WorldWideScience

Sample records for hla-b27 transgenic rat

  1. Cytotoxic T-Cell-Mediated Response against Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in HLA-B27 Transgenic Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Falgarone, Géraldine; Blanchard, Hervé S.; Riot, Bertrand; Simonet, Michel; Breban, Maxime

    1999-01-01

    Yersinia-induced reactive arthritis is highly associated with HLA-B27, the role of which in defense against the triggering bacteria remains unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the capacity of rats transgenic for HLA-B27 to mount a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response against Y. pseudotuberculosis and to determine the influence of the HLA-B27 transgene on this response. Rats transgenic for HLA-B*2705 and human ?2-microglobulin of the 21-4L line, which do not spontaneously develop di...

  2. Characterization of psoriasiform and alopecic skin lesions in HLA-B27 transgenic rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Yanagisawa, H.; Richardson, J. A.; Taurog, J. D.; Hammer, R E

    1995-01-01

    We have previously reported a multisystem inflammatory disease in transgenic rat lines with high expression of HLA-B*2705 and human beta 2 microglobulin. Skin disease in these rats includes two predominant lesions: 1) marked psoriasiform dermatitis of the tail and digits; and 2) progressive alopecia of face, neck, trunk, and extremities. Here we present the results of a systematic survey of these lesions. Tail and digit skin showed psoriasiform hyperplasia of the epidermis associated with par...

  3. HLA-B27 typing in the categorisation of uveitis in a HLA-B27 rich population

    OpenAIRE

    Huhtinen, M; Karma, A

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To determine whether HLA-B27 typing helps the clinician in the diagnostic examination of uveitis in a HLA-B27 rich population and also whether the clinical picture of HLA-B27 positive unilateral acute or recurrent anterior uveitis (AAU) is distinguishable from the idiopathic negative form.?METHODS—During a 3 year period 220 consecutive patients with undetermined uveitis at onset were examined in the Helsinki University Eye Clinic. HLA-B27 antigen was tested for 85% of the patients. Other...

  4. Panuveíte em artrite indiferenciada HLA-B27 positiva Panuveitis in HLA-B27 positive undifferentiated arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Sérgio Ferreira Santos

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Entre os vários tipos de inflamação ocular associados às doenças reumatológicas, a uveíte anterior é particularmente comum nas espondiloartropatias, em especial quando associada à presença do genótipo HLA-B27. Relatou-se o caso de um paciente com artrite indiferenciada HLA-B27 positivo, complicado com panuveíte e vasculite da retina, refratária ao tratamento imunossupressor tradicional, que obteve boa resposta clínica ao uso de anti-TNF-alfa.Among the several types of ocular inflammation associated to the rheumatic diseases, anterior uveitis is particularly common in the spondyloarthropathies, especially when associated to the presence of the HLA-B27 genotype. We report the case of HLA-B27 positive patient with undifferentiated arthritis, complicated with panuveitis and retinal vasculitis, that was refractory to the traditional imunossupressive treatment, and had a good clinical response with anti-TNF-alpha therapy.

  5. HLA-B27 frequency in a group of patients with psoriatic arthritis / Freqüência de HLA-B27 em uma amostra de pacientes com artrite psoriática

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Danilo Garcia, Ruiz; Mário Newton Leitão de, Azevedo; Omar, Lupi.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: O HLA-B27 está associado às espondiloartrites, grupo de doenças que engloba, entre outras, a artrite psoriásica. OBJETIVOS: Descrever a freqüência de HLA-B27 em uma amostra de pacientes brasileiros com artrite psoriásica e correlacionar sua presença ou ausência com as manifestações clín [...] icas dos mesmos. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal avaliando 44 pacientes com artrite psoriásica de um ambulatório de Reumatologia. A avaliação consistia em registro de informações demográficas e sociais, exame clínico da pele e das articulações e pesquisa de HLA-B27. Os dados gerados foram tratados por meio de estatística descritiva e comparativa em Software apropriado. Foram utilizados testes paramétricos e não-paramétricos com significância estatística de 5%. RESULTADOS: O HLA-B27 resultou negativo em 32 dos 44 pacientes estudados (72,7%). A maioria dos pacientes era do sexo masculino, da raça branca, procedente do Rio de Janeiro, portador de psoríase em placas e com idade média de 52,9 anos. Houve associação estatisticamente significativa entre o HLA-B27 positivo e o sexo masculino (p=0,004). O HLA-B27 negativo teve tendência à correlação com artrite de mãos e punhos (p=0,07). Houve correlação inversa significativa entre os valores do HLA e do teste de Schöber (p=0,02). CONCLUSÃO: Apesar do HLA-B27 ser negativo na maioria dos pacientes estudados, esteve significativamente associado ao sexo masculino e inversamente correlacionado ao teste de Schöber. Abstract in english BACKGROUND: HLA-B27 is associated with spondyloarthritis, a group of diseases that includes psoriatic arthritis. OBJECTIVES: To describe the HLA-B27 frequency in a group of Brazilian patients with psoriatic arthritis and correlate its presence or absence with their clinical manifestations. METHODS: [...] Cross-sectional study with 44 psoriatic arthritis patients of a Rheumatology clinic. Demographic and social data were recorded, as were skin and joints clinical examination. HLA-B27 was tested. All data were processed descriptively and comparatively by appropriate software. Parametric and non parametric tests were used with 5% statistical significance. RESULTS: HLA-B27 was negative in 32 of the 44 patients (72,7%). Most of them were male, Caucasian, living in Rio de Janeiro, with plaque type psoriasis and average age of 52,9 years. There was statistical significant correlation between positive HLA-B27 and male gender (p=0,004). Negative HLA-B27 had a tendency to correlate with hands and wrists arthritis (p=0,07). There was an inverse significant correlation between HLA values and Schöber's test (p=0,02). CONCLUSION: Although HLA-B27 is negative in most of patients, it is significantly associated to male gender and inversely correlated with Schöber's test.

  6. The radiographic features of rheumatoid arthritis in HLA-B27-positive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographs were reviewed in a group of nine patients with classical seropositive rheumatoid arthritis who on tissue typing were found to express the class I HLA-B27 allele. Radiographs were analyzed with regard to whether or not they demonstrated radiographic features of (1) classical rheumatoid arthritis, (2) seronegative arthritis, or (3) mixed features of rheumatoid and seronegative arthritis. Five patients (55%) displayed radiographic features consistent with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, two patients (22%) showed radiographic features of seronegative disorder (periostitis and sacroiliitis), and two patients (22%) showed a mixed picture with evidence of both rheumatoid arthritis and a seronegative disorder. Thus, the HLA-B27 allele contributed to the radiographic features in 44% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and associated HLA-B27. Thus, the wide range of findings in our population indicates that the radiographic attributes are not specific enough to constitute a unique subpopulation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.)

  7. Genética, HLA-B27 y espondilitis anquilosante: 40 años / Genetics of ankylosing spondylitis

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Patricia, Castro-Santos; Miguel A, Gutiérrez; Roberto, Díaz-Peña.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available [...] Abstract in english Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a prototypical inflammatory disease of the locomotor system affecting axial skeleton. It is part of the general group of spondyloarthopathies (SpA). Its strong association with histocompatibility antigen HLA-B27 is known since 1973. However, HLA-B27 contribution to AS [...] genetic risk is approximately 16%. Therefore, other genes are necessarily involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Genomic development and the possibility of making genome wide screening have contributed enormously to the study of the disease. In this paper, we describe the actual knowledge about AS genetic risk, which has contributed to understand the influence of HLA-B27 on the etiology and pathogenesis of the disease. We also intend to foresee how these findings will result in an improvement of patients’ quality of life.

  8. A Homogeneous HLA-B*27 Genotyping Assay Using Dried Reagent Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Minna Kiviniemi; Jorma Ilonen; Timo Lövgren

    2009-01-01

    The presence of HLA-B*27 allele with patients suspected with ankylosing spondylitis can be used in the diagnostic process. We have developed an assay for typing for the HLA-B*27 in whole blood dried on sample collection cards using pre-dried reagent wells and homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence based PCR approach. Essentially only the sample needs to be added to the dry ready-to-use reaction well in order to start the homogenous amplification assay. The method was validated with 229 sample...

  9. A homogeneous HLA-B*27 genotyping assay using dried reagent mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, Minna; Ilonen, Jorma; Lövgren, Timo

    2009-01-01

    The presence of HLA-B*27 allele with patients suspected with ankylosing spondylitis can be used in the diagnostic process. We have developed an assay for typing for the HLA-B*27 in whole blood dried on sample collection cards using pre-dried reagent wells and homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence based PCR approach. Essentially only the sample needs to be added to the dry ready-to-use reaction well in order to start the homogenous amplification assay. The method was validated with 229 samples also typed with an existing DELFIA-based method and results of both assays were 100% concordant. The dried reagents were shown to be stable at least up to eight weeks at room temperature without any decline in their performance. PMID:19893203

  10. HLA-B27 and its subtypes in Syrian patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim Harfouch; Salwa A. Al-Cheikh

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To assess HLA-B*27 and its subtypes associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in Syrian patients. METHODS A polymerase chain reaction with specific sequence primer method were used to study the HLA-B* locus polymorphism in 50 Syrian patients fulfilling the modified New York criteria for classification of ankylosing spondylitis and 217 unrelated healthy Syrian controls. Patients were recruited from the Outpatients Department, Alassad University Hospital, Damascus, Syria b...

  11. Multiple sclerosis and HLA-B27 negative sacroiliitis in a Crohn?s disease patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.H. Katsanos, N. Tzambouras, E.V. Tsianos

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY A relationship between inflammatory bowel disease and MS is supported by a higher than expected coexistence of these diseases among families and individuals. A 32 year-old male with Crohn?s disease of the terminal ileum diagnosed 4 years earlier and HLA-B27 bilateral sacroiliitis diagnosed two years earlier, was admitted to our hospital because of an acute episode of blurred vision. In addition the patient complained of urine incontinence. Before this admission the patient had been elsewhere administered three doses of Remicade and 16mg of methylprednisolone p.os. During admission the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis was made (MRI and IgG Index and Remicade was discontinued. The patient was started on therapy with interferon-beta for MS, oxybutynin hydrochloride (10mg/day for urine incontinence, prednizolone (10mg/day, methotrexate (10mg/week and azathioprine (100mg/day for Crohn?s disease and is now in excellent clinical status. To the best of our knowledge this is one of the very rare cases of Crohn?s disease with HLA-B27 negative sacroiliitis preceding multiple sclerosis diagnosis. Key words: Crohn?s disease, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, multiple sclerosis, Remicade

  12. HLA-A*01:03, HLA-A*24:02, HLA-B*08:01, HLA-B*27:05, HLA-B*35:01, HLA-B*44:02, and HLA-C*07:01 Monochain Transgenic/H-2 Class I Null Mice: Novel Versatile Preclinical Models of Human T Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucherma, Rachid; Kridane-Miledi, Hédia; Bouziat, Romain; Rasmussen, Michael; Gatard, Tanja; Langa-Vives, Francina; Lemercier, Brigitte; Lim, Annick; Bérard, Marion; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Buus, Søren; Rooke, Ronald; Lemonnier, François A.

    2014-01-01

    We have generated a panel of transgenic mice expressing HLA-A*01:03, -A*24:02, -B*08:01, -B*27:05, -B*35:01, -B*44:02, or -C*07:01 as chimeric monochain molecules (i.e., appropriate HLA ?1?2 H chain domains fused with a mouse ?3 domain and covalently linked to human ?2-microglobulin). Whereas surface expression of several transgenes was markedly reduced in recipient mice that coexpressed endogenous H-2 class I molecules, substantial surface expression of all human transgenes was observed in mice lacking H-2 class I molecules. In these HLA monochain transgenic/H-2 class I null mice, we observed a quantitative and qualitative restoration of the peripheral CD8+ T cell repertoire, which exhibited a TCR diversity comparable with C57BL/6 WT mice. Potent epitope-specific, HLA-restricted, IFN-?–producing CD8+ T cell responses were generated against known reference T cell epitopes after either peptide or DNA immunization. HLA-wise, these new transgenic strains encompass a large proportion of individuals from all major human races and ethnicities. In combination with the previously created HLA-A*02:01 and -B*07:02 transgenic mice, the novel HLA transgenic mice described in this report should be a versatile preclinical animal model that will speed up the identification and optimization of HLA-restricted CD8+ T cell epitopes of potential interest in various autoimmune human diseases and in preclinical evaluation of T cell–based vaccines. PMID:23776170

  13. HLA-A*01:03, HLA-A*24:02, HLA-B*08:01, HLA-B*27:05, HLA-B*35:01, HLA-B*44:02, and HLA-C*07:01 Monochain Transgenic/H-2 Class I Null Mice : Novel Versatile Preclinical Models of Human T Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boucherma, Rachid; Kridane-Miledi, Hédia

    2013-01-01

    We have generated a panel of transgenic mice expressing HLA-A*01:03, -A*24:02, -B*08:01, -B*27:05, -B*35:01, -B*44:02, or -C*07:01 as chimeric monochain molecules (i.e., appropriate HLA ?1?2 H chain domains fused with a mouse ?3 domain and covalently linked to human ?2-microglobulin). Whereas surface expression of several transgenes was markedly reduced in recipient mice that coexpressed endogenous H-2 class I molecules, substantial surface expression of all human transgenes was observed in mice lacking H-2 class I molecules. In these HLA monochain transgenic/H-2 class I null mice, we observed a quantitative and qualitative restoration of the peripheral CD8(+) T cell repertoire, which exhibited a TCR diversity comparable with C57BL/6 WT mice. Potent epitope-specific, HLA-restricted, IFN-?-producing CD8(+) T cell responses were generated against known reference T cell epitopes after either peptide or DNA immunization. HLA-wise, these new transgenic strains encompass a large proportion of individuals from all major human races and ethnicities. In combination with the previously created HLA-A*02:01 and -B*07:02 transgenic mice, the novel HLA transgenic mice described in this report should be a versatile preclinical animal model that will speed up the identification and optimization of HLA-restricted CD8(+) T cell epitopes of potential interest in various autoimmune human diseases and in preclinical evaluation of T cell-based vaccines.

  14. HLA-B*27:05-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes in Indian HIV type 1C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaramurthi, Jagadish Chandrabose; Ramanathan, V D; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    HLA-B*27:05 is one of the widely reported alleles associated with resistance to HIV, while HLA-A24, HLA-B7, HLA-B*07:02, HLA-B*35:01, HLA-B*53:01, and HLA-B40 are reported to be associated with susceptibility to HIV. Using a bioinformatics approach we attempted to predict potential HLA-B*27:05-specific HIV-1C epitopes that do not bind to susceptibility-associated HLA alleles based on our hypothesis that such epitopes have a greater probability of eliciting a protective immune response in the host. A consensus sequence was built for all proteins of Indian clade C virus. Epitopes specific to HLA-B*27:05 were predicted from the consensus sequence using two different bioinformatics methods to enhance the accuracy of the prediction. Epitopes that were also predicted to bind to any of the susceptibility-associated HLA alleles were excluded from the list. The short-listed epitopes were modeled using MODPROPEP to refine the prediction. Fourteen peptides were identified as epitopes by both sequence-based methods and were found to interact strongly with HLA-B*27:05 by molecular modeling studies. Five of the 14 epitopes were previously reported as immunogenic by other researchers, while the remaining nine are novel. The 14 epitopes have been repeatedly identified by three different methods indicating their potential as useful candidates for an effective HIV vaccine. PMID:22924625

  15. Analysis of HLA-B15 and HLA-B27 in spondyloarthritis with peripheral and axial clinical patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londono, John; Santos, Ana Maria; Peña, Paola; Calvo, Enrique; Espinosa, Luis R; Reveille, John D; Vargas-Alarcon, Gilberto; Jaramillo, Carlos A; Valle-Oñate, Rafael; Avila, Mabel; Romero, Consuelo; Medina, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    Objective Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) B27 and HLA-B15 are associated with spondyloarthritis (SpA). Recent Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) criteria emphasise a distinction between SpA with axial and peripheral patterns. We analysed whether HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 alleles could associate with these patterns. Methods We studied 100 healthy individuals and 178 patients with SpA according to European Spondyloarthropathy Study Group (ESSG) criteria. Patients were then classified according to ASAS criteria, the axial spondyloarthritis pattern (axSpA) being defined by ascertained sacroiliitis and the peripheral pattern (pSpA) by enthesitis and/or arthritis in extremities. A combined ax/p pattern was also considered. Results Only HLA-B27 and HLA-B15 alleles were associated with SpA. ASAS criteria for axSpA were met in 152 patients (12 with isolated axSpA and 140 with a combined ax/p patterns). When the ASAS peripheral criteria were applied, 161 patients met these criteria (13 with isolated pSpA and 148 with a combined ax/p pattern). HLA-B27 was found in 83% of patients with axSpA and 43% of ax/pSpA patients according to axASAS. HLA-B27 occurred in 7% controls but not in any patient with isolated pSpA. HLA-B15 was encountered in 31% of patients with isolated pSpA and 20% of ax/pSpA patients according to pASAS criteria. Moreover, 2 healthy controls, but none of our patients with isolated axSpA were positive for HLA-B15. Conclusions Our data suggest that the presence of HLA-B15 favours the development of isolated/combined peripheral rather than isolated axSpA, while HLA-B27 promotes an isolated/combined axial disease and excludes a peripheral pattern. HLA-B15 should be considered in addition to HLA-B27 when diagnosing patients with SpA according to ASAS criteria. PMID:26560062

  16. Autoantibodies to the HLA-B27 sequence cross-react with the hypothetical peptide from the arthritis-associated Shigella plasmid.

    OpenAIRE

    TSUCHIYA, N.; Husby, G.; Williams, R C; Stieglitz, H; Lipsky, P E; Inman, R D

    1990-01-01

    We previously reported elevated serum antibody levels to a peptide representing the HLA-B27 polymorphic region (B27 peptide) in HLA-B27(+) ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. A plasmid (pHS-2) isolated from arthritogenic Shigella flexneri strains had been shown to encode an amino acid sequence homologous to HLA-B27. Rabbit antibody to this sequence (pHS-2 peptide) strongly cross-reacted with B27 peptide and, to a much lesser extent, with Klebsiella nitrogenase peptide. Serum antibody levels...

  17. A comparison of self-reported joint symptoms following infection with different enteric pathogens: effect of HLA-B27

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiellerup, P.; Krogfelt, K.A.; Locht, H.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We conducted a case-case comparison study to estimate the attack-rate of reactive joint pain (JPrea) following intestinal infections, and evaluated whether the susceptibility and severity of joint symptoms was associated with the tissue-type HLA-B27. METHODS: Consecutive patients with positive fecal culture for Salmonella, Campylobacter, Yersinia, Shigella, and E. coli were addressed by questionnaires inquiring about gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and the occurrence of joint pain in a...

  18. The LMP2 polymorphism is associated with susceptibility to acute anterior uveitis in HLA-B27 positive juvenile and adult Mexican subjects with ankylosing spondylitis

    OpenAIRE

    Maksymowych, W; Jhangri, G.; Gorodezky, C.; M. Luong; Wong, C; Burgos-Vargas, R.; Morenot, M.; J. Sanchez-Corona; Ramos-Remus, C; Russell, A.

    1997-01-01

    INTRODUCTION—An association between polymorphism of the HLA linked LMP2 locus and the development of acute anterior uveitis (AAU) has previously been described in B27 positive white subjects with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This study evaluated LMP2 alleles in two HLA-B27 positive Mexican populations of patients with spondyloarthropathy known to have a different clinical spectrum of disease from white people.?PATIENTS AND METHODS—The study populations consisted of 90 AS patients from Guadala...

  19. Genetic Polymorphisms of Stromal Interaction Molecule 1 Associated with the Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate and C-Reactive Protein in HLA-B27 Positive Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, James Cheng-Chung; Hung, Kuo-Sheng; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Wong, Ruey-Hong; Huang, Chun-Huang; Jan, Ming-Shiou; Wu, Shyh-Jong; Juan, Yung-Shun; Chang, Wei-chiao

    2012-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammation of the sacroiliac joints, spine and peripheral joints. The development of ankylosing spondylitis is still unclear. Genetics factors such as human leukocyte antigen HLA-B27 and ERAP1 have been widely reported to associate to AS susceptibility. In this study, we enrolled 361 AS patients and selected four tagging single nucleotides polymorphisms (tSNPs) at STIM1 gene. The correlation between STIM1 genetic polymorphisms and AS activity index (...

  20. AIDS-protective HLA-B*27/B*57 and chimpanzee MHC class I molecules target analogous conserved areas of HIV-1/SIVcpz

    OpenAIRE

    Groot, Natasja G de; Heijmans, Corrine M.C.; Zoet, Yvonne M.; de Ru, Arnoud H.; Verreck, Frank A.; van Veelen, Peter A.; Drijfhout, Jan W.; Doxiadis, Gaby G.M.; Remarque, Edmond J; Doxiadis, Ilias I.N.; van Rood, Jon J.; Koning, Frits; Bontrop, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    In the absence of treatment, most HIV-1-infected humans develop AIDS. However, a minority are long-term nonprogressors, and resistance is associated with the presence of particular HLA-B*27/B*57 molecules. In contrast, most HIV-1-infected chimpanzees do not contract AIDS. In comparison with humans, chimpanzees experienced an ancient selective sweep affecting the MHC class I repertoire. We have determined the peptide-binding properties of frequent chimpanzee MHC class I molecules, and show tha...

  1. HLA-B27 Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Antigen B27 Related tests: ESR ; C-Reactive Protein ; Rheumatoid Factor ; HLA Testing At a Glance Test Sample The ... This group of tests may include an RF (rheumatoid factor) with either an ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate) or ...

  2. Generation of Transgenic Rats Using Lentiviral Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, Holger M; Fischer, Henrike J

    2016-01-01

    Transgenesis is a valuable tool with which to study different aspects of gene function in the context of the intact organism. During the last two decades a tremendous number of transgenic animals have been generated, and the continuous improvement of technology and the development of new systems have fostered their widespread application in biomedical research. Generally, transgenic animals are generated by introducing foreign DNA into fertilized oocytes, which can be achieved either by injecting recombinant DNA into the pronucleus or by transferring lentiviral particles into the perivitelline space. While mice remain the favored species in many laboratories, there are a number of applications where the use of rats is advantageous. One such research area is multiple sclerosis. Here, several experimental models are available that are closely mimicking the human disease, and it is possible to induce neuroinflammation by transferring pathogenic T cells which can then be studied by flow cytometry and 2-photon live imaging. Unlike for mice, the development of transgenic rats has encountered some hurdles in the past, e.g., due to a complicated reproductive biology and the frailty of the fertilized oocytes in vitro. In this chapter we provide a protocol describing how we manipulate single cell embryos in our lab in order to efficiently generate transgenic rats in a variety of different strains using lentiviral gene transfer. PMID:25063498

  3. First transgenic rat model developing progressive cortical neurofibrillary tangles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipcik, Peter; Zilka, Norbert; Bugos, Ondrej; Kucerak, Juraj; Koson, Peter; Novak, Petr; Novak, Michal

    2012-07-01

    Neurofibrillary degeneration induced by misfolded protein tau is considered to be one of the key pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we have introduced a novel transgenic rat model expressing a human truncated tau that encompasses 3 microtubule binding domains (3R) and a proline-rich region (3R tau151-391). The transgenic rats developed progressive age-dependent neurofibrillary degeneration in the cortical brain areas. Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) satisfied several key histological criteria used to identify neurofibrillary degeneration in human Alzheimer's disease including argyrophilia, Congo red birefringence, and Thioflavin S reactivity. Neurofibrillary tangles were also identified with antibodies used to detect pathologic tau in the human brain, including DC11, recognizing an abnormal tau conformation and antibodies that are specific for hyperphosphorylated forms of tau protein. Moreover, neurofibrillary degeneration was characterized by extensive formation of sarkosyl insoluble tau protein complexes consisting of rat endogenous and truncated tau species. Interestingly, the transgenic rats did not show neuronal loss either in the cortex or in the hippocampus. We suggest that novel transgenic rat model for human tauopathy represents a valuable tool in preclinical drug discovery targeting neurofibrillary degeneration of Alzheimer's type. PMID:21196063

  4. Prodiabetogenic effects of transgenic resistin in old spontaneously hypertensive rats,.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Kazdová, L.; Kurtz, T. W.

    Elsevier. Ro?. 7, ?. 3 (2006), s. 463-463. ISSN 1567-5688. [International Symposium on Atherosclerosis /14./. 18.06.2006-22.06.2006, Rome] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : resistin * spontaneously hypertensive rat * transgenic Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  5. PP005. Vitamin D depletion aggravates hypertension in transgenic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørkholt Andersen, Louise; Herse, Florian; Christesen, Henrik Thybo; Dechend, Ralf; Müller, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vitamin D may ameliorate hypertension and kidney disease through genomic and extra-genomic pathways. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of vitamin D in a transgenic rat model of angiotensin II-mediated hypertensive organ failure. METHODS: In 4-week-old age-matched rats overexpressing the human renin and angiotensinogen genes, group 1 (n=18) received vitamin D depleted chow; group 2 (n=15) standard chow and intraperitoneal paricalcitol at 800ng/kg thrice weekly; and group 3 (n=15)...

  6. Lanolin as a treatment option for ringtail in transgenic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Douglas K; Rogers, Melissa M; Hankenson, F Claire

    2006-01-01

    Ringtail is a condition characterized by dry skin and annular constrictions that sometimes result in loss of portions of the tail. This condition most commonly affects preweanling rats, and low relative humidity is thought to be a principal cause. The use of transgenic rats in our facility has been increasing since 2002, and we recently diagnosed several litters from transgenic Fischer 344 rats (Rattus norvegicus) with ringtail. Treatment was necessary to maintain the health and integrity of the tails to allow genotyping. Lanolin ointment was chosen because it is a nontoxic, inexpensive, effective moisturizer used for treating human skin conditions. We examined 5 litters comprising 37 pups total, ranging in age from 7 to 17 days at the time of presentation. Animals in 3 litters were randomly assigned to a treatment or nontreatment group, and all animals in the remaining 2 litters were treated. Lanolin was applied to the tails of treatment groups once daily for 6 d. Treatment was tolerated well by pups and no animals were rejected by the dams. After treatment, tail condition was scored from 0 to 3, with 0 representing a tail normal in appearance, and 3 representing severe disease. Chi square testing showed marginal statistical significance, with a trend for a higher percentage of treated rats having healthier tails on day 7 compared to untreated pups. The Pearson correlation between treatment and tail condition scores was significant. Results indicate that lanolin was an efficacious treatment option for ringtail. PMID:16539341

  7. HIV-1 transgenic rats develop T cell abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIV-1 infection leads to impaired antigen-specific T cell proliferation, increased susceptibility of T cells to apoptosis, progressive impairment of T-helper 1 (Th1) responses, and altered maturation of HIV-1-specific memory cells. We have identified similar impairments in HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rats. Tg rats developed an absolute reduction in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells able to produce IFN-? following activation and an increased susceptibility of T cells to activation-induced apoptosis. CD4+ and CD8+ effector/memory (CD45RC-CD62L-) pools were significantly smaller in Tg rats compared to non-Tg controls, although the converse was true for the naieve (CD45RC+CD62L+) T cell pool. Our interpretation is that the HIV transgene causes defects in the development of T cell effector function and generation of specific effector/memory T cell subsets, and that activation-induced apoptosis may be an essential factor in this process

  8. Developing tTA Transgenic Rats for Inducible and Reversible Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Hongxia Zhou, Cao Huang, Jianbin Tong, Xu-Gang Xia

    2009-01-01

    To develop transgenic lines for conditional expression of desired genes in rats, we generated several lines of the transgenic rats carrying the tetracycline-controlled transactivator (tTA) gene. Using a vigorous, ubiquitous promoter to drive the tTA transgene, we obtained widespread expression of tTA in various tissues. Expression of tTA was sufficient to strongly activate its reporter gene, but was below the toxicity threshold. We examined the dynamics of Doxycycline (Dox)-regulated gene exp...

  9. Regulatory regions of rat insulin I gene necessary for expression in transgenic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Dandoy-Dron, F; Monthioux, E; Jami, J; Bucchini, D

    1991-01-01

    Ten transgenic mouse lines harboring the -346/-103 fragment of the rat insulin I enhancer linked to a heterologous promoter and a reporter gene (Eins-Ptk-CAT construct) were produced. Expression of the hybrid transgene was essentially observed in pancreas and to a lesser extent in brain. These results indicate that the rat insulin I promoter is dispensable for pancreatic expression. This insulin gene sequence is the shortest fragment described as conferring tissue-specific expression in trans...

  10. Safety assessment of transgenic potatoes with soybean glycinin by feeding studies in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, W; Momma, K; Yoon, H J; Ozawa, S; Ohkawa, Y; Ishige, T; Kito, M; Utsumi, S; Murata, K

    1999-11-01

    Feeding studies of transgenic potatoes with native and designed soybean glycinins in rats were done for four weeks. The designed glycinin has four additional methioninyl residues in the middle of the glycinin molecule. Rats were divided into four groups fed (I) only a commercial diet, (II) the diet plus non-transgenic potatoes, (III) the diet plus transgenic potatoes with native glycinin, and (IV) the diet plus transgenic potatoes with designed glycinin. Rats were fed 2,000 mg/kg-weight potatoes every day by oral administration. During the period tested, rats in each group (groups II, III, and IV) grew well without marked differences in appearance, food intake, body weight, or in cumulative body weight gain. No significant differences were also found in blood count, blood composition, and in internal organ weights among the rats after feeding potatoes (groups II, III, and IV) for four weeks. Necropsy at the end of experiment indicated neither pathologic symptoms in all rats tested nor histopathological abnormalities in liver and kidney. Judging from these results, the transgenic potatoes with glycinins are confirmed to have nearly the same nutritional and biochemical characteristics as non-transgenic one. PMID:10635558

  11. PP005. Vitamin D depletion aggravates hypertension in transgenic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    BjØrkholt Andersen, Louise; Herse, Florian

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vitamin D may ameliorate hypertension and kidney disease through genomic and extra-genomic pathways. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of vitamin D in a transgenic rat model of angiotensin II-mediated hypertensive organ failure. METHODS: In 4-week-old age-matched rats overexpressing the human renin and angiotensinogen genes, group 1 (n=18) received vitamin D depleted chow; group 2 (n=15) standard chow and intraperitoneal paricalcitol at 800ng/kg thrice weekly; and group 3 (n=15) standard chow and vehicle injections. Blood pressure (tail cuff) and 24-h albuminuria were determined once weekly. After three weeks, animals were sacrificed. Heart tissue was examined for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) by RT-PCR. RESULTS: The vitamin D depleted group had higher blood pressure at week 1 (mean difference 23.4mmHg, 95% CI 9.1-37.7) and tended to have higher blood pressure in weeks 2 and 3 (mean difference 14.3mmHg 95% CI -0.02-28.7 and 15.2mmHg 95% CI -1.5-33). The depletion group had higher heart-to-body weight ratio, and a trend towards higher ANP and BNP levels. The group receiving paricalcitol did not perform better. No differences were found between groups in mortality or proteinuria. CONCLUSION: Short-term vitamin D depletion aggravated hypertension and end-organ damage in a rat model of angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Short-term interventions with high-dose vitamin D analogues had no protective effect.

  12. A transgenic rat expressing human APP with the Swedish Alzheimer's disease mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Ronnie; Malkiewicz, Katarzyna

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, transgenic mice have become valuable tools for studying mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). With the aim of developing an animal model better for memory and neurobehavioural testing, we have generated a transgenic rat model of AD. These animals express human amyloid precursor protein (APP) containing the Swedish AD mutation. The highest level of expression in the brain is found in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. Starting after the age of 15 months, the rats show increased tau phosphorylation and extracellular Abeta staining. The Abeta is found predominantly in cerebrovascular blood vessels with very rare diffuse plaques. We believe that crossing these animals with mutant PS1 transgenic rats will result in accelerated plaque formation similar to that seen in transgenic mice.

  13. Polyethylenimine-mediated expression of transgenes in the acinar cells of rats salivary glands in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Sramkova, Monika; Parente, Laura; Wigand, Timothy; Aye, Myo-Pale'; Shitara, Akiko; Weigert, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Non viral-mediated transfection of plasmid DNA provides a fast and reliable way to express various transgenes in selected cell populations in live animals. Here, we show an improvement of a previously published method that is based on injecting plasmid DNA into the ductal system of the salivary glands in live rats. Specifically, using complexes between plasmid DNA and polyethyleneimine (PEI) we show that the expression of the transgenes is directed selectively to the salivary acinar cells. PE...

  14. Generation and characterization of a Tet-On (rtTA-M2 transgenic rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhwani Meena

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tetracycline-inducible gene regulation system is a powerful tool that allows temporal and dose-dependent regulation of target transgene expression in vitro and in vivo. Several tetracycline-inducible transgenic mouse models have been described with ubiquitous or tissue-specific expression of tetracycline-transactivator (tTA, reverse tetracycline-transactivator (rtTA or Tet repressor (TetR. Here we describe a Tet-On transgenic rat that ubiquitously expresses rtTA-M2 driven by the murine ROSA 26 promoter. Results The homozygous rat line (ROSA-rtTA-M2 generated by lentiviral vector injection, has a single integration site and was derived from the offspring of a genetic mosaic founder with multiple transgene integrations. The rtTA-M2 transgene integrated into an intron of a putative gene on chromosome 2 and does not appear to affect the tissue-specificity or expression of that gene. Fibroblasts from the ROSA-rtTA-M2 rats were transduced with a TetO7/CMV-EGFP lentivirus and exhibited doxycycline dose-dependent expression of the EGFP reporter transgene, in vitro. In addition, doxycycline-inducible EGFP expression was observed, in vivo, when the TetO7/CMV-EGFP lentivirus was injected into testis, kidney and muscle tissues of ROSA-rtTA-M2 rats. Conclusions This conditional expression rat model may have application for transgenic overexpression or knockdown studies of gene function in development, disease and gene therapy.

  15. Developing tTA Transgenic Rats for Inducible and Reversible Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Zhou, Cao Huang, Min Yang, Carlisle P Landel, Pedro Yuxing Xia, Yong-Jian Liu, Xu Gang Xia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To develop transgenic lines for conditional expression of desired genes in rats, we generated several lines of the transgenic rats carrying the tetracycline-controlled transactivator (tTA gene. Using a vigorous, ubiquitous promoter to drive the tTA transgene, we obtained widespread expression of tTA in various tissues. Expression of tTA was sufficient to strongly activate its reporter gene, but was below the toxicity threshold. We examined the dynamics of Doxycycline (Dox-regulated gene expression in transgenic rats. In the two transmittable lines, tTA-mediated activation of the reporter gene was fully subject to regulation by Dox. Dox dose-dependently suppressed tTA-activated gene expression. The washout time for the effects of Dox was dose-dependent. We tested a complex regime of Dox administration to determine the optimal effectiveness and washout duration. Dox was administered at a high dose (500 ?g/ml in drinking water for two days to reach the effective concentration, and then was given at a low dose (20 ?g/ml to maintain effectiveness. This regimen of Dox administration can achieve a quick switch between ON and OFF statuses of tTA-activated gene expression. In addition, administration of Dox to pregnant rats fully suppressed postnatal tTA-activated gene expression in their offspring. Sufficient levels of Dox are present in mother's milk to produce maximal efficacy in nursing neonates. Administration of Dox to pregnant or nursing rats can provide a continual suppression of tTA-dependent gene expression during embryonic and postnatal development. The tTA transgenic rat allows for inducible and reversible gene expression in the rat; this important tool will be valuable in the development of genetic rat models of human diseases.

  16. Free Access to Running Wheels Abolishes Hyperphagia in Human Growth Hormone Transgenic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    KOMATSUDA, Mugiko; YAMANOUCHI, Keitaro; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Nishihara, Masugi

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major health problem, and increased food intake and decreased physical activity are considered as two major factors causing obesity. Previous studies show that voluntary exercise in a running wheel decreases not only body weight but also food intake of rats. We previously produced human growth hormone transgenic (TG) rats, which are characterized by severe hyperphagia and obesity. To gain more insight into the effects on physical activity to food consumption and ob...

  17. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid prevents retinal degeneration in transgenic P23H rats

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Sánchez, Laura; Lax Zapata, Pedro; Pinilla Lozano, Isabel; Martín Nieto, José; Cuenca Navarro, Nicolás

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the preventive effect of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) on photoreceptor degeneration, synaptic connectivity and functional activity of the retina in the transgenic P23H rat, an animal model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods. P23H line-3 rats were injected with TUDCA once a week from postnatal day (P)21 to P120, in parallel with vehicle-administered controls. At P120, functional activity of the retina was evaluated by electroretinographic (ERG) r...

  18. Comparative effects of dietary administered transgenic and conventional papaya on selected intestinal parameters in rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Melissa; Wheatley, Andrew O; Omoruyi, Felix; Asemota, Helen N; Williams, Nadia P; Tennant, Paula F

    2010-06-01

    Transformation of agricultural crops with novel genes has significantly advanced disease-resistance breeding, including virus resistance through the expression of virus sequences. In this study, the effects of long-term, repeated exposure to transgenic papayas carrying the coat protein gene of Papaya ringspot virus and conventional non-transgenic papaya on the histology and selected biochemical parameters of the intestinal tract were compared. For 3 months, male and female Wistar rats received diets containing transgenic or non-transgenic papaya at twice the equivalent of the average daily consumption of fresh papayas. Gross and macroscopic appearance of intestinal tissues, as well as stomach tissues, was comparable (P papaya did not result in biologically important unintended effects. PMID:19690973

  19. A new transgenic rat model of of hepatic steatosis and the metabolic syndrome.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Mlejnek, Petr; Qi, N.; Wang, J.; Kazdová, L.; Pravenec, Michal; Kurtz, T. W.

    Elsevier. Ro?. 6, ?. 1 (2005), s. 46-46. ISSN 1567-5688. [Congress of the European Atherosclerosis Society /75./. 23.04.2005-26.04.2005, Prague] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : SREBP1A transgenic * rat * metabolic syndrome Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  20. Cognitive impairment in the Tg6590 transgenic rat model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloskowska, Ewa; Pham, Therese M

    2010-01-01

    Recently, interest in the rat as an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been growing. We have previously described the Tg6590 transgenic rat line expressing the amyloid precursor protein containing the Swedish AD mutation (K670M/N671L) that shows early stages of Abeta deposition, predominantly in cerebrovascular blood vessels, after 15 months of age. Here we show that by the age of 9 months, that is long before the appearance of Abeta deposits, the Tg6590 rats exhibit deficits in the Morris water maze spatial navigation task and altered spontaneous behaviour in the open-field test. The levels of soluble Abeta were elevated both in the hippocampus and cortex of transgenic animals. Magnetic resonance imaging showed no major changes in the brains of transgenic animals, although they tended to have enlarged lateral ventricles when compared to control animals. The Tg6590 transgenic rat line should prove a suitable model of early AD for advanced studies including serial cerebrospinal fluid sampling, electrophysiology, neuroimaging or complex behavioural testing.

  1. Cognitive impairment in the Tg6590 transgenic rat model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloskowska, Ewa; Pham, Therese M; Nilsson, Tatjana; Zhu, Shunwei; Oberg, Johanna; Codita, Alina; Pedersen, Lars A; Pedersen, Jan T; Malkiewicz, Katarzyna; Winblad, Bengt; Folkesson, Ronnie; Benedikz, Eirikur

    2010-01-01

    Recently, interest in the rat as an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been growing. We have previously described the Tg6590 transgenic rat line expressing the amyloid precursor protein containing the Swedish AD mutation (K670M/N671L) that shows early stages of Abeta deposition, predominantly in cerebrovascular blood vessels, after 15 months of age. Here we show that by the age of 9 months, that is long before the appearance of Abeta deposits, the Tg6590 rats exhibit deficits in the Mo...

  2. Neuronal and astrocytic metabolism in a transgenic rat model of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsen, Linn Hege; Witter , Menno P.; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Regional hypometabolism of glucose in the brain is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, little is known about the specific alterations of neuronal and astrocytic metabolism involved in homeostasis of glutamate and GABA in AD. Here, we investigated the effects of amyloid ? (A?) pathology on neuronal and astrocytic metabolism and glial-neuronal interactions in amino acid neurotransmitter homeostasis in the transgenic McGill-R-Thy1-APP rat model of AD compared with healthy controls a...

  3. Chromosome assignment of Cd36 transgenes in two rat SHR lines by FISH and linkage mapping of transgenic insert in the SHR-TG19 line.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liška, F.; Levan, G.; Helou, K.; Sladká, M.; Pravenec, Michal; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; K?en, Vladimír

    2002-01-01

    Ro?. 48, ?. 4 (2002), s. 139-144. ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ?R GV204/98/K015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : spontaneously hypertensive rat * Cd36 * transgenic lines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.615, year: 2002

  4. Chronic alcohol ingestion exacerbates skeletal muscle myopathy in HIV-1 transgenic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bratina Margaux A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Separately, chronic alcohol ingestion and HIV-1 infection are associated with severe skeletal muscle derangements, including atrophy and wasting, weakness, and fatigue. One prospective cohort study reported that 41% of HIV-infected patients met the criteria for alcoholism, however; few reports exist on the co-morbid effects of these two disease processes on skeletal muscle homeostasis. Thus, we analyzed the atrophic effects of chronic alcohol ingestion in HIV-1 transgenic rats and identified alterations to several catabolic and anabolic factors. Findings Relative plantaris mass, total protein content, and fiber cross-sectional area were reduced in each experimental group compared to healthy, control-fed rats. Alcohol abuse further reduced plantaris fiber area in HIV-1 transgenic rats. Consistent with previous reports, gene levels of myostatin and its receptor activin IIB were not increased in HIV-1 transgenic rat muscle. However, myostatin and activin IIB were induced in healthy and HIV-1 transgenic rats fed alcohol for 12 weeks. Catabolic signaling factors such as TGF?1, TNF?, and phospho-p38/total-p38 were increased in all groups compared to controls. There was no effect on IL-6, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF, cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1, or ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF in control-fed, transgenic rats. However, the co-morbidity of chronic alcohol abuse and HIV-1-related protein expression decreased expression of the two anabolic factors, CT-1 and CNTF. Conclusions Consistent with previous reports, alcohol abuse accentuated skeletal muscle atrophy in an animal model of HIV/AIDS. While some catabolic pathways known to drive alcoholic or HIV-1-associated myopathies were also elevated in this co-morbid model (e.g., TGF?1, consistent expression patterns were not apparent. Thus, specific alterations to signaling mechanisms such as the induction of the myostatin/activin IIB system or reductions in growth factor signaling via CT-1- and CNTF-dependent mechanisms may play larger roles in the regulation of muscle mass in alcoholic, HIV-1 models.

  5. A transgenic rat that develops Alzheimer's disease-like amyloid pathology, deficits in synaptic plasticity and cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Orozco, Ian J; Planel, Emmanuel; Wen, Yi; Bretteville, Alexis; Krishnamurthy, Pavan; Wang, Lili; Herman, Mathieu; Figueroa, Helen; Yu, W Haung; Arancio, Ottavio; Duff, Karen

    2008-07-01

    In the last decade, multiple lines of transgenic APP overexpressing mice have been created that recapitulate certain aspects of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, none of the previously reported transgenic APP overexpressing rat models developed AD-like beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposits, or age-related learning and memory deficits. In the present study, we have characterized a transgenic rat model overexpressing transgenes with three, familial AD mutations (two in APP and one in PS1) that were developed by Flood et al. [Flood, D.G., et al., Abeta deposition in a transgenic rat model of Alzheimer's disease. Society for Neuroscience 2003, Washington, DC, 2003]. From the age of 9 months, these rats develop Abeta deposits in both diffuse and compact forms, with the latter being closely associated with activated microglia and reactive astrocytes. Impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) was revealed by electrophysiological recordings performed on hippocampal slices from rats at 7 months of age, which is 2 months before the appearance of amyloid plaques. The deficit in LTP was accompanied by impaired spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze, which became more pronounced in transgenic rats of 13 months of age. For Tg rats of both ages, there was a trend for cognitive impairment to correlate with total Abeta42 levels in the hippocampus. The rat model therefore recapitulates AD-like amyloid pathology and cognitive impairment. The advantage of the rat model over the available mouse models is that rats provide better opportunities for advanced studies, such as serial CSF sampling, electrophysiology, neuroimaging, cell-based transplant manipulations, and complex behavioral testing. PMID:18504134

  6. HIV-1 transgene expression in rats causes oxidant stress and alveolar epithelial barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Barbara A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-infected individuals are at increased risk for acute and chronic airway disease even though there is no evidence that the virus can infect the lung epithelium. Although HIV-related proteins including gp120 and Tat can directly cause oxidant stress and cellular dysfunction, their effects in the lung are unknown. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of HIV-1 transgene expression in rats on alveolar epithelial barrier function. Alveolar epithelial barrier function was assessed by determining lung liquid clearance in vivo and alveolar epithelial monolayer permeability in vitro. Oxidant stress in the alveolar space was determined by measuring the glutathione redox couple by high performance liquid chromatography, and the expression and membrane localization of key tight junction proteins were assessed. Finally, the direct effects of the HIV-related proteins gp120 and Tat on alveolar epithelial barrier formation and tight junction protein expression were determined. Results HIV-1 transgene expression caused oxidant stress within the alveolar space and impaired epithelial barrier function even though there was no evidence of overt inflammation within the airways. The expression and membrane localization of the tight junction proteins zonula occludens-1 and occludin were decreased in alveolar epithelial cells from HIV-1 transgenic rats. Further, treating alveolar epithelial monolayers from wild type rats in vitro with recombinant gp120 or Tat for 24 hours reproduced many of the effects on zonula occludens-1 and occludin expression and membrane localization. Conclusion Taken together, these data indicate that HIV-related proteins cause oxidant stress and alter the expression of critical tight junction proteins in the alveolar epithelium, resulting in barrier dysfunction.

  7. Angiotensin II induced inflammation in the kidney and in the heart of double transgenic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haller Hermann

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We are investigating a double transgenic rat (dTGR model, in which rats transgenic for the human angiotensinogen and renin genes are crossed. These rats develop moderately severe hypertension but die of end-organ cardiac and renal damage by week 7. The heart shows necrosis and fibrosis, whereas the kidneys resemble the hemolytic-uremic syndrome vasculopathy. Surface adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 are expressed early on the endothelium, while the corresponding ligands are found on circulating leukocytes. Leukocyte infiltration in the vascular wall accompanies PAI-1, MCP-1, iNOS and Tissue Factor expression. Furthermore we show evidence that Ang II causes the upregulation of NF-kB in our model. Methods We started PDTC-treatment on four weeks old dTGR (200 mg/kg sc and age-matched SD rats.. Blood-pressure- and albuminuria- measurements were monitored during the treatement period (four weeks. The seven weeks old animals were killed, hearts and kidneys were isolated and used for immunohistochemical-and electromobility shift assay analsis. Results Chronic treatment with the antioxidant PDTC decreased blood pressure (162 ± 8 vs. 190 ± 7 mm Hg, p = 0.02. Cardiac hypertrophy index was significantly reduced (4.90 ± 0.1 vs. 5.77 ± 0.1 mg/g, p Conclusion Our data show that inhibition of NF-?B by PDTC markedly reduces inflammation, iNOS expression in the dTGR most likely leading to decreased cytotoxicity, and cell proliferation. Thus, NF-?B activation plays an important role in ANG II-induced end-organ damage.

  8. A progressive dopaminergic phenotype associated with neurotoxic conversion of ?-synuclein in BAC-transgenic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nuber, Silke; Harmuth, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Conversion of soluble ?-synuclein into insoluble and fibrillar inclusions is a hallmark of Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies. Accumulating evidence points towards a relationship between its generation at nerve terminals and structural synaptic pathology. Little is known about the pathogenic impact of ?-synuclein conversion and deposition at nigrostriatal dopaminergic synapses in transgenic mice, mainly owing to expression limitations of the ?-synuclein construct. Here, we explore whether both the rat as a model and expression of the bacterial artificial chromosome construct consisting of human full-length wild-type ?-synuclein could exert dopaminergic neuropathological effects. We found that the human promoter induced a pan-neuronal expression, matching the rodent ?-synuclein expression pattern, however, with prominent C-terminally truncated fragments. Ageing promoted conversion of both full-length and C-terminally truncated ?-synuclein species into insolube and proteinase K-resistant fibres, with strongest accumulation in the striatum, resembling biochemical changes seen in human Parkinson's disease. Transgenic rats develop early changes in novelty-seeking, avoidance and smell before the progressive motor deficit. Importantly, the observed pathological changes were associated with severe loss of the dopaminergic integrity, thus resembling more closely the human pathology.

  9. Stress sensitivity is increased in transgenic rats with low brain angiotensinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Helge; Kröger, Juliane; Jöhren, Olaf; Szymczak, Silke; Bader, Michael; Dominiak, Peter; Raasch, Walter

    2010-01-01

    AT(1) blockers attenuate hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis reactivity in hypertension independently of their potency to lower blood pressure. A reduced pituitary sensitivity to CRH and a downregulation of hypothalamic CRH expression have been suggested to influence HPA axis activity during chronic AT(1) blockade. This study was aimed at confirming the role of central angiotensin II in regulating HPA reactivity by using the transgenic rat TGR(ASrAOGEN), a model featuring low levels of brain angiotensinogen. Different stress tests were performed to determine HPA reactivity in TGR(ASrAOGEN) and appropriate controls. In TGR(ASrAOGEN), blood pressure was diminished compared to controls. The corticosterone response to a CRH or ACTH challenge and a forced swim test was more distinct in TGR(ASrAOGEN) than it was in controls and occurred independently of a concurrent enhancement in ACTH. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we found increased mRNA levels of melanocortin 2 (Mc2r) and AT(2) receptors (Agtr2) in the adrenals of TGR(ASrAOGEN), whereas mRNA levels of Crh, Pomc, and AT(1) receptors (Agtr1) remained unchanged in hypothalami and pituitary glands. Since stress responses were increased rather than attenuated in TGR(ASrAOGEN), we conclude that the reduced HPA reactivity during AT(1) blockade could not be mimicked in a specific transgenic rat model featuring a centrally inactivated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. The ACTH independency of the enhanced corticosterone release during CRH test and the enhanced corticosterone response to ACTH rather indicates an adrenal mechanism. The upregulation of adrenal MC2 and AT(2) receptors seems to be involved in the stimulated facilitation of adrenal corticosterone release for effectuating the stimulated stress responses. PMID:19808775

  10. The hypertensive Ren-2 transgenic rat TGR (mREN2)27 in hypertension research. Characteristics and functional aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langheinrich, M; Lee, M A; Böhm, M; Pinto, Y M; Ganten, D; Paul, M

    1996-05-01

    Primary human hypertension is a polygenic disorder. It is the prevalent cause of cardiovascular disease leading to cardiac failure, stroke, chronic renal failure and, ultimately to death. Several genes are involved in cardiovascular control mechanisms and their genetics are complex. Experimental models which are well defined are needed to clarify the role of individual genes. The generation of the hypertensive transgenic rat line TGR (mREN2)27 bearing the murine Ren-2 gene cloned from the DBA/2J mouse strain provides a monogenic model of hypertension in which the genetic basis (the additional renin gene) is known. These rats develop severe hypertension, which reaches 200 mm Hg and higher at 8 weeks of age in the heterozygous animal. Homozygous rats develop even higher blood pressures than heterozygous animals, which is paralleled by a higher mortality rate in homozygous rats. Animals develop pathomorphologic alterations which are characteristic for systemic hypertension. The transgenic rats are characterized by unchanged or even suppressed concentrations of active renin, angiotensin I (ANG I), ANG II, and angiotensinogen compared to transgene-negative littermates. In contrast, plasma levels of inactive renin (prorenin) are much higher in TGR (mREN)27 rats than in control animals. In the kidneys, renin is suppressed, probably mediated through negative feedback inhibition, in other tissues, especially in the adrenal gland, murine Ren-2 mRNA is expressed at very high levels. The cascade of pathophysiologic events which finally lead to hypertension is not fully understood in this rat model. Treatment with ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor antagonists such as losartan is extremely efficient, which could mean that hypertension in this model is mediated through ANG II. Since the the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the kidneys is suppressed, other ANG II generating sites must be considered. This favors the concept of extrarenal RASs in this model. PMID:8735183

  11. Genotoxic effects of bitumen fumes in Big Blue transgenic rat lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottin, Marie Claire; Gate, Laurent; Rihn, Bertrand; Micillino, Jean Claude; Nathalie, Monhoven; Martin, Aurélie; Nunge, Hervé; Morel, Georges; Wrobel, Richard; Ayi-Fanou, Lucie; Champmartin, Catherine; Keith, Gérard; Binet, Stéphane

    2006-04-11

    Road paving workers are exposed to bitumen fumes (CAS No. 8052-42-4), a complex mixture of volatile compounds and particles containing carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. However, epidemiological and experimental animal studies failed to draw unambiguous conclusions concerning their toxicity. In order to gain better insights on their genotoxic potential, we used an experimental design able to generate bitumen fumes at road paving temperature (temperature: 170 degrees C, total particulate matter: 100mg/m3) and perform a nose-only exposure of Big Blue transgenic rodents 6h/day for five consecutive days. The mutagenic properties of bitumen fumes were determined by analyzing the mutation frequency and spectrum of the neutral reporter gene cII inserted into the rodent genome. We previously observed in mouse lung, that bitumen fumes did not induce an increase of cII mutants, a modification of the mutation spectrum, nor the formation of DNA adducts. Since DNA adducts were found in the lungs of rats exposed to asphalt fumes in similar conditions, we decided to carry out an analogous experiment with Big Blue rats. A DNA adduct was detected 3 and 30 days after the end of treatment suggesting that these genetic alterations were quite steady. Thirty days after exposure, the cII mutant frequency was similar in control and exposed rats. In addition, a slight but not significant modification of the mutation spectrum associated with an increase of G:C to T:A and A:T to C:G transversions was noticeable in the treated animals. Then, these data failed to demonstrate a pulmonary mutagenic potential for bitumen fumes generated at road paving temperature in our experimental conditions despite the presence of a DNA adduct. These results may provide information concerning the pulmonary mechanism of action of this aerosol and may contribute to the occupational health hazard assessment. PMID:16457858

  12. Transgenic rats overexpressing the human MrgX3 gene show cataracts and an abnormal skin phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human MrgX3 gene, belonging to the mrgs/SNSRs (mass related genes/sensory neuron specific receptors) family, was overexpressed in transgenic rats using the actin promoter. Two animal lines showed cataracts with liquification/degeneration and swelling of the lens fiber cells. The transient epidermal desquamation was observed in line with higher gene expression. Histopathology of the transgenic rats showed acanthosis and focal parakeratosis. In the epidermis, there was an increase in cellular keratin 14, keratin 10, and loricrin, as well as PGP 9.5 in innervating nerve fibers. These phenotypes accompanied an increase in the number of proliferating cells. These results suggest that overexpression of the human MrgX3 gene causes a disturbance of the normal cell-differentiation process

  13. Rosuvastatin ameliorates inflammation, renal fat accumulation, and kidney injury in transgenic spontaneously hypertensive rats expressing human C-reactive protein.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šilhavý, Jan; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Šimáková, Miroslava; Mlejnek, Petr; Oliyarnyk, O.; Malínská, H.; Kazdová, L.; Mancini, M.; Pravenec, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Ro?. 64, ?. 3 (2015), s. 295-301. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11049; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204; GA MZd(CZ) NT14325; GA ?R(CZ) GB14-36804G Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : rosuvastatin * kidney damage * CRP * transgenic * spontaneously hypertensive rat Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  14. Fat-specific transgenic expression of resistin in the spontaneously hypertensive rat impairs fatty acid re-esterification.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Kazdová, L.; Cahová, M.; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Wang, J.; Qi, N.; Kurtz, T. W.

    2006-01-01

    Ro?. 30, ?. 7 (2006), s. 1157-1159. ISSN 0307-0565 R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GA301/03/0751; GA MZd(CZ) NB7403; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Grant ostatní: HHMI(US) 55005624 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : spontaneously hypertensive rat * transgenic resistin * fatty acid reesterification Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.055, year: 2006

  15. Temporal sensitivity changes with extended training in a bisection task in a transgenic rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce L Brown

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated temporal perception in a Huntington Disease transgenic rat model using a temporal bisection procedure. After initial discrimination training in which animals learned to press one lever after a 2-s tone duration, and the other lever after a 8-s tone duration for food reward, the bisection procedure was implemented in which intermediate durations with no available reinforcement were interspersed with trials with the anchor durations. Bisection tests were repeated in a longitudinal design from 4 to 8 months of age. The results showed that response latencies evolved from a monotonic step-function to an inverted U-shaped function with repeated testing, a precursor of nonresponding on trials with intermediate durations. We inferred that temporal sensitivity and incentive motivation combined to control the transformation of the bisection task from a two-choice task at the outset of testing to a three-choice task with repeated testing. Changes in the structure of the task and/or continued training were accompanied by improvement in temporal sensitivity. In sum, the present data highlight the possible joint roles of temporal and non-temporal factors in the temporal bisection task, and suggested that non-temporal factors may compensate for deficits in temporal processing.

  16. Reduced impact of emotion on choice behavior in presymptomatic BACHD rats, a transgenic rodent model for Huntington Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjeroud, Najia; Yagüe, Sara; Yu-Taeger, Libo; Bozon, Bruno; Leblanc-Veyrac, Pascale; Riess, Olaf; Allain, Philippe; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Doyère, Valérie; El Massioui, Nicole

    2015-11-01

    Executive dysfunction and psychiatric symptoms are hallmarks of Huntington disease (HD), a neurodegenerative disorder genetically characterized by expanded CAG repeats in the HTT gene. Using the BACHD rat model of HD (97 CAG-CAA repeats), the present research seeks to characterize the progressive emergence of decision-making impairments in a rat version of the Iowa Gambling Task (RGT) and the impact of emotional modulation, whether positive or negative, on choice behavior. The choice efficiency shown both by WT rats (independent of their age) and the youngest BACHD rats (2 and 8months old) evidenced that they are able to integrate outcomes of past decisions to determine expected reward values for each option. However, 18months old BACHD rats made fewer choices during the RGT session and were less efficient in choosing advantageous options than younger animals. Presenting either chocolate pellets or electrical footshocks half-way through a second RGT session reduced exploratory activity (inefficient nose-poking) and choices with a weaker effect on BACHD animals than on WT. Choice efficiency was left intact in transgenic rats. Our results bring new knowledge on executive impairments and impact of emotional state on decision-making at different stages of the disease, increasing the face-validity of the BACHD rat model. PMID:26463506

  17. Sustained and promoter dependent bone morphogenetic protein expression by rat mesenchymal stem cells after BMP-2 transgene electrotransfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Ferreira

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs with electrotransferred bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 transgene is an attractive therapeutic modality for the treatment of large bone defects: it provides both stem cells with the ability to form bone and an effective bone inducer while avoiding viral gene transfer. The objective of the present study was to determine the influence of the promoter driving the human BMP-2 gene on the level and duration of BMP-2 expression after transgene electrotransfer into rat MSCs. Cytomegalovirus, elongation factor-1?, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and beta-actin promoters resulted in a BMP-2 secretion rate increase of 11-, 78-, 66- and 36-fold over respective controls, respectively. In contrast, the osteocalcin promoter had predictable weak activity in undifferentiated MSCs but induced the strongest BMP-2 secretion rates in osteoblastically-differentiated MSCs. Regardless of the promoter driving the transgene, a plateau of maximal BMP-2 secretion persisted for at least 21 d after the hBMP-2 gene electrotransfer. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of gene electrotransfer for efficient BMP-2 transgene delivery into MSCs and for a three-week sustained BMP-2 expression. It also provides the first in vitro evidence for a safe alternative to viral methods that permit efficient BMP-2 gene delivery and expression in MSCs but raise safety concerns that are critical when considering clinical applications.

  18. Cardiac remodeling during and after renin-angiotensin system stimulation in Cyp1a1-Ren2 transgenic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heijnen, Bart Fj; Pelkmans, Leonie Pj; Danser, Ah Jan; Garrelds, Ingrid M; Mullins, John J; De Mey, Jo Gr; Struijker-Boudier, Harry Aj; Janssen, Ben Ja

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated renin-angiotensin system (RAS)-induced cardiac remodeling and its reversibility in the presence and absence of high blood pressure (BP) in Cyp1a1-Ren2 transgenic inducible hypertensive rats (IHR). In IHR (pro)renin levels and BP can be dose-dependently titrated by oral administration of indole-3-carbinol (I3C). Young (four-weeks old) and adult (30-weeks old) IHR were fed I3C for four weeks (leading to systolic BP >200 mmHg). RAS-stimulation was stopped and animals were fo...

  19. Age-related autocrine diabetogenic effects of transgenic resistin in spontaneously hypertensive rats: gene expression profile analysis.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Šimáková, Miroslava; Mlejnek, Petr; Šilhavý, J.; Maxová, M.; Kazdová, L.; Seidman, J. G.; Seidman, Ch. E.; Eminaga, S.; Gorham, J.; Wang, J.; Kurtz, T. W.

    2011-01-01

    Ro?. 43, ?. 7 (2011), s. 372-379. ISSN 1094-8341 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME08006; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510; GA AV ?R(CZ) IAA500110805; GA MZd(CZ) NS9759 Grant ostatní: Fondation Leducq(FR) 06CVD03 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : transgenic rat * adipose tissue * insulin resistance * autocrine effects Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 2.735, year: 2011

  20. Dietary effects of soy isoflavones daidzein and genistein on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced mammary mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in ovariectomized Big Blue transgenic rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Manjanatha, Mugimane; Shelton, Sharon; Bishop, Michelle; Lyn-Cook, Lascelles; Aidoo, Anane

    2006-01-01

    The major constituents of isoflavones daidzein (DZ) and genistein (GE) interact with the and estrogen receptors in several tissues including mammary tissues. In this study, we used ovariectomy (OVX) to model menopause and determined the effects of DZ, GE or 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) exposures on chemically induced mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in the mammary glands of female Big Blue transgenic rats. The rats were fed control diet containing the isoflavones and E(2) and treated with a single o...

  1. Sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 overexpression is associated with reduced adipogenesis and ectopic fat accumulation in transgenic spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Šilhavý, Jan; Trnovská, J.; Kazdová, L.; Pravenec, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 63, ?. 5 (2014), s. 587-590. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH12061 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 * transgenic * spontaneously hypertensive rat * lipid metabolism Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  2. Benzo[a]pyrene-enhanced mutagenesis by man-made mineral fibres in the lung of gama-lacI transgenic rats.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Topinka, Jan; Loli, P.; Hurbánková, M.; Ková?iková, Z.; Volkovová, K.; Wolff, T.; Oesterle, D.; Kyrtopoulos, S.A.; Georgiadis, P.

    2006-01-01

    Ro?. 595, - (2006), s. 167-173. ISSN 0027-5107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : transgenic rats * mineral fibres * mutations Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 4.111, year: 2006

  3. A progressive dopaminergic phenotype associated with neurotoxic conversion of  -synuclein in BAC-transgenic rats

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Conversion of soluble ?-synuclein into insoluble and fibrillar inclusions is a hallmark of Parkinson’s disease and other synucleinopathies. Accumulating evidence points towards a relationship between its generation at nerve terminals and structural synaptic pathology. Little is known about the pathogenic impact of ?-synuclein conversion and deposition at nigrostriatal dopaminergic synapses in transgenic mice, mainly owing to expression limitations of the ?-synuclein construct. ...

  4. Feasibility study for functional test battery of SOD transgenic rat (H46R) and evaluation of edaravone, a free radical scavenger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Masashi; Warita, Hitoshi; Mizuno, Hideki; Suzuki, Naoki; Yuki, Satoshi; Itoyama, Yasuto

    2011-03-25

    We evaluated a battery of functional tests for investigating the effects of edaravone, a free radical scavenger, in SOD1 transgenic (H46R) rat model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Edaravone (1.5 or 3.0mg/kg/h) or saline was administered intravenously to rats by continuous infusion (1h per day) for 2days, followed by a 2-day holiday. Lifetime and duration of illness were evaluated, and motor function was assessed using the hind-foot reflex test, landing foot-splay test, rota rod test and inclined plate test at a predetermined time point at which half of the control animals had died. Statistical comparison of motor functions of edaravone-treated and control SOD1 transgenic rats at an objectively determined time point was confirmed to be feasible. Edaravone-treated male rats showed significantly better performance in the landing foot-splay test. The present model seems suitable for evaluating motor function of H46R SOD1 transgenic rats, and be useful for examining the therapeutic potential of edaravone to treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:21276427

  5. HIV-1 transgenic rat CD4+ T cells develop decreased CD28 responsiveness and suboptimal Lck tyrosine dephosphorylation following activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impaired CD4+ T cell responses, resulting in dysregulated T-helper 1 (Th1) effector and memory responses, are a common result of HIV-1 infection. These defects are often preceded by decreased expression and function of the ?/? T cell receptor (TCR)-CD3 complex and of co-stimulatory molecules including CD28, resulting in altered T cell proliferation, cytokine secretion and cell survival. We have previously shown that HIV Tg rats have defective development of T cell effector function and generation of specific effector/memory T cell subsets. Here we identify abnormalities in activated HIV-1 Tg rat CD4+ T cells that include decreased pY505 dephosphorylation of Lck (required for Lck activation), decreased CD28 function, reduced expression of the anti-apoptotic molecule Bcl-xL, decreased secretion of the mitogenic lympokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) and increased activation induced apoptosis. These events likely lead to defects in antigen-specific signaling and may help explain the disruption of Th1 responses and the generation of specific effector/memory subsets in transgenic CD4+ T cells

  6. Severely impaired hippocampal neurogenesis associates with an early serotonergic deficit in a BAC ?-synuclein transgenic rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Zacharias; Ben Abdallah, Nada; Vogelgsang, Jonathan; Tischer, Lucas; Deusser, Janina; Amato, Davide; Anderson, Scott; Müller, Christian P; Riess, Olaf; Masliah, Eliezer; Nuber, Silke; Winkler, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a multisystem disorder, involving several monoaminergic neurotransmitter systems resulting in a broad range of motor and non-motor symptoms. Pathological hallmarks of PD are the loss of dopaminergic neurons and the accumulation of alpha-synuclein, however also being present in the serotonergic raphe nuclei early in the disease course. The dysfunction of the serotonergic system projecting to the hippocampus may contribute to early non-motor symptoms such as anxiety and depression. The adult hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG), a unique niche of the forebrain continuously generating new neurons, may particularly present enhanced susceptibility towards accumulating alpha-synuclein levels. The underlying molecular mechanisms in the context of neuronal maturation and survival of new-born neurons are yet not well understood. To characterize the effects of overexpression of human full-length alpha-synuclein on hippocampal cellular and synaptic plasticity, we used a recently generated BAC alpha-synuclein transgenic rat model showing important features of PD such as widespread and progressive alpha-synuclein aggregation pathology, dopamine loss and age-dependent motor decline. At the age of four months, thus prior to the occurrence of the motor phenotype, we observed a profoundly impaired dendritogenesis of neuroblasts in the hippocampal DG resulting in severely reduced survival of adult new-born neurons. Diminished neurogenesis concurred with a serotonergic deficit in the hippocampus as defined by reduced levels of serotonin (5-HT) 1B receptor, decreased 5-HT neurotransmitter levels, and a loss of serotonergic nerve terminals innervating the DG/CA3 subfield, while the number of serotonergic neurons in the raphe nuclei remained unchanged. Moreover, alpha-synuclein overexpression reduced proteins involved in vesicle release, in particular synapsin-1 and Rab3 interacting molecule (RIM3), in conjunction with an altered ultrastructural architecture of hippocampal synapses. Importantly, BAC alpha-synuclein rats showed an early anxiety-like phenotype consisting of reduced exploratory behavior and feeding. Taken together, these findings imply that accumulating alpha-synuclein severely affects hippocampal neurogenesis paralleled by impaired 5-HT neurotransmission prior to the onset of aggregation pathology and overt motor deficits in this transgenic rat model of PD. PMID:26523794

  7. Gene Delivery by Subconjunctival Injection of Adenovirus in Rats: A Study of Local Distribution, Transgene Duration and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jia Hui; Tsai, Pei-Jhen; Tsai, Han-En; Sheu, Shwu-Jiuan; Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Dusting, Gregory J.; Tai, Ming-Hong; Bee, Youn-Shen

    2015-01-01

    Subconjunctival injection is a minimally invasive route for gene delivery to ocular tissues, but has traditionally been limited to use in the cornea. The accurate ocular distribution of virus has not, however, been previously investigated. Adenovirus is an attractive gene vector as it can deliver large genes and allow for short-term gene expression, but how safe it is when delivered via subconjunctival injection remains to be established. We have characterized the bio-distribution and safety of subconjunctivally administered adenovirus in Brown Norway rats. The bio-distribution and transgene duration of adenovirus carrying luciferase gene (Ad-Luci) at various time intervals were evaluated via bioluminescence imaging after subconjunctival injection. Adenovirus carrying a reporter gene, ?-galactosidase (Ad-LacZ) or hrGFP (Ad-hrGFP) was administered subconjunctivally and the viral distribution in various ocular tissues was assessed by histological analysis and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Hepatic damage was assessed by biochemical and immunohistological analysis with TUNEL stain. Systemic immunogenicity was assessed by measuring serum level of TNF-? via ELISA, 2 hours and 14 days after administration of adenovirus. Retinal function was examined by electroretinography. Subconjunctival injection of Ad-Luci induced luciferase expression in the injected eyes within 24 hours, for at least 64 days. Histological analysis showed adenovirus distributed across anterior and posterior ocular tissues. qPCR demonstrated different amounts of adenovirus in different ocular tissues, with the highest amounts closest to the injection site Unlike the intravenous route, subconjunctivally delivered adenovirus did not elicit any detectable hepatic injury or systemic immunogenicity. Retinal function was unaffected by adenovirus irrespective of administration route. In conclusion, an adenoviral vector administered subconjunctivally can infiltrate into different ocular tissues and lead to short-term ocular transgene expression, without causing hepatic injury and immune activation. Therefore, subconjunctivally administered adenovirus may be a promising gene delivery approach for managing anterior and posterior segment eye diseases requiring short-term therapy. PMID:26642208

  8. Fumaric Acid Esters Can Block Pro-Inflammatory Actions of Human CRP and Ameliorate Metabolic Disturbances in Transgenic Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šilhavý, Jan; Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Landa, Vladimír; Šimáková, Miroslava; Strnad, Hynek; Oliyarnyk, O.; Škop, V.; Kazdová, L.; Kurtz, T.; Pravenec, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 9, ?. 7 (2014), e101906. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT14325; GA MŠk(CZ) LH12061; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : fumaric acid esters * C-reactive protein * transgenic * spontaneously hypertensive rat Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  9. Medial prefrontal cortex neuronal activation and synaptic alterations after stress-induced reinstatement of palatable food seeking: a study using c-fos-GFP transgenic female rats

    OpenAIRE

    Cifani, Carlo; Koya, Eisuke; Navarre, Brittany M.; Calu, Donna J.; Baumann, Michael H; Marchant, Nathan J; LIU, QING-RONG; Khuc, Thi; PICKEL, JAMES; Lupica, Carl R.; Shaham, Yavin; Hope, Bruce T

    2012-01-01

    Relapse to maladaptive eating habits during dieting is often provoked by stress and there is evidence for a role of ovarian hormones in stress responses and feeding. We studied the role of these hormones in stress-induced reinstatement of food seeking and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) neuronal activation in c-fos-GFP transgenic female rats, which express green fluorescent protein (GFP) in strongly activated neurons. Food-restricted ovariectomized or sham-operated c-fos-GFP rats were trained...

  10. Circadian dysfunction in P23H rhodopsin transgenic rats: effects of exogenous melatonin

    OpenAIRE

    Lax Zapata, Pedro; Baño Otalora, Beatriz; Esquiva Sobrino, Gema; Rol de Lama, María de los Ángeles; Madrid Pérez, Juan Antonio; Cuenca Navarro, Nicolás

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on the effects of retinal degeneration on the circadian patterns of P23H rats, as well as on the effect of exogenous melatonin administration. To this end, the body temperature of P23H and Sprague–Dawley rats was continuously monitored and their retinas examined at different stages of degeneration, by means of histological labeling and electroretinogram recordings. Melatonin (2 mg/kg BW/day) was supplied ad libitum throughout the experiment to a subset of animals. The body ...

  11. Transgenic rats reveal functional conservation of regulatory controls between the Fugu isotocin and rat oxytocin?genes

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesh, Byrappa; Si-Hoe, San Ling; Murphy, David; Brenner, Sydney

    1997-01-01

    We have asked whether comparative genome analysis and rat transgenesis can be used to identify functional regulatory domains in the gene locus encoding the hypothalamic neuropeptides oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin. Isotocin (IT) and vasotocin (VT) are the teleost homologues of these genes. A contiguous stretch of 46 kb spanning the Fugu IT-VT locus has been sequenced, and nine putative genes were found. Unlike the OT and vasopressin genes, which are closely linked in the mammalian genome in a ...

  12. Cardiac remodeling during and after renin-angiotensin system stimulation in Cyp1a1-Ren2 transgenic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heijnen, Bart Fj; Pelkmans, Leonie Pj

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated renin-angiotensin system (RAS)-induced cardiac remodeling and its reversibility in the presence and absence of high blood pressure (BP) in Cyp1a1-Ren2 transgenic inducible hypertensive rats (IHR). In IHR (pro)renin levels and BP can be dose-dependently titrated by oral administration of indole-3-carbinol (I3C). Young (four-weeks old) and adult (30-weeks old) IHR were fed I3C for four weeks (leading to systolic BP >200 mmHg). RAS-stimulation was stopped and animals were followed-up for a consecutive period. Cardiac function and geometry was determined echocardiographically and the hearts were excised for molecular and immunohistochemical analyses. Echocardiographic studies revealed that four weeks of RAS-stimulation incited a cardiac remodeling process characterized by increased left ventricular (LV) wall thickness, decreased LV volumes, and shortening of the left ventricle. Hypertrophic genes were highly upregulated, whereas in substantial activation a fibrotic response was absent. Four weeks after withdrawal of I3C, (pro)renin levels were normalized in all IHR. While in adult IHR BP returned to normal, hypertension was sustained in young IHR. Despite the latter, myocardial hypertrophy was fully regressed in both young and adult IHR. We conclude that (pro)renin-induced severe hypertension in IHR causes an age-independent fully reversible myocardial concentric hypertrophic remodeling, despite a continued elevated BP in young IHR.

  13. Strong association of HLA-B27 heavy chain with beta(2)-microglobulin.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tran, T. M.; Ho?ejší, Václav; Weinrich, S.; Pla, M.; Breur, B. S.; ?apková, Jana; Flieger, Miroslav; Ivanyi, P.; Ivašková, E.

    2000-01-01

    Ro?. 61, ?. 12 (2000), s. 1197-1201. ISSN 0198-8859 R&D Projects: GA MZd NI5314; GA MZd IZ3647 Institutional research plan: CEZ:A53/98:Z5-020-9ii Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.953, year: 2000

  14. Is There an HLA-B27 Associated Peptide Responsible for Ankylosin Spondylitis.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Petr; Man, Petr; Stod?lková, Eva; Ivašková, E.; Flieger, Miroslav

    Praha : Verlag, 2006, s. 96-96. [International Mass Spectrometry Conference /17./. Prague (CZ), 27.08.2006-01.09.2006] R&D Projects: GA MZd 1A8631 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : biomarkers * fourier transform * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  15. Transgenic rescue of defective Cd36 enhances myocardial adenylyl cyclase signaling in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klevstig, M.; Manakov, D.; Kašparová, D.; Brabcová, I.; Papoušek, František; Žurmanová, J.; Zídek, Václav; Šilhavý, Jan; Necká?, Jan; Pravenec, Michal; Kolá?, František; Nováková, O.; Novotný, J.

    2013-01-01

    Ro?. 465, ?. 10 (2013), s. 1477-1486. ISSN 0031-6768 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204; GA AV ?R(CZ) IAAX01110901; GA ?R(CZ) GAP303/10/0505 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : SHR rats * Cd36 * heart * beta-Adrenergic receptors * Adenylyl cyclase * Protein kinase A Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.073, year: 2013

  16. Plasmid-based genetic modification of human bone marrow-derived stromal cells: analysis of cell survival and transgene expression after transplantation in rat spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Tendeloo Viggo FI

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone marrow-derived stromal cells (MSC are attractive targets for ex vivo cell and gene therapy. In this context, we investigated the feasibility of a plasmid-based strategy for genetic modification of human (hMSC with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP and neurotrophin (NT3. Three genetically modified hMSC lines (EGFP, NT3, NT3-EGFP were established and used to study cell survival and transgene expression following transplantation in rat spinal cord. Results First, we demonstrate long-term survival of transplanted hMSC-EGFP cells in rat spinal cord under, but not without, appropriate immune suppression. Next, we examined the stability of EGFP or NT3 transgene expression following transplantation of hMSC-EGFP, hMSC-NT3 and hMSC-NT3-EGFP in rat spinal cord. While in vivo EGFP mRNA and protein expression by transplanted hMSC-EGFP cells was readily detectable at different time points post-transplantation, in vivo NT3 mRNA expression by hMSC-NT3 cells and in vivo EGFP protein expression by hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells was, respectively, undetectable or declined rapidly between day 1 and 7 post-transplantation. Further investigation revealed that the observed in vivo decline of EGFP protein expression by hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells: (i was associated with a decrease in transgenic NT3-EGFP mRNA expression as suggested following laser capture micro-dissection analysis of hMSC-NT3-EGFP cell transplants at day 1 and day 7 post-transplantation, (ii did not occur when hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells were transplanted subcutaneously, and (iii was reversed upon re-establishment of hMSC-NT3-EGFP cell cultures at 2 weeks post-transplantation. Finally, because we observed a slowly progressing tumour growth following transplantation of all our hMSC cell transplants, we here demonstrate that omitting immune suppressive therapy is sufficient to prevent further tumour growth and to eradicate malignant xenogeneic cell transplants. Conclusion In this study, we demonstrate that genetically modified hMSC lines can survive in healthy rat spinal cord over at least 3 weeks by using adequate immune suppression and can serve as vehicles for transgene expression. However, before genetically modified hMSC can potentially be used in a clinical setting to treat spinal cord injuries, more research on standardisation of hMSC culture and genetic modification needs to be done in order to prevent tumour formation and transgene silencing in vivo.

  17. Transgenic mouse lines expressing rat AH receptor variants - A new animal model for research on AH receptor function and dioxin toxicity mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han/Wistar (Kuopio; H/W) rats are exceptionally resistant to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) toxicity mainly because of their mutated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) gene. In H/W rats, altered splicing of the AHR mRNA generates two AHR proteins: deletion (DEL) and insertion (INS) variants, with the INS isoform being predominantly expressed. To gain further insight into their functional properties, cDNAs of these and rat wild-type (rWT) isoform were transferred into C57BL/6J-derived mice by microinjection. The endogenous mouse AHR was eliminated by selective crossing with Ahr-null mice. A single mouse line was obtained for each of the three constructs. The AHR mRNA levels in tissues were generally close to those of C57BL/6 mice in INS and DEL mice and somewhat higher in rWT mice; in testis, however, all 3 constructs exhibited marked overexpression. The transgenic mouse lines were phenotypically normal except for increased testis weight. Induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes by TCDD occurred similarly to that in C57BL/6 mice, but there tended to be a correlation with AHR concentrations, especially in testis. In contrast to C57BL/6 mice, the transgenics did not display any major gender difference in susceptibility to the acute lethality and hepatotoxicity of TCDD; rWT mice were highly sensitive, DEL mice moderately resistant and INS mice highly resistant. Co-expression of mouse AHR and rWT resulted in augmented sensitivity to TCDD and abolished the natural resistance of female C57BL/6 mice, whereas mice co-expressing mouse AHR and INS were resistant. Thus, these transgenic mouse lines provide a novel promising tool for molecular studies on dioxin toxicity and AHR function.

  18. Human cyclin T1 expression ameliorates a T-cell-specific transcriptional limitation for HIV in transgenic rats, but is not sufficient for a spreading infection of prototypic R5 HIV-1 strains ex vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Littman Dan R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cells derived from native rodents have limits at distinct steps of HIV replication. Rat primary CD4 T-cells, but not macrophages, display a profound transcriptional deficit that is ameliorated by transient trans-complementation with the human Tat-interacting protein Cyclin T1 (hCycT1. Results Here, we generated transgenic rats that selectively express hCycT1 in CD4 T-cells and macrophages. hCycT1 expression in rat T-cells boosted early HIV gene expression to levels approaching those in infected primary human T-cells. hCycT1 expression was necessary, but not sufficient, to enhance HIV transcription in T-cells from individual transgenic animals, indicating that endogenous cellular factors are critical co-regulators of HIV gene expression in rats. T-cells from hCD4/hCCR5/hCycT1-transgenic rats did not support productive infection of prototypic wild-type R5 HIV-1 strains ex vivo, suggesting one or more significant limitation in the late phase of the replication cycle in this primary rodent cell type. Remarkably, we identify a replication-competent HIV-1 GFP reporter strain (R7/3 YU-2 Env that displays characteristics of a spreading, primarily cell-to-cell-mediated infection in primary T-cells from hCD4/hCCR5-transgenic rats. Moreover, the replication of this recombinant HIV-1 strain was significantly enhanced by hCycT1 transgenesis. The viral determinants of this so far unique replicative ability are currently unknown. Conclusion Thus, hCycT1 expression is beneficial to de novo HIV infection in a transgenic rat model, but additional genetic manipulations of the host or virus are required to achieve full permissivity.

  19. Novel transgenic mouse models develop retinal changes associated with early diabetic retinopathy similar to those observed in rats with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Changmei; Zhang, Zifeng; Zhang, Peng; Makita, Jun; Kawada, Hiroyoshi; Blessing, Karen; Kador, Peter F

    2014-02-01

    Retinal capillary pericyte degeneration has been linked to aldose reductase (AR) activity in diabetic retinopathy (DR). Since the development of DR in mice and rats has been reported to differ and that this may be linked to differences in retinal sorbitol levels, we have established new murine models of early onset diabetes mellitus as tools for investigating the role of AR in DR. Transgenic diabetic mouse models were developed by crossbreeding diabetic C57BL/6-Ins2(Akita)/J (AK) with transgenic C57BL mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP), human aldose reductase (hAR) or both in vascular tissues containing smooth muscle actin-? (SMAA). Changes in retinal sorbitol levels were determined by HPLC while changes of growth factors and signaling were investigated by Western Blots. Retinal vascular changes were quantitatively analyzed on elastase-digestion flat mounts. Results show that sorbitol levels were higher in neural retinas of diabetic AK-SMAA-GFP-hAR compared to AK-SMAA-GFP mice. AK-SMAA-GFP-hAR mice showed induction of the retinal growth factors VEGF, IGF-1, bFGF and TGF?, as well as signaling changes in P-Akt, P-SAPK/JNK, and P-44/42 MAPK. Increased loss of nuclei per capillary length and a significant increase in the percentage of acellular capillaries presented in 18 week old AK-SMAA-GFP-hAR mice. These changes are similar to those observed in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Retinal changes in both mice and rats were prevented by inhibition of AR. These studies confirm that the increased expression of AR in mice results in the development of retinal changes associated with the early stages of DR that are similar to those observed in rats. PMID:24370601

  20. Fluorescent Visualisation of Oxytocin in the Hypothalamo-neurohypophysial/-spinal Pathways After Chronic Inflammation in Oxytocin-Monomeric Red Fluorescent Protein 1 Transgenic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, T; Kawasaki, M; Hashimoto, H; Ishikura, T; Yoshimura, M; Ohkubo, J-I; Maruyama, T; Motojima, Y; Sabanai, K; Mori, T; Ohnishi, H; Sakai, A; Ueta, Y

    2015-07-01

    Oxytocin (OXT) is a well-known neurohypophysial hormone that is synthesised in the paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei (SON) of the hypothalamus. The projection of magnocellular neurosecretory cells, which synthesise OXT and arginine vasopressin in the PVN and SON, to the posterior pituitary plays an essential role in mammalian labour and lactation through its peripheral action. However, previous studies have shown that parvocellular OXTergic cells in the PVN, which project to the medulla and spinal cord, are involved in various physiological functions (e.g. sensory modulation and autonomic). In the present study, we examined OXT expression in the PVN, SON and spinal cord after chronic inflammation from adjuvant arthritis (AA). We used transgenic rats that express OXT and the monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) fusion gene to visualise both the magnocellular and parvocellular OXTergic pathways. OXT-mRFP1 fluorescence intensity was significantly increased in the PVN, SON, dorsal horn of the spinal cord and posterior pituitary in AA rats. The levels of OXT-mRFP1 mRNA were significantly increased in the PVN and SON of AA rats. These results suggested that OXT was up-regulated in both hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory cells and parvocellular cells by chronic inflammation, and also that OXT in the PVN-spinal pathway may be involved in sensory modulation. OXT-mRFP1 transgenic rats are a very useful model for visualising the OXTergic pathways from vesicles in a single cell to terminals in in vitro preparations. PMID:25943916

  1. Protective effects of citrus nobiletin and auraptene in transgenic rats developing adenocarcinoma of the prostate (TRAP) and human prostate carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, MingXi; Ogawa, Kumiko; Asamoto, Makoto; Hokaiwado, Naomi; Seeni, Azman; Suzuki, Shugo; Takahashi, Satoru; Tanaka, Takuji; Ichikawa, Kazuhito; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2007-04-01

    Dietary phytochemicals, including nobiletin and auraptene, have been shown to exert inhibiting effects in several chemically induced carcinogenesis models. We here investigated the influence of nobiletin and auraptene on prostate carcinogenesis using transgenic rats developing adenocarcinoma of the prostate (TRAP) bearing the SV40 T antigen transgene under control of the probasin promoter and human prostate cancer cells. Starting at 5 weeks of age, male TRAP rats received powder diet containing 500 p.p.m. nobiletin or auraptene, or the basal diet for 15 weeks and then were sacrificed for analysis of serum testosterone levels and histological changes. The body and relative prostate weights and serum testosterone levels did not differ among the groups. Since all animals developed prostate carcinomas, these were semiquantitatively measured and expressed as relative areas of prostate epithelial cells. Nobiletin caused significant reduction in the ventral (Pauraptene also effectively reduced the epithelial component (Pauraptene in a dose-dependent manner, with significant increase in apoptosis. In conclusion, these compounds, particularly nobiletin, may be valuable for prostate cancer prevention. PMID:17284254

  2. Adeno-associated viral vector serotypes 1 and 5 targeted to the neonatal rat and pig striatum induce widespread transgene expression in the forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Birgitte R; Stott, Simon R W

    2010-01-01

    Viral vector-mediated gene transfer has emerged as a powerful means to target transgene expression in the central nervous system. Here we characterized the efficacy of serotypes 1 and 5 recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) after stereotaxic delivery to the neonatal rat and minipig striatum. The efficiency of GFP expression and the phenotype of GFP-positive cells were assessed within the forebrain at different time points up to 12 months after surgery. Both rAAV1-GFP and rAAV5-GFP delivery resulted in transduction of the striatum as well as striatal input and output areas, including large parts of the cortex. In both species, rAAV5 resulted in a more widespread transgene expression compared to rAAV1. In neonatal rats, rAAV5 also transduced several other areas such as the olfactory bulbs, hippocampus, and septum. Phenotypic analysis of the GFP-positive cells, performed using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy, showed that most of the GFP-positive cells by either serotype were NeuN-positive neuronal profiles. The rAAV5 vector further displayed the ability to transduce non-neuronal cell types in both rats and pigs, albeit at a low frequency. Our results show that striatal delivery of rAAV5 vectors in the neonatal brain represents a useful tool to express genes of interest both in the basal ganglia and the neocortex. Furthermore, we apply, for the first time, viral vector-mediated gene transfer to the pig brain providing the opportunity to study effects of genetic manipulation in this non-primate large animal species. Finally, we generated an atlas of the Göttingen minipig brain for guiding future studies in this large animal species.

  3. Transgenic tea

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya, Amita; Saini, U.; Ahuja, P.S.

    2006-01-01

    Like most of the important crop plants of the world, transgenic technology has also been extended to tea. Both biolistic and Agrobacterium mediated transformation methods have been employed to transform explants like leaves and somatic embryos. While gusand nptil genes were used to optimize parameters and develop protocols for transgenic production, plants expressing stress tolerance genes (osmotin) have also been produced. These methods have opened a whole new era for developing tea plants a...

  4. Regressive and reactive changes in the connectivity patterns of rod and cone pathways of P23H transgenic rat retina

    OpenAIRE

    Cuenca Navarro, Nicolás; Pinilla Lozano, Isabel; Sauvé, Yves; Lu, B; Wang, Shaomei; Lund, Raymond D.

    2004-01-01

    We have used the P23H line 1 homozygous albino rat to study how progressive photoreceptor degeneration affects rod and cone relay pathways. We examined P23H retinas at different stages of degeneration by confocal microscopy of immunostained sections and electroretinogram (ERG) recordings. By 21 days of age in the P23H rat retina, there is already substantial loss of rods and reduction in rod bipolar dendrites along with reduction of metabotropic glutamate receptor 6 (mGluR6) and rod-assoc...

  5. Benzo[a]pyrene-enhanced mutagenesis by man-made mineral fibres in the lung of lamda-lacI transgenic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topinka, J; Loli, P; Hurbáková, M; Kováciková, Z; Volkovová, K; Wolff, T; Oesterle, D; Kyrtopoulos, S A; Georgiadis, P

    2006-03-20

    In an attempt to examine the interaction of man-made mineral fibres with benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), homozygous X-lacI transgenic F344 rats were intratracheally treated with rock (stone) wool RWI and glass wool MMVF 10 fibres together with B[a]P. To analyze the induction of gene mutations by fibres and B[a]P in lung, single doses of 1 and 2 mg fibres/animal or multiple doses of 2 mg fibres/animal were administered weekly on 4 consecutive weeks (total dose 8 mg/animal). B[a]P (10 mg/animal) was administered either simultaneously with fibres (for single dose treatment with fibres) or together with the last fiber treatment (for multiple dose treatment with fibres). Animals were scarified 4 weeks after the last treatment. Benzo[a]pyrene administered simultaneously with RW1 fibres exhibited a strong synergistic effect on mutagenicity, the observed mutant frequency (MF) being more than three-fold higher than the net sum of the MF induced after separate administration of both agents. Our data suggest that DNA adducts induced by simultaneous B[a]P and fiber treatment lead to a strong increase in mutatant frequencies. PMID:16375931

  6. Peptides from HLA-B27 molecules of patients with ankylosing spondylitis reveal increased glutamic acid/glutamine ratio.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stod?lková, Eva; Ivašková, E.; Sedlá?ková, M.; Pohl, J.; Votruba, Jaroslav; Man, Petr; ?apková, Jana; Ivanyi, J.; Flieger, Miroslav

    Oslo : Verlag, 2006, s. 12-12. [European Immunogenetics and Histocompatibility conference /20./. Oslo (NO), 08.06.2006-11.06.2006] R&D Projects: GA MZd 1A8631 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : sped * peptide Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  7. Nogo-A-deficient transgenic rats show deficits in higher cognitive functions, decreased anxiety and altered circadian activity patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Petrasek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Decreased levels of Nogo-A dependent signaling have been shown to affect behavior and cognitive functions. In Nogo-A knockout and knock-down laboratory rodents, behavioral alterations were observed, possibly corresponding with human neuropsychiatric diseases of neurodevelopmental origin, particularly schizophrenia. This study offers further insight into behavioral manifestations of Nogo-A knockdown in laboratory rats, focusing on spatial and non-spatial cognition, anxiety levels, circadian rhythmicity and activity patterns. Demonstrated is an impairment of cognitive functions and behavioral flexibility in a spatial active avoidance task, while non-spatial memory in a step-through avoidance task was spared. No signs of anhedonia, typical for schizophrenic patients, were observed in the animals. Some measures indicated lower anxiety levels in the Nogo-A deficient group. Circadian rhythmicity in locomotor activity was preserved in the Nogo-A-knockout rats and their circadian period (tau did not differ from controls. However, daily activity patterns were slightly altered in the knockdown animals. We conclude that a reduction of Nogo-A levels induces changes in CNS development, manifested as subtle alterations in cognitive functions, emotionality and activity patterns.

  8. Transgenic expression of CD36 in the spontaneously hypertensive rat is associated with amelioration of metabolic disturbances but has no effect on hypertension.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Musilová, Alena; Kazdová, L.; Qi, N.; Wang, J.; St. Lezin, E. S.; Kurtz, T. W.

    2003-01-01

    Ro?. 52, ?. 6 (2003), s. 681-688. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ?R GA305/00/1646; GA ?R GA301/00/1636; GA MZd NB4904 Grant ostatní: HHMI(US) 55000331 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Cd36 * dyslipidemia * transgenic SHR Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.939, year: 2003

  9. Toxicity assessment of transgenic papaya ringspot virus of 823-2210 line papaya fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Tang; Yen, Gow-Chin; Huang, Ting-Tzu; Chan, Lit-Fu; Cheng, Ying-Huey; Wu, Jhaol-Huei; Yeh, Shyi-Dong; Wang, Sheng-Yang; Liao, Jiunn-Wang

    2013-02-20

    The transgenic papaya is a valuable strategy for creating plants resistant to papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) infection and increasing production. This study was further performed to evaluate the comparative toxicity effects of the newly developed transgenic line of the fruits of two backcross transgenic papaya lines (2210 and 823) and one hybrid line (823-2210) and compare to their parent non-transgenic (TN-2) counterparts. The stability analysis of coat protein (CP) of PRSV was investigated using the digestion stability assays in simulated gastric fluid (SGF), simulated intestinal fluid (SIF), and bile salts to detect the CP fragments. Results revealed that the CP fragments were rapidly hydrolyzed in SGF and were undetectable in organs and gastrointestinal contents in rats. For the genotoxicity, three in vitro assays were conducted and exhibited that non-transgenic and backcross transgenic papaya fruits were negative. Moreover, a repeated animal feeding study was conducted by feeding 2 g/kg of body weight (bw) of non-transgenic and backcross transgenic papaya fruits for 28 days in rats. There were no biological or toxicological significances between non-transgenic and backcross transgenic papaya fruits in rats. The results demonstrated that the backcross transgenic papaya fruit can be recognized as an equivalent substitution for traditional papaya in food safety. PMID:23350793

  10. Chronic immunoneutralization of brain angiotensin-(1-12) lowers blood pressure in transgenic (mRen2)27 hypertensive rats

    OpenAIRE

    Isa, Katsunori; García-Espinosa, Maria Antonia; Arnold, Amy C.; Pirro, Nancy T.; Tommasi, Ellen N.; Ganten, Detlev; Chappell, Mark C.; Carlos M Ferrario; Diz, Debra I.

    2009-01-01

    Angiotensin-(1-12) [ANG-(1-12)] is a newly identified peptide detected in a variety of rat tissues, including the brain. To determine whether brain ANG-(1-12) participates in blood pressure regulation, we treated male adult (mRen2)27 hypertensive rats (24–28 wk of age) with Anti-ANG-(1-12) IgG or Preimmune IgG via an intracerebroventricular cannula for 14 days. Immunoneutralization of brain ANG-(1-12) lowered systolic blood pressure (?43 ± 8 mmHg on day 3 and ?26 ± 7 mmHg on day 10 from basel...

  11. Epithelial cell differentiation in normal and transgenic mouse intestinal isografts

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Transgenes consisting of segments of the rat liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) gene's 5' non-transcribed domain linked to the human growth hormone (hGH) gene (minus its regulatory elements) have provided useful tools for analyzing the mechanisms that regulate cellular and spatial differentiation of the continuously renewing gut epithelium. We have removed the jejunum from normal and transgenic fetal mice before or coincident with, cytodifferentiation of its epithelium. These segments ...

  12. Administration of 4-(?-L-rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl isothiocyanate delays disease phenotype in SOD1(G93A) rats: a transgenic model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galuppo, Maria; Giacoppo, Sabrina; Iori, Renato; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    4-(?-L-Rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl glucosinolate (glucomoringin, GMG) is a compound found in Moringa oleifera seeds. Myrosinase-catalyzed hydrolysis at neutral pH of GMG releases the biologically active compound 4-(?-L-rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl isothiocyanate (GMG-ITC). The present study was designed to test the potential therapeutic effectiveness of GMG-ITC to counteract the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using SOD1tg rats, which physiologically develops SOD1(G93A) at about 16 weeks of life, and can be considered a genetic model of disease. Rats were treated once a day with GMG (10?mg/Kg) bioactivated with myrosinase (20?µL/rat) via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection for two weeks before disease onset and the treatment was prolonged for further two weeks before the sacrifice. Immune-inflammatory markers as well as apoptotic pathway were investigated to establish whether GMG-ITC could represent a new promising tool in clinical practice to prevent ALS. Achieved data display clear differences in molecular and biological profiles between treated and untreated SOD1tg rats leading to guessing that GMG-ITC can interfere with the pathophysiological mechanisms at the basis of ALS development. Therefore, GMG-ITC produced from myrosinase-catalyzed hydrolysis of pure GMG could be a candidate for further studies aimed to assess its possible use in clinical practice for the prevention or to slow down this disease. PMID:26075221

  13. Administration of 4-(?-L-Rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl Isothiocyanate Delays Disease Phenotype in SOD1G93A Rats: A Transgenic Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    4-(?-L-Rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl glucosinolate (glucomoringin, GMG) is a compound found in Moringa oleifera seeds. Myrosinase-catalyzed hydrolysis at neutral pH of GMG releases the biologically active compound 4-(?-L-rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl isothiocyanate (GMG-ITC). The present study was designed to test the potential therapeutic effectiveness of GMG-ITC to counteract the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using SOD1tg rats, which physiologically develops SOD1G93A at about 16 weeks of life, and can be considered a genetic model of disease. Rats were treated once a day with GMG (10?mg/Kg) bioactivated with myrosinase (20?µL/rat) via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection for two weeks before disease onset and the treatment was prolonged for further two weeks before the sacrifice. Immune-inflammatory markers as well as apoptotic pathway were investigated to establish whether GMG-ITC could represent a new promising tool in clinical practice to prevent ALS. Achieved data display clear differences in molecular and biological profiles between treated and untreated SOD1tg rats leading to guessing that GMG-ITC can interfere with the pathophysiological mechanisms at the basis of ALS development. Therefore, GMG-ITC produced from myrosinase-catalyzed hydrolysis of pure GMG could be a candidate for further studies aimed to assess its possible use in clinical practice for the prevention or to slow down this disease. PMID:26075221

  14. Analysis of gene expression changes in relation to toxicity and tumorigenesis in the livers of Big Blue transgenic rats fed comfrey (Symphytum officinale)

    OpenAIRE

    Mei Nan; Guo Lei; Zhang Lu; Shi Leming; Sun Yongming; Fung Chris; Moland Carrie L; Dial Stacey L; Fuscoe James C; Chen Tao

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Comfrey is consumed by humans as a vegetable and a tea, and has been used as an herbal medicine for more than 2000 years. Comfrey, however, is hepatotoxic in livestock and humans and carcinogenic in experimental animals. Our previous study suggested that comfrey induces liver tumors by a genotoxic mechanism and that the pyrrolizidine alkaloids in the plant are responsible for mutation induction and tumor initiation in rat liver. Results In this study, we identified comfrey...

  15. Preparation of Acute Hippocampal Slices from Rats and Transgenic Mice for the Study of Synaptic Alterations during Aging and Amyloid Pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Diana M. Mathis; Furman, Jennifer L.; NORRIS, CHRISTOPHER M.

    2011-01-01

    The rodent hippocampal slice preparation is perhaps the most broadly used tool for investigating mammalian synaptic function and plasticity. The hippocampus can be extracted quickly and easily from rats and mice and slices remain viable for hours in oxygenated artificial cerebrospinal fluid. Moreover, basic electrophysisologic techniques are easily applied to the investigation of synaptic function in hippocampal slices and have provided some of the best biomarkers for cognitive impairments. T...

  16. [Analyses of virus resistance and transgenes for transgenic papaya].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang-Ming; Wei, Xiang-Dong; Chen, Dong-Hong; Lan, Chong-Yu; Zhu, Li-Min

    2003-03-01

    Virus resistance in field and molecular biological characterizations of the transgenes were analyzed for two lines of T(1) generation of transgenic papaya with the replicase mutant gene from papaya ringspot virus (PRV). The transgenic plants showed highly resistant or immune against PRV. Results indicated that the transgenes inherited to and expressed at RNA level in the progenies. PMID:15639849

  17. Peptides Eluted from HLA-B27 of Human Splenocytes and blood Cells Reveal a Partially Different Motif Compared to In Vitro Grown Cell Lines.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stod?lková, Eva; Man, Petr; Pohl, J.; Van Nguyen, D.; Vaingátová, Silvie; Ivašková, E.; Pla, M.; ?apková, J.; Sedlá?ková, M.; Ivanyi, P.; Flieger, Miroslav

    Montreal, 2004, s. 22. [International Congress of Immunology and Annual Conference of FOCIS /12./. Montreal (CA), 18.07.2004-23.07.2004] R&D Projects: GA MZd NI7327 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : hla * hla-b Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  18. Peptides eluted from HLA-B27 of human splenocytes and blood cells reveal a similar but partially different profile compared to in vitro grown cell lines.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stod?lková, Eva; Man, Petr; Pohl, J.; Nguyen, V. D.; Vaingátová, Silvie; Ivašková, E.; Pla, M.; ?apková, Jana; Sedlá?ková, M.; Ivanyi, P.; Flieger, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    Ro?. 94, - (2004), s. 261-265. ISSN 0165-2478 R&D Projects: GA MZd NI7327 Keywords : hla-b*2705 * peptide profile * lc-ms/ms analysis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.136, year: 2004

  19. HLA-B27 and gender independently determine the likelihood of a positive MRI of the sacroiliac joints in patients with early inflammatory back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Onna, M; Jurik, A G; van der Heijde, D; van Tubergen, A; Heuft-Dorenbosch, L; Landewé, R

    2011-01-01

    To describe how inflammation on MRI of the sacroiliac joints in patients with recent-onset inflammatory back pain (IBP) evolves over time, and to study determinants of activity on MRI of the sacroiliac joint.

  20. Transgenic animal models for the functional analysis of vasoactive peptides

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    M., Bader.

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The interplay of vasoactive peptide systems is an essential determinant of blood pressure regulation in mammals. While the endothelin and the renin-angiotensin systems raise blood pressure by inducing vasoconstriction and sodium retention, the kallikrein-kinin and the natriuretic-peptide systems red [...] uce arterial pressure by eliciting vasodilatation and natriuresis. Transgenic technology has proven to be very useful for the functional analysis of vasoactive peptide systems. As an outstanding example, transgenic rats overexpressing the mouse Ren-2 renin gene in several tissues become extremely hypertensive. Several other transgenic rat and mouse strains with genetic modifications of components of the renin-angiotensin system have been developed in the past decade. Moreover, in recent years gene-targeting technology was employed to produce mouse strains lacking these proteins. The established animal models as well as the main insights gained by their analysis are summarized in this review.

  1. Phytoremediation with transgenic trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peuke, A.D.; Rennenberg, H. [Inst. fuer Forstbotanik und Baumphysiologie, Professur fuer Baumphysiologie, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    In the present paper actual trends in the use of transgenic trees for phytoremediation of contaminated soils are reviewed. In this context a current field trial in which transgenic poplars with enhanced GSH synthesis and hence elevated capacity for phytochelatin production are compared with wildtype plants for the removal of heavy metals at different levels of contamination and under different climatic conditions. The studies are carried out with grey poplar (Populus tremula x P. alba), wildtype plants and plants overexpressing the gene for {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gshI) from E. coli in the cytosol. The expression of this gene in poplar leads to two- to four-fold enhanced GSH concentrations in the leaves. In greenhouse experiments under controlled conditions these transgenic poplars showed a high potential for uptake and detoxification of heavy metals and pesticides. This capacity is evaluated in field experiments. Further aims of the project are to elucidate (a) the stability of the transgene under field conditions and (b) the possibility of horizontal gene transfer to microorganisms in the rhizosphere. The results will help to assess the biosafety risk of the use of transgenic poplar for phytoremediation of soils. (orig.)

  2. Calcium electrotransfer for termination of transgene expression in muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Spanggaard, Iben

    2011-01-01

    Gene electrotransfer is expanding in clinical use, thus we have searched for an emergency procedure to stop transgene expression in case of serious adverse events. Calcium is cytotoxic at high intracellular levels, so we tested effects of calcium electrotransfer on transgene expression in muscle. A clinical grade calcium solution (20 ?l, 168 mM) was injected into transfected mouse or rat tibialis cranialis muscle. Ca(2+) uptake was quantified using calcium 45 ((45)Ca), and voltage and time between injection and pulsation were varied. Extinction of transgene expression was investigated by using both in vivo imaging of infrared fluorescent "Katushka" and erythropoietin evaluated by ELISA and hemoglobin. Histology was performed. Electrotransfer of Katushka and erythropoietin yielded significant expression. Maximal calcium uptake occurred after injection of Ca(2+) before electropulsing using eight high voltage pulses of 1000 V/cm. Using these parameters, in vivo imaging showed that transgene expression significantly decreased 4 hr after Ca(2+) electrotransfer and was eliminated within 24 hr. Similarly, serum erythropoietin was reduced by 46% at 4 hr and to control levels at 2 days. Histological analyses showed muscle damage and subsequent regeneration. Electrotransfer of isotonic CaCl(2) terminates transgenic protein expression in muscles and may be used for contingency elimination of transgene expression.

  3. Transgenic Farm Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of recombinant DNA technology has enabled scientists to isolate single genes, analyze and modify their nucleotide structure(s), make copies of these isolated genes, and insert copies of these genes into the genome of plants and animals. The transgenic technology of adding genes to li...

  4. Transgenic algae engineered for higher performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, Pat J; Anderson, Penelope S; Knight, Thomas J

    2014-10-21

    The present disclosure relates to transgenic algae having increased growth characteristics, and methods of increasing growth characteristics of algae. In particular, the disclosure relates to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and a glutamine synthetase.

  5. Targeted overexpression of androgen receptor with a liver-specific promoter in transgenic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    B Chatterjee; Song, C. S.; Jung, M H; Chen, S.; Walter, C. A.; Herbert, D. C.; Weaker, F J; Mancini, M A; Roy, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    The rodent liver displays marked age- and sex-dependent changes in androgen sensitivity due to the sexually dimorphic and temporally programmed expression of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. We have altered this normal phenotype by constitutive overexpression of the rat AR transgene in the mouse liver by targeting it via the human phenylalanine hydroxylase (hPAH) gene promoter. These transgenic animals in their heterozygous state produce an approximately 30-fold higher level of the AR in the ...

  6. Pharmacogenetic heterogeneity of transgene expression in muscle and tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attema Joline

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant adenoviruses are employed to deliver a therapeutic transgene in the liver, muscle or tumour tissue. However, to rationalise this delivery approach, the factors of variation between individuals need to be identified. It is assumed that differences between inbred strains of laboratory animals are considered to reflect differences between patients. Previously we showed that transgene expression in the liver of different rat strains was dependent on the transcription efficiency of the transgene. In the present paper we investigated if transfection of muscle and tumour tissue were also subject to such variations. Methods Variation, in transgene expression, after intramuscular gene delivery was determined in different rodent strains and gene expression in tumours was investigated in different human and rodent cell lines as well as in subcutaneously implanted rodent tumours. The molecular mechanisms involved in transgene expression were dissected using an adenovirus encoding luciferase. The luciferase activity, the viral DNA copies and the luciferase transcripts were assessed in cultured cells as well as in the tissues. Results Large differences of luciferase activity, up to 2 logs, were observed between different rodent strains after intramuscular injection of Ad Luciferase. This inter-strain variation of transgene expression was due to a difference in transcription efficiency. The transgene expression level in tumour cell lines of different tissue origin could be explained largely by the difference of infectibility to the adenovirus. In contrast, the main step responsible for luciferase activity variation, between six human breast cancer cell lines with similar phenotype, was at the transcriptional level. Conclusion Difference in transcriptional efficiency in muscles as observed between different inbred strains and between human breast cancer cell lines may be expected to occur between individual patients. This might have important consequences for clinical gene therapy. The variation between tumour types and tissues within a species are mainly at the levels of infectivity.

  7. TL transgenic mouse strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of abnormal development of the thymus of these mice, TCR ?? lineage of the T cell differentiation is disturbed and cells belonging to the TCR ?? CD4- CD8- double negative (DN) lineage become preponderant. The ?? DN cells migrate into peripheral lymphoid organs and constitute nearly 50% of peripheral T cells. Immune function of the transgenic mice is severely impaired, indicating that the ?? cells are incapable of participating in these reactions. Molecular and serological analyses of T-cell lymphomas reveal that they belong to the ?? lineage. Tg.Tlaa-3-1 mice should be useful in defining the role of TL in normal and abnormal T cell differentiation as well as in the development of T-cell lymphomas, and further they should facilitate studies on the differentiation and function of ?? T cells. We isolated T3b-TL gene from B6 mice and constructed a chimeric gene in which T3b-TL is driven by the promoter of H-2Kb. With the chimeric gene, two transgenic mouse strains, Tg. Con.3-1 and -2 have been derived in C3H background. Both strains express TL antigen in various tissues including skin. The skin graft of transgenic mice on C3H and (B6 X C3H)F1 mice were rejected. In the mice which rejected the grafts, CD8+TCR?? cytotoxic T cells (CTL) against TL antigens were recognized. The recognition of TL by CTL did not require the antigen presentation by H-2 molecules. The results indicated that TL antigen in the skin becomes a transplantation antigen and behaves like a typical allogeneic MHC class I antigen. The facts that (B6 X C3H)F1 mice rejected the skin expressing T3b-TL antigen and induced CTL that killed TL+ lymphomas of B6 origin revealed that TL antigen encoded by T3b-TL is recognized as non-self in B6 mice. Experiments are now extended to analyze immune responses to TL antigen expressed on autochthonous T cell lymphomas. (J.P.N.)

  8. Regeneration of transgenic tamarillo plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, R G; Gardner, R C

    1993-04-01

    Media were developed to regenerate shoots from leaf pieces of tamarillo (Cyphomandra betacea (Cav.) Sendtner). Shoots were derived via organogenesis and could be easily rooted and transferred to the growth chamber. Transgenic tamarillo plants were produced using the binary vector pKIWI110 in the avirulent Agrobacterium strain LBA4404. All transgenic plants were kanamycin resistant and some plants expressed the ? D-glucuronidase (gusA) reporter gene and were chlorsulfuron resistant. Molecular evidence for transformation was obtained using PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and Southern hybridization. Inheritance of the transgenic phenotypes was demonstrated in seedling progeny. PMID:24197262

  9. Wading pools and fading memories – place navigation in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    HeikkiTanila

    2012-01-01

    The Morris swim navigation task (‘water maze’) has been a primary research tools to assess hippocampal delpendent spatial learning and memory is rodents for three decades. Originally developed for rats, its application to mouse studies has been a tedious process, but nowadays there are more studies performed with the Morris swim task in mice than in rats. The task has proved to be particularly useful in demonstrating age-related memory impairment in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s dise...

  10. Temporal Expression of Mutant LRRK2 in Adult Rats Impairs Dopamine Reuptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Zhou, Cao Huang, Jianbin Tong, Weimin C Hong, Yong-Jian Liu, Xu-Gang Xia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD results from progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Most PD cases are sporadic, but some have pathogenic mutation in the individual genes. Mutation of the leucine-rich repeat kinase-2 (LRRK2 gene is associated with familial and sporadic PD, as exemplified by G2019S substitution. While constitutive expression of mutant LRRK2 in transgenic mice fails to induce neuron death, transient expression of the disease gene by viral delivery causes a substantial loss of dopaminergic neurons in mice. To further assess LRRK2 pathogenesis, we created inducible transgenic rats expressing human LRRK2 with G2019S substitution. Temporal overexpression of LRRK2G2019S in adult rats impaired dopamine reuptake by dopamine transporter (DAT and thus enhanced locomotor activity, the phenotypes that were not observed in transgenic rats constitutively expressing the gene throughout life time. Reduced DAT binding activity is an early sign of dopaminergic dysfunction in asymptomatic subjects carrying pathogenic mutation in LRRK2. Our transgenic rats recapitulated the initiation process of dopaminergic dysfunction caused by pathogenic mutation in LRRK2. Inducible transgenic approach uncovered phenotypes that may be obscured by developmental compensation in constitutive transgenic rats. Finding in inducible LRRK2 transgenic rats would guide developing effective strategy in transgenic studies: Inducible expression of transgene may induce greater phenotypes than constitutive gene expression, particularly in rodents with short life time.

  11. ALIMENTOS TRANSGÉNICOS TRANSGENIC FOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Soledad Reyes S.

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Gracias al gran avance de la tecnología, la ingeniería genética y la biología molecular, se han desarrollado los productos transgénicos. En sus inicios, los productos modificados genéticamente tenían como objeto obtener ventajas en las áreas de la agricultura y ganadería. Posteriormente esta técnica se comenzó a aplicar en el ámbito de la producción de alimentos para el consumo humano. Se ha generado mucha controversia en relación a su utilización. Esta revisión tiene por objeto revisar la información científica disponible en relación a las aplicaciones, ventajas y potenciales riesgos para la salud humana y el medio ambiente asociados al consumo de los alimentos transgénicosDue to the advancements in technology, genetic engineering and molecular biology, have develop transgenic foods. Initially, genetically modified plants were produced to confer advantages in agriculture and animal husbandry. Later this technique was applied to the production of food for human consumption, generating a great deal of controversy. This review discusses the available scientific evidence in relation to the advantages and potential risks of genetically modified foods

  12. ALIMENTOS TRANSGÉNICOS / TRANSGENIC FOODS

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    María Soledad, Reyes S.; Jaime, Rozowski N.

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Gracias al gran avance de la tecnología, la ingeniería genética y la biología molecular, se han desarrollado los productos transgénicos. En sus inicios, los productos modificados genéticamente tenían como objeto obtener ventajas en las áreas de la agricultura y ganadería. Posteriormente esta técnica [...] se comenzó a aplicar en el ámbito de la producción de alimentos para el consumo humano. Se ha generado mucha controversia en relación a su utilización. Esta revisión tiene por objeto revisar la información científica disponible en relación a las aplicaciones, ventajas y potenciales riesgos para la salud humana y el medio ambiente asociados al consumo de los alimentos transgénicos Abstract in english Due to the advancements in technology, genetic engineering and molecular biology, have develop transgenic foods. Initially, genetically modified plants were produced to confer advantages in agriculture and animal husbandry. Later this technique was applied to the production of food for human consump [...] tion, generating a great deal of controversy. This review discusses the available scientific evidence in relation to the advantages and potential risks of genetically modified foods

  13. Transgenic agriculture and environmental indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denize Dias de Carvalho

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the rapid diffusion of transgenic crops, there are still few environmental impact studies capable of supplying a conclusive scientific response in regard to its technical and economic advantages and disadvantages. Prospective scenarios were elaborated to assist environmental impact assessment, using techniques derived from SWOT (Strength, Weakness, Opportunity, Threat analysis and the DPSIR (Driving Force – human activity, Pressure, State, Impact, Response model, to evaluate the environmental indicators and the relationship between them. Control and management actions were identified, searching the integration of aspects related to the biotechnology applied to transgenic processes, biodiversity, biosafety and intellectual property. It was demonstrated that the DPSIR model is, in fact, an instrument for integrated environmental assessment and the application of the proposed methodology resulted in favorable indicators to the adoption of transgenic agriculture. The elaborated scenarios are useful to develop an Environmental Management System (EMS to agriculture.

  14. Generating Transgenic Mouse Models for Studying Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Josephine M; Marietta, Eric V; Murray, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief overview of current animal models for studying celiac disease, with a focus on generating HLA transgenic mouse models. Human Leukocyte Antigen class II molecules have been a particular target for transgenic mice due to their tight association with celiac disease, and a number of murine models have been developed which had the endogenous MHC class II genes replaced with insertions of disease susceptible HLA class II alleles DQ2 or DQ8. Additionally, transgenic mice that overexpress interleukin-15 (IL-15), a key player in the inflammatory cascade that leads to celiac disease, have also been generated to model a state of chronic inflammation. To explore the contribution of specific bacteria in gluten-sensitive enteropathy, the nude mouse and rat models have been studied in germ-free facilities. These reductionist mouse models allow us to address single factors thought to have crucial roles in celiac disease. No single model has incorporated all of the multiple factors that make up celiac disease. Rather, these mouse models can allow the functional interrogation of specific components of the many stages of, and contributions to, the pathogenic mechanisms that will lead to gluten-dependent enteropathy. Overall, the tools for animal studies in celiac disease are many and varied, and provide ample space for further creativity as well as to characterize the complete and complex pathogenesis of celiac disease. PMID:26498609

  15. The rat as an animal model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Kloskowska, Ewa; Winblad, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    As a disease model, the laboratory rat has contributed enormously to neuroscience research over the years. It has also been a popular animal model for Alzheimer's disease but its popularity has diminished during the last decade, as techniques for genetic manipulation in rats have lagged behind that of mice. In recent years, the rat has been making a comeback as an Alzheimer's disease model and the appearance of increasing numbers of transgenic rats will be a welcome and valuable complement to th...

  16. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  17. Transgenic crop-mite interactions.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemek, Rostislav

    France : IOBC/WPRS, 2007 - (Weintraub, P.), s. 155-160 ISBN 92-9067-200-3. [Meeting of IOBC study group "Integrated Control of Plant-feeding Mites". Jerusalem (IL), 12.03.2007-14.03.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ?R IAA6007303 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : GMO * transgenic plants * mites Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection

  18. Transgenic trees and forestry biosafety

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Sofía, Valenzuela; Claudio, Balocchi; Jaime, Rodríguez.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The benefits from the development of transgenic trees are expected from the improvement of traits as growth and form, wood quality, industrial processes, disease and insect resistance, herbicide tolerance, ecological restoration, rooting ability, etc. One of the first reported field trials with gene [...] tically modified forest trees was established in Belgium in 1988 and the characteristic evaluated was herbicide tolerance in poplars. Since then, there have been more than 200 reported trials, involving at least 15 forest species. The majority of the field trials have been carried out in the USA (64%). More than 50% of the field trials are done with Populus species and the main target traits are herbicide tolerance (31%), followed by marker genes (23%) and insect resistance (14%). Until today, there is only one report on commercial-scale production of transgenic forest trees which is Populus nigra with the Bt gene release in China in 2002 and established on commercial plantations in 2003. Operational application of GMO's in forestry depends on technical, economical, political and public aspects, but the development of adequate regulatory frameworks and public acceptance of transgenic trees will define the future of this technology in forestry.

  19. Differential transgene expression in brain cells in vivo and in vitro from AAV-2 vectors with small transcriptional control units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeno-associated- (AAV) based vectors are promising tools for gene therapy applications in several organs, including the brain, but are limited by their small genome size. Two short promoters, the human synapsin 1 gene promoter (hSYN) and the murine cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter (mCMV), were evaluated in bicistronic AAV-2 vectors for their expression profiles in cultured primary brain cells and in the rat brain. Whereas transgene expression from the hSYN promoter was exclusively neuronal, the murine CMV promoter targeted expression mainly to astrocytes in vitro and showed weak transgene expression in vivo in retinal and cortical neurons, but strong expression in thalamic neurons. We propose that neuron specific transgene expression in combination with enhanced transgene capacity will further substantially improve AAV based vector technology

  20. Will transgenic plants adversely affect the environment?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vassili V Velkov; Alexander B Medvinsky; Mikhail S Sokolov; Anatoly I Marchenko

    2005-09-01

    Transgenic insecticidal plants based on Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) endotoxins, on proteinase inhibitors and on lectins, and transgenic herbicide tolerant plants are widely used in modern agriculture. The results of the studies on likelihood and non-likelihood of adverse effects of transgenic plants on the environment including: (i) effects on nontarget species; (ii) invasiveness; (iii) potential for transgenes to ‘escape’ into the environment by horizontal gene transfer; and (iv) adverse effects on soil biota are reviewed. In general, it seems that large-scale implementation of transgenic insecticidal and herbicide tolerant plants do not display considerable negative effects on the environments and, moreover, at least some transgenic plants can improve the corresponding environments and human health because their production considerably reduces the load of chemical insecticides and herbicides.

  1. Transgenic Spodoptera exigua: possibilities for their use

    OpenAIRE

    Gerritsen, L.J.M.; Visser, J.H.; Jongsma, M A

    2002-01-01

    Transgenic Spodoptera exigua are being developed by microinjection of a piggyBac vector. The vector expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the actin promoter. Forty percent of the first-instar larvae that hatched from the injected eggs were green fluorescent. However, after backcrossing none of the G1 first-instar larvae was fluorescent and a transgenic line could not be established. Several possibilities for the use of transgenic insects are discussed

  2. Dynamics of cell proliferation and cell death during the emergence of primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the immature central nervous system in transgenic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Fung, K. M.; Lee, V. M.; Trojanowski, J. Q.

    1995-01-01

    Cell proliferation and cell death play critical roles in embryonic development, postnatal tissue maintenance, and tumor formation. To understand the interplay between cell proliferation and death in tumor formation, we studied these two processes in nascent primitive neuroectodermal tumors that arose postnatally from neuroepithelial cells ventral to the median eminence of transgenic mice (designated rTH-Tag mice) carrying a Simian virus 40 large T antigen transgene driven by a rat tyrosine hy...

  3. Improving expression of reporter transgene in stem cell by construction of different lentiviral vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For stem cell trafficking applications, it is imperative to express transgenes at desired and stable levels. In recent years, lentivirus-mediated gene transfer was shown to be an efficient method to stably introduce genetic modifications in target cells, even if these are in proliferative or nonproliferative states. Moreover, transgene expression levels can be controlled by using different promoters. The present study was designed to compare the potency of various promoters regulating expression of imaging reporter genes in embryonic H9c2 cardiomyoblasts derived from rat heart. Lentiviral vector was produced by the transient transfection of plasmids carrying required genes and those encoding for virus coating proteins into 293T cells. Harvested viral constructs were incubated with Hela and H9c2 cells, respectively. Transgene expressions were detected by several imaging modalities and evaluated by enzymatic assays. Results - We observed that the level of stable transgene expression in lentivirus-transduced myoblasts could be modulated over several orders of magnitude, with the Ubiquitin (Ub) promoter exhibiting the highest activity, intermediate expression was observed with the CAG promoter, whereas expression observed with the CMV promoter was very weak. We observed that the level of stable transgene expression in lentivirus-transduced myoblasts could be modulated over several orders of magnitude, with the Ubiquitin (Ub) promoter exhibiting the highest activity, intermediate expression was observed with the CAG promoter, whereas expression observed with the CMV promoter was very weak. Here we show that lentivirus-mediated gene transfer allows efficient and stable transgene expression in embryonic cardiomyoblasts in vitro and that transgene expression levels can be varied by using different well-characterized gene promoters. In vivo trials about gene expression will probably further determine the potential of long-term trafficking stem cells using lentivirus

  4. Improving expression of reporter transgene in stem cell by construction of different lentiviral vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tae, Seong Ho; Min, Jung Joon [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Le, Uyenchi N.; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman [Singapore Bio-Imaging Imaging Consortium, Singapore (Singapore)

    2007-07-01

    For stem cell trafficking applications, it is imperative to express transgenes at desired and stable levels. In recent years, lentivirus-mediated gene transfer was shown to be an efficient method to stably introduce genetic modifications in target cells, even if these are in proliferative or nonproliferative states. Moreover, transgene expression levels can be controlled by using different promoters. The present study was designed to compare the potency of various promoters regulating expression of imaging reporter genes in embryonic H9c2 cardiomyoblasts derived from rat heart. Lentiviral vector was produced by the transient transfection of plasmids carrying required genes and those encoding for virus coating proteins into 293T cells. Harvested viral constructs were incubated with Hela and H9c2 cells, respectively. Transgene expressions were detected by several imaging modalities and evaluated by enzymatic assays. Results - We observed that the level of stable transgene expression in lentivirus-transduced myoblasts could be modulated over several orders of magnitude, with the Ubiquitin (Ub) promoter exhibiting the highest activity, intermediate expression was observed with the CAG promoter, whereas expression observed with the CMV promoter was very weak. We observed that the level of stable transgene expression in lentivirus-transduced myoblasts could be modulated over several orders of magnitude, with the Ubiquitin (Ub) promoter exhibiting the highest activity, intermediate expression was observed with the CAG promoter, whereas expression observed with the CMV promoter was very weak. Here we show that lentivirus-mediated gene transfer allows efficient and stable transgene expression in embryonic cardiomyoblasts in vitro and that transgene expression levels can be varied by using different well-characterized gene promoters. In vivo trials about gene expression will probably further determine the potential of long-term trafficking stem cells using lentivirus.

  5. Lactase gene promoter fragments mediate differential spatial and temporal expression patterns in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi; Maravelias, Charalambos; Sibley, Eric

    2006-04-01

    Lactase gene expression is spatiotemporally regulated during mammalian gut development. We hypothesize that distinct DNA control regions specify appropriate spatial and temporal patterning of lactase gene expression. In order to define regions of the lactase promoter involved in mediating intestine-specific and spatiotemporal restricted expression, transgenic mice harboring 100 bp, 1.3- and 2.0- kb fragments of the 5' flanking region of the rat lactase gene cloned upstream of a luciferase reporter were characterized. The 100-bp lactase promoter-reporter transgenic mouse line expressed maximal luciferase activity in the intestine with a posterior shift in spatial restriction and ectopic expression in the stomach and lung. The temporal pattern of expression mediated by the 1.3-kb promoter?reporter transgene increases with postnatal maturation in contrast with the postnatal decline mediated by the 2.0-kb promoter-reporter transgene and the endogenous lactase gene. The differential transgene expression patterns mediated by the lactase promoter fragments suggests that intestine-specific spatial and temporal control elements reside in distinct regions of the DNA sequences upstream of the lactase gene transcription start-site. PMID:16629594

  6. Combining M-FISH and Quantum Dot technology for fast chromosomal assignment of transgenic insertions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Mohammed

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical mapping of transgenic insertions by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH is a reliable and cost-effective technique. Chromosomal assignment is commonly achieved either by concurrent G-banding or by a multi-color FISH approach consisting of iteratively co-hybridizing the transgenic sequence of interest with one or more chromosome-specific probes at a time, until the location of the transgenic insertion is identified. Results Here we report a technical development for fast chromosomal assignment of transgenic insertions at the single cell level in mouse and rat models. This comprises a simplified 'single denaturation mixed hybridization' procedure that combines multi-color karyotyping by Multiplex FISH (M-FISH, for simultaneous and unambiguous identification of all chromosomes at once, and the use of a Quantum Dot (QD conjugate for the transgene detection. Conclusions Although the exploitation of the unique optical properties of QD nanocrystals, such as photo-stability and brightness, to improve FISH performance generally has been previously investigated, to our knowledge this is the first report of a purpose-designed molecular cytogenetic protocol in which the combined use of QDs and standard organic fluorophores is specifically tailored to assist gene transfer technology.

  7. Transgenic mouse model for skin malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, M; Takahashi, M; Akhand, A A; Liu, W; Dai, Y; Shimizu, S; Iwamoto, T; Suzuki, H; Nakashima, I

    1998-10-01

    We report here on a novel metallothionein-I (MT)/ret transgenic mouse line in which skin melanosis, benign melanocytic tumor and malignant melanoma metastasizing to distant organs develop stepwise. The process of tumor development and its malignant transformation in this line may resemble that of the human giant congenital melanocytic nevus that is present at birth and that frequently gives rise to malignant melanoma during aging. We observed an increase in the expression level and activity of the ret transgene during the disease progression. That increase in transgene expression accompanied an activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and c-Jun as well as matrix metalloproteinases. These results suggest that progressive dysregulation of the expression level of the ret transgene might play a crucial role in the malignant transformation of melanocytic tumors developed in the MT/ret transgenic mouse line. PMID:9778055

  8. Glyphostate-drift but not herbivory alters the rate of transgene flow from single and stacked trait transgenic canola (Brassica napus L.) to non-transgenic B. napus and B. rapa

    Science.gov (United States)

    While transgenic plants can offer agricultural benefits, the escape of transgenes out of crop fields is a major environmental concern. Escape of transgenic herbicide resistance has occurred between transgenic Brassica napus (canola) and weedy species in numerous locations. In t...

  9. Comparison of nutritional value of transgenic peanut expressing bar and rcg3 genes with non-transgenic counterparts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transgenic peanut plants expressing bar and rcg3 genes were subjected to assessment of any change in nutritional value of the crop at various locations. The protein and fat contents of transgenic lines were compared with the non-transgenic parent varieties. Protein content in the transgenic lines was higher as compared to that in non-transgenic counterparts and differences among locations for fat and protein content were significant. No differences among fatty acids were recorded for genes, events and locations. Irrespective of small differences, all the values were in range described for this crop and transgenic lines appeared to be substantially equivalent to non-transgenic parent varieties. (author)

  10. Disease-associated polymorphisms in ERAP1 do not alter endoplasmic reticulum stress in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, T J; Lau, M C; Keith, P; Ciccia, F; Costello, M-E; Bradbury, L; Low, P-L; Agrawal, N; Triolo, G; Alessandro, R; Robinson, P C; Thomas, G P; Brown, M A

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which human leukocyte antigen B27 (HLA-B27) contributes to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) remains unclear. Genetic studies demonstrate that association with and interaction between polymorphisms of endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) and HLA-B27 influence the risk of AS. It has been hypothesised that ERAP1-mediated HLA-B27 misfolding increases endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, driving an interleukin (IL) 23-dependent, pro-inflammatory immune response. We tested the hypothesis that AS-risk ERAP1 variants increase ER-stress and concomitant pro-inflammatory cytokine production in HLA-B27(+) but not HLA-B27(-) AS patients or controls. Forty-nine AS cases and 22 healthy controls were grouped according to HLA-B27 status and AS-associated ERAP1 rs30187 genotypes: HLA-B27(+)ERAP1(risk), HLA-B27(+)ERAP1(protective), HLA-B27(-)ERAP1(risk) and HLA-B27(-)ERAP1(protective). Expression levels of ER-stress markers GRP78 (8?kDa glucose-regulated protein), CHOP (C/EBP-homologous protein) and inflammatory cytokines were determined in peripheral blood mononuclear cell and ileal biopsies. We found no differences in ER-stress gene expression between HLA-B27(+) and HLA-B27(-) cases or healthy controls, or between cases or controls stratified by carriage of ERAP1 risk or protective alleles in the presence or absence of HLA-B27. No differences were observed between expression of IL17A or TNF (tumour necrosis factor) in HLA-B27(+)ERAP1(risk), HLA-B27(+)ERAP1(protective) and HLA-B27(-)ERAP1(protective) cases. These data demonstrate that aberrant ERAP1 activity and HLA-B27 carriage does not alter ER-stress levels in AS, suggesting that ERAP1 and HLA-B27 may influence disease susceptibility through other mechanisms. PMID:25354578

  11. Strategies for antiviral resistance in transgenic plants

    OpenAIRE

    Prins, M.W.; Laimer, M; Noris, E.; Schubert, J.; Wassenegger, M.; Tepfer, M.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic engineering offers a means of incorporating new virus resistance traits into existing desirable plant cultivars. The initial attempts to create transgenes conferring virus resistance were based on the pathogen-derived resistance concept. The expression of the viral coat protein gene in transgenic plants was shown to induce protective effects similar to classical cross protection, and was therefore distinguished as 'coat-protein-mediated' protection. Since then, a large variety of vira...

  12. Transgenic Mouse Technology: Principles and Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, T Rajendra; Larson, Melissa; Wang, Huizhen; McDermott, Jeff; Bronshteyn, Illya

    2009-01-01

    Introduction of foreign DNA into the mouse germ line is considered a major technical advancement in the fields of developmental biology and genetics. This technology now referred to as transgenic mouse technology has revolutionized virtually all fields of biology and provided new genetic approaches to model many human diseases in a whole animal context. Several hundreds of transgenic lines with expression of foreign genes specifically targeted to desired organelles/cells/tissues have been cha...

  13. Transgenic Wheat, Barley and Oats: Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunwell, Jim M.

    Following the success of transgenic maize and rice, methods have now been developed for the efficient introduction of genes into wheat, barley and oats. This review summarizes the present position in relation to these three species, and also uses information from field trial databases and the patent literature to assess the future trends in the exploitation of transgenic material. This analysis includes agronomic traits and also discusses opportunities in expanding areas such as biofuels and biopharming.

  14. Transgenic animals and their application in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagle TR, Kunkulol RR, Baig MS, More SY

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transgenic animals are animals that are genetically altered to have traits that mimic symptoms of specific human pathologies. They provide genetic models of various human diseases which are important in understanding disease and developing new targets. In early 1980 Gordon and co-workers described the first gene addition experiment using the microinjection technology and since then the impact of transgenic technology on basic research has been significant. Within 20 years of its inception, ATryn the first drug approved by USFDA from transgenic animals was developed and it has opened door to drugs from transgenic animals. In addition, they are looked upon as potential future donors for xenotransplantation. With increasing knowledge about the genetics and improvements in the transgenetic technology numerous useful applications like biologically safe new-generation drugs based on human regulatory proteins are being developed.Various aspects of concern in the coming years are the regulatory guidelines, ethical issues and patents related to the use of transgenic animals. This modern medicine is on the threshold of a pharmacological revolution. Use of transgenic animals will provide solutions for drug research, xenotransplantation, clinical trials and will prove to be a new insight in drug development.

  15. TRANSGENIC FISH MODEL IN ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Sharma

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A number of experiments and the use of drugs have been performed in fish. The fish may be used as model organism in various biological experiments, including environmental toxicology. Aquatic animals are being engineered to increase aquaculture production, for medical and industrial research, and for ornamental reasons. Fish have been found to play an important role in assessing potential risks associated with exposure to toxic substances in aquatic environment. Hence, it has been thought that the development of transgenic fish can enhance the use of fish in environmental toxicology. India has developed experimental transgenics of rohu fish, zebra fish, cat fish and singhi fish. Genes, promoters and vectors of indigenous origin are now available for only two species namely rohu and singhi for engineering growth. Development of fish model carrying identical transgenes to those found in rodents is beneficial and has shown that several aspects of in vivo mutagenesis are similar between the two classes of vertebrates. Fish shows the frequencies of spontaneous mutations similar to rodents and respond to mutagen exposure consistent with known mutagenic mechanisms. The feasibility of in vivo mutation analysis using transgenic fish has been demonstrated and the potential value of transgenic fish as a comparative animal model has been illustrated. Therefore, the transgenic fish can give the significant contribution to study the environmental toxicity in animals as a whole.

  16. Selenoprotein-Transgenic Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiazuan Ni

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se deficiency is associated with the occurrence of many diseases. However, excessive Se supplementation, especially with inorganic Se, can result in toxicity. Selenoproteins are the major forms of Se in vivo to exert its biological function. Expression of those selenoproteins, especially with the application of a newly developed system, is thus very important for studying the mechanism of Se in nutrition. The use of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (C. reinhardtii as a biological vector to express an heterogeneous protein is still at the initial stages of development. In order to investigate the possibility of using this system to express selenoproteins, human 15-KDa selenoprotein (Sep15, a small but widely distributed selenoprotein in mammals, was chosen for the expression platform test. Apart from the wild-type human Sep15 gene fragment, two Sep15 recombinants were constructed containing Sep15 open reading frame (ORF and the selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS element from either human Sep15 or C. reinhardtii selenoprotein W1, a highly expressed selenoprotein in this alga. Those Sep15-containing plasmids were transformed into C. reinhardtii CC-849 cells. Results showed that Sep15 fragments were successfully inserted into the nuclear genome and expressed Sep15 protein in the cells. The transgenic and wild-type algae demonstrated similar growth curves in low Se culture medium. To our knowledge, this is the first report on expressing human selenoprotein in green alga.

  17. Rosuvastatin Can Block Pro-Inflammatory Actions of Transgenic Human C-Reactive Protein Without Reducing its Circulating Levels.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šilhavý, Jan; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Šimáková, Miroslava; Mlejnek, Petr; Škop, V.; Oliyarnyk, O.; Kazdová, L.; Mancini, M.; Saar, K.; Schulz, H.; Hübner, N.; Kurtz, T. W.; Pravenec, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 32, ?. 2 (2014), s. 59-65. ISSN 1755-5914 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204; GA ?R(CZ) GA13-04420S; GA MZd(CZ) NT14325; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10067 Grant ostatní: MH CZ - DRO(CZ) IN0002301 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : C-reactive protein * transgenic * spontaneously hypertensive rat * rosuvastatin Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.362, year: 2014

  18. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade improves diastolic function independent of blood pressure reduction in a transgenic model of RAAS overexpression

    OpenAIRE

    Habibi, Javad; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Ma, Lixin; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Rainey, William E.; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Sowers, James R.

    2011-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that aldosterone can promote diastolic dysfunction and cardiac fibrosis independent of blood pressure effects, perhaps through increased oxidative stress and inflammation. Accordingly, this investigation was designed to ascertain if mineralocorticoid receptor blockade improves diastolic dysfunction independently of changes in blood pressure through actions on myocardial oxidative stress and fibrosis. We used young transgenic (mRen2)27 [TG(mRen2)27] rats with increas...

  19. Toxins for Transgenic Resistance to Hemipteran Pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryony C. Bonning

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The sap sucking insects (Hemiptera, which include aphids, whiteflies, plant bugs and stink bugs, have emerged as major agricultural pests. The Hemiptera cause direct damage by feeding on crops, and in some cases indirect damage by transmission of plant viruses. Current management relies almost exclusively on application of classical chemical insecticides. While the development of transgenic crops expressing toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt has provided effective plant protection against some insect pests, Bt toxins exhibit little toxicity against sap sucking insects. Indeed, the pest status of some Hemiptera on Bt-transgenic plants has increased in the absence of pesticide application. The increased pest status of numerous hemipteran species, combined with increased prevalence of resistance to chemical insecticides, provides impetus for the development of biologically based, alternative management strategies. Here, we provide an overview of approaches toward transgenic resistance to hemipteran pests.

  20. Advancing environmental risk assessment for transgenic biofeedstock crops

    OpenAIRE

    Wolt Jeffrey D

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Transgenic modification of plants is a key enabling technology for developing sustainable biofeedstocks for biofuels production. Regulatory decisions and the wider acceptance and development of transgenic biofeedstock crops are considered from the context of science-based risk assessment. The risk assessment paradigm for transgenic biofeedstock crops is fundamentally no different from that of current generation transgenic crops, except that the focus of the assessment must consider t...

  1. Genomic stability and long-term transgene expression in poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fladung, Matthias; Hoenicka, Hans; Raj Ahuja, M

    2013-12-01

    Stable expression of foreign genes over the entire life span of a plant is important for long-lived organisms such as trees. For transgenic forest trees, very little information is available on long-term transgene expression and genomic stability. Independent transgenic lines obtained directly after transformation are initially screened in respect to T-DNA integration and transgene expression. However, very little consideration has been given to long-term transgene stability in long-lived forest trees. We have investigated possible genome wide changes following T-DNA integration as well as long-term stability of transgene expression in different transgenic lines of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides) that are up to 19 years old. For studies on possible genome wide changes following T-DNA integration, four different independent rolC-transgenic lines were subjected to an extensive AFLP study and compared to the non-transgenic control line. Only minor genomic changes following T-DNA integration could be detected. To study long-term transgene expression, six different independent rolC-transgenic lines produced in 1993 and since that time have been kept continuously under in vitro conditions. In addition, 18 transgenic plants belonging to eight independent rolC-transgenic lines transferred to glasshouse between 1994 and 2004 were chosen to determine the presence and expression of the rolC gene. In all transgenic lines examined, the rolC gene could successfully be amplified by PCR tests. Both, the 19 years old tissue cultures and the up to 18 years old glasshouse-grown trees revealed expression of the rolC transgene, as demonstrated by the rolC-phenotype and/or northern blot experiments confirming long-term transgene expression. PMID:23740206

  2. Postmortem findings in cloned and transgenic piglets dead before weaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Mette; Winther, K.D.; Secher, Jan Ole Bertelsen; Callesen, H.

    2015-01-01

    Important factors contributing to the well-known high mortality of piglets produced by SCNT are gross malformations of vital organs. The aim of the present retrospective study was to describe malformations found in cloned piglets, transgenic or not, dying or culled before weaning on Day 28. Large White (LW) embryos were transferred to 78 LW recipients, while 72 recipients received Göttingen embryos (67 transgenic and five not transgenic) and 56 received Yucatan embryos (43 transgenic and 13 not ...

  3. Transgenic cultures: from the economic viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Mosquera

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of transgenic seeds for agricultural purposes poses modification to their production, due to the potential for reaching desired characteristics such as greater yield, this being fundamental in an economic environment characterised by open market conditions. However, acceptance of products resulting from genetic engineering is far from becoming a simple process; discussion relating to the predominance of private sector interests, the monopoly of knowledge and the safety of such seeds/food is currently in the spotlight. This article presents the main points of debate regarding adoption of transgenic cultures, contributing to discussion about this topic for Colombia.

  4. Comparative metallomics of transgenic and non-transgenic soybeans using HPLC-ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. In the last years, many soybean varieties have been developed, and due to these modifications, the proteins composition and profile can be affected, causing changes in the species proteome (S. Natarajan et al., Anal. Biochem., 342 (2005), 214-220.). With the proteome modifications, the metallome of this specie, defined as the total content of metals and metalloids in a cell or tissue (J. Spuznar, Analyst, 130 (2005), 442-465.), can also be affected (A. Sussulini et al., J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 22 (2007), 1501-1506.). So, the aim of this work is to amplify the information about the transgenic and non-transgenic soybeans metallome, and doing that we expect to find biomarkers that can differentiate the transgenic and non-transgenic soybeans physiologically. For that purpose a SEC column (GE Healthcare, model Superdex 200) was employed for the separation of the proteins, which were extracted using the mobile phase of the chromatographic system (90 mmol.L-1 phosphate buffer - pH 7.2). After the chromatographic separation, the eluate was passed through a DAD Series 200 detector (PerkinElmer), the fractions were collected and latter introduced into the ICP-MS (PerkinElmer, model ELANDRC-e) for the element-selective detection. The calibration of the column using purified proteins of known molecular weight allowed the calculation of the approximate masses of the eight fractions (1800-800 kDa; 800-420 kDa; 420-120 kDa; 100-23 kDa; 23-7 kDa; 7-2 kDa; 2-0.4 kDa and 0.4-0.2 kDa, respectively) identified in the transgenic and non-transgenic soybeans after 95 min of separation using a flow rate of 0.25 mL.min-1. A wide range of elements could be identified in all the fractions, including: Cu, Zn, Mn, Mg, Ni, Cr, Hg, Fe and Pb. Differences in the detectability of elements in the transgenic and non-transgenic soybeans were found, specially for Hg where the counts were two times higher in the transgenic soybean. Elements were found in the two samples that were not common for both of them, such as Sr identified only in fraction 2 of the non-transgenic soybean and Th in fraction 4 of the transgenic soybean. Financial support from Fundacao de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado de Sao Paulo - FAPESP and Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Cientifico e Tecnologico - CNPq are highly acknowledged.

  5. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  6. DEREGULATION OF TRANSGENIC PAPAYA FOR JAPAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    The transgenic SunUp and Rainbow papaya developed for Hawaii was commercialized in 1998 and virtually saved Hawaii’s papaya industry from further damage being caused by papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). Since Japan makes up a significant part (about 35% in 1992) in Hawaii’s papaya export market, effort...

  7. Metal resistance sequences and transgenic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Richard Brian (Athens, GA); Summers, Anne O. (Athens, GA); Rugh, Clayton L. (Athens, GA)

    1999-10-12

    The present invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding a metal ion resistance protein, which are expressible in plant cells. The metal resistance protein provides for the enzymatic reduction of metal ions including but not limited to divalent Cu, divalent mercury, trivalent gold, divalent cadmium, lead ions and monovalent silver ions. Transgenic plants which express these coding sequences exhibit increased resistance to metal ions in the environment as compared with plants which have not been so genetically modified. Transgenic plants with improved resistance to organometals including alkylmercury compounds, among others, are provided by the further inclusion of plant-expressible organometal lyase coding sequences, as specifically exemplified by the plant-expressible merB coding sequence. Furthermore, these transgenic plants which have been genetically modified to express the metal resistance coding sequences of the present invention can participate in the bioremediation of metal contamination via the enzymatic reduction of metal ions. Transgenic plants resistant to organometals can further mediate remediation of organic metal compounds, for example, alkylmetal compounds including but not limited to methyl mercury, methyl lead compounds, methyl cadmium and methyl arsenic compounds, in the environment by causing the freeing of mercuric or other metal ions and the reduction of the ionic mercury or other metal ions to the less toxic elemental mercury or other metals.

  8. Progress in Xenotransplantation Research Employing Transgenic Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Niemann

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Microinjection of foreign DNA into pronuclei of a fertilized oocyte has predominantly been used for the generation of transgenic livestock. This technology works reliably, but is inefficient and results in random integration and variable expression patterns in the transgenic offspring. Nevertheless, remarkable achievements have been made with this technology with regard to xenotransplantation. Transgenic pigs that express human complement regulating proteins have been tested in their ability to serve as donors in human organ transplantation (i.e. xenotransplantation. In vitro and in vivo data convincingly show that the hyperacute rejection response can be overcome in a clinically acceptable manner by successfully employing this strategy. The recent developments in nuclear transfer and its merger with the growing genomic data allow targeted and regulatable transgenesis. Systems for efficient homologous recombination in somatic cells are being developed and the first knock-out pigs, carrying a deletion in the a-galactosyltransferase gene, were recently generated. It is anticipated that poly-transgenic pigs will be available as donors for functional xenografts within a few years. Similarly, pigs may serve as donors for a variety of xenogenic cells and tissues. The availability of these technologies is essential to maintain "genetic security" and to ensure absence of unwanted side effects.

  9. CSF phospho-tau correlates with behavioural decline and brain insoluble phospho-tau levels in a rat model of tauopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Zilka, Norbert; Korenova, Miroslava; Kovacech, Branislav; Iqbal, Khalid; Novak, Michal

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the relationship between progressive neurobehavioural decline and phospho-tau levels (p-tau181) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the brain in transgenic rats expressing human truncated tau protein. Behavioural analyses, as quantified using the NeuroScale scoring method, revealed that the transgenic rats fell into two main groups based on the baseline behavioural functioning: (1) mild neurobehavioural impairment (MNI, score 3.3–26) and (2) sever...

  10. Activation of Thiazide-Sensitive Co-Transport by Angiotensin II in the cyp1a1-Ren2 Hypertensive Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Ashek, Ali; Menzies, Robert I; Mullins, Linda J.; Bellamy, Christopher O.C.; Harmar, Anthony J; Kenyon, Christopher J.; Flatman, Peter W.; Mullins, John J.; Matthew A. Bailey

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic rats with inducible expression of the mouse Ren2 gene were used to elucidate mechanisms leading to the development of hypertension and renal injury. Ren2 transgene activation was induced by administration of a naturally occurring aryl hydrocarbon, indole-3-carbinol (100 mg/kg/day by gastric gavage). Blood pressure and renal parameters were recorded in both conscious and anesthetized (butabarbital sodium; 120 mg/kg IP) rats at selected time-points during the development of hypertens...

  11. Temporal and spatial patterns of transgene expression in aging adult mice provide insights about the origins, organization, and differentiation of the intestinal epithelium.

    OpenAIRE

    Cohn, S. M.; Roth, K A; Birkenmeier, E. H.; Gordon, J I

    1991-01-01

    We have used liver fatty acid-binding protein/human growth hormone (L-FABP/hGH) fusion genes to explore the temporal and spatial differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells in 1- to 12-month-old transgenic mice. The intact, endogenous L-FABP gene (Fabpl) was not expressed in the colon at any time. Young adult transgenic mice containing nucleotides -596 to +21 of the rat L-FABP gene linked to the hGH gene (minus its 5' nontranscribed domain) demonstrated inappropriate expression of hGH in e...

  12. Green tea polyphenols control dysregulated glutamate dehydrogenase in transgenic mice by hijacking the ADP activation site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changhong; Li, Ming; Chen, Pan; Narayan, Srinivas; Matschinsky, Franz M; Bennett, Michael J; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2011-09-30

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate and, in animals, is extensively regulated by a number of metabolites. Gain of function mutations in GDH that abrogate GTP inhibition cause the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome (HHS), resulting in increased pancreatic ?-cell responsiveness to leucine and susceptibility to hypoglycemia following high protein meals. We have previously shown that two of the polyphenols from green tea (epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate (ECG)) inhibit GDH in vitro and that EGCG blocks GDH-mediated insulin secretion in wild type rat islets. Using structural and site-directed mutagenesis studies, we demonstrate that ECG binds to the same site as the allosteric regulator, ADP. Perifusion assays using pancreatic islets from transgenic mice expressing a human HHS form of GDH demonstrate that the hyperresponse to glutamine caused by dysregulated GDH is blocked by the addition of EGCG. As observed in HHS patients, these transgenic mice are hypersensitive to amino acid feeding, and this is abrogated by oral administration of EGCG prior to challenge. Finally, the low basal blood glucose level in the HHS mouse model is improved upon chronic administration of EGCG. These results suggest that this common natural product or some derivative thereof may prove useful in controlling this genetic disorder. Of broader clinical implication is that other groups have shown that restriction of glutamine catabolism via these GDH inhibitors can be useful in treating various tumors. This HHS transgenic mouse model offers a highly useful means to test these agents in vivo. PMID:21813650

  13. Green Tea Polyphenols Control Dysregulated Glutamate Dehydrogenase in Transgenic Mice by Hijacking the ADP Activation Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Changhong; Li, Ming; Chen, Pan; Narayan, Srinivas; Matschinsky, Franz M.; Bennett, Michael J.; Stanley, Charles A.; Smith, Thomas J. (CH-PA); (UPENN); (Danforth)

    2012-05-09

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate and, in animals, is extensively regulated by a number of metabolites. Gain of function mutations in GDH that abrogate GTP inhibition cause the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome (HHS), resulting in increased pancreatic {beta}-cell responsiveness to leucine and susceptibility to hypoglycemia following high protein meals. We have previously shown that two of the polyphenols from green tea (epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate (ECG)) inhibit GDH in vitro and that EGCG blocks GDH-mediated insulin secretion in wild type rat islets. Using structural and site-directed mutagenesis studies, we demonstrate that ECG binds to the same site as the allosteric regulator, ADP. Perifusion assays using pancreatic islets from transgenic mice expressing a human HHS form of GDH demonstrate that the hyperresponse to glutamine caused by dysregulated GDH is blocked by the addition of EGCG. As observed in HHS patients, these transgenic mice are hypersensitive to amino acid feeding, and this is abrogated by oral administration of EGCG prior to challenge. Finally, the low basal blood glucose level in the HHS mouse model is improved upon chronic administration of EGCG. These results suggest that this common natural product or some derivative thereof may prove useful in controlling this genetic disorder. Of broader clinical implication is that other groups have shown that restriction of glutamine catabolism via these GDH inhibitors can be useful in treating various tumors. This HHS transgenic mouse model offers a highly useful means to test these agents in vivo.

  14. A 700-bp fragment of the human antithrombin III promoter is sufficient to confer high, tissue-specific expression on human apolipoprotein A-II in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremp, G L; Duchange, N; Branellec, D; Cereghini, S; Tailleux, A; Berthou, L; Fievet, C; Touchet, N; Schombert, B; Fruchart, J C

    1995-04-24

    The human antithrombin III-encoding gene (hAT-III) promoter (phAT-III) was used to generate transgenic mice producing a human hepatic apolipoprotein, apolipoprotein A-II (hApoA-II). Integration of the transgene into the mouse genome resulted in the efficient production of hApoA-II in plasma, reaching up to 0.40 g/l in two transgenic lines. The human ApoA-II mRNA was detected at high levels, both in the liver and in the kidney of transgenic mice. The rat AT-III gene shows the same expression pattern. In contrast, as previously described, the same promoter permitted the expression of the SV40 large T antigen only in the liver of transgenic mice. In view of the extra-hepatic distribution of the ApoA-II mRNA, a preliminary characterization of the hAT-III proximal promoter (phAT-III), driving the expression of the transgene, was realized. Using DNase I footprinting analysis with liver nuclear extracts, four protected regions (I-IV) were identified in the first 175 bp of the 5' region of hAT-III. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays performed with liver and kidney nuclear extracts indicate that region III (nucleotides (nt) -67 to -90) interacts with the liver-enriched HNF4 nuclear factor. Furthermore, our data suggest that region I (nt -123 to -138) interacts with the liver-enriched HNF3 transcription factor family, both in liver and kidney. Taken together, these results demonstrate that phAT-III is a useful tool to create transgenic mice producing high plasma levels of a human apolipoprotein due to expression of the transgene in liver and kidney.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7758957

  15. c-MycERTAM transgene silencing in a genetically modified human neural stem cell line implanted into MCAo rodent brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heward Julie

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human neural stem cell line CTX0E03 was developed for the cell based treatment of chronic stroke disability. Derived from fetal cortical brain tissue, CTX0E03 is a clonal cell line that contains a single copy of the c-mycERTAM transgene delivered by retroviral infection. Under the conditional regulation by 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT, c-mycERTAM enabled large-scale stable banking of the CTX0E03 cells. In this study, we investigated the fate of this transgene following growth arrest (EGF, bFGF and 4-OHT withdrawal in vitro and following intracerebral implantation into a mid-cerebral artery occluded (MCAo rat brain. In vitro, 4-weeks after removing growth factors and 4-OHT from the culture medium, c-mycERTAM transgene transcription is reduced by ~75%. Furthermore, immunocytochemistry and western blotting demonstrated a concurrent decrease in the c-MycERTAM protein. To examine the transcription of the transgene in vivo, CTX0E03 cells (450,000 were implanted 4-weeks post MCAo lesion and analysed for human cell survival and c-mycERTAM transcription by qPCR and qRT-PCR, respectively. Results The results show that CTX0E03 cells were present in all grafted animal brains ranging from 6.3% to 39.8% of the total cells injected. Prior to implantation, the CTX0E03 cell suspension contained 215.7 (SEM = 13.2 copies of the c-mycERTAM transcript per cell. After implantation the c-mycERTAM transcript copy number per CTX0E03 cell had reduced to 6.9 (SEM = 3.4 at 1-week and 7.7 (SEM = 2.5 at 4-weeks. Bisulfite genomic DNA sequencing of the in vivo samples confirmed c-mycERTAM silencing occurred through methylation of the transgene promoter sequence. Conclusion In conclusion the results confirm that CTX0E03 cells downregulated c-mycERTAM transgene expression both in vitro following EGF, bFGF and 4-OHT withdrawal and in vivo following implantation in MCAo rat brain. The silencing of the c-mycERTAM transgene in vivo provides an additional safety feature of CTX0E03 cells for potential clinical application.

  16. Compensation of the AKT signaling by ERK signaling in transgenic mice hearts overexpressing TRIM72

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AKT and ERK signaling pathways are known to be involved in cell hypertrophy, proliferation, survival and differentiation. Although there is evidence for crosstalk between these two signaling pathways in cellulo, there is less evidence for cross talk in vivo. Here, we show that crosstalk between AKT and ERK signaling in the hearts of TRIM72-overexpressing transgenic mice (TRIM72-Tg) with alpha-MHC promoter regulates and maintains their heart size. TRIM72, a heart- and skeletal muscle-specific protein, downregulates AKT-mTOR signaling via IRS-1 degradation and reduces the size of rat cardiomyocytes and the size of postnatal TRIM72-Tg hearts. TRIM72 expression was upregulated by hypertrophic inducers in cardiomyocytes, while IRS-1 was downregulated by IGF-1. TRIM72 specifically regulated IGF-1-dependent AKT-mTOR signaling, resulting in a reduction of the size of cardiomyocytes. Postnatal TRIM72-Tg hearts were smaller than control-treated hearts with inhibition of AKT-mTOR signaling. However, adult TRIM72-Tg hearts were larger than of control despite the suppression of AKT-mTOR signaling. Activation of ERK, PKC-?, and JNK were observed to be elevated in adult TRIM72-Tg, and these signals were mediated by ET-1 via the ET receptors A and B. Altogether, these results suggest that AKT signaling regulates cardiac hypertrophy in physiological conditions, and ERK signaling compensates for the absence of AKT signaling during TRIM72 overexpression, leading to pathological hypertrophy. -- Highlights: • TRIM72 inhibits AKT signaling through ubiquitination of IRS-1 in cardiac cells. • TRIM72 regulates the size of cardiac cells. • TRIM72 regulates size of postnatal TRIM72-overexpressing transgenic mice hearts. • Adult TRIM72-overexpressing transgenic mice hearts showed cardiac dysfunction. • Adult TRIM72 transgenic mice hearts showed higher expression of endothelin receptors

  17. Compensation of the AKT signaling by ERK signaling in transgenic mice hearts overexpressing TRIM72

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Young-Mi, E-mail: youngmi_ham@hms.harvard.edu [College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Mahoney, Sarah Jane [Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    The AKT and ERK signaling pathways are known to be involved in cell hypertrophy, proliferation, survival and differentiation. Although there is evidence for crosstalk between these two signaling pathways in cellulo, there is less evidence for cross talk in vivo. Here, we show that crosstalk between AKT and ERK signaling in the hearts of TRIM72-overexpressing transgenic mice (TRIM72-Tg) with alpha-MHC promoter regulates and maintains their heart size. TRIM72, a heart- and skeletal muscle-specific protein, downregulates AKT-mTOR signaling via IRS-1 degradation and reduces the size of rat cardiomyocytes and the size of postnatal TRIM72-Tg hearts. TRIM72 expression was upregulated by hypertrophic inducers in cardiomyocytes, while IRS-1 was downregulated by IGF-1. TRIM72 specifically regulated IGF-1-dependent AKT-mTOR signaling, resulting in a reduction of the size of cardiomyocytes. Postnatal TRIM72-Tg hearts were smaller than control-treated hearts with inhibition of AKT-mTOR signaling. However, adult TRIM72-Tg hearts were larger than of control despite the suppression of AKT-mTOR signaling. Activation of ERK, PKC-?, and JNK were observed to be elevated in adult TRIM72-Tg, and these signals were mediated by ET-1 via the ET receptors A and B. Altogether, these results suggest that AKT signaling regulates cardiac hypertrophy in physiological conditions, and ERK signaling compensates for the absence of AKT signaling during TRIM72 overexpression, leading to pathological hypertrophy. -- Highlights: • TRIM72 inhibits AKT signaling through ubiquitination of IRS-1 in cardiac cells. • TRIM72 regulates the size of cardiac cells. • TRIM72 regulates size of postnatal TRIM72-overexpressing transgenic mice hearts. • Adult TRIM72-overexpressing transgenic mice hearts showed cardiac dysfunction. • Adult TRIM72 transgenic mice hearts showed higher expression of endothelin receptors.

  18. A multidisciplinary approach involving comparative 'OMICS' of transgenic and non-transgenic soybeam seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Soybean culture has an expressive impact in the economy of many countries, being the commercialization of its by-products, which presents many benefits in terms of health and nutritional aspects, and which also includes a fuel alternative (biodiesel), the main factor for the large soybean production. Part of this impact is due to the transgenic modification of soybean, conferring enhanced characteristics to the culture, such as tolerance to fungicides (Y. Kim et al., J. Microbiol. Biotechnol., 16 (2006), 25-31.). Due to the insertion of hexogen genes, some proteome modification is possible (S. Natarajan et al., Anal. Biochem., 342 (2005), 214-220), and recently some metallome modification was reported by our research group (A. Sussulini et al., J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 22 (2007), 1501-1506). Then, the aim of this work is to enlarge the results in terms of 'omics' when considering transgenic and non-transgenic soybean seeds. For this task, the identification of more than 140 soybean proteins using MALDI-QTOF-MS after 2D-PAGE protein separation (369±46 and 376±42 protein spots in the 4-7 pI range for transgenic and non-transgenic soybean seeds, respectively), the analysis of the protein expression using image program, the analysis of some enzymes (SOD, GR, APX, CAT) involved in the ROS production, the mapping of 80 protein spots using SR-XRF, and the metal identification of more than 30 spots using ICP-MS was carried out. In terms of metal distribution when considering some proteins, the results displayed a great ability of proteins bind different metal ions. High iron (sucrose binding protein homolog S-64 - 57,922 kDa), chromium (protein not identified), lead (seed maturation protein PM 41 - 15,103 kDa), copper and tin (trypsin inhibitor (kunitz), chain A - 20,417 kDa) contents were achieved in the non-transgenic soybean, while high magnesium (actin - 50,281 kDa), barium (protein not identified) and ruthenium (protein not identified) contents were achieved in the transgenic soybean. The results put in evidence the possibility to find a biomarker candidate for differentiating transgenic and non-transgenic organisms. Financial support from Fundacao de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado de Sao Paulo - FAPESP, Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Cientifico e Tecnologico - CNPq, Fianciadora de Estudos e Projetos - FINEP, and Proteome Network of the Sao Paulo state - Brazilian National Laboratory of Synchrotron Radiation are highly acknowledged.

  19. Transgenic animal methodologies and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, J W; Harold, G; Leila, Y

    1993-09-01

    In the past 10 years the capacity has been acquired to genetically transform mammals via insertion of genes into developmentally totipotent embryonic cells. This profound advance has impacted significantly on our understanding of basic mechanisms of gene regulation, and has enabled practitioner's of this "transgenic technology" to establish important paradigms for the genetic engineering of experimental animals and livestock. The two most powerful forms of genetic engineering to emerge from this research include the targeted expression of foreign genes, or transgenes, and the ability to target specific endogenous mouse genes for mutagenesis. In this presentation I will outline the general principles underlying this technology, and provide examples of its use in research on cancer and aging that are ongoing in our laboratory. PMID:8297811

  20. Transgenic nonhuman primates for neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Anthony WS

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Animal models that represent human diseases constitute an important tool in understanding the pathogenesis of the diseases, and in developing effective therapies. Neurodegenerative diseases are complex disorders involving neuropathologic and psychiatric alterations. Although transgenic and knock-in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD and Huntington's disease (HD have been created, limited representation in clinical aspects has been recognized and the rodent models lack true neurodegeneration. Chemical induction of HD and PD in nonhuman primates (NHP has been reported, however, the role of intrinsic genetic factors in the development of the diseases is indeterminable. Nonhuman primates closely parallel humans with regard to genetic, neuroanatomic, and cognitive/behavioral characteristics. Accordingly, the development of NHP models for neurodegenerative diseases holds greater promise for success in the discovery of diagnoses, treatments, and cures than approaches using other animal species. Therefore, a transgenic NHP carrying a mutant gene similar to that of patients will help to clarify our understanding of disease onset and progression. Additionally, monitoring disease onset and development in the transgenic NHP by high resolution brain imaging technology such as MRI, and behavioral and cognitive testing can all be carried out simultaneously in the NHP but not in other animal models. Moreover, because of the similarity in motor repertoire between NHPs and humans, it will also be possible to compare the neurologic syndrome observed in the NHP model to that in patients. Understanding the correlation between genetic defects and physiologic changes (e.g. oxidative damage will lead to a better understanding of disease progression and the development of patient treatments, medications and preventive approaches for high risk individuals. The impact of the transgenic NHP model in understanding the role which genetic disorders play in the development of efficacious interventions and medications is foreseeable.

  1. Regulation of transgene expression in genetic immunization

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    J.S., Harms; S.C., Oliveira; G.A., Splitter.

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of mammalian gene expression vectors has become increasingly important for genetic immunization and gene therapy as well as basic research. Essential for the success of these vectors in genetic immunization is the proper choice of a promoter linked to the antigen of interest. Many genetic im [...] munization vectors use promoter elements from pathogenic viruses including SV40 and CMV. Lymphokines produced by the immune response to proteins expressed by these vectors could inhibit further transcription initiation by viral promoters. Our objective was to determine the effect of IFN-g on transgene expression driven by viral SV40 or CMV promoter/enhancer and the mammalian promoter/enhancer for the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) gene. We transfected the luciferase gene driven by these three promoters into 14 cell lines of many tissues and several species. Luciferase assays of transfected cells untreated or treated with IFN-g indicated that although the viral promoters could drive luciferase production in all cell lines tested to higher or lower levels than the MHC I promoter, treatment with IFN-g inhibited transgene expression in most of the cell lines and amplification of the MHC I promoter-driven transgene expression in all cell lines. These data indicate that the SV40 and CMV promoter/enhancers may not be a suitable choice for gene delivery especially for genetic immunization or cancer cytokine gene therapy. The MHC I promoter/enhancer, on the other hand, may be an ideal transgene promoter for applications involving the immune system.

  2. Transgenic plants designed for phytoremediation purposes.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mackova, M.; Francová, K.; Pavlíková, D.; Surá, M.; Szekeres, M.; Sylvestre, M.; Száková, J.; Macek, Tomáš

    Berlin, 2003, s. 2415-2424. [International FZK/TNO Conference on Contaminated Soil /8./. Gent (BE), 12.05.2003-16.05.2003] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA526/02/0293 Grant ostatní: 5 FW EU(XE) QLK 3-CT-2001-00101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : transgenic plants * phytoremediation Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  3. Transgenic Crops: Environmental Impacts and Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Khattak, Asif Khan

    2005-01-01

    In order to have a proper regulation or an amendment enacted for a particular technology or its derived products (transgenic crops in this case), it is essential for policymakers, in my view, to have a proper understanding of contemporary scientific study pertaining to that technology or research area. Similarly, based on this perception, a review of scientific empirical data is deemed to be important to understand why the precautionary principle has been implemented in the regulatory process...

  4. Transgenic cereals: current status and future prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Dunwell, Jim M

    2014-01-01

    This review summarises the history of transgenic (GM) cereals, principally maize, and then focuses on the scientific literature published in the last two years. It describes the production of GM cereals with modified traits, divided into input traits and output traits. The first category includes herbicide tolerance and insect resistance, and resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses; the second includes altered grains for starch, protein or nutrient quality, the use of cereals for the produc...

  5. Transgenic pig carrying green fluorescent proteasomes

    OpenAIRE

    Miles, Edward L.; O’Gorman, Chad; Zhao, Jianguo; SAMUEL, MELISSA; WALTERS, ERIC; Yi, Young-Joo; Sutovsky, Miriam; Prather, Randall S; Wells, Kevin D; Sutovsky, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Among its many functions, the ubiquitin–proteasome system regulates substrate-specific proteolysis during the cell cycle, apoptosis, and fertilization and in pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, and liver cirrhosis. Proteasomes are present in human and boar spermatozoa, but little is known about the interactions of proteasomal subunits with other sperm proteins or structures. We have created a transgenic boar with green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged 20S proteasomal core subunit...

  6. Caudal dysgenesis in islet-1 transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, Yunhua Li; Yueh, Yir Gloria; Yaworsky, Paul J; Salbaum, J. Michael; Kappen, Claudia

    2003-01-01

    Maternal diabetes during pregnancy is responsible for the occurrence of diabetic embryopathy, a spectrum of birth defects that includes heart abnormalities, neural tube defects, and caudal dysgenesis syndromes. Here, we report that mice transgenic for the homeodomain transcription factor Isl-1 develop profound caudal growth defects that resemble human sacral/caudal agenesis. Isl-1 is normally expressed in the pancreas and is required for pancreas development and endocrine cell differentiation...

  7. Phytoremediation of polychlorinated biphenyls by transgenic tobacco.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chrastilová, Z.; Macková, M.; Nováková, M.; Szekeres, M.; Macek, Tomáš

    Chania : Technical University of Crete, 2008 - (Kalogerakis, N.; Fava, F.; Banwart, S.). s. 295-295 ISBN 978-960-8475-12-0. [European Bioremediation Conference /4./. 03.09.2008-06.09.2008, Chania] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M06030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : phytoremediation * PCB * transgenic plants * bphC Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  8. Biological containment strategies for transgenic crops

    OpenAIRE

    Maagd, R.A., de; Boutilier, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    Biological containment is the prevention or reduction in the spread of transgenes by modifying plant growth or development, most commonly through modification of reproductive characteristics. This review provides a summary of the current strategies for biological containment, including the use of both naturally occurring and engineered mechanisms. A wide range of strategies and their efficacy, where possible, are discussed. While some strategies are still in the conceptual phase, others are m...

  9. Transgenic oil palm: production and projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveez, G K; Masri, M M; Zainal, A; Majid, N A; Yunus, A M; Fadilah, H H; Rasid, O; Cheah, S C

    2000-12-01

    Oil palm is an important economic crop for Malaysia. Genetic engineering could be applied to produce transgenic oil palms with high value-added fatty acids and novel products to ensure the sustainability of the palm oil industry. Establishment of a reliable transformation and regeneration system is essential for genetic engineering. Biolistic was initially chosen as the method for oil palm transformation as it has been the most successful method for monocotyledons to date. Optimization of physical and biological parameters, including testing of promoters and selective agents, was carried out as a prerequisite for stable transformation. This has resulted in the successful transfer of reporter genes into oil palm and the regeneration of transgenic oil palm, thus making it possible to improve the oil palm through genetic engineering. Besides application of the Biolistics method, studies on transformation mediated by Agrobacterium and utilization of the green fluorescent protein gene as a selectable marker gene have been initiated. Upon the development of a reliable transformation system, a number of useful targets are being projected for oil palm improvement. Among these targets are high-oleate and high-stearate oils, and the production of industrial feedstock such as biodegradable plastics. The efforts in oil palm genetic engineering are thus not targeted as commodity palm oil. Due to the long life cycle of the palm and the time taken to regenerate plants in tissue culture, it is envisaged that commercial planting of transgenic palms will not occur any earlier than the year 2020. PMID:11171275

  10. Characterization of immunoglobulin heavy chain knockout rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménoret, Séverine; Iscache, Anne-L; Tesson, Laurent; Rémy, Séverine; Usal, Claire; Osborn, Michel J; Cost, Gregory J; Brüggemann, Marianne; Buelow, Roland; Anegon, Ignacio

    2010-10-01

    The rat is a species frequently used in immunological studies but, until now, there were no models with introduced gene-specific mutations. In a recent study, we described for the first time the generation of novel rat lines with targeted mutations using zinc-finger nucleases. In this study, we compare immune development in two Ig heavy-chain KO lines; one with truncated C? and a new line with removed JH segments. Rats homozygous for IgM mutation generate truncated C? mRNA with a de novo stop codon and no C? mRNA. JH-deletion rats showed undetectable mRNA for all H-chain transcripts. No serum IgM, IgG, IgA and IgE were detected in these rat lines. In both lines, lymphoid B-cell numbers were reduced >95% versus WT animals. In rats homozygous for IgM mutation, no Ab-mediated hyperacute allograft rejection was encountered. Similarities in B-cell differentiation seen in Ig KO rats and ES cell-derived Ig KO mice are discussed. These Ig and B-cell-deficient rats obtained using zinc-finger nucleases-technology should be useful as biomedical research models and a powerful platform for transgenic animals expressing a human Ab repertoire. PMID:21038471

  11. Transgene-specific and event-specific molecular markers for characterization of transgenic papaya lines resistant to Papaya ringspot virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ming-Jen; Chen, Shu; Kung, Yi-Jung; Cheng, Ying-Huey; Bau, Huey-Jiunn; Su, Tien-Tsai; Yeh, Shyi-Dong

    2009-12-01

    The commercially valuable transgenic papaya lines carrying the coat protein (CP) gene of Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) and conferring virus resistance have been developed in Hawaii and Taiwan in the past decade. Prompt and sensitive protocols for transgene-specific and event-specific detections are essential for traceability of these lines to fulfill regulatory requirement in EU and some Asian countries. Here, based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approaches, we demonstrated different detection protocols for characterization of PRSV CP-transgenic papaya lines. Transgene-specific products were amplified using different specific primer pairs targeting the sequences of the promoter, the terminator, the selection marker, and the transgene, and the region across the promoter and transgene. Moreover, after cloning and sequencing the DNA fragments amplified by adaptor ligation-PCR, the junctions between plant genomic DNA and the T-DNA insert were elucidated. The event-specific method targeting the flanking sequences and the transgene was developed for identification of a specific transgenic line. The PCR patterns using primers designed from the left or the right flanking DNA sequence of the transgene insert in three selected transgenic papaya lines were specific and reproducible. Our results also verified that PRSV CP transgene is integrated into transgenic papaya genome in different loci. The copy number of inserted T-DNA was further confirmed by real-time PCR. The event-specific molecular markers developed in this investigation are crucial for regulatory requirement in some countries and intellectual protection. Also, these markers are helpful for prompt screening of a homozygote-transgenic progeny in the breeding program. PMID:19526355

  12. Production of recombinant proteins in milk of transgenic and non-transgenic goats

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Raylene Ramos, Moura; Luciana Magalhães, Melo; Vicente José de Figueirêdo, Freitas.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Among all the transgenic mammalians produced so far, goats have represented an excellent model of transgenesis when considering the factors such as the market demand for protein, volume of milk produced per lactation and reproductive rate. Various recombinant proteins have been obtained from the tra [...] nsgenic and non-transgenic goats, and among these, human antithrombin, produced by the transgenic goats, was the first recombinant protein of animal origin to be released as a drug for the clinical use in humans. This review reports the aspects inherent to the production of recombinant proteins in the goats, from the production of the animal bioreactors up to the expression of these proteins in their milk.

  13. Generation of bovine transgenics using somatic cell nuclear transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Stice Steven L; Hodges Craig A

    2003-01-01

    Abstract The ability to produce transgenic animals through the introduction of exogenous DNA has existed for many years. However, past methods available to generate transgenic animals, such as pronuclear microinjection or the use of embryonic stem cells, have either been inefficient or not available in all animals, bovine included. More recently somatic cell nuclear transfer has provided a method to create transgenic animals that overcomes many deficiencies present in other methods. This revi...

  14. Single-copy insertion of transgenes in Caenorhabditis elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøkjaer-Jensen, Christian; Davis, M Wayne; Hopkins, Christopher E; Newman, Blake J; Thummel, Jason M; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Grunnet, Morten; Jorgensen, Erik M

    2008-01-01

    At present, transgenes in Caenorhabditis elegans are generated by injecting DNA into the germline. The DNA assembles into a semistable extrachromosomal array composed of many copies of injected DNA. These transgenes are typically overexpressed in somatic cells and silenced in the germline. We have developed a method that inserts a single copy of a transgene into a defined site. Mobilization of a Mos1 transposon generates a double-strand break in noncoding DNA. The break is repaired by copying DN...

  15. Efficient expression of transgenes in adult zebrafish by electroporation

    OpenAIRE

    Rao S Hari; Rambabu K Murali; Rao N Madhusudhana

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Expression of transgenes in muscle by injection of naked DNA is widely practiced. Application of electrical pulses at the site of injection was demonstrated to improve transgene expression in muscle tissue. Zebrafish is a precious model to investigate developmental biology in vertebrates. In this study we investigated the effect of electroporation on expression of transgenes in 3–6 month old adult zebrafish. Results Electroporation parameters such as number of pulses, volt...

  16. Transgene-mediated cosuppression in the C. elegans germ line

    OpenAIRE

    Dernburg, Abby F.; Zalevsky, Jonathan; Colaiácovo, Mónica P.; Villeneuve, Anne M.

    2000-01-01

    Functional silencing of chromosomal loci can be induced by transgenes (cosuppression) or by introduction of double-stranded RNA (RNAi). Here, we demonstrate the generality of and define rules for a transgene-mediated cosuppression phenomenon in the Caenorhabditis elegans germ line. Functional repression is not a consequence of persistent physical association between transgenes and endogenous genes or of mutations in affected genes. The cosuppression mechanism likely involves an RNA mediator t...

  17. Generation of bovine transgenics using somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stice Steven L

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ability to produce transgenic animals through the introduction of exogenous DNA has existed for many years. However, past methods available to generate transgenic animals, such as pronuclear microinjection or the use of embryonic stem cells, have either been inefficient or not available in all animals, bovine included. More recently somatic cell nuclear transfer has provided a method to create transgenic animals that overcomes many deficiencies present in other methods. This review summarizes the benefits of using somatic cell nuclear transfer to create bovine transgenics as well as the possible opportunities this method creates for the future.

  18. Composite potato plants with transgenic roots on non-transgenic shoots: a model system for studying gene silencing in roots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Patricia; Santala, Johanna; Nielsen, Steen Lykke; Hühns, Maja; Broer, Inge; Valkonen, Jari P. T.

    2014-01-01

    Composite plants, with transgenic roots on a non-transgenic shoot, can be obtained by shoot explant transformation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes. The aim of this study was to generate composite potato plants (Solanum tuberosum) to be used as a model system in future studies on root-pathogen interactions and gene silencing in the roots. The proportion of transgenic roots among the roots induced was high (80-100 %) in the four potato cultivars tested (Albatros, Desirée, Sabina and Saturna). No wil...

  19. Functional conservation between rodents and chicken of regulatory sequences driving skeletal muscle gene expression in transgenic chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Lorna

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory elements that control expression of specific genes during development have been shown in many cases to contain functionally-conserved modules that can be transferred between species and direct gene expression in a comparable developmental pattern. An example of such a module has been identified at the rat myosin light chain (MLC 1/3 locus, which has been well characterised in transgenic mouse studies. This locus contains two promoters encoding two alternatively spliced isoforms of alkali myosin light chain. These promoters are differentially regulated during development through the activity of two enhancer elements. The MLC3 promoter alone has been shown to confer expression of a reporter gene in skeletal and cardiac muscle in transgenic mice and the addition of the downstream MLC enhancer increased expression levels in skeletal muscle. We asked whether this regulatory module, sufficient for striated muscle gene expression in the mouse, would drive expression in similar domains in the chicken. Results We have observed that a conserved downstream MLC enhancer is present in the chicken MLC locus. We found that the rat MLC1/3 regulatory elements were transcriptionally active in chick skeletal muscle primary cultures. We observed that a single copy lentiviral insert containing this regulatory cassette was able to drive expression of a lacZ reporter gene in the fast-fibres of skeletal muscle in chicken in three independent transgenic chicken lines in a pattern similar to the endogenous MLC locus. Reporter gene expression in cardiac muscle tissues was not observed for any of these lines. Conclusions From these results we conclude that skeletal expression from this regulatory module is conserved in a genomic context between rodents and chickens. This transgenic module will be useful in future investigations of muscle development in avian species.

  20. Transgenic DNA integrated into the oat genome is frequently interspersed by host DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Pawlowski, Wojciech P; Somers, David A.

    1998-01-01

    Integration of transgenic DNA into the plant genome was investigated in 13 transgenic oat (Avena sativa L.) lines produced using microprojectile bombardment with one or two cotransformed plasmids. In all transformation events, the transgenic DNA integrated into the plant genome consisted of intact transgene copies that were accompanied by multiple, rearranged, and/or truncated transgene fragments. All fragments of transgenic DNA cosegregated, indicating that they were integrated at single gen...

  1. Effect of the cauliflower Or transgene on carotenoid accumulation and chromoplast formation in transgenic potato tubers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic plants have facilitated our understanding of the functional roles of genes and the metabolic processes affected in plants. Recently, we isolated the Or gene from an orange cauliflower mutant and showed that the Or gene could serve as a novel genetic tool to enrich carotenoid content in tr...

  2. SEQUENCE SIMILARITY BETWEEN THE VIRAL CP GENE AND THE TRANSGENE IN TRANSGENIC PAPAYAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) coat protein transgene present in ‘Rainbow’ and ‘SunUp’ papayas disclose high sequence similarity (>89%) to the cp gene from PRSV BR and TH. Despite this, both isolates are able to break down the resistance in ‘Rainbow’, while only the latter is able to do so in ‘Sun...

  3. Characterization of a Maize Wip1 Promoter in Transgenic Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengxue Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Maize Wip1 gene encodes a wound-induced Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI protein which is a type of serine protease inhibitor, and its expression is induced by wounding or infection, conferring resistance against pathogens and pests. In this study, the maize Wip1 promoter was isolated and its function was analyzed. Different truncated Wip1 promoters were fused upstream of the GUS reporter gene and transformed into Arabidopsis, tobacco and rice plants. We found that (1 several truncated maize Wip1 promoters led to strong GUS activities in both transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco leaves, whereas low GUS activity was detected in transgenic rice leaves; (2 the Wip1 promoter was not wound-induced in transgenic tobacco leaves, but was induced by wounding in transgenic rice leaves; (3 the truncated Wip1 promoter had different activity in different organs of transgenic tobacco plants; (4 the transgenic plant leaves containing different truncated Wip1 promoters had low GUS transcripts, even though high GUS protein level and GUS activities were observed; (5 there was one transcription start site of Wip1 gene in maize and two transcription start sites of GUS in Wip1::GUS transgenic lines; (6 the adjacent 35S promoter which is present in the transformation vectors enhanced the activity of the truncated Wip1 promoters in transgenic tobacco leaves, but did not influence the disability of truncated Wip1231 promoter to respond to wounding signals. We speculate that an ACAAAA hexamer, several CAA trimers and several elements similar to ACAATTAC octamer in the 5'-untranslated region might contribute to the strong GUS activity in Wip1231 transgenic lines, meanwhile, compared to the 5'-untranslated region from Wip1231 transgenic lines, the additional upstream open reading frames (uORFs in the 5'-untranslated region from Wip1737 transgenic lines might contribute to the lower level of GUS transcript and GUS activity.

  4. Sequence similarity between the cp gene and the transgene in transgenic papayas = Similaridade de seqüência entre o gene cp do vírus e do transgene presente em mamoeiros transgênicos

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, M.T.; Teixeira, M.; Gonsalves, D.

    2005-01-01

    The Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) coat protein transgene present in 'Rainbow' and 'SunUp' papayas disclose high sequence similarity (>89%) to the cp gene from PRSV BR and TH. Despite this, both isolates are able to break down the resistance in 'Rainbow', while only the latter is able to do so in 'SunUp'. The objective of this work was to evaluate the degree of sequence similarity between the cp gene in the challenge isolate and the cp transgene in transgenic papayas resistant to PRSV. The prod...

  5. Rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Sofía Rodríguez-Reyna, Cynthia Martínez-Reyes, Jesús Kazúo Yamamoto-Furusho

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the literature concerning rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, including common immune-mediated pathways, frequency, clinical course and therapy. Musculoskeletal complications are frequent and well-recognized manifestations in IBD, and affect up to 33% of patients with IBD. The strong link between the bowel and the osteo-articular system is suggested by many clinical and experimental observations, notably in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. The autoimmune pathogenic mechanisms shared by IBD and spondyloarthropathies include genetic susceptibility to abnormal antigen presentation, aberrant recognition of self, the presence of autoantibodies against specific antigens shared by the colon and other extra-colonic tissues, and increased intestinal permeability. The response against microorganisms may have an important role through molecular mimicry and other mechanisms. Rheumatic manifestations of IBD have been divided into peripheral arthritis, and axial involvement, including sacroiliitis, with or without spondylitis, similar to idiopathic ankylosing spondylitis. Other periarticular features can occur, including enthesopathy, tendonitis, clubbing, periostitis, and granulomatous lesions of joints and bones. Osteoporosis and osteomalacia secondary to IBD and iatrogenic complications can also occur. The management of the rheumatic manifestations of IBD consists of physical therapy in combination with local injection of corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; caution is in order however, because of their possible harmful effects on intestinal integrity, permeability, and even on gut inflammation. Sulfasalazine, methotrexate, azathioprine, cyclosporine and leflunomide should be used for selected indications. In some cases, tumor necrosis factor-? blocking agents should be considered as first-line therapy.

  6. Overview on the investigations of transgenic plums in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic plums of Prunus domestica L. transformed with the Plum pox virus coat protein gene (PPV-CP) were the subjects of three experiments undertaken in Romania. In the first experiment, PPV-CP transgenic clones C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, PT3 and PT5 were evaluated for Sharka resistance under high natu...

  7. Overview of the investigation of transgenic plums in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic plums of Prunus domestica L. transformed with the Plum pox virus coat protein gene (PPV-CP) were the subjects of three experiments undertaken in Romania. In the first experiment, PPV-CP transgenic clones C2, C3, C4, C5, C6 and PT3 were evaluated for Sharka resistance under high natural i...

  8. Advancing environmental risk assessment for transgenic biofeedstock crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolt Jeffrey D

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transgenic modification of plants is a key enabling technology for developing sustainable biofeedstocks for biofuels production. Regulatory decisions and the wider acceptance and development of transgenic biofeedstock crops are considered from the context of science-based risk assessment. The risk assessment paradigm for transgenic biofeedstock crops is fundamentally no different from that of current generation transgenic crops, except that the focus of the assessment must consider the unique attributes of a given biofeedstock crop and its environmental release. For currently envisioned biofeedstock crops, particular emphasis in risk assessment will be given to characterization of altered metabolic profiles and their implications relative to non-target environmental effects and food safety; weediness and invasiveness when plants are modified for abiotic stress tolerance or are domesticated; and aggregate risk when plants are platforms for multi-product production. Robust risk assessments for transgenic biofeedstock crops are case-specific, initiated through problem formulation, and use tiered approaches for risk characterization.

  9. Transgenic crops. Processes, products and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transgenic crops are a natural extension of plant breeding technologies, offering new opportunities for increasing the productivity of agriculture and reducing the cost of food production, for increasing the appeal, nutritional content and quality of fresh and processed foods, and for reducing the environmental damage of agricultural practices. These new transgenic traits will be combined with continuing improvements in the latest varieties developed via breeding technologies, spurring investment in both. These technologies are inherently compatible with and necessary for meeting the challenges now facing the world, namely, economic growth and development, environmental protection and remediation, and human needs for food, shelter and a decent quality of life. The first products from genetically engineered crops are beginning to enter commerce. This is a critical time for issues that will shape public acceptance and for adoption of regulatory and trade policies that encourage rather than discourage investment in and use of this technology. Further investment in the tools for transforming crops and in the basic and applied sciences that will provide a pipeline of new genes is also needed. (author). 24 refs, 1 tab

  10. [Biofuels, food security and transgenic crops].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Orlando; Chaparro-Giraldo, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Soaring global food prices are threatening to push more poor people back below the poverty line; this will probably become aggravated by the serious challenge that increasing population and climate changes are posing for food security. There is growing evidence that human activities involving fossil fuel consumption and land use are contributing to greenhouse gas emissions and consequently changing the climate worldwide. The finite nature of fossil fuel reserves is causing concern about energy security and there is a growing interest in the use of renewable energy sources such as biofuels. There is growing concern regarding the fact that biofuels are currently produced from food crops, thereby leading to an undesirable competition for their use as food and feed. Nevertheless, biofuels can be produced from other feedstocks such as lingo-cellulose from perennial grasses, forestry and vegetable waste. Biofuel energy content should not be exceeded by that of the fossil fuel invested in its production to ensure that it is energetically sustainable; however, biofuels must also be economically competitive and environmentally acceptable. Climate change and biofuels are challenging FAO efforts aimed at eradicating hunger worldwide by the next decade. Given that current crops used in biofuel production have not been domesticated for this purpose, transgenic technology can offer an enormous contribution towards improving biofuel crops' environmental and economic performance. The present paper critically presents some relevant relationships between biofuels, food security and transgenic plant technology. PMID:19722000

  11. A Comparison of Neuroinflammation to Implanted Microelectrodes in Rat and Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Potter-Baker, Kelsey A.; Ravikumar, Madhumitha; Burke, Alan A.; Meador, William D.; Householder, Kyle T.; Buck, Amy C.; Sunil, Smrithi; Stewart, Wade G.; Anna, Jake P.; Tomaszewski, William H.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Rat models have emerged as a common tool to study neuroinflammation to intracortical microelectrodes. While a number of studies have attempted to understand the factors resulting in neuroinflammation using rat models, a complete understanding of key mechanistic pathways remains elusive. Transgenic mouse models, however, could facilitate a deeper understanding of mechanistic pathways due to an ease of genetic alteration. Therefore, the goal of the present study is to compare neuroinflammation ...

  12. Efficient gene targeting by homology-directed repair in rat zygotes using TALE nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Remy, Séverine; Tesson, Laurent; Menoret, Séverine; Usal, Claire; De Cian, Anne; Thepenier, Virginie; Thinard, Reynald; Baron, Daniel; Charpentier, Marine; Renaud, Jean-Baptiste; Buelow, Roland; Cost, Gregory J; Giovannangeli, Carine; Fraichard, Alexandre; Concordet, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    The generation of genetically modified animals is important for both research and commercial purposes. The rat is an important model organism that until recently lacked efficient genetic engineering tools. Sequence-specific nucleases, such as ZFNs, TALE nucleases, and CRISPR/Cas9 have allowed the creation of rat knockout models. Genetic engineering by homology-directed repair (HDR) is utilized to create animals expressing transgenes in a controlled way and to introduce precise genetic modific...

  13. Hearing impairment in the P23H-1 retinal degeneration rat model

    OpenAIRE

    ElenaCaminos; JorgeV.Sotoca

    2014-01-01

    The transgenic P23H line 1 (P23H-1) rat expresses a variant of rhodopsin with a mutation that leads to loss of visual function. This rat strain is an experimental model usually employed to study photoreceptor degeneration. Although the mutated protein should not interfere with other sensory functions, observing severe loss of auditory reflexes in response to natural sounds led us to study auditory brain response (ABR) recording. Animals were separated into different hearing levels following t...

  14. Nephropathy in human immunodeficiency virus-1 transgenic mice is due to renal transgene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Bruggeman, L.A.; Dikman, S; C. Meng; Quaggin, S E; Coffman, T.M.; Klotman, P E

    1997-01-01

    HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is a progressive glomerular and tubular disease that is increasingly common in AIDS patients and one of the leading causes of end stage renal disease in African Americans. A major unresolved issue in the pathogenesis of HIVAN is whether the kidney disease is due to renal cell infection or a "bystander" phenomenon mediated by systemically dysregulated cytokines. To address this issue, we have used two different experimental approaches and an HIV-1 transgenic ...

  15. Effect of the Citrus Lycopene ?-Cyclase Transgene on Carotenoid Metabolism in Transgenic Tomato Fruits

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Fei; Zhou, Wenjing; Zhang, Jiancheng; Xu, Qiang (Casey); Deng, Xiuxin

    2012-01-01

    Lycopene ?-cyclase (LYCB) is the key enzyme for the synthesis of ?-carotene, a valuable component of the human diet. In this study, tomato constitutively express Lycb-1 was engineered. The ?-carotene level of transformant increased 4.1 fold, and the total carotenoid content increased by 30% in the fruits. In the transgenic line, the downstream ?-branch metabolic fluxes were repressed during the three developmental stages while ?-carotene content increased in the ripe stage. Microarray analysi...

  16. Welfare assessment in transgenic pigs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Reinhard C.; Remuge, Liliana

    2012-01-01

    Since large animal transgenesis has been successfully attempted for the first time about 25 years ago, the technology has been applied in various lines of transgenic pigs. Nevertheless one of the concerns with the technology—animal welfare—has not been approached through systematic assessment and statements regarding the welfare of transgenic pigs have been based on anecdotal observations during early stages of transgenic programs. The main aim of the present study was therefore to perform an extensive welfare assessment comparing heterozygous transgenic animals expressing GFP with wildtype animals along various stages of post natal development. The protocol used covered reproductory performance and behaviour in GFP and wildtype sows and general health and development, social behaviour, exploratory behaviour and emotionality in GFP and wildtype littermates from birth until an age of roughly 4 months. The absence of significant differences between GFP and wildtype animals in the parameters observed suggests that the transgenic animals in question are unlikely to suffer from deleterious effects of transgene expression on their welfare and thus support existing anecdotal observations of pigs expressing GFP as healthy. Although the results are not surprising in the light of previous experience, they give a more solid fundament to the evaluation of GFP expression as being relatively non-invasive in pigs. The present study may furthermore serve as starting point for researchers aiming at a systematic characterization of welfare relevant effects in the line of transgenic pigs they are working with.

  17. Genetic load and transgenic mitigating genes in transgenic Brassica rapa (field mustard × Brassica napus (oilseed rape hybrid populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warwick Suzanne I

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One theoretical explanation for the relatively poor performance of Brassica rapa (weed × Brassica napus (crop transgenic hybrids suggests that hybridization imparts a negative genetic load. Consequently, in hybrids genetic load could overshadow any benefits of fitness enhancing transgenes and become the limiting factor in transgenic hybrid persistence. Two types of genetic load were analyzed in this study: random/linkage-derived genetic load, and directly incorporated genetic load using a transgenic mitigation (TM strategy. In order to measure the effects of random genetic load, hybrid productivity (seed yield and biomass was correlated with crop- and weed-specific AFLP genomic markers. This portion of the study was designed to answer whether or not weed × transgenic crop hybrids possessing more crop genes were less competitive than hybrids containing fewer crop genes. The effects of directly incorporated genetic load (TM were analyzed through transgene persistence data. TM strategies are proposed to decrease transgene persistence if gene flow and subsequent transgene introgression to a wild host were to occur. Results In the absence of interspecific competition, transgenic weed × crop hybrids benefited from having more crop-specific alleles. There was a positive correlation between performance and number of B. napus crop-specific AFLP markers [seed yield vs. marker number (r = 0.54, P = 0.0003 and vegetative dry biomass vs. marker number (r = 0.44, P = 0.005]. However under interspecific competition with wheat or more weed-like conditions (i.e. representing a situation where hybrid plants emerge as volunteer weeds in subsequent cropping systems, there was a positive correlation between the number of B. rapa weed-specific AFLP markers and seed yield (r = 0.70, P = 0.0001, although no such correlation was detected for vegetative biomass. When genetic load was directly incorporated into the hybrid genome, by inserting a fitness-mitigating dwarfing gene that that is beneficial for crops but deleterious for weeds (a transgene mitigation measure, there was a dramatic decrease in the number of transgenic hybrid progeny persisting in the population. Conclusion The effects of genetic load of crop and in some situations, weed alleles might be beneficial under certain environmental conditions. However, when genetic load was directly incorporated into transgenic events, e.g., using a TM construct, the number of transgenic hybrids and persistence in weedy genomic backgrounds was significantly decreased.

  18. The effect of Bt-transgene introgression on plant growth and reproduction in wild Brassica juncea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Bo; Darmency, Henry; Stewart, C Neal; Wei, Wei; Tang, Zhi-Xi; Ma, Ke-Ping

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the relative plant growth and reproduction of insect-resistant and susceptible plants following the introgression of an insect-resistance Bt-transgene from Brassica napus, oilseed rape, to wild Brassica juncea. The second backcrossed generation (BC2) from a single backcross family was grown in pure and mixed stands of Bt-transgenic and non-transgenic siblings under two insect treatments. Various proportions of Bt-transgenic plants were employed in mixed stands to study the interaction between resistant and susceptible plants. In the pure stands, Bt-transgenic BC2 plants performed better than non-transgenic plants with or without insect treatments. In mixed stands, Bt-transgenic BC2 plants produced fewer seeds than their non-Bt counterparts at low proportions of Bt-transgenic BC2 plants in the absence of insects. Reproductive allocation of non-transgenic plants marginally increased with increasing proportions of Bt-transgenic plants under herbivore pressure, which resulted in increased total biomass and seed production per stand. The results showed that the growth of non-transgenic plants was protected by Bt-transgenic plants under herbivore pressure. The Bt-transgene might not be advantageous in mixed stands of backcrossed hybrids; thus transgene introgression would not be facilitated when herbivorous insects are not present. However, a relatively large initial population of Bt-transgenic plants might result in transgene persistence when target herbivores are present. PMID:25487040

  19. Generation and characterization of human heme oxygenase-1 transgenic pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Hye-Jung; Koo, Ok Jae; Yang, Jaeseok; Cho, Bumrae; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Park, Sol Ji; Hurh, Sunghoon; Kim, Hwajung; Lee, Eun Mi; Ro, Han; Kang, Jung Taek; Kim, Su Jin; Won, Jae-Kyung; O'Connell, Philip J; Kim, Hyunil; Surh, Charles D; Lee, Byeong-Chun; Ahn, Curie

    2012-01-01

    Xenotransplantation using transgenic pigs as an organ source is a promising strategy to overcome shortage of human organ for transplantation. Various genetic modifications have been tried to ameliorate xenograft rejection. In the present study we assessed effect of transgenic expression of human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1), an inducible protein capable of cytoprotection by scavenging reactive oxygen species and preventing apoptosis caused by cellular stress during inflammatory processes, in neonatal porcine islet-like cluster cells (NPCCs). Transduction of NPCCs with adenovirus containing hHO-1 gene significantly reduced apoptosis compared with the GFP-expressing adenovirus control after treatment with either hydrogen peroxide or hTNF-? and cycloheximide. These protective effects were diminished by co-treatment of hHO-1 antagonist, Zinc protoporphyrin IX. We also generated transgenic pigs expressing hHO-1 and analyzed expression and function of the transgene. Human HO-1 was expressed in most tissues, including the heart, kidney, lung, pancreas, spleen and skin, however, expression levels and patterns of the hHO-1 gene are not consistent in each organ. We isolate fibroblast from transgenic pigs to analyze protective effect of the hHO-1. As expected, fibroblasts derived from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs were significantly resistant to both hydrogen peroxide damage and hTNF-? and cycloheximide-mediated apoptosis when compared with wild-type fibroblasts. Furthermore, induction of RANTES in response to hTNF-? or LPS was significantly decreased in fibroblasts obtained from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs. These findings suggest that transgenic expression of hHO-1 can protect xenografts when exposed to oxidative stresses, especially from ischemia/reperfusion injury, and/or acute rejection mediated by cytokines. Accordingly, hHO-1 could be an important candidate molecule in a multi-transgenic pig strategy for xenotransplantation. PMID:23071605

  20. Areas of concern for the evaluation of transgenic arthropods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Areas of concern for the release of transgenic insects relate to risks associated with: (1) the host insect involved, (2) the vector used for gene transfer, (3) genes of interest within the vector including markers, and (4) the expected persistence of the transgenic strain in the environment. The transgenic insect must be considered in terms of whether it is a pest or beneficial insect and risks relevant to its use as a non-transgenic insect. The vector used for gene transfer must be considered in terms of its mobility properties in the host insect and its potential for intra-genomic and inter-genomic movement, potentially mediated by a cross-mobilizing system. Intra-genomic movement may influence the expected expression and activity of gene of interest within the transgene, possibly having unanticipated effects on the host and, thus, program effectiveness. Inter-genomic movement is of considerable importance since risks must be evaluated in terms of the effects of the vector system and genes of interest on a multitude of potential host organisms. Risk assessment for transgene stability requires methods for transformant identification and a full genetic analysis of the transformed genome so changes in transgene presence or movement can be rapidly and reliably determined. Genes of interest within the transgene must be evaluated in terms of their affect on the host insect, and the potential influence of their gene products on the environment and other organisms should the transgene be transmitted to another host. These factors must be considered individually, their interaction with one another, and also in the context of transformant strain persistence in the field. (author)

  1. WP1: transgenic opto-animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    U?arowska, E.; Czajkowski, Rafa?; Konopka, W.

    2014-11-01

    We aim to create a set of genetic tools where permanent opsin expression (ChR or NpHR) is precisely limited to the population of neurons that express immediate early gene c-fos during a specific temporal window of behavioral training. Since the c-fos gene is only expressed in neurons that form experience-dependent ensemble, this approach will result in specific labeling of a small subset of cells that create memory trace for the learned behavior. To this end we employ two alternative inducible gene expression systems: Tet Expression System and Cre/lox System. In both cases, the temporal window for opsin induction is controlled pharmacologically, by doxycycline or tamoxifen, respectively. Both systems will be used for creating lines of transgenic animals.

  2. Update on the development of virus-resistant papaya: virus-resistant transgenic papaya for people in rural communities of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuanrungsirikul, S; Sarindu, N; Prasartsee, V; Chaikiatiyos, S; Siriyan, R; Sriwatanakul, M; Lekananon, P; Kitprasert, C; Boonsong, P; Kosiyachinda, P; Fermin, G; Gonsalves, D

    2005-12-01

    Papaya (Carica papaya L.) is one of the most important and preferred crops in rural communities in Thailand. Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) is a serious disease of papaya throughout Thailand. Efforts to control the virus by various methods either have not been successful or have not resulted in sustainable control. In 1995, collaborative research by the Department of Agriculture of Thailand and Cornell University to develop transgenic papaya resistant to PRSV was initiated. Two local Thai cultivars were transformed by microprojectile bombardment with the use of a nontranslatable coat protein gene of PRSV from Khon Kaen. Numerous kanamycin-resistantplants were regenerated and were inoculated with the PRSV Khon Kaen isolate for selection of resistant lines. Since 1997, promising RO transgenic lines have been transferred to the research station at Thapra for subsequent screenhouse tests and selection of the most PRSV-resistant lines. In selection set 1, three R3 lines initially derived from Khaknuan papaya showed excellent resistance to PRSV (97% to 100%) and had a yield of fruit 70 times higher than nontransgenic Khaknuan papaya. In selection set 2, one R3 line initially derived from Khakdam papaya showed 100% resistance. Safety assessments of these transgenic papayas have so far found no impact on the surrounding ecology. No natural crossing between transgenic and nonmodified papaya was observed beyond a distance of 10 m from the test plots. Analysis of the nutritional composition found no differences in nutrient levels in comparison with the nonmodified counterparts. Molecular characterization by Southern blotting revealed three copies of the transgene presented; however, no coat protein product was expressed. Data on additional topics, such as the effects offeeding the transgenic papaya to rats and the stability of the gene inserts, are currently being gathered. PMID:16465990

  3. BAC Transgenic Expression Efficiency: Bicistronic vs. ATG-Fusion Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Tao; Yasumoto, Hiroaki; Tsai, Robert Y.L.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based transgene can be expressed bicistronically with the target gene or fused to its translation start codon. To compare the transgene expression efficiencies of these two methods, mice were created that expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the genomic locus of nucleostemin using the bicistronic (NSiGFP) or the ATG-fusion approach (NSmGFP). Three lines with 1, 2, and 4 copies of the NSiGFP transgene, and two lines with one copy of the NSmGFP tr...

  4. Transgene-mediated cosuppression in the C. elegans germ line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dernburg, Abby F.; Zalevsky, Jonathan; Colaiácovo, Mónica P.; Villeneuve, Anne M.

    2000-01-01

    Functional silencing of chromosomal loci can be induced by transgenes (cosuppression) or by introduction of double-stranded RNA (RNAi). Here, we demonstrate the generality of and define rules for a transgene-mediated cosuppression phenomenon in the Caenorhabditis elegans germ line. Functional repression is not a consequence of persistent physical association between transgenes and endogenous genes or of mutations in affected genes. The cosuppression mechanism likely involves an RNA mediator that defines its target specificity, reminiscent of RNAi. Cosuppression is strongly abrogated in rde-2 and mut-7 mutants, but is not blocked in an rde-1 mutant, indicating that cosuppression and RNAi have overlapping but distinct genetic requirements. PMID:10887151

  5. Immunotoxicological studies of genetically modified rice expressing PHA-E lectin or Bt toxin in Wistar rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroghsbo, Stine; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard; Poulsen, Morten; Schrøder, Malene; Kvist, Peter H.; Taylor, Mark; Gatehouse, Angharad; Shu, Qinqyao; Knudsen, L. B.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the SAFOTEST project the immunmodulating effect of Cry1Ab protein from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and PHA-E lectin from kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin) was examined in 28- and 90-day feeding studies in Wistar rats. PHA-E lectin was chosen as positive control. Rats were fed control rice, transgenic rice expressing Cry I Ab protein or PHA-E lectin, or transgenic rice spiked with the purified recombinant protein. Total immunoglobulin levels, mitogen-induced cell proli...

  6. Mutagenesis by man-made mineral fibres in the lung of rats.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Topinka, Jan; Loli, P.; Dušinská, M.; Hurbánková, M.; Ková?iková, Z.; Volkovová, K.; Kažimírová, A.; Baran?oková, M.; Tatrai, E.; Wolff, T.; Oesterle, D.; Kyrtopoulos, S.A.; Georgiadis, P.

    2006-01-01

    Ro?. 595, - (2006), s. 174-183. ISSN 0027-5107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : transgenic rats * mineral fibres Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 4.111, year: 2006

  7. Differences in social interaction- vs cocaine reward in rat vs mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai K Kummer

    2014-10-01

    Considering that human addicts regularly prefer drugs of abuse to drug-free social interaction, the present findings suggest that our experimental paradigm of concurrent CPP for cocaine vs social interaction is of even greater translational power if performed in C57BL/6 mice, the genetic background for most transgenic rodent models, than in rats.

  8. Postischemic cardiac recovery in heme oxygenase-1 transgenic ischemic/reperfused mouse myocardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Bela; Varga, Balazs; Czompa, Attila; Bak, Istvan; Lekli, Istvan; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Zsuga, Judit; Kemeny-Beke, Adam; Antal, Miklos; Szendrei, Levente; Tosaki, Arpad

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) transgenic mice (Tg) were created using a rat HO-1 genomic transgene. Transgene expression was detected by RT-PCR and Western blots in the left ventricle (LV), right ventricle (RV) and septum (S) in mouse hearts, and its function was demonstrated by the elevated HO enzyme activity. Tg and non-transgenic (NTg) mouse hearts were isolated and subjected to ischemia/reperfusion. Significant post-ischemic recovery in coronary flow (CF), aortic flow (AF), aortic pressure (AOP) and first derivative of AOP (AOPdp/dt) were detected in the HO-1 Tg group compared to the NTg values. In HO-1 Tg hearts treated with 50 ?mol/kg of tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPPIX), an HO enzyme inhibitor, abolished the post-ischemic cardiac recovery. HO-1 related carbon monoxide (CO) production was detected in NTg, HO-1 Tg and HO-1 Tg + SnPPIX treated groups, and a substantial increase in CO production was observed in the HO-1 Tg hearts subjected to ischemia/reperfusion. Moreover, in ischemia/reperfusion-induced tissue Na+ and Ca2+ gains were reduced in HO-1 Tg group in comparison with the NTg and HO-1 Tg + SnPPIX treated groups; furthermore K+ loss was reduced in the HO-1 Tg group. The infarct size was markedly reduced from its NTg control value of 37 ± 4% to 20 ± 6% (P < 0.05) in the HO-1 Tg group, and was increased to 47 ± 5% (P < 0.05) in the HO-1 knockout (KO) hearts. Parallel to the infarct size reduction, the incidence of total and sustained ventricular fibrillation were also reduced from their NTg control values of 92% and 83% to 25% (P < 0.05) and 8% (P < 0.05) in the HO-1 Tg group, and were increased to 100% and 100% in HO-1 KO?/? hearts. Immunohistochemical staining of HO-1 was intensified in HO-1 Tg compared to the NTg myocardium. Thus, the HO-1 Tg mouse model suggests a valuable therapeutic approach in the treatment of ischemic myocardium. PMID:20716121

  9. Effects of Transgenic Rice on Life History Traits of Daphnia magna in Life Table Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Sungjin; Dongwoo Yang; Chang-Gi Kim; Sangkyu Park

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the impacts of transgenic rice on freshwater organisms, we conducted two life tableexperiments using Daphnia magna for fifteen and twenty days, respectively. We examined life history traits suchas population growth rates (r), reproductive rates (R0), generation times, and survivorship. In the first experiment,we used non-drought-stressed transgenic and non-transgenic rice harvested in 2005. In the second study, weused non-transgenic and transgenic rice harvested in 2006 followi...

  10. Evaluation of tyrosinase minigene co-injection as a marker for genetic manipulations in transgenic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Methot, D; Reudelhuber, T. L.; Silversides, D W

    1995-01-01

    The utility of tyrosinase minigene co-injection was evaluated as a visual marker for the generation and breeding of transgenic mice. In an evaluation of 39 transgenic founder animals and 44 transgenic lines five phenotypic patterns of pigmentation were consistently observed, including albino, dark, light, mottled and himalayan. In these studies co-injection of the tyrosinase minigene along with the transgene of interest (TOI) resulted in genomic integration of the two transgenes in 95% of the...

  11. Differential protection by human glutathione S-transferase P1 against cytotoxicity of benzo[a]pyrene, dibenzo[a,l]pyrene, or their dihydrodiol metabolites, in bi-transgenic cell lines that co-express rat versus human cytochrome P4501A1.

    OpenAIRE

    Kabler, Sandra L.; Seidel, Albrecht; Jacob, Juergen; Doehmer, Johannes; Morrow, Charles S.; Townsend, Alan J.

    2009-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are activated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes, and a subset of the reactive metabolites generated is detoxified via conjugation with glutathione (GSH) by specific glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). We have used V79MZ cells stably transfected with either human or rat cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1), alone or in combination with human GSTP1 (hGSTP1), to examine the dynamics of activation versus detoxification of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (D...

  12. Functional changes in the uterine artery precede the hypertensive phenotype in a transgenic model of hypertensive pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulgar, Victor M; Yamaleyeva, Liliya M; Varagic, Jasmina; McGee, Carolynne; Bader, Michael; Dechend, Ralf; Brosnihan, K Bridget

    2015-11-01

    The pregnant female human angiotensinogen (hAGN) transgenic rat mated with the male human renin (hREN) transgenic rat is a model of preeclampsia (TgA) with increased blood pressure, proteinuria, and placenta alterations of edema and necrosis at late gestation. We studied vascular responses and the role of COX-derived prostanoids in the uterine artery (UA) at early gestation in this model. TgA UA showed lower stretch response, similar smooth muscle ?-actin content, and lower collagen content compared with Sprague-Dawley (SD) UA. Vasodilation to acetylcholine was similar in SD and TgA UA (64 ± 8 vs. 75 ± 6% of relaxation, P > 0.05), with an acetylcholine-induced contraction in TgA UA that was abolished by preincubation with indomethacin (78 ± 6 vs. 83 ± 11%, P > 0.05). No differences in the contraction to phenylephrine were observed (159 ± 11 vs. 134 ± 12 %KMAX, P > 0.05), although in TgA UA this response was greatly affected by preincubation with indomethacin (179 ± 16 vs. 134 ± 9 %KMAX, P 0.05). Plasma thromboxane levels were similar between groups. In summary, TgA UA displays functional alterations at early gestation before the preeclamptic phenotype is established. Inhibition of COX enzymes normalizes some of the functional defects in the TgA UA. An increased role for COX-derived prostanoids in this model of preeclampsia may contribute to the development of a hypertensive pregnancy. PMID:26394667

  13. Field and pulping performances of transgenic trees with altered lignification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilate, Gilles; Guiney, Emma; Holt, Karen; Petit-Conil, Michel; Lapierre, Catherine; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Pollet, Brigitte; Mila, Isabelle; Webster, Elizabeth A; Marstorp, Håkan G; Hopkins, David W; Jouanin, Lise; Boerjan, Wout; Schuch, Wolfgang; Cornu, Daniel; Halpin, Claire

    2002-06-01

    The agronomic and pulping performance of transgenic trees with altered lignin has been evaluated in duplicated, long-term field trials. Poplars expressing cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) or caffeate/5-hydroxy-ferulate O-methyltransferase (COMT) antisense transgenes were grown for four years at two sites, in France and England. The trees remained healthy throughout the trial. Growth indicators and interactions with insects were normal. No changes in soil microbial communities were detected beneath the transgenic trees. The expected modifications to lignin were maintained in the transgenics over four years, at both sites. Kraft pulping of tree trunks showed that the reduced-CAD lines had improved characteristics, allowing easier delignification, using smaller amounts of chemicals, while yielding more high-quality pulp. This work highlights the potential of engineering wood quality for more environmentally benign papermaking without interfering with tree growth or fitness. PMID:12042866

  14. Designer proton-channel transgenic algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James Weifu (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-04-26

    A designer proton-channel transgenic alga for photobiological hydrogen production that is specifically designed for production of molecular hydrogen (H.sub.2) through photosynthetic water splitting. The designer transgenic alga includes proton-conductive channels that are expressed to produce such uncoupler proteins in an amount sufficient to increase the algal H.sub.2 productivity. In one embodiment the designer proton-channel transgene is a nucleic acid construct (300) including a PCR forward primer (302), an externally inducible promoter (304), a transit targeting sequence (306), a designer proton-channel encoding sequence (308), a transcription and translation terminator (310), and a PCR reverse primer (312). In various embodiments, the designer proton-channel transgenic algae are used with a gas-separation system (500) and a gas-products-separation and utilization system (600) for photobiological H.sub.2 production.

  15. Hybridization between transgenic and wild plants: environmental risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Chaparro Giraldo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetically modified products are widely commercialized in agricultural production. These include resistant plants to diseases, insects or herbicides, plants with capacity for longer storing times or better nutritional quality. However, there are some concerns and critics from environmental organizations on the risk associated to transgenic plants or organisms genetically modified (OGM. This review discusses the vertical gene transfer (plant/Plant within the OGM context. Although transgenic hybrids have been reported between transgenic plants and their wild relatives, the extent of the environmental risk has not been evaluated per se. The risk depends on the plant species involved, the transgenes, and the ecosystem where the plants are located. Studies on biosafety assessment must be evaluated case by case. Biotechnology and conventional methods allow to control gen flow and decrease the risk of gene transfer among species.

  16. Time-Course Expression Profiles of Hair Cycle-Associated Genes in Male Mini Rats after Depilation of Telogen-Phase Hairs

    OpenAIRE

    Aya Umeda-Ikawa; Isao Shimokawa; Kunio Doi

    2009-01-01

    Jcl:WistarTGN(ARGHGEN)1Nts rat (Mini rat) is a growth hormone (GH)-deficient transgenic rat. The hair cycle in the dorsal skin of male Mini rats enters a long-lasting telogen phase after eights weeks of age, but depilation can induce a transient hair cycle again. In this study, a time-course profiling of genes expression was done on the dorsal skin of male Mini rats along the progression of depilation-induced hair cycle using DNA microarray analysis. As a result, 1,215 probe sets including 1,...

  17. Enhanced phytoremediation of volatile environmental pollutants with transgenic trees

    OpenAIRE

    Doty, Sharon L.; James, C. Andrew; Moore, Allison L.; Vajzovic, Azra; Singleton, Glenda L.; Ma, Caiping; Khan, Zareen; XIN, GANG; Kang, Jun Won; Park, Jin Young; Meilan, Richard; Steven H. Strauss; Wilkerson, Jasmine; Farin, Federico; Strand, Stuart E.

    2007-01-01

    Small, volatile hydrocarbons, including trichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, carbon tetrachloride, benzene, and chloroform, are common environmental pollutants that pose serious health effects. We have developed transgenic poplar (Populus tremula × Populus alba) plants with greatly increased rates of metabolism and removal of these pollutants through the overexpression of cytochrome P450 2E1, a key enzyme in the metabolism of a variety of halogenated compounds. The transgenic poplar plants exhi...

  18. Handmade cloned transgenic piglets expressing the nematode fat-1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Yidi; Dou, Hongwei; Yin, Jingdong; Chen, Yu; Pang, Xinzhi; Vajta, Gabor; Bolund, Lars; Du, Yutao; Ma, Runlin Z

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Production of transgenic animals via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been adapted worldwide, but this application is somewhat limited by its relatively low efficiency. In this study, we used handmade cloning (HMC) established previously to produce transgenic pigs that express the functional nematode fat-1 gene. Codon-optimized mfat-1 was inserted into eukaryotic expression vectors, which were transferred into primary swine donor cells. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), gas ch...

  19. Experimental Meningococcal Sepsis in Congenic Transgenic Mice Expressing Human Transferrin

    OpenAIRE

    Szatanik, Marek; Hong, Eva; Ruckly, Corinne; Ledroit, Morgan; Giorgini, Dario; Jopek, Katarzyna; Nicola, Marie-Anne; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2011-01-01

    Severe meningococcal sepsis is still of high morbidity and mortality. Its management may be improved by an experimental model allowing better understanding of its pathophysiology. We developed an animal model of meningococcal sepsis in transgenic BALB/c mice expressing human transferrin. We studied experimental meningococcal sepsis in congenic transgenic BALB/c mice expressing human transferrin by transcriptional profiling using microarray analysis of blood and brain samples. Genes encoding a...

  20. Generation and Characterization of Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Transgenic Pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Yeom, Hye-Jung; Koo, Ok Jae; Yang, Jaeseok; Cho, Bumrae; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Park, Sol Ji; Hurh, Sunghoon; Kim, Hwajung; Lee, Eun Mi; Ro, Han; Kang, Jung Taek; Kim, Su Jin; Won, Jae-Kyung; O'Connell, Philip J.; Kim, Hyunil

    2012-01-01

    Xenotransplantation using transgenic pigs as an organ source is a promising strategy to overcome shortage of human organ for transplantation. Various genetic modifications have been tried to ameliorate xenograft rejection. In the present study we assessed effect of transgenic expression of human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1), an inducible protein capable of cytoprotection by scavenging reactive oxygen species and preventing apoptosis caused by cellular stress during inflammatory processes, in neon...

  1. Hybridization between transgenic and wild plants: environmental risk

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandro Chaparro Giraldo

    2011-01-01

    Genetically modified products are widely commercialized in agricultural production. These include resistant plants to diseases, insects or herbicides, plants with capacity for longer storing times or better nutritional quality. However, there are some concerns and critics from environmental organizations on the risk associated to transgenic plants or organisms genetically modified (OGM). This review discusses the vertical gene transfer (plant/Plant) within the OGM context. Although transgenic...

  2. Transgenic and conventional Brazilian soybeans don't cause or prevent preneoplastic colon lesions or oxidative stress in a 90-day in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Augusto Sbruzzi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The study presents the results of a 90-day safety assessment of rats fed with four varieties of soybeans, BRS 245 RR and BRS Valiosa RR (transgenic, BRS 133 and MG BR46 Conquista (non-transgenic. METHODS: Diets were prepared by incorporating toasted soybean flour to a commercial diet at 1%, 10% or 20% weight In the in vivo experimental the rats' body weight, body weight gain, food consumption, number of aberrant crypt foci, oxidative stress biomarkers, urea and creatinine levels were analyzed and compared between experimental groups, as well as histopathological observations (digestive tract, liver, kidneys. RESULTS: The results indicate that glyphosate-tolerant soy varieties neither induce nor prevent aberrant crypt foci induction, nor do their conventional counterparts. Similarly, none of the four soybean varieties tested induced changes in the digestive tract, liver or kidney. Serum biochemical parameters were also unchanged. CONCLUSION: The consumption of both, conventional and transgenic soybeans, were insufficient to ameliorate dimethylhydrazine-induced oxidative stress.

  3. Evaluating potential risks of transgenic arthropods for pest management programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetic modification using recombinant DNA methods can now be used, almost routinely, to transform pest and beneficial arthropods and such genetically engineered insects and mites could be used to improve pest management programs. Genetic manipulation with recombinant DNA techniques may generate concerns about risk, requiring additional time and resources to resolve. Risk assessments must be conducted prior to releasing transgenic arthropods into the environment for either short term experiments or permanent establishment. Potential risk issues to be resolved include whether: the inserted gene(s) (trait) is stable; the traits can be horizontally transferred to other populations or species; released arthropods will perform as expected (especially with regard to their geographic distribution, host or prey specificity; released arthropods will have unintended environmental effects; and, in the case of short term releases, the released arthropods can be recovered from field sites. If the transgenic arthropods strain(s) perform well in preliminary, short term releases and risk assessments are completed satisfactorily, permanent releases into the environment may follow. Many pest management programs, especially those involving replacement of pest populations by the transgenic population, will require permanent establishment in the environment and the use of 'drive mechanisms', have been proposed to achieve this. Because efficacy can be severely compromised by 'transgene silencing', plant molecular biologists are now attempting to stabilize gene expression by building in 'insulators'. Transgene silencing occurs in Drosophila and will no doubt be a factor in other transgenic arthropods. (author)

  4. A versatile transgenic allele for mouse overexpression studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatshad, Hamid; Biggs, Daniel; Diaz, Rebeca; Hortin, Nicole; Preece, Christopher; Davies, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    For the analysis of gene function in vivo, gene overexpression in the mouse provides an alternative to loss-of-function knock-out approaches and can help reveal phenotypes where compensatory mechanisms are at play. Furthermore, when multiple lines overexpressing a gene-of-interest at varying levels are studied, the consequences of differences in gene dosage can be explored. Despite these advantages, inherent shortcomings in the methodologies used for the generation of gain-of-function transgenic mouse models have limited their application to functional gene analysis, and the necessity for multiple lines comes at a significant animal and financial cost. The targeting of transgenic overexpression constructs at single copy into neutral genomic loci is the preferred method for the generation of such models, which avoids the unpredictable outcomes associated with conventional random integration. However, despite the increased reliability that targeted transgenic methodologies provide, only one expression level results, as defined by the promoter used. Here, we report a new versatile overexpression allele, the promoter-switch allele, which couples PhiC31 integrase-targeted transgenesis with Flp recombinase promoter switching and Cre recombinase activation. These recombination switches allow the conversion of different overexpression alleles, combining the advantages of transgenic targeting with tunable transgene expression. With this approach, phenotype severity can be correlated with transgene expression in a single mouse model, providing a cost-effective solution amenable to systematic gain-of-function studies. PMID:26369329

  5. Effect of 60Co ?-rays irradiation on antioxidant enzymes activities in transgenic and non-transgenic tobacco seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes of activities of antioxidant enzymes in pprI-transgenic tobacco seedlings and non-transgenic tobacco seedlings after different doses 60Co ?-rays irradiation were studied. The results showed that the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) in pprI-transgenic tobacco seedlings and non-transgenic tobacco seedlings were gradually increased after different doses 60Co ?-rays irradiation. The activity of SOD was to the maximum at 100 Gy treatment, but the activity of POD and CAT at 300 Gy treatment, and then these three antioxidant enzymes gradually decreased with the increase of irradiation dose. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis also revealed that the over-express of these antioxidant enzymes were induced after different doses 60Co ?-rays irradiation and were consistent with the variance of their enzymic activities, which enhanced the tolerance of tobacco against irradiation. (authors)

  6. Comparative study of transgenic and non-transgenic maize (Zea mays) flours commercialized in Brazil, focussing on proteomic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Nádia; Barbosa, Herbert; Jacob, Silvana; Arruda, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Genetically modified foods are a major concern around the world due to the lack of information concerning their safety and health effects. This work evaluates differences, at the proteomic level, between two types of crop samples: transgenic (MON810 event with the Cry1Ab gene, which confers resistance to insects) and non-transgenic maize flour commercialized in Brazil. The 2-D DIGE technique revealed 99 differentially expressed spots, which were collected in 2-D PAGE gels and identified via mass spectrometry (nESI-QTOF MS/MS). The abundance of protein differences between the transgenic and non-transgenic samples could arise from genetic modification or as a result of an environmental influence pertaining to the commercial sample. The major functional category of proteins identified was related to disease/defense and, although differences were observed between samples, no toxins or allergenic proteins were found. PMID:25766830

  7. Dihydrofolate Reductase and Thymidylate Synthase Transgenes Resistant to Methotrexate Interact to Permit Novel Transgene Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushworth, David; Mathews, Amber; Alpert, Amir; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2015-09-18

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an anti-folate that inhibits de novo purine and thymidine nucleotide synthesis. MTX induces death in rapidly replicating cells and is used in the treatment of multiple cancers. MTX inhibits thymidine synthesis by targeting dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and thymidylate synthase (TYMS). The use of MTX to treat cancer also causes bone marrow suppression and inhibits the immune system. This has led to the development of an MTX-resistant DHFR, DHFR L22F, F31S (DHFR(FS)), to rescue healthy cells. 5-Fluorouracil-resistant TYMS T51S, G52S (TYMS(SS)) is resistant to MTX and improves MTX resistance of DHFR(FS) in primary T cells. Here we find that a known mechanism of MTX-induced increase in DHFR expression persists with DHFR(FS) and cis-expressed transgenes. We also find that TYMS(SS) expression of cis-expressed transgenes is similarly decreased in an MTX-inducible manner. MTX-inducible changes in DHFR(FS) and TYMS(SS) expression changes are lost when both genes are expressed together. In fact, expression of the DHFR(FS) and TYMS(SS) cis-expressed transgenes becomes correlated. These findings provide the basis for an unrecognized post-transcriptional mechanism that functionally links expression of DHFR and TYMS. These findings were made in genetically modified primary human T cells and have a clear potential for use in clinical applications where gene expression needs to be regulated by drug or maintained at a specific expression level. We demonstrate a potential application of this system in the controlled expression of systemically toxic cytokine IL-12. PMID:26242737

  8. The Murine Stem Cell Virus Promoter Drives Correlated Transgene Expression in the Leukocytes and Cerebellar Purkinje Cells of Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Oue, Miho; Handa, Hiroshi; Matsuzaki, Yasunori; Suzue, Kazutomo; Murakami, Hirokazu; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2012-01-01

    The murine stem cell virus (MSCV) promoter exhibits activity in mouse hematopoietic cells and embryonic stem cells. We generated transgenic mice that expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the MSCV promoter. We obtained 12 transgenic founder mice through 2 independent experiments and found that the bodies of 9 of the founder neonates emitted different levels of GFP fluorescence. Flow cytometric analysis of circulating leukocytes revealed that the frequency of ...

  9. Composite potato plants with transgenic roots on non-transgenic shoots: a model system for studying gene silencing in roots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Patricia; Santala, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    Composite plants, with transgenic roots on a non-transgenic shoot, can be obtained by shoot explant transformation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes. The aim of this study was to generate composite potato plants (Solanum tuberosum) to be used as a model system in future studies on root-pathogen interactions and gene silencing in the roots. The proportion of transgenic roots among the roots induced was high (80-100 %) in the four potato cultivars tested (Albatros, Desirée, Sabina and Saturna). No wild-type adventitious roots were formed at mock inoculation site. All strains of A. rhizogenes tested induced phenotypically normal roots which, however, showed a reduced response to cytokinin as compared with non-transgenic roots. Nevertheless, both types of roots were infected to a similar high rate with the zoospores of Spongospora subterranea, a soilborne potato pathogen. The transgenic roots of composite potato plants expressed significantly higher amounts of ?-glucuronidase (GUS) than the roots of a GUS-transgenic potato line event. Silencing of the uidA transgene (GUS) was tested by inducing roots on the GUS-transgenic cv. Albatros event with strains of A. rhizogenes over-expressing either the uidA sense or antisense transcripts, or inverted-repeat or hairpin uidA RNA. The three last mentioned constructs caused 2.5-4.0 fold reduction in the uidA mRNA expression. In contrast, over-expression of uidA resulted in over 3-fold increase in the uidA mRNA and GUS expression, indicating that sense-mediated silencing (co-suppression) was not functional in roots. The results suggest that composite plants offer a useful experimental system for potato research, which has gained little previous attention.

  10. RNAi-mediated knockdown of IKK1 in transgenic mice using a transgenic construct containing the human H1 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Maldonado, Rodolfo; Murillas, Rodolfo; Navarro, Manuel; Page, Angustias; Suarez-Cabrera, Cristian; Alameda, Josefa P; Bravo, Ana; Casanova, M Llanos; Ramirez, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of gene expression through siRNAs is a tool increasingly used for the study of gene function in model systems, including transgenic mice. To achieve perdurable effects, the stable expression of siRNAs by an integrated transgenic construct is necessary. For transgenic siRNA expression, promoters transcribed by either RNApol II or III (such as U6 or H1 promoters) can be used. Relatively large amounts of small RNAs synthesis are achieved when using RNApol III promoters, which can be advantageous in knockdown experiments. To study the feasibility of H1 promoter-driven RNAi-expressing constructs for protein knockdown in transgenic mice, we chose IKK1 as the target gene. Our results indicate that constructs containing the H1 promoter are sensitive to the presence of prokaryotic sequences and to transgene position effects, similar to RNApol II promoters-driven constructs. We observed variable expression levels of transgenic siRNA among different tissues and animals and a reduction of up to 80% in IKK1 expression. Furthermore, IKK1 knockdown led to hair follicle alterations. In summary, we show that constructs directed by the H1 promoter can be used for knockdown of genes of interest in different organs and for the generation of animal models complementary to knockout and overexpression models. PMID:24523631

  11. In utero recombinant adeno-associated virus gene transfer in mice, rats, and primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marrero Luis

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene transfer into the amniotic fluid using recombinant adenovirus vectors was shown previously to result in high efficiency transfer of transgenes into the lungs and intestines. Adenovirus mediated in utero gene therapy, however, resulted in expression of the transgene for less than 30 days. Recombinant adenovirus associated viruses (rAAV have the advantage of maintaining the viral genome in daughter cells thus providing for long-term expression of transgenes. Methods Recombinant AAV2 carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP was introduced into the amniotic sac of fetal rodents and nonhuman primates. Transgene maintenance and expression was monitor. Results Gene transfer resulted in rapid uptake and long-term gene expression in mice, rats, and non-human primates. Expression and secretion of the reporter gene, GFP, was readily demonstrated within 72 hours post-therapy. In long-term studies in rats and nonhuman primates, maintenance of GFP DNA, protein expression, and reporter gene secretion was documented for over one year. Conclusions Because only multipotential stem cells are present at the time of therapy, these data demonstrated that in utero gene transfer with AAV2 into stem cells resulted in long-term systemic expression of active transgene roducts. Thus, in utero gene transfer via the amniotic fluid may be useful in treatment of gene disorders.

  12. Survival of Skin Graft between Transgenic Cloned Dogs and Non-Transgenic Cloned Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Geon A; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Jo, Young Kwang; Choi, Jin; Park, Jung Eun; Park, Eun Jung; Lim, Sang Hyun; Yoon, Byung Il; Kang, Sung Keun; Jang, Goo; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2014-01-01

    Whereas it has been assumed that genetically modified tissues or cells derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) should be accepted by a host of the same species, their immune compatibility has not been extensively explored. To identify acceptance of SCNT-derived cells or tissues, skin grafts were performed between cloned dogs that were identical except for their mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes and foreign gene. We showed here that differences in mtDNA haplotypes and genetic modification did not elicit immune responses in these dogs: 1) skin tissues from genetically-modified cloned dogs were successfully transplanted into genetically-modified cloned dogs with different mtDNA haplotype under three successive grafts over 63 days; and 2) non-transgenic cloned tissues were accepted into transgenic cloned syngeneic recipients with different mtDNA haplotypes and vice versa under two successive grafts over 63 days. In addition, expression of the inserted gene was maintained, being functional without eliciting graft rejection. In conclusion, these results show that transplanting genetically-modified tissues into normal, syngeneic or genetically-modified recipient dogs with different mtDNA haplotypes do not elicit skin graft rejection or affect expression of the inserted gene. Therefore, therapeutically valuable tissue derived from SCNT with genetic modification might be used safely in clinical applications for patients with diseased tissues. PMID:25372489

  13. Survival of skin graft between transgenic cloned dogs and non-transgenic cloned dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Geon A; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Jo, Young Kwang; Choi, Jin; Park, Jung Eun; Park, Eun Jung; Lim, Sang Hyun; Yoon, Byung Il; Kang, Sung Keun; Jang, Goo; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2014-01-01

    Whereas it has been assumed that genetically modified tissues or cells derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) should be accepted by a host of the same species, their immune compatibility has not been extensively explored. To identify acceptance of SCNT-derived cells or tissues, skin grafts were performed between cloned dogs that were identical except for their mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes and foreign gene. We showed here that differences in mtDNA haplotypes and genetic modification did not elicit immune responses in these dogs: 1) skin tissues from genetically-modified cloned dogs were successfully transplanted into genetically-modified cloned dogs with different mtDNA haplotype under three successive grafts over 63 days; and 2) non-transgenic cloned tissues were accepted into transgenic cloned syngeneic recipients with different mtDNA haplotypes and vice versa under two successive grafts over 63 days. In addition, expression of the inserted gene was maintained, being functional without eliciting graft rejection. In conclusion, these results show that transplanting genetically-modified tissues into normal, syngeneic or genetically-modified recipient dogs with different mtDNA haplotypes do not elicit skin graft rejection or affect expression of the inserted gene. Therefore, therapeutically valuable tissue derived from SCNT with genetic modification might be used safely in clinical applications for patients with diseased tissues. PMID:25372489

  14. Hematological and biochemical indexes in blood of HBV transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-jiao ZHENG

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the effects of gene integration of HBV on the biochemical and hematological indices in blood of transgenic mice.Methods The venous blood was collected from orbital venous plexus of 28 normal mice born in the same brood(HBsAg negative and 50 HBV transgenic mice(HBsAg positive,6-8 weeks in age.The blood routine examination was performed,including white blood cells(WBC,red blood cells(RBC,hemoglobin(Hb,platelets(PLT,lymphocyte percentage(L%,intermediate cell percentage(M%,the percentage of leaf cells(G% and blood biochemical parameters including glucose(GLU,urea nitrogen(BUN,creatinine(CREA,total protein(ALB,albumin(ALB,total bilirubin(TBIL,alanine aminotransferase(ALT,aspartate aminotransferase(AST,total cholesterol(CHOL and triglyceride(TG.The differential indexes were analyzed in HBsAg positive and negative mice,also the mice of different sex.Results Significant differences were found between the transgenic and normal mice in blood GLU,BUN,CREA,RBCs,Hb and PLT(P < 0.05,while no significant differences were found in other indices.No difference was found in the above 6 indices between the different sex of normal mice,while there was significant difference in blood GLU between males and females in transgenic mice,and it was higher in males than in females(P < 0.05.The blood GLU,CREA and BUN were higher in transgenic male mice than in normal male mice,and the contents of RBCs,Hb and PLT were higher in transgenic female mice than in normal female mice(P < 0.05.Conclusion HBV DNA may throw some influences on blood biochemical and hematological indexes of HBV transgenic mice,and it may provide some valuable references to the study of HBV pathogenesis in HBV animal models.

  15. Glyoxalase-1 overexpression reduces endothelial dysfunction and attenuates early renal impairment in a rat model of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouwers, Olaf; Niessen, Petra M G; Miyata, Toshio; Østergaard, Jakob A; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Peutz-Kootstra, Carine J; Sieber, Jonas; Mundel, Peter H; Brownlee, Michael; Janssen, Ben J A; De Mey, Jo G R; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Schalkwijk, Casper G

    2014-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: In diabetes, advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and the AGE precursor methylglyoxal (MGO) are associated with endothelial dysfunction and the development of microvascular complications. In this study we used a rat model of diabetes, in which rats transgenically overexpressed the MGO-detoxifying enzyme glyoxalase-I (GLO-I), to determine the impact of intracellular glycation on vascular function and the development of early renal changes in diabetes. METHODS: Wild-type and Glo...

  16. Glyoxalase-1 overexpression reduces endothelial dysfunction and attenuates early renal impairment in a rat model of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouwers, Olaf; Niessen, Petra M G

    2014-01-01

    In diabetes, advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and the AGE precursor methylglyoxal (MGO) are associated with endothelial dysfunction and the development of microvascular complications. In this study we used a rat model of diabetes, in which rats transgenically overexpressed the MGO-detoxifying enzyme glyoxalase-I (GLO-I), to determine the impact of intracellular glycation on vascular function and the development of early renal changes in diabetes.

  17. Transgênicos sem maniqueísmo / Transgenics without manichaeism

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Silvio, Valle.

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Vivemos em uma época marcada pela hegemonia da ciência e da tecnologia, carregada de questões à espera de respostas, para que o futuro da humanidade seja alcançado de forma segura e sustentável. O desenvolvimento de processos agroindustriais - especificamente, a produção de alimentos - com tecnologi [...] a de DNA recombinante tem trazido perspectivas de bons lucros apenas para os grandes conglomerados da biotecnologia e para produtores rurais com alto grau de desenvolvimento tecnológico. Discordamos de uma moratória para a tecnologia do DNA recombinante. Além disso, afirmações de ausência de risco podem levar a conclusões precipitadas, pois pouquíssimos testes foram realizados até hoje. É premente que se estabeleça uma política nacional de biossegurança, que envolva a sociedade civil organizada e todos os órgãos de governo (federal e estaduais) responsáveis pela fiscalização, e que se implantem um programa de biovigilância e um código de ética de manipulações genéticas. Abstract in english We live in an era characterized by the hegemony of science and technology, an era fraught with questions awaiting answers which would enable a safe and sustainable future for humankind. The development of agro-industrial processes - food products in particular - through recombinant DNA technology ha [...] s enhanced the profit prospects of the few big biotechnology companies and of large-scale farmers who have access to the latest technological developments. We thus oppose a moratorium on recombinant DNA technology. Moreover, hasty statements about risk-free transgenics may be misleading in the absence of extensive safety tests. There is a pressing need for the establishment of a biosafety policy in this country involving the organized civil society and every government agency responsible for monitoring such matters. There is also the need to put in place a bio-surveillance and a code of ethics regarding genetic manipulation.

  18. [Improving the nutritional value of plant foods through transgenic approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong-Mei; Mao, Xue; Wang, Shu-Jian; Li, Run-Zhi

    2004-07-01

    The most nutrients required in the human diet come from plants. The nutritional quality of plant products affects the human healthy. The advance of molecular cloning and transgenic technology has provided a new way to enhance the nutritional value of plant material. Transgenic modification of plant nutritional value has progressed greatly in the following aspects: improving the quality, composition and levels of protein, starch and fatty acid in different crops; increasing the levels of antioxidants (e.g. carotenoids and flavonoids); breeding the new type of plants with medical value for human. To date, many transgenic plants with nutritional enhancement have been developed. These transgenic plant products could be directly used as human diet or as valued materials in developing the "functional food" with especial nutritional quality and healthy effects after they are approved by a series of evaluations on their safety and nutritional efficiency for human being. We designed new zinc finger transcription factors (ZFP-TFs) that can specifically down-regulate the expression of the endogenous soybean FAD2-1 gene which catalyzes oleic acid to linoleic acid. Seed-specific expression of these ZFP-TFs in transgenic soybean somatic embryos repressed FAD2-1 transcription and increased significantly the levels of oleic acid, indicating that the engineered ZFP-TFs are capable of regulating fatty acid metabolism and modulating the expression of endogenous genes in plants. PMID:15968973

  19. Oat Phytochrome Is Biologically Active in Transgenic Tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, M. T.; Quail, P. H.

    1989-08-01

    To determine the functional homology between phytochromes from evolutionarily divergent species, we used the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter to express a monocot (oat) phytochrome cDNA in a dicot plant (tomato). Immunoblot analysis shows that more than 50% of the transgenic tomato plants synthesize the full-length oat phytochrome polypeptide. Moreover, leaves of light-grown transgenic plants contain appreciably less oat phytochrome than leaves from dark-adapted plants, and etiolated R1 transgenic seedlings have higher levels of spectrally active phytochrome than wild-type tomato seedlings in direct proportion to the level of immunochemically detectable oat polypeptide present. These data suggest that the heterologous oat polypeptide carries a functional chromophore, allowing reversible photoconversion between the two forms of the molecule, and that the far-red absorbing form (Pfr) is recognized and selectively degraded by the Pfr-specific degradative machinery in the dicot cell. The overexpression of oat phytochrome has pleiotropic, phenotypic consequences at all major phases of the life cycle. Adult transgenic tomato plants expressing high levels of the oat protein tend to be dwarfed, with dark green foliage and fruits. R1 transgenic seedlings have short hypocotyls with elevated anthocyanin contents. We conclude that a monocot phytochrome can be synthesized and correctly processed to a biologically active form in a dicot cell, and that the transduction pathway components that interact with the photoreceptor are evolutionarily conserved. PMID:12359910

  20. Handmade cloned transgenic piglets expressing the nematode fat-1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Yidi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Production of transgenic animals via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been adapted worldwide, but this application is somewhat limited by its relatively low efficiency. In this study, we used handmade cloning (HMC) established previously to produce transgenic pigs that express the functional nematode fat-1 gene. Codon-optimized mfat-1 was inserted into eukaryotic expression vectors, which were transferred into primary swine donor cells. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), gas chromatography, and chromosome analyses were performed to select donor clones capable of converting n-6 into n-3 fatty acids. Blastocysts derived from the clones that lowered the n-6/n-3 ratio to approximately 1:1 were transferred surgically into the uteri of recipients for transgenic piglets. By HMC, 37% (n=558) of reconstructed embryos developed to the blastocyst stage after 7 days of culture in vitro, with an average cell number of 81±36 (n=14). Three recipients became pregnant after 408 day-6 blastocysts were transferred into four naturally cycling females, and a total of 14 live offspring were produced. The nematode mfat-1 effectively lowered the n-6/n-3 ratio in muscle and major organs of the transgenic pig. Our results will help to establish a reliable procedure and an efficient option in the production of transgenic animals.

  1. Glycinebetaine synthesizing transgenic potato plants exhibit enhanced tolerance to salt and cold stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abiotic stresses are the most important contributors towards low productivity of major food crops. Various attempts have been made to enhance abiotic stress tolerance of crop plants by classical breeding and genetic transformation. Genetic transformation with glycinebetaine (GB) synthesizing enzymes' gene(s) in naturally non accumulating plants has resulted in enhanced tolerance against variety of abiotic stresses. Present study was aimed to evaluate the performance of GB synthesizing transgenic potato plants against salt and cold stresses. Transgenic potato plants were challenged against salt and cold stresses at whole plant level. Transgenic lines were characterized to determine the transgene copy number. Different parameters like integrity, chlorophyll contents, tuber yield and vegetative biomass were studied to monitor the stress tolerance of transgenic potato plants. The results were compared with Non-transgenic (NT) plants and statistically analyzed to evaluate significant differences. Multi-copy insertion of expression cassette was found in both transgenic lines. Upon salt stress, transgenic plants maintained better growth as compared to NT plants. The tuber yield of transgenic plants was significantly greater than NT plants in salt stress. Transgenic plants showed improved membrane integrity against cold stress by depicting appreciably reduced ion leakage as compared to NT plants. Moreover, transgenic plants showed significantly less chlorophyll bleaching than NT plants upon cold stress. In addition, NT plants accumulated significantly less biomass, and yielded fewer tubers as compared to transgenic plants after cold stress treatment. The study will be a committed step for field evaluation of transgenic plants with the aim of commercialization. (author)

  2. Development and application of transgenic technologies in cassava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nigel; Chavarriaga, Paul; Raemakers, Krit; Siritunga, Dimuth; Zhang, Peng

    2004-11-01

    The capacity to integrate transgenes into the tropical root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is now established and being utilized to generate plants expressing traits of agronomic interest. The tissue culture and gene transfer systems currently employed to produce these transgenic cassava have improved significantly over the past 5 years and are assessed and compared in this review. Programs are underway to develop cassava with enhanced resistance to viral diseases and insects pests, improved nutritional content, modified and increased starch metabolism and reduced cyanogenic content of processed roots. Each of these is described individually for the underlying biology the molecular strategies being employed and progress achieved towards the desired product. Important advances have occurred, with transgenic plants from several laboratories being prepared for field trails. PMID:15630627

  3. Identification of transgenic foods using NIR spectroscopy: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alishahi, A.; Farahmand, H.; Prieto, N.; Cozzolino, D.

    2010-01-01

    The utilization of chemometric methods in the quantitative and qualitative analysis of feeds, foods, medicine and so on has been accompanied with the great evolution in the progress and in the near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Hence, recently the application of NIR spectroscopy has extended on the context of genetics and transgenic products. The aim of this review was to investigate the application of NIR spectroscopy to identificate transgenic products and to compare it with the traditional methods. The results of copious researches showed that the application of NIRS technology was successful to distinguish transgenic foods and it has advantages such as fast, avoiding time-consuming, non-destructive and low cost in relation to the antecedent methods such as PCR and ELISA.

  4. [Use of transgenic animals in the European Union

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpire, Véronique; Balls, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Transgenic animals present unique possibilities for medical, agricultural and fundamental research, and as a means of producing valuable pharmaceutical and nutrient products. Their use has increased dramatically in recent years and is set to increase further in the near future. It has been claimed that transgenic animals might allow reduction and refinement in animal use, via more-precise gene targeting in breeding programmes. However, these objectives are threatened by transgenic procedures which may promote greater animal use, more-varied applications, and the greater likelihood of animal suffering. Current legislation on animal experimentation, for example, Directive 86/609/EU, was passed and implemented before the full implications of transgenesis were recognised. For this reason, ECVAM organised a workshop which was held in Southwell, Nottinghamshire, UK, on 7-11 April 1997. The aim of this workshop was to reach a consensus on a set of guidelines designed to assist regulatory authorities in their decision-making process. The conclusions of the workshop are subdivided into general considerations, proposals to use transgenic animals, production and use of transgenic animals, specific considerations relating to animals used as basic research/disease models, animals used in testing for toxicity and carcinogenicity, and transgenic farm animals. 14 recommendations have been derived from these conclusions and should make an important contribution to ensuring that the interests and welfare of animals are given due respect. They demonstrate a willingness by scientists to respond to public concerns and they should facilitate a consistent, harmonised and equitable regulatory approach within the EU. PMID:11208264

  5. Amino acids regulate transgene expression in MDCK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrente, Marta; Guetg, Adriano; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Arps, Lisa; Ruckstuhl, Lisa; Camargo, Simone M R; Verrey, François

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression and cell growth rely on the intracellular concentration of amino acids, which in metazoans depends on extracellular amino acid availability and transmembrane transport. To investigate the impact of extracellular amino acid concentrations on the expression of a concentrative amino acid transporter, we overexpressed the main kidney proximal tubule luminal neutral amino acid transporter B0AT1-collectrin (SLC6A19-TMEM27) in MDCK cell epithelia. Exogenously expressed proteins co-localized at the luminal membrane and mediated neutral amino acid uptake. However, the transgenes were lost over few cell culture passages. In contrast, the expression of a control transgene remained stable. To test whether this loss was due to inappropriately high amino acid uptake, freshly transduced MDCK cell lines were cultivated either with physiological amounts of amino acids or with the high concentration found in standard cell culture media. Expression of exogenous transporters was unaffected by physiological amino acid concentration in the media. Interestingly, mycoplasma infection resulted in a significant increase in transgene expression and correlated with the rapid metabolism of L-arginine. However, L-arginine metabolites were shown to play no role in transgene expression. In contrast, activation of the GCN2 pathway revealed by an increase in eIF2? phosphorylation may trigger transgene derepression. Taken together, high extracellular amino acid concentration provided by cell culture media appears to inhibit the constitutive expression of concentrative amino acid transporters whereas L-arginine depletion by mycoplasma induces the expression of transgenes possibly via stimulation of the GCN2 pathway. PMID:24797296

  6. Preservation and Faithful Expression of Transgene via Artificial Seeds in Alfalfa

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Wenting; Liang, Zongsuo; Wang, Xinhua; Sibbald, Susan; Hunter, David; Tian, Lining

    2013-01-01

    Proper preservation of transgenes and transgenic materials is important for wider use of transgenic technology in plants. Here, we report stable preservation and faithful expression of a transgene via artificial seed technology in alfalfa. DNA constructs containing the uid reporter gene coding for ?-glucuronidase (GUS) driven by a 35S promoter or a tCUP promoter were introduced into alfalfa via Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Somatic embryos were subsequently induced from trans...

  7. Male mating strategy and the introgression of a growth hormone transgene

    OpenAIRE

    Valosaari, Kata-Riina; Aikio, Sami; Kaitala, Veijo

    2008-01-01

    Escaped transgenic organisms (GMO's) may threaten the populations of their wild relatives if able to hybridize with each other. The introgression of a growth enhancement transgene into a wild Atlantic salmon population may be affected by the transgene's effects not only on fitness parameters, but also on mating behaviour. Large anadromous GMO males are most preferred in mating, but a transgene can also give the large sneakers a reproductive advantage over the smaller wild individuals. With a ...

  8. Post-mortem findings in cloned and transgenic piglets dead before weaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Mette; Winther, Kjeld Dahl; Secher, Jan O; Callesen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Important factors contributing to the well-known high mortality of piglets produced by SCNT are gross malformations of vital organs. The aim of the present retrospective study was to describe malformations found in cloned piglets, transgenic or not, dying or culled before weaning on Day 28. Large White (LW) embryos were transferred to 78 LW recipients, while 72 recipients received Göttingen embryos (67 transgenic and five not transgenic) and 56 received Yucatan embryos (43 transgenic and 13 not ...

  9. Expression and purification of recombinant human serum albumin from selectively terminable transgenic rice*

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qing; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Feng-zhen; Shen, Zhi-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is widely utilized for medical purposes and biochemical research. Transgenic rice has proved to be an attractive bioreactor for mass production of recombinant HSA (rHSA). However, transgene spread is a major environmental and food safety concern for transgenic rice expressing proteins of medical value. This study aimed to develop a selectively terminable transgenic rice line expressing HSA in rice seeds, and a simple process for recovery and purification of rHSA for ...

  10. Glyphosate-drift but not herbivory alters the rate of transgene flow from single and stacked trait transgenic canola (Brassica napus) to nontransgenic B. napus and B. rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londo, Jason P; Bollman, Michael A; Sagers, Cynthia L; Lee, E Henry; Watrud, Lidia S

    2011-08-01

    Transgenic plants can offer agricultural benefits, but the escape of transgenes is an environmental concern. In this study we tested the hypothesis that glyphosate drift and herbivory selective pressures can change the rate of transgene flow between the crop Brassica napus (canola), and weedy species and contribute to the potential for increased transgene escape risk and persistence outside of cultivation. • We constructed plant communities containing single transgenic B. napus genotypes expressing glyphosate herbicide resistance (CP4 EPSPS), lepidopteran insect resistance (Cry1Ac), or both traits ('stacked'), plus nontransgenic B. napus, Brassica rapa and Brassica nigra. Two different selective pressures, a sublethal glyphosate dose and lepidopteran herbivores (Plutella xylostella), were applied and rates of transgene flow and transgenic seed production were measured. • Selective treatments differed in the degree in which they affected gene flow and production of transgenic hybrid seed. Most notably, glyphosate-drift increased the incidence of transgenic seeds on nontransgenic B. napus by altering flowering phenology and reproductive function. • The findings of this study indicate that transgenic traits may be transmitted to wild populations and may increase in frequency in weedy populations through the direct and indirect effects of selection pressures on gene flow. PMID:21443650

  11. Detecting adventitious transgenic events in a maize center of diversity

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Luis Fernando Rimachi, Gamarra; Jorge Alcántara, Delgado; Yeny Aquino, Villasante; Rodomiro, Ortiz.

    2011-07-15

    Full Text Available Background: The genetic diversity of maize in Peru includes several landraces (within race clusters) and modern open pollinated and hybrid cultivars that are grown by farmers across various regions, thereby making this country a secondary center of diversity for this crop. A main topic of controvers [...] y in recent years refers to the unintended presence of transgenic events in locally grown cultivars at main centers of crop diversity. Peru does not yet have biosafety regulations to control or permit the growing of genetically modified crops. Hence, the aim of this research was to undertake a survey in the valley of Barranca, where there were recent claims of authorized transgenic maize grown in farmers fields as well as in samples taken from feed storage and grain or seed trade centers. Results: A total of 162 maize samples (134 from fields, 15 from local markets, eight from the collecting centers of poultry companies, from the local trading center and four samples from seed markets) were included for a qualitative detection by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) 35S promoter (P35S) and nopaline synthase terminator (Tnos) sequences, as well as for six transgenic events, namely BT11, NK603, T25, 176, TC1507 and MON810. The 134 maize samples from farmers fields were negative for Cry1Ab delta-endotoxin insecticidal protein and enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) using lateral flow strips. The PCR analysis did not detect any of the six transgenic events in samples from farmers fields, local markets, seed trading shops and the local collecting center. There were four transgenic events (T25, NK603, MON810 and TC1507) in grain samples from the barns of poultry companies. Conclusions: This research could not detect, at the 95% probability level, transgenes in farmers' fields in the valley of Barranca. The four transgenic events in grain samples from barns of poultry companies were not surprising because Peru imports maize, mainly for animal feed, from Argentina and the United States that are known for growing transgenic maize.

  12. First molecular identification of the transgene red fluorescent protein (RFP in transgenic ornamental zebrafish (Danio rerio introduced in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Scotto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the transgenic fluorescent red, orange and pink zebra fish (Danio rerio, found in local aquariums in Peru, were identified using the PCR technique to amplify the transgene RFP sea anemone belonging to Discosoma spp. The gene expression of the red fluorescent protein (RFP transgene was found to determine different gradients-of-bioluminescence (shades in color in each GMO fish analyzed. We performed sequence analysis of the two variants of the RFP along with six variants of the existing fluorescent protein GFP from the Genbank, this could help identify quickly if they are new genes or variants thereof as these novel fluorescent proteins may be introduced in aquatic GMO in the future. Thus, developing and improving biosecurity measures through its timely detection at the molecular genetic level.

  13. Salicylate and catechol levels are maintained in nahG transgenic poplar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic profiling was used to investigate the molecular phenotypes of transgenic Populus tremula x P. alba bybrids expressing the nahG transgene, a bacterial gene encoding salicylate hydroxylase that converts salicylic acid to catechol. Despite the efficacy of this transgenic approach to reducing...

  14. Vldlr overexpression causes hyperactivity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwata Keiko

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reelin regulates neuronal positioning in cortical brain structures and neuronal migration via binding to the lipoprotein receptors Vldlr and Lrp8. Reeler mutant mice display severe brain morphological defects and behavioral abnormalities. Several reports have implicated reelin signaling in the etiology of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders, including autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression. Moreover, it has been reported that VLDLR mRNA levels are increased in the post-mortem brain of autistic patients. Methods We generated transgenic (Tg rats overexpressing Vldlr, and examined their histological and behavioral features. Results Spontaneous locomotor activity was significantly increased in Tg rats, without detectable changes in brain histology. Additionally, Tg rats tended to show performance deficits in the radial maze task, suggesting that their spatial working memory was slightly impaired. Thus, Vldlr levels may be involved in determining locomotor activity and memory function. Conclusions Unlike reeler mice, patients with neurodevelopmental or psychiatric disorders do not show striking neuroanatomical aberrations. Therefore, it is notable, from a clinical point of view, that we observed behavioral phenotypes in Vldlr-Tg rats in the absence of neuroanatomical abnormalities.

  15. DISEASE RESISTANT TRANSGENIC COTTON TO PREVENT PREHARVEST AFLATOXIN CONTAMINATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are developing transgenic cottons that are resistant to the saprophytic fungus Aspergillus flavus, which produces carcinogenic aflatoxin on lipid-rich cottonseed. Several independently transformed lines of cotton expressing antifungal genes coding for either the chloroperoxidase (CPO-P) or the s...

  16. Development of transgenic chickens expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we demonstrated the successful production of transgenic chickens expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene. Replication-defective recombinant retroviruses produced from vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein pseudotyped retrovirus vector system were injected beneath the blastoderm of non-incubated chicken embryos (stage X). From 129 injected eggs, 13 chicks hatched after 21 days of incubation. All hatched chicks were found to express vector-encoded EGFP gene, which was under the control of the Rous sarcoma virus promoter and boosted post-transcriptionally by woodchuck hepatitis virus post-transcriptional regulatory element sequence. Green fluorescent signals, indicative of the EGFP gene expression, were detected in various body parts, including head, limb, eye, toe, and several internal organs. Genomic incorporation of the transgene was also proven by Southern blot assay. Our results show the exceptional versatile effectiveness of the EGFP gene as a marker in the gene expression-related studies which therefore would be very helpful in establishing a useful transgenic chicken model system for studies on embryo development and for efficient production of transgenic chickens as bioreactors

  17. Transgenic RNAi in mouse oocytes: The first decade.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malík, Radek; Svoboda, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Ro?. 134, 1-2 (2012), s. 64-68. ISSN 0378-4320 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : RNAi * oocyte * transgene * silencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.897, year: 2012

  18. Transgenic maize plants expressing a fungal phytase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rumei; Xue, Guangxing; Chen, Ping; Yao, Bin; Yang, Wenzhu; Ma, Qianli; Fan, Yunliu; Zhao, Zuoyu; Tarczynski, Mitchell C; Shi, Jinrui

    2008-08-01

    Maize seeds are the major ingredient of commercial pig and poultry feed. Phosphorus in maize seeds exists predominantly in the form of phytate. Phytate phosphorus is not available to monogastric animals and phosphate supplementation is required for optimal animal growth. Undigested phytate in animal manure is considered a major source of phosphorus pollution to the environment from agricultural production. Microbial phytase produced by fermentation as a feed additive is widely used to manage the nutritional and environmental problems caused by phytate, but the approach is associated with production costs for the enzyme and requirement of special cares in feed processing and diet formulation. An alternative approach would be to produce plant seeds that contain high phytase activities. We have over-expressed Aspergillus niger phyA2 gene in maize seeds using a construct driven by the maize embryo-specific globulin-1 promoter. Low-copy-number transgenic lines with simple integration patterns were identified. Western-blot analysis showed that the maize-expressed phytase protein was smaller than that expressed in yeast, apparently due to different glycosylation. Phytase activity in transgenic maize seeds reached approximately 2,200 units per kg seed, about a 50-fold increase compared to non-transgenic maize seeds. The phytase expression was stable across four generations. The transgenic seeds germinated normally. Our results show that the phytase expression lines can be used for development of new maize hybrids to improve phosphorus availability and reduce the impact of animal production on the environment. PMID:17932782

  19. BIODIVERSITY (COMMUNICATIONS ARISING): MAIZE TRANSGENE RESULTS IN MEXICO ARE ARTEFACTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quist and Chapela's conclusion that the transgenes they claim to have detected in native maize in Oaxaca, Mexico, are predominantly reassorted and inserted into a "diversity of genomic contexts" seems to be based on an artefact arising from the inverse polymerase chain reaction (i-PCR) they used to ...

  20. [Features of development and reproduction of transgenic flax].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemesh, V A; Samatadze, T E; Guzenko, E V; Zhelezniakova, E V; Amosova, A V; Zelenin, A V; Muravenko, O V

    2014-01-01

    Primary transformants carrying a genetic construct with the chimeric gfp-tua6 gene were obtained using biolistic transformation of hypocotyl explants of flax variety Vasilek. Viable modified plants were used as a basis for the production of inbred lines with confirmed inheritance of introduced genetic construct in three generations. The characteristics of phenological growth stages, plant height, number of bolls and meiosis were studied for transgenic plants. A comparison of transformed lines based on reproduction years revealed a significant decrease of seed production in one line. Meiotic analysis of this line at metaphase I and anaphase I stages was conducted. The percentage of cells with impaired meiosis was highest in transgenic plants of the line with the lowest seed production. Thus, the nonspecific incorporation of genetic construct into the flax genome using biolistic transformation impairs meiosis to a different extent and it is the main reason for unequal reproducibility of transgenic flax. The production of stably reproducing transgenic lines requires systematic analysis of meiosis. PMID:25739298

  1. TRANSGENE ESCAPE MONITORING, POPULATION GENETICS, AND THE LAW

    Science.gov (United States)

    There has been little discussion about how to apply population genetics methods to monitor the spread of transgenes that are detected outside the agricultural populations where they are deployed. Population geneticists have developed tools for analyzing the genetic makeup of indi...

  2. NEW PIGGYBAC VECTORS FOR FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS AND TRANSGENIC INSECT RELEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our research focuses on creating transgenic fruit fly strains for improved biological control and functional genomics analysis. This has involved the development of the piggyBac transposon-based transformation system that is now used in four orders of insects. For biocontrol based on conditional l...

  3. PiggyBac Transgene Insertion Site GIZA Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetically modified New World screwworms were analyzed by inverse PCR and several sequences of genomic DNA flanking the transposon insertion sites were obtained. One transgenic strain, designated GIZA, exhibited the properties of a lethal genetic mutation. Classic genetic crosses of these insects r...

  4. The effect of transgenic GNA potatoes on aphids and thrips.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rovenská, Gabriela; Zemek, Rostislav

    ?eské Bud?jovice : ÚMBR AV ?R, 2001. s. 57. [Assessment of the Impacts of Genetically Modified Plants (AIGM). 13.09.2001-15.09.2001, ?eské Bud?jovice] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : transgenic cultivar Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection

  5. Efficient expression of transgenes in adult zebrafish by electroporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao S Hari

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression of transgenes in muscle by injection of naked DNA is widely practiced. Application of electrical pulses at the site of injection was demonstrated to improve transgene expression in muscle tissue. Zebrafish is a precious model to investigate developmental biology in vertebrates. In this study we investigated the effect of electroporation on expression of transgenes in 3–6 month old adult zebrafish. Results Electroporation parameters such as number of pulses, voltage and amount of plasmid DNA were optimized and it was found that 6 pulses of 40 V·cm-1 at 15 ?g of plasmid DNA per fish increased the luciferase expression 10-fold compared to controls. Similar enhancement in transgene expression was also observed in Indian carp (Labeo rohita. To establish the utility of adult zebrafish as a system for transient transfections, the strength of the promoters was compared in A2 cells and adult zebrafish after electroporation. The relative strengths of the promoters were found to be similar in cell lines and in adult zebrafish. GFP fluorescence in tissues after electroporation was also studied by fluorescence microscopy. Conclusion Electroporation after DNA injection enhances gene expression 10-fold in adult zebrafish. Electroporation parameters for optimum transfection of adult zebrafish with tweezer type electrode were presented. Enhanced reporter gene expression upon electroporation allowed comparison of strengths of the promoters in vivo in zebrafish.

  6. Agricultural Biotechnology (Production of Foreign Compounds in Transgenic Plants)

    OpenAIRE

    Pueyo, José J.; Hiatt, Andrew

    1998-01-01

    Expression of bacterial genes, mammalian genes, or other plant genes is becoming routine for several plant species. Most transgenic plants are generated for basic research purposes, such as the evaluation of tissue-specific expression of genes, processing and secretion signals, and enhancer elements.

  7. Postmortem findings in cloned and transgenic piglets dead before weaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Mette; Winther, K.D.

    2015-01-01

    Important factors contributing to the well-known high mortality of piglets produced by SCNT are gross malformations of vital organs. The aim of the present retrospective study was to describe malformations found in cloned piglets, transgenic or not, dying or culled before weaning on Day 28. Large White (LW) embryos were transferred to 78 LW recipients, while 72 recipients received Göttingen embryos (67 transgenic and five not transgenic) and 56 received Yucatan embryos (43 transgenic and 13 not transgenic). Overall pregnancy rate was 76%, and there were more abortions in recipients with minipig embryos than in those with LW embryos (26% and 24% vs. 6%). Piglets (n = 815) were born from 128 sows with 6.5 ± 0.4 full-born piglets per litter. The overall rate of stillborn piglets was 21% of all born with the number of stillborn piglets ranging from one to nine in a litter. The mortality of the surviving piglets during the first month was 48%. Thus, altogether 58% of the full-born piglets died before weaning. In 87 of the 128 litters (68%), one to 12 of the piglets showed major or minor malformations. Malformations were found in 232 piglets (29.5% of all born). A single malformation was registered in 152 piglets, but several piglets showed two (n = 58) or more (n = 23) malformations (7.4% and 2.8% of all born, respectively). A significantly higher malformation rate was found in transgenic Göttingen and Yucatan piglets (32% and 46% of all born, respectively) than in nontransgenic LW (17%). There was a gender difference in the transgenic minipigs because male piglets had a higher rate of malformations (49.1%) than females (29.7%). The most common defects in the cloned piglets were in the digestive (12.2%), circulatory (9.4%), reproductive (11.3%), and musculoskeletal (9.1%) systems. Malformations of the musculoskeletal system were most frequent in Göttingen (16.3% vs. approximately 5.5% in the two other breeds), whereas abnormal cardiopulmonary systems were most frequent in Yucatan piglets (26.9% vs. 2.1% in LW and 5.3% in Göttingen). In conclusion, these results show that pig cloning results in a considerable loss of piglets and that many of these can be related to various malformations that all are also seen in noncloned piglets. Because approximately half of the cloned piglets still survive, even with eventual unknown minor malformations, use of pigs as models for human diseases is still realistic. However, continued efforts are needed to further reduce the level of malformations.

  8. Visualization of C. elegans transgenic arrays by GFP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sternberg Paul W

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeting the green fluorescent protein (GFP via the E. coli lac repressor (LacI to a specific DNA sequence, the lac operator (lacO, allows visualization of chromosomes in yeast and mammalian cells. In principle this method of visualization could be used for genetic mosaic analysis, which requires cell-autonomous markers that can be scored easily and at single cell resolution. The C. elegans lin-3 gene encodes an epidermal growth factor family (EGF growth factor. lin-3 is expressed in the gonadal anchor cell and acts through LET-23 (transmembrane protein tyrosine kinase and ortholog of EGF receptor to signal the vulval precursor cells to generate vulval tissue. lin-3 is expressed in the vulval cells later, and recent evidence raises the possibility that lin-3 acts in the vulval cells as a relay signal during vulval induction. It is thus of interest to test the site of action of lin-3 by mosaic analysis. Results We visualized transgenes in living C. elegans by targeting the green fluorescent protein (GFP via the E. coli lac repressor (LacI to a specific 256 sequence repeat of the lac operator (lacO incorporated into transgenes. We engineered animals to express a nuclear-localized GFP-LacI fusion protein. C. elegans cells having a lacO transgene result in nuclear-localized bright spots (i.e., GFP-LacI bound to lacO. Cells with diffuse nuclear fluorescence correspond to unbound nuclear localized GFP-LacI. We detected chromosomes in living animals by chromosomally integrating the array of the lacO repeat sequence and visualizing the integrated transgene with GFP-LacI. This detection system can be applied to determine polyploidy as well as investigating chromosome segregation. To assess the GFP-LacI•lacO system as a marker for mosaic analysis, we conducted genetic mosaic analysis of the epidermal growth factor lin-3, expressed in the anchor cell. We establish that lin-3 acts in the anchor cell to induce vulva development, demonstrating this method's utility in detecting the presence of a transgene. Conclusion The GFP-LacI•lacO transgene detection system works in C. elegans for visualization of chromosomes and extrachromosomal transgenes. It can be used as a marker for genetic mosaic analysis. The lacO repeat sequence as an extrachromosomal array becomes a valuable technique allowing rapid, accurate determination of spontaneous loss of the array, thereby allowing high-resolution mosaic analysis. The lin-3 gene is required in the anchor cell to induce the epidermal vulval precursors cells to undergo vulval development.

  9. Tilapia chromosomal growth hormone gene expression accelerates growth in transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Reynold, Morales; María Teresa, Herrera; Amílcar, Arenal; Asterio, Cruz; Oscar, Hernández; Rafael, Pimentel; Isabel, Guillén; Rebeca, Martínez; Mario P, Estrada.

    2001-08-15

    Full Text Available Gene transfer is economically important and model fish species has produced a great impact in modern biology and biotechnology. Transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio) were generated through the co-injection of a GFP-expressing plasmid and an "all fish" transgene composed by the carp beta-actin promoter [...] and the chromosomal tilapia (Oreochromis hornorum) growth hormone gene. The GFP expression was a good indicator of stable transformation and allowed for high efficiency selection of transgenic fish. Transgenic F1 zebrafish grew 20% faster than full sibling non-transgenic controls.

  10. Ex Vivo Gene Therapy Using Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Deliver Growth Factors in the Skeletal Muscle of a Familial ALS Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masatoshi; Svendsen, Clive N

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic protein and molecule delivery to target sites by transplanted human stem cells holds great promise for ex vivo gene therapy. Our group has demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of ex vivo gene therapy targeting the skeletal muscles in a transgenic rat model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We used human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and genetically modified them to release neuroprotective growth factors such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Intramuscular growth factor delivery via hMSCs can enhance neuromuscular innervation and motor neuron survival in a rat model of ALS (SOD1(G93A) transgenic rats). Here, we describe the protocol of ex vivo delivery of growth factors via lentiviral vector-mediated genetic modification of hMSCs and hMSC transplantation into the skeletal muscle of a familial ALS rat model. PMID:26611598

  11. Options for development of transgenic pigs with enhanced performance traits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Traditional breeding practices have yielded a slow but steady genetic improvement of domestic animals. Unfortunately, these practices often do not enable the separation of desirable production traits from undesirable traits, and furthermore, do not enable the transfer of advantageous genetic traits from one species to another. Transgenic methodologies surmount these barriers, and transgenic pigs have been developed that have a variety of novel enhanced performance traits, the capability to serve as factories for the production of pharmaceuticals, and soon may provide a reliable supply of organs for xenotransplantation. This presentation will focus primarily on the expression of novel performance traits, since they have the potential to provide the greatest benefit to farmers in countries with a less well developed agricultural infrastructure. The first hurdle in the development of animals with novel production characteristics is the availability of reliable methods for the production of transgenic animals. This requires the combination of a suitable transgenic technique and an appropriate genetic construct. Classic pronuclear microinjection, the original method for producing transgenic animals may soon be surpassed by the more convenient sperm-mediated transgenesis, use of a retroviral vector system, or by techniques involving nuclear transfer. Despite the complexity involved in generating transgenic animals, a variety of interesting performance enhancing genes have been introduced into pigs. These include porcine growth hormone and IGF1 to enhance growth characteristics and carcass quality, ?-lactalbumin to enhance the growth of nursing piglets, plant oleate desaturase (http://www.newscientist.com/hottopics/gm/gm.jsp?id=ns99991841) to increase the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids in tissues, and phytase to enhance plant phosphorus utilization. No information is available on the performance or meat quality characteristics of pigs expressing the desaturase gene, however, expression of growth hormone, ?- lactalbumin and phytase genes in pigs has been shown to be efficacious. As an example, phytase in transgenic pigs enable practically complete utilization of the phosphorus in cereal grain as compared to less than half by non-transgenic pigs. This new trait would be particularly beneficial in a production environment without extensive infrastructure characteristic of modern intensive Western-style agriculture. In addition to bypassing the need for expensive supplemental phosphorus, it also could help avoid environmental problems associated with intensive agriculture. In addition to genes already tested that enhance performance characteristics of pigs, other genes of interest include those coding for plant cell wall hydrolases, genes coding for disease resistance, and yet others that could improve protein utilization. Expression of a novel gene in a pig is only the first step in bringing a new line of transgenic pigs into the pork production system. Once a transgenic pig has been documented to perform according to expectation, and several generations have passed to ensure that the novel gene is stably inherited and expression maintained, governmental regulatory requirements must be satisfied to ensure that the pig has no deleterious effect on the environment, and that the meat is safe for human consumption. The food safety standards may vary among countries, but those established by the FAO (http://www.fao.org/es/ESN/food/risk_biotech_papers_en.stm) are usually taken as the primary requirement and country specific requirement overlaid. Meeting these standards dictates that, at least initially, only traits with great utility will be funded at a sufficiently high level to afford the essential testing to meet national and international safety requirements. (author)

  12. Accumulation of transgene-derived siRNAs is not sufficient for RNAi-mediated protection against Citrus tristeza virus in transgenic Mexican lime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Carmelo; Cervera, Magdalena; Fagoaga, Carmen; Moreno, Pedro; Navarro, Luis; Flores, Ricardo; Peña, Leandro

    2010-01-01

    Mexican lime plants transformed with the 3'-terminal 549 nucleotides of the Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genome in sense, antisense and intron-hairpin formats were analysed for transgene-derived transcript and short interfering RNA (siRNA) accumulation, and for CTV resistance. Propagations from all sense, antisense and empty-vector transgenic lines were susceptible to CTV, except for a single sense-line plant with a complex transgene integration pattern that showed transgene-derived siRNAs in association with low levels of the transgene-derived transcript. In contrast, nine of 30 intron-hairpin lines showed CTV resistance, with 9%-56% of bud-propagated plants, depending on the line, remaining uninfected on graft inoculation, and the others being susceptible. Although resistance was always associated with the presence of transgene-derived siRNAs, their level in different sense and intron-hairpin transformants was variable irrespective of the response to CTV infection. In intron-hairpin lines with single transgene integration, CTV resistance was correlated with low accumulation of the transgene-derived transcript rather than with high accumulation of transgene-derived siRNAs. PMID:20078774

  13. Functional screening of an asthma QTL in YAC transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symula, Derek J.; Frazer, Kelly A.; Ueda, Yukihiko; Denefle, Patrice; Stevens, Mary E.; Wang, Zhi-En; Locksley, Richard; Rubin, Edward M.

    1999-07-02

    While large numbers of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to genetically complex conditions have been discovered, few causative genes have been identified. This is mainly due to the large size of QTLs and the subtle connection between genotype and quantitative phenotype associated with these conditions. While large numbers of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to genetically complex conditions have been discovered, few causative genes have been identified. This is mainly due to the large size of QTLs and the subtle connection between genotype and quantitative phenotype associated with these conditions. To screen for genes contributing to an asthma QTL mapped to human chromosome 5q33, the authors characterized a panel of large-insert 5q31 transgenics based on studies demonstrating that altering gene dosage frequently affects quantitative phenotypes normally influenced by that gene. This panel of human YAC transgenics, propagating a one megabase interva2048 chromosome 5q31 containing 23 genes, was screened for quantitative changes in several asthma-associated phenotypes. Multiple independent transgenic lines with altered IgE response to antigen treatment shared a 180 kb region containing 5 genes, including human interleukin 4 (IL4) and interleukin 13 (IL13), which induce IgE class switching in B cells5. Further analysis of these mice and mice transgenic for only murine Il4 and Il13 demonstrated that moderate changes in murine Il4 and Il13 expression affect asthma-associated phenotypes in vivo. This functional screen of large-insert transgenics enabled them to sift through multiple genes in the 5q3 asthma QTL without prior consideration of assumed individual gene function and identify genes that influence the QTL phenotype in vivo.

  14. The Comparative Effects of Genetically Modified Maize and Conventional Maize on Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Kýlýçgün

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available       Aim: Genetically modified crops have a potential to solve many of the world’s  nutrition problems. On the other hand, the impact of these novel crops on environmental, animal and human health should be tested and their risk assessment is required. In this study, the aim of this study was to investigate the positive or possible negative effects of genetically modified maize on offspring rats which were between the start of dry food feeding and the time interval until they reached puberty. Material and Method: Thirty Wistar albino rats were used in this study. The rats were fed with transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis maize and conventional maize during 40 days. After the experimental period, the length, height and weight of organs and serum chemistry and hematology values were measured. Results: The length, height and weight of liver, spleen, lung and kidneys in Bacillus thuringiensis maize group of rats were different from those in control and conventional groups. When mean values of serum chemistry and hematology parameters, which were glucose, urea, total protein, cholesterol, triglyceride, very low-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, calcium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, chlorine were examined, some obvious differences were found between the rats fed with transgenic maize and its conventional counterpart and control groups. Discussion: The results of this study showed that Bacillus  thuringiensis maize may not only have an effect on the length, height and weight of organs of the maturing term of rats but also lead to alterations in serum chemistry and hematology values.

  15. Evaluation of tyrosinase minigene co-injection as a marker for genetic manipulations in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methot, D; Reudelhuber, T L; Silversides, D W

    1995-11-25

    The utility of tyrosinase minigene co-injection was evaluated as a visual marker for the generation and breeding of transgenic mice. In an evaluation of 39 transgenic founder animals and 44 transgenic lines five phenotypic patterns of pigmentation were consistently observed, including albino, dark, light, mottled and himalayan. In these studies co-injection of the tyrosinase minigene along with the transgene of interest (TOI) resulted in genomic integration of the two transgenes in 95% of the F0 generation. Co-segregation of transgenes occurred in 94% of doubly transgenic mice in the F1 generation, without dissociation in subsequent generations. All pigmented phenotypes proved useful for distinguishing homozygous from heterozygous F2 animals via backcross trials, while the light, mottled and himalayan phenotypes proved useful in visually discriminating between homozygous and heterozygous F2 animals. In addition, the light, mottled and himalayan phenotypes proved useful in determining segregation patterns of transgenes in the progeny of crosses between separate transgenic lines. Moreover, there appears to be a correlation between intensity of pigmentation and degree of expression of the co-injected TOI. These studies confirm that tyrosinase co-injection is a useful adjunct in transgenic mouse studies and can serve to reduce routine genetic validation of transgenic lines. PMID:8524641

  16. Potassium channels in hippocampal neurones are absent in a transgenic but not in a chemical model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, B; Wilton, L A K; Good, M; Chapman, P F; Wann, K T

    2008-01-23

    We have investigated using single channel patch-clamp methods potassium channel prevalence in hippocampal neurones from two animal models of AD. Experiments have been carried out on transgenic mice (Tg2576) carrying the Swedish mutation (K670N/M671L) and rats receiving ventricular infusions of okadaic acid. In cell-attached patches from hippocampal neurones from the Tg2576 and control littermate mice there were three principal unitary conductance - 22 pS, 111 pS and 178 pS. The two channels of intermediate and large conductance were voltage-dependent, highly active in cell-attached patches, activity decreasing markedly on hyperpolarisation. The large conductance channel was sensitive to TEA, iberiotoxin, was activated in excised inside-out patches by Ca 2+(i) and is the type I maxi-K+ channel. Significantly, there was a reduction in the prevalence of a TEA-sensitive 113 pS channel in neurones from TG2576 mice with a corresponding increase in prevalence of the maxi-K+ channel. There was no difference in the characteristics of maxi-K+ between patches in neurones from the transgenic and littermate controls. In the rat model single channel analysis was performed on hippocampal neurons from three groups of animals i.e. non-operated, and these receiving an infusion of vehicle or vehicle with okadaic acid. Three principal unitary conductances of around 18 pS, 118 pS and 185 pS were also observed in cell-attached recordings from these three groups. The intermediate and high conductance channels were blocked by TEA or 4-AP or 140 mM RbCl. There were no statistically significant differences in the channel prevalence or channel density between the control and test groups. PMID:18093574

  17. Non-Homologous End Joining Plays a Key Role in Transgene Concatemer Formation in Transgenic Zebrafish Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Dai, Xiaojuan Cui, Zuoyan Zhu, Wei Hu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on concatemer formation and integration pattern of transgenes in zebrafish embryos. A reporter plasmid based on enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP driven by Cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter, pCMV-pax6in-eGFP, was constructed to reflect transgene behavior in the host environment. After removal of the insertion fragment by double digestion with various combinations of restriction enzymes, linearized pCMV-pax6in-eGFP vectors were generated with different combinations of 5?-protruding, 3?-protruding, and blunt ends that were microinjected into zebrafish embryos. Repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs was monitored by GFP expression following religation of the reporter gene. One-hundred-and-ninety-seven DNA fragments were amplified from GFP-positive embryos and sequenced to analyze the repair characteristics of different DSB end combinations. DSBs involving blunt and asymmetric protruding ends were repaired efficiently by direct ligation of blunt ends, ligation after blunting and fill-in, or removed by cutting. Repair of DSBs with symmetric 3?-3? protrusions was less efficient and utilized template-directed repair. The results suggest that non-homologous end joining (NHEJ was the principal mechanism of exogenous gene concatemer formation and integration of transgenes into the genome of transgenic zebrafish.

  18. Pre-immunization with an Intramuscular Injection of AAV9-Human Erythropoietin Vectors Reduces the Vector-Mediated Transduction following Re-Administration in Rat Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Chun; Yang, Wei-hua; Chen, Sha-Sha; Ma, Bao-Feng; Li, Bin; Lu, Tao; Qu, Ting-Yu; Klein, Ronald L.; Zhao, Li-Ru; DUAN, WEI-MING

    2013-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9)-mediated human erythropoietin (hEPO) gene delivery into the brain protects dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. In the present study, we examined whether pre-exposure to AAV9-hEPO vectors with an intramuscular or intrastriatal injection would reduce AAV9-mediated hEPO transduction in rat brain. We first characterized transgene expression and immune responses against ...

  19. Identifying the integrated neural networks involved in capsaicin-induced pain using fMRI in awake TRPV1 knockout and wild-type rats

    OpenAIRE

    Yee, Jason R.; Kenkel, William; Caccaviello, John C.; Gamber, Kevin; Simmons, Phil; Nedelman, Mark; Kulkarni, Praveen; Ferris, Craig F

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we used functional MRI in awake rats to investigate the pain response that accompanies intradermal injection of capsaicin into the hindpaw. To this end, we used BOLD imaging together with a 3D segmented, annotated rat atlas and computational analysis to identify the integrated neural circuits involved in capsaicin-induced pain. The specificity of the pain response to capsaicin was tested in a transgenic model that contains a biallelic deletion of the gene encoding for th...

  20. Transgenic Expression of Osteoactivin/gpnmb Enhances Bone Formation In Vivo and Osteoprogenitor Differentiation Ex Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frara, Nagat; Abdelmagid, Samir M; Sondag, Gregory R; Moussa, Fouad M; Yingling, Vanessa R; Owen, Thomas A; Popoff, Steven N; Barbe, Mary F; Safadi, Fayez F

    2016-01-01

    Initial identification of osteoactivin (OA)/glycoprotein non-melanoma clone B (gpnmb) was demonstrated in an osteopetrotic rat model, where OA expression was increased threefold in mutant bones, compared to normal. OA mRNA and protein expression increase during active bone regeneration post-fracture, and primary rat osteoblasts show increased OA expression during differentiation in vitro. To further examine OA/gpnmb as an osteoinductive agent, we characterized the skeletal phenotype of transgenic mouse overexpressing OA/gpnmb under the CMV-promoter (OA-Tg). Western blot analysis showed increased OA/gpnmb in OA-Tg osteoblasts, compared to wild-type (WT). In OA-Tg mouse femurs versus WT littermates, micro-CT analysis showed increased trabecular bone volume and thickness, and cortical bone thickness; histomorphometry showed increased osteoblast numbers, bone formation and mineral apposition rates in OA-Tg mice; and biomechanical testing showed higher peak moment and stiffness. Given that OA/gpnmb is also over-expressed in osteoclasts in OA-Tg mice, we evaluated bone resorption by ELISA and histomorphometry, and observed decreased serum CTX-1 and RANK-L, and decreased osteoclast numbers in OA-Tg, compared to WT mice, indicating decreased bone remodeling in OA-Tg mice. The proliferation rate of OA-Tg osteoblasts in vitro was higher, compared to WT, as was alkaline phosphatase staining and activity, the latter indicating enhanced differentiation of OA-Tg osteoprogenitors. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed increased TGF-?1 and TGF-? receptors I and II expression in OA-Tg osteoblasts, compared to WT. Together, these data suggest that OA overexpression has an osteoinductive effect on bone mass in vivo and stimulates osteoprogenitor differentiation ex vivo. J. Cell. Physiol. 230: 72-83, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25899717

  1. FAS-Dependent Cell Death in ?-Synuclein Transgenic Oligodendrocyte Models of Multiple System Atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Christine L; Fillon, Gwenaëlle

    2013-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy is a parkinsonian neurodegenerative disorder. It is cytopathologically characterized by accumulation of the protein p25? in cell bodies of oligodendrocytes followed by accumulation of aggregated ?-synuclein in so-called glial cytoplasmic inclusions. p25? is a stimulator of ?-synuclein aggregation, and coexpression of ?-synuclein and p25? in the oligodendroglial OLN-t40-AS cell line causes ?-synuclein aggregate-dependent toxicity. In this study, we investigated whether the FAS system is involved in ?-synuclein aggregate dependent degeneration in oligodendrocytes and may play a role in multiple system atrophy. Using rat oligodendroglial OLN-t40-AS cells we demonstrate that the cytotoxicity caused by coexpressing ?-synuclein and p25? relies on stimulation of the death domain receptor FAS and caspase-8 activation. Using primary oligodendrocytes derived from PLP-?-synuclein transgenic mice we demonstrate that they exist in a sensitized state expressing pro-apoptotic FAS receptor, which makes them sensitive to FAS ligand-mediated apoptosis. Immunoblot analysis shows an increase in FAS in brain extracts from multiple system atrophy cases. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated enhanced FAS expression in multiple system atrophy brains notably in oligodendrocytes harboring the earliest stages of glial cytoplasmic inclusion formation. Oligodendroglial FAS expression is an early hallmark of oligodendroglial pathology in multiple system atrophy that mechanistically may be coupled to ?-synuclein dependent degeneration and thus represent a potential target for protective intervention.

  2. Use of Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction for Determining Copy Numbers of Transgenes in Lesquerella fendleri

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Q. Chen; Jiann-Tsyh Lin

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: In transgenic plants, the number of transgene copies could greatly influence the level of expression and genetic stability of the target gene, thus it is important to develop an efficient method for accurate estimation of transgene copies. The quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) technique is becoming more efficient nowadays to determine copy numbers of transgenes in transgenic plants, being used here, for the first time in quantifying copy numb...

  3. A 90-day safety study of genetically modified rice expressing Cry1Ab protein (Bacillus thuringiensis toxin) in Wistar rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Malene; Poulsen, Morten; Wilcks, Andrea; Kroghsbo, Stine; Miller, Andreas; Frenzel, Thomas; Danier, Jürgen; Rychlik, Michael; Emami, Kaveh; Gatehouse, Angharad; Shu, Qingyao; Engel, Karl-Heinz; Altosaar, Illimar; Knudsen, Ib

    2007-01-01

    An animal model for safety assessment of genetically modified foods was tested as part of the SAFOTEST project. In a 90-day feeding study on Wistar rats, the transgenic KMD1 rice expressing Cry1Ab protein was compared to its non-transgenic parental wild type, Xiushui 11. The KMD1 rice contained 15 mg Bt toxin/kg and based on the average feed consumption the daily intake was 0.54 mg Bt toxin/ kg body weight. No adverse effects on animal behaviour or weight gain were observed during the study. Blo...

  4. Effects of Transgenic Rice on Life History Traits of Daphnia magna in Life Table Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam, Sungjin

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the impacts of transgenic rice on freshwater organisms, we conducted two life tableexperiments using Daphnia magna for fifteen and twenty days, respectively. We examined life history traits suchas population growth rates (r, reproductive rates (R0, generation times, and survivorship. In the first experiment,we used non-drought-stressed transgenic and non-transgenic rice harvested in 2005. In the second study, weused non-transgenic and transgenic rice harvested in 2006 following drought stress. Each experiment involvedthree treatments in which D. magna neonates were fed with Selenastrum capricornutum (control treatment andS. capricornutum with 5% aqueous extracts of non-transgenic rice (N-T and transgenic rice (T. In the firstexperiment, D. magna showed reduced population growth rates and lowered fecundity in the N-T and Ttreatments. In the second experiment, D. magna receiving both transgenic and non-transgenic rice extractsshowed very high mortality, low population growth rates and reproduction rates. We could not detect anysignificant negative effects of extracts from transgenic rice on D. magna life history traits at 95%.

  5. Recent advances in development of marker-free transgenic plants: Regulation and biosafety concern

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Narendra Tuteja; Shiv Verma; Ranjan Kumar Sahoo; Sebastian Raveendar; In Bheema Lingeshwara Reddy

    2012-03-01

    During the efficient genetic transformation of plants with the gene of interest, some selectable marker genes are also used in order to identify the transgenic plant cells or tissues. Usually, antibiotic- or herbicide-selective agents and their corresponding resistance genes are used to introduce economically valuable genes into crop plants. From the biosafety authority and consumer viewpoints, the presence of selectable marker genes in released transgenic crops may be transferred to weeds or pathogenic microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract or soil, making them resistant to treatment with herbicides or antibiotics, respectively. Sexual crossing also raises the problem of transgene expression because redundancy of transgenes in the genome may trigger homology-dependent gene silencing. The future potential of transgenic technologies for crop improvement depends greatly on our abilities to engineer stable expression of multiple transgenic traits in a predictable fashion and to prevent the transfer of undesirable transgenic material to non-transgenic crops and related species. Therefore, it is now essential to develop an efficient marker-free transgenic system. These considerations underline the development of various approaches designed to facilitate timely elimination of transgenes when their function is no longer needed. Due to the limiting number of available selectable marker genes, in future the stacking of transgenes will be increasingly desirable. The production of marker-free transgenic plants is now a critical requisite for their commercial deployment and also for engineering multiple and complex trait. Here we describe the current technologies to eliminate the selectablemarker genes (SMG) in order to develop marker-free transgenic plants and also discuss the regulation and biosafety concern of genetically modified (GM) crops.

  6. Effects of aliskiren on stroke in rats expressing human renin and angiotensinogen genes

    OpenAIRE

    Schmerbach, K; Pfab, T.; Zhao, Y; Culman, J; Mueller, S; Villringer, A.; Mueller, D.N.; Hocher, B; Unger, T.; Thoene-Reineke, C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pre-treatment with angiotensin receptor blockers is known to improve neurological outcome after stroke. This study investigated for the first time, whether the renin inhibitor aliskiren has similar neuroprotective effects. METHODS: Since aliskiren specifically blocks human renin, double transgenic rats expressing human renin and angiotensinogen genes were used. To achieve a systolic blood pressure of 150 or 130 mmHg animals were treated with aliskiren (7.5 or 12.5 mg/kg*d) or cande...

  7. Transgenic approaches for development of disease resistance in banana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banana (Musa spp.) is an important food and cash crop worldwide. Diseases and pests pose the most serious constraint to banana cultivation. Among the diseases, Fusarium wilt and Banana Bunchy Top Virus (BBTV) are the most important economically. We have explored different transgenic approaches for development of efficient resistance in banana against these two diseases. For countering Fusarium wilt, we have over expressed Petunia floral defensins using a strong constitutive promoter in transgenic banana plants. We have also tested a host induced gene silencing strategy targeting two vital fungal genes to obtain Fusarium resistant banana plants. For development of BBTV resistant banana plants also, we have used a host-induced gene silencing approach utilizing the full and partial coding sequence of the viral replication initiation protein. Successful bioassays performed in controlled greenhouse conditions have shown the efficacy of using these strategies to develop disease resistant banana plants. (author)

  8. Case Study: Polycystic Livers in a Transgenic Mouse Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovaglio, Jamie A.; Artwohl, James E.; Ward, Christopher J.; Diekwisch, Thomas G. H.; Ito, Yoshihiro; Fortman, Jeffrey D.

    2014-04-01

    Three mice (2 male, 1 female; age, 5 to 16 mo) from a mouse line transgenic for keratin 14 (K14)-driven LacZ expression and on an outbred Crl:CD1(ICR) background, were identified as having distended abdomens and livers that were diffusely enlarged by numerous cysts (diameter, 0.1 to 2.0 cm). Histopathology revealed hepatic cysts lined by biliary type epithelium and mild chronic inflammation, and confirmed the absence of parasites. Among 21 related mice, 5 additional affected mice were identified via laparotomy. Breeding of these 5 mice (after 5 mo of age) did not result in any offspring; the K14 mice with olycystic livers failed to reproduce. Affected male mice had degenerative testicular lesions, and their sperm was immotile. Nonpolycystic K14 control male mice bred well, had no testicular lesions, and had appropriate sperm motility. Genetic analysis did not identify an association of this phenotype with the transgene or insertion site.

  9. Optimizing pyramided transgenic Bt crops for sustainable pest management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrière, Yves; Crickmore, Neil; Tabashnik, Bruce E

    2015-02-01

    Transgenic crop pyramids producing two or more Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins that kill the same insect pest have been widely used to delay evolution of pest resistance. To assess the potential of pyramids to achieve this goal, we analyze data from 38 studies that report effects of ten Bt toxins used in transgenic crops against 15 insect pests. We find that compared with optimal low levels of insect survival, survival on currently used pyramids is often higher for both susceptible insects and insects resistant to one of the toxins in the pyramid. Furthermore, we find that cross-resistance and antagonism between toxins used in pyramids are common, and that these problems are associated with the similarity of the amino acid sequences of domains II and III of the toxins, respectively. This analysis should assist in future pyramid design and the development of sustainable resistance management strategies. PMID:25599179

  10. Human mutant huntingtin disrupts vocal learning in transgenic songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wan-Chun; Kohn, Jessica; Szwed, Sarah K; Pariser, Eben; Sepe, Sharon; Haripal, Bhagwattie; Oshimori, Naoki; Marsala, Martin; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Lee, Ramee

    2015-11-01

    Speech and vocal impairments characterize many neurological disorders. However, the neurogenetic mechanisms of these disorders are not well understood, and current animal models do not have the necessary circuitry to recapitulate vocal learning deficits. We developed germline transgenic songbirds, zebra finches (Taneiopygia guttata) expressing human mutant huntingtin (mHTT), a protein responsible for the progressive deterioration of motor and cognitive function in Huntington's disease (HD). Although generally healthy, the mutant songbirds had severe vocal disorders, including poor vocal imitation, stuttering, and progressive syntax and syllable degradation. Their song abnormalities were associated with HD-related neuropathology and dysfunction of the cortical-basal ganglia (CBG) song circuit. These transgenics are, to the best of our knowledge, the first experimentally created, functional mutant songbirds. Their progressive and quantifiable vocal disorder, combined with circuit dysfunction in the CBG song system, offers a model for genetic manipulation and the development of therapeutic strategies for CBG-related vocal and motor disorders. PMID:26436900

  11. Bioproduction of prostaglandins in a transgenic liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Miho; Kanamoto, Hirosuke; Nagaya, Shingo; Ohyama, Kanji

    2013-10-01

    Prostaglandins are biologically active substances used in a wide range of medical treatments. Prostaglandins have been supplied mainly by chemical synthesis; nevertheless, the high cost of prostaglandin production remains a factor. To lower the cost of prostaglandin production, we attempted to produce prostaglandins using a liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha L., which accumulates arachidonic acid, which is known as a substrate of prostaglandins. Here we report the first bioproduction of prostaglandins in plant species by introducing a cyclooxygenase gene from a red alga, Gracilaria vermiculophylla into the liverwort. The transgenic liverworts accumulated prostaglandin F2?, prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin D2 which were not detected in the wild-type liverwort. Moreover, we succeeded in drastically increasing the bioproduction of prostaglandins using an in vitro reaction system with the extracts of transgenic liverworts. PMID:23463075

  12. Towards Transgenic Primates: What can we learn from mouse genetics?

    OpenAIRE

    KUANG, Hui; WANG, Phillip L.; Tsien, Joe Z.

    2009-01-01

    Considering the great physiological and behavioral similarities with humans, monkeys represent the ideal models not only for the study of complex cognitive behavior but also for the preclinical research and development of novel therapeutics for treating human diseases. Various powerful genetic technologies initially developed for making mouse models are being explored for generating transgenic primate models. We review the latest genetic engineering technologies and discuss the potentials and...

  13. Nonapoptotic neurodegeneration in a transgenic mouse model of Huntington's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Turmaine, Mark; Raza, Aysha; Mahal, Amarbirpal; Mangiarini, Laura; Bates, Gillian P.; Davies, Stephen W.

    2000-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterized by personality changes, motor impairment, and subcortical dementia. HD is one of a number of diseases caused by expression of an expanded polyglutamine repeat. We have developed several lines of mice that are transgenic for exon 1 of the HD gene containing an expanded CAG sequence. These mice exhibit a defined neurological phenotype along with neuronal changes that are pathognomonic for the disease. We hav...

  14. The role of transgenic mouse models in carcinogen identification.

    OpenAIRE

    Pritchard, John B.; French, John E; Davis, Barbara J.; Haseman, Joseph K

    2003-01-01

    In this article, we examine existing data on the use of transgenic mouse models for identification of human carcinogens. We focus on the three most extensively studied of these mice, Trp53+/-, Tg/AC, and RasH2, and compare their performance with the traditional 2-year rodent bioassay. Data on 99 chemicals were evaluated. Using the International Agency for Research on Cancer/Report on Carcinogens determinations for the carcinogenicity of these chemicals to humans as the standard for comparison...

  15. Nestin Reporter Transgene Labels Multiple Central Nervous System Precursor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Szele, Francis G.; Anjen Chenn; Miller, Richard J.; Gwendolyn E. Goings; Yongsoo Kim; Walker, Avery S.

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic neuroepithelia and adult subventricular zone (SVZ) stem and progenitor cells express nestin. We characterized a transgenic line that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) specified to neural tissue by the second intronic enhancer of the nestin promoter that had several novel features. During embryogenesis, the dorsal telencephalon contained many and the ventral telencephalon few eGFP+ cells. eGFP+ cells were found in postnatal and adult neurogenic regions. eGFP+ cells ...

  16. Intragenesis and cisgenesis as alternatives to transgenic crop development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Inger; Wendt, Toni; Holm, Preben Bach

    2013-01-01

    One of the major concerns of the general public about transgenic crops relates to the mixing of genetic materials between species that cannot hybridize by natural means. To meet this concern, the two transformation concepts cisgenesis and intragenesis were developed as alternatives to transgenesis. Both concepts imply that plants must only be transformed with genetic material derived from the species itself or from closely related species capable of sexual hybridization. Furthermore, foreign seq...

  17. Development of Transgenic Papaya through Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Abul Kalam Azad; Md. Golam Rabbani; Latifah Amin; Nik Marzuki Sidik

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic papaya plants were regenerated from hypocotyls and immature zygotic embryo after cocultivation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA-4404 carrying a binary plasmid vector system containing neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) gene as the selectable marker and ?-glucuronidase (GUS) as the reporter gene. The explants were co-cultivated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens on regeneration medium containing 500?mg/L carbenicillin?+?200?mg/L cefotaxime for one week. The cocultivated explants were...

  18. Probing Pineal-specific Gene Expression with Transgenic Zebrafish†

    OpenAIRE

    KOJIMA, Daisuke; DOWLING, JOHN E.; Fukada, Yoshitaka

    2008-01-01

    The pineal gland of zebrafish (Danio rerio) contains lightsensitive photoreceptor cells and plays an important role in the neuroendocrine system. The zebrafish exorhodopsin gene encodes a pineal-specific photoreceptive protein, whose promoter region harbors a cis-acting element, pineal expression-promoting element (PIPE), directing pineal-specific gene expression. For in vivo genetic studies on PIPE-binding proteins and their regulatory mechanisms, we generated a transgenic zebrafish line, Tg...

  19. Transgenic Models of Alzheimer's Disease: Learning from Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Spires, Tara L; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2005-01-01

    Summary: As the scope of the problem of Alzheimer's disease (AD) grows due to an aging population, research into the devastating condition has taken on added urgency. Rare inherited forms of AD provide insight into the molecular pathways leading to degeneration and have made possible the development of transgenic animal models. Several of these models are based on the overexpression of amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilins, or tau to cause production and accumulation of amyloid-? into ...

  20. DNA-Delivery Methods to Produce Transgenic Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz Darbani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s, diverse methods for plant transformation have been described including biological, chemical and physical based methods. Transformation is performed to introduce novel traits, study basic biological processes, or produce recombinant proteins of interest. We review Agrobacterium-mediated transformation as well as non-biological based approaches for the production of transgenic plants. This review presents the methods of gene transfer into plants, applications, advantages and disadvantages of each method.

  1. Early flowering and genetic containment studies in transgenic poplar

    OpenAIRE

    Fladung M; Polak O; Lehnhardt D; Hoenicka H

    2012-01-01

    Despite of the immense potential of gene technologies for tree breeding, release of genetic modified trees is still very rare. Biosafety concerns have hitherto limited application of gene technologies. The potential risks of transgenic trees, in particular transfer of recombinant DNA into the gene pool of a given species via vertical gene transfer, have been motive of concern. Biosafety research may allow avoiding potential risks of this technology. However, the evaluation of strategies for p...

  2. Environmental and transgene expression effects on the barley seed proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnie, Christine; Steenholdt, T.

    2004-01-01

    The barley (Hordeum vulgare) cultivar Golden Promise is no longer widely used for malting, but is amenable to transformation and is therefore a valuable experimental cultivar. Its characteristics include high salt tolerance, however it is also susceptible to several fungal pathogens. Proteome analysis was used to describe the water-soluble protein fraction of Golden Promise seeds in comparison with the modern malting cultivar Barke. Using 2D-gel electrophoresis to visualise several hundred proteins in the pH ranges 4-7 and 6-11, 16 protein spots were found to differ between the two cultivars. Eleven of these were identified by mass spectrometric peptide mass mapping, including an abundant chitinase implicated in defence against fungal pathogens and a small heat-shock protein. To enable a comparison with transgenic seed protein patterns, differences in spot patterns between field and greenhouse-grown seeds were analysed. Four spots were observed to be increased in intensity in the proteome of greenhouse-grown seeds, three of which may be related to nitrogen availability during grain filling and total protein content of the seeds, since they also increased in field grown seeds supplied with extra nitrogen. Finally, the fate of transgene products in barley seeds was followed. Spots containing two green fluorescent protein constructs and the herbicide resistance marker phosphinothricin acetyltransferase were observed in 2D-gel patterns of transgenic seeds and identified by mass spectrometry. Phosphinothricin acetyltransferase was observed in three spots differing in pI suggesting that post-translational modification of the transgene product had occurred.

  3. Optical modulation of transgene expression in retinal pigment epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanker, D.; Lavinsky, D.; Chalberg, T.; Mandel, Y.; Huie, P.; Dalal, R.; Marmor, M.

    2013-03-01

    Over a million people in US alone are visually impaired due to the neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The current treatment is monthly intravitreal injections of a protein which inhibits Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, thereby slowing progression of the disease. The immense financial and logistical burden of millions of intravitreal injections signifies an urgent need to develop more long-lasting and cost-effective treatments for this and other retinal diseases. Viral transfection of ocular cells allows creation of a "biofactory" that secretes therapeutic proteins. This technique has been proven successful in non-human primates, and is now being evaluated in clinical trials for wet AMD. However, there is a critical need to down-regulate gene expression in the case of total resolution of retinal condition, or if patient has adverse reaction to the trans-gene products. The site for genetic therapy of AMD and many other retinal diseases is the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We developed and tested in pigmented rabbits, an optical method to down-regulate transgene expression in RPE following vector delivery, without retinal damage. Microsecond exposures produced by a rapidly scanning laser vaporize melanosomes and destroy a predetermined fraction of the RPE cells selectively. RPE continuity is restored within days by migration and proliferation of adjacent RPE, but since the transgene is not integrated into the nucleus it is not replicated. Thus, the decrease in transgene expression can be precisely determined by the laser pattern density and further reduced by repeated treatment without affecting retinal structure and function.

  4. Transgenic Vegetable Breeding for Nutritional Quality and Health Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    João Silva Dias; Rodomiro Ortiz

    2012-01-01

    Vegetables are essential for well-balanced diets. About 3 billion people in the world are malnourished due to imbalanced diets. Vegetables can contribute to the prevention of malnutrition disorders. Genetic engineering enables vegetable breeders to incorporate desired transgenes into elite cultivars, thereby improving their value considerably. It further offers unique opportunities for improving nutritional quality and bringing other health benefits. Many vegetable crops have been genetically...

  5. Evaluating impact of possible transgenic poplar cultivation on protected areas

    OpenAIRE

    Buonamici Anna; Paffetti Donatella; Travaglini Davide; Biricolti Stefano; Bottalico Francesca; Chelazzi Lorenzo; Cimò Filippo; Colombini Isabella; Fiorentini Silvia; Tomaselli Valeria; Vettori Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Plant biodiversity studies have been performed in the Migliarino-San Rossore-Massaciuccoli Regional Park in Tuscany (Italy) within the framework of the European project LIFE08 NAT/IT/342.This project aims at developing a quick monitoring index (QMI) to rapidly assess the potential risk generated by transgenic plants in characterized ecosystems or biotopes. For this reason test areas have been selected inside the protected area to evaluate plant (weeds and trees), animal, and soil microoganism...

  6. Biglycan Overexpression on Tooth Enamel Formation in Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    WEN Xin; Zou, YanMing; Luo, Wen; Goldberg, Michel; MOATS, REX; Peter S. Conti; Snead, Malcolm L.; Paine, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    Previously it was shown that the volume of forming enamel of molar teeth in biglycan-null mice was greater than in genetically matched wild-type mice. This phenotypic change appeared to result from an increase in amelogenin expression, implying that biglycan directly influences amelogenin synthesis. To determine whether biglycan over-expression resulted in decreased amelogenin expression, we engineered transgenic mice to over-express biglycan in the enamel organ epithelium. Biglycan over-expr...

  7. EXPRESSION OF CHITINASE GENE IN TRANSGENIC RAPE PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Li Ruili; Duan Hongying; Wang Jingxue; Gao Wu Jun; Lu Longdou

    2005-01-01

    The hypocotyl and cotyledon of Brassica napus L. H165 and Brassica juncea DB3 were transformed with chitinase gene and herbicide-resistance gene by co-culture with Agrobacterium tumefacients LBA4404, and rape plants were obtained which could grow on the medium containing herbicide. The PCR result showed that exotic genes were integrated in the genome of the rape. Further study was performed to determine the impact of temperature on the transgenic rate and the differentiation of explants.

  8. Glutamate metabolism is impaired in transgenic mice with tau hyperphosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Hege Nilsen, Linn; Rae, Caroline; Lars M. Ittner; Götz, Jürgen; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    In neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia, the protein tau is hyperphosphorylated and eventually aggregates to develop neurofibrillary tangles. Here, the consequences of tau hyperphosphorylation on both neuronal and astrocytic metabolism and amino-acid neurotransmitter homeostasis were assessed in transgenic mice expressing the pathogenic mutation P301L in the human tau gene (pR5 mice) compared with nontransgenic littermate controls. Mice were inj...

  9. Cell culture induced epigenetic changes in tobacco transgenic loci.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    K?ížová, Kate?ina; Fojtová, Miloslava; Depicker, A.; Kova?ík, Aleš

    Brno, 2009. s. 28. ISBN 978-80-210-4830-0. [Pracovní setkání biochemik? a molekulárních biolog? /13./. 14.04.2009-15.04.2009, Brno] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004; GA AV ?R(CZ) IAA600040611 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : gene silencing * transgenes * plant cell culture Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  10. The expression of modified 7SL RNA in transgenic potato.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrba, Lukáš; Matoušek, Jaroslav

    Nitra : IPGB SAS, 2003. s. 80. [Int. Symp. Ser. Recent Advances in Plant Biotechnology: Plant Biotechnology - Progress and Developments/5./. 07.09.2003-13.09.2003, Stará Lesná] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA521/99/1591; GA ?R GA521/03/0072; GA AV ?R IBS5051006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5051902 Keywords : transgenic plants * potato es Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  11. ADAM 12 Protease Induces Adipogenesis in Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kawaguchi, Nobuko; Xu, Xiufeng; Tajima, Rie; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Sundberg, Christina; Loechel, Frosty; Albrechtsen, Reidar; WEWER, Ulla M.

    2002-01-01

    ADAM 12 (meltrin-?) is a member of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family. ADAM 12 functions as an active metalloprotease, supports cell adhesion, and has been implicated in myoblast differentiation and fusion. Human ADAM 12 exists in two forms: the prototype membrane-anchored protein, ADAM 12-L, and a shorter secreted form, ADAM 12-S. Here we report the occurrence of adipocytes in the skeletal muscle of transgenic mice in which overexpression of either form is driven by the musc...

  12. Risks and concerns regarding transgenic food and human health

    OpenAIRE

    Orlando Acosta

    2011-01-01

    The transgenic technology in agriculture has recently been in the center of an intense debate between two radically opposite points of view. Some non-government organizations (NGO) consider this technology as dangerous for human health, environment and economics of developing countries. On the contrary, the scientific community has been publicly supportive of this technology, suggesting that education is the key to gaining the public acceptance. Although genetically modified (GM) plants for f...

  13. Phytoremediation of small organic contaminants using transgenic plants

    OpenAIRE

    James, C Andrew; Strand, Stuart E

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy of transgenic plants in the phytoremediation of small organic contaminants has been investigated. Two principal strategies have been pursued (1) the manipulation of phase I metabolic activity to enhance in planta degradation rates, or to impart novel metabolic activity, and (2) the enhanced secretion of reactive enzymes from roots leading to accelerated ex planta degradation of organic contaminants. A pair of dehalogenase genes from Xanthobacter autotrophicus was expressed in tob...

  14. Giardia lamblia infections in B-cell-deficient transgenic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Stager, S; Muller, N.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, we infected B-cell (and antibody-)-deficient transgenic mice with the Giardia lamblia clone GS/M-83-H7. These animals were inhibited in intestinal anti-Giardia immunoglobulin A (IgA) production and could not resolve the parasite infection, and antigenic diversification within the respective parasite populations occurred in an unusually slow manner. These findings indicate an important immunological function of local IgA antibodies which promotes antigenic variation of th...

  15. Transgenic tomato hybrids resistant to tomato spotted wilt virus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    de Haan, P; Ultzen, T.; Prins,M.; Gielen, J.; Goldbach, R.; Grinsven, M., van

    1996-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) infections cause significant economic losses in the commercial culture of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Culture practices have only been marginally effective in controlling TSWV. The ultimate way to minimize losses caused by TSWV is resistant varieties. These can be obtained by introgression of natural sources of resistance from wild relatives or by expressing viral sequences in transgenic tomato plants. We report high levels of resistance to TSWV obtained...

  16. Electrochemical determination of metallothionein in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    K?ížková, S.; Diopan, V.; Baloun, J.; Šupálková, V.; Shestisvka, V.; Kotrba, P.; Macková, M.; Macek, Tomáš; Havel, L.; Adam, V.; Zehnálek, J.; Kizek, R.

    Praha : VŠCHT Praha, 2007 - (Macková, M.; Macek, T.; Demnerová, K.; Pazlar, V.). s. 15 ISBN 978-80-7080-025-6. [Symposium on Biosorption and Bioremediation /4./. 26.08.2007-30.08.2007, Praha] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M06030; GA ?R(CZ) GA522/07/0692 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : metallothionein * heavy metals * transgenic plant * tobacco Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  17. Transmission of multiple system atrophy prions to transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Watts, Joel C.; Giles, Kurt; Oehler, Abby; Middleton, Lefkos; Dexter, David T; Gentleman, Steve M; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of misfolded ?-synuclein protein in glial cells within the brain. Transgenic mice expressing mutant ?-synuclein that were inoculated with brain homogenate from MSA patients developed clinical, biochemical, and pathological signs of a neurodegenerative disease, indicating that MSA is transmissible under certain conditions. This transmissibility is reminiscent of the human prion disorders, such as Cr...

  18. Metabolic profiling of a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans Alzheimer model

    OpenAIRE

    Van Assche, Roel; Temmerman, Liesbet; Dias, Daniel A.; Boughton, Berin; Boonen, Kurt; Braeckman, Bart P; Schoofs, Liliane; Roessner, Ute

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, no early-onset biomarkers are currently available for Alzheimer’s disease, a cureless neurodegenerative disease afflicting millions worldwide. In this study, transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans were used to investigate changes in the metabolome after induced expression of amyloid-?. GC- and LC–MS-based platforms determined a total of 157 differential features. Some of these were identified using in-house (GC–MS) or public libraries (LC–MS), revealing changes in alla...

  19. Destabilization of homologous transgene interactions in tobacco cell cultures.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    K?ížová, Kate?ina; Fojtová, Miloslava; Depicker, A.; Kova?ík, Aleš

    Olomouc, 2007. s. 63. ISSN 1213-6670. [Konference experimentální biologie rostlin, 11. dny fyziologie rostlin. 09.07.2007-12.07.2007, Olomouc] R&D Projects: GA AV ?R(CZ) IAA600040611; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : gene expression * DNA methylation * transgenic tobacco plants Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  20. Generating high temperature tolerant transgenic plants: Achievements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Anil; Mittal, Dheeraj; Negi, Manisha; Lavania, Dhruv

    2013-05-01

    Production of plants tolerant to high temperature stress is of immense significance in the light of global warming and climate change. Plant cells respond to high temperature stress by re-programming their genetic machinery for survival and reproduction. High temperature tolerance in transgenic plants has largely been achieved either by over-expressing heat shock protein genes or by altering levels of heat shock factors that regulate expression of heat shock and non-heat shock genes. Apart from heat shock factors, over-expression of other trans-acting factors like DREB2A, bZIP28 and WRKY proteins has proven useful in imparting high temperature tolerance. Besides these, elevating the genetic levels of proteins involved in osmotic adjustment, reactive oxygen species removal, saturation of membrane-associated lipids, photosynthetic reactions, production of polyamines and protein biosynthesis process have yielded positive results in equipping transgenic plants with high temperature tolerance. Cyclic nucleotide gated calcium channel proteins that regulate calcium influxes across the cell membrane have recently been shown to be the key players in induction of high temperature tolerance. The involvement of calmodulins and kinases in activation of heat shock factors has been implicated as an important event in governing high temperature tolerance. Unfilled gaps limiting the production of high temperature tolerant transgenic plants for field level cultivation are discussed. PMID:23498861

  1. Early flowering and genetic containment studies in transgenic poplar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fladung M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite of the immense potential of gene technologies for tree breeding, release of genetic modified trees is still very rare. Biosafety concerns have hitherto limited application of gene technologies. The potential risks of transgenic trees, in particular transfer of recombinant DNA into the gene pool of a given species via vertical gene transfer, have been motive of concern. Biosafety research may allow avoiding potential risks of this technology. However, the evaluation of strategies for prevention of vertical gene transfer, probably the most important concern toward transgenic trees, has been hindered by the long time they require to reach the reproductive phase. We tested different strategies for promoting early flowering in poplar, aiming the development of a system for biosafety studies on gene containment. Early flowering poplar containing the 35S::LFY or HSP::FT gene constructs allowed first approaches for the faster evaluation of gene containment. However, some drawbacks, e.g., disturbed vegetative growth and flower development, still limit their potential application on biosafety research. A non-transgenic hybrid aspen showing a short vegetative phase was successfully used for the evaluation of the PrMALE1::STS sterility gene construct.

  2. Wheat puroindolines enhance fungal disease resistance in transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, K; Balconi, C; Sherwood, J E; Giroux, M J

    2001-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides play a role in the immune systems of animals and plants by limiting pathogen infection and growth. The puroindolines, endosperm-specific proteins involved in wheat seed hardness, are small proteins reported to have in vitro antimicrobial properties. Rice, the most widely used cereal crop worldwide, normally does not contain puroindolines. Transgenic rice plants that constitutively express the puroindoline genes pinA and/or pinB throughout the plants were produced. PIN extracts of leaves from the transgenic plants reduced in vitro growth of Magnaporthe grisea and Rhizoctonia solani, two major fungal pathogens of rice, by 35 to 50%. Transgenic rice expressing pinA and/or pinB showed significantly increased tolerance to M. grisea (rice blast), with a 29 to 54% reduction in symptoms, and R. solani (sheath blight), with an 11 to 22% reduction in symptoms. Puroindolines are effective in vivo in antifungal proteins and could be valuable new tools in the control of a wide range of fungal pathogens of crop plants. PMID:11605965

  3. Transgenic Technology meeting 2008 in Toronto, Canada: a meeting report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerchow, Boris

    2009-06-01

    In a history that goes back to 1999, the Transgenic Technology meetings started out in Sweden and over the years began to attract a growing community of technicians and researchers mainly from Europe. As the meetings started to attract an expanding worldwide audience, the community decided to found the International Society for Transgenic Technologies at the Barcelona meeting in 2005. The 2007 convention was held at Brisbane, Australia, and in 2008, the 8th Transgenic Technology meeting was held for the second time on behalf of ISTT and for the second time outside of Europe in Toronto, Canada. Due to its excellent program with over 400 participants the meeting was able to attract the highest number of delegates of all past TT meetings. With extended times for plenary discussions about technical and organizational aspects, as well as top level scientific presentations, both technicians and scientists enjoyed this as an extremely fruitful meeting from which they could take home solutions for daily routines as well as new insights and ideas for coming projects. PMID:19093224

  4. Intragenesis and cisgenesis as alternatives to transgenic crop development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Inger; Wendt, Toni

    2013-01-01

    One of the major concerns of the general public about transgenic crops relates to the mixing of genetic materials between species that cannot hybridize by natural means. To meet this concern, the two transformation concepts cisgenesis and intragenesis were developed as alternatives to transgenesis. Both concepts imply that plants must only be transformed with genetic material derived from the species itself or from closely related species capable of sexual hybridization. Furthermore, foreign sequences such as selection genes and vector-backbone sequences should be absent. Intragenesis differs from cisgenesis by allowing use of new gene combinations created by in vitro rearrangements of functional genetic elements. Several surveys show higher public acceptance of intragenic/cisgenic crops compared to transgenic crops. Thus, although the intragenic and cisgenic concepts were introduced internationally only 9 and 7 years ago, several different traits in a variety of crops have currently been modified according to these concepts. Five of these crops are now in field trials and two have pending applications for deregulation. Currently, intragenic/cisgenic plants are regulated as transgenic plants worldwide. However, as the gene pool exploited by intragenesis and cisgenesis are identical to the gene pool available for conventional breeding, less comprehensive regulatory measures are expected. The regulation of intragenic/cisgenic crops is presently under evaluation in the EU and in the US regulators are considering if a subgroup of these crops should be exempted from regulation. It is accordingly possible that the intragenic/cisgenic route will be of major significance for future plant breeding.

  5. Pathogen resistance of transgenic tobacco plants producing caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun-Soo; Sano, Hiroshi

    2008-02-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) is a typical purine alkaloid, and produced by a variety of plants such as coffee and tea. Its physiological function, however, is not completely understood, but chemical defense against pathogens and herbivores, and allelopathic effects against competing plant species have been proposed. Previously, we constructed transgenic tobacco plants, which produced caffeine up to 5 microg per gram fresh weight of leaves, and showed them to repel caterpillars of tobacco cutworms (Spodoptera litura). In the present study, we found that these transgenic plants constitutively expressed defense-related genes encoding pathogenesis-related (PR)-1a and proteinase inhibitor II under non-stressed conditions. We also found that they were highly resistant against pathogens, tobacco mosaic virus and Pseudomonas syringae. Expression of PR-1a and PR-2 was higher in transgenic plants than in wild-type plants during infection. Exogenously applied caffeine to wild-type tobacco leaves exhibited the similar resistant activity. These results suggested that caffeine stimulated endogenous defense system of host plants through directly or indirectly activating gene expression. This assumption is essentially consistent with the idea of chemical defense, in which caffeine may act as one of signaling molecules to activate defense response. It is thus conceivable that the effect of caffeine is bifunctional; direct interference with pest metabolic pathways, and activation of host defense systems. PMID:18036626

  6. Using inositol as a biocompatible ligand for efficient transgene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Bellis, Susan L; Fan, Yiwen; Wu, Yunkun

    2015-01-01

    Transgene transfection techniques using cationic polymers such as polyethylenimines (PEIs) and PEI derivatives as gene vectors have shown efficacy, although they also have shortcomings. PEIs have decent DNA-binding capability and good cell internalization performance, but they cannot deliver gene payloads very efficiently to cell nuclei. In this study, three hyperbranched polyglycerol-polyethylenimine (PG6-PEI) polymers conjugated with myo-inositol (INO) molecules were developed. The three resulting PG6-PEI-INO polymers have an increased number of INO ligands per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 1 had only 14 carboxymethyl INO (CMINO) units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 2 had approximately 130 CMINO units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 3 had as high as 415 CMINO units approximately. Mixing PG6-PEI-INO polymers with DNA produced compact nanocomposites. We then performed localization studies using fluorescent microscopy. As the number of conjugated inositol ligands increased in PG6-PEI-INO polymers, there was a corresponding increase in accumulation of the polymers within 293T cell nuclei. Transfection performed with spherical 293T cells yielded 82% of EGFP-positive cells when using PG6-PEI-INO 3 as the vehicle. Studies further revealed that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (eATP) can inhibit the transgene efficiency of PG6-PEI-INO polymers, as compared with PEI and PG6-PEI that were not conjugated with inositol. Our work unveiled the possibility of using inositol as an effective ligand for transgene expression. PMID:25926732

  7. Recent advances in the development of transgenic papaya technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecson Mendoza, Evelyn Mae; C Laurena, Antonio; Botella, José Ramón

    2008-01-01

    Papaya with resistance to papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) is the first genetically modified tree and fruit crop and also the first transgenic crop developed by a public institution that has been commercialized. This chapter reviews the different transformation systems used for papaya and recent advances in the use of transgenic technology to introduce important quality and horticultural traits in papaya. These include the development of the following traits in papaya: resistance to PRSV, mites and Phytophthora, delayed ripening trait or long shelf life by inhibiting ethylene production or reducing loss of firmness, and tolerance or resistance to herbicide and aluminum toxicity. The use of papaya to produce vaccine against tuberculosis and cysticercosis, an infectious animal disease, has also been explored. Because of the economic importance of papaya, there are several collaborative and independent efforts to develop PRSV transgenic papaya technology in 14 countries. This chapter further reviews the strategies and constraints in the adoption of the technology and biosafety to the environment and food safety. Constraints to adoption include public perception, strict and expensive regulatory procedures and intellectual property issues. PMID:18606373

  8. Transgenic Plants Lower the Costs of Cellulosic Biofuels (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-11-01

    A new transgenic maize was observed to be less recalcitrant than wild-type biomass, as manifested through lower severity requirements to achieve comparable levels of conversion. Expression of a single gene derived from bacteria in plants has resulted in transgenic plants that are easier and cheaper to convert into biofuels. Part of the high production cost of cellulosic biofuels is the relatively poor accessibility of substrates to enzymes due to the strong associations between plant cell wall components. This biomass recalcitrance makes costly thermochemical pretreatment necessary. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have created transgenic maize expressing an active glycosyl hydrolase enzyme, E1 endoglucanase, originally isolated from a thermophilic bacterium, Acidothermus cellulolyticus. This engineered feedstock was observed to be less recalcitrant than wild-type biomass when subjected to reduced severity pretreatments and post-pretreatment enzymatic hydrolysis. This reduction in recalcitrance was manifested through lower severity requirements to achieve comparable levels of conversion of wild-type biomass. The improvements observed are significant enough to positively affect the economics of the conversion process through decreased capital construction costs and decreased degradation products and inhibitor formation.

  9. AAV vectors transduce hepatocytes in vivo as efficiently in cirrhotic as in healthy rat livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrevals, L; Enguita, M; Rodriguez, C; Gonzalez-Rojas, J; Alzaguren, P; Razquin, N; Prieto, J; Fortes, P

    2012-04-01

    In liver cirrhosis, abnormal liver architecture impairs efficient transduction of hepatocytes with large viral vectors such as adenoviruses. Here we evaluated the ability of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors, small viral vectors, to transduce normal and cirrhotic rat livers. Using AAV serotype-1 (AAV1) encoding luciferase (AAV1Luc) we analyzed luciferase expression with a CCD camera. AAV1Luc was injected through the hepatic artery (intra-arterial (IA)), the portal vein (intra-portal (IP)), directly into the liver (intra-hepatic (IH)) or infused into the biliary tree (intra-biliar). We found that AAV1Luc allows long-term and constant luciferase expression in rat livers. Interestingly, IP administration leads to higher expression levels in healthy than in cirrhotic livers, whereas the opposite occurs when using IA injection. IH administration leads to similar transgene expression in cirrhotic and healthy rats, whereas intra-biliar infusion is the least effective route. After 70% partial hepatectomy, luciferase expression decreased in the regenerating liver, suggesting lack of efficient integration of AAV1 DNA into the host genome. AAV1Luc transduced mainly the liver but also the testes and spleen. Within the liver, transgene expression was found mainly in hepatocytes. Using a liver-specific promoter, transgene expression was detected in hepatocytes but not in other organs. Our results indicate that AAVs are convenient vectors for the treatment of liver cirrhosis. PMID:21850051

  10. Transgenic plants expressing GLK1 and CCA1 having increased nitrogen assimilation capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coruzzi, Gloria (New York, NY); Gutierrez, Rodrigo A. (Santiago, CL); Nero, Damion C. (Woodside, NY)

    2012-04-10

    Provided herein are compositions and methods for producing transgenic plants. In specific embodiments, transgenic plants comprise a construct comprising a polynucleotide encoding CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1, operably linked to a plant-specific promote, wherein the CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1 is ectopically overexpressed in the transgenic plants, and wherein the promoter is optionally a constitutive or inducible promoter. In other embodiments, transgenic plants in which express a lower level of CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1 are provided. Also provided herein are commercial products (e.g., pulp, paper, paper products, or lumber) derived from the transgenic plants (e.g., transgenic trees) produced using the methods provided herein.

  11. Extraction and separation of water soluble proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis-transgenic and non-transgenic maize species by CZE.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sázelová, Petra; Kaši?ka, Václav; Ibanez, E.; Cifuentes, A.

    2009-01-01

    Ro?. 32, ?. 21 (2009), s. 3801-3808. ISSN 1615-9306 R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GA203/08/1428 Grant ostatní: GA ?R(CZ) GA203/09/0675 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Bacillus thuringiensis -transgenic maize * CZE-UV profiling * Maize proteins Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.551, year: 2009

  12. Severe B cell hyperplasia and autoimmune disease in TALL-1 transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Khare, Sanjay D.; Sarosi, Ildiko; Xia, Xing-Zhong; McCabe, Susan; Miner, Kent; Solovyev, Irina; Hawkins, Nessa; Kelley, Michael; Chang, David; Van, Gwyneth; Ross, Larry; Delaney, John; Wang, Ling; Lacey, David; Boyle, William J.

    2000-01-01

    TALL-1/Blys/BAFF is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand superfamily that is functionally involved in B cell proliferation. Here, we describe B cell hyperplasia and autoimmune lupus-like changes in transgenic mice expressing TALL-1 under the control of a ?-actin promoter. The TALL-1 transgenic mice showed severe enlargement of spleen, lymph nodes, and Peyer's patches because of an increased number of B220+ cells. The transgenic mice also had hypergammaglobulinemia contributed by...

  13. Cyclic hair-loss and regrowth in transgenic mice overexpressing an intermediate filament gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, B C; Rogers, G E

    1990-01-01

    We have produced transgenic mice containing up to 250 copies of a sheep wool intermediate filament keratin gene to study the effect of its expression on hair structure and development. Several transgenic lines expressed the gene and in the one containing 250 transgenes, a pattern of hair-loss and regrowth was stably established. Successive waves of hair growth follow periods of denuding like the natural progression of hairs in the mouse hair cycle. By in situ hybridization we have shown that ...

  14. Post-mortem re-cloning of a transgenic red fluorescent protein dog

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, So Gun; Koo, Ok Jae; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kim, MinJung; Kim, Geon-A; Park, Eun Jung; JANG, Goo; Lee, Byeong-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the world's first transgenic dogs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. However, cellular senescence is a major limiting factor for producing more advanced transgenic dogs. To overcome this obstacle, we rejuvenated transgenic cells using a re-cloning technique. Fibroblasts from post-mortem red fluorescent protein (RFP) dog were reconstructed with in vivo matured oocytes and transferred into 10 surrogate dogs. One puppy was produced and confirmed as a re-cloned dog. Althoug...

  15. Hypotension and reduced nitric oxide-elicited vasorelaxation in transgenic mice overexpressing endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohashi, Y.; Kawashima, S.; Hirata, K i; Yamashita, T.; Ishida, T1; Inoue, N.; Sakoda, T; Kurihara, H; Yazaki, Y.; Yokoyama, M.

    1998-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), constitutively produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), plays a major role in the regulation of blood pressure and vascular tone. We generated transgenic mice overexpressing bovine eNOS in the vascular wall using murine preproendothelin-1 promoter. In transgenic lineages with three to eight transgene copies, bovine eNOS-specific mRNA, protein expression in the particulate fractions, and calcium-dependent NOS activity were confirmed by RNase protection assay, im...

  16. Determination of gene escape and fruit quality characteristics in transgenic melon (Cucumis melo L. var. inodorus)

    OpenAIRE

    MEND?, Ye?im YALÇIN; SARI, Nebahat; AKYILDIZ, Asiye; SOLMAZ, ?lknur; ÜNEK, Ceren

    2010-01-01

    Gene escape and fruit quality characteristics of transgenic melons (Cucumis melo L. var inodorus cv. 'Kirkagac 637') resistant to zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) and control plants were investigated under screenhouse conditions. No significant differences were observed between transgenic and transgenic × control genotypes, with regard to rind thickness, fruit cavity length, fruit cavity width, total soluble solids, pistil scar diameter, and peduncle length. Fruit characters, inc...

  17. Recombineering strategies for developing next generation BAC transgenic tools for optogenetics and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Ting, Jonathan T; Feng, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    The development and application of diverse BAC transgenic rodent lines has enabled rapid progress for precise molecular targeting of genetically-defined cell types in the mammalian central nervous system. These transgenic tools have played a central role in the optogenetic revolution in neuroscience. Indeed, an overwhelming proportion of studies in this field have made use of BAC transgenic Cre driver lines to achieve targeted expression of optogenetic probes in the brain. In addition, severa...

  18. Characterization of SV-40 Tag rats as a model to study prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in men. Animal models that closely mimic clinical disease in humans are invaluable tools in the fight against prostate cancer. Recently, a Simian Virus-40 T-antigen (SV-40 Tag) targeted probasin promoter rat model was developed. This model, however, has not been extensively characterized; hence we have investigated the ontogeny of prostate cancer and determined the role of sex steroid receptor and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling proteins in the novel SV-40 Tag rat. The SV-40 Tag rat was histopathologically characterized for time to tumor development, incidence and multiplicity and in the ventral, dorsal, lateral and anterior lobes of the prostate. Immunoassay techniques were employed to measure cell proliferation, apoptosis, and sex steroid receptor and growth factor signaling-related proteins. Steroid hormone concentrations were measured via coated well enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and well-differentiated prostate cancer developed as early as 2 and 10 weeks of age, respectively in the ventral prostate (VP) followed by in the dorsolateral (DLP). At 8 weeks of age, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) concentrations in SV-40 Tag rats were increased when compared to non-transgenic rats. High cell proliferation and apoptotic indices were found in VP and DLP of transgenic rats. Furthermore, we observed increased protein expression of androgen receptor, IGF-1, IGF-1 receptor, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases in the prostates of SV-40 Tag rats. The rapid development of PIN and prostate cancer in conjunction with the large prostate size makes the SV-40 Tag rat a useful model for studying prostate cancer. This study provides evidence of the role of sex steroid and growth factor proteins in prostate cancer development and defines appropriate windows of opportunity for preclinical trials and aids in the rational design of chemoprevention, intervention, regression, and therapeutic studies using prostate cancer rodent models

  19. Characterization of SV-40 Tag rats as a model to study prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eltoum Isam A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in men. Animal models that closely mimic clinical disease in humans are invaluable tools in the fight against prostate cancer. Recently, a Simian Virus-40 T-antigen (SV-40 Tag targeted probasin promoter rat model was developed. This model, however, has not been extensively characterized; hence we have investigated the ontogeny of prostate cancer and determined the role of sex steroid receptor and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 signaling proteins in the novel SV-40 Tag rat. Methods The SV-40 Tag rat was histopathologically characterized for time to tumor development, incidence and multiplicity and in the ventral, dorsal, lateral and anterior lobes of the prostate. Immunoassay techniques were employed to measure cell proliferation, apoptosis, and sex steroid receptor and growth factor signaling-related proteins. Steroid hormone concentrations were measured via coated well enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA kits. Results Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN and well-differentiated prostate cancer developed as early as 2 and 10 weeks of age, respectively in the ventral prostate (VP followed by in the dorsolateral (DLP. At 8 weeks of age, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT concentrations in SV-40 Tag rats were increased when compared to non-transgenic rats. High cell proliferation and apoptotic indices were found in VP and DLP of transgenic rats. Furthermore, we observed increased protein expression of androgen receptor, IGF-1, IGF-1 receptor, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases in the prostates of SV-40 Tag rats. Conclusion The rapid development of PIN and prostate cancer in conjunction with the large prostate size makes the SV-40 Tag rat a useful model for studying prostate cancer. This study provides evidence of the role of sex steroid and growth factor proteins in prostate cancer development and defines appropriate windows of opportunity for preclinical trials and aids in the rational design of chemoprevention, intervention, regression, and therapeutic studies using prostate cancer rodent models.

  20. Preservation and faithful expression of transgene via artificial seeds in alfalfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenting; Liang, Zongsuo; Wang, Xinhua; Sibbald, Susan; Hunter, David; Tian, Lining

    2013-01-01

    Proper preservation of transgenes and transgenic materials is important for wider use of transgenic technology in plants. Here, we report stable preservation and faithful expression of a transgene via artificial seed technology in alfalfa. DNA constructs containing the uid reporter gene coding for ?-glucuronidase (GUS) driven by a 35S promoter or a tCUP promoter were introduced into alfalfa via Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Somatic embryos were subsequently induced from transgenic alfalfa plants via in vitro technology. These embryos were treated with abscisic acid to induce desiccation tolerance and were subjected to a water loss process. After the desiccation procedure, the water content in dried embryos, or called artificial seeds, was about 12-15% which was equivalent to that in true seeds. Upon water rehydration, the dried somatic embryos showed high degrees of viability and exhibited normal germination. Full plants were subsequently developed and recovered in a greenhouse. The progeny plants developed from artificial seeds showed GUS enzyme activity and the GUS expression level was comparable to that of plants developed from somatic embryos without the desiccation process. Polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that the transgene was well retained in the plants and Southern blot analysis showed that the transgene was stably integrated in plant genome. The research showed that the transgene and the new trait can be well preserved in artificial seeds and the progeny developed. The research provides a new method for transgenic germplasm preservation in different plant species. PMID:23690914

  1. Comparative development and impact of transgenic papayas in Hawaii, Jamaica, and Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermín, Gustavo; Tennant, Paula; Gonsalves, Carol; Lee, David; Gonsalves, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    We present data concerning the creation of transgenic papayas resistant to Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) and their adoption by three different countries: the United States (e.g., Hawaii), Jamaica, and Venezuela. Although the three sets of transgenic papayas showed effective resistance to PRSV, the adoption rate in each country has varied from full utilization in Hawaii to aggressive testing but delay in deregulating of the product in Jamaica to rejection at an early stage in Venezuela. Factors that contributed to the rapid adoption in Hawaii include a timely development of the transgenic product, PRSV causing severe damage to the papaya industry, close collaboration between researchers and the industry, and the existence of procedures for deregulating a transgenic product. In Jamaica, the technology for developing the initial field-testing of the product progressed rather rapidly, but the process of deregulation has been slowed down owing to the lack of sustained governmental efforts to complete the regulatory procedures for transgenic crops. In Venezuela, the technology to develop and greenhouse test the transgenic papaya has moved abreast with the Jamaica project, but the field testing of the transgenic papaya within the country was stopped very early on by actions by people opposed to transgenic products. The three cases are discussed in an effort to provide information on factors, other than technology, that can influence the adoption of a transgenic product. PMID:15310936

  2. Production of human CD59-transgenic pigs by embryonic germ cell nuclear transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: ? Human CD59 (hCD59) gene was introduced into porcine embryonic germ (EG) cells. ? hCD59-transgenic EG cells were resistant to hyperacute rejection in cytolytic assay. ? hCD59-transgenic pigs were produced by EG cell nuclear transfer. -- Abstract: This study was performed to produce transgenic pigs expressing the human complement regulatory protein CD59 (hCD59) using the nuclear transfer (NT) of embryonic germ (EG) cells, which are undifferentiated stem cells derived from primordial germ cells. Because EG cells can be cultured indefinitely in an undifferentiated state, they may provide an inexhaustible source of nuclear donor cells for NT to produce transgenic pigs. A total of 1980 NT embryos derived from hCD59-transgenic EG cells were transferred to ten recipients, resulting in the birth of fifteen piglets from three pregnancies. Among these offspring, ten were alive without overt health problems. Based on PCR analysis, all fifteen piglets were confirmed as hCD59 transgenic. The expression of the hCD59 transgene in the ten living piglets was verified by RT-PCR. Western analysis showed the expression of the hCD59 protein in four of the ten RT-PCR-positive piglets. These results demonstrate that hCD59-transgenic pigs could effectively be produced by EG cell NT and that such transgenic pigs may be used as organ donors in pig-to-human xenotransplantation.

  3. Production of human CD59-transgenic pigs by embryonic germ cell nuclear transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Kwang Sung; Won, Ji Young [Department of Physiology, Dankook University School of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-Ki [Animal Biotechnology Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Sorrell, Alice M. [Department of Physiology, Dankook University School of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun [Department of Nanobiomedical Science, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Jae-Seok [Animal Biotechnology Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Bong-Hwan [Genomics and Bioinformatics Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Won-Kyong [Animal Biotechnology Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Hosup, E-mail: shim@dku.edu [Department of Nanobiomedical Science, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Human CD59 (hCD59) gene was introduced into porcine embryonic germ (EG) cells. {yields} hCD59-transgenic EG cells were resistant to hyperacute rejection in cytolytic assay. {yields} hCD59-transgenic pigs were produced by EG cell nuclear transfer. -- Abstract: This study was performed to produce transgenic pigs expressing the human complement regulatory protein CD59 (hCD59) using the nuclear transfer (NT) of embryonic germ (EG) cells, which are undifferentiated stem cells derived from primordial germ cells. Because EG cells can be cultured indefinitely in an undifferentiated state, they may provide an inexhaustible source of nuclear donor cells for NT to produce transgenic pigs. A total of 1980 NT embryos derived from hCD59-transgenic EG cells were transferred to ten recipients, resulting in the birth of fifteen piglets from three pregnancies. Among these offspring, ten were alive without overt health problems. Based on PCR analysis, all fifteen piglets were confirmed as hCD59 transgenic. The expression of the hCD59 transgene in the ten living piglets was verified by RT-PCR. Western analysis showed the expression of the hCD59 protein in four of the ten RT-PCR-positive piglets. These results demonstrate that hCD59-transgenic pigs could effectively be produced by EG cell NT and that such transgenic pigs may be used as organ donors in pig-to-human xenotransplantation.

  4. Effect of Sirolimus on Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Transgenic Hypertensive Rat.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bohmová, R.; Honsová, E.; Heemann, U.; Mandys, Václav; Lodererová, A.; Matl, I.; Viklický, O.

    2002-01-01

    Ro?. 34, - (2002), s. 3051-3052. ISSN 0041-1345 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : sirolimus Subject RIV: FE - Other Internal Medicine Disciplines Impact factor: 0.478, year: 2002

  5. Transgenic rescue of defective Cd36 ameliorates insulin resistance in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Musilová, Alena; K?en, Vladimír; Kazdová, L.; Aitman, T. J.; Glazier, A. M.; Ibrahimi, A.; Abumrad, N. A.; Qi, N.; Wang, J. M.; St.Lezin, E. M.; Kurtz, W. T.

    2001-01-01

    Ro?. 27, ?. 2 (2001), s. 156-158. ISSN 1061-4036 R&D Projects: GA ?R GA301/00/1636; GA ?R GV204/98/K015; GA MŠk LN00A079 Grant ostatní: HHMI(US) 55000331 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Cd36 (fatty acid transporter) Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 29.600, year: 2001

  6. Mutagenesis by asbestos in the lung of lambda-lacI transgenic rats.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Topinka, Jan; Loli, P.; Georgiadis, P.; Dušinská, M.; Hurbánková, M.; Ková?iková, Z.; Volkovová, K.; Kažimírová, A.; Baran?oková, M.; Tatrai, E.; Oesterle, D.; Wolff, T.; Kyrtopoulos, S. A.

    2004-01-01

    Ro?. 553, 1-2 (2004), s. 67-78. ISSN 0027-5107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : asbestos * mutations Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2004

  7. Development of potato transgenic plants and molecular and genetic analyses of their integration stability and transgene expression efficiency using vegetative and sexual propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrobacterium mediated transformation of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) and the stability of integration, expression and inheritance of transgenes were investigated. Over 400 kanamycin resistant transgenic plants with the nptII, gus, tt (insect toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis, variety kurstaki) and tg (fusion of tt and gus under the 35S promoter) foreign genes were obtained from eight potato genotypes by co-cultivation of the leaf discs with A. tumefaciens LBA 4404 (pBI 121), A. tumefaciens 3850 (pGV 941tg) and A. rchizogenes A4 (pGV 941tt). Southern blot analysis showed that more than 80% of the regenerating plants had one or several copies of the foreign genes. Selection for kanamycin resistance and Southern blot analysis revealed the stability of inheritance of transgenes by vegetative propagation of the plants via cloning and through tubers. However, 0.3% of the plants lost the nptII gene during the cloning process. About 500 self-pollinated seeds of four independently obtained transgenic clones were harvested. Analysis of the phenotypic segregation of the transgenic progeny on selective medium with kanamycin (50 mg/L) was made and compared with the controls. Inheritance and expression of the nptII transgene in the progeny of all four transgenic clones were shown, although the character of segregation appeared to differ in the various clones

  8. Detection of Transgenic and Endogenous Plant DNA Fragments and Proteins in the Digesta, Blood, Tissues, and Eggs of Laying Hens Fed with Phytase Transgenic Corn

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Qiugang; Gao, Chunqi; Zhang, Jianyun; Zhao, Lihong; Hao, Wenbo; Ji, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    The trials were conducted to assess the effects of long-term feeding with phytase transgenic corn (PTC) to hens on laying performance and egg quality, and investigate the fate of transgenic DNA and protein in digesta, blood, tissues, and eggs. Fifty-week old laying hens (n?=?144) were fed with a diet containing 62.4% PTC or non-transgenic isogenic control corn (CC) for 16 weeks. We observed that feeding PTC to laying hens had no adverse effect on laying performance or egg quality (P>0.05) exc...

  9. Regulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity thresholds and changes in exploratory and learning behavior in dominant negative NPR-B mutant rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Buttgereit

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The second messenger cyclic GMP affects synaptic transmission and modulates synaptic plasticity and certain types of learning and memory processes. The impact of the natriuretic peptide receptor B (NPR-B and its ligand C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP, one of several cGMP producing signalling systems, on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and learning is, however, less well understood. We have previously shown that the NPR-B ligand CNP increases the magnitude of long-term depression (LTD in hippocampal area CA1, while reducing the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP. We have extended this line of research to show that bidirectional plasticity is affected in the opposite way in rats expressing a dominant-negative mutant of NPR-B (NSE-NPR-BdeltaKC lacking the intracellular guanylyl cyclase domain under control of a promoter for neuron-specific enolase. The brain cells of these transgenic rats express functional dimers of the NPR-B receptor containing the dominant-negative NPR-BdeltaKC mutant, and therefore show decreased CNP-stimulated cGMP-production in brain membranes. The NPR-B transgenic rats display enhanced LTP but reduced LTD in hippocampal slices. When the frequency-dependence of synaptic modification to afferent stimulation in the range of 1-100 Hz was assessed in transgenic rats the threshold for LTP induction was raised, but LTD induction was facilitated. In parallel, NPR-BdeltaKC rats exhibited an enhancement in exploratory and learning behavior. These results indicate that bidirectional plasticity and learning and memory mechanism are affected in transgenic rats expressing a dominant-negative mutant of NPR-B. Our data substantiate the hypothesis that NPR-B-dependent cGMP signalling has a modulatory role for synaptic information storage and learning.

  10. Case Study: Polycystic Livers in a Transgenic Mouse Line

    OpenAIRE

    Lovaglio, Jamie; Artwohl, James E.; Ward, Christopher J.; Diekwisch, Thomas GH; Ito, Yoshihiro; Fortman, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Three mice (2 male, 1 female; age, 5 to 16 mo) from a mouse line transgenic for keratin 14 (K14)-driven LacZ expression and on an outbred Crl:CD1(ICR) background, were identified as having distended abdomens and livers that were diffusely enlarged by numerous cysts (diameter, 0.1 to 2.0 cm). Histopathology revealed hepatic cysts lined by biliary type epithelium and mild chronic inflammation, and confirmed the absence of parasites. Among 21 related mice, 5 additional affected mice were identif...

  11. Transgenic Mice Convert Carbohydrates to Essential Fatty Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Pai, Victor J.; Wang, Bin; LI, XIANGYONG; Wu, Lin; Jing X. Kang

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic mice (named “Omega mice”) were engineered to carry both optimized fat-1 and fat-2 genes from the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans and are capable of producing essential omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids from saturated fats or carbohydrates. When maintained on a high-saturated fat diet lacking essential fatty acids or a high-carbohydrate, no-fat diet, the Omega mice exhibit high tissue levels of both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids, with a ratio of ?1?1. This study thus presents an in...

  12. ADAM 12 protease induces adipogenesis in transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaguchi, Nobuko; Xu, Xiufeng; Tajima, Rie; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Sundberg, Christina; Loechel, Frosty; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Wewer, Ulla M

    2002-01-01

    ADAM 12 (meltrin-alpha) is a member of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family. ADAM 12 functions as an active metalloprotease, supports cell adhesion, and has been implicated in myoblast differentiation and fusion. Human ADAM 12 exists in two forms: the prototype membrane-anchored protein, ADAM 12-L, and a shorter secreted form, ADAM 12-S. Here we report the occurrence of adipocytes in the skeletal muscle of transgenic mice in which overexpression of either form is driven by the mus...

  13. [Transgenic bioinsecticides inimical to parasites, but imical to environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuci?ska, Jolanta; Lonc, Elzbieta; Rydzanicz, Katarzyna

    2003-01-01

    Identification of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) parasporal crystalline inclusions composed of Cry proteins (=delta-endotoxins) resulted in introduction of microbial pesticides for biological control of some parasites. Delta-endotoxins are encoded by cry genes and are active against pest and nuisance insects (mostly mosquitoes and black flies--vectors of still important infectious diseases). The recent significant progress in DNA recombination technique may overcome limitations (a short residual persistence and a narrow spectrum of activity) associated with application of Bt conventional products. An introduction of cry genes from mosquitocidal subspecies B. th. israelensis (Bti) to the aquatic microorganisms inhabiting the same water bodies as mosquito and fly larvae (Diptera), has considerably improved the toxin delivery system to target insects. However, in the first experiments, in which Bti genes were cloned in cyanobacteria (Agmenellum quadruplicatum, Synechocystis PCC6803), a low gene expression was observed. Thus, it was necessary to integrate cry genes with strong promoters or to increase the number of vector-introduced copies. To overcome the obstacles of low gene expression and regulatory restriction for recombinant organisms, Bti spore/crystal formulations were encapsulated in the aquatic protozoan, Tetrahymena pyriformis. Large numbers of crystals (180 to 240/cell) were accumulated in its food vacuoles. This system resulted also in an increase in toxin persistence from 24 to 71 h. Cloning Bti genes in B. sphaericus (which also produces mosquitocidal proteins) was another way of an increasing Bt crystal residual activity. In this case, the crystals were additionally protected by B. sphaericus exosporium. These transgenic bacteria produced large amounts of delta-endotoxins that remained under water surface longer than the wild B. sphaericus strains. Moreover, they had a broader spectrum of insecticidal activity, because B. sphaericus is toxic mostly to Culex and Anopheles, and Bti--mostly to Culex, Aedes and some Simmulidae. Gram-negative bacteria (Asticcacaulis excentricus, Caulobacter crescentus and Ancylobacter aquaticus) turned out also to be effective delta-endotoxin producers. They grow on simple media and do not contain proteases which could degrade Cry proteins. In some cases, 100% mosquito larvae mortality was observed as a result of an exposure to transgenic microorganisms containing Bti genes. However, transgenic techniques are still not very popular in the world, despite their efficacy in biological control of insects. The transgenic organism construction is expensive and time-consuming. Genetic engineering is still raising a lot of anxieties and doubts concerning inappropriate use of modified organisms. On the other hand, this technology could solve many problems associated with vectors of important diseases, which are still unapproachable to contemporary medicine. PMID:16889013

  14. EXPRESSION OF CHITINASE GENE IN TRANSGENIC RAPE PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ruili

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The hypocotyl and cotyledon of Brassica napus L. H165 and Brassica juncea DB3 were transformed with chitinase gene and herbicide-resistance gene by co-culture with Agrobacterium tumefacients LBA4404, and rape plants were obtained which could grow on the medium containing herbicide. The PCR result showed that exotic genes were integrated in the genome of the rape. Further study was performed to determine the impact of temperature on the transgenic rate and the differentiation of explants.

  15. FLUORESCENT TRANSGENIC FISH IN PERU: BIOSAFETY AND RISK ANALYSIS PENDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scotto, Carlos

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Transgenesis involves processes of molecular genetic manipulation of DNAwhich seeks to "introduce genes" of interest from one organism into the genetic material of another to obtain goods or services. The resulting organism is called a Genetically Modified Organism or GMO. It shows the first case of transgenic fluorescent fish as a real example of GMOs existing in Peru. Reproduction and hybridization in confined environments, provide new approaches to biosecurity decision-makers about this new technological contribution to the task of Peru.

  16. Transmission of Elk and Deer Prions to Transgenic Mice†

    OpenAIRE

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Giles, Kurt; Bouzamondo-Bernstein, Essia; Bosque, Patrick J.; Miller, Michael W; Safar, Jiri; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal prion disease in deer and elk. Unique among the prion diseases, it is transmitted among captive and free-ranging animals. To facilitate studies of the biology of CWD prions, we generated five lines of transgenic (Tg) mice expressing prion protein (PrP) from Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni), denoted Tg(ElkPrP), and two lines of Tg mice expressing PrP common to white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), den...

  17. Electrochemical determination of metallothionein in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    K?ížková, S.; Diopan, V.; Baloun, J.; Šupálková, V.; Shestisvka, V.; Kotrba, P.; Macková, Martina; Macek, Tomáš; Havel, L.; Adam, V.; Zehnálek, J.; Kizek, R.

    Praha : VŠCHT, 2007 - (Macková, M.; Macek, T.; Demnerová, K.; Pazlar, V.; Nováková, M.), s. 21-23 ISBN 978-80-7080-026-3. [Symposium on Biosorption and Bioremediation /4./. Praha (CZ), 26.08.2007-30.08.2007] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M06030 Grant ostatní: GA?R(CZ) GA522/07/0692 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : metallothionein * heavy metals * transgenic plants * GM-tobacco Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  18. Evaluation of adenovirus capsid labeling versus transgene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curiel David T

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adenoviral vectors have been utilized for a variety of gene therapy applications. Our group has incorporated bioluminescent, fluorographic reporters, and/or suicide genes within the adenovirus genome for analytical and/or therapeutic purposes. These molecules have also been incorporated as capsid components. Recognizing that incorporations at either locale yield potential advantages and disadvantages, our report evaluates the benefits of transgene incorporation versus capsid incorporation. To this end, we have genetically incorporated firefly luciferase within the early region 3 or at minor capsid protein IX and compared vector functionality by means of reporter readout.

  19. Functional Coexpression of HSV-1 Thymidine Kinase and Green Fluorescent Protein: Implications for Noninvasive Imaging of Transgene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Jacobs

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Current gene therapy technology is limited by the paucity of methodology for determining the location and magnitude of therapeutic transgene expression in vivo. We describe and validate a paradigm for monitoring therapeutic transgene expression by noninvasive imaging of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk marker gene expression. To test proportional coexpression of therapeutic and marker genes, a model fusion gene comprising green fluorescent protein (gfp and HSV-1-tk genes was generated (tkgfp gene and assessed for the functional coexpression of the gene product, TKGFP fusion protein, in rat 9L gliosarcoma, RG2 glioma, and W256 carcinoma cells. Analysis of the TKGFP protein demonstrated that it can serve as a therapeutic gene by rendering tkgfp transduced cells sensitive to ganciclovir or as a screening marker useful for identifying transduced cells by fluorescence microscopy or fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. TK and GFP activities in the TKGFP fusion protein were similar to corresponding wild-type proteins and accumulation of the HSV-1-tk-specific radiolabeled substrate, 2?-fluoro-2?-deoxy-1?-D-arabino-furanosyl-5-iodo-uracil (FIAU, in stability transduced clones correlated with gfp-fluorescence intensity over a wide range of expression levels. The tkgfp fusion gene itself may be useful in developing novel cancer gene therapy approaches. Valuable information about the efficiency of gene transfer and expression could be obtained by non-invasive imaging of tkgfp expression with FIAU and clinical imaging devices (gamma camera, positron-emission tomography [PET], single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT], and/or direct visualization of gfp expression in situ by fluorescence microscopy or endoscopy.

  20. TT2014 meeting report on the 12th Transgenic Technology meeting in Edinburgh: new era of transgenic technologies with programmable nucleases in the foreground.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beck, Inken; Sedlá?ek, Radislav

    2015-01-01

    Ro?. 24, ?. 1 (2015), s. 179-183. ISSN 0962-8819 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Transgenic * Nuclease * Gene Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.322, year: 2014

  1. Screen of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins for transgenic rice to control Sesamia inferens and Chilo suppressalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic rice to control stem borer damage is under development in China. To assess the potential of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgenes in stem borer control, the toxicity of five Bt protoxins (Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1Ba and Cry1Ca) against two rice stem borers, Sesamia inferens (pink stem...

  2. Marketing Strategic Benefit-risk Analysis: Transgenic Poultry Food Supply Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the causes of marketing strategic benefit-risk of transgenic poultry food supply chain in china, we analyze the role that benefits and risks play in the formation of the decision-making process of transgenic poultry food participants. This study discusses the ways and strategies of transgenic poultry food supply chain from the following aspects: a, the food's safety concerning producers, marketing participants and consumers’ risk behaviour at three stages of the transgenic poultry food supply chain. b, all these risks should be effectively managed in order to derive the utmost of benefits and avoid disruption or catastrophic economic consequences for all stages of the transgenic poultry food supply chain. c, the identification, analysis, determination and understanding of the benefit-risk trade-offs of market participants in transgenic poultry food market may help policy makers, financial analysts and marketers to make well informed and effective corporate marketing strategies in order to deal with highly uncertain and risky situations. We hope these can accelerate the construction of marketing strategic benefit-risk trade-offs of transgenic poultry food supply chain, promote sustained and rapid growth of transgenic poultry food industry in china.

  3. PERSISTENCE IN SOIL OF TRANSGENIC PLANT PRODUCED BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS VAR. KURSTAKI O-ENDOTOXIN1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic plants that produce pesticidal proteins will release these proteins into the soil when these plants are incorporated into the soil by tillage or as leaf litter. Little is known about the fate and persistence of transgenic plant pesticidal products in the soil. We used ...

  4. An efficient method to successively introduce transgenes into a given genomic locus in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiler Hartmut

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression of transgenes in mice requires transcriptional regulatory elements that direct expression in a chosen cell type. Unfortunately, the availability of well-characterized promoters that direct bona-fide expression of transgenes in transgenic mice is limited. Here we described a method that allows highly efficient targeting of transgenes to a preselected locus in ES cells. Results A pgk-LoxP-Neo cassette was introduced into a desired genomic locus by homologous recombination in ES cells. The pgk promoter was then removed from the targeted ES cells by Cre recombinase thereby restoring the ES cells' sensitivity to G418. We demonstrated that transgenes could be efficiently introduced into this genomic locus by reconstituting a functional Neo gene. Conclusion This approach is simple and extremely efficient in facilitating the introduction of single-copy transgenes into defined genomic loci. The availability of such an approach greatly enhances the ease of using endogenous regulatory elements to control transgene expression and, in turn, expands the repertoire of elements available for transgene expression.

  5. Glyphosate drift promotes changes in fitness and transgene flow in canola (Brassica napus) and hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. With the advent of transgenic crops, genetically modified, herbicide resistant B. napus has become a model system for examining the risks of escape of transgenes from cultivation and for evaluating potential ecological consequences of novel genes in wild species. 2. We exam...

  6. Transgenic banana expressing Pflp gene confers enhanced resistance to Xanthomonas wilt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namukwaya, B; Tripathi, L; Tripathi, J N; Arinaitwe, G; Mukasa, S B; Tushemereirwe, W K

    2012-08-01

    Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW), caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum, is one of the most important diseases of banana (Musa sp.) and currently considered as the biggest threat to banana production in Great Lakes region of East and Central Africa. The pathogen is highly contagious and its spread has endangered the livelihood of millions of farmers who rely on banana for food and income. The development of disease resistant banana cultivars remains a high priority since farmers are reluctant to employ labor-intensive disease control measures and there is no host plant resistance among banana cultivars. In this study, we demonstrate that BXW can be efficiently controlled using transgenic technology. Transgenic bananas expressing the plant ferredoxin-like protein (Pflp) gene under the regulation of the constitutive CaMV35S promoter were generated using embryogenic cell suspensions of banana. These transgenic lines were characterized by molecular analysis. After challenge with X. campestris pv. musacearum transgenic lines showed high resistance. About 67% of transgenic lines evaluated were completely resistant to BXW. These transgenic lines did not show any disease symptoms after artificial inoculation of in vitro plants under laboratory conditions as well as potted plants in the screen-house, whereas non-transgenic control plants showed severe symptoms resulting in complete wilting. This study confirms that expression of the Pflp gene in banana results in enhanced resistance to BXW. This transgenic technology can provide a timely solution to the BXW pandemic. PMID:22101927

  7. ENGINEERING RESISTANCE AGAINST PAPAYA RINGSPOT VIRUS BY NATIVE, CHIMERIC AND SYNTHETIC TRANSGENES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The transgenic Rainbow papaya is hemizygous for the coat protein gene of a papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) isolate from Hawaii. Rainbow shows excellent resistance to PRSV isolates in Hawaii, but is susceptible to PRSV isolates from many parts of the world. In order to obtain transgenic papaya which m...

  8. VIRUS COAT PROTEIN TRANSGENIC PAPAYA PROVIDES PRACTICAL CONTROL OF PAPAYA RINGSPOT VIRUS IN HAWAII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two field trials to evaluate transgenic resistance to Papaya ringspot virus were established in Puna, island of Hawaii. One trial included 'SunUp' (a homozygous transformant of 'Sunset'), 'Rainbow' (a hybrid of 'SunUp'), 'Kapoho' (a widely used non-transgenic cultivar) and '63-1' (another segregati...

  9. Virtual Transgenics: Using a Molecular Biology Simulation to Impact Student Academic Achievement and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shegog, Ross; Lazarus, Melanie M.; Murray, Nancy G.; Diamond, Pamela M.; Sessions, Nathalie; Zsigmond, Eva

    2012-01-01

    The transgenic mouse model is useful for studying the causes and potential cures for human genetic diseases. Exposing high school biology students to laboratory experience in developing transgenic animal models is logistically prohibitive. Computer-based simulation, however, offers this potential in addition to advantages of fidelity and reach.…

  10. Simplified Insertion of Transgenes Onto Balancer Chromosomes via Recombinase-Mediated Cassette Exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Florence F.; Johnson, Justine E.; Zeidler, Martin P.; Bateman, Jack R.

    2012-01-01

    Balancer chromosomes are critical tools for Drosophila genetics. Many useful transgenes are inserted onto balancers using a random and inefficient process. Here we describe balancer chromosomes that can be directly targeted with transgenes of interest via recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE).

  11. Efficient gene targeting by homology-directed repair in rat zygotes using TALE nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy, Séverine; Tesson, Laurent; Menoret, Séverine; Usal, Claire; De Cian, Anne; Thepenier, Virginie; Thinard, Reynald; Baron, Daniel; Charpentier, Marine; Renaud, Jean-Baptiste; Buelow, Roland; Cost, Gregory J; Giovannangeli, Carine; Fraichard, Alexandre; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio

    2014-08-01

    The generation of genetically modified animals is important for both research and commercial purposes. The rat is an important model organism that until recently lacked efficient genetic engineering tools. Sequence-specific nucleases, such as ZFNs, TALE nucleases, and CRISPR/Cas9 have allowed the creation of rat knockout models. Genetic engineering by homology-directed repair (HDR) is utilized to create animals expressing transgenes in a controlled way and to introduce precise genetic modifications. We applied TALE nucleases and donor DNA microinjection into zygotes to generate HDR-modified rats with large new sequences introduced into three different loci with high efficiency (0.62%-5.13% of microinjected zygotes). Two of these loci (Rosa26 and Hprt1) are known to allow robust and reproducible transgene expression and were targeted for integration of a GFP expression cassette driven by the CAG promoter. GFP-expressing embryos and four Rosa26 GFP rat lines analyzed showed strong and widespread GFP expression in most cells of all analyzed tissues. The third targeted locus was Ighm, where we performed successful exon exchange of rat exon 2 for the human one. At all three loci we observed HDR only when using linear and not circular donor DNA. Mild hypothermic (30°C) culture of zygotes after microinjection increased HDR efficiency for some loci. Our study demonstrates that TALE nuclease and donor DNA microinjection into rat zygotes results in efficient and reproducible targeted donor integration by HDR. This allowed creation of genetically modified rats in a work-, cost-, and time-effective manner. PMID:24989021

  12. Screening of transgenic proteins expressed in transgenic food crops for the presence of short amino acid sequences identical to potential, IgE - binding linear epitopes of allergens

    OpenAIRE

    Peijnenburg Ad ACM; Kleter Gijs A

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Transgenic proteins expressed by genetically modified food crops are evaluated for their potential allergenic properties prior to marketing, among others by identification of short identical amino acid sequences that occur both in the transgenic protein and allergenic proteins. A strategy is proposed, in which the positive outcomes of the sequence comparison with a minimal length of six amino acids are further screened for the presence of potential linear IgE-epitopes. Thi...

  13. Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Responses to Transgene Product, Not Adeno-Associated Viral Capsid Protein, Limit Transgene Expression in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Siders, William M.; Shields, Jacqueline; KAPLAN, JOHANNE; Lukason, Michael; Woodworth, Lisa; Wadsworth, Sam; Scaria, Abraham

    2009-01-01

    The use of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors for gene replacement therapy is currently being explored in several clinical indications. However, reports have suggested that input capsid proteins from AAV-2 vector particles may result in the stimulation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses that can result in a loss of transduced cells. To explore the impact of anti-AAV CTLs on AAV-mediated transgene expression, both immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice and B cell-deficient ?MT mice were immuniz...

  14. Analysis of water soluble proteins and peptides from Bt transgenic and non-transgenic maize varieties by capillary electrophoresis.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sázelová, Petra; Kaši?ka, Václav; Ibanez, E.; Cifuentes, A.

    Praha : Institut of organic Chemistry and Biochemistry ASCR, 2009 - (Slaninová, J.), s. 110-112 ISBN 978-80-86241-31-9. - (Collection Symposium Series. 11). [Biologically Active Peptides. Conference /11./. Praha (CZ), 22.04.2009-24.04.2009] R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GA203/08/1428 Grant ostatní: GA ?R(CZ) GA203/09/0675 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : capillary affinity electrophoresis * Bt-transgenic maize * water - soluble protein s/peptides Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  15. Immunohistochemical detection of transgene expression in the brain using small epitope tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debyser Zeger

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vivo overexpression of proteins is a powerful approach to study their biological function, generate disease models or evaluate gene therapy approaches. In order to investigate an exogenously expressed protein, specific and sensitive detection is essential. Unfortunately, antibodies that allow histological detection of the protein of interest are not always readily available. The use of an epitope tag fused to the protein can circumvent this problem as well as provide the possibility to discriminate endogenous from overexpressed proteins. In order to minimize impact on the bioactivity and biodistribution of the overexpressed protein, preference is given to small tags. Results In the present study, we evaluated several small epitope tags together with corresponding anti-tag antibodies for the detection of overexpressed proteins in rat brain, using eGFP as a reference. We generated several lentiviral vectors encoding eGFP with different N-terminally fused small epitope tags (AU1, flag, 3flag, HA, myc and V5. After confirmation of their functionality in cell culture, we injected these lentiviral vectors stereotactically into the striatum of rats and prepared paraformaldehyde fixed floating sections for immunohistochemical analysis. Using multiple antibodies and antibody dilutions per epitope tag, we extensively assessed the efficiency of several anti-tag antibodies for chromogenic immunohistochemical detection of the epitope tagged eGFPs by determining the proportion of immunoreactivity detected by anti-tag antibodies compared to anti-GFP antibody. Using fluorescence immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy, we also quantified the proportion of eGFP-positive cells detected by anti-tag antibodies. Our results show that all the examined small epitope tags could be detected by anti-tag antibodies both in cell extracts as well as in vivo, although to varying degrees depending on the tag and antibody used. Using the presented protocol, V5/anti-V5 and HA/HA11 tag/antibody combinations provided the most sensitive detection in brain tissue. We confirmed the applicability of these optimized in vivo tag detection conditions for a difficult to detect protein, firefly luciferase (fLuc, using lentiviral vector constructs expressing V5 tagged and 3flag tagged fLuc protein. Conclusions We show here that several small epitope tags are useful for immunohistochemical detection of exogenous proteins in vivo. Our study also provides a generic methodology which is broadly applicable for the detection of overexpressed transgenes in mammalian brain tissue.

  16. Suppression of intestinal immunity through silencing of TCTP by RNAi in transgenic silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Cuimei; Wang, Fei; Ma, Sanyuan; Li, Xianyang; Song, Liang; Hua, Xiaoting; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-12-10

    Intestinal immune response is a front line of host defense. The host factors that participate in intestinal immunity response remain largely unknown. We recently reported that Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (BmTCTP) was obtained by constructing a phage display cDNA library of the silkworm midgut and carrying out high throughput screening of pathogen binding molecules. To further address the function of BmTCTP in silkworm intestinal immunity, transgenic RNAi silkworms were constructed by microinjection piggBac plasmid to Dazao embryos. The antimicrobial capacity of transgenic silkworm decreased since the expression of gut antimicrobial peptide from transgenic silkworm was not sufficiently induced during oral microbial challenge. Moreover, dynamic ERK phosphorylation from transgenic silkworm midgut was disrupted. Taken together, the innate immunity of intestinal was suppressed through disruption of dynamic ERK phosphorylation after oral microbial infection as a result of RNAi-mediated knockdown of midgut TCTP in transgenic silkworm. PMID:26302749

  17. Lentiviral-Mediated Transgene Expression Can Potentiate Intestinal Mesenchymal-Epithelial Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohn Aimee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesenchymal-epithelial signaling is essential for the development of many organs and is often disrupted in disease. In this study, we demonstrate the use of lentiviral-mediated transgene delivery as an effective approach for ectopic transgene expression and an alternative to generation of transgenic animals. One benefit to this approach is that it can be used independently or in conjunction with established transgenic or knockout animals for studying modulation of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions. To display the power of this approach, we explored ectopic expression of a Wnt ligand in the mouse intestinal mesenchyme and demonstrate its functional influence on the adjacent epithelium. Our findings highlight the efficient use of lentiviral-mediated transgene expression for modulating mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in vivo.

  18. Interface of biotechnology and ecology for environmental risk assessments of transgenic fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Robert H; Sundström, L Fredrik; Muir, William M

    2006-02-01

    Genetically engineered fish with enhanced phenotypic traits have yet to be implemented into commercial applications. This is partly because of the difficulties in reliably predicting the ecological risk of transgenic fish should they escape into the wild. The ecological consequences of the phenotypic differences between transgenic and wild-type fish, as determined in the laboratory, can be uncertain because of genotype-by-environment effects (GXE). Additionally, we are limited in our ability to extrapolate simple phenotypes to the complex ecological interactions that occur in nature. Genetic background can also shape the phenotypic effects of transgenes, which, over time and among different wild populations, can make risk assessments a continuously evolving target. These uncertainties suggest that assessments of transgenic fish in contained facilities need to be conducted under as wide a range of conditions as possible, and that efficacious physical and biological containment strategies remain as crucial approaches to ensure the safe application of transgenic fish technology. PMID:16380181

  19. [Application of ICP-MS to the detection of 22 elements in transgenic soybean oil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wel, Zhen-lin; Shen, Lin; Rui, Yu-kui; Jiao, Chuan-zhen

    2008-06-01

    With the rapid development of transgenic food, more and more transgenic food has been pouring into the market, and much attention has been paid to the edible safety of transgenic food. Transgenic soybean oils were studied by ICP-MS to detect 22 kinds of elements. The results showed that the contents of 7 kinds of macroelements range from 0. 13 to 12.52 microg x g(-1) in transgenic soybean oils, the range of the rest 15 kinds of microelements is from 0.15 ng x g(-1) to 7)0.00 ng x g(-1). The sequence of macroelement concentration is Ca>Na>K>Mg>Al>P>Si. There are 5 kinds of micoelements whose concentrations were higher than 200 ng x g(-1), including Zn>Ba>Cr>Fe>Ti, especially Zn, Ba, Cr and Fe. PMID:18800733

  20. Monitoring the threat of unintentional transgene flow into maize gene banks and breeding materials

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Monica, Mezzalama; Jonathan H, Crouch; Rodomiro, Ortiz.

    2010-03-15

    Full Text Available The use of transgenic crops is steadily increasing around the world, led by soybean (based on total area) and maize (in terms of total number of countries). Transgenic maize is grown in at least 17 countries across four continents: Africa, America, Asia and Europe. The comprehensive global spread of [...] transgenic maize has significant implications for organizations involved in germplasm conservation and genetic enhancement; particularly as some countries require a GMO-free declaration when receiving shipments of maize germplasm. This article describes the protocol used by the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) for monitoring unintentional transgene flow in maize genebank and breeding plots. The protocol is based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) markers for detecting specific recombinant DNA sequences in bulked samples collected from sentinel plots. To date, no unintentional transgene flow has been detected in CIMMYT fields of maize genebank accessions or breeding materials.

  1. Lentiviral-Mediated Transgene Expression Can Potentiate Intestinal Mesenchymal-Epithelial Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dismuke Adria D

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesenchymal-epithelial signaling is essential for the development of many organs and is often disrupted in disease. In this study, we demonstrate the use of lentiviral-mediated transgene delivery as an effective approach for ectopic transgene expression and an alternative to generation of transgenic animals. One benefit to this approach is that it can be used independently or in conjunction with established transgenic or knockout animals for studying modulation of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions. To display the power of this approach, we explored ectopic expression of a Wnt ligand in the mouse intestinal mesenchyme and demonstrate its functional influence on the adjacent epithelium. Our findings highlight the efficient use of lentiviral-mediated transgene expression for modulating mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in vivo.

  2. Phage integrases for the construction and manipulation of transgenic mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sclimenti Christopher R

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Phage integrases catalyze site-specific, unidirectional recombination between two short att recognition sites. Recombination results in integration when the att sites are present on two different DNA molecules and deletion or inversion when the att sites are on the same molecule. Here we demonstrate the ability of the ?C31 integrase to integrate DNA into endogenous sequences in the mouse genome following microinjection of donor plasmid and integrase mRNA into mouse single-cell embryos. Transgenic early embryos and a mid-gestation mouse are reported. We also demonstrate the ability of the ?C31, R4, and TP901-1 phage integrases to recombine two introduced att sites on the same chromosome in human cells, resulting in deletion of the intervening material. We compare the frequencies of mammalian chromosomal deletion catalyzed by these three integrases in different chromosomal locations. The results reviewed here introduce these bacteriophage integrases as tools for site-specific modification of the genome for the creation and manipulation of transgenic mammals.

  3. Transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease: phenotype and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Guy A; Jacobsen, Heimut

    2003-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of senile dementia, for which there is presently no disease-based treatment. The identification of genetic factors contributing to this disease, and the intense investigation into the cell biology of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and, to some extent, tau, has led to the development of several transgenic mouse models of this disease. These mice show some of the characteristic AD pathology, such as an age-dependent formation of amyloid plaques consisting of Abeta peptides. However, they usually lack both the tau pathology, i.e. neurofibrillary tangle formation, and the neurodegeneration also associated with AD. Importantly, many of these transgenic lines develop age-dependent deficits in some relevant behavioural tests and thus provide an animal model not only for amyloidosis but also for the cognitive deficits of AD patients. Incorporation of additional disease genes may lead to models that show a more complete disease phenotype. This review attempts to summarize much of this work, and describes how the availability of these models should assist in the understanding of AD aetiology and the identification of effective treatments for this disease. The review also considers the role behavioural testing may have in future AD drug discovery research. PMID:14501255

  4. Neuronal transgene expression in dominant-negative SNARE mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Takumi; Chen, Michael J; Li, Baoman; Smith, Nathan A; Peng, Weiguo; Sun, Wei; Toner, Michael J; Kress, Benjamin T; Wang, Linhui; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Takano, Takahiro; Wang, Su; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2014-12-10

    Experimental advances in the study of neuroglia signaling have been greatly accelerated by the generation of transgenic mouse models. In particular, an elegant manipulation that interferes with astrocyte vesicular release of gliotransmitters via overexpression of a dominant-negative domain of vesicular SNARE (dnSNARE) has led to documented astrocytic involvement in processes that were traditionally considered strictly neuronal, including the sleep-wake cycle, LTP, cognition, cortical slow waves, depression, and pain. A key premise leading to these conclusions was that expression of the dnSNARE was specific to astrocytes. Inconsistent with this premise, we report here widespread expression of the dnSNARE transgene in cortical neurons. We further demonstrate that the activity of cortical neurons is reversibly suppressed in dnSNARE mice. These findings highlight the need for independent validation of astrocytic functions identified in dnSNARE mice and thus question critical evidence that astrocytes contribute to neurotransmission through SNARE-dependent vesicular release of gliotransmitters. PMID:25505312

  5. Spontaneous and transgenic rodent models of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prattis, Susan; Jurjus, Abdo

    2015-06-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disorder with many different putative influences mediating disease onset, severity, progression and diminution. Spontaneous natural IBD is classically expressed as Crohn's Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC) commonly found in primates; lymphoplasmocytic enteritis, eosinophilic gastritis and colitis, and ulcerative colitis with neuronal hyperplasia in dogs; and colitis in horses. Spontaneous inflammatory bowel disease has been noted in a number of rodent models which differ in genetic strain background, induced mutation, microbiota influences and immunopathogenic pathways. Histological lesions in Crohn's Disease feature noncaseating granulomatous inflammation while UC lesions typically exhibit ulceration, lamina propria inflammatory infiltrates and lack of granuloma development. Intestinal inflammation caused by CD and UC is also associated with increased incidence of intestinal neoplasia. Transgenic murine models have determined underlying etiological influences and appropriate therapeutic targets in IBD. This literature review will discuss current opinion and findings in spontaneous IBD, highlight selected transgenic rodent models of IBD and discuss their respective pathogenic mechanisms. It is very important to provide accommodation of induced putative deficits in activities of daily living and to assess discomfort and pain levels in the face of significant morbidity and/or mortality in these models. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome) and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis, and evaluating ways in which they influence disease expression represent potential investigative approaches with the greatest potential for new discoveries. PMID:26155200

  6. The use of transgenic animals to study lipoprotein metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, E.M.; Plump, A.S.

    1993-12-01

    The application of transgenic technology to lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis was first reported in 1988. Today, a large percentage of the genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism have been overexpressed in mice, and a substantial number of these same genes have been disrupted by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. The utility of animal models of lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis is far-reaching given the complex nature of these systems. There are at least 17 known genes directly involved in lipoprotein metabolism and likely dozens more may be involved. This massive network of interacting factors has necessitated the development of in vivo systems which can be subject to genetic manipulation. The power of overexpression is obvious: elucidating function in a relatively controlled genetic environment in which the whole system is present and operational. The not-so-obvious problem with transgenics is ``background,`` or for purposes of the current discussion, the mouse`s own lipoprotein system. With the advent of gene knockout, we have been given the ability to overcome ``background.`` By recreating the genetic complement of the mouse we can alter a system in essentially any manner desired. As unique tools, and in combination with one another, the overexpression of foreign genes and the targeted disruption or alteration of endogenous genes has already and will continue to offer a wealth of information on the biology of lipoprotein metabolism and its effect on atherosclerosis susceptibility.

  7. Transgenic mouse model for neurocristopathy: Schwannomas and facial bone tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, N A; Rodriguez, M L; Garvey, J S; Miller, C A; Hood, L

    1993-04-15

    We have characterized a strain of double transgenic mice with simian virus 40 large tumor antigen and prokaryotic lacZ under the control of the myelin basic protein promoter that develops spindle-cell sarcomas and osteogenic sarcomas at 5-7 months of age. Although poorly differentiated, the spindle-cell sarcomas were characterized as malignant Schwannomas based on their neural association, the presence of basal lamina, and expression of Schwann cell-specific genes. The osteogenic sarcomas were often multiple and appeared predominantly in the facial bones, less frequently in the ribs and vertebral column, and only rarely in the appendicular skeleton. Benign osteoblastic lesions were often observed adjacent to these sarcomas. Both the osteoblastic cells in the facial skeleton and Schwann cells are regarded as neural crest derivatives. The biological properties and anatomical location of these tumors suggest that they may share a common origin from the neural crest or its derivatives. R.P. Bolande [Hum. Pathol. (1974) 5, 409-429] introduced the term neurocristopathy as a unifying concept to describe such lesions arising from the neural crest or its derivatives. Cell lines established from both bone and Schwann cell tumors arising in these transgenic mice express simian virus 40 large tumor antigen mRNA as well as functional large tumor antigen. Such cell lines are potentially valuable in the search for markers that identify mammalian neural crest derivatives. PMID:8386366

  8. Transgenic chickens expressing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Ho, Young Tae; Kim, Teoan; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2013-09-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator is a serine protease that is clinically used in humans for the treatment of thrombolytic disorders and vascular diseases such as acute ischemic stroke and acute peripheral arterial occlusion. This study explored the feasibility of using chickens as a bioreactor for producing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (huPA). Recombinant huPA gene, under the control of a ubiquitous Rous sarcoma virus promoter, was injected into the subgerminal cavity of freshly laid chicken eggs at stage X using the replication-defective Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retrovirus vectors encapsidated with VSV-G (vesicular stomatitis virus G) glycoprotein. A total of 38 chicks, out of 573 virus-injected eggs, hatched and contained the huPA gene in their various body parts. The mRNA transcript of the huPA gene was present in various organs, including blood and egg, and was germ-line transmitted to the next generation. The level of active huPA protein was 16-fold higher in the blood of the transgenic chicken than in the nontransgenic chicken (P system. Transgenic chickens, expressing the huPA under the control of a ubiquitous promoter, may not only be used as a bioreactor for pharming of the huPA drug but also be useful for studying huPA-induced bleeding and other disorders. PMID:23960123

  9. Development of transgenic yellow poplar for mercury phytoremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugh, C L; Senecoff, J F; Meagher, R B; Merkle, S A

    1998-10-01

    We examined the ability of yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) tissue cultures and plantlets to express modified mercuric reductase (merA) gene constructs. Mercury-resistant bacteria express merA to convert highly toxic, ionic mercury, Hg(II), to much less toxic, elemental mercury, Hg(O). Expression of merA in transgenic plants might provide an ecologically compatible approach for the remediation of mercury pollution. Because the alteration of the bacterial merA gene sequence is necessary for high-level expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, yellow poplar proembryogenic masses (PEMs) were transformed with three modified merA constructs via microprojectile bombardment. Each construct was synthesized to have altered flanking regions with increasing amounts of modified coding sequence. All merA constructs conferred resistance to toxic, ionic mercury in independently transformed PEM colonies. Stability of merA transgene expression increased in parallel with the extent of gene coding sequence modification. Regenerated plantlets containing the most modified merA gene (merA18) germinated and grew vigorously in media containing normally toxic levels of ionic mercury. The merA18 plantlets released elemental mercury at approximately 10 times the rate of untransformed plantlets. These results indicate that plants expressing modified merA constructs may provide a means for the phytoremediation of mercury pollution. PMID:9788347

  10. MR Microimaging of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent neurological condition affecting industrialized nations and will rapidly become a healthcare crisis as the population ages. Currently, the post-mortem histological observation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles is the only definitive diagnosis available for AD. A pre-mortem biological or physiological marker specific for AD used in conjunction with current neurological and memory testing could add a great deal of confidence to the diagnosis of AD and potentially allow therapeutic intervention much earlier in the disease process. Our group has developed MRI techniques to detect individual amyloid plaques in AD transgenic mouse brain in vivo. We are also developing contrast-enhancing agents to increase the specificity of detection of amyloid plaques. Such in vivo imaging of amyloid plaques will also allow the evaluation of anti-amyloid therapies being developed by the pharmaceutical industry in pre-clinical trials of AD transgenic mice. This short review briefly discusses our progress in these areas. (orig.)

  11. Expression of functional oat phytochrome A in transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, R C; Casal, J J; Jordan, E T; Christou, P; Vierstra, R D

    1995-11-01

    To investigate the biological functions of phytochromes in monocots, we generated, by electric discharge particle bombardment, transgenic rice (Oryza sativa cv Gulfmont) that constitutively expresses the oat phytochrome A apoprotein. The introduced 124-kD polypeptide bound chromophore and assembled into a red- and far-red-light-photoreversible chromoprotein with absorbance spectra indistinguishable from those of phytochrome purified from etiolated oats. Transgenic lines expressed up to 3 and 4 times more spectrophotometrically detectable phytochrome than wild-type plants in etiolated and green seedlings, respectively. Upon photo-conversion to the far-red-absorbing form of phytochrome, oat phytochrome A was degraded in etiolated seedlings with kinetics similar to those of endogenous rice phytochromes (half-life approximately 20 min). Although plants overexpressing phytochrome A were phenotypically indistinguishable from wild-type plants when grown under high-fluence white light, they were more sensitive as etiolated seedlings to light pulses that established very low phytochrome equilibria. This indicates that the introduced oat phytochrome A was biologically active. Thus, rice ectopically expressing PHY genes may offer a useful model to help understand the physiological functions of the various phytochrome isoforms in monocotyledonous plants. PMID:8552709

  12. Influence of Phytase Transgenic Corn on the Intestinal Microflora and the Fate of Transgenic DNA and Protein in Digesta and Tissues of Broilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sufen; Li, Ang; Zhang, Liyang; Liu, Zhenhua; Luo, Xugang

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of phytase transgenic corn (PTC) on intestinal microflora, and the fate of transgenic DNA and protein in the digesta and tissues of broilers. A total of 160 1-day-old Arbor Acres commercial male broilers were randomly assigned to 20 cages (8 chicks per cage) with 10 cages (replicates) for each treatment. Birds were fed with a diet containing either PTC (54.0% during 1–21 days and 61.0% during 22–42 days) or non-transgenic isogenic control corn (CC) for a duration of 42 days. There were no significant differences (P>0.05) between birds fed with the PTC diets and those fed with the CC diets in the quantities of aerobic bacteria, anaerobic bacteria, colibacillus and lactobacilli, or microbial diversities in the contents of ileum and cecum. Transgenic phyA2 DNA was not detected, but phyA2 protein was detected in the digesta of duodenum and jejunum of broilers fed with the PTC diets. Both transgenic phyA2 DNA and protein fragments were not found in the digesta of the ileum and rectum, heart, liver, kidney, and breast or thigh muscles of broilers fed with the PTC diets. It was concluded that PTC had no adverse effect on the quantity and diversity of gut microorganisms; Transgenic phyA2 DNA or protein was rapidly degraded in the intestinal tract and was not transferred to the tissues of broilers. PMID:26599444

  13. Reproductive fitness of outcrossed hybrids between transgenic broccoli (brassica oleracea) carrying the ipt transgene and conventional varieties of kale, broccoli and cauliflower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollens are potential carriers for genetically modified crops to transfer genetic materials horizontally to other plants. For phanerogams, pollen viability and cross-compatibility are critical factors for successful outcross hybridization. To evaluate this possibility, this project investigated pollen viability and pod setting rate by comparing broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica Planck) and broccoli transformed with the isopentenyl transferase (ipt) gene. Both served as pollen donors and four other varieties as pollen receptors to determine outcross rates. For pollen viability, F1 progeny was higher (p?0.05) for the cross of transgenic ipt broccoli with Li Syue significantly by FDA (fluorescein diacetate) assay. Higher successful hybrids were observed for transgenic ipt broccoli with Fu Yue, Li Syue and Green King. As pollen properties, number and grain diameter were significantly larger (p?0.05) in hybrid combinations of transgenic ipt broccoli with Li Syue and Green King significantly (p?0.05). The pod setting rates were higher while transgenic ipt broccoli served as donor plant. These results analyzing pollen properties between transgenic crops with possible outcross candidates would serve as one of those critical strategies for evaluating environmental biosafety issues for transgenic crops. (author)

  14. A dominant-negative mutation within AtMYB90 blocks flower pigment production in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    During de novo shoot induction in cultured transgenic tobacco callus a spontaneous mutation within the coding region of a AtMYB90 transgene produced a plant line in which the original transgene-induced over-pigmented phenotype (dark red/purple from anthocyanin overproduction in most tissues) was los...

  15. Expression of a fungal endochitinase gene in transgenic tomato and tobacco results in enhanced tolerance to fungal pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Mamta R.; Mukherjee, Prasun K; Eapen, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Development of transgenic Nicotiana tabacum and Lycopersicon esculentum expressing an endochitinase (ech42) gene from biocontrol fungus Trichoderma virens using Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation is reported in this paper. Integration of transgene in the genome of transgenic plants was demonstrated using polymerase chain reaction and Southern-blot hybridization, while expression was ascertained by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Histochemical analysis confirmed the...

  16. Calpain and PARP Activation during Photoreceptor Cell Death in P23H and S334ter Rhodopsin Mutant Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Jasvir; Mencl, Stine; Sahaboglu, Ayse; Farinelli, Pietro; van Veen, Theo; Zrenner, Eberhart; Ekström, Per; Paquet-Durand, Francois; Arango-Gonzalez, Blanca

    2011-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited neurodegenerative diseases affecting photoreceptors and causing blindness. Many human cases are caused by mutations in the rhodopsin gene. An important question regarding RP pathology is whether different genetic defects trigger the same or different cell death mechanisms. To answer this question, we analysed photoreceptor degeneration in P23H and S334ter transgenic rats carrying rhodopsin mutations that affect protein folding an...

  17. Liver tumor formation by a mutant retinoblastoma protein in the transgenic mice is caused by an upregulation of c-Myc target genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bo; Hikosaka, Keisuke; Sultana, Nishat; Sharkar, Mohammad Tofael Kabir [Department of Biochemistry, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handa-yama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Noritake, Hidenao [Department of Biochemistry, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handa-yama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Department of Internal Medicine, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handa-yama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Kimura, Wataru; Wu, Yi-Xin [Department of Biochemistry, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handa-yama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Kobayashi, Yoshimasa [Department of Internal Medicine, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handa-yama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Uezato, Tadayoshi [Department of Biochemistry, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handa-yama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Miura, Naoyuki, E-mail: nmiura@hama-med.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handa-yama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fifty percent of the mutant Rb transgenic mice produced liver tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the tumor, Foxm1, Skp2, Bmi1 and AP-1 mRNAs were up-regulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No increase in expression of the Myc-target genes was observed in the non-tumorous liver. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumor formation depends on up-regulation of the Myc-target genes. -- Abstract: The retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor encodes a nuclear phosphoprotein that regulates cellular proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. In order to adapt itself to these biological functions, Rb is subjected to modification cycle, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. To directly determine the effect of phosphorylation-resistant Rb on liver development and function, we generated transgenic mice expressing phosphorylation-resistant human mutant Rb (mt-Rb) under the control of the rat hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 gene promoter/enhancer. Expression of mt-Rb in the liver resulted in macroscopic neoplastic nodules (adenomas) with {approx}50% incidence within 15 months old. Interestingly, quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis showed that c-Myc was up-regulated in the liver of mt-Rb transgenic mice irrespective of having tumor tissues or no tumor. In tumor tissues, several c-Myc target genes, Foxm1, c-Jun, c-Fos, Bmi1 and Skp2, were also up-regulated dramatically. We determined whether mt-Rb activated the Myc promoter in the HTP9 cells and demonstrated that mt-Rb acted as an inhibitor of wild-type Rb-induced repression on the Myc promoter. Our results suggest that continued upregulation of c-Myc target genes promotes the liver tumor formation after about 1 year of age.

  18. Patogenia de las espondiloartropatías seronegativas

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Modesto, González Cortiñas.

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió la función que desempeña el antígeno leucocitario humano (HLA-B27) en la patogénesis de las espondiloartropatias seronegativas. Se describió detalladamente la zona de unión de péptidos de la molécula conocida como «bolsón 45». Como hipótesis actuales en el surgimiento de la enfermedad se [...] discutieron la mímica molecular entre bacterias artritogénicas y HLA-B27, la positividad del HLA-B27 y la persistencia de las infecciones enterobacteriales, HLA-B27 factores modificantes y el modelo del péptido artritogénico. Se explicó la función de la célula T CDB+ en el desencadenamiento de la enfermedad y su control por los linfocitos T CD4+. Abstract in english The function of HLA-B27 in the pathogenesis of seronegative spondyloarthropathies was studied. The zone of union of the peptides of the molecule known as «big pocket 45» was described in detail. The molecular mimicry between arthritogenic bacteria and HLA-B27, the positivity of HLA-B27 and the persi [...] stance of enterobacterial infections, the HLA-B27 modifying factors, and the model of arthritogenic peptide were discussed as present hypotheses connected with the appearance of the disease. The function of the CDB-positive T-cell in the outbreak of the disease, as well as its control by the CD4-positive T-lymphocytes was explained.

  19. Time-Course Expression Profiles of Hair Cycle-Associated Genes in Male Mini Rats after Depilation of Telogen-Phase Hairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Umeda-Ikawa

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Jcl:WistarTGN(ARGHGEN1Nts rat (Mini rat is a growth hormone (GH-deficient transgenic rat. The hair cycle in the dorsal skin of male Mini rats enters a long-lasting telogen phase after eights weeks of age, but depilation can induce a transient hair cycle again. In this study, a time-course profiling of genes expression was done on the dorsal skin of male Mini rats along the progression of depilation-induced hair cycle using DNA microarray analysis. As a result, 1,215 probe sets including 1,171 hair cycle-related ones showed more than 3-fold changes in expression compared with that in before-depilation telogen phase. The present data will contribute to elucidating the mechanisms of hair cycle regulation and should lead to the identification of novel molecular targets for hair growth and/or depilation agents.

  20. T-Cell Mediated Immune Responses Induced in ret Transgenic Mouse Model of Malignant Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Schadendorf

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Poor response of human malignant melanoma to currently available treatments requires a development of innovative therapeutic strategies. Their evaluation should be based on animal models that resemble human melanoma with respect to genetics, histopathology and clinical features. Here we used a transgenic mouse model of spontaneous skin melanoma, in which the ret transgene is expressed in melanocytes under the control of metallothionein-I promoter. After a short latency, around 25% mice develop macroscopic skin melanoma metastasizing to lymph nodes, bone marrow, lungs and brain, whereas other transgenic mice showed only metastatic lesions without visible skin tumors. We found that tumor lesions expressed melanoma associated antigens (MAA tyrosinase, tyrosinase related protein (TRP-1, TRP-2 and gp100, which could be applied as targets for the immunotherapy. Upon peptide vaccination, ret transgenic mice without macroscopic melanomas were able to generate T cell responses not only against a strong model antigen ovalbumin but also against typical MAA TRP-2. Although mice bearing macroscopic primary tumors could also display an antigen-specific T cell reactivity, it was significantly down-regulated as compared to tumor-free transgenic mice or non-transgenic littermates. We suggest that ret transgenic mice could be used as a pre-clinical model for the evaluation of novel strategies of melanoma immunotherapy.

  1. Adenovirus-mediated transduction of auto- and dual-regulated transgene expression in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Nicolini, Valeria; Fussenegger, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Transduction of therapeutic transgenes using multiply attenuated viral vectors is considered an essential technology for gene therapy scenarios. While first-generation viral transduction systems were engineered for constitutive expression of a single therapeutic transgene, most advanced viral gene-transfer technologies enable regulated expression of several transgenes. Efficient transfer of numerous transgenes enables co-expression of therapeutic transgenes along with marker or selection determinants, production of multi-subunit protein complexes, or combinatorial expression of a particular set of genes to treat multigenic disorders. Likewise, adjustable transcription control is fundamental to adapt therapeutic protein production to the changing daily dosing regimes of a patient, to titrate expression of protein pharmaceuticals into the therapeutic window, and to reverse dosing upon completion of the therapy. Also, conditional transcription dosing has been successfully used for production of difficult-to-express protein therapeutics in biopharmaceutical manufacturing and for sophisticated gene-function analysis in basic research programs. By way of example, we provide detailed design (auto-regulated and binary dual-regulated expression configurations), production (generation, purification, and quality control of transgenic adenovirus particles), and handling (transduction) protocols for adenovirus vectors that enable transduction of mammalian cells for regulated expression of several transgenes. PMID:18470648

  2. Enhanced UV-induced skin carcinogenesis in transgenic mice overexpressing proprotein convertases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Bassi, Daniel E; Zhang, Jirong; Li, Tianyu; Cai, Kathy Q; Testa, Courtney Lyons; Nicolas, Emmanuelle; Klein-Szanto, Andres J

    2013-02-01

    The proprotein convertases (PCs) furin and PACE4 process numerous substrates involved in tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. We have previously shown that PCs increase the susceptibility to chemical skin carcinogenesis. Because of the human relevancy of UV radiation in the etiopathogenesis of human skin cancer, we investigated whether or not transgenic mice overexpressing either furin alone or both furin and PACE4 show increased susceptibility to UV carcinogenesis. After backcrossing our previously described furin and PACE4 transgenic lines, targeted to the epidermis, into a SKH-1 background, we exposed both single and double transgenic mice to UV radiation for 34 weeks. The results showed an increase in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) multiplicity of approximately 70% in the single furin transgenic mouse line SF47 (P furin and PACE4 to the epidermis in double transgenic mice did not have an additive effect on tumor incidence/multiplicity but did enhance the tumor histopathologic grade, i.e., a significant increase in higher grade SCCs was seen in the bigenic mouse line SPF47 (P furin transgenic mice that was not substantially enhanced in the double furin/PACE4 transgenic mice. PMID:23441131

  3. Recombineering strategies for developing next generation BAC transgenic tools for optogenetics and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan T Ting

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The development and application of diverse BAC transgenic rodent lines has enabled rapid progress for precise molecular targeting of genetically-defined cell types in the mammalian central nervous system. These transgenic tools have played a central role in the optogenetic revolution in neuroscience. Indeed, an overwhelming proportion of studies in this field have made use of BAC transgenic cre driver lines to achieve targeted expression of optogenetic probes in the brain. In addition, several BAC transgenic mouse lines have been established for direct cell-type specific expression of Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2. While the benefits of these new tools largely outweigh any accompanying challenges, many available BAC transgenic lines may suffer from confounds due in part to increased gene dosage of one or more ‘extra’ genes contained within the large BAC DNA sequences. Here we discuss this under-appreciated issue and propose strategies for developing the next generation of BAC transgenic lines that are devoid of extra genes. Furthermore, we provide evidence that these strategies are simple, reproducible, and do not disrupt the intended cell-type specific transgene expression patterns for several distinct BAC clones. These strategies may be widely implemented for improved BAC transgenesis across diverse disciplines.

  4. Effective generation of transgenic pigs and mice by linker based sperm-mediated gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih Ping Yao

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic animals have become valuable tools for both research and applied purposes. The current method of gene transfer, microinjection, which is widely used in transgenic mouse production, has only had limited success in producing transgenic animals of larger or higher species. Here, we report a linker based sperm-mediated gene transfer method (LB-SMGT that greatly improves the production efficiency of large transgenic animals. Results The linker protein, a monoclonal antibody (mAb C, is reactive to a surface antigen on sperm of all tested species including pig, mouse, chicken, cow, goat, sheep, and human. mAb C is a basic protein that binds to DNA through ionic interaction allowing exogenous DNA to be linked specifically to sperm. After fertilization of the egg, the DNA is shown to be successfully integrated into the genome of viable pig and mouse offspring with germ-line transfer to the F1 generation at a highly efficient rate: 37.5% of pigs and 33% of mice. The integration is demonstrated again by FISH analysis and F2 transmission in pigs. Furthermore, expression of the transgene is demonstrated in 61% (35/57 of transgenic pigs (F0 generation. Conclusions Our data suggests that LB-SMGT could be used to generate transgenic animals efficiently in many different species.

  5. Heat shock factor 1 counteracts epigenetic silencing of nuclear transgenes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strenkert, Daniela; Schmollinger, Stefan; Schroda, Michael

    2013-05-01

    We found previously that the Chlamydomonas HSP70A promoter counteracts transcriptional silencing of downstream promoters in a transgene setting. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, we analyzed chromatin state and transgene expression in transformants containing HSP70A-RBCS2-ble (AR-ble) constructs harboring deletions/mutations in the A promoter. We identified histone modifications at transgenic R promoters indicative for repressive chromatin, i.e. low levels of histone H3/4 acetylation and H3-lysine 4 trimethylation and high levels of H3-lysine 9 monomethylation. Transgenic A promoters also harbor lower levels of active chromatin marks than the native A promoter, but levels were higher than those at transgenic R promoters. Strikingly, in AR promoter fusions, the chromatin state at the A promoter was transferred to R. This effect required intact HSE4, HSE1/2 and TATA-box in the A promoter and was mediated by heat shock factor (HSF1). However, time-course analyses in strains inducibly depleted of HSF1 revealed that a transcriptionally competent chromatin state alone was not sufficient for activating the R promoter, but required constitutive HSF1 occupancy at transgenic A. We propose that HSF1 constitutively forms a scaffold at the transgenic A promoter, presumably containing mediator and TFIID, from which local chromatin remodeling and polymerase II recruitment to downstream promoters is realized. PMID:23585280

  6. Assessment of the diversity and dynamics of Plum pox virus and aphid populations in transgenic European plums under Mediterranean conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capote, Nieves; Pérez-Panadés, Jordi; Monzó, César; Carbonell, Emilio; Urbaneja, Alberto; Scorza, Ralph; Ravelonandro, Michel; Cambra, Mariano

    2008-06-01

    The molecular variability of Plum pox virus (PPV) populations was compared in transgenic European plums (Prunus domestica L.) carrying the coat protein (CP) gene of PPV and non-transgenic plums in an experimental orchard in Valencia, Spain. A major objective of this study was to detect recombination between PPV CP transgene transcripts and infecting PPV RNA. Additionally, we assessed the number and species of PPV aphid vectors that visited transgenic and non-transgenic plum trees. Test trees consisted of five different P. domestica transgenic lines, i.e. the PPV-resistant C5 'HoneySweet' line and the PPV-susceptible C4, C6, PT6 and PT23 lines, and non-transgenic P. domestica and P. salicina Lind trees. No significant difference in the genetic diversity of PPV populations infecting transgenic and conventional plums was detected, in particular no recombinant between transgene transcripts and incoming viral RNA was found at detectable levels. Also, no significant difference was detected in aphid populations, including viruliferous individuals, that visited transgenic and conventional plums. Our data indicate that PPV-CP transgenic European plums exposed to natural PPV infection over an 8 year period caused limited, if any, risk beyond the cultivation of conventional plums under Mediterranean conditions in terms of the emergence of recombinant PPV and diversity of PPV and aphid populations. PMID:17605085

  7. Generation of single-copy transgenic mouse embryos directly from ES cells by tetraploid embryo complementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Roong

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic mice have been used extensively to analyze gene function. Unfortunately, traditional transgenic procedures have only limited use in analyzing alleles that cause lethality because lines of founder mice cannot be established. This is frustrating given that such alleles often reveal crucial aspects of gene function. For this reason techniques that facilitate the generation of embryos expressing such alleles would be of enormous benefit. Although the transient generation of transgenic embryos has allowed limited analysis of lethal alleles, it is expensive, time consuming and technically challenging. Moreover a fundamental limitation with this approach is that each embryo generated is unique and transgene expression is highly variable due to the integration of different transgene copy numbers at random genomic sites. Results Here we describe an alternative method that allows the generation of clonal mouse embryos harboring a single-copy transgene at a defined genomic location. This was facilitated through the production of Hprt negative embryonic stem cells that allow the derivation of embryos by tetraploid embryo complementation. We show that targeting transgenes to the hprt locus in these ES cells by homologous recombination can be efficiently selected by growth in HAT medium. Moreover, embryos derived solely from targeted ES cells containing a single copy LacZ transgene under the control of the ?-myosin heavy chain promoter exhibited the expected cardiac specific expression pattern. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that tetraploid embryo complementation by F3 hprt negative ES cells facilitates the generation of transgenic mouse embryos containing a single copy gene at a defined genomic locus. This approach is simple, extremely efficient and bypasses any requirement to generate chimeric mice. Moreover embryos generated by this procedure are clonal in that they are all derived from a single ES cell lines. This facilitates the comparative analysis of lethal alleles and thereby advances our ability to analyze gene function in mammals.

  8. Use of Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction for Determining Copy Numbers of Transgenes in Lesquerella fendleri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Q. Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In transgenic plants, the number of transgene copies could greatly influence the level of expression and genetic stability of the target gene, thus it is important to develop an efficient method for accurate estimation of transgene copies. The quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR technique is becoming more efficient nowadays to determine copy numbers of transgenes in transgenic plants, being used here, for the first time in quantifying copy numbers of transgenes in Lesquerella fendleri. Approach: The system utilized a known one copy gene, LfKCS4/5, from L. fendleri as an endogenous calibrator and the threshold Crossing point (Ct measured by Applied Biosystem 7500 system to calculate the copy numbers of transgenes in primary transgenic lines (T0 generation. Results: The qPCR condition was optimized and each primer set had a PCR efficiency of 0.99 or 1.01. Our data demonstrated unambiguous 2-fold discrimination of the copy number of ?-glucuronidase gene (gusA and hygromycine phosphotransferase II (hptII genes in 12 T0 lines. Most of the lines contained one or two copies of each gene. Eight out of 12 samples (66.7% showed more copies of gusA gene than that of hptII gene, suggesting rearrangements of the Transferred (T-DNA. Possible modifications of the T-DNA cassette in L. fendleri are discussed based on main models of T-DNA integration in the plant genome. Conclusion: The qPCR described in this study is an efficient method and it is particularly useful in identification and selection of transgenic plants with desirable copy numbers at early stage.

  9. Enhanced UV-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Proprotein Convertases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Fu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The proprotein convertases (PCs furin and PACE4 process numerous substrates involved in tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. We have previously shown that PCs increase the susceptibility to chemical skin carcinogenesis. Because of the human relevancy of UV radiation in the etiopathogenesis of human skin cancer, we investigated whether or not transgenic mice overexpressing either furin alone or both furin and PACE4 show increased susceptibility to UV carcinogenesis. After backcrossing our previously described furin and PACE4 transgenic lines, targeted to the epidermis, into a SKH-1 background, we exposed both single and double transgenic mice to UV radiation for 34 weeks. The results showed an increase in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC multiplicity of approximately 70% in the single furin transgenic mouse line SF47 (P < .002 and a 30% increase in the other single transgenic line SF49 when compared to wild-type (WT SKH-1 mice. Interestingly, there was also an increase in the percentage of high histologic grade SCCs in the transgenic lines compared to the WT mice, i.e., WT = 9%, SF47 = 15%, and SF49 = 26% (P < .02. Targeting both furin and PACE4 to the epidermis in double transgenic mice did not have an additive effect on tumor incidence/multiplicity but did enhance the tumor histopathologic grade, i.e., a significant increase in higher grade SCCs was seen in the bigenic mouse line SPF47 (P < .02. Thus, we observed an increased susceptibility to UV in single furin transgenic mice that was not substantially enhanced in the double furin/PACE4 transgenic mice.

  10. Both core and F proteins of hepatitis C virus could enhance cell proliferation in transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wen-Ta [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Li, Hui-Chun [Department of Biochemistry, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Lee, Shen-Kao; Ma, Hsin-Chieh; Yang, Chee-Hing; Chen, Hung-Ling [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Lo, Shih-Yen, E-mail: losylo@mail.tcu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Department of Laboratory Medicine, Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital, Hualien, Taiwan (China)

    2013-05-24

    Highlights: •HCV core and F proteins could induce hepatocyte proliferation in the transgenic mice. •?-Catenin signaling pathway was activated by core protein in the transgenic mice. •?-Catenin signaling pathway was activated by myc-F protein in the transgenic mice. •Expression of SMA protein was enhanced by core but not myc-F protein. -- Abstract: The role of the protein encoded by the alternative open reading frame (ARF/F/core+1) of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome in viral pathogenesis remains unknown. The different forms of ARF/F/core+1 protein were labile in cultured cells, a myc-tag fused at the N-terminus of the F protein made it more stable. To determine the role of core and F proteins in HCV pathogenesis, transgenic mice with either protein expression under the control of Albumin promoter were generated. Expression of core protein and F protein with myc tag (myc-F) could be detected by Western blotting analysis in the livers of these mice. The ratio of liver to body weight is increased for both core and myc-F transgenic mice compared to that of wild type mice. Indeed, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein, a proliferation marker, was up-regulated in the transgenic mice with core or myc-F protein. Further analyses by microarray and Western blotting suggested that ?-catenin signaling pathway was activated by either core or myc-F protein in the transgenic mice. These transgenic mice were further treated with either Diethynitrosamine (a tumor initiator) or Phenobarbital (a tumor promoter). Phenobarbital but not Diethynitrosamine treatment could increase the liver/body weight ratio of these mice. However, no tumor formation was observed in these mice. In conclusion, HCV core and myc-F proteins could induce hepatocyte proliferation in the transgenic mice possibly through ?-catenin signaling pathway.

  11. Mushroom body miscellanea: transgenic Drosophila strains expressing anatomical and physiological sensor proteins in Kenyon cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech, Ulrike; Dipt, Shubham; Barth, Jonas; Singh, Priyanka; Jauch, Mandy; Thum, Andreas S.; Fiala, André; Riemensperger, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster represents a key model organism for analyzing how neuronal circuits regulate behavior. The mushroom body in the central brain is a particularly prominent brain region that has been intensely studied in several insect species and been implicated in a variety of behaviors, e.g., associative learning, locomotor activity, and sleep. Drosophila melanogaster offers the advantage that transgenes can be easily expressed in neuronal subpopulations, e.g., in intrinsic mushroom body neurons (Kenyon cells). A number of transgenes has been described and engineered to visualize the anatomy of neurons, to monitor physiological parameters of neuronal activity, and to manipulate neuronal function artificially. To target the expression of these transgenes selectively to specific neurons several sophisticated bi- or even multipartite transcription systems have been invented. However, the number of transgenes that can be combined in the genome of an individual fly is limited in practice. To facilitate the analysis of the mushroom body we provide a compilation of transgenic fruit flies that express transgenes under direct control of the Kenyon-cell specific promoter, mb247. The transgenes expressed are fluorescence reporters to analyze neuroanatomical aspects of the mushroom body, proteins to restrict ectopic gene expression to mushroom bodies, or fluorescent sensors to monitor physiological parameters of neuronal activity of Kenyon cells. Some of the transgenic animals compiled here have been published already, whereas others are novel and characterized here for the first time. Overall, the collection of transgenic flies expressing sensor and reporter genes in Kenyon cells facilitates combinations with binary transcription systems and might, ultimately, advance the physiological analysis of mushroom body function. PMID:24065891

  12. Mushroom body miscellanea: transgenic Drosophila strains expressing anatomical and physiological sensor proteins in Kenyon cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Fiala

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster represents a key model organism for analyzing how neuronal circuits regulate behavior. The mushroom body in the central brain is a particularly prominent brain region that has been intensely studied in several insect species and been implicated in a variety of behaviors, e.g., associative learning, locomotor activity and sleep. Drosophila melanogaster offers the advantage that transgenes can be easily expressed in neuronal subpopulations, e.g., in intrinsic mushroom body neurons (Kenyon cells. A number of transgenes has been described and engineered to visualize the anatomy of neurons, to monitor physiological parameters of neuronal activity, and to manipulate neuronal function artificially. To target the expression of these transgenes selectively to specific neurons several sophisticated bi- or even multipartite transcription systems have been invented. However, the number of transgenes that can be combined in the genome of an individual fly is limited in practice. To facilitate the analysis of the mushroom body we provide a compilation of transgenic fruit flies that express transgenes under direct control of the Kenyon-cell specific promoter, mb247. The transgenes expressed are fluorescence reporters to analyze neuroanatomical aspects of the mushroom body, proteins to restrict ectopic gene expression to mushroom bodies, or fluorescent sensors to monitor physiological parameters of neuronal activity of Kenyon cells. Some of the transgenic animals compiled here have been published already, whereas others are novel and characterized here for the first time. Overall, the collection of transgenic flies expressing sensor and reporter genes in Kenyon cells facilitates combinations with binary transcription systems and might, ultimately, advance the physiological analysis of mushroom body function.

  13. Mammary gland tumor formation in transgenic mice overexpressing stromelysin-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sympson, Carolyn J; Bissell, Mina J; Werb, Zena

    1995-06-01

    An intact basement membrane (BM) is essential for the proper function, differentiation and morphology of many epithelial cells. The disruption or loss of this BM occurs during normal development as well as in the disease state. To examine the importance of BM during mammary gland development in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that inappropriately express autoactivating isoforms of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. The mammary glands from these mice are both functionally and morphologically altered throughout development. We have now documented a dramatic incidence of breast tumors in several independent lines of these mice. These data suggest that overexpression of stromelysin-1 and disruption of the BM may be a key step in the multi-step process of breast cancer.

  14. Transgenic mouse - Methods and protocols, 2nd edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Marten H. Hofner (from the Dept. of Pathology of the Groningen University and Jan M. van Deursen (from the Mayo College of Medicine at Rochester, MN, USA provided us with the valuable second edition of Transgenic mouse: in fact, eventhough we are in the –omics era and already equipped with the state-of-the-art techniques in whatsoever field, still we need to have gene(s functional analysis data to understand common and complex deseases. Transgenesis is still an irreplaceable method and protocols to well perform it are more than welcome. Here, how to get genetic modified mice (the quintessential model of so many human deseases considering how much of the human genes are conserved in the mouse and the great block of genic synteny existing between the two genomes is analysed in deep and presented in clearly detailed step by step protocols....

  15. Transgenic soybeans and soybean protein analysis: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Savithiry; Luthria, Devanand; Bae, Hanhong; Lakshman, Dilip; Mitra, Amitava

    2013-12-01

    To meet the increasing global demand for soybeans for food and feed consumption, new high-yield varieties with improved quality traits are needed. To ensure the safety of the crop, it is important to determine the variation in seed proteins along with unintended changes that may occur in the crop as a result various stress stimuli, breeding, and genetic modification. Understanding the variation of seed proteins in the wild and cultivated soybean cultivars is useful for determining unintended protein expression in new varieties of soybeans. Proteomic technology is useful to analyze protein variation due to various stimuli. This short review discusses transgenic soybeans, different soybean proteins, and the approaches used for protein analysis. The characterization of soybean protein will be useful for researchers, nutrition professionals, and regulatory agencies dealing with soy-derived food products. PMID:24099420

  16. Generation of transgenic maize with enhanced provitamin A content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluru, Maneesha; Xu, Yang; Guo, Rong; Wang, Zhenguo; Li, Shanshan; White, Wendy; Wang, Kan; Rodermel, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) affects over 250 million people worldwide and is one of the most prevalent nutritional deficiencies in developing countries, resulting in significant socio-economic losses. Provitamin A carotenoids such as beta-carotene, are derived from plant foods and are a major source of vitamin A for the majority of the world's population. Several years of intense research has resulted in the production of 'Golden Rice 2' which contains sufficiently high levels of provitamin A carotenoids to combat VAD. In this report, the focus is on the generation of transgenic maize with enhanced provitamin A content in their kernels. Overexpression of the bacterial genes crtB (for phytoene synthase) and crtI (for the four desaturation steps of the carotenoid pathway catalysed by phytoene desaturase and zeta-carotene desaturase in plants), under the control of a 'super gamma-zein promoter' for endosperm-specific expression, resulted in an increase of total carotenoids of up to 34-fold with a preferential accumulation of beta-carotene in the maize endosperm. The levels attained approach those estimated to have a significant impact on the nutritional status of target populations in developing countries. The high beta-carotene trait was found to be reproducible over at least four generations. Gene expression analyses suggest that increased accumulation of beta-carotene is due to an up-regulation of the endogenous lycopene beta-cylase. These experiments set the stage for the design of transgenic approaches to generate provitamin A-rich maize that will help alleviate VAD. PMID:18723758

  17. Transgenic mouse model for the formation of Hirano bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stramiello Michael

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hirano bodies are actin-rich cytoplasmic inclusions found predominantly in the brain in association with a variety of conditions including aging and Alzheimer's disease. The function of Hirano bodies in normal aging and in progression of disease has not been extensively investigated due to a lack of experimental model systems. We have developed a transgenic mouse model by expression of a gain-of-function actin cross-linking protein mutant. Results We used the Cre/loxP system to permit tissue specific expression of Hirano bodies, and employed the murine Thy 1 promoter to drive expression of Cre recombinase in the brain. Hirano bodies were observed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of homozygous double transgenic 6 month old mice containing Cre. The Hirano bodies were eosinophilic rods, and also exhibited the paracrystalline F-actin filament organization that is characteristic of these inclusions. Mice with Hirano bodies appear healthy and fertile, but exhibited some alterations in both short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity, including paired-pulse depression rather than facilitation, and decreased magnitude of early LTP. Conclusions Hirano bodies are not lethal and appear to have little or no effect on histology and tissue organization. Hirano bodies do modulate synaptic plasticity and exert clearly discernable effects on LTP and paired-pulse paradigms. This model system will allow us to investigate the impact of Hirano bodies in vivo, the pathways for formation and degradation of Hirano bodies, and whether Hirano bodies promote or modulate development of pathology and disease progression.

  18. Tumorigenic potential of pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) in vivo investigated using a transgenic mouse model, and effects of cross breeding with p53 (+/?) transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pituitary tumor-transforming gene (PTTG) is an oncogene that is overexpressed in variety of tumors and exhibits characteristics of a transforming gene. Previous transgenic mouse models to access the tumorigenic potential in the pituitary and ovary have resulted in dysplasia without formation of visible tumors, possibly due to the insufficient expression of PTTG. PTTG expression level is critical for ovarian tumorigenesis in a xenograft model. Therefore, the tumorigenic function of PTTG in vivo remains unclear. We generated a transgenic mouse that overexpresses PTTG driven by the CMV promoter to determine whether PTTG functions as a transforming oncogene that is capable of initiating tumorigenesis. Transgenic animals were generated by microinjection of PTTG transgene into the male pronucleus of FVB 0.5 day old embryos. Expression levels of PTTG in tissues of transgenic animals were analyzed using an immunohistochemical analysis. H&E staining and immunohistostaining were performed to examine the type of tumor in transgenic and PTTG transgenic/p53+/- animals. PTTG transgenic offspring (TgPTTG) were monitored for tumor development at various ages. H&E analysis was performed to identify the presence of cancer and hyperplastic conditions verified with the proliferation marker PCNA and the microvessel marker CD31. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine transgene expression, revealing localization to the epithelium of the fallopian tube, with more generalized expression in the liver, lung, kidney, and spleen. At eight months of age, 2 out of 15 TgPTTG developed ovarian cancer, 2 out of 15 developed benign tumors, 2 out of 15 developed cervical dysplasia, and 3 out of 15 developed adenomyosis of the uterus. At ten months of age, 2 out of 10 TgPTTG developed adenocarcinoma of the ovary, 1 out of 10 developed a papillary serous adenocarcinoma, and 2 out of 10 presented with atypia of ovarian epithelial cells. Tumorigenesis is a multi-step process, often requiring multiple oncogenes and/or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Therefore, to understand the contribution of p53 to PTTG induced tumorigenesis, we crossbred TgPTTG to p53+/? mice and maintained those 8 to 10 months. TgPTTG/p53+/? animals developed sarcomas faster than p53+/? alone as well as different tumor types in addition to cervical carcinomas in situ in 10 out of 17 females. We conclude that while PTTG is a functional transforming oncogene, it requires an additional partner to effectively promote tumorigenesis through the loss of p53 include or between function or modulation

  19. Tumorigenic potential of pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG in vivo investigated using a transgenic mouse model, and effects of cross breeding with p53 (+/? transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong Miranda Y

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pituitary tumor-transforming gene (PTTG is an oncogene that is overexpressed in variety of tumors and exhibits characteristics of a transforming gene. Previous transgenic mouse models to access the tumorigenic potential in the pituitary and ovary have resulted in dysplasia without formation of visible tumors, possibly due to the insufficient expression of PTTG. PTTG expression level is critical for ovarian tumorigenesis in a xenograft model. Therefore, the tumorigenic function of PTTG in vivo remains unclear. We generated a transgenic mouse that overexpresses PTTG driven by the CMV promoter to determine whether PTTG functions as a transforming oncogene that is capable of initiating tumorigenesis. Methods Transgenic animals were generated by microinjection of PTTG transgene into the male pronucleus of FVB 0.5 day old embryos. Expression levels of PTTG in tissues of transgenic animals were analyzed using an immunohistochemical analysis. H&E staining and immunohistostaining were performed to examine the type of tumor in transgenic and PTTG transgenic/p53+/- animals. Results PTTG transgenic offspring (TgPTTG were monitored for tumor development at various ages. H&E analysis was performed to identify the presence of cancer and hyperplastic conditions verified with the proliferation marker PCNA and the microvessel marker CD31. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine transgene expression, revealing localization to the epithelium of the fallopian tube, with more generalized expression in the liver, lung, kidney, and spleen. At eight months of age, 2 out of 15 TgPTTG developed ovarian cancer, 2 out of 15 developed benign tumors, 2 out of 15 developed cervical dysplasia, and 3 out of 15 developed adenomyosis of the uterus. At ten months of age, 2 out of 10 TgPTTG developed adenocarcinoma of the ovary, 1 out of 10 developed a papillary serous adenocarcinoma, and 2 out of 10 presented with atypia of ovarian epithelial cells. Tumorigenesis is a multi-step process, often requiring multiple oncogenes and/or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Therefore, to understand the contribution of p53 to PTTG induced tumorigenesis, we crossbred TgPTTG to p53+/? mice and maintained those 8 to 10 months. TgPTTG/p53+/? animals developed sarcomas faster than p53+/? alone as well as different tumor types in addition to cervical carcinomas in situ in 10 out of 17 females. Conclusions We conclude that while PTTG is a functional transforming oncogene, it requires an additional partner to effectively promote tumorigenesis through the loss of p53 include or between function or modulation.

  20. Development of re-arrangeable gene transfer systems to create balancer chromosomes and increase transgene stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Transposon-based vectors provide the most suitable gene transfer systems for insect germ line transformation and therefore for the molecular improvement of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). However, the long time stability of genome integrated transposon constructs depends on the absence of transposon activity that could remobilize the transposon-integrated transgene. To achieve transgene stability, transposon vectors are usually non-autonomous and chosen so that no endogenous or related transposon activities are present. Nevertheless, the non-autonomous transposon-integrated transgene might become unstable when by horizontal gene transfer an active transposon of its own type enters the species. Due to the large numbers of progeny and the high mobility, transgenic insects present great environmental concerns. Therefore, it will be important that transgene constructs are as stably integrated as possible, so that the vector used for gene transfer cannot become unstable and unintentionally escape or even integrate into the genome of another organism. In this respect, we have developed transposon vectors whose terminal inverted repeats can be rearranged after integration, which prevents mobilization of the integrated transgene even in the presence of the corresponding transposase. Such re-arrangeable gene transfer systems should help to avoid the instability of integrated transgenes and thus increase the stability of transgenic strains. Moreover, the thereby induced chromosomal rearrangements serve as partial balancer chromosomes to stably inherit a combination of transgene insertions during genetic crosses, which will facilitate the establishment and keeping of transgenic insect strain. In order to develop re-arrangable gene transfer systems we made use of the yeast-derived FLP recombinase and its recombination target sites (FRTs), which have been shown functional in the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster. We have started to create transposon vectors based on the transposable elements piggyBac and Hermes that carry FRT sites. The vectors contain fluorescent protein-based transformation markers, whereby the FRTs are placed in the 5'UTR region and thus separate the transcriptional promoters from the coding region of the fluorescent marker. As original transformation markers, we have used the eye-specific yellowish-green fluorescent marker 3xP3-EYFP, the eye-specific cyan-fluorescent marker 3xP3-ECFP and the constitutive red fluorescent marker PUb-DsRed1. These vectors have been used to generate transgenic Drosophila melanogaster strains. In the different strains the genomic localization and orientation of the integrated transgenes has been determined by inverse PCR and comparison to the Drosophila full genome sequence. Suitable piggyBac and Hermes integrations have been recombined to establish strains that contain both types of transgenes on the same chromosome. In these strains, we induced the FRT-based recombination by expression of the FLP recombinase and isolated recombination events due to the change of fluorescent marker expression. After recombination, DsRed has become eye-specifically, and ECFP (or EYFP, respectively) has become constitutively expressed. The FRT-mediated recombination generates localised inversions, which we have tested for local balancing effects that make stable co-inheritance of two transgene constructs possible at the same time. Moreover, the rearrangement destroys the regular alignment of both the piggyBac as well as the Hermes terminal inverted repeats. When combining pBac(3xP3-FRT-ECFPaf) with pBac(PUb-FRT-DsRedaf), the rearranged situation consists of piggyBac constructs with two right (R) or two left (L) ends, respectively. To test if such a rearrangement will immobilise the transgene insertions we compared the mobilisation rates of the original integrated transgenes and the rearranged transgenes, which confirm that the rearranged situation is immobile. Currently, we are also finishing tests on generating deficiencies and duplications based on this system. (author)

  1. Human CD68 promoter GFP transgenic mice allow analysis of monocyte to macrophage differentiation in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Asif J; McNeill, Eileen; Kapellos, Theodore S.; Regan-Komito, Daniel; Norman, Sophie; Burd, Sarah; Smart, Nicola; Machemer, Daniel E. W.; Stylianou, Elena; McShane, Helen; Channon, Keith M; Chawla, Ajay; Greaves, David R.

    2014-01-01

    CD68-GFP reporter mice show GFP transgene expression in both monocytes and tissue resident macrophage populations.Adoptively transferred CD68-GFP monocytes maintain GFP expression after recruitment in an ongoing inflammatory response.

  2. Using transgenic reporters to visualise bone and cartilage signalling during development in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ChrissyLHammond

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP was first used as a marker of protein expression in vivo 18 years ago, heralding the beginning of what became known as the Green Revolution. Since then, there has been an explosion in the number of transgenic lines in existence, and these transgenic tools are now being applied to skeletal research. Advances in transgenesis are also leading to increasing use of new model organisms for studying skeletogenesis. Such new models include the small teleosts zebrafish and medaka, which due to their optical translucency offer imaging possibilities in the live animals. In this review, we will introduce a number of recent advances in genetic engineering and transgenesis and the new genetic tools that are currently being developed. We will provide examples of how zebrafish and medaka transgenic lines are helping us to understand the behaviour of skeletal cells in vivo. Finally, we will discuss future prospects for the application of transgenic technology to skeletal research.

  3. Production of cyanophycin, a suitable source for the biodegradable polymer polyaspartate, in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Katrin; Stephan, Dirk Paul; Ziegler, Karl; Hühns, Maja; Broer, Inge; Lockau, Wolfgang; Pistorius, Elfriede K

    2005-03-01

    The production of biodegradable polymers in transgenic plants in order to replace petrochemical compounds is an important challenge for plant biotechnology. Polyaspartate, a biodegradable substitute for polycarboxylates, is the backbone of the cyanobacterial storage material cyanophycin. Cyanophycin, a copolymer of l-aspartic acid and l-arginine, is produced via non-ribosomal polypeptide biosynthesis by the enzyme cyanophycin synthetase. A gene from Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 encoding cyanophycin synthetase has been expressed constitutively in tobacco and potato. The presence of the transgene-encoded messenger RNA (mRNA) correlated with changes in leaf morphology and decelerated growth. Such transgenic plants were found to produce up to 1.1% dry weight of a polymer with cyanophycin-like properties. Aggregated material, able to bind a specific cyanophycin antibody, was detected in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of the transgenic plants. PMID:17173624

  4. The guidelines project of the IOBC global WG and risk assessment of transgenic arthropods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The guidelines project 'Development of International Scientific Biosafety Testing Guidelines for Transgenic Plants' is an international initiative of public sector scientists organized within a global Working Group on 'Transgenic Organisms in Integrated Pest Management and Biological Control' under the umbrella of the International Organization of Biological Control (IOBC). The project aims to: - develop comprehensive, transparent scientific guidelines for pre-release biosafety testing of transgenic plants, which could serve as an international standard; - extend the guidelines for possible use in post-release monitoring; - facilitate the development of the scientific capacity in developing and developed countries to implement the guidelines. - test the application the guidelines in real policy contexts to assist in the evaluation of particular transgenic crops. - publish the guidelines and periodically revise them in response to new developments thereby providing for their up-to-date, long-time use. (author)

  5. In trans silencing properties of a tobacco transgene locus depend on its epigenetic state.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojtová, Miloslava; Van Houdt, H.; Depicker, A.; Kova?ík, Aleš

    2004-01-01

    Ro?. 26, ?. 3 (2004), s. 147. ISSN 0137-5881. [Congress of the Federation of European Societies of Plant Biology /14./. 23.08.2004-27.08.2004, Cracow] Keywords : plant transgenes * gene expression * silencing Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  6. An isologous porcine promoter permits high level expression of human hemoglobin in transgenic swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A; Martin, M J; Okabe, J F; Truglio, R A; Dhanjal, N K; Logan, J S; Kumar, R

    1994-01-01

    We describe isologous promoter replacement as an approach to permit high level expression of human hemoglobin in transgenic swine. We linked the human beta globin genomic coding region to the porcine beta globin promoter and used this fusion gene in an expression construct containing the human beta locus control region and the human alpha and epsilon genes to produce transgenic pigs. The highest level of expression was 24% human (32g/liter) and 30% human alpha/pig beta hybrid (40g/liter) hemoglobin in one transgenic pig. This pig was bred to a non-transgenic animal resulting in the transmission of high level human hemoglobin expression to 5 of 12 progeny. PMID:7764326

  7. Multiple transgene traits may create un-intended fitness effects in Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasingly, genetically modified crops are being developed to express multiple “stacked” traits for different types of transgenes, for example, herbicide resistance, insect resistance, crop quality and resistance to environmental factors. The release of crops that express mult...

  8. An inducible transgene reports activation of macrophages in live zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Leslie E; Chien, An-Tzu; Astin, Jonathan W; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S; Hall, Christopher J

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are the most functionally heterogenous cells of the hematopoietic system. Given many diseases are underpinned by inappropriate macrophage activation, macrophages have emerged as a therapeutic target to treat disease. A thorough understanding of what controls macrophage activation will likely reveal new pathways that can be manipulated for therapeutic benefit. Live imaging fluorescent macrophages within transgenic zebrafish larvae has provided a valuable window to investigate macrophage behavior in vivo. Here we describe the first transgenic zebrafish line that reports macrophage activation, as evidenced by induced expression of an immunoresponsive gene 1(irg1):EGFP transgene. When combined with existing reporter lines that constitutively mark macrophages, we reveal this unique transgenic line can be used to live image macrophage activation in response to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide and xenografted human cancer cells. We anticipate the Tg(irg1:EGFP) line will provide a valuable tool to explore macrophage activation and plasticity in the context of different disease models. PMID:26123890

  9. An efficient transgenic system by TA cloning vectors and RNAi for C. elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the nematode, transgenic analyses have been performed by microinjection of DNA from various sources into the syncytium gonad. To expedite these transgenic analyses, we solved two potential problems in this work. First, we constructed an efficient TA-cloning vector system which is useful for any promoter. By amplifying the genomic DNA fragments which contain regulatory sequences with or without the coding region, we could easily construct plasmids expressing fluorescent protein fusion without considering restriction sites. We could dissect motor neurons with three colors in a single animal. Second, we used feeding RNAi to isolate transgenic strains which express lag-2::venus fusion gene. We found that the fusion protein is toxic when ectopically expressed in embryos but is functional to rescue a loss of function mutant in the lag-2 gene. Thus, the transgenic system described here should be useful to examine the protein function in the nematode

  10. Evaluation of a Transgenic Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis with Noninvasive Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Enriquez-Algeciras, Mabel; DING, DI; Chou, Tsung-Han; Wang, Jianhua; Padgett, Kyle R.; Porciatti, Vittorio; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K

    2011-01-01

    A transgenic mice model of multiple sclerosis (ND4 mice) shows progressive visual loss as determined by pattern electroretinogram (PERG). Noninvasive evaluation (PERG, MRI, and OCT) of brain and optic nerve of ND4 mice has been described.

  11. Transgenic expression of Lactoferrin imparts resistance to a soilborne fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var Xanthi) and Arabidopsis (A. thaliana) plants expressing an antimicrobial bovine lactoferrin (BLF) gene were developed and evaluated for resistance against an economically important fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of damping off diseases....

  12. The presence of Bt-transgenic oilseed rape in wild mustard populations affects plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongbo; Stewart, C Neal; Li, Junsheng; Huang, Hai; Zhang, Xitao

    2015-12-01

    The adventitious presence of transgenic plants in wild plant populations is of ecological and regulatory concern, but the consequences of adventitious presence are not well understood. Here, we introduced Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac (Bt)-transgenic oilseed rape (Bt OSR, Brassica napus) with various frequencies into wild mustard (Brassica juncea) populations. We sought to better understand the adventitious presence of this transgenic insecticidal crop in a wild-relative plant population. We assessed the factors of competition, resource availability and diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) infestation on plant population dynamics. As expected, Bt OSR performed better than wild mustard in mixed populations under herbivore attack in habitats with enough resources, whereas wild mustard had higher fitness when Bt OSR was rarer in habitats with limited resources. Results suggest that the presence of insect-resistant transgenic plants could decrease the growth of wild mustard and Bt OSR plants and their populations, especially under high herbivore pressure. PMID:26338267

  13. Expression of human erythropoietin gene in the mammary gland of a transgenic mouse.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikuš, Tomáš; Malý, Petr; Poplštein, M.; Landa, Vladimír; Trefil, P.; Lidický, J.

    2001-01-01

    Ro?. 47, ?. 6 (2001), s. 187-195. ISSN 0015-5500 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : erythropoietin, mammary gland, transgenic mouse Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.519, year: 2001

  14. Composition and safety analysis of Chinese traditional fermented soybean paste made by transgenic soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukui, Rui; Wenya, Wang; Hongxing, Zhang; Fusuo, Zhang; Yinhua, Jin; Jing, Guo

    2009-01-01

    The traditional Chinese soybean paste was produced by cooked transgenic soybean fermentation with the composition of moisture 53%, amino acid 0.84% (calculated by nitrogen), votive sugar 6.21% and total acid 1.66%. A number of microorganism species were isolated and identified, including fungi and bacteria, and the bacterium species Rhizopus oryzae Went and Prinsen Geerligs were dominant in transgenic soybean paste. The results showed that the transgenic soybean paste contain abundant amino acids and vitamins (vitamin A, 42.87 IU; vitamin B, 10.31 mg; vitamin B, 20.64 mg; nicotinamide, 2.54 mg; pantothenic acid, 0.63 mg; vitamin B, 6,847 microg; folic acid, 105 microg; vitamin B, 123.85 microg; and biotin, 56.34 microg). Pathogenic microorganisms were not be detected in the transgenic fermented soybean paste. PMID:18608534

  15. Heart block, ventricular tachycardia, and sudden death in ACE2 transgenic mice with downregulated connexins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, Mary; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Maguire, Colin T; Acton, Susan; Hales, Paul; Stagliano, Nancy; Fairchild-Huntress, Victoria; Xu, Jian; Lorenz, John N; Kadambi, Vivek; Berul, Charles I; Breitbart, Roger E

    2003-09-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme related carboxypeptidase (ACE2) is a recently discovered homolog of angiotensin converting enzyme with tissue-restricted expression, including heart, and the capacity to cleave angiotensin peptides. We tested the hypothesis that cardiac ACE2 activity contributes to features of ventricular remodeling associated with the renin-angiotensin system by generating transgenic mice with increased cardiac ACE2 expression. These animals had a high incidence of sudden death that correlated with transgene expression levels. Detailed electrophysiology revealed severe, progressive conduction and rhythm disturbances with sustained ventricular tachycardia and terminal ventricular fibrillation. The gap junction proteins connexin40 and connexin43 were downregulated in the transgenic hearts, indicating that ACE2-mediated gap junction remodeling may account for the observed electrophysiologic disturbances. Spontaneous downregulation of the ACE2 transgene in surviving older animals correlated with restoration of nearly normal conduction, rhythm, and connexin expression. PMID:12967627

  16. Transgenic rabbits as bioreactors for the production of human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limonta, J M; Castro, F O; Martínez, R; Puentes, P; Ramos, B; Aguilar, A; Lleonart, R L; de la Fuente, J

    1995-05-15

    Gene farming is one of the most promising areas in modern biotechnology. To assay the potential usefulness of transgenic rabbits as bioreactors, one call embryos were microinjected with a chimeric gene comprising 5' sequences from mouse whey acidic protein gene (mWAP) linked to the human growth hormone (hGH) gene. Transgenic animals were obtained and the presence of the foreign protein was detected in the milk and serum of these animals at levels of up to 50 micrograms ml-1 and 0.6 ng ml-1, respectively. Founder transgenics were able to transmit the microinjected gene to the first filial generation in a Mendelian fashion. These results showed that transgenic rabbits could constitute a suitable system for the rapid production of recombinant proteins in the milk of lactating females. PMID:7794600

  17. Immunotoxicological studies of genetically modified rice expressing PHA-E lectin or Bt toxin in Wistar rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroghsbo, Stine; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    As part of the SAFOTEST project the immunmodulating effect of Cry1Ab protein from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and PHA-E lectin from kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin) was examined in 28- and 90-day feeding studies in Wistar rats. PHA-E lectin was chosen as positive control. Rats were fed control rice, transgenic rice expressing Cry I Ab protein or PHA-E lectin, or transgenic rice spiked with the purified recombinant protein. Total immunoglobulin levels, mitogen-induced cell proliferation, T-dependent antibody response to sheep red blood cells and the antigen-specific antibody response in serum were examined at the end of the studies. A dose-dependent increase in mesenteric lymph node weight and total immunoglobulin A was seen when feeding PHA-E transgenic rice alone or spiked with 0.1% purified PHA-E lectin for 90 days indicating a local effect of PHA-E in the intestine. No adverse effects of Cry1Ab protein were found. An anti-PHA-E and anti-Cry I Ab antibody response was induced both after inhalation (control groups) and after inhalation/ingestion (groups fed recombinant protein alone or together with transgenic rice). In conclusion, only PHA-E lectin was found to have an immunomodulating effect when feeding rats for 90 days with approximately 70 mg PHA-E/kg bodyweight per day. As both PHA-E lectin and Cry1Ab protein were capable of inducing an antigen-specific antibody response it is important to make careful considerations when designing future animal studies to avoid intake of proteins from the other groups by inhalation as well as to examine the sensitization and elicitation potential of 'foreign' proteins before introduction to the world market. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Immunotoxicological studies of genetically modified rice expressing PHA-E lectin or Bt toxin in Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the SAFOTEST project the immunmodulating effect of Cry1Ab protein from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and PHA-E lectin from kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin) was examined in 28- and 90-day feeding studies in Wistar rats. PHA-E lectin was chosen as positive control. Rats were fed control rice, transgenic rice expressing Cry1Ab protein or PHA-E lectin, or transgenic rice spiked with the purified recombinant protein. Total immunoglobulin levels, mitogen-induced cell proliferation, T-dependent antibody response to sheep red blood cells and the antigen-specific antibody response in serum were examined at the end of the studies. A dose-dependent increase in mesenteric lymph node weight and total immunoglobulin A was seen when feeding PHA-E transgenic rice alone or spiked with 0.1% purified PHA-E lectin for 90 days indicating a local effect of PHA-E in the intestine. No adverse effects of Cry1Ab protein were found. An anti-PHA-E and anti-Cry1Ab antibody response was induced both after inhalation (control groups) and after inhalation/ingestion (groups fed recombinant protein alone or together with transgenic rice). In conclusion, only PHA-E lectin was found to have an immunomodulating effect when feeding rats for 90 days with approximately 70 mg PHA-E/kg bodyweight per day. As both PHA-E lectin and Cry1Ab protein were capable of inducing an antigen-specific antibody response it is important to make careful considerations when designing future animal studies to avoid intake of proteins from the other groups by inhalation as well as to examine the sensitization and elicitation potential of 'foreign' proteins before introduction to the world market

  19. Screening of transgenic proteins expressed in transgenic food crops for the presence of short amino acid sequences identical to potential, IgE – binding linear epitopes of allergens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peijnenburg Ad ACM

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic proteins expressed by genetically modified food crops are evaluated for their potential allergenic properties prior to marketing, among others by identification of short identical amino acid sequences that occur both in the transgenic protein and allergenic proteins. A strategy is proposed, in which the positive outcomes of the sequence comparison with a minimal length of six amino acids are further screened for the presence of potential linear IgE-epitopes. This double track approach involves the use of literature data on IgE-epitopes and an antigenicity prediction algorithm. Results Thirty-three transgenic proteins have been screened for identities of at least six contiguous amino acids shared with allergenic proteins. Twenty-two transgenic proteins showed positive results of six- or seven-contiguous amino acids length. Only a limited number of identical stretches shared by transgenic proteins (papaya ringspot virus coat protein, acetolactate synthase GH50, and glyphosate oxidoreductase and allergenic proteins could be identified as (part of potential linear epitopes. Conclusion Many transgenic proteins have identical stretches of six or seven amino acids in common with allergenic proteins. Most identical stretches are likely to be false positives. As shown in this study, identical stretches can be further screened for relevance by comparison with linear IgE-binding epitopes described in literature. In the absence of literature data on epitopes, antigenicity prediction by computer aids to select potential antibody binding sites that will need verification of IgE binding by sera binding tests. Finally, the positive outcomes of this approach warrant further clinical testing for potential allergenicity.

  20. Insecticidal activity of transgenic tobacco plants expressing both Bt and CpTI genes on cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, X; Shi, X; Zhao, J; Zhao, R; Fan, Y

    1999-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing both Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal protein and cowpea trypsin inhibitor (CpTI) genes was used to evaluate the insecticidal activity on the cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera) compared with transgenic tobacco with Bt insecticidal protein gene alone. Mortality of first to third instar larvae fed on transgenic two genes tobacco for three days was significantly higher than that fed on transgenic Bt tobacco. First to fourth instar larvae fed on transgenic two genes tobacco continuously could not survive until pupation. Second instar larvae were fed on transgenic tobacco plants for three days and then were transferred to an artificial diet. The efficacy of transgenic two genes tobacco on mortality, larvae weight, percentage of pupation, and time to pupation were significantly higher than that of transgenic tobacco with Bt insecticidal protein gene alone. The results with transgenic tobacco as model plant were valuable for other crops both for the enhancement of insecticidal efficacy and for the delay of insect adaptation to transgenic Bt crops. PMID:10668128

  1. Transgenic rice plants expressing a Bacillus subtilis protoporphyrinogen oxidase gene are resistant to diphenyl ether herbicide oxyfluorfen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H J; Lee, S B; Chung, J S; Han, S U; Han, O; Guh, J O; Jeon, J S; An, G; Back, K

    2000-06-01

    Protoporphyrinogen oxidase (Protox), the penultimate step enzyme of the branch point for the biosynthetic pathway of Chl and hemes, is the target site of action of diphenyl ether (DPE) herbicides. However, Bacillus subtilis Protox is known to be resistant to the herbicides. In order to develop the herbicide-resistant plants, the transgenic rice plants were generated via expression of B. subtilis Protox gene under ubiquitin promoter targeted to the cytoplasm or to the plastid using Agrobacterium-mediated gene transformation. The integration and expression of the transgene were investigated at T0 generation by DNA and RNA blots. Most transgenic rice plants revealed one copy transgene insertion into the rice genome, but some with 3 copies. The expression levels of B. subtilis Protox mRNA appeared to correlate with the copy number. Furthermore, the plastidal transgenic lines exhibited much higher expression of the Protox mRNA than the cytoplasmic transgenic lines. The transgenic plants expressing the B. subtilis Protox gene at T0 generation were found to be resistant to oxyfluorfen when judged by cellular damage with respect to cellular leakage, Chl loss, and lipid peroxidation. The transgenic rice plants targeted to the plastid exhibited higher resistance to the herbicide than the transgenic plants targeted to the cytoplasm. In addition, possible resistance mechanisms in the transgenic plants to DPE herbicides are discussed. PMID:10945344

  2. Maternal endometrial oedema may increase perinatal mortality of cloned and transgenic piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Mette; Winter, K.D.; Dantzer, Vibeke; Li, J.; Kragh, P.M.; Du, Y.; Lin, L.; Liu, Y.; Vajta, Gabor; Sangild, Per Torp; Callesen, Henrik; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen

    2011-01-01

    The perinatal mortality of cloned animals is a well-known problem. In the present retrospective study, we report on mortality of cloned transgenic or non-transgenic piglets produced as part of several investigations. Large White (LW) sows (n = 105) received hand-made cloned LW or minipig blastocysts and delivered either spontaneously or after prostaglandin induction followed by either Caesarean section or vaginal birth. The overall pregnancy rate was 62%, with 26% of pregnancies terminating befo...

  3. Maternal endometrial edema may increase perinatal mortality of cloned and transgenic piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Mette; Winter, Kjeld Dahl; Dantzer, Vibeke; Li, Juan; Kragh, Peter M; Du, Yutao; Lin, Lin; Liu, Ying; Vajta, Gabor; Sangild, P T; Callesen, Henrik; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen

    2011-01-01

    The perinatal mortality of cloned animals is a well-known problem. In the present retrospective study, we report on mortality of cloned transgenic or non-transgenic piglets produced as part of several investigations. Large White (LW) sows (n = 105) received hand-made cloned LW or minipig blastocysts and delivered either spontaneously or after prostaglandin induction followed by either Caesarean section or vaginal birth. The overall pregnancy rate was 62%, with 26% of pregnancies terminating befo...

  4. Tie-1-directed expression of Cre recombinase in endothelial cells of embryoid bodies and transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, E; Brakebusch, C; Hietanen, K; Fässler, R

    2001-01-01

    Tissue-specific gene inactivation using the Cre-loxP system has become an important tool to unravel functions of genes when the conventional null mutation is lethal. We report here the generation of a transgenic mouse line expressing Cre recombinase in endothelial cells. In order to avoid the production and screening of multiple transgenic lines we used embryonic stem cell and embryoid body technology to identify recombinant embryonic stem cell clones with high, endothelial-specific Cre activity...

  5. MMTV-Cre transgenes can adversely affect lactation: considerations for conditional gene deletion in mammary tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Gertraud W; Hennighausen, Lothar

    2011-01-01

    CRE-loxP-mediated inactivation and activation of genes in mouse mammary epithelium have been widely used to study genetic pathways in normal development and neoplastic transformation in vivo. In 1997 we generated three distinct mouse lines carrying an identical MMTV-Cre transgene (lines A, D and F). Since the presence of CRE recombinase can adversely affect the physiology of non-mammary cells, we have explored whether transgenic females display lactational defects. While dams from line D nurs...

  6. Transgene products in honeydew: estimating risks for non-target insects

    OpenAIRE

    Hogervorst, Petronella Alida Maria; Rahier, Martine

    2006-01-01

    Insect-resistant genetically modified (GM) crops could harm organisms other than the pests targeted by the toxin. These so-called non-target organisms include parasitoids and predators that are important for natural pest regulation, which could be exposed to the expressed insecticidal proteins through feeding on transgenic plant tissue or through feeding on target or non-target herbivores containing the transgene product. In this thesis, honeydew excreted by phloem-feeding insects is addresse...

  7. Conserved regulation of Math5 and Math1 revealed by Math5-GFP transgenes

    OpenAIRE

    Hufnagel, Robert B.; Riesenberg, Amy N.; Saul, Sara M.; Brown, Nadean L.

    2007-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell genesis requires the proneural bHLH transcription factor Math5 (Atoh7), but little is known about the regulatory elements that control its expression. Here, we investigate Math5 gene regulation using transgenic mice. These mice express GFP in the prenatal retina, live-labeling RGC axon migration and innervation of the brain. Unexpectedly, these Math5-GFP transgenes are also found in Math1 expression domains throughout the nervous system, intriguing since Math5 and Math1 ...

  8. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zagozdzon Agnieszka M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study. Results A new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10?weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10?weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal. Conclusions We have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques.

  9. Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein–specific T Cell Receptor Transgenic Mice Develop Spontaneous Autoimmune Optic Neuritis

    OpenAIRE

    Bettelli, Estelle; Pagany, Maria; Weiner, Howard L.; Linington, Christopher; Sobel, Raymond A.; Kuchroo, Vijay K

    2003-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is considered to be an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that in many patients first presents clinically as optic neuritis. The relationship of optic neuritis to MS is not well understood. We have generated novel T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice specific for myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). MOG-specific transgenic T cells are not deleted nor tolerized and are functionally competent. A large proportion (>30%) of MOG-specific TCR trans...

  10. Analysis of T-DNA integration and generative segregation in transgenic winter triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack)

    OpenAIRE

    Hensel Goetz; Oleszczuk Sylwia; Daghma Diaa Eldin S; Zimny Janusz; Melzer Michael; Kumlehn Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background While the genetic transformation of the major cereal crops has become relatively routine, to date only a few reports were published on transgenic triticale, and robust data on T-DNA integration and segregation have not been available in this species. Results Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of stable transgenic winter triticale cv. Bogo carrying the selectable marker gene HYGROMYCIN PHOSPHOTRANSFERASE (HPT) and a synthetic green fluorescent protein gene (gfp). Pro...

  11. Effects of mti-2 Transgenic Potato Plants on the Aphid Myzus persicae (Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae)

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Claude Laberche; Philippe Giordanengo; Lise Jouanin; Antony Beaujean; Charles Vincent; Salima Lehraiki; Anas Cherqui; Julien Saguez

    2010-01-01

    Overexpressed in transgenic plants, protease inhibitors showed insecticidal effects against several insect taxa. We transformed potato internodes with the mustard trypsin inhibitor mti-2 gene. Among the 35 independent transgenic potato lines obtained via Agrobacterium tumefasciens transformation, four (DM6, DM7, DM11, and DM19) were selected for their high level of MTI-2 (at least to 30% of trypsin activity inhibition). Feeding assays were carried out to evaluate their effects on the gree...

  12. Expression of Multiple Resistance Genes Enhances Tolerance to Environmental Stressors in Transgenic Poplar (Populus × euramericana ‘Guariento’)

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Xiaohua; Chu, Yanguang; Li, Huan; Hou, Yingjie; Zhang, Bingyu; Huang, Qinjun; Hu, Zanmin; Huang, Rongfeng; Tian, Yingchuan

    2011-01-01

    Commercial and non-commercial plants face a variety of environmental stressors that often cannot be controlled. In this study, transgenic hybrid poplar (Populus × euramericana ‘Guariento’) harboring five effector genes (vgb, SacB, JERF36, BtCry3A and OC-I) were subjected to drought, salinity, waterlogging and insect stressors in greenhouse or laboratory conditions. Field trials were also conducted to investigate long-term effects of transgenic trees on insects and salt tolerance in the transf...

  13. Recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase from milk of transgenic animals to protect against organophosphate poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yue-Jin; Huang, Yue; Baldassarre, Hernan; Wang, Bin; Lazaris, Anthoula; Leduc, Martin; Bilodeau, Annie S.; Bellemare, Annie; Côté, Mélanie; Herskovits, Peter; Touati, Madjid; Turcotte, Carl; Valeanu, Loredana; Lemée, Nicolas; Wilgus, Harvey

    2007-01-01

    Dangerous organophosphorus (OP) compounds have been used as insecticides in agriculture and in chemical warfare. Because exposure to OP could create a danger for humans in the future, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) has been developed for prophylaxis to these chemicals. Because it is impractical to obtain sufficient quantities of plasma BChE to treat humans exposed to OP agents, the production of recombinant BChE (rBChE) in milk of transgenic animals was investigated. Transgenic mice and goats w...

  14. Rapid generation of stable transgenic embryonic stem cell lines using modular lentivectors

    OpenAIRE

    Suter, David M.; Cartier, Laetitia; Bettiol, Esther; Tirefort, Diderik; Jaconi, Marisa E.; Dubois-Dauphin, Michel; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2006-01-01

    Generation of stable transgenic embryonic stem (ES) cell lines by classic transfection is still a difficult task, requiring time-consuming clonal selection, and hampered by clonal artifacts and gene silencing. Here we describe a novel system that allows construction of lentivectors and generation of stable ES cell lines with > 99% transgene expression within a very short time frame. Rapid insertion of promoters and genes of interest is obtained through a modular recombinational cloning system...

  15. The N gene of tobacco confers resistance to tobacco mosaic virus in transgenic tomato.

    OpenAIRE

    Whitham, S; Mccormick, S.; Baker, B.

    1996-01-01

    It has been proposed that cloned plant disease resistance genes could be transferred from resistant to susceptible plant species to control important crop plant diseases. The recently cloned N gene of tobacco confers resistance to the viral pathogen, tobacco mosaic virus. We generated transgenic tomato plants bearing the N gene and demonstrate that N confers a hypersensitive response and effectively localizes tobacco mosaic virus to sites of inoculation in transgenic tomato, as it does in tob...

  16. Simultaneous activation of salicylate production and fungal resistance in transgenic chrysanthemum producing caffeine

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yun-Soo; Lim, Soon; Yoda, Hiroshi; Choi, Chang-Sun; Choi, Yong-Eui; Sano, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Caffeine functions in the chemical defense against biotic attackers in a few plant species including coffee and tea. Transgenic tobacco plants that endogenously produced caffeine by expressing three N-methyltransferases involved in the caffeine biosynthesis pathway exhibited a strong resistance to pathogens and herbivores. Here we report that transgenic Chrysanthemum, which produced an equivalent level of caffeine as the tobacco plants at approximately 3 µg g?1 fresh tissues, also exhibited a...

  17. Transgenic Expression of MsHsp23 Confers Enhanced Tolerance to Abiotic Stresses in Tall Fescue

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ki-Won; Choi, Gi Jun; Kim, Ki-Yong; Ji, Hee Jung; Park, Hyung Soo; Kim, Yong-Goo; Lee, Byung Hyun; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) is an important cool season forage plant that is not well suited to extreme heat, salts, or heavy metals. To develop transgenic tall fescue plants with enhanced tolerance to abiotic stress, we introduced an alfalfa Hsp23 gene expression vector construct through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Integration and expression of the transgene were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction, northern blot, and western blot analyses. Under normal growth con...

  18. Production of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Virus-Like Particles in Transgenic Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Biemelt, Sophia; Sonnewald, Uwe; Galmbacher, Petra; Willmitzer, Lothar; Müller, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Cervical cancer is linked to infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV) and is the third most common cancer among women worldwide. There is a strong demand for the development of an HPV preventive vaccine. Transgenic plants expressing the HPV major capsid protein L1 could be a system to produce virus-like particles for prophylactic vaccination or could even be used as edible vaccines to induce an L1-specific prophylactic immune response. Here, we describe the generation of transgenic tobacco...

  19. Production of scFv-Conjugated Affinity Silk Powder by Transgenic Silkworm Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Mitsuru; Kojima, Katsura; Sakuma, Chisato; Murakami, Maria; Aratani, Eriko; Takenouchi, Takato; Tamada, Yasushi; Kitani, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Bombyx mori (silkworm) silk proteins are being utilized as unique biomaterials for medical applications. Chemical modification or post-conjugation of bioactive ligands expand the applicability of silk proteins; however, the processes are elaborate and costly. In this study, we used transgenic silkworm technology to develop single-chain variable fragment (scFv)-conjugated silk fibroin. The cocoons of the transgenic silkworm contain fibroin L-chain linked with scFv as a fusion protein. After di...

  20. Standing genetic variation and compensatory evolution in transgenic organisms: a growth-enhanced salmon simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahrens, Robert N. M.; Devlin, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Genetically modified strains usually are generated within defined genetic backgrounds to minimize variation for the engineered characteristic in order to facilitate basic research investigations or for commercial application. However, interactions between transgenes and genetic background have been documented in both model and commercial agricultural species, indicating that allelic variation at transgene-modifying loci are not uncommon in genomes. Engineered organisms that have the potential...

  1. Stochastic, stage-specific mechanisms account for the variegation of a human globin transgene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graubert, T A; Hug, B A; Wesselschmidt, R; Hsieh, C L; Ryan, T M; Townes, T M; Ley, T J

    1998-06-15

    The random insertion of transgenes into the genomic DNA of mice usually leads to widely variable levels of expression in individual founder lines. To study the mechanisms that cause variegation, we designed a transgene that we expected to variegate, which consisted of a beta-globin locus control region 5' HS-2 linked in tandem to a tagged human beta-globin gene (into which a Lac-Z cassette had been inserted). All tested founder lines exhibited red blood cell-specific expression, but levels of expression varied >1000-fold from the lowest to the highest expressing line. Most of the variation in levels of expression appeared to reflect differences in the percentage of cells in the peripheral blood that expressed the transgene, which ranged from 0.3% in the lowest expressing line to 88% in the highest; the level of transgene expression per cell varied no more than 10-fold from the lowest to the highest expressing line. These differences in expression levels could not be explained by the location of transgene integration, by an effect of beta-galactosidase on red blood cell survival, by the half life of the beta-galactosidase enzyme or by the age of the animals. The progeny of all early erythroid progenitors (BFU-E colony-forming cells) exhibited the same propensity to variegate in methylcellulose-based cultures, suggesting that the decision to variegate occurs after the BFU-E stage of erythroid differentiation. Collectively, these data suggest that variegation in levels of transgene expression are due to local, integration site-dependent phenomena that alter the probability that a transgene will be expressed in an appropriate cell; however, these local effects have a minimal impact on the transgene's activity in the cells that initiate transcription. PMID:9611227

  2. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zagozdzon, Agnieszka M

    2012-05-30

    AbstractBackgroundNumerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study.ResultsA new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice) expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10?weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10?weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal.ConclusionsWe have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and\\/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques.

  3. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study. A new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice) expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10 weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10 weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal. We have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques

  4. Remobilizing deleted piggyBac vector post-integration for transgene stability in silkworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Wang, Riyuan; Wang, Yuancheng; Xu, Hanfu; Yuan, Lin; Ding, Huan; Ma, Sanyuan; Zhou, You; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-06-01

    Deletion of transposable elements post-genomic integration holds great promise for stability of the transgene in the host genome and has an essential role for the practical application of transgenic animals. In this study, a modified piggyBac vector that mediated deletion of the transposon sequence post-integration for transgene stability in the economically important silkworm Bombyx mori was constructed. The piggyBac vector architecture contains inversed terminal repeat sequences L1, L2 and R1, which can form L1/R1 and L2/R1 types of transposition cassettes. hsp70-PIG as the piggyBac transposase expression cassette for initial transposition, further remobilization and transgene stabilization test was transiently expressed in a helper vector or integrated into the modified vector to produce a transgenic silkworm. Shortening L2 increased the transformation frequency of L1/R1 into the silkworm genome compared to L2/R1. After the integration of L1/R1 into the genome, the remobilization of L2/R1 impaired the transposon structure and the resulting transgene linked with an impaired transposon was stable in the genome even in the presence of exogenously introduced transposase, whereas those flanked by the intact transposon were highly mobile in the genome. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of post-integration deletion of transposable elements to guarantee true transgene stabilization in silkworm. We suggest that the modified vector will be a useful resource for studies of transgenic silkworms and other piggyBac-transformed organisms. PMID:25589404

  5. Linking immune-mediated arterial inflammation and cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis in a transgenic mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Ludewig, Burkhard; Freigang, Stefan; Jäggi, Martin; Kurrer, Michael O; Pei, Yao-Chang; Vlk, Lenka; Odermatt, Bernhard; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Hengartner, Hans

    2000-01-01

    Arterial inflammatory responses are thought to be a significant component of atherosclerotic disease. We describe here, using a transgenic approach, the mutual perpetuation of immune-mediated arterial inflammation and cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis. Mice expressing the bacterial transgene ?-galactosidase exclusively in cardiomyocytes and in smooth muscle cells in lung arteries and the aorta (SM-LacZ), and hypercholesterolemic apolipoprotein E-deficient SM-LacZ...

  6. Matrix attachment regions (MARs) enhance transformation frequencies and reduce variance of transgene expression in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, K.; Leah, R.; Knudsen, S.; Cameron-Mills, V.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear matrix attachment regions (MARs) are defined as genomic DNA sequences, located at the physical boundaries of chromatin loops. They are suggested to play a role in the cis unfolding and folding of the chromatin fibre associated with the regulation of gene transcription. Inclusion of MARs in transgene cassettes enhances their expression and reduces position-effect variations in the transgenic host. The present study is the first to investigate the influence of MAR sequences on transformati...

  7. Transgenic lettuce seedlings carrying hepatitis B virus antigen HBsAg

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson Marcondes; Ekkehard Hansen

    2008-01-01

    The obtainment of transgenic edible plants carrying recombinant antigens is a desired issue in search for economic alternatives viewing vaccine production. Here we report a strategy for genetic transformation of lettuce plants (Lactuca sativa L.) using the surface antigen HBsAg of hepatitis B virus. Transgenic lettuce seedlings were obtained through the application of a regulated balance of plant growth regulators. Genetic transformation process was acquired by cocultivation of cotyledons wit...

  8. Expression of a begomoviral DNA? gene in transgenic Nicotiana plants induced abnormal cell division*

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Xiao-feng; Li, Yun-Qin; Hu, Dong-wei; Zhou, Xue-Ping

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of monopartite begomoviruses are being identified that a satellite molecule (DNA?) is required to induce typical symptoms in host plants. DNA? encodes a single gene (termed ?C1) encoded in the complementary-sense. We have produced transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana and N. tabacum plants expressing the ?C1 gene of a DNA? associated with Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV), under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Transgenic plants expressing ...

  9. A non-destructive screenable marker, OsFAST, for identifying transgenic rice seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Shimada, Takashi L; Ogawa, Yoichi; Shimada, Tomoo; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2011-01-01

    The production of transgenic plants has contributed greatly to plant research. Previously, an improved method for screening transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana seeds using the FAST (Fluorescence-Accumulating-Seed Technology) method and FAST marker was reported. Arabidopsis seeds containing the FAST marker may be visually screened using a fluorescence stereomicroscope or blue LED handy-type instrument. Although the FAST method was originally designed for Arabidopsis screens, this study endeavors t...

  10. Next-generation transgenic mice for optogenetic analysis of neural circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George J Augustine

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we characterize several new lines of transgenic mice useful for optogenetic analysis of brain circuit function. These mice express optogenetic probes, such as enhanced halorhodopsin or several different versions of channelrhodopsins, behind various neuron-specific promoters. These mice permit photoinhibition or photostimulation both in vitro and in vivo. Our results also reveal the important influence of fluorescent tags on optogenetic probe expression and function in transgenic mice.

  11. Healing of Burn Wounds in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Transforming Growth Factor-?1 in the Epidermis

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Liju; Chan, Teddy; Demare, Jack; Iwashina, Takashi; GHAHARY, AZIZ; Scott, Paul G.; Tredget, Edward E

    2001-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) isoforms are multifunctional cytokines that play an important role in wound healing. Transgenic mice overexpressing TGF-? in the skin under control of epidermal-specific promoters have provided models to study the effects of increased TGF-? on epidermal cell growth and cutaneous wound repair. To date, most of these studies used transgenic mice that overexpress active TGF-? in the skin by modulating the latency-associated-peptide to prevent its association ...

  12. Hearing impairment in the P23H-1 retinal degeneration rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoca, Jorge V; Alvarado, Juan C; Fuentes-Santamaría, Verónica; Martinez-Galan, Juan R; Caminos, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The transgenic P23H line 1 (P23H-1) rat expresses a variant of rhodopsin with a mutation that leads to loss of visual function. This rat strain is an experimental model usually employed to study photoreceptor degeneration. Although the mutated protein should not interfere with other sensory functions, observing severe loss of auditory reflexes in response to natural sounds led us to study auditory brain response (ABR) recording. Animals were separated into different hearing levels following the response to natural stimuli (hand clapping and kissing sounds). Of all the analyzed animals, 25.9% presented auditory loss before 50 days of age (P50) and 45% were totally deaf by P200. ABR recordings showed that all the rats had a higher hearing threshold than the control Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, which was also higher than any other rat strains. The integrity of the central and peripheral auditory pathway was analyzed by histology and immunocytochemistry. In the cochlear nucleus (CN), statistical differences were found between SD and P23H-1 rats in VGluT1 distribution, but none were found when labeling all the CN synapses with anti-Syntaxin. This finding suggests anatomical and/or molecular abnormalities in the auditory downstream pathway. The inner ear of the hypoacusic P23H-1 rats showed several anatomical defects, including loss and disruption of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons. All these results can explain, at least in part, how hearing impairment can occur in a high percentage of P23H-1 rats. P23H-1 rats may be considered an experimental model with visual and auditory dysfunctions in future research. PMID:25278831

  13. Hearing impairment in the P23H-1 retinal degeneration rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ElenaCaminos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The transgenic P23H line 1 (P23H-1 rat expresses a variant of rhodopsin with a mutation that leads to loss of visual function. This rat strain is an experimental model usually employed to study photoreceptor degeneration. Although the mutated protein should not interfere with other sensory functions, observing severe loss of auditory reflexes in response to natural sounds led us to study auditory brain response (ABR recording. Animals were separated into different hearing levels following the response to natural stimuli (hand clapping and kissing sounds. Of all the analyzed animals, 25.9% presented auditory loss before 50 days of age (P50 and 45% were totally deaf by P200. ABR recordings showed that all the rats had a higher hearing threshold than the control Sprague-Dawley (SD rats, which was also higher than any other rat strains. The integrity of the central and peripheral auditory pathway was analyzed by histology and immunocytochemistry. In the cochlear nucleus (CN, statistical differences were found between SD and P23H-1 rats in VGluT1 distribution, but none were found when labeling all the CN synapses with anti-Syntaxin. This finding suggests anatomical and/or molecular abnormalities in the auditory downstream pathway. The inner ear of the hypoacusic P23H-1 rats showed several anatomical defects, including loss and disruption of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons. All these results can explain, at least in part, how hearing impairment can occur in a high percentage of P23H-1 rats. P23H-1 rats may be considered an experimental model with visual and auditory dysfunctions in future research.

  14. Analysis of T-DNA integration and generative segregation in transgenic winter triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hensel Goetz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the genetic transformation of the major cereal crops has become relatively routine, to date only a few reports were published on transgenic triticale, and robust data on T-DNA integration and segregation have not been available in this species. Results Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of stable transgenic winter triticale cv. Bogo carrying the selectable marker gene HYGROMYCIN PHOSPHOTRANSFERASE (HPT and a synthetic green fluorescent protein gene (gfp. Progeny of four independent transgenic plants were comprehensively investigated with regard to the number of integrated T-DNA copies, the number of plant genomic integration loci, the integrity and functionality of individual T-DNA copies, as well as the segregation of transgenes in T1 and T2 generations, which also enabled us to identify homozygous transgenic lines. The truncation of some integrated T-DNAs at their left end along with the occurrence of independent segregation of multiple T-DNAs unintendedly resulted in a single-copy segregant that is selectable marker-free and homozygous for the gfp gene. The heritable expression of gfp driven by the maize UBI-1 promoter was demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Conclusions The used transformation method is a valuable tool for the genetic engineering of triticale. Here we show that comprehensive molecular analyses are required for the correct interpretation of phenotypic data collected from the transgenic plants.

  15. Response difference of transgenic and conventional rice (Oryza sativa) to nanoparticles (?Fe2O3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Xin; Deng, Yingqing; Rui, Yukui; Gao, Binbin; Luo, Wenhe; Chen, Shili; Van Nhan, Le; Li, Xuguang; Liu, Shutong; Han, Yaning; Liu, Liming; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are an increasingly common contaminant in agro-environments, and their potential effect on genetically modified (GM) crops has been largely unexplored. GM crop exposure to NPs is likely to increase as both technologies develop. To better understand the implications of nanoparticles on GM plants in agriculture, we performed a glasshouse study to quantify the uptake of Fe2O3 NPs on transgenic and non-transgenic rice plants. We measured nutrient concentrations, biomass, enzyme activity, and the concentration of two phytohormones, abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and malondialdehyde (MDA). Root phytohormone inhibition was positively correlated with Fe2O3 NP concentrations, indicating that Fe2O3 had a significant influence on the production of these hormones. The activities of antioxidant enzymes were significantly higher as a factor of low Fe2O3 NP treatment concentration and significantly lower at high NP concentrations, but only among transgenic plants. There was also a positive correlation between the treatment concentration of Fe2O3 and iron accumulation, and the magnitude of this effect was greatest among non-transgenic plants. The differences in root phytohormone production and antioxidant enzyme activity between transgenic and non-transgenic rice plants in vivo suggests that GM crops may react to NP exposure differently than conventional crops. It is the first study of NPs that may have an impact on GM crops, and a realistic significance for food security and food safety. PMID:26154040

  16. Overexpression of monoubiquitin improves photosynthesis in transgenic tobacco plants following high temperature stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fengxia; Gong, Jiangfeng; Zhang, Jin; Feng, Yanan; Wang, Guokun; Guo, Qifang; Wang, Wei

    2014-09-01

    The ubiquitin/26S proteasome system (Ub/26S) is implicated in abiotic stress responses in plants. In this paper, transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing Ta-Ub2 from wheat were used to study the functions of Ub in the improvement of photosynthesis under high temperature (45°C) stress. We observed higher levels of Ub conjugates in transgenic plants under high temperature stress conditions compared to wild type (WT) as a result of the constitutive overexpression of Ta-Ub2, suggesting increased protein degradation by the 26S proteasome system under high temperature stress. Overexpressing Ub increased the photosynthetic rate (Pn) of transgenic tobacco plants, consistent with the improved ATPase activity in the thylakoid membrane and enhanced efficiency of PSII photochemistry. The higher D1 protein levels following high temperature stress in transgenic plants than WT were also observed. These findings imply that Ub may be involved in tolerance of photosynthesis to high temperature stress in plants. Compared with WT, the transgenic plants showed lower protein carbonylation and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, less reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, but higher antioxidant enzyme activity under high temperature stress. These findings suggest that the improved antioxidant capacity of transgenic plants may be one of the most important mechanisms underlying Ub-regulated high temperature tolerance. PMID:25113454

  17. Allergenicity assessment of the papaya ringspot virus coat protein expressed in transgenic rainbow papaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermín, Gustavo; Keith, Ronald C; Suzuki, Jon Y; Ferreira, Stephen A; Gaskill, Douglas A; Pitz, Karen Y; Manshardt, Richard M; Gonsalves, Dennis; Tripathi, Savarni

    2011-09-28

    The virus-resistant, transgenic commercial papaya Rainbow and SunUp (Carica papaya L.) have been consumed locally in Hawaii and elsewhere in the mainland United States and Canada since their release to planters in Hawaii in 1998. These papaya are derived from transgenic papaya line 55-1 and carry the coat protein (CP) gene of papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). The PRSV CP was evaluated for potential allergenicity, an important component in assessing the safety of food derived from transgenic plants. The transgene PRSV CP sequence of Rainbow papaya did not exhibit greater than 35% amino acid sequence homology to known allergens, nor did it have a stretch of eight amino acids found in known allergens which are known common bioinformatic methods used for assessing similarity to allergen proteins. PRSV CP was also tested for stability in simulated gastric fluid and simulated intestinal fluid and under various heat treatments. The results showed that PRSV CP was degraded under conditions for which allergenic proteins relative to nonallergens are purported to be stable. The potential human intake of transgene-derived PRSV CP was assessed by measuring CP levels in Rainbow and SunUp along with estimating the fruit consumption rates and was compared to potential intake estimates of PRSV CP from naturally infected nontransgenic papaya. Following accepted allergenicity assessment criteria, our results show that the transgene-derived PRSV CP does not pose a risk of food allergy. PMID:21819140

  18. [Application of bionic technology to speciation analysis and bioavailability assessment of nickel in transgenic soybean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Hui; Li, Shun-Xing; Mou, Yang; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Li, Yan-Cai; Wang, Hui; Zheng, Na-Yan; Xie, He-Fang

    2013-11-01

    The safety of transgenic food has been paid the most attention to by the public and scientists. Trace metal bioavailability could provide information for safety assessment of transgenic food. The critical functional digestion and absorption in the gastrointestinal tract were simulated by bionic gastrointestinal digestion, metabolism of gut microbiota, and bionic biomembrane adsorption with liposome and then used for the pretreatment of transgenic and general soybeans. Ni speciation in the chyme was defined as affinity-liposome and water soluble Ni. Nickel bioavailability was assessed by the content of affinity-liposome Ni. Water soluble Ni was the main species of nickel complex in the chyme. Nickel bioavailability was 4.1% for transgenic soybean and 3.3% for general soybean, which could be enhanced by gastrointestinal digestion and metabolism of gut microbiota. After transgene, nickel bioavailability was increased 24% but the content of affinity-liposome Ni was 122.3 ng x g(-1) for transgenic soybean, just as 36% as that of general soybean. PMID:24555384

  19. Development of a transgenic tobacco plant for phytoremediation of methylmercury pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Takeshi; Morita, Hirofumi; Akizawa, Toshifumi; Pan-Hou, Hidemitsu

    2010-06-01

    To develop the potential of plant for phytoremediation of methylmercury pollution, a genetically engineered tobacco plant that coexpresses organomercurial lyase (MerB) with the ppk-specified polyphosphate (polyP) and merT-encoding mercury transporter was constructed by integrating a bacterial merB gene into ppk/merT-transgenic tobacco. A large number of independent transgenic tobaccos was obtained, in some of which the merB gene was stably integrated in the plant genome and substantially translated to the expected MerB enzyme in the transgenic tobacco. The ppk/merT/merB-transgenic tobacco callus showed more resistance to methylmercury (CH3Hg+) and accumulated more mercury from CH3Hg+-containing medium than the ppk/merT-transgenic and wild-type progenitors. These results suggest that the MerB enzyme encoded by merB degraded the incorporated CH3Hg+ to Hg2+, which then accumulated as a less toxic Hg-polyP complex in the tobacco cells. Phytoremediation of CH3Hg+ and Hg2+ in the environment with this engineered ppk/merT/merB-transgenic plant, which prevents the release mercury vapor (Hg0) into the atmosphere in addition to generating potentially recyclable mercury-rich plant residues, is believed to be more acceptable to the public than other competing technologies, including phytovolatilization. PMID:20393701

  20. Cloning of genes and developing transgenic crops with enhanced tolerance to salinity and drought (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abiotic stresses represent the most limiting factors affecting agricultural productivity. In India more than 60% of total cultivated land is still rainfed and crops experience frequent droughts. Thus, we need to develop transgenic crops tolerant to drought, and other related abiotic stress factors such as salinity, low and high temperature stresses. At the National Research Centre on Plant Biotechnology, Indian Agricultural Research Institute (ICAR), we have initiated a programme on developing transgenic crops tolerant to a range of abiotic stresses. The major emphasis is on developing transgenic potato, tomato, mustard, rice and wheat. While, transgenic plants of potato. tomato and mustard have already been generated with osmotin gene and are at different stages of testing, other key genes imparting tolerance to abiotic stresses are being isolated from different species for producing transgenic rice and wheat cultivars tolerant to multiple stresses. Genes that have been isolated in our laboratory include ascorbate peroxidase gene (TaApx) and genes encoding transcription factor, CBFs (TaCBF2 and TaCBP3) from a drought tolerant wheat cultivar (C306), Lea1 cDNA from Brassica species, codA from Arthrobacter globiformis, and otsBA operon from E. coli. Apart from these stress-related genes, we have isolated a few stress-inducible promoters for deploying them in gene stacking in developing transgenic crops with enhanced tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses. The results will be presented. (author)

  1. Aberrant phenotypes of transgenic mice expressing dimeric human erythropoietin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Seong-Jo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dimeric human erythropoietin (dHuEPO peptides are reported to exhibit significantly higher biological activity than the monomeric form of recombinant EPO. The objective of this study was to produce transgenic (tg mice expressing dHuEPO and to investigate the characteristics of these mice. Methods A dHuEPO-expressing vector under the control of the goat beta-casein promoter, which produced a dimer of human EPO molecules linked by a 2-amino acid peptide linker (Asp-Ile, was constructed and injected into 1-cell fertilized embryos by microinjection. Mice were screened using genomic DNA samples obtained from tail biopsies. Blood samples were obtained by heart puncture using heparinized tubes, and hematologic parameters were assessed. Using the microarray analysis tool, we analyzed differences in gene expression in the spleens of tg and control mice. Results A high rate of spontaneous abortion or death of the offspring was observed in the recipients of dHuEPO embryos. We obtained 3 founder lines (#4, #11, and #47 of tg mice expressing the dHuEPO gene. However, only one founder line showed stable germline integration and transmission, subsequently establishing the only transgenic line (#11. We obtained 2 F1 mice and 3 F2 mice from line #11. The dHuEPO protein could not be obtained because of repeated spontaneous abortions in the tg mice. Tg mice exhibited symptoms such as short lifespan and abnormal blood composition. The red blood cell count, white blood cell count, and hematocrit levels in the tg mice were remarkably higher than those in the control mice. The spleens of the tg mice (F1 and F2 females were 11- and -21-fold larger than those of the control mice. Microarray analysis revealed 2,672 spleen-derived candidate genes; more genes were downregulated than upregulated (849/764. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR were used for validating the results of the microarray analysis of mRNA expression. Conclusions In conclusion, dHuEPO tg mice caused excessive erythrocytosis that led to abnormal blood composition, short lifespan, and abnormal splenomegaly. Further, we identified 2,672 genes associated with splenomegaly by microarray analysis. These results could be useful in the development of dHuEPO-producing tg animals.

  2. Transgênicos e evolução dirigida / Transgenics and controlled evolution

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    João Lúcio de, Azevedo; Maria Helena Pelegrinelli, Fungaro; Maria Lúcia Carneiro, Vieira.

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Os eventos de mutação são responsáveis pela geração de variabilidade genética nas populações, permitindo a ação da seleção natural que favorece os tipos mais adaptados. A exploração dessa variabilidade, embora de forma empírica, teve início há cerca de dez mil anos, quando se deu a domesticação das [...] primeiras culturas agrícolas. Com o advento da genética, práticas racionais de seleção passaram a ser adotadas visando o melhoramento genético de plantas, animais e microrganismos de interesse para o homem. Recentemente, surgiram as técnicas de manipulação de DNA, permitindo a transferência de genes entre organismos, transpondo barreiras de cruzamento entre os reinos vegetal, animal, protista e fungi. A geração dos organismos geneticamente modificados, ou transgênicos, tem sido alvo de polêmica e discussão nos diversos segmentos da sociedade. Porém, não se deve generalizar o uso dos transgênicos, pois cada um deve ser analisado quanto às suas vantagens, desvantagens e contribuição à melhoria da qualidade de vida. Métodos recentes de mutação e recombinação gênica in vitro são também apresentados no texto. Abstract in english Mutation events are responsible for the generation of genetic variability in the populations enabling the occurrence of natural selection which favors the better-adapted types. The exploitation of this variability, though carried out empirically, dates from ten thousand years ago with the domesticat [...] ion of the first cultivated crops. With the advent of genetics, rational selection procedures were adopted with a view to the genetic breeding of plants, animals and microorganisms which might be of interest to men. Recently, new DNA manipulation techniques came up enabling the transference of genes between organisms, cutting across barriers which hindered crossings between the vegetable, animal, protist and fungus kingdoms. The generation of genetically modified organisms, or transgenics, has aroused a heated and controversial debate in various sectors of our society. Yet we must be cautious before generalizing the use of transgenics since each one should be analyzed at a time for its particular advantages and drawbacks, and for its contribution to the improvement of life quality. This paper also considers recent methods of mutation and in vitro genic recombination.

  3. Transgênicos e evolução dirigida Transgenics and controlled evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Lúcio de Azevedo

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Os eventos de mutação são responsáveis pela geração de variabilidade genética nas populações, permitindo a ação da seleção natural que favorece os tipos mais adaptados. A exploração dessa variabilidade, embora de forma empírica, teve início há cerca de dez mil anos, quando se deu a domesticação das primeiras culturas agrícolas. Com o advento da genética, práticas racionais de seleção passaram a ser adotadas visando o melhoramento genético de plantas, animais e microrganismos de interesse para o homem. Recentemente, surgiram as técnicas de manipulação de DNA, permitindo a transferência de genes entre organismos, transpondo barreiras de cruzamento entre os reinos vegetal, animal, protista e fungi. A geração dos organismos geneticamente modificados, ou transgênicos, tem sido alvo de polêmica e discussão nos diversos segmentos da sociedade. Porém, não se deve generalizar o uso dos transgênicos, pois cada um deve ser analisado quanto às suas vantagens, desvantagens e contribuição à melhoria da qualidade de vida. Métodos recentes de mutação e recombinação gênica in vitro são também apresentados no texto.Mutation events are responsible for the generation of genetic variability in the populations enabling the occurrence of natural selection which favors the better-adapted types. The exploitation of this variability, though carried out empirically, dates from ten thousand years ago with the domestication of the first cultivated crops. With the advent of genetics, rational selection procedures were adopted with a view to the genetic breeding of plants, animals and microorganisms which might be of interest to men. Recently, new DNA manipulation techniques came up enabling the transference of genes between organisms, cutting across barriers which hindered crossings between the vegetable, animal, protist and fungus kingdoms. The generation of genetically modified organisms, or transgenics, has aroused a heated and controversial debate in various sectors of our society. Yet we must be cautious before generalizing the use of transgenics since each one should be analyzed at a time for its particular advantages and drawbacks, and for its contribution to the improvement of life quality. This paper also considers recent methods of mutation and in vitro genic recombination.

  4. Role of transgenic plants in agriculture and biopharming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Parvaiz; Ashraf, Muhammad; Younis, Muhammad; Hu, Xiangyang; Kumar, Ashwani; Akram, Nudrat Aisha; Al-Qurainy, F

    2012-01-01

    At present, environmental degradation and the consistently growing population are two main problems on the planet earth. Fulfilling the needs of this growing population is quite difficult from the limited arable land available on the globe. Although there are legal, social and political barriers to the utilization of biotechnology, advances in this field have substantially improved agriculture and human life to a great extent. One of the vital tools of biotechnology is genetic engineering (GE) which is used to modify plants, animals and microorganisms according to desired needs. In fact, genetic engineering facilitates the transfer of desired characteristics into other plants which is not possible through conventional plant breeding. A variety of crops have been engineered for enhanced resistance to a multitude of stresses such as herbicides, insecticides, viruses and a combination of biotic and abiotic stresses in different crops including rice, mustard, maize, potato, tomato, etc. Apart from the use of GE in agriculture, it is being extensively employed to modify the plants for enhanced production of vaccines, hormones, etc. Vaccines against certain diseases are certainly available in the market, but most of them are very costly. Developing countries cannot afford the disease control through such cost-intensive vaccines. Alternatively, efforts are being made to produce edible vaccines which are cheap and have many advantages over the commercialized vaccines. Transgenic plants generated for this purpose are capable of expressing recombinant proteins including viral and bacterial antigens and antibodies. Common food plants like banana, tomato, rice, carrot, etc. have been used to produce vaccines against certain diseases like hepatitis B, cholera, HIV, etc. Thus, the up- and down-regulation of desired genes which are used for the modification of plants have a marked role in the improvement of genetic crops. In this review, we have comprehensively discussed the role of genetic engineering in generating transgenic lines/cultivars of different crops with improved nutrient quality, biofuel production, enhanced production of vaccines and antibodies, increased resistance against insects, herbicides, diseases and abiotic stresses as well as the safety measures for their commercialization. PMID:21959304

  5. Differential effects of two MRI contrast agents on the integrity and distribution of rAAV2 and rAAV5 in the rat striatum

    OpenAIRE

    Osting, Sue; Bennett, Antonette; Power, Shelby; Wackett, Jordan; Hurley, Samuel A; Andrew L Alexander; Agbandje-Mckena, Mavis; Burger, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed as a method to optimize intracerebral targeting and for tracking infusate distribution in gene therapy trials for nervous system disorders. We thus investigated possible effects of two MRI contrast agents, gadoteridol (Gd) and galbumin (Gab), on the distribution and levels of transgene expression in the rat striatum and their effect on integrity and stability of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) particles. MRI studies s...

  6. Full-length transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channels mediate calcium signals and possibly contribute to osmoreception in vasopressin neurones in the rat supraoptic nucleus.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moriya, T.; Shibasaki, R.; Kayano, T.; Takebuchi, N.; Ichimura, M.; Kitamura, N.; Asano, A.; Hosaka, Y. Z.; Forostyak, Oksana; Verkhratsky, A.; Dayanithi, Govindan; Shibuya, I.

    2015-01-01

    Ro?. 57, ?. 1 (2015), s. 24-37. ISSN 0143-4160 R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GAP303/11/0192; GA ?R(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA ?R(CZ) GA14-34077S Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : osmoregulation * oxytocin * SON * transgenic rats * TRPV1 * vasopressin Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.513, year: 2014

  7. Generation of transgenic mouse line expressing Kusabira Orange throughout body, including erythrocytes, by random segregation of provirus method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanaka, Sanae; Ooehara, Jun; Morita, Yohei; Ema, Hideo; Takahashi, Satoru; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Otsu, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Onodera, Masafumi; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2013-06-14

    Fluorescent-protein transgenic mice are useful for obtaining marked somatic cells to study kinetics of development or differentiation. Fluorescence-marked hematopoietic stem cells in particular are commonly used for studying hematopoiesis. However, as far as we know, no transgenic mouse line is described in which a fluorescent protein is stably and constitutively expressed in all hematopoietic cells, including erythrocytes and platelets. Using the random segregation of provirus (RSP) method, we generated from retrovirally transduced mouse embryonic stem cells a transgenic mouse line expressing a red/orange fluorescent protein, Kusabira Orange (KuO). KuO transgenic mouse line cells carry only one proviral integration site and stably express KuO in all hematopoietic-lineage elements, including erythrocytes and platelets. Moreover, bone-marrow transplantation in KuO transgenic mice demonstrated normal hematopoieisis. KuO transgenic mice likely will prove useful for study of hematopoiesis that includes erythropoiesis and megakaryopoiesis. PMID:23685154

  8. Potential for the environmental impact of transgenic crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Philip J; Clarke, Belinda; Fontes, Eliana M G

    2002-06-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in how changes in agricultural practice associated with the introduction of particular genetically modified (GM) crops might indirectly impact the environment. There is also interest in any effects that might be associated with recombinant and novel combinations of DNA passing into the environment, and the possibility that they may be taken up by microorganisms or other live biological material. From the current state of knowledge, the impact of free DNA of transgenic origin is likely to be negligible compared with the large amount of total free DNA. We can find no compelling scientific arguments to demonstrate that GM crops are innately different from non-GM crops. The kinds of potential impacts of GM crops fall into classes familiar from the cultivation of non-GM crops (e.g., invasiveness, weediness, toxicity, or biodiversity). It is likely, however, that the novelty of some of the products of GM crop improvement will present new challenges and perhaps opportunities to manage particular crops in creative ways. PMID:12042859

  9. [Methods for construction of transgenic plant expression vector: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yangpu; Yang, Shushen

    2015-03-01

    Construction of recombinant plasmid vector for gene expression is a key step in making transgenic plants and important to study gene function and plant genetic engineering. A right choice of gene construction method can be cost-effective and achieve more diverse recombinant plasmids. In addition to the traditional methods in construction of plant gene expression vectors, such as Gateway technology, three DNA method and one step cloning, a few novel methods have been developed in recent years. These methods include oligonucleotide synthesis-based construction of small fragment gene expression vectors via competitive connection; construction of small RNA expression vector using pre-microRNA; recombination-fusion PCR method which inserts DNA fragments of multiple restriction sites into the target vector; and insertion of a DNA fragment into any region of a linear vector via In-Fusion Kit. Construction of complex vectors with many fragments uses sequence and ligation-independent cloning method, Gibson isothermal assembly or Golden Gate assembly. This paper summarizes our working experience in the area of recombinant vector construction and reports from others with an intention to disseminate ideas about currently widely used DNA recombination methods for plant transformation. PMID:26204753

  10. Use of transgenic mice as models for prostate cancer chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguewa, P A; Calvo, A

    2010-11-01

    Prostate cancer is a long latency type of tumor that usually develops in men older than 50 years of age. Prostate epithelial neoplasia (PIN), the initial malignant lesion, progresses to invasive carcinoma over the course of years. Because of the particular features of prostate carcinogenesis, this type of tumor may represent a paradigm for cancer prevention. Several clinical trials have evaluated the effect of different compounds on prostate tumor development, including finasteride, selenium, vitamin E, and carotenes. Although some results are promising, no conclusive data have been achieved as to recommend any of these compounds as preventive agents. Results from some trials, such as SELECT, where supplementation of selenium and/or vitamin-E was used, have been rather disappointing. However, many novel chemopreventive agents that target different cancer-related pathways are being developed lately. Appropriate animal models (in particular, genetically modified mice) are being used to assess the efficacy of these novel compounds. The transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model has been validated as an accurate model to test a variety of preventive agents. Genistein, alpha-difluoromethylornithine, toremifene, R-flurbiprofen, celecoxib, and green tea polyphenols have been shown to prevent prostate cancer development in TRAMP mice. In conclusion, new chemopreventive compounds which are effective in animal models are likely to be tested soon in clinical trials, with the final goal of reducing prostate cancer incidence in men. PMID:20937024

  11. Screening of Transgenic Tobacco for Resistance Against Cucumber mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nadarajah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Coat protein (CP, Movement Protein (MP and Overlapping (OVG genes were isolated from a Malaysian Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV isolate via RT-PCR and transformed into Nicotiana tabacum through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Out of the thirty six independently transformed lines developed from the three different genes and the mutants of MP and OVG, five lines were tested for resistance against CMV by challenge inoculations using three different concentrations (1:10, 3:10 and 5:10 of CMV macerated in 0.1 M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.0. The transgenic lines exhibiting complete resistance remained symptomless even when re-inoculated with 1:10 concentration of virus. The level of viral RNA accumulation in inoculated leaves was significantly (at least 2-3 times lower compared to the control untransformed plants. The upper leaves which were analysed for systemic spread of the infection had much lower levels of viral RNA accumulation compared to the inoculated leaves. Amongst the three genes and two mutant lines that were generated in this study, we found that the CP and MP genes were able to provide a better level of resistance to the plants compared to the overlapping gene.

  12. Transgenes and transgressions: scientific dissent as heterogeneous practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delborne, Jason A

    2008-08-01

    Although scholars in science and technology studies have explored many dynamics and consequences of scientific controversy, no coherent theory of scientific dissent has emerged. This paper proposes the elements of such a framework, based on understanding scientific dissent as a set of heterogeneous practices. I use the controversy over the presence of transgenic DNA in Mexican maize in the early 2000s to point to a processual model of scientific dissent. 'Contrarian science' includes knowledge claims that challenge the dominant scientific trajectory, but need not necessarily lead to dissent. 'Impedance' represents efforts to undermine the credibility of contrarian science (or contrarian scientists) and may originate within or outside of the scientific community. In the face of impedance, contrarian scientists may become dissenters. The actions of the scientist at the center of the case study, Professor Ignacio Chapela of the University of California, Berkeley, demonstrate particular practices of scientific dissent, ranging from 'agonistic engagement' to 'dissident science'. These practices speak not only to functional strategies of winning scientific debate, but also to attempts to reconfigure relations among scientists, publics, institutions, and politics that order knowledge production. PMID:19227618

  13. Sperm Nuclear Transfer and Transgenic Production in the Fish Medaka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongming Liu, Ling Liu, Qiwei Wei, Yunhan Hong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sperm nuclear transfer or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI is a powerful assisted reproductive technology (ART for treating human male infertility. Controversial reports of increased birth defects have raised concerns about the ART's safety. The cause for birth defects, however, has remained elusive for analysis in human because of the sample size, male infertility genetics, physiological heterogeneity and associated procedures such as embryo manipulations. Animal models are required to evaluate factors leading to the increased birth defects. Here we report the establishment of medakafish model for ICSI and transgenic production. This small laboratory fish has high fecundity and easy embryology. We show that ICSI produced a 5% high percentage of fertile animals that exhibited both paternal and maternal contribution as evidenced by the pigmentation marker. Furthermore, when sperm were pre-incubated with a plasmid ubiquitously expressing RFP and subjected to ICSI, 50% of sperm nuclear transplants showed germline transmission. We conclude that medaka is an excellent model for ICSI to evaluate birth defects and that sperm nuclear transfer can mediate stable gene transfer at high efficiency. Although more demanding for experimentation, sperm-mediated transgenesis should be particularly applicable for aquaculture species with a lengthy generation time and/or a large adult body size.

  14. Maíz transgénico: ¿Beneficio para quién? / Transgenic maize: Benefit for whom?

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Bethel Marina, Luna Mena; J. Reyes, Altamirano Cárdenas.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available En la introducción se comentan algunas de las consecuencias ecológicas, agronómicas, socioeconómicas y culturales de la liberación comercial de maíz transgénico en México. Posteriormente, se describe la situación actual del proceso de concentración y privatización en la producción y comercio de semi [...] llas a nivel mundial y de manera particular en México. Luego, se mencionan las oportunidades y alternativas que existen ante la situación descrita previamente. Así, se indican los aspectos relacionados con las patentes biotecnológicas dentro del contexto internacional y los Derechos de Obtentor, seguido del análisis de las propuestas de reformas a la Ley Federal de Variedades Vegetales del país. El documento finaliza con una discusión general y con las conclusiones. Abstract in english In the introduction are discussed some of the ecological, agronomic, socioeconomic and cultural consequences of the commercial release of transgenic maize in Mexico. Subsequently, the current process of privatization and concentration in production and seed trade worldwide and particularly in Mexico [...] is described. Then, the opportunities and alternatives available to the situation described previously are mentioned. Later, aspects of biotechnology patents in the international context and the Plant Breeders Rights are indicated followed by the analysis of the proposed reforms to the Federal Law on Plant Varieties in the country. The paper concludes with a general discussion and conclusions.

  15. Disrupted and transgenic urate oxidase alter urate and dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiqun; Burdett, Thomas C; Desjardins, Cody A; Logan, Robert; Cipriani, Sara; Xu, Yuehang; Schwarzschild, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Urate is the end product of purine metabolism in humans, owing to the evolutionary disruption of the gene encoding urate oxidase (UOx). Elevated urate can cause gout and urolithiasis and is associated with cardiovascular and other diseases. However, urate also possesses antioxidant and neuroprotective properties. Recent convergence of epidemiological and clinical data has identified urate as a predictor of both reduced risk and favorable progression of Parkinson's disease (PD). In rodents, functional UOx catalyzes urate oxidation to allantoin. We found that UOx KO mice with a constitutive mutation of the gene have increased concentrations of brain urate. By contrast, UOx transgenic (Tg) mice overexpressing the enzyme have reduced brain urate concentrations. Effects of the complementary UOx manipulations were assessed in a mouse intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of hemiparkinsonism. UOx KO mice exhibit attenuated toxic effects of 6-OHDA on nigral dopaminergic cell counts, striatal dopamine content, and rotational behavior. Conversely, Tg overexpression of UOx exacerbates these morphological, neurochemical, and functional lesions of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway. Together our data support a neuroprotective role of endogenous urate in dopaminergic neurons and strengthen the rationale for developing urate-elevating strategies as potential disease-modifying therapy for PD. PMID:23248282

  16. Sugarcane borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) resistance to transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fangneng; Leonard, B Rogers; Andow, David A

    2007-02-01

    Transgenic maize, Zea mays L., expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) CrylAb toxin has been planted to extensive areas across the United States and several other countries, but no resistance has been documented in field populations oflepidopteran target pests. This article describes the first report of resistance alleles to commercially available Cry1Ab Bt maize in a Louisiana population of sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae). Two hundred thirteen two-parent isolines of D. saccharalis were screened for Cry1Ab resistance on Bt maize leaf tissue using an F2 screening technique. Larvae representing three isolines survived >15 d on Bt tissue in the F2 generation. The second generation backcross progeny (B1F2) derived from isoline 52 completed larval development on Bt maize in the greenhouse. Segregation and resistance frequency analysis associated with isoline 52 suggested that Bt resistance is probably determined by a nearly completely recessive allele at a single locus. With this assumption, the estimated resistance allele frequency in this population is 0.0023, within a 95% confidence interval of 0.0003-0.0064. PMID:17370824

  17. Recombination-ready Sindbis replicon expression vectors for transgene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Ken E

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sindbis viruses have been widely used as tools to study gene function in cells. Despite the utility of these systems, the construction and production of alphavirus replicons is time consuming and inefficient due to potential additional restriction sites within the insert region and lack of directionality for insert ligation. In this report, we present a system useful for producing recombinant Sindbis replicons that uses lambda phage recombination technology to rapidly and specifically construct replicon expression plasmids that contain insert regions in the desired orientation. Results Recombination of the gene of interest with the replicon plasmid resulted in nearly 100% recombinants, each of which contained a correctly orientated insert. Replicons were easily produced in cell culture and packaged into pseudo-infectious viral particles. Insect and mammalian cells infected with pseudo-infectious viral particles expressed various transgenes at high levels. Finally, inserts from persistently replicating replicon RNA were easily isolated and recombined back into entry plasmids for sequencing and subsequent analysis. Conclusion Replication-ready replicon expression plasmids make the use of alphavirus replicons fast and easy as compared to traditional replicon production methods. This system represents a significant step forward in the utility and ease of use of alphavirus replicons in the study of gene function.

  18. Transduction of rat pancreatic islets with pseudotyped adeno-associated virus vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanchette-Mackie E Joan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic islet transplantation is a promising treatment for type I diabetes mellitus, but current immunosuppressive strategies do not consistently provide long-term survival of transplanted islets. We are therefore investigating the use of adeno-associated viruses (AAVs as gene therapy vectors to transduce rat islets with immunosuppressive genes prior to transplantation into diabetic mice. Results We compared the transduction efficiency of AAV2 vectors with an AAV2 capsid (AAV2/2 to AAV2 vectors pseudotyped with AAV5 (AAV2/5, AAV8 (AAV2/8 or bovine adeno-associated virus (BAAV capsids, or an AAV2 capsid with an insertion of the low density lipoprotein receptor ligand from apolipoprotein E (AAV2apoE, on cultured islets, in the presence of helper adenovirus infection to speed expression of a GFP transgene. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry were used. The AAV2/5 vector was superior to AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 in rat islets. Flow cytometry indicated AAV2/5-mediated gene expression in approximately 9% of rat islet cells and almost 12% of insulin-positive cells. The AAV2/8 vector had a higher dependence on the helper virus multiplicity of infection than the AAV 2/5 vector. In addition, the BAAV and AAV2apoE vectors were superior to AAV2/2 for transducing rat islets. Rat islets (300 per mouse transduced with an AAV2/5 vector harboring the immunosuppressive transgene, tgf?1, retain the ability to correct hyperglycemia when transplanted into immune-deficient diabetic mice. Conclusion AAV2/5 vectors may therefore be useful for pre-treating donor islets prior to transplantation.

  19. Molecular responses of Bt transgenic corn (Zea mays L. plans to salt (NaCl stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Salah Beltagi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-transformed and Bt transgenic crop lines of a hybrid (YieldGard 2 corn (Zea mays L. plants in the 4th leaf stage were subjected to 0, 50, 100 and 150 mM NaCl. Significant (P = 0.05 reduction in growth of non-traformed plants was recorded under almost all levels (50, 100 and 150 mM of salt (NaCl stress; while, the growth of the Bt transgenic corn plants showed no significant changes under the same levels of salt stress. Chlorophyll a contents were reduced at 150 mM NaCl only; but did not change in the BT transgenic corn plants. Chlorophyll b was not responsive to NaCl treatments in both non-transformed and Bt transgenic corn plants. Chlorophyll stability index (CSI were always higher in the Bt transgenic than in the non-transformed corn plants under all salinity levels. The analyses of SDS-PAGE revealed relative stability in the patterns of protein bands in the Bt transgenic corn plants under salinity stress. The sum of optical densities of protein bands was higher in the Bt transgenic corn plants. In response to salinity stress, a group of polypeptide (76.96, 59.38, 41.56, 33.5 and 31.26 KDa were newly synthesized in both non-transformed and Bt transgenic plants. Salt-susceptible polypeptides of molecular weights 325.47, 32.64 and 24.17 KDa were found only in non-transformed corn plants and completely disappeared under all level of salt stress; while two polypeptides of molecular weights 38.59 and 30.61 KDa were totally inhibited in all salt-stressed corn plants. The synthesis of another four polypeptides (298.81, 99.82, 20.79 and 19.43 KDa was solely specific to the Bt transgenic corn plants. Stability of chlorophyll pigments and molecular weights of salt stress responsive proteins are key genetic determinants of salt stress in Bt transgenic corn plants.

  20. Improving the production of transgenic fish germlines: in vivo evaluation of mosaicism in zebrafish (Danio rerio) using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) and growth hormone cDNA transgene co-injection strategy

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Márcio de Azevedo, Figueiredo; Carlos Frederico Ceccon, Lanes; Daniela Volcan, Almeida; Luis Fernando, Marins.

    Full Text Available In fish, microinjection is the method most frequently used for gene transfer. However, due to delayed transgene integration this technique almost invariably produces mosaic individuals and if the gene is not integrated into germ cells its transmission to descendants is difficult or impossible. We ev [...] aluated the degree of in vivo mosaicism using a strategy where a reporter transgene is co-injected with a transgene of interest so that potential germline founders can be easily identified. Transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio) were produced using two transgenes, both comprised of the carp beta-actin promoter driving the expression of either the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene or the growth hormone cDNA from the marine silverside fish Odonthestes argentinensis. The methodology applied allowed a rapid identification of G0 transgenic fish and also detected which fish were transmitting transgenes to the next generation. This strategy also allowed inferences to be made about genomic transgene integration events in the six lineages produced and allowed the identification of one lineage transmitting both transgenes linked on the same chromosome. These results represent a significant advance in the reduction of the effort invested in producing a stable genetically modified fish lineage.