transfer significantly. Here we investigate how the modulation of the electronic structure of the chromophores by chemical substitution can enhance energy-transfer efficiency. Unlike previous work that does not consider the direct effect of the electronic structure on exciton dynamics, we add chemical substituents to the fluorone dimer to study the effect of electron-donating and electron-withdrawing substituents on exciton energy transfer. The exciton dynamics are studied from the solution of a quantum Liouville equation for an open system whose model Hamiltonian is derived from excited-state electronic structure calculations. Both van der Waals energies and coupling energies, arising from the Hellmann-Feynman force generated upon transferring the dimers from infinity to a finite separation, are built into the model Hamiltonian. Though these two effects are implicitly treated in dipole-based models, their explicit and separate treatment as discussed here is critical to forging the correct connection with the electronic structure calculations. We find that the addition of electron-donating substituents to the fluorone system results in an increase in exciton-transfer rates by factors ranging from 1.3-1.9. The computed oscillator strength is consistent with the recent experimental results on a larger heterodimer system containing fluorone. The oscillator strength increases with the addition of electron-donating substituents. Our results indicate that the study of chromophore networks via electronic structure will help in the future design of efficient synthetic light-harvesting systems. PMID:25062094

  17. The effect of intramolecular quantum modes on free energy relationships for electron transfer reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulstrup, Jens; Jortner, Joshua

    1975-01-01

    A general quantum mechanical description of exothermic electron transfer reactions is formulated by treating such reactions as the nonradiative decay of a ''supermolecule'' consisting of the electron donor, the electron acceptor, and the polar solvent. In particular, the role of the high-frequency intramolecular degrees of feedom on the free energy relationship for series of closely related reactions was investigated for various model systems involving displacement of potential energy surfaces, ...

  18. Properties of the transfer matrices of deflecting magnet systems for free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oscillation of the free electron laser (FEL) requires the high current and low emittance electron beam. The beam transport system should be achromatic and isochronous to preserve the brightness and the emittance of the electron beam. In this paper we clarify the algebraic properties of the transfer matrices of the magnetic deflection system, which is a key component in the beam transport line. (author)

  19. ELECTRON TRANSFER IN Hg1-xCdxTe-CdTe HETEROSTRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    Boebinger, G.; Vieren, J.; Guldner, Y.; Voos, M.; Faurie, J.

    1987-01-01

    Far infrared magneto-absorption experiments performed at 1.6K in HgCdTe-CdTe heterojunctions show that a two-dimensional electron gas is formed in the HgCdTe layer at the HgCdTe-CdTe interface. The electron effective masses of the two populated subbands is obtained and compared to previous theoretical calculations. The electron transfer across the interface involves deep traps in the CdTe layers.

  20. Direct observation of ultrafast-electron-transfer reactions unravels high effectiveness of reductive DNA damage

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Jenny; Ma, Yuhan; LUO, TING; Bristow, Robert G.; Jaffray, David A.; Lu, Qing-Bin

    2011-01-01

    Both water and electron-transfer reactions play important roles in chemistry, physics, biology, and the environment. Oxidative DNA damage is a well-known mechanism, whereas the relative role of reductive DNA damage is unknown. The prehydrated electron (), a novel species of electrons in water, is a fascinating species due to its fundamental importance in chemistry, biology, and the environment. is an ideal agent to observe reductive DNA damage. Here, we report both the first in situ femtosec...

  1. Potential for direct interspecies electron transfer in methanogenic wastewater digester aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morita, Masahiko; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Franks, Ashley E; Summers, Zarath M; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Rotaru, Amelia E; Rotaru, Camelia; Lovley, Derek R; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms for electron transfer within microbial aggregates derived from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor converting brewery waste to methane were investigated in order to better understand the function of methanogenic consortia. The aggregates were electrically conductive, with conductivities 3-fold higher than the conductivities previously reported for dual-species aggregates of Geobacter species in which the two species appeared to exchange electrons via interspecies electron trans...

  2. Long-range intramolecular electron transfer in aromatic radical anions and binuclear transition metal complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    1981-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer (ET) over distances up to about 10 Å between states in which the electron is localized on donor and acceptor groups by interaction with molecular or external solvent nuclear motion occurs, in particular, in two classes of systems. The excess electron in anionic radicals containing two aromatic end groups connected by a flexible polymethylene chain or a rigid cyclohexane frame is thus trapped on either aromatic end group, and ET between these groups can be detecte...

  3. Inhibiting Interfacial Recombination Events in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells using Self-Assembled Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunsolu, Omotola O; Wang, Jamie C; Hanson, Kenneth

    2015-12-23

    The rate and efficiency of electron transfer events at the semiconductor-dye-electrolyte interface is of critical importance to the overall performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells. In this work, we introduce self-assembled bilayers composed of a metal oxide electrode, bridging molecules, linking ions, and dye as an effective strategy to manipulate interfacial electron transfer events at the photoanode of DSSCs. Spectroelectrochemical measurements including current-voltage, incident photon-to-current efficiency, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy are used to quantify interfacial electron transfer and transport events with respect to the length of the bridging molecules. The general trend in increased lifetime and diffusion length in TiO2 as well as an increase in open circuit voltage with bridge length indicate that the bilayer is an effective strategy in inhibiting the TiO2(e(-)) to redox mediator recombination events. However, the increased separation between the dye and the semiconductor also reduces the electron injection rate resulting in a decrease in photocurrent as the bridge length increases. The observed enhancement in open circuit voltages are far outweighed by the significant decrease in photocurrent and thus overall device performance decreases with increasing bridge length. PMID:26619360

  4. Designed Surface Residue Substitutions in [NiFe] Hydrogenase that Improve Electron Transfer Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac T. Yonemoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photobiological hydrogen production is an attractive, carbon-neutral means to convert solar energy to hydrogen. We build on previous research improving the Alteromonas macleodii “Deep Ecotype” [NiFe] hydrogenase, and report progress towards creating an artificial electron transfer pathway to supply the hydrogenase with electrons necessary for hydrogen production. Ferredoxin is the first soluble electron transfer mediator to receive high-energy electrons from photosystem I, and bears an electron with sufficient potential to efficiently reduce protons. Thus, we engineered a hydrogenase-ferredoxin fusion that also contained several other modifications. In addition to the C-terminal ferredoxin fusion, we truncated the C-terminus of the hydrogenase small subunit, identified as the available terminus closer to the electron transfer region. We also neutralized an anionic patch surrounding the interface Fe-S cluster to improve transfer kinetics with the negatively charged ferredoxin. Initial screening showed the enzyme tolerated both truncation and charge neutralization on the small subunit ferredoxin-binding face. While the enzyme activity was relatively unchanged using the substrate methyl viologen, we observed a marked improvement from both the ferredoxin fusion and surface modification using only dithionite as an electron donor. Combining ferredoxin fusion and surface charge modification showed progressively improved activity in an in vitro assay with purified enzyme.

  5. Charge transfer dynamics from adsorbates to surfaces with single active electron and configuration interaction based approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We model electron dynamics across cyano alkanethiolates attached to gold cluster. • We present electron transfer time scales from TD-DFT and TD-CI based simulations. • Both DFT and CI methods qualitatively predict the trend in time scales. • TD-CI predicts the experimental relative time scale very accurately. - Abstract: We employ wavepacket simulations based on many-body time-dependent configuration interaction (TD-CI), and single active electron theories, to predict the ultrafast molecule/metal electron transfer time scales, in cyano alkanethiolates bonded to model gold clusters. The initial states represent two excited states where a valence electron is promoted to one of the two virtual ?? molecular orbitals localized on the cyanide fragment. The ratio of the two time scales indicate the efficiency of one charge transfer channel over the other. In both our one-and many-electron simulations, this ratio agree qualitatively with each other as well as with the previously reported experimental time scales (Blobner et al., 2012), measured for a macroscopic metal surface. We study the effect of cluster size and the description of electron correlation on the charge transfer process

  6. Fast electron transfer through a single molecule natively structured redox protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Della Pia, Eduardo Antonio; Chi, Qijin

    2012-01-01

    The electron transfer properties of proteins are normally measured as molecularly averaged ensembles. Through these and related measurements, proteins are widely regarded as macroscopically insulating materials. Using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), we present new measurements of the conductance through single-molecules of the electron transfer protein cytochrome b562 in its native conformation, under pseudo-physiological conditions. This is achieved by thiol (SH) linker pairs at opposite ends of the molecule through protein engineering, resulting in defined covalent contact between a gold surface and a platinum–iridium STM tip. Two different orientations of the linkers were examined: a long-axis configuration (SH-LA) and a short-axis configuration (SH-SA). In each case, the molecular conductance could be ‘gated’ through electrochemical control of the heme redox state. Reproducible and remarkably high conductance was observed in this relatively complex electron transfer system, with single-molecule conductance values peaking around 18 nS and 12 nS for the SH-SA and SH-LA cytochrome b562 molecules near zero electrochemical overpotential. This strongly points to the important role of the heme co-factor bound to the natively structured protein. We suggest that the two-step model of protein electron transfer in the STM geometry requires a multi-electron transfer to explain such a high conductance. The model also yields a low value for the reorganisation energy, implying that solvent reorganisation is largely absent.

  7. Correlation between biological activity and electron transferring of bovine liver catalase: Osmolytes effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Proline increases ET in Bovine Liver Catalase (BLC) whereas histidine decreases it. • Proline also increased the biological activity, whereas histidine decreased it. • Electron transferring and biological activity for BLC are directly correlated. • Proline causes favorable ET for BLC shown by positive E1/2 (E°?) and negative ?G. • Histidine makes ET unfavorable for BLC, manifested by E1/2 (E°?) 0. -- Abstract: Catalase is a crucial antioxidant enzyme that protects life against detrimental effects of H2O2 by disproportionating it into water and molecular oxygen. Effect of proline as a compatible and histidine as a non compatible osmolyte on the electron transferring and midpoint potential of catalase has been investigated. Proline increases the midpoint potential (?Em > 0), therefore causing the ?GET to be less positive and making the electron transfer reaction more facile whereas histidine decreases the Em (?Em ET, thereby rendering the electron transfer reaction less efficient. These results indicate the inhibitory effect of histidine evident by a ?37% decrease in the cathodic peak current compared to 16% increase in the case of proline indicative of activation. The insight paves the tedious way towards our ultimate goal of elucidating a correlation between biological activity and electron transferring

  8. Influence of Solvent, Electron Acceptors and Arenes on Photochemical Decarboxylation of Free Carboxylic Acids via Single Electron Transfer (SET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuharu Yoshimi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Single electron transfer (SET-photochemical decarboxylation of free carboxylic acids was performed in a polar solvent using several arenes such as phenanthrene, naphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene, biphenyl, triphenylene, and chrysene in the presence of various electron acceptors such as 1,2-, 1,3-, and 1,4-dicyanobenzenes, methyl 4-cyanobenzoate, and 1,4-dicyanonaphthalene. The decarboxylation reaction was influenced by the arenes, electron acceptors, and solvent. The best result was achieved by the photoreaction using biphenyl and 1,4-dicyanonaphthalene in aqueous acetonitrile.

  9. Electronic Structure of the Perylene / Zinc Oxide Interface: A Computational Study of Photoinduced Electron Transfer and Impact of Surface Defects

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingrui

    2015-07-29

    The electronic properties of dye-sensitized semiconductor surfaces consisting of pery- lene chromophores chemisorbed on zinc oxide via different spacer-anchor groups, have been studied at the density-functional-theory level. The energy distributions of the donor states and the rates of photoinduced electron transfer from dye to surface are predicted. We evaluate in particular the impact of saturated versus unsaturated aliphatic spacer groups inserted between the perylene chromophore and the semiconductor as well as the influence of surface defects on the electron-injection rates.

  10. 75 FR 75897 - Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ...the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS...abatement. According to IRS research, however, employers...depositor of Form 943 taxes is determined according...deposit of employment taxes attributable to payments...be considered to be in compliance with Sec. Sec....

  11. 77 FR 6310 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ...following methods: Electronic...official business days between...Division of Research, Markets...data, and research results on...course of business in the proposed...and the quantitative and qualitative...provide data, research results...types of businesses through which...and the quantitative and...

  12. Activators generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization of styrene in the presence of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Effect of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MCM-41) on the activator generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP) is investigated. Decrement of conversion and number average molecular weight and also increment of polydispersity index (PDI) values are three main results of addition of MCM-41 nanoparticles. Incorporation of MCM-41 nanoparticles in the polystyrene matrix can clearly increase thermal stability and decrease glass transition temperature of the nanocomposites. - Highlights: • Spherical morphology, hexagonal structure, and high surface area with regular pore diameters of the synthesized MCM-41 nanoparticles are examined. • AGET ATRP of styrene in the presence of MCM-41 nanoparticles is performed. • Effect of MCM-41 nanoparticles addition on the polymerization rate, conversion and molecular weights of the products are discussed. • Improvement in thermal stability of the nanocomposites and decreasing Tg values was also observed by incorporation of MCM-41 nanoparticles. - Abstract: Activator generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization was employed to synthesize well-defined mesoporous silica nanoparticles/polystyrene composites. Inherent features of spherical mesoporous silica nanoparticles were evaluated by nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherm, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analysis techniques. Conversion and molecular weight evaluations were carried out using gas and size exclusion chromatography respectively. By the addition of only 3 wt% mesoporous silica nanoparticles, conversion decreases from 81 to 58%. Similarly, number average molecular weight decreases from 17,116 to 12,798 g mol?1. However, polydispersity index (PDI) values increases from 1.24 to 1.58. A peak around 4.1–4.2 ppm at proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy results clearly confirms the living nature of the polymerization. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that thermal stability of the nanocomposites increases by adding nanoparticles content. Decrease of glass transition temperature is also demonstrated by the addition of 3 wt% of silica nanoparticles according to the differential scanning calorimetry results

  13. Coherent state transfer between an electron- and nuclear spin in 15N@C60

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Richard M; Porfyrakis, Kyriakos; Gauger, Erik M; Lovett, Brendon W; Ardavan, Arzhang; Lyon, S A; Briggs, G Andrew D; Morton, John J L

    2010-01-01

    Electron spin qubits in molecular systems offer high reproducibility and the ability to self assemble into larger architectures. However, interactions between neighbouring qubits are 'always-on' and although the electron spin coherence times can be several hundred microseconds, these are still much shorter than typical times for nuclear spins. Here we implement an electron-nuclear hybrid scheme which uses coherent transfer between electron and nuclear spin degrees of freedom in order to both controllably turn on/off dipolar interactions between neighbouring spins and benefit from the long nuclear spin decoherence times (T2n). We transfer qubit states between the electron and 15N nuclear spin in 15N@C60 with a two-way process fidelity of 88%, using a series of tuned microwave and radiofrequency pulses and measure a nuclear spin coherence lifetime of over 100 ms.

  14. Scanning probe microscopies for the creation and characterization of interfacial architectures: Studies of alkyl thiolate monolayers at gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, J.

    1997-01-10

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) offers access to the structural and material properties of interfaces, and when combined with macroscopic characterization techniques results in a powerful interfacial development tool. However, the relative infancy of SPM techniques has dictated that initial investigations concentrate on model interfacial systems as benchmarks for testing the control and characterization capabilities of SPM. One such family of model interfacial systems results from the spontaneous adsorption of alkyl thiols to gold. This dissertation examines the application of SPM to the investigation of the interfacial properties of these alkyl thiolate monolayers. Structural investigations result in a proposed explanation for counterintuitive correlations between substrate roughness and heterogeneous electron transfer barrier properties. Frictional measurements are used for characterization of the surface free energy of a series of end-group functionalized monolayers, as well as for the material properties of monolayers composed of varying chain length alkyl thiols. Additional investigations used these characterization techniques to monitor the real-time evolution of chemical and electrochemical surface reactions. The results of these investigations demonstrates the value of SPM technology to the compositional mapping of surfaces, elucidation of interfacial defects, creation of molecularly sized chemically heterogeneous architectures, as well as to the monitoring of surface reactions. However, it is the future which will demonstrate the usefulness of SPM technology to the advancement of science and technology.

  15. Bidirectional microbial electron transfer: Switching an acetate oxidizing biofilm to nitrate reducing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pous, Narcís; Carmona-Martínez, Alessandro A; Vilajeliu-Pons, Anna; Fiset, Erika; Bañeras, Lluis; Trably, Eric; Balaguer, M Dolors; Colprim, Jesús; Bernet, Nicolas; Puig, Sebastià

    2016-01-15

    Up to date a few electroactive bacteria embedded in biofilms are described to catalyze both anodic and cathodic reactions in bioelectrochemical systems (i.e. bidirectional electron transfer). How these bacteria transfer electrons to or from the electrode is still uncertain. In this study the extracellular electron transfer mechanism of bacteria within an electroactive biofilm was investigated by using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). First, a mature anodic electroactive biofilm was developed from an activated sludge sample (inoculum), acetate as electron donor and a poised electrode (+397mV vs. SHE). Later, this biofilm was "switched" to biocathodic conditions by feeding it with a medium containing nitrates and poising the electrode at -303mV vs. SHE. The electrochemical characterization indicated that both, acetate oxidation and nitrate reduction took place at a similar formal potential of -175±05 and -175±34mV vs. SHE, respectively. The biofilm was predominantly composed by Geobacter sp. at both experimental conditions. Taken together, the results indicated that both processes could be catalyzed by using the same electron conduit, and most likely by the same bacterial consortium. Hence, this study suggests that electroactive bacteria within biofilms could use the same electron transfer conduit for catalyzing anodic and cathodic reactions. PMID:26339932

  16. Electronic system for the automatic transfer of data from multichannel analyzer memory to computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electronic system has been build for the automatic transfer of data from Intertechnique Multichannel analyzer Memory to HP 2116 C computer. By using a balanced twisted-pair transmission line, transfer can be made from devices separated up to 300 meters. A logic interface is associated to each apparatus. Computer manages the transmission process and indicates the errors that could happen. 4096 channels are transmitted into 17 sec

  17. Deterministic quantum state transfer from an electronic charge qubit to a photonic polarization qubit

    OpenAIRE

    Ament, L.J.P.; Beenakker, C. W. J.

    2006-01-01

    Building on an earlier proposal for the production of polarization-entangled microwaves by means of intraband transitions in a pair of quantum dots, we show how this device can be used to transfer an unknown single-qubit state from electronic charge to photonic polarization degrees of freedom. No postselection is required, meaning that the quantum state transfer happens deterministically. Decoherence of the charge qubit causes a non-monotonic decay of the fidelity of the tra...

  18. Electronic and vibronic properties of a discotic liquid-crystal and its charge transfer complex

    CERN Document Server

    Haverkate, Lucas; Johnson, Mark; Carter, Elisabeth; Kotlewski, Arek; Picken, Stephen; Mulder, Fokko; Kearley, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Discotic liquid crystalline (DLC) charge transfer (CT) complexes combine visible light absorption and rapid charge transfer characteristics within the CT complex, being favorable properties for photovoltaic (PV) applications. We present a detailed study of the electronic and vibrational properties of the prototypic 1:1 mixture of discotic 2,3,6,7,10,11-hexakishexyloxytriphenylene (HAT6) and 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone (TNF). It is shown that intermolecular charge transfer occurs in the groundstate of the complex: a charge delocalization of about 10-2 electron from the HAT6 core to TNF is deduced from both Raman and NMR measurements, implying the presence of permanent dipoles at the donor-acceptor interface. A combined analysis of density functional theory calculations, resonant Raman and UV-VIS absorption measurements indicate that fast relaxation occurs in the UV region due to intramolecular vibronic coupling of HAT6 quinoidal modes with lower lying electronic states. Relatively slower relaxation in the visi...

  19. Breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer-Condon-Marcus approximation in long distance electron transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the issue of how the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer-Condon-Marcus approximation affects the dependence of the electron-transfer rate k upon distance, as well as the dependences upon the driving force and temperature. For large distances, ca. r>10 A, it is predicted that: (i) the slope of lnk vs r dependence decreases down to zero; (ii) the bell-shaped Marcus dependence upon the driving force is distorted, with the maximum shifting toward ?G>0; and (iii) the apparent activation energy increases and the temperature dependence more and more declines from the Arrhenius form. These effects can be experimentally distinguished from similar effects due to other mechanisms, such as thermal activation of the electron transferred and temperature dependence of the reorganization parameters and driving force. Experimental data by Isied et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 97 (1993) 11456] on electron transfer between metal ions across rigid oligoproline bridges are well fitted using the present theory

  20. Nobel Prize 1992: Rudolph A. Marcus: theory of electron transfer reactions in chemical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the theory developed by Rudolph A. Marcus is presented, who for his rating to the theory of electron transfer in chemical systems was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1992. Marcus theory has constituted not only a good extension of the use of a spectroscopic principle, but also has provided an energy balance and the application of energy conservation for electron transfer reactions. A better understanding of the reaction coordinate is exposed in terms energetic and establishing the principles that govern the transfer of electrons, protons and some labile small molecular groups as studied at present. Also, the postulates and equations described have established predictive models of reaction time, very useful for industrial environments, biological, metabolic, and others that involve redox processes. Marcus theory itself has also constituted a large contribution to the theory of complex transition

  1. Transfer function restoration in 3D electron microscopy via iterative data refinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional electron microscopy (3D-EM) is a powerful tool for visualizing complex biological systems. As with any other imaging device, the electron microscope introduces a transfer function (called in this field the contrast transfer function, CTF) into the image acquisition process that modulates the various frequencies of the signal. Thus, the 3D reconstructions performed with these CTF-affected projections are also affected by an implicit 3D transfer function. For high-resolution electron microscopy, the effect of the CTF is quite dramatic and limits severely the achievable resolution. In this work we make use of the iterative data refinement (IDR) technique to ameliorate the effect of the CTF. It is demonstrated that the approach can be successfully applied to noisy data

  2. Synthesis of nickel oxides nanoparticles on glassy carbon as an electron transfer facilitator for horseradish peroxidase: Direct electron transfer and H2O2 determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, horseradish peroxidase/nickel oxides nanoparticles/glassy carbon (HRP/NiO NPs/GC) electrode was prepared by first applying nickel oxides nanoparticles on glassy carbon surface and then horseradish peroxidase immobilized on the NiO NPs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been used as a diagnostic tools to identify the synthesized NiO NPs. Immobilized HRP showed an electrochemical redox behavior pertained to HRP(Fe(III)-Fe(II)) by direct electron transfer between protein and nanoparticles with a formal potential (E0') of - 55.5 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl and 141.5 mV vs. NHE) in 50 mM phosphate buffer solution (PBS). The anodic charge transfer coefficient (?) and heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (ks) were 0.42 and 0.75 s-1, respectively. Biocatalytic activity of HRP/NiO NPs/GC electrode for reduction of hydrogen peroxide and application to hydrogen peroxide determination was exemplified.

  3. Smart interfacial bonding alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Q. Hwang; J. C. Hamilton; J. E. Houston

    1999-04-01

    The goal of this LDRD was to explore the use of the newly discovered strain-stabilized 2-D interfacial alloys as smart interface bonding alloys (SIBA). These materials will be used as templates for the heteroepitaxial growth of metallic thin films. SIBA are formed by two metallic components which mix at an interface to relieve strain and prevent dislocations from forming in subsequent thin film growth. The composition of the SIBA is determined locally by the amount of strain, and therefore can react smartly to areas of the highest strain to relieve dislocations. In this way, SIBA can be used to tailor the dislocation structure of thin films. This project included growth, characterization and modeling of films grown using SIBA templates. Characterization will include atomic imaging of the dislocations structure, measurement of the mechanical properties of the film using interface force microscopy (IFM) and the nanoindenter, and measurement of the electronic structure of the SIBA with synchrotron photoemission. Resistance of films to sulfidation and oxidation will also be examined. The Paragon parallel processing computer will be used to calculate the structure of the SIBA and thin films in order to develop ability to predict and tailor SIBA and thin film behavior. This work will lead to the possible development of a new class of thin film materials with properties tailored by varying the composition of the SIBA, serving as a buffer layer to relieve the strain between the substrate and the thin film. Such films will have improved mechanical and corrosion resistance allowing application as protective barriers for weapons applications. They will also exhibit enhanced electrical conductivity and reduced electromigration making them particularly suitable for application as interconnects and other electronic needs.

  4. Optical manipulation of ultrafast electron and nuclear motion on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petek, Hrvoje

    2009-12-02

    We study the unoccupied electronic structure and dynamics of chemisorbed atoms and molecules on metal surfaces by time resolved two-photon photoemission (TR-2PP). spectroscopy, low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM), and theory. Our research concerns simple atomic adsorbates such as alkali and alkaline earth atoms, which provide fundamentally important models for adsorbate-surface interactions, and more complex adsorbates such as fullerenes on noble metals, which illustrate emergent interfacial properties that derive from intrinsic molecular attributes, and moleculemolecule and molecule-surface interactions. Our goal is to understand how these interactions contribute to formation of the interfacial electronic structure, and how thus formed electronic properties affect interfacial phenomena of importance to energy transduction and storage. Moreover, we explore how the interfacial electronic excitation drives dynamical phenomena such as charge transfer and surface femtochemistry.

  5. A systematic study of electron or hole transfer along DNA dimers, trimers and polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Simserides, Constantinos

    2014-01-01

    A systematic study of electron or hole transfer along DNA dimers, trimers and polymers is presented with a tight-binding approach at the base-pair level, using the relevant on-site energies of the base-pairs and the hopping parameters between successive base-pairs. A system of $N$ coupled differential equations is solved numerically with the eigenvalue method, allowing the temporal and spatial evolution of electrons or holes along a $N$ base-pair DNA segment to be determined. Useful physical quantities are defined and calculated including the maximum transfer percentage $p$ and the pure maximum transfer rate $\\frac{p}{T}$ for cases where a period $T$ can be defined, as well as the pure mean carrier transfer rate $k$ and the speed of charge transfer $u=kd$, where $d = N \\times$ 3.4 {\\AA} is the charge transfer distance. The inverse decay length $\\beta$ used for the exponential fit $k = k_0 \\exp(-\\beta d)$ and the exponent $\\eta$ used for the power law fit $k = k_0' N^{-\\eta}$ are computed. The electron and hol...

  6. Transient kinetics of electron transfer from a variety of c-type cytochromes to plastocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, T E; Zhao, Z G; Cusanovich, M A; Tollin, G

    1993-05-01

    Plastocyanin (PC) and its physiological reaction partner cytochrome (cyt) f form a complex which is electrostatically stabilized by interactions between complementary localized charges. We have measured the kinetics of intracomplex electron transfer between several reduced cytochromes and PC using laser flash photolysis. With spinach cyt f and spinach PC, we obtain first-order rate constants, kforward = 2780 s-1 and kreverse = 1050 s-1, for the reversible reaction and a complex dissociation constant of about 23 microM at an ionic strength (I) of 5 mM. The observed rate constant increases by a factor of 2 between I = 5 and 40 mM and then decreases monotonically at higher ionic strengths. This indicates that the complex is not completely dissociated until I = 150 mM and that the proteins within the electrostatically most stable complex are not optimally oriented for electron transfer. Similar results were obtained with turnip cyt f and spinach PC, although in this case intracomplex electron transfer is about 4 times as fast. Horse cyt c also forms an electrostatically stabilized complex with PC, and yields a limiting rate constant for intracomplex electron transfer (1750 s-1) and a dissociation constant (10 microM) comparable to those for spinach cyt f. The ionic strength dependence shows that the complex is more readily dissociated (complete at I = 25 mM) than is that of cyt f and that rearrangement is not required for optimal electron transfer. Addition of polylysine results in 10-fold inhibition of the rate of electron transfer. Pseudomonas cyt c-551 is an acidic cytochrome which does not form a complex with PC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8387337

  7. Protein Phosphorylation and Intermolecular Electron Transfer: A Joint Experimental and Computational Study of a Hormone Biosynthesis Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Zöllner, Andy; Pasquinelli, Melissa A.; Bernhardt, Rita; Beratan, David N.

    2007-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a common regulator of enzyme activity. Chemical modification of a protein surface, including phosphorylation, could alter the function of biological electron-transfer reactions. However, the sensitivity of intermolecular electron-transfer kinetics to post-translational protein modifications has not been widely investigated. We have therefore combined experimental and computational studies to assess the potential role of phosphorylation in electron-transfer reactions...

  8. Mimicking the electron transfer chain in photosystem II with a molecular triad thermodynamically capable of water oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Megiatto, Jackson D.; Antoniuk-Pablant, Antaeres; Sherman, Benjamin D.; Kodis, Gerdenis; Gervaldo, Miguel; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.; Gust, Devens

    2012-01-01

    In the photosynthetic photosystem II, electrons are transferred from the manganese-containing oxygen evolving complex (OEC) to the oxidized primary electron-donor chlorophyll P680•+ by a proton-coupled electron transfer process involving a tyrosine-histidine pair. Proton transfer from the tyrosine phenolic group to a histidine nitrogen positions the redox potential of the tyrosine between those of P680•+ and the OEC. We report the synthesis and time-resolved spectroscopic study of a molecular...

  9. Electron excitation and energy transfer rates for H2O in the upper atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunger Michael

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent measurements of the cross sections for electronic state excitations in H2O have made it possible to calculate rates applicable to these excitation processes. We thus present here calculations of electron energy transfer rates for electronic and vibrational state excitations in H2O, as well as rates for excitation of some of these states by atmospheric thermal and auroral secondary electrons. The calculation of these latter rates is an important first step towards our aim of including water into a statistical equilibrium model of the atmosphere under auroral conditions. PACS Codes: 34.50.Gb 34.50.Ez

  10. Electron transfer across anodic films formed on tin in carbonate-bicarbonate buffer solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impedance and steady-state data were recorded in order to study the kinetics of electron transfer between passive tin electrodes and an electrolytic solution containing the K3Fe(CN)6-K4Fe(CN)6 redox couple. Film thickness plays a key role in determining the type of electronic conduction of these oxide covered electrodes. Electron exchange with the oxide takes place with participation of the conduction band in the semiconducting film. A mechanism involving direct electron tunneling through the space charge barrier is the most suitable to interpret the experimental evidence

  11. Ultrafast electron transfer in type II GaAs/AlAs superlattices by femtosecond luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron transfer from GaAs wells (? wavefunctions) to AlAs barriers (X wavefunctions) in GaAs/AlAs type II superlattices has been studied by time resolved luminescence with femtosecond resolution. Transfer times can be as short as 140 fs for narrow wells and as long as 25 ps for the widest wells. They do not depend appreciably on the barrier thickness. We discuss the possible contribution to the transfer mechanism of state mixing, intervalley scattering and Froelich interaction. Our measurement favors phonon assisted, intervalley type scattering, modified by the overlap of the different wavefunctions. (orig.)

  12. Controllable Quantum State Transfer Between a Josephson Charge Qubit and an Electronic Spin Ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Run-Ying; Wang, Hong-Ling; Feng, Zhi-Bo

    2015-05-01

    We propose a theoretical scheme to implement controllable quantum state transfer between a superconducting charge qubit and an electronic spin ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centers. By an electro-mechanical resonator acting as a quantum data bus, an effective interaction between the charge qubit and the spin ensemble can be achieved in the dispersive regime, by which state transfers are switchable due to the adjustable electrical coupling. With the accessible experimental parameters, we further numerically analyze the feasibility and robustness. The present scheme could provide a potential approach for transferring quantum states controllably with the hybrid system.

  13. Near-contact adiabatic suppression of electron transfer in the inverted region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A few theories of activated electron transfer in inverted Marcus region are used for bridging the non-adiabatic, solvent controlled and deeply adiabatic transfer. The simple analytical interpolation between dynamic and stochastic theories provides a continuous description of the electron transfer rate at any non-adiabatic coupling between the diabatic states. When coupling increases with shortening of inter-particle distance the pre-exponent of the Arrhenius transfer rate first increases being quadratic in coupling, then levels off approaching the 'dynamic solvent effect' (DSE) region and finally is cut off exponentially due to adiabaticity of the transfer. These changes affect significantly the spatial dependence of the transfer rate near the contact provided the coupling there is strong. The rate tends to zero at contact distance being strongly suppressed nearby adiabatically. It is much smaller then the perturbation (golden rule) and even DSE results. The latter is actually unattainable anywhere if contact tunneling is really strong. The transfer rate is a bell-shaped curve adiabatic and non-adiabatic on the opposite sides and sensitive to the friction (DSE damping) only in between, near the maximum

  14. An efficient implementation of the localized operator partitioning method for electronic energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The localized operator partitioning method [Y. Khan and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 194112 (2012)] rigorously defines the electronic energy on any subsystem within a molecule and gives a precise meaning to the subsystem ground and excited electronic energies, which is crucial for investigating electronic energy transfer from first principles. However, an efficient implementation of this approach has been hindered by complicated one- and two-electron integrals arising in its formulation. Using a resolution of the identity in the definition of partitioning, we reformulate the method in a computationally efficient manner that involves standard one- and two-electron integrals. We apply the developed algorithm to the 9 ? ((1 ? naphthyl) ? methyl) ? anthracene (A1N) molecule by partitioning A1N into anthracenyl and CH2 ? naphthyl groups as subsystems and examine their electronic energies and populations for several excited states using configuration interaction singles method. The implemented approach shows a wide variety of different behaviors amongst the excited electronic states

  15. Subshell resolved L-K electron transfer and ionization of Yb with Si ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured subshell resolved L-K electron transfer cross sections from the L subshell of the Yb target to the vacant K-shell of the Si projectile at energies varying between 2-4.5 MeV/A. In addition, the L subshell ionization cross sections are also obtained for Yb. It is observed that contrary to expectations, the L2 subshell electron transfer as well as ionization cross sections are substantially lower than the corresponding cross sections for the L1 subshell. (orig.)

  16. Electronic memory switching in a new charge transfer-complex thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K. Z.; Xue, Z. Q.; Ouyang, M.; Zhang, H. X.; Huang, C. H.

    1995-11-01

    Charge transfer-complex thin films of 1,4-bis(2,2-dicyanovinyl)benzene(BDCB) with silver, sandwiched between two silver elctrodes, show current-controlled bistable electronic switching and memory behavior. The switching from a high to low impedance is believed to be associated with chemical phase change similar to that for charge transfer-complex thin films of TCNQ with either copper or silver. The films are analyzed by infrared, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction.

  17. Nonlinear response of metal nanoparticles: Double plasmon excitation and electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Shiwu [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Zhongguancun Software Park II, 100094, Beijing (China)

    2015-06-21

    We investigate the dynamical response of a metal nanoparticle and the electron transfer to a molecule near its surface using time-dependent density functional theory. In addition to the linear response of the Mie resonance, double plasmon excitations and a low-frequency charge transfer band emerge and become prominent at high laser intensities. Both modes are nonlinear processes, which are derived from the re-excitation and decay of the primary plasmon mode, respectively. Our results shed light on the localised characters of the plasmon-molecule coupling and hot electron distributions. These findings have general implications to photoinduced phenomena in nanosystems.

  18. Direct electron transfer: an approach for electrochemical biosensors with higher selectivity and sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freire Renato S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The most promising approach for the development of electrochemical biosensors is to establish a direct electrical communication between the biomolecules and the electrode surface. This review focuses on advances, directions and strategies in the development of third generation electrochemical biosensors. Subjects covered include a brief description of the fundamentals of the electron transfer phenomenon and amperometric biosensor development (different types and new oriented enzyme immobilization techniques. Special attention is given to different redox enzymes and proteins capable of electrocatalyzing reactions via direct electron transfer. The analytical applications and future trends for third generation biosensors are also presented and discussed.

  19. Photo-induced regeneration of hormones by electron transfer processes: Potential biological and medical consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getoff, Nikola, E-mail: nikola.getoff@univie.ac.a [Section of Radiation Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Hartmann, Johannes [Department of Gynecologic Endocrinology and Reproduction, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Schittl, Heike [Section of Radiation Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Gerschpacher, Marion [Department of Gynecologic Endocrinology and Reproduction, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Quint, Ruth Maria [Section of Radiation Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-08-15

    Based on the previous results concerning electron transfer processes in biological substances, it was of interest to investigate if hormone transients resulting by e.g. electron emission can be regenerated. The presented results prove for the first time that the hormone transients originating by the electron emission process can be successfully regenerated by the transfer of electrons from a potent electron donor, such as vitamin C (VitC). Investigations were performed using progesterone (PRG), testosterone (TES) and estrone (E1) as representatives of hormones. By irradiation with monochromatic UV light ({lambda}=254 nm) in a media of 40% water and 60% ethanol, the degradation as well as the regeneration of the hormones was studied with each hormone individually and in the mixture with VitC as a function of the absorbed UV dose, using HPLC. Calculated from the obtained initial yields, the determined regeneration of PRG amounted to 52.7%, for TES to 58.6% and for E1 to 90.9%. The consumption of VitC was determined in the same way. The reported results concerning the regeneration of hormones by the transfer of electrons from an electron donor offer a new, promising method for the therapy with hormones. As a consequence of the regeneration of hormones, a decreased formation of carcinogenic metabolites is expected.

  20. Electrochemical study of the intermolecular electron transfer to Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of electron transfer reaction between cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase (NiR) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and various physiological/non physiological redox partners was investigated using cyclic voltammetry at the pyrolytic graphite electrode. While NiR did not exchange electron with the electrode, cytochrome c551 and azurin, both from Ps. aeruginosa, behaved as fast electrochemical systems. The intermolecular electron transfers between NiR and cytochrome c551 or azurin as electron shuttles, in the presence of nitrite, were studied. Second order rate constants of 2x106 and 1.4x105 M-1 s-1 are calculated for cytochrome c551 and azurin, respectively. The dependence of the second-order rate constant on ionic strength and pH is discussed. Finally, the effect of the global charge of the electron shuttles was explored using differently charged species (proteins or small ions). The experimental results suggest involvement of polar interactions as well as of hydrophobic contacts in the protein recognition prior to the intermolecular electron transfer. As the cross-reaction between Ps. nautica cytochrome c552 and Ps. aeruginosa NiR was shown to be as efficient as the catalytic reaction involving the physiological partners, it is concluded to a 'pseudo-specificity' in the recognition between NiR and the electron donor

  1. Experimental studies of fundamental issues in electron transfer through nanometer scale devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiromichi

    Electron transfer reactions constitute many of the primary events in materials science, chemistry, physics, and biochemistry, e.g. the electron transport properties and photoexcited processes in solids and molecules, chemical reactions, corrosion, photosynthesis, respiration, and so forth. A self-assembled monolayer (SAM) film provides us with a unique environment not only to understand and manipulate the surface electronic properties of a solid, but also to control electron transfer processes at the interface. The first topic in this thesis describes the structure and electron tunneling characterization of alkanethiol SAMs on InP(100). Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the bonding of alkanethiols to n-InP surfaces and to measure the monolayer thickness. The results showed that the sulfur binds to In atoms on the surface, and provided film thicknesses of 6.4 A for C8H17SH, 11.1 A for C12H25SH, and 14.9 A for C16H 33SH, resulting in an average tilt angle of 55°. The analysis indicated that super-exchange coupling between the alkane chains plays an important role in defining electron tunneling barriers, especially for highly tilted chains. The second topic describes studies of cytochrome c bound to pure and mixed SAMs of o-terminated alkanethiol (terminated with pyridine, imidazole or nitrile groups) and alkanethiol on gold. Electrochemical methods are used to determine electron transfer rate constants of cytochrome c, and scanning tunneling microscopy to observe the cytochrome c on the SAM. Detailed analysis revealed direct association of the heme of cytochrome c with the terminal groups of the SAMs and a 'turning-over' of the electron transfer of cytochrome c from adiabatic to non-adiabatic regime. The third topic describes studies of oxidation and reduction of cytochrome c in solution through eleven different self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold electrodes by cyclic voltammetry. Electron transfer rate constants of cytochrome c through the eleven SAMs ranged from ?10-4 to ˜10-1 cm/sec. A strong correlation between the electron transfer rate constants and the hydrogen bonding ability of the SAM is identified. This correlation is discussed in terms of the dependence of the rate constant on the outer-sphere reorganization energy and the electronic coupling between the cytochrome and the differently terminated monolayer films.

  2. DFT and time-resolved IR investigation of electron transfer between photogenerated 17- and 19-electron organometallic radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahoon, James B.; Kling, Matthias F.; Sawyer, Karma R.; Andersen, Lars K.; Harris, Charles B.

    2008-04-30

    The photochemical disproportionation mechanism of [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} in the presence of Lewis bases PR{sub 3} was investigated on the nano- and microsecond time-scales with Step-Scan FTIR time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. 532 nm laser excitation was used to homolytically cleave the W-W bond, forming the 17-electron radicals CpW(CO){sub 3} and initiating the reaction. With the Lewis base PPh{sub 3}, disproportionation to form the ionic products CpW(CO){sub 3}PPh{sub 3}{sup +} and CpW(CO){sub 3}{sup -} was directly monitored on the microsecond time-scale. Detailed examination of the kinetics and concentration dependence of this reaction indicates that disproportionation proceeds by electron transfer from the 19-electron species CpW(CO){sub 3}PPh{sub 3} to the 17-electron species CpW(CO){sub 3}. This result is contrary to the currently accepted disproportionation mechanism which predicts electron transfer from the 19-electron species to the dimer [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2}. With the Lewis base P(OMe){sub 3} on the other hand, ligand substitution to form the product [CpW(CO){sub 2}P(OMe){sub 3}]{sub 2} is the primary reaction on the microsecond time-scale. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations support the experimental results and suggest that the differences in the reactivity between P(OMe){sub 3} and PPh{sub 3} are due to steric effects. The results indicate that radical-to-radical electron transfer is a previously unknown but important process for the formation of ionic products with the organometallic dimer [CpW(CO){sub 3}]{sub 2} and may also be applicable to the entire class of organometallic dimers containing a single metal-metal bond.

  3. A de novo designed 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxin mimic mediates electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anindya; Sommer, Dayn Joseph; Schmitz, Robert Arthur; Brown, Chelsea Lynn; Gust, Devens; Astashkin, Andrei; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2014-12-10

    [Fe-S] clusters, nature's modular electron transfer units, are often arranged in chains that support long-range electron transfer. Despite considerable interest, the design of biomimetic artificial systems emulating multicluster-binding proteins, with the final goal of integrating them in man-made oxidoreductases, remains elusive. Here, we report a novel bis-[4Fe-4S] cluster binding protein, DSD-Fdm, in which the two clusters are positioned within a distance of 12 Å, compatible with the electronic coupling necessary for efficient electron transfer. The design exploits the structural repeat of coiled coils as well as the symmetry of the starting scaffold, a homodimeric helical protein (DSD). In total, eight hydrophobic residues in the core of DSD were replaced by eight cysteine residues that serve as ligands to the [4Fe-4S] clusters. Incorporation of two [4Fe-4S] clusters proceeds with high yield. The two [4Fe-4S] clusters are located in the hydrophobic core of the helical bundle as characterized by various biophysical techniques. The secondary structure of the apo and holo proteins is conserved; further, the incorporation of clusters results in stabilization of the protein with respect to chemical denaturation. Most importantly, this de novo designed protein can mimic the function of natural ferredoxins: we show here that reduced DSD-Fdm transfers electrons to cytochrome c, thus generating the reduced cyt c stoichiometrically. PMID:25437708

  4. Linker effects on monolayer formation and long-range electron transfer in helical peptide monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikuma, Yoko; Takeda, Kazuki; Morita, Tomoyuki; Ohmae, Masashi; Kimura, Shunsaku

    2009-05-01

    Helical peptides carrying a ferrocene unit at the C-terminus were immobilized on gold at the N-terminus via three different linkers to form self-assembled monolayers, and the long-range electron transfer from the ferrocene unit to gold was electrochemically studied. The linkers are 4-thiobenzoic acid, 3-fluoro-4-thiobenzoic acid, and 2-methoxy-4-thiobenzoic acid. All the peptides formed a monolayer with vertical orientation but some differences in monolayer packing and ferrocene surface density as they formed. However, the treatment with dodecanethiol in a gas phase uniformed to show similar monolayer physical parameters, and the electron-transfer rate constants were reproducibly obtained as well. These three peptide monolayers exhibited the same electron-transfer rate constants despite three linkers with different oxidation potentials. On the other hand, the electron transfer was decelerated seemingly by reducing the ferrocene surface density. Theoretical calculations with simple models demonstrated that the experimental result supports a hopping mechanism rather than electron tunneling though it cannot be fully excluded. PMID:19361180

  5. 36 CFR 1235.46 - What electronic media may be used for transferring records to the National Archives of the United...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...Agencies may transfer electronic records to the National Archives of the United...transfer permanent electronic records to the National Archives of the United...or the National Archives and Records Administration, Electronic/Special...

  6. Electronic parameters for the hole transfer in DNA duplex oligomers

    CERN Document Server

    Berashevich, D J A; Berashevich, Dr. Julia A.; Chakraborty, Tapash

    2007-01-01

    We report on our calculations of the inner-sphere reorganization energy and the interaction of the pi orbitals within DNA oligomers. The exponential decrease of the electronic coupling between the highest and second highest occupied base orbitals of the intrastrand nucleobases in the (A-T)n and (G-C)n oligomers have been found with an increase of the sequence number n in the DNA structure. We conclude that for realistic estimation of the electronic coupling values between the nucleobases within the DNA molecule, a DNA chain containing at least four base pairs is required. We estimate the geometry relaxation of the base pairs within the (A-T)n and (G-C)n oligomers (n=1-6) due to their oxidation. The decrease of the inner-sphere reorganization energy with elongation of the oligomer structure participating in the oxidation process have been observed. The maximum degree of geometry relaxation of the nucleobase structures and correspondingly the higher charge density in the oxidized state are found to be located c...

  7. Electrostatic models of electron-driven proton transfer across a lipid membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Nori, Franco

    2010-01-01

    We present two models for electron-driven uphill proton transport across lipid membranes, with the electron energy converted to the proton gradient via the electrostatic interaction. In the first model, associated with the cytochrome c oxidase complex in the inner mitochondria membranes, the electrostatic coupling to the site occupied by an electron lowers the energy level of the proton-binding site, making the proton transfer possible. In the second model, roughly describing the redox loop in a nitrate respiration of E. coli bacteria, an electron displaces a proton from the negative side of the membrane to a shuttle, which subsequently diffuses across the membrane and unloads the proton to its positive side. We show that both models can be described by the same approach, which can be significantly simplified if the system is separated into several clusters, with strong Coulomb interaction inside each cluster and weak transfer couplings between them. We derive and solve the equations of motion for the electro...

  8. Photoinduced electron transfer in donor-acceptor complexes of ethylene with molecular and atomic iodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalume, Aimable; George, Lisa; Powell, Andrew D; Dawes, Richard; Reid, Scott A

    2014-08-28

    Building upon our recent studies of radical addition pathways following excitation of the I2 chromophore in the donor-acceptor complex of ethylene and I2 (C2H4···I2), in this article, we extend our studies to examine photoinduced electron transfer. Thus, irradiation into the intense charge-transfer band of the complex (?max = 247 nm) gave rise to a band at 366 nm that is assigned to the bridged ethylene-I radical complex on the basis of our prior work. The formation of the radical complex is explained by a mechanism that involves rapid back electron transfer leading to I-I bond fission. Excitation into the charge-transfer band of the radical complex led to regeneration of the parent complex and the formation of the final photoproduct, anti- and gauche-1,2-diiodoethane, which confirms that the reaction proceeds ultimately by a radical addition mechanism. This finding is contrasted with our previous study of the C2H4···Br2 complex, where CT excitation led to only one product, anti-1,2-dibromoethane, a result explained by a single electron-transfer mechanism proceeding via a bridged bromonium ion intermediate. For the I2 complex, the breakup of the photolytically generated I2(-•) anion radical is apparently sufficiently slow to render it uncompetitive with back electron transfer. Finally, we report a detailed computational examination of the parent and radical complexes of both bromine and iodine, using high-level single- and multireference methods, which provide insight into the different behaviors of the charge-transfer states of the two radicals and the role of spin-orbit coupling. PMID:25075444

  9. Electron transfer kinetics in water-splitting dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swierk, John R.

    Water-splitting dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical (WS-DSPECs) cells utilize molecular sensitizers absorbed on mesoporous TiO2 electrodes to harvest visible light, inject photoexcited electrons into the conduction band of TiO2, and finally transfer holes across the TiO2 surface to water oxidation catalysts, which in turn oxidize water to give molecular oxygen and four protons. Within the TiO2 layer photoinjected electrons are transported to a transparent conductor back contact and from there to a dark cathode to reduce protons to molecular hydrogen. WS-DSPECs offer several advantages for alternative solar fuels systems: the use of low-cost materials, tunable molecular sensitizers, and relaxed catalytic turnover requirements to name a few. Despite these advantageous features, power conversion efficiencies in WS-DSPECs are generally low. Broadly, this thesis explores the fundamental electron transfer processes that control the efficiency of these cells. Chapter 1 presents a survey of the previous literature and individually considers each component of a WS-DSPEC (water oxidation catalyst, sensitizers, electrode materials, redox mediators, and overall system design). Chapter 2 presents a novel method of preparing a WS-DSPEC that utilizes crystalline IrO2 nanoparticles directly sintered to TiO2 as a water oxidation catalyst and describes a previously unknown electron-scavenging pathway by IrO2. Chapter 3 explores how electron trapping by and proton intercalation into TiO2 controls the photoelectrochemical performance of WS-DSPECs. Chapter 4 characterizes how electron recombination with the oxidized sensitizer and electron scavenging by the IrO 2 catalyst combine to limit the concentration of conduction band electrons and by extension photocurrent in WS-DSPECs. Chapter 5 demonstrates the use of the first totally organic sensitizers for light driven water-splitting and explores how the molecular and electronic structure of a sensitizer affects the electron transfer steps of injection, recombination, and hole transfer among others. Finally, in Chapter 6 a model system that describes electron transfer between an oxidized sensitizer and water oxidation catalyst is demonstrated and provides insight into sensitizer regeneration in WS-DSPECs. Together the results in these chapters present a detailed picture of how electron scavenging, recombination, and transport combine to generate photocurrent in a fully characterized WS-DSPEC and serve as starting point for the further development of WS-DSPECs.

  10. Two-photon Induced Hot Electron Transfer to a Single Molecule in a Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Shiwei; Ho, Wilson

    2010-01-01

    The junction of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating in the tunneling regime was irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. A photo-excited hot electron in the STM tip resonantly tunnels into an excited state of a single molecule on the surface, converting it from the neutral to the anion. The electron transfer rate depends quadratically on the incident laser power, suggesting a two-photon excitation process. This nonlinear optical process is further confirmed by t...

  11. Investigations of bimolecular photoinduced electron transfer reactions in polar solvents using ultrafast spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Vauthey, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Several controversial questions in the field of bimolecular photoinduced electron transfer reactions in polar solvents are first briefly reviewed. Results obtained in our group using ultrafast spectroscopy and giving a new insight into these problems will then be described. They concern the driving force dependence of the charge separation distance, the formation of the reaction product in an electronic excited state, the absence of normal region for weakly exergonic charge recombination proc...

  12. Photoinduced Reductive Electron Transfer in LNA:DNA Hybrids : A Compromise between Conformation and Base Stacking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenge, Ulrike; Wengel, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Lock it, but not too much: LNA units (locked or bridging nucleic acids) in LNA:DNA hybrids lead to a negative effect on electron transfer (ET), but they also force the nucleic acid structure in the A-type double helix, which allows a better base stacking than the normal B-type and thus positively influences the ET. This result is significant for the design of nucleic acids of molecular electronics.

  13. Reorganization energy of the initial electron-transfer step in photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers.

    OpenAIRE

    Parson, W. W.; Chu, Z. T.; Warshel, A (Arieh)

    1998-01-01

    The reorganization energy (lambda) for electron transfer from the primary electron donor (P*) to the adjacent bacteriochlorophyll (B) in photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers is explored by molecular-dynamics simulations. Relatively long (40 ps) molecular-dynamics trajectories are used, rather than free energy perturbation techniques. When the surroundings of the reaction center are modeled as a membrane, lambda for P* B --> P+ B- is found to be approximately 1.6 kcal/mol. The results are...

  14. Influence of Complex Stabilities on Electron-Transfer Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of exchange in solutions containing sulphate ions was measured in the system FeII/FeIII at different temperatures with 5'9Fe as a tracer. At 25°C and an ionic strength of 1 the rate constants are: k1[FeSO+4/Fe2+] =295 litres mole-1 sec-1, k2[Fe(SO4)2-/Fe2+] =17 500 litres mole-1 sec-1. The activation energies are E1 =13.8 kcal/mole, E2 = 15kcal/mole. For the rate constants of the electron exchange between different complexes of FeIII and Fe2+ ions the following relation was found: log10k = 1.1 + 0. 5 |?log10K|, where ? log10K is the difference between the logarithms of the stability constants of the FeIII and FeII complexes with the same ligands. All rate constants for electron exchange between FeIII complexes and Fe2+ ions follow this relation (as far as stability constants are known). In the system CeIII/ CeIV a first-order reaction with respect to CeIII contributes to the exchange reaction. This is explained by the formation of excited CeIII ions. The rate constant is k5 = 4.45 x 10-4 sec-1 (0°C). At 0°C the rate constants for the second-order reactions are: k1[CeSO+24/Ce3+] = 0.10 litres mole-1 sec-1, k2[Ce(SO4)2/Ce3+] = 0.11 litres mole-1 sec-1; k3[Ce(SO4)2-3/Ce3+] = 0.17 litres mole-1 sec-1, k4 [Ce4+/Ce3+] = 5.05 x 10-3 litres mole-1 sec-1. The electron exchange is accelerated by sulphate ions, but not to the same extent as in the system FeII/FeIII. The fact that the rate constants k, k2 and k3 are nearly equal shows that the charge of the complexes has no influence. The rate constants in the system CeIII/CeIV also follow a relation of the form log k = a + b?log K. The constants a and b were found to be: a = -2.3, b = 0.4. In the system UIV/UVI - in the absence of light - the rate of the electron exchange in solutions containing sulphate ions is proportional to the concentrations of UIV and UVI and inversely proportional to the third power of the H+ concentration. The rate determining step is the disproportionation of UV which is present in small quantities in equilibrium with UIV and UVI. The rate constant was found to be 1.2 x 10-4 mole2 litre-2sec-1 (25°C, ionic strength 2). This value is by a factor of about 600 higher than the rate constant in a solution containing Perchlorate ions instead of sulphate ions. The activation energy was found to be 10.2 kcal/mole. (author)

  15. Charge transfer and electronic doping in nitrogen-doped graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joucken, Frédéric; Tison, Yann; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Tejeda, Antonio; Taleb-Ibrahimi, Amina; Conrad, Edward; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Bellec, Amandine; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Ghijsen, Jacques; Sporken, Robert; Amara, Hakim; Ducastelle, François; Lagoute, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the modification of the graphene’s electronic structure upon doping is crucial for enlarging its potential applications. We present a study of nitrogen-doped graphene samples on SiC(000) combining angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The comparison between tunneling and angle-resolved photoelectron spectra reveals the spatial inhomogeneity of the Dirac energy shift and that a phonon correction has to be applied to the tunneling measurements. XPS data demonstrate the dependence of the N 1s binding energy of graphitic nitrogen on the nitrogen concentration. The measure of the Dirac energy for different nitrogen concentrations reveals that the ratio usually computed between the excess charge brought by the dopants and the dopants’ concentration depends on the latter. This is supported by a tight-binding model considering different values for the potentials on the nitrogen site and on its first neighbors. PMID:26411651

  16. Charge transfer and electronic doping in nitrogen-doped graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joucken, Frédéric; Tison, Yann; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Tejeda, Antonio; Taleb-Ibrahimi, Amina; Conrad, Edward; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Bellec, Amandine; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Ghijsen, Jacques; Sporken, Robert; Amara, Hakim; Ducastelle, François; Lagoute, Jérôme

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the modification of the graphene’s electronic structure upon doping is crucial for enlarging its potential applications. We present a study of nitrogen-doped graphene samples on SiC(000) combining angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The comparison between tunneling and angle-resolved photoelectron spectra reveals the spatial inhomogeneity of the Dirac energy shift and that a phonon correction has to be applied to the tunneling measurements. XPS data demonstrate the dependence of the N 1s binding energy of graphitic nitrogen on the nitrogen concentration. The measure of the Dirac energy for different nitrogen concentrations reveals that the ratio usually computed between the excess charge brought by the dopants and the dopants’ concentration depends on the latter. This is supported by a tight-binding model considering different values for the potentials on the nitrogen site and on its first neighbors.

  17. Are the orientation and bond strength of the RCO2(-)M link key factors for ultrafast electron transfers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Peng; Karsenti, Paul-Ludovic; Brisard, Gessie; Marsan, Benoit; Harvey, Pierre D

    2015-11-24

    The photo-induced electron transfers in the "straight up" ionic assemblies [] and [][] ([]* ? or ) are ultrafast (bent geometry to obtain fast electron injection in porphyrin-containing DSSCs. PMID:26463512

  18. Technology transfer present and futures in the electronic arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Degger

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We are entering an era where creating the fantastical is possible in the arts. In the areas of mixed reality and biological arts, responsive works are created based on advances in basic science and technology. This is enabling scientists and artists to pose new questions. As the time between discovery and application is so short, artists need imaginative ways of accessing new technology in order to critique and use it.These are the new paints that the majority of artists cannot afford or access, technology to enable cloning of DNA, to print channels on a chip, to access proprietary 3G networks. Currently, partnerships or residencies are used to facilitate artist’s access to these technologies. What would they do if technology was available that enabled them to make any art work they so desire? Are the limitations in current technology an advantage rather than a disadvantage in some of their works? Does interaction with technologists make their work more robust? Are there disadvantages? How do they get access to the technology they require? Open source or proprietary? Or have they encountered the situation where their vision is greater than technology allows. When their work breaks because of this fact, is their art broken? Blast Theory (Brighton,UK, FoAM(Brussels, Belgium and Amsterdam, Netherlands, SymbioticA (Perth, Australia are organisations pushing technological boundaries in the service of art. This paper addresses some questions of technology transfer in relation to recent artworks, particularly I like Frank in Adelaide (Blast Theory, transient reality generators (trg (FoAM and Multi electrode array artist (MeART (SymbioticA.

  19. Mechanism of the hydrogen transfer from the OH group to oxygen-centered radicals: proton-coupled electron-transfer versus radical hydrogen abstraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivella, Santiago; Anglada, Josep M; Solé, Albert; Bofill, Josep M

    2004-07-19

    High-level ab initio electronic structure calculations have been carried out with respect to the intermolecular hydrogen-transfer reaction HCOOH+.OH-->HCOO.+H(2)O and the intramolecular hydrogen-transfer reaction .OOCH2OH-->HOOCH(2)O.. In both cases we found that the hydrogen atom transfer can take place via two different transition structures. The lowest energy transition structure involves a proton transfer coupled to an electron transfer from the ROH species to the radical, whereas the higher energy transition structure corresponds to the conventional radical hydrogen atom abstraction. An analysis of the atomic spin population, computed within the framework of the topological theory of atoms in molecules, suggests that the triplet repulsion between the unpaired electrons located on the oxygen atoms that undergo hydrogen exchange must be much higher in the transition structure for the radical hydrogen abstraction than that for the proton-coupled electron-transfer mechanism. It is suggested that, in the gas phase, hydrogen atom transfer from the OH group to oxygen-centered radicals occurs by the proton-coupled electron-transfer mechanism when this pathway is accessible. PMID:15252786

  20. (Comparison of group transfer, inner sphere and outer sphere electron transfer mechanisms of organometallic complexes)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwood, J.

    1990-01-01

    During the course of Grant ER13775 we have constructed an infrared stopped-flow spectrophotometer and initiated a study of the mechanisms of reactions that involve a change in the oxidation state of organometallic complexes. The spectrometer combined conventional stopped-flow techniques with an infrared optical system comprised of a carbon monoxide laser, an IRTRAN flow-through cell and a mercury-cadium-telluride detector. In this summary we will highlight our results on reactions: (1) that formally involve exchange of a charged species between two metal carbonyl anions, (2) that involve additional of an electron to, or removal of an electron from organometallic complexes that contain a metal-metal bond, and (3) between coordination complexes and metal carbonyl anions. 12 refs.

  1. An efficient implementation of the localized operator partitioning method for electronic energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Brumer, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The localized operator partitioning method [Y. Khan and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 194112 (2012)] rigorously defines the electronic energy on any subsystem within a molecule and gives a precise meaning to the subsystem ground and excited electronic energies, which is crucial for investigating electronic energy transfer from first principles. However, an efficient implementation of this approach has been hindered by complicated one- and two-electron integrals arising in its formulation. Using a resolution of the identity in the definition of partitioning we reformulate the method in a computationally e?cient manner that involves standard one- and two-electron integrals. We apply the developed algorithm to the 9-((1-naphthyl)-methyl)-anthracene (A1N) molecule by partitioning A1N into anthracenyl and CH2-naphthyl groups as subsystems, and examine their electronic energies and populations for several excited states using Configuration Interaction Singles method. The implemented approach shows a wide variety o...

  2. The ‘porin–cytochrome’ model for microbe-to-mineral electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, David J.; Butt, Julea N.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Baiden, Nanakow; Gates, Andrew J.; Marritt, Sophie; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2012-05-30

    Many species of bacteria can couple anaerobic growth to the respiratory reduction of insoluble minerals containing Fe(III) or Mn(III/IV). It has been suggested that in Shewanella species electrons cross the outer membrane to extracellular substrates via 'porin-cytochrome' electron transport modules. The molecular structure of an outer-membrane extracellular-facing deca-haem terminus for such a module has recently been resolved. It is debated how, once outside the cells, electrons are transferred from outer-membrane cytochromes to insoluble electron sinks. This may occur directly or by assemblies of cytochromes, perhaps functioning as 'nanowires', or via electron shuttles. Here we review recent work in this field and explore whether it allows for unification of the electron transport mechanisms supporting extracellular mineral respiration in Shewanella that may extend into other genera of Gram-negative bacteria.

  3. Fast electron transfer through a single molecule natively structured redox protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Pia, Eduardo Antonio; Chi, Qijin; MacDonald, J. Emyr; Ulstrup, Jens; Jones, D. Dafydd; Elliott, Martin

    2012-10-01

    The electron transfer properties of proteins are normally measured as molecularly averaged ensembles. Through these and related measurements, proteins are widely regarded as macroscopically insulating materials. Using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), we present new measurements of the conductance through single-molecules of the electron transfer protein cytochrome b562 in its native conformation, under pseudo-physiological conditions. This is achieved by thiol (SH) linker pairs at opposite ends of the molecule through protein engineering, resulting in defined covalent contact between a gold surface and a platinum-iridium STM tip. Two different orientations of the linkers were examined: a long-axis configuration (SH-LA) and a short-axis configuration (SH-SA). In each case, the molecular conductance could be `gated' through electrochemical control of the heme redox state. Reproducible and remarkably high conductance was observed in this relatively complex electron transfer system, with single-molecule conductance values peaking around 18 nS and 12 nS for the SH-SA and SH-LA cytochrome b562 molecules near zero electrochemical overpotential. This strongly points to the important role of the heme co-factor bound to the natively structured protein. We suggest that the two-step model of protein electron transfer in the STM geometry requires a multi-electron transfer to explain such a high conductance. The model also yields a low value for the reorganisation energy, implying that solvent reorganisation is largely absent.The electron transfer properties of proteins are normally measured as molecularly averaged ensembles. Through these and related measurements, proteins are widely regarded as macroscopically insulating materials. Using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), we present new measurements of the conductance through single-molecules of the electron transfer protein cytochrome b562 in its native conformation, under pseudo-physiological conditions. This is achieved by thiol (SH) linker pairs at opposite ends of the molecule through protein engineering, resulting in defined covalent contact between a gold surface and a platinum-iridium STM tip. Two different orientations of the linkers were examined: a long-axis configuration (SH-LA) and a short-axis configuration (SH-SA). In each case, the molecular conductance could be `gated' through electrochemical control of the heme redox state. Reproducible and remarkably high conductance was observed in this relatively complex electron transfer system, with single-molecule conductance values peaking around 18 nS and 12 nS for the SH-SA and SH-LA cytochrome b562 molecules near zero electrochemical overpotential. This strongly points to the important role of the heme co-factor bound to the natively structured protein. We suggest that the two-step model of protein electron transfer in the STM geometry requires a multi-electron transfer to explain such a high conductance. The model also yields a low value for the reorganisation energy, implying that solvent reorganisation is largely absent. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental methods, DNA and protein sequences, additional STM statistical analysis and images, electrochemical data and It-z data analysis. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr32131a

  4. Transfer and reconstruction of the density matrix in off-axis electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduced density matrix completely describes the quantum state of an electron scattered by an object in transmission electron microscopy. However, the detection process restricts access to the diagonal elements only. The off-diagonal elements, determining the coherence of the scattered electron, may be obtained from electron holography. In order to extract the influence of the object from the off-diagonals, however, a rigorous consideration of the electron microscope influences like aberrations of the objective lens and the Möllenstedt biprism in the presence of partial coherence is required. Here, we derive a holographic transfer theory based on the generalization of the transmission cross-coefficient including all known holographic phenomena. We furthermore apply a particular simplification of the theory to the experimental analysis of aloof beam electrons scattered by plane silicon surfaces. - Highlights: • Density matrix transfer theory for off-axis electron holography is derived. • Generalizing the concept of the transmission-cross coefficient. • Conditions for direct density matrix reconstruction are found. • 2D-density matrix reconstruction for aloof beam electrons is conducted

  5. Single-electron transfer living radical copolymerization of SWCNT-g-PMMA via graft from approach.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jaisankar, S. N.; Haridharan, N.; Murali, A.; Ponyrko, Sergii; Špírková, Milena; Mandal, A. B.; Mat?jka, Libor

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 55, ?. 13 (2014), s. 2959-2966. ISSN 0032-3861 R&D Projects: GA ?R GAP108/12/1459 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : single electron transfer * single-walled carbon nanotubes * controlled radical polymerization Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.562, year: 2014

  6. Marcus Theory: Thermodynamics CAN Control the Kinetics of Electron Transfer Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Todd P.

    2012-01-01

    Although it is generally true that thermodynamics do not influence kinetics, this is NOT the case for electron transfer reactions in solution. Marcus Theory explains why this is so, using straightforward physical chemical principles such as transition state theory, Arrhenius' Law, and the Franck-Condon Principle. Here the background and…

  7. Charge distribution effects in polyatomic reactants involved in simple electron transfer reactions.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fawcett, W. R.; Chavis, G. J.; Hromadová, Magdaléna

    2008-01-01

    Ro?. 53, ?. 23 (2008), s. 6787-6792. ISSN 0013-4686 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : electron transfer kinetics * charge distribution effects * double-layer effects in electrode kinetics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.078, year: 2008

  8. QUANTUM CHEMICAL MODELING OF SPECTRAL PROPERTIES AND ELECTRON TRANSFER IN EXTENDED SYSTEMS.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Záliš, Stanislav; Kvapilová, Hana; Kratochvílová, Irena; Šebera, Jakub; Vl?ek Jr., Antonín; Winter, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    Ro?. 2011, ?. 1 (2011), P1299. ISSN 1708-5284 R&D Projects: GA AV ?R KAN100400702; GA MŠk LD11086 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : quantum chemical modeling * electron transfer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  9. Direct electron transfer from photosystem II to hematite in a hybrid photoelectrochemical cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wangyin; Wang, Zhiliang; Zhu, Qingjun; Han, Guangye; Ding, Chunmei; Chen, Jun; Shen, Jian-Ren; Li, Can

    2015-11-17

    A hybrid photoanode integrating the cyanobacterial photosystem II (PSII) with a hematite film for water oxidation is constructed. Direct electron transfer from PSII to the excited Ti/Fe2O3 electrode occurs under light irradiation, resulting in a significant improvement of the photocurrent. PMID:26443427

  10. Solution of the proton radius puzzle? Low momentum transfer electron scattering data are not enough

    CERN Document Server

    Distler, Michael O; Bernauer, Jan C

    2015-01-01

    In two recent papers it is argued that the 'proton radius puzzle' can be explained by truncating the electron scattering data to low momentum transfer and fit the rms radius in the low momentum expansion of the form factor. It is shown that this procedure is inconsistent and violates the Fourier theorem. The puzzle cannot be explained in this way.

  11. Coupling of heterogeneous and homogeneous electron transfer: Transition from stability to chaotic behavior.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hromadová, Magdaléna; Pospíšil, Lubomír; Fanelli, N.; Gál, Miroslav; Kolivoška, Viliam; Valášek, M.

    2012-01-01

    Ro?. 2012, - (2012), s. 72. ISSN 0872-1904. [Iberic Meeting of Electrochemistry /14./ and Meeting of the Portuguese Electrochemical Society /17./. 11.04.2012-14.04.2012, Madeira Island] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA203/09/0705; GA AV ?R IAA400400802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : electron transfer * electrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  12. Electron transfer and dissociation mechanism of ferrioxalate: A time resolved optical and EXAFS study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Hua; Tomov, Ivan V.; Ding, Xunliang; Rentzepis, Peter M.

    2007-03-01

    By means of ultrafast optical transient spectroscopy and EXAFS we have measured the transient spectra kinetics and Fe-O bond length of the ferrioxalate redox reaction transients. Based on Fe-O bond distances of the photoredox intermediates and quantum chemistry DFT and H-F calculations we propose a photoredox mechanism where photodissociation precedes electron transfer.

  13. Numerical Simulation for Heat Transfer in Liquid Cooling System of Electronic Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim A. Pomytkin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the task of optimizing the thermal liquid cooling system distributor of electronic components by means of numerical simulation of heat transfer in the investigated object. This task allowed us to find the optimal geometric parameters of the thermal spreader.

  14. Proton transfer in phenol-amine complexes: phenol electronic effects on free energy profile in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, Shinji; Kato, Shigeki

    2010-12-01

    Free energy profiles for the proton transfer reactions in hydrogen-bonded complex of phenol with trimethylamine in methyl chloride solvent are studied with the reference interaction site model self-consistent field method. The reactions in both the electronic ground and excited states are considered. The second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP) theory or the second-order multireference MP theory is used to evaluate the effect of the dynamical electron correlation on the free energy profiles. The free energy surface in the ground state shows a discrepancy with the experimental results for the related hydrogen-bonded complexes. To resolve this discrepancy, the effects of chloro-substitutions in phenol are examined, and its importance in stabilizing the ionic form is discussed. The temperature effect is also studied. In contrast to the ground state, the ??* excited state of phenol-trimethylamine complex exhibits the proton transfer reaction with a low barrier. The reaction is almost thermoneutral. This is attributed to the reduction of proton affinity of phenol by the ??* electronic excitation. We further examine the possibility of the electron-proton-coupled transfer in the ??* state through the surface crossing with the charge transfer type ??* state. PMID:20602442

  15. Bimolecular Excited-State Electron Transfer with Surprisingly Long-Lived Radical Ions

    KAUST Repository

    Alsam, Amani A.

    2015-09-02

    We explored the excited-state interactions of bimolecular, non-covalent systems consisting of cationic poly[(9,9-di(3,3’-N,N’-trimethyl-ammonium) propyl fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-co-(9,9-dioctyl-fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)] diiodide salt (PFN) and 1,4-dicyanobenzene (DCB) using steady-state and time-resolved techniques, including femto- and nanosecond transient absorption and femtosecond infrared spectroscopies with broadband capabilities. The experimental results demonstrated that photo-induced electron transfer from PFN to DCB occurs on the picosecond time scale, leading to the formation of PFN+• and DCB-• radical ions. Interestingly, real-time observations of the vibrational marker modes on the acceptor side provided direct evidence and insight into the electron transfer process indirectly inferred from UV-Vis experiments. The band narrowing on the picosecond time scale observed on the antisymmetric C-N stretching vibration of the DCB radical anion provides clear experimental evidence that a substantial part of the excess energy is channeled into vibrational modes of the electron transfer product and that the geminate ion pairs dissociate. More importantly, our nanosecond time-resolved data indicate that the charge-separated state is very long lived (? 30 ns) due to the dissociation of the contact radical ion pair into free ions. Finally, the fast electron transfer and slow charge recombination anticipate the current donor?acceptor system with potential applications in organic solar cells.

  16. Bibliography on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions (updated 1993)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following our previous compilations [IPPJ-AM-45 (1986), NIFS-DATA-7 (1990)], bibliographic information on experimental and theoretical studies on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions is up-dated. The references published through 1980-1992 are included. For easy finding references for particular combination of collision partners, a simple list is also provided. (author) 1542 refs

  17. 27 CFR 24.272 - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...to effect an electronic fund transfer message as required by paragraph (b) (2...part of the required records. (d) Failure to make a taxpayment by EFT. The proprietor...6651, and 6656, as applicable, for failure to make a taxpayment by EFT on or...

  18. 27 CFR 53.158 - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...to effect an electronic fund transfer message as required by paragraph (b)(2...part of the required records. (d) Failure to make a taxpayment by EFT. The taxpayer...6651 and 6656, as applicable, for failure to make a payment or deposit of tax...

  19. 27 CFR 41.115a - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...to effect an electronic fund transfer message as required by paragraph (b)(2...as part of required records. (d) Failure to make a taxpayment by EFT. The taxpayer...6651, or 6656, as applicable, for failure to make a taxpayment by EFT on or...

  20. 27 CFR 26.112a - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...to effect an electronic fund transfer message as required by paragraph (b)(2...as part of required records. (d) Failure to make a taxpayment by EFT. The taxpayer...6651, or 6656, as applicable, for failure to make a taxpayment by EFT on or...

  1. 27 CFR 19.524 - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...to effect an electronic fund transfer message as required by paragraph (b)(2...as part of required records. (d) Failure to make a taxpayment by EFT. The taxpayer...6651, or 6656, as applicable, for failure to make a taxpayment by EFT on or...

  2. Energy partitioning in single-electron transfer events between gaseous dications and their neutral counterparts.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schröder, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Ro?. 18, ?. 2 (2012), s. 139-148. ISSN 1469-0667 R&D Projects: GA ?R GA203/09/1223 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : coincidence techniques * dications * electron transfer * energy partitioning * synchrotron radiation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.259, year: 2012

  3. Electron transfer reaction in the Marcus inverted region: Role of high frequency vibrational modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical study of the dynamics of photo-electron transfer reactions in the Marcus inverted regime is presented. This study is motivated partly by the recent proposal of Barbara et al. (J. Phys. Chem. 96, 3728, 1991) that a minimal model of an electron transfer reaction should consist of a polar solvent mode (X), a low frequency vibrational mode (Q) and one high frequency mode (q). Interplay between these modes may be responsible for the crossover observed in the dynamics from a solvent controlled to a vibrational controlled electron transfer. The following results have been obtained. (i) In the case of slowly relaxing solvents, the proximity of the point of excitation to an effective sink on the excited surface is critical in determining the decay of the reactant population. This is because the Franck-Condon overlap between the reactant ground and the product excited states decreases rapidly with increase in the quantum number of the product vibrational state. (ii) Non-exponential solvation dynamics has an important effect in determining the rates of electron transfer. Especially, a biphasic solvation and a large coupling between the reactant and the product states both may be needed to explain the experimental results

  4. Single step versus stepwise electron transfer in head-to-tail dipyridinium isomers.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hromadová, Magdaléna; Lachmanová, Št?pánka; Pospíšil, Lubomír; Tarábek, Ján; Fortage, J.; Dupeyre, G.; Lainé, P. P.; Peltier, C.; Ciofini, I.

    Liblice : International Society of Electrochemistry, 2013. s. o12. [International Conference on Electrified Interfaces ICEI 2013 /13./.. 30.06.2013-05.07.2013, Liblice] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA203/09/0705; GA AV ?R M200401202 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : electron transfer * electrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  5. Single Step versus Stepwise Electron Transfer in Expanded Pyridiniums, Kinetic Aspects.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hromadová, Magdaléna; Lachmanová, Št?pánka; Pospíšil, Lubomír; Tarábek, Ján; Fortage, J.; Dupeyre, G.; Lainé, P. P.; Peltier, C.; Ciofini, I.

    Paris : University of Paris, 2013. s. 72-72. [ElecNano5: The Nanoscale and Electroanalysis: Surface Nanostructuration, Nanobiological Systems, Coupled Techniques, Microsystems. 15.05.2013-17.05.2013, Bordeaux] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA203/09/0705 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : electron transfer * electrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  6. The Fate of Electronically Excited States : Ultrafast Electron and Energy Transfer in Solvated Donor-Acceptor Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wallin, Staffan

    2005-01-01

    Processes where a molecule absorbs visible light and then disposes of the excess energy via electron/energy transfer reactions have an important role both in nature (e.g. in photosynthesis) and in many technical applications (e.g. in photography and photovoltaics). This thesis uses different spectroscopical techniques, mainly ultrafast transient absorption, to study such processes. The thesis can roughly be divided into three parts. In the first part, donor-acceptor systems linked by differen...

  7. Probing Interfacial Water on Nanodiamonds in Colloidal Dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Tristan; Yuzawa, Hayato; Nagasaka, Masanari; Yamanoi, Ryoko; Osawa, Eiji; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Aziz, Emad F

    2015-08-01

    The structure of interfacial water layers around nanoparticles dispersed in an aqueous environment may have a significant impact on their reactivity and on their interaction with biological species. Using transmission soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy in liquid, we demonstrate that the unoccupied electronic states of oxygen atoms from water molecules in aqueous colloidal dispersions of nanodiamonds have a different signature than bulk water. X-ray absorption spectroscopy can thus probe interfacial water molecules in colloidal dispersions. The impacts of nanodiamond surface chemistry and concentration on interfacial water electronic signature are discussed. PMID:26267179

  8. Electron transfer and ionization in collisions of highly stripped ions with neutral targets at intermediate velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A highly-charged ion impinging upon a neutral target atom will capture electrons into excited states of the projectile. If the velocity is much less than that of the target electrons, little direct ionization is expected, although appreciable target ionization has been reported for very highly charged ions. Recent studies on both transfer and ionization for Arq+ (6?q?17) and O+8,7 on Ar and He target shave been performed for projectile velocities between 0.2 and 1.7 a.u. The measured quantities include charge-state-correlated differential cross sections, K-x-ray emission, and longitudinal recoil- ion momentum transfer, from which Q values can be deduced. Non-negligible direct ionization is observed. Information is extracted on both the primary transfer process and the decay of the multiply excited projectile states formed. Comparisons with model predictions will be made

  9. Electronic Couplings for Resonance Energy Transfer from CCSD Calculations: From Isolated to Solvated Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricato, Marco; Curutchet, Carles; Mennucci, Benedetta; Scalmani, Giovanni

    2015-11-10

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations of electronic couplings provide great insights for the study of resonance energy transfer (RET). However, most of these calculations rely on approximate QM methods due to the computational limitations imposed by the size of typical donor-acceptor systems. In this work, we present a novel implementation that allows computing electronic couplings at the coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) level of theory. Solvent effects are also taken into account through the polarizable continuum model (PCM). As a test case, we use a dimer of indole, a common model system for tryptophan, which is routinely used as an intrinsic fluorophore in Förster resonance energy transfer studies. We consider two bright ? ? ?* states, one of which has charge transfer character. Lastly, the results are compared with those obtained by applying TD-DFT in combination with one of the most popular density functionals, B3LYP. PMID:26574317

  10. Quantum molecular dynamics study on energy transfer to the secondary electron in surface collision process of an ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibahara, M [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Satake, S; Taniguchi, J [Department of Applied Electronics, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba, 278-8510 (Japan)], E-mail: siba@mech.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2008-03-15

    In the present study the quantum molecular dynamics method was applied to an energy transfer problem to an electron during ionic surface collision process in order to elucidate how energy of ionic collision transfers to the emitted electrons. Effects of various physical parameters, such as the collision velocity and interaction strength between the observed electron and the classical particles on the energy transfer to the electron were investigated by the quantum molecular dynamics method when the potassium ion was collided with the surface so as to elucidate the energy path to the electron and the predominant factor of energy transfer to the electron. Effects of potential energy between the ion and the electron and that between the surface molecule and the electron on the electronic energy transfer were shown in the present paper. The energy transfer to the observed secondary electron through the potential energy term between the ion and the electron was much dependent on the ion collision energy although the energy increase to the observed secondary electron was not monotonous through the potential energy between the ion and surface molecules with the change of the ion collision energy.

  11. Quantum molecular dynamics study on energy transfer to the secondary electron in surface collision process of an ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study the quantum molecular dynamics method was applied to an energy transfer problem to an electron during ionic surface collision process in order to elucidate how energy of ionic collision transfers to the emitted electrons. Effects of various physical parameters, such as the collision velocity and interaction strength between the observed electron and the classical particles on the energy transfer to the electron were investigated by the quantum molecular dynamics method when the potassium ion was collided with the surface so as to elucidate the energy path to the electron and the predominant factor of energy transfer to the electron. Effects of potential energy between the ion and the electron and that between the surface molecule and the electron on the electronic energy transfer were shown in the present paper. The energy transfer to the observed secondary electron through the potential energy term between the ion and the electron was much dependent on the ion collision energy although the energy increase to the observed secondary electron was not monotonous through the potential energy between the ion and surface molecules with the change of the ion collision energy

  12. Constraint-Based Modeling of Carbon Fixation and the Energetics of Electron Transfer in Geobacter metallireducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feist, AM; Nagarajan, H; Rotaru, AE; Tremblay, PL; Zhang, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR; Zengler, K

    2014-04-24

    Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III) was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate) by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species. Author Summary The ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons directly with their environment has large implications for our knowledge of industrial and environmental processes. For decades, it has been known that microbes can use electrodes as electron acceptors in microbial fuel cell settings. Geobacter metallireducens has been one of the model organisms for characterizing microbe-electrode interactions as well as environmental processes such as bioremediation. Here, we significantly expand the knowledge of metabolism and energetics of this model organism by employing constraint-based metabolic modeling. Through this analysis, we build the metabolic pathways necessary for carbon fixation, a desirable property for industrial chemical production. We further discover a novel growth condition which enables the characterization of autotrophic (i.e., carbon-fixing) metabolism in Geobacter. Importantly, our systems-level modeling approach helped elucidate the key metabolic pathways and the energetic cost associated with extracellular electron transfer. This model can be applied to characterize and engineer the metabolism and electron transfer capabilities of Geobacter for biotechnological applications.

  13. Direct observation of electron-to-hole energy transfer in CdSe quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, E; Koeberg, M; Wang, F; Zhang, H; de Mello Donegá, C; Vanmaekelbergh, D; Bonn, M

    2006-02-10

    We independently determine the subpicosecond cooling rates for holes and electrons in CdSe quantum dots. Time-resolved luminescence and terahertz spectroscopy reveal that the rate of hole cooling, following photoexcitation of the quantum dots, depends critically on the electron excess energy. This constitutes the first direct, quantitative measurement of electron-to-hole energy transfer, the hypothesis behind the Auger cooling mechanism proposed in quantum dots, which is found to occur on a 1 +/- 0.15 ps time scale. PMID:16486988

  14. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Phuc T; Renslow, Ryan S; Atci, Erhan; Reardon, Patrick N; Lindemann, Stephen R; Fredrickson, James K; Call, Douglas R; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville (Washington, USA). We operated two reactors: graphite electrodes were polarized at potentials of -700 mVAg/AgCl [cathodic (CAT) mat system] and +300 mVAg/AgCl [anodic (AN) mat system] and the electron transfer rates between the electrode and mat were monitored. We observed a diel cycle of electron transfer rates for both AN and CAT mat systems. Interestingly, the CAT mats generated the highest reducing current at the same time points that the AN mats showed the highest oxidizing current. To characterize the physicochemical factors influencing electron transfer processes, we measured depth profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO) and sulfide in the mats using microelectrodes. We further demonstrated that the mat-to-electrode and electrode-to-mat electron transfer rates were light- and temperature-dependent. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, we determined that the electrode potential regulated the diffusivity and porosity of the microbial mats. Both porosity and diffusivity were higher in the CAT mats than in the AN mats. We also used NMR spectroscopy for high-resolution quantitative metabolite analysis and found that the CAT mats had significantly higher concentrations of osmoprotectants such as betaine and trehalose. Subsequently, we performed amplicon sequencing across the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of incubated mats to understand the impact of electrode potential on microbial community structure. These data suggested that variation in the electrochemical conditions under which mats were generated significantly impacted the relative abundances of mat members and mat metabolism. PMID:26388853

  15. Intramolecular electron transfer in ruthenium-modified cytochrome C: Driving force effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of intramolecular electron transfer rates in several cis- and trans- tetraammine(L)-ruthenium-His33-modified horse heart cytochromes c (L = isonicotinamide, pyridine, N-methylpyrazinium, and H2O/OH) is reported herein. Activation parameters have also been obtained for L = isonicotinamide and pyridine. Only modest rate increases are observed for large changes in driving force (from L = pyridine to N-methylpyrazinium). The heme-to-ruthenium electron transfer rates for L = isonicotinamide, pyridine, and N-methylpyrazinium were measured by oxidation of the fully reduced complexes by radiolytically-generated carbonate (CO3-) radical. From previously reported work and these results, it is clear that the oxidative and reductive methods do not result in production of the same electron transfer intermediate. Possible reasons for this will be discussed. It is important to consider the effects of the local protein environment on the properties of the ruthenium center. There is a general effect of moderation of reduction potentials; that is to say that protein-bound high-potential complexes have lower reduction potentials than their small molecule models. The reverse holds for the low potential complexes. This effect can be a significant source of error in driving force estimates based on model complexes. Identification of the operative electron transfer mechanism remains an unsolved problem. Efforts will be made to increase the driving force further (within the constraints of the heme-ruthenium system) to determine the applicable reorganization parameters. Interpretation will be aided by parallel investigations into the effects of protein conformation and the distance dependences of through-bond and through-space electron transfer mechanisms

  16. Study of photo-activated electron transfer reactions in the first excited singlet state by picosecond and nanosecond laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picosecond laser spectroscopy has been used to study two photo-activated electron transfer reactions: - a bimolecular electron transfer reaction between a sensitizer, DODCI, and an electron acceptor, methylviologen. The two radical ions created with an electron transfer efficiency ? ? 0.07 have been identified in picosecond and nanosecond laser absorption spectroscopy by adding selective solutes such as para-benzoquinone (an electron acceptor) or L(+) ascorbic acid (an electron donor). - an intramolecular electron transfer reaction in a triad molecule consisting of a tetra-aryl-porphyrin covalently linked to both a carotenoid and a quinone. The photoinduced charge separation occurs within 30 ps and leads, with a yield of 25 pc, to the formation of a zwitterion whose half-life is 2.5 ?s. The experimental results obtained in these two studies show an effective decrease in the recombination rate of the two radical ions created in the encounter pair. (author)

  17. Colloidal silver catalyzed multi-electron transfer processes in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (CH3)2COH radicals were ?-radiolytically produced in aqueous solutions of colloidal silver(2.5 x 10-4 mol/l, acetone(0.1 - 0.2 M)) and propanol-2(0.2-0.4). The radicals were able to reduce Cd2, N2O and NO3- with yields of practically 100%. In the absence of colloidal silver, Cd2+ was not reduced, but N2O or NONO-3 were reduced with yields of the order of 1%. The reduction processes in the presence of silver occurred in competition with the reduction of water by the organic radicals. The catalytic action of colloidal silver is explained by electron transfer from the organic radicals to the silver praticles that become a pool of electrons and adsorbed hydrogen atoms. The stored electrons are then used to carry out the reduction of water or of dissolved substances. Relative rate constants for a number of multi-electron transfer processes at the colloidal silver pool are given and details of the reaction mechanism including the action of adsorbed H3 - atoms are discussed. - Radiolytically produced Cd+ ions were also reduced at the colloidal silver pool. However, Zn+, Ni+, and Co+ were found to transfer an electron to the pool. The homogeneous reaction between NONO-3 and (CH3)2COH was also investigated. A rate constant of 28 M-1s-1 was found for this reaction. (orig.)

  18. Electron Transport, Energy Transfer, and Optical Response in Single Molecule Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    The field of molecular electronics has grown significantly since the first measurements of single molecule conductance. The single molecule junction, a device in which two conducting leads are spanned by a single molecule, has become a powerful tool for studying charge transfer at the molecular level. While early experiments were focused on elastic electron conductance, today measurements of vibronic effects, molecular optical response, spintronics, thermal conductance, and quantum interference and decoherence effects are prominent areas of research. These new experimental advancements demand improved theoretical treatments which properly account for the interactions between different degrees of freedom: charge, electronic, vibrational, spin, etc.; all in physically relevant parameter ranges. This talk focuses on using a many-body states based approach to investigate the regime of strong interaction between these degrees of freedom, with relatively weak coupling between the molecule and the electric reservoirs created by the conducting leads. We focused on three related processes, electron transfer, electronic energy transfer and molecular excitation. In collaboraton with Boris Fainberg, Faculty of Sciences, Holon Institute of Technology; Sergei Tretiak, Theoretical Division, Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory; and Michael Galperin, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego.

  19. Influence of chemical and structural evolution of dissolved organic matter on electron transfer capacity during composting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Electron transfer capability (ETC) of compost-derived DOM was investigated. • Composting treatment increased the ETC of DOM from municipal solid wastes. • The ETC increase related to humic matter, and molecule weight, and N and S content. - Abstract: Dissolved organic matter (DOM) can mediate electron transfer and change chemical speciation of heavy metals. In this study, the electron transfer capability (ETC) of compost-derived DOM was investigated through electrochemical approaches, and the factors influencing the ETC were studied using spectral and elemental analysis. The results showed that the electron accepting capacity (EAC) and electron donating capacity (EDC) of compost-derived DOM were 3.29–40.14 ?mole? (g C)?1 and 57.1– 346.07 ?mole? (g C)?1, respectively. Composting treatment increased the fulvic- and humic-like substance content, oxygenated aliphatic carbon content, lignin-derived aromatic carbon content, molecule weight, and N and S content of DOM, but decreased the aliphatic carbon content and the C and H content. This conversion increased the EDC and EAC of the DOM during composting

  20. Distance, stereoelectronic effects, and the Marcus inverted region in intramolecular electron transfer in organic radical anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of molecules with the general structure A1-Sp-A2 have been synthesized. Pulse radiolysis was used to convert them into negative ions, and the rates of intramolecular electron transfer were measured. In the first series studied Sp is the androstane skeleton with the acceptors attached to the 3- and 16-positions. The series consisted of eight molecules with A2 = 4-biphenyl and eight different A1 groups differing in electron affinity by 2.4 eV. The electron transfer rates differ by more than 3 orders of magnitude throughout the series and depend in a very nonlinear fashion on the free energy of the reaction. The second series of molecules was designed to study the effect of the spacer which was varied from the steroid to decalins (eight compounds) and cyclohexanes (four compounds). No comprehensive distance dependence exists. Instead, the rates are strongly influenced by the donor-acceptor attachment geometry which influences the electronic coupling. For the type of spacers studied it was found that the electron transfer rates are slowed down by 1 order of magnitude for each 2.0 bonds for a constant reorganization energy