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1

Assessing nursing students' knowledge of health literacy.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Because patients' limited level of health literacy can have a negative impact on patient health outcomes, it is important to address this topic in the nursing curricula. The author discusses a comparative study that assessed baccalaureate nursing students' knowledge of health literacy before and after implementation of an asynchronous online educational module. With a significant difference between the pretest and posttest scores, the findings provide information that can inform curriculum planning in baccalaureate nursing programs.

McCleary-Jones V

2012-09-01

2

Assessment of head nurses’ mental health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Aim: To investigate mental health of head nurses in internal medicine and surgery departments of Athens and province. Material and methods: 79 head nurses and nurse supervisors in internal medicine and surgery departments of secondary health care hospitals in Athens and one provincial town filled in the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)-28. Results: Mean age of the sample was 40.19±5.30 years old.10% of head nurses and nurse supervisors exhibited considerable mental health burden, while no differences were observed between men and women. Conclusions: Head nurses and nurse supervisors generally exhibit lower mental burden than other nurses. However, in a considerable percentage of them, mental heal problems are still significant, without differentiation between men and women.

Gesouli-Voltyraki E.; Marneras Ch.; Charisi E.; Kostopoulou S.; Alverti V.; Chatzitheodorou S.; Mantzorou M.

2012-01-01

3

Health Technology Assessment in nursing: a literature review.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: The Health Technology Assessment (HTA) approach, which provides scientific support for the decisions taken within the health field, is of increasing importance worldwide. In a context of limited resources, HTA has the potential of being an efficient tool for addressing the sustainability problems and the allocation choices arising from the constant increase in demand. AIM: This study aims to investigate HTA use in nursing, both in terms of quantifying HTA evaluations of nursing phenomena which have been conducted and in terms of the extent to which nursing has used the HTA approach. The Italian context has been analysed because of the growing diffusion of the HTA in Italy along with the recent developments in the nursing profession. METHODS: A narrative review of international literature was undertaken using the following databases: HTA, PubMed, CINAHL, ILISI. RESULTS: Seventy evaluation studies on nursing were identified from the HTA database (1.12% of all studies in the database). The areas of nursing intervention and the country of origin of the studies were identified. Two nursing studies on the HTA approach were found in the PubMed, CINAHL and HTA databases. The first focused on the evaluation of nursing technology process and analysed 126 studies in six main thematic areas; the second was a systematic review on HTA in nursing and analysed 192 studies (46 meta-analyses, 31 Finnish primary studies, 117 international primary studies). Three Italian studies were identified from the ILISI database and Italian grey literature. DISCUSSION: In the international literature, although analyses regarding the efficacy of nursing interventions have been conducted, there are to date very few research projects that focus exclusively on the HTA process as applied to nursing. The recent development of a standardized nursing language coupled with the open debate as to which research method (qualitative vs. quantitative) best serves to 'read' nursing phenomena may explain the scarce diffusion of HTA in the field of nursing.

Ramacciati N

2013-03-01

4

What is the process of a comprehensive mental health nursing assessment? Results from a qualitative study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: It is a truism that nursing care must be informed by assessment, otherwise how can one know what care is required or that it has been successfully delivered? Yet, little is known about the process of comprehensive mental health nursing assessment in practice. If the education of mental health nurses is to be effective, it is essential that the key content of, and the processes involved in carrying out a mental health nursing assessment in practice are able to be articulated to learners. AIM: To identify the processes of assessment that occur in mental health nursing practice based on interviews with mental health nurses working in clinical and management roles in clinical areas. METHOD: Interviews were undertaken with 18 nurses who worked in inpatient and community mental health settings either as clinicians or managers. The nurses ranged from new graduates to those with more than 20 years of experience. FINDINGS AND DISCUSSION: Clear processes were reported to be involved in undertaking a comprehensive mental health nursing assessment in practice, with three main themes emerging during analysis. First is the importance of engaging the patient; second is tell me what the problem is? with one subtheme reconcile inconsistencies; and finally, the ongoing nature of the assessment process. CONCLUSION: Common processes emerged when the nurses described their individual approaches to undertaking comprehensive mental health assessment. The results have important policy implications for the educational preparation of mental health nurses, their ongoing supervision and further research into contemporary mental health nursing practice.

Coombs T; Curtis J; Crookes P

2013-03-01

5

Perceptions of health assessment, treatment and care by community nurses  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore and describe whether primary health care nurses are equipped with the skills they require in health assessment, treatment and care. OpsommingDie doel van hierdie navorsing was om te verken en te beskryfofdie primere gesondheidsorgverpleegkundiges met die nodige vaardighede toegerus is, ten einde in staat te wees om kwaliteit pasientsorg deur gesondheidsberaming, behandeling en verpleegsorg, te verleen. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

S S Monamodi; S D Roos

1999-01-01

6

Kennedy Axis V: Clinimetric properties assessed by mental health nurses.  

Science.gov (United States)

The Kennedy Axis V is a routine outcome measurement instrument which can assist the assessment of the short-term risk for violence and other adverse patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the interrater reliability and clinical utility of the instrument when used by mental health nurses in daily care of patients with mental illness. This cross-sectional study was conducted in inpatient and outpatient adult psychiatric care units and in one adolescent inpatient unit at a university hospital in the Netherlands. Interrater reliability was measured based on the independent scores of two different nurses for the same patients. The clinical utility of the instrument was evaluated by means of a clinical utility questionnaire. To gain a deeper understanding of rating difficulties at the adolescent unit, additional data were collected in two focus group interviews. The overall results revealed a substantial level of agreement between nurses (intraclass correlation coefficient and Pearson 0.79). Some rating challenges were identified, including difficulties with scoring the instrument and using tailor-made interventions related to the scores. These challenges can be resolved using refined training and implementation strategies. When the Kennedy Axis V is accompanied by a solid implementation strategy in adult mental health care, the instrument can be used for short-term risk assessment and thereby contribute in efforts to reduce violence, suicide, self-harm, severe self-neglect, and enhanced objectivity in clinical decision-making. PMID:23211020

Faay, Margo D M; van de Sande, Roland; Gooskens, Floor; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B

2012-12-05

7

Kennedy Axis V: Clinimetric properties assessed by mental health nurses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The Kennedy Axis V is a routine outcome measurement instrument which can assist the assessment of the short-term risk for violence and other adverse patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the interrater reliability and clinical utility of the instrument when used by mental health nurses in daily care of patients with mental illness. This cross-sectional study was conducted in inpatient and outpatient adult psychiatric care units and in one adolescent inpatient unit at a university hospital in the Netherlands. Interrater reliability was measured based on the independent scores of two different nurses for the same patients. The clinical utility of the instrument was evaluated by means of a clinical utility questionnaire. To gain a deeper understanding of rating difficulties at the adolescent unit, additional data were collected in two focus group interviews. The overall results revealed a substantial level of agreement between nurses (intraclass correlation coefficient and Pearson 0.79). Some rating challenges were identified, including difficulties with scoring the instrument and using tailor-made interventions related to the scores. These challenges can be resolved using refined training and implementation strategies. When the Kennedy Axis V is accompanied by a solid implementation strategy in adult mental health care, the instrument can be used for short-term risk assessment and thereby contribute in efforts to reduce violence, suicide, self-harm, severe self-neglect, and enhanced objectivity in clinical decision-making.

Faay MD; van de Sande R; Gooskens F; Hafsteinsdóttir TB

2013-10-01

8

Oral health assessment by nursing staff of Alzheimer's patients in a long-term-care facility.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Dental care and oral hygiene are often neglected in nursing homes. This study examines the effect of an education program on the ability of nursing staff to conduct an oral health assessment for a population of persons with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. The findings of this study showed that the CNA's are as capable as the Licensed Nurses in assessing oral health status. In future training of nursing staff, increased emphasis on identification of problems in specific areas may improve the overall assessments by nurses and nursing assistants.

Lin CY; Jones DB; Godwin K; Godwin RK; Knebl JA; Niessen L

1999-03-01

9

Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of baccalaureate nursing students regarding oral health assessment.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Good oral health is important to overall health. Oral and pharyngeal cancers account for 2% of all cancers, yet no significant improvement in mortality has been demonstrated over the past 30 years. Nurses are in a unique position to integrate and conduct oral health assessments across a wide range of practice settings. Although nursing programs include health assessment and promotion in their curricula, there is poor integration of oral health as a focus. This study aimed to identify the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of baccalaureate nursing students about oral health assessment. A convenience sample of 163 students in two undergraduate courses within a baccalaureate nursing education program was surveyed. Findings indicated that these nursing students felt that oral health was essential to their nursing practice; however, they did not have a full understanding of the key components of an oral health examination or about effective smoking cessation strategies.

Clemmens D; Rodriguez K; Leef B

2012-09-01

10

Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of baccalaureate nursing students regarding oral health assessment.  

Science.gov (United States)

Good oral health is important to overall health. Oral and pharyngeal cancers account for 2% of all cancers, yet no significant improvement in mortality has been demonstrated over the past 30 years. Nurses are in a unique position to integrate and conduct oral health assessments across a wide range of practice settings. Although nursing programs include health assessment and promotion in their curricula, there is poor integration of oral health as a focus. This study aimed to identify the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of baccalaureate nursing students about oral health assessment. A convenience sample of 163 students in two undergraduate courses within a baccalaureate nursing education program was surveyed. Findings indicated that these nursing students felt that oral health was essential to their nursing practice; however, they did not have a full understanding of the key components of an oral health examination or about effective smoking cessation strategies. PMID:22909038

Clemmens, Donna; Rodriguez, Karla; Leef, Betty

2012-08-20

11

Effect of an oral health assessment education program on nurses' knowledge and patient care practices in skilled nursing facilities.  

Science.gov (United States)

This pilot intervention study measured the impact of an oral health education intervention on nurses' knowledge and patient care practices in regard to oral assessments of institutionalized elders. Two 1-hour education sessions were completed over a 3-week period; a pretest and a posttest were administered immediately preceding the first session and immediately following the second session. Medical records were reviewed prior to and after the intervention to assess practices including completeness of oral health assessment and congruency with the Minimum Data Set 2.0 (MDS). Nine nurses attended the education intervention. Retrospectively, 176 records were reviewed preintervention and 80 postintervention. There was no significant change in knowledge from the pre- to posttest (p= .262). Completeness of all oral health assessment variables increased significantly (p= .001) as did the congruency of data between the nursing assessment (NA) and MDS assessments (p= .002). Providing nurses with education on oral health assessments in skilled nursing facilities has a positive impact on completeness of data and congruency between the NA and the MDS. PMID:19573046

Munoz, Nancy; Touger-Decker, Riva; Byham-Gray, Laura; Maillet, Julie O'Sullivan

12

Effect of an oral health assessment education program on nurses' knowledge and patient care practices in skilled nursing facilities.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This pilot intervention study measured the impact of an oral health education intervention on nurses' knowledge and patient care practices in regard to oral assessments of institutionalized elders. Two 1-hour education sessions were completed over a 3-week period; a pretest and a posttest were administered immediately preceding the first session and immediately following the second session. Medical records were reviewed prior to and after the intervention to assess practices including completeness of oral health assessment and congruency with the Minimum Data Set 2.0 (MDS). Nine nurses attended the education intervention. Retrospectively, 176 records were reviewed preintervention and 80 postintervention. There was no significant change in knowledge from the pre- to posttest (p= .262). Completeness of all oral health assessment variables increased significantly (p= .001) as did the congruency of data between the nursing assessment (NA) and MDS assessments (p= .002). Providing nurses with education on oral health assessments in skilled nursing facilities has a positive impact on completeness of data and congruency between the NA and the MDS.

Munoz N; Touger-Decker R; Byham-Gray L; Maillet JO

2009-07-01

13

Community health nursing assessment of neurodevelopment in high-risk infants.  

Science.gov (United States)

All infants discharged from designated perinatal center neonatal intensive care units in Illinois are referred for follow-up home visits by community health nurses. These visits provide parental support, teaching, and anticipatory guidance plus physical and developmental assessment of the infant. The maternal and child nursing consultants who coordinate this follow-up program are frequently called upon to assist the community health nurses in physical/developmental assessment techniques. The neurodevelopmental component of the assessment, including areas of alertness, tone, head circumference, vision and hearing screening, plus primitive reflexes, is described. PMID:6565109

Ritchie, S; Trotter, C W

14

[Nurse's assessment of oral health of elderly people: OHAT validity and reliability].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of the study was to apply the Oral Health Assessment Tool (OHAT)for determination of the reliability and validity indexes, when utilized by nursing staff The OHAT was administered to 50 elderly individuals. The exams were performed in different periods of times by a Nurse and a Dental Surgeon (DS). The determination of internal consistency was verified through Cronbach's Alpha Coeficient and ANOVA. For the determination of stability and reliability, the percentage agreement and Kappa test were considered. There was no statistical difference among the final averages obtained by the DS and the nurse (p=0.41). There was a higher internal consistency in the exams performed by the DS. The Kappa value of the instrument reached 0.46, being considered moderate. The OHAT instrument can be used by nurses as a screening tool however, previous training is needed for criteria standardization.

de Mello AL; Zimermann K; Gonçalves LH

2012-06-01

15

[Nurse's assessment of oral health of elderly people: OHAT validity and reliability].  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of the study was to apply the Oral Health Assessment Tool (OHAT)for determination of the reliability and validity indexes, when utilized by nursing staff The OHAT was administered to 50 elderly individuals. The exams were performed in different periods of times by a Nurse and a Dental Surgeon (DS). The determination of internal consistency was verified through Cronbach's Alpha Coeficient and ANOVA. For the determination of stability and reliability, the percentage agreement and Kappa test were considered. There was no statistical difference among the final averages obtained by the DS and the nurse (p=0.41). There was a higher internal consistency in the exams performed by the DS. The Kappa value of the instrument reached 0.46, being considered moderate. The OHAT instrument can be used by nurses as a screening tool however, previous training is needed for criteria standardization. PMID:23155579

de Mello, Ana Lúcia Schaefer Ferreira; Zimermann, Karoline; Gonçalves, Lucia Hisako Takase

2012-06-01

16

[Mental health support for nurses].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Burnout specific to human service workers has been reported in the U.S. in the 1970s. Since then, such burnout has become widely known and the mental health of nurses has attracted attention. Stressors in the work environment and complexity have increased with advancement in increasingly complicated medical care. One of the major roles of a psychiatric liaison nurse is to provide support to improve the mental health of nurses. In our hospital, a psychiatric liaison nurse has a staff position under the direct supervision of the director of the nursing department but operates outside the chain of command. A psychiatric liaison nurse is not involved in the performance review of nurses. Thus, the nursing staff and the nursing manager can discuss their problems with the psychiatric liaison nurse without risks. Psychiatric liaison nurses provide support as counselors through individual and group interviews so that nurses can become re-energized about their work. In addition, psychiatric liaison nurses provide consultations and education. They perform coordination function to organize an environment to promote consultations regarding nurse support to the staff nurses and the nursing manager and to promote support by supervisors. For support after reinstatement of a nurse following a medical leave, it is particularly important to work with not only the individual nurse but also the entire nursing team. In our hospital, newly graduated nurses are given the GHQ-28 after one month of employment to assess the support they might need. In our study, nurses with high risks were divided into a group with a score of at least 6 points but less than 10 points and a group with a score of at least 10 points. The group with at least 10 points had significantly higher rates of leave of absence and resignation. Thus, early intervention was thought to be necessary in newly graduated nurses with a score of at least 10 points in the GHQ.

Fukushima Y

2012-01-01

17

Enhancing graduate nurses' health assessment knowledge and skills using low-fidelity adult human simulation.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: Although simulation technology in nursing education is becoming increasingly commonplace, a review of the literature reveals a paucity of rigorous, high-level research comparing the effectiveness of simulation with other traditional education methods in the acquisition of clinical knowledge and skills. This research aimed to investigate the impact of three learning interventions on graduate nurse health assessment knowledge and skills. It was hypothesized that the patient assessment skills of graduate nurses who completed a simulation learning activity would be superior to those who completed traditional education activities. METHODS: Graduate nurses (n = 74) were randomly allocated to three groups (1: self-directed learning package [SDLP] only; 2: SDLP plus two scenario-based PowerPoint workshops; and 3: SDLP plus two simulation education sessions using a manikin with low-fidelity capabilities. Following the education activities, graduates completed an individual test involving a systematic patient assessment upon a manikin. They were scored using a checklist of relevant responses. RESULTS: Analysis of variance results suggest that the mean test score for nurses in the simulation group (mean = 135.52, SD = 26.63) was significantly higher (P < 0.001) than those in the learning package group (mean = 107.42, SD = 29.82) and the PowerPoint group (mean = 102.77, SD = 31.68). CONCLUSIONS: Simulation appears to be an effective educational tool for teaching patient assessment knowledge and skills to graduate nurses. Incorporation of such technology into graduate nurse education may decrease the time required to become clinically proficient, resulting in more confident and work-ready practitioners.

Shepherd IA; Kelly CM; Skene FM; White KT

2007-01-01

18

Assessing student nurses' learning needs for addressing patients' sexual health concerns in Taiwan.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Patients' health status may involve sexual issues and nursing education must prepare nurses to address patients' sexual health concerns. In Taiwan, nursing school curricula rarely include programs related to patients' sexuality or sexual health issues, and reflect conservative Asian attitudes toward sexuality. OBJECTIVES: Our aims were to determine Taiwanese student nurses' learning needs relative to addressing patients' sexual health concerns, and to gather information for curriculum development in sexual health education. DESIGN: Descriptive, correlational study. SETTING: Nursing school at a medical university in central Taiwan. PARTICIPANTS: 140 senior student nurses. METHODS: A 24-item instrument entitled "Learning Needs for Addressing Patients' Sexual Health Concerns" (LNAPSHC) was developed through 15 semi-structured interviews of senior nursing students, expert review, and comparative analysis of text and field notes. Content validity and reliability were evaluated using exploratory factor analysis to measure construct validity and Cronbach's alpha to measure internal consistency. Univariate and multivariate linear models were developed. RESULTS: Age, gender, and religion were not significant influences. Expressed learning needs included sexuality in health and illness, communication about patients' intimate relationships, and approaches to sexual health care. "Obtaining a comprehensive sexual health history" was the highest learning need. "Having sexual consultations with patients without embarrassment" was lower. Most participants recognized their role in sexuality-related health care, but their preparation and willingness to address it were limited. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicated a gap between student nurses' positive perspectives on the role of nursing in sexual health care and their limited intention to provide it. Reported learning needs indicated that student nurses needed an effective curriculum to increase their ability and willingness to address patients' sexual health. Our results may help nursing educators develop curricula and clinical training to increase student nurses' competence in addressing patients' sexual health concerns.

Tsai LY; Huang CY; Liao WC; Tseng TH; Lai TJ

2013-02-01

19

Assessment of computer-related health problems among post-graduate nursing students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The study was conducted to assess computer-related health problems among post-graduate nursing students and to develop a Self Instructional Module for prevention of computer-related health problems in a selected university situated in Delhi. A descriptive survey with co-relational design was adopted. A total of 97 samples were selected from different faculties of Jamia Hamdard by multi stage sampling with systematic random sampling technique. Among post-graduate students, majority of sample subjects had average compliance with computer-related ergonomics principles. As regards computer related health problems, majority of post graduate students had moderate computer-related health problems, Self Instructional Module developed for prevention of computer-related health problems was found to be acceptable by the post-graduate students.

Khan SA; Sharma V

2013-01-01

20

Combined Assessment Program Summary Report: Evaluation of Nurse Staffing in Veterans Health Administration Facilities.  

Science.gov (United States)

The VA Office of Inspector General Office of Healthcare Inspections completed an evaluation of nurse staffing in Veterans Health Administration facilities. The purpose of the evaluation was to determine the extent to which Veterans Health Administration f...

2013-01-01

 
 
 
 
21

Dental neglect as a marker of broader neglect: a qualitative investigation of public health nurses' assessments of oral health in preschool children.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Child neglect is a pernicious child protection issue with adverse consequences that extend to adulthood. Simultaneously, though it remains prevalent, childhood dental caries is a preventable disease. Public health nurses play a pivotal role in assessing oral health in children as part of general health surveillance. However, little is known about how they assess dental neglect or what their thresholds are for initiating targeted support or instigating child protection measures. Understanding these factors is important to allow improvements to be made in care pathways. METHODS: We investigated public health nurses' assessment of oral health in preschool children in relation to dental neglect and any associations they make with child neglect more broadly. A qualitative study was conducted in Scotland during 2011/12. Sixteen public health nurses were recruited purposively from one health region. Individual, semi-structured interviews were undertaken and data were analyzed inductively using a framework approach. Categories were subsequently mapped to the research questions. RESULTS: Public health nurses assess oral health through proxy measures, opportunistic observation and through discussion with parents. Dental neglect is rarely an isolated issue that leads on its own to child protection referral. It tends to be other presenting issues that initiate a response. Threshold levels for targeted support were based on two broad indicators: social issues and concerns about child (and parental) dental health. Thresholds for child protection intervention were untreated dental caries or significant dental pain. Barriers to intervention are that dental neglect may be 'unseen' and 'unspoken'. The study revealed a communication gap in the care pathway for children where a significant dental problem is identified. CONCLUSIONS: Public health nurses take their child protection role seriously, but rarely make a link between dental caries and child neglect. Clear guidance on oral health assessment is required for public health nurses. Establishing formal communication pathways between child dental care providers and public health nurses may help close gaps in care pathways. However, further research is required into how these communication mechanisms can be improved.

Bradbury-Jones C; Innes N; Evans D; Ballantyne F; Taylor J

2013-01-01

22

Environment, Health, & Nursing Practice  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the connection nurses see between the environment and health concerns of their patients. The study surveyed registered nurses (RNs) in a western state to determine whether they evaluated themselves as knowledgeable about environmental health (EH) hazards and if they felt prepared by their nursing curriculum to share this information with their patients. The study replicates a survey of Wisconsin nurses concerning issues related to EH knowledge among RNs in Idaho. Data from 170 respondents to a mailed survey indicated that although nurses agreed that they should be knowledgeable about EH hazards, few were adequately prepared. Overall, many nurses felt unprepared from their nursing curricula to address EH issues in the field. Corrective measures are discussed.

Patt Elison-Bowers; Nancy Otterness; Mary Pritchard

2011-01-01

23

Curriculum learning designs: Teaching health assessment skills for advanced nursing practitioners through sustainable flexible learning.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Innovative curriculum designs are vital for effective learning in contemporary nursing education where traditional modes of delivery are not adequate to meet the learning needs of postgraduate students. This instance of postgraduate teaching in a distributed learning environment offered the opportunity to design a flexible learning model for teaching advanced clinical skills. AIM: To present a sustainable model for flexible learning that enables specialist nurses to gain postgraduate qualifications without on-campus class attendance by teaching and assessing clinical health care skills in an authentic workplace setting. METHODS: An action research methodology was used to gather evidence and report on the process of curriculum development of a core unit, Comprehensive Health Assessment (CHA), within 13 different postgraduate speciality courses. Qualitative data was collected from 27 teaching academics, 21 clinical specialist staff, and 7 hospital managers via interviews, focus groups and journal reflections. Evaluations from the initial iteration of CHA from 36 students were obtained. Data was analyzed to develop and evaluate the curriculum design of CHA. RESULTS: The key factors indicated by participants in the curriculum design process were coordination and structuring of teaching and assessment; integration of content development; working with technologies, balancing specialities and core knowledge; and managing induction and expectations. CONCLUSIONS: A set of recommendations emerged as a result of the action research process. These included: a constructive alignment approach to curriculum design; the production of a facilitator's guide that specifies expectations and unit information for academic and clinical education staff; an agreed template for content authors; and the inclusion of synchronous communication for real-time online tutoring. The highlight of the project was that it built curriculum design capabilities of clinicians and students which can sustain this alternative model of online learning.

Fitzgerald L; Wong P; Hannon J; Solberg Tokerud M; Lyons J

2013-10-01

24

Health Practices of School Nurses  

Science.gov (United States)

The health practices of school nurses affect our role as advocates and educators to promote the health of youth. This study describes the health practices of a convenience sample of 388 school nurses who attended the business meeting at an annual school nurse conference. A self-administered, 40-item questionnaire identified health practices of…

Petch-Levine, Deborah; Cureton, Virginia Young; Canham, Daryl; Murray, Meg

2003-01-01

25

Measures assessing spirituality as more than religiosity: a methodological review of nursing and health-related literature.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS: This paper is a report of a methodological review conducted to analyse, evaluate and synthesize the rigour of measures found in nursing and health-related literature used to assess and evaluate patient spirituality as more than religiosity. BACKGROUND: Holistic healthcare practitioners recognize important distinctions exist about what constitutes spiritual care needs and preferences and what constitutes religious care needs and preferences in patient care practice. DATA SOURCES: Databases searched, limited to the years 1982 and 2009, included AMED, Alt Health Watch, CINAHL Plus with Full Text, EBSCO Host, EBSCO Host Religion and Philosophy, ERIC, Google Scholar, HAPI, HUBNET, IngentaConnect, Mental Measurements Yearbook Online, Ovid MEDLINE, Social Work Abstracts and Hill and Hood's Measures of Religiosity text. Review methods: A methodological review was carried out. Measures assessing spirituality as more than religiosity were critically reviewed including quality appraisal, relevant data extraction and a narrative synthesis of findings. RESULTS: Ten measures fitting inclusion criteria were included in the review. Despite agreement among nursing and health-related disciplines that spirituality and religiosity are distinct and diverse concepts, the concept of spirituality was often used interchangeably with the concept religion to assess and evaluate patient spirituality. The term spiritual or spirituality was used in a preponderance of items to assess or evaluate spirituality. CONCLUSIONS: Measures differentiating spirituality from religiosity are grossly lacking in nursing and health-related literature.

Sessanna L; Finnell DS; Underhill M; Chang YP; Peng HL

2011-08-01

26

Geriatric nursing assessment.  

Science.gov (United States)

Gerontological nursing is a unique area of nursing. The cornerstone of the gerontological nursing process is assessment. In some traditional education models, nurses are taught assessments in general areas, such as cardiology, neurology, urology, and orthopedics. Little emphasis is placed on integrating these systems. A one-day workshop was developed with the objective to further develop the assessment skills of the registered nurse (RN) in continuing care by demonstrating a holistic approach to assessment and care planning. For this workshop, the "giants of geriatric medicine," namely falls, incontinence, confusion, iatrogenic illness, and impaired homeostasis (Cape, 1978) were further developed into a geriatric nursing model to include the psychosocial issues. This model demonstrates a way of assessing and integrating the information known about the resident. To ensure the workshop content was practical for the nurse, existing resident care documentation within the sponsoring organization, The Capital Care Group, was used. Through the education provided in the workshop, the RNs recognized that individualized care is based on full assessment of the resident, integration of the information gathered, and complete documentation. PMID:13677154

Olenek, Katherine; Skowronski, Teresia; Schmaltz, Dianne

2003-08-01

27

Geriatric nursing assessment.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Gerontological nursing is a unique area of nursing. The cornerstone of the gerontological nursing process is assessment. In some traditional education models, nurses are taught assessments in general areas, such as cardiology, neurology, urology, and orthopedics. Little emphasis is placed on integrating these systems. A one-day workshop was developed with the objective to further develop the assessment skills of the registered nurse (RN) in continuing care by demonstrating a holistic approach to assessment and care planning. For this workshop, the "giants of geriatric medicine," namely falls, incontinence, confusion, iatrogenic illness, and impaired homeostasis (Cape, 1978) were further developed into a geriatric nursing model to include the psychosocial issues. This model demonstrates a way of assessing and integrating the information known about the resident. To ensure the workshop content was practical for the nurse, existing resident care documentation within the sponsoring organization, The Capital Care Group, was used. Through the education provided in the workshop, the RNs recognized that individualized care is based on full assessment of the resident, integration of the information gathered, and complete documentation.

Olenek K; Skowronski T; Schmaltz D

2003-08-01

28

A theoretical approach to nursing assessment.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Nurses use theory to sharpen their observations and to facilitate their understanding of the human responses to which they direct their interventions. An assessment tool, derived from the nursing theory 'modelling and role-modelling', was developed by nurses at the University of Michigan Hospitals. This tool appears to elicit the data necessary to assess and diagnose the health status of clients. This article describes the assessment tool, why it was developed, the objectives in utilization of the tool and suggestions for implementation.

Campbell J; Finch D; Allport C; Erickson HC; Swain MA

1985-03-01

29

Health literacy and nursing: an update.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Health literacy refers to a patient's knowledge and skill in making informed health care decisions. Low health literacy is associated with poor health outcomes that nurses have the potential to affect. Screening tools are available to assess a patient's health literacy, but not all are easy to use. Recently health literacy experts have recommended that all patients be treated as if they have low health literacy. The authors review the recent definitions and dimensions of health literacy, the prevalence and characteristics of patients with low health literacy, and strategies nurses can use in clinical settings.

Dickens C; Piano MR

2013-06-01

30

Promoting nurses mental health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this article obstacles that influence nurses mental health are described as well as ways to address the obstacles to promote mental health. Opsomming In hierdie artikel word struikelblokke wat verpleegkundiges se geestesgesondheid beinvloed beskryf asook wyses hoe om die struikelblokke aan te spreek om sodoende geestesgesondheid te bevorder. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

Marie Poggenpoel

1996-01-01

31

Health and nursing problems of elderly patients related to bio-psycho-social need deficiencies and functional assessment.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Elderly population is characterized by larger need for social welfare and medical treatment than other age groups. Along with aging, there is a number of emerging health, nursing, caring, psychological and social problems. Complexity of these problems results from overlapping and advancing involutional changes, multi-illness, decreased functional efficiency and other factors. The aim of the study was the assessment of health problems in geriatric patients as well as bio-psycho-social need deficiencies in a view of selected parameters of functional efficiency. The research group consisted of the Chair and Clinic of Geriatrics, 186 women and 114 men, 300 persons in total. The research was carried out using a diagnostic poll method with the application of the Activities of Daily Living (ADL) questionnaire of assessment of daily efficiency on the basis of the Katz Scale; the Care Dependency Scale (CDS) questionnaire used to measure the level of the care dependency and human needs, Norton's bed sores risk assessment scale, the Nursing Care Category (NCC) questionnaire applied to assess the need for nursing care. In most patients the results unveiled manifestations of three or more illnesses. Functional efficiency was at low and average level. Half of the subjects were endangered by risk of bed sores as well as showed high need fulfillment deficiency. The highest level of the deficiency was observed in patients in the eldest age group as well as suffering from multi-illness. Material status, education, place of residence or gender showed no significant influence on the level of need fulfillment.

Muszalik M; Dijkstra A; K?dziora-Kornatowska K; Zieli?ska-Wi?czkowska H

2012-07-01

32

Evaluating the integration of cultural competence skills into health and physical assessment tools: a survey of Canadian schools of nursing.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Currently used audiovisual (AV) teaching tools to teach health and physical assessment reflect a Eurocentric bias using the biomedical model. The purpose of our study was to (a) identify commonly used AV teaching tools of Canadian schools of nursing and (b) evaluate the identified tools. A two-part descriptive quantitative method design was used. First, we surveyed schools of nursing across Canada. Second, the identified AV teaching tools were evaluated for content and modeling of cultural competence. The majority of the schools (67%) used publisher-produced videos associated with a physical assessment textbook. Major findings included minimal demonstration of negotiation with a client around cultural aspects of the interview including the need for an interpreter, modesty, and inclusion of support persons. Identification of culturally specific examples given during the videos was superficial and did not provide students with a comprehensive understanding of necessary culturally competent skills.

Chircop A; Edgecombe N; Hayward K; Ducey-Gilbert C; Sheppard-Lemoine D

2013-04-01

33

Spirituality, meaning, mental health, and nursing.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

1. Spirituality, defined as meaning making, is a primary motivation in life. 2. The medical literature increasingly demonstrates an important positive relationship between spirituality and health. 3. Nurses often feel uncomfortable or unprepared to discuss spiritual issues with patients. 4. Through a few simple questions, nurses can easily make spiritual assessment a routine part of taking a patient's psychosocial history.

Ameling A; Povilonis M

2001-04-01

34

Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health  

Science.gov (United States)

Intute's Nursing, Midwifery, and Health professional pages is a free online resource that provides information skills for nurses, midwives, and health visitors, allowing them to make practical use of the Internet in their work. The site contains key Internet resources to support the study, teaching, and/or research for nurses, midwives, and health visitors. For those completely unfamiliar with the Web world, the site also contains a glossary to help demystify some Internet terminology.

2007-02-28

35

Promoting health literacy: a nursing imperative.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

It is imperative that nursing responds to the call of creating a health literate society by taking an active role in health literacy research, education, and promotion. Nurses have a professional and ethical obligation to communicate in a clear, purposeful way that addresses the unique information needs of each patient. Evidence-based strategies that promote health literacy must be incorporated in every patient's plan of care and become part of the routine practice of nursing. The goal of all patient interactions should be to empower the patient to obtain, understand, and act on information that is needed for optimal health. This article explores the concept of health literacy and its relationship to patient education and communication. Practical strategies that the nurse can use to assess, communicate with, and evaluate comprehension in patients with low literacy skills are provided.

Speros CI

2011-09-01

36

[Assessment of the community health nursing curriculum in relation to the modified Stake curriculum evaluation model  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The modified Stake curriculum evaluation model was implemented in practice to evaluate the Community Nursing Science curricula of three Nursing Colleges and the method used is outlined. Some of the results obtained regarding the model's description matrix are: . students are not familiar with the philosophy of Community Nursing Science; . students doubt their readiness for clinical work directly after training; . only one of the tutors in Community Nursing Science had applicable clinical experience in community nursing; . satisfaction regarding the content and evaluation of Community Nursing Science exists amongst students. The purpose of the evaluation was to identify shortcomings in the curricula and and to facilitate curriculum improvement.

Roos SD; Basson AA; Krüger RA

1994-02-01

37

Global health for nursing...and nursing for global health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article draws on the literature to present a conceptualization of global health (GH) that corresponds with the discipline of nursing and defines the contributions of nursing to GH. The author's perspective is that "health" should be defined and considered holistically to reflect the fact that GH involves more than the eradication of disease and that health as a fundamental right of every human being must be made explicit. "Global" refers to the supraterritorial links among the social determinants of health located at points anywhere on earth within a whole-world context. The focus of GH is the supraterritorial determinants and its ultimate objective is health equity for all nations and all people. The contributions of nurses are advocacy, healing and alleviating suffering through caring, and increasing nursing capacity globally. To truly advance the GH agenda, a new world order is needed, one in which political decision-making is guided by our shared humanity.

Merry L

2012-12-01

38

Registered nurses as responsible clinicians under the New Zealand Mental Health (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act 1992.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The objectives of this research were to determine how many registered nurses are working as 'responsible clinicians', under what phases of the legislation they are functioning, and to describe the enabling processes and barriers to nurses undertaking this statutory role. An anonymous descriptive survey was distributed to the 11 nurses who were currently responsible clinicians as well as five senior nurses selected from each of the 21 District Health Boards and the Auckland Regional Forensic Psychiatry Services (n = 121). The response rate was 88.4% (n = 107). The survey questioned respondents on statutory roles currently undertaken. Respondents were asked whether the responsible clinician role was a legitimate one for nurses and whether they were motivated to attain it. They were also asked which competencies of the role they believed they met, their perceptions of credentialing processes and the educational requirements needed to achieve the role. A descriptive statistical analysis was undertaken and open-ended questions were analysed using content analysis. Of the approximately 395 responsible clinicians nationally, 11 (2.8%) are nurses. Most nurses viewed the role as legitimate. However, many were unaware of competencies for the role and credentialing processes, and were somewhat ambivalent about achieving the role due to current workload, role conflict and lack of remuneration. Competency deficits were highlighted. There are grounds to encourage nurses as responsible clinicians given the intent of the legislation. This will require the promulgation of appropriate mental health policy, and a concerted effort by major stakeholders in mental health service delivery.

McKenna BG; O'Brien AJ; Dal Din T; Thom K

2006-06-01

39

Perceptions of school nurses and principals towards nurse role in providing school health services in Qatar.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: The school nurse plays a crucial role in the provision of comprehensive health services to students. This role encompasses both health and educational goals. The perception of the school nurse's role and its relation to health promotion is fundamental to the development of school nursing. This study aimed to determine the perception of school nurses and principals toward the role of school nurses in providing school health services in Qatar. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out among all school nurses (n=159) and principals (n=159) of governmental schools in Qatar. The participants were assessed for their perception toward the role of the school nurse in the school using 19-Likert-type scaled items Questionnaire. RESULTS: The response rates were 100% for nurses and 94% for principals. The most commonly perceived roles of the school nurse by both nurses and principals were 'following up of chronically ill students', 'providing first aid', and 'referral of students with health problems', whereas most of the roles that were not perceived as school nurse roles were related to student academic achievements. CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS: School nurses and principals agreed on the clinical/medical aspects of nurses' role within schools, but disagreed on nurses' involvement in issues related to the school performance of students. The study recommends raising awareness of school principals on the school nursing role, especially in issues related to the school performance of students.

Al-Dahnaim L; Said H; Salama R; Bella H; Malo D

2013-04-01

40

Public health nursing education in Saudi Arabia.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Public health nurses are key personnel in promoting and protecting the health of populations using knowledge from the nursing, social, and public health sciences. In Saudi Arabia, the nursing profession requires the integration of public health education and associated competencies in the nursing curriculum. In this paper, we aim to highlight the importance of public health nursing in overcoming the challenges associated with epidemiological transitions and responding to the health needs of rising populations, describe the development of the nursing profession in Saudi Arabia, and recommend public health teaching and training objectives for nursing education. The future Saudi public health nurse should be competent in addressing the determinants of health and illness that are salient to a culturally distinct group. This newly outlined role for public health nurses will maximize the use of the educated Saudi nursing workforce and will fill the gap in population public health needs in an efficient and effective way.

Jradi H; Zaidan A; Shehri AM

2013-04-01

 
 
 
 
41

Meet The Occupational Health Nurse  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The great upsurge of knowledge and progress in occupational health medicine which occurred during both world wars was proof that good occupational health services mean greater productivity, with the result that today the scope of the occupational health nurse is unlimited.

Y. Campbell

1979-01-01

42

Recent Developments in Public Health Nursing in the Americas  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study presents an assessment of the participation and training of nurses in public health areas in the Americas. Information was gathered through a literature review and interviews with key informants from Mexico, Colombia, and Paraguay. Results demonstrate that there is significant variation in definitions of public health nursing across the region and current systematized data about the workforce profile of public health nursing personnel is not available for many countries in the Americas. There are significant regional differences in the levels and types of training of nurses working in public health areas and an increasing number of nurses are pursuing training in public health at the master’s and doctoral levels. Many nurses carry out some or all of the essential functions of public health, but are not considered to be public health nurses. Generally, auxiliary and technical nurses have a broader presence in public health areas than professional nurses. In the future, regional health systems reforms should support increased recruitment and training of public health nurses, as well as stronger roles in public health research and health care at the individual, community, and population levels.

Gustavo Nigenda; Laura Magaña-Valladares; Kelly Cooper; Jose Arturo Ruiz-Larios

2010-01-01

43

Nurses' knowledge of pressure ulcer risk assessment.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Pressure ulcers are a largely avoidable, but serious health problem in the UK. Nurses should be knowledgeable of the signs and symptoms of pressure ulcers, and preventive strategies to reduce their incidence. This article explores the literature on nurses' understanding and use of risk assessment tools to identify patients at increased risk of developing pressure ulcers and how, if at all, this contributes to fewer pressure ulcers in the healthcare setting.

Joseph J; Clifton SD

2013-04-01

44

Madagascar nursing needs assessment: education and development of the profession.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: To address how Madagascar is improving nursing education and the profession to strengthen their nursing workforce. BACKGROUND: The sub-Saharan Africa nursing workforce shortage is more than 600,000. Madagascar measures among affected countries. Nursing in Madagascar with reference to the Malagasy Lutheran Church Health Department (SALFA) is examined in this paper. The Malagasy Lutheran Nursing School (SEFAM) was established in 1956 to prepare nurses and midwives. The school recently relocated to better meet SALFA goals to increase nurses in the system and improve nursing education. A US nursing faculty and the SEFAM director proposed to conduct programme assessment to ensure that nursing and midwifery education meet health, social and community needs in Madagascar. DATA SOURCE/METHODS: An in-depth needs assessment of the school programme, facilities and resources occurred. Site visits and informal interviews were held. Field study visits to nursing schools and health-care facilities in Kenya and Tanzania assisted the authors in learning how nursing developed in those countries. Data analysis included comparison of the authors' comprehensive notes for congruity and accuracy. OUTCOMES: Strategies are needed to support and maintain quality education, improve quality and quantity of nursing care services in hospitals and dispensaries, and improve conditions for nurses and other health-care workers. Compared with Madagascar, Kenya and Tanzania have more well-developed systems of nursing education and professional development. LIMITATIONS: There were limited written sources for some information but methods, such as verbal accounts, compensated for this limitation. IMPLICATIONS/CONCLUSIONS: Implications include advantages, disadvantages, facilitators and barriers to nursing educational and professional development in Madagascar. Development of nursing education, regulation and the profession will continue with support from key stakeholders. Kenya and Tanzania can serve as role models for Madagascar nurses. Countries with similar nursing education and professional development issues can be informed by lessons learned in this project.

Plager KA; Razaonandrianina JO

2009-03-01

45

Nursing and the health system in Brazil.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The purpose of this article is to describe nursing in the Brazilian health system and to analyze the characteristics of nursing personnel in Brazil. This description includes types of health institutions, services rendered, and the distribution of nursing personnel by professional categories in 1956, 1982, and 1995. Discussion of the challenges facing Brazilian nurses is presented using data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE), Federal Nursing Board (COFEn), Regional Nursing Board (COREn), and the Brazilian Nursing Association (ABEn). An increase in the number of outpatient units and in diagnostic and therapeutic examinations has led to an increased the demand for nurses. Public health nurses participate in planning, management, sanitary education, health promotion, and supervision of nursing care provided by nursing technicians, assistants, and other helpers.

Villa TC; Assis MM; Mishima SM; Pereira MJ; de Almeida MC; Palha PF; Pinto IC

1999-01-01

46

Nursing care and environmental health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: to reflect about nursing care in environmental health. Methodology: reflective study that was conducted from August to November 2008, through weekly discussions during the course Research Methodology Program Graduate in Nursing, Federal University of Ceará, with the referrals articles, book chapters and resolutions on thematic care, nursing and environmental health. Results: we observed the necessity of professional commitment in the reduction of risks to the ecosystem, damages to ecological and population welfare. In face of this, health promotion is clearly expressed in man's relationship with the environment, showing the importance of environmental health as a direct human health. It appears that there are many factors involved and there is still need for shared responsibility, which includes the commitment of the professional. Conclusion: in this scenario, the professional nursing should take their cooperation through a careful committed to environmental health, especially in relation to solid waste management of health services, but also intervene in the poor management of such waste, both for preventive actions as corrective.

Eveline Pinheiro Beserra, Maria Dalva Santos Alves

2010-01-01

47

Assessment of nursing home residents in Europe: the Services and Health for Elderly in Long TERm care (SHELTER) study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Aims of the present study are the following: 1. to describe the rationale and methodology of the Services and Health for Elderly in Long TERm care (SHELTER) study, a project funded by the European Union, aimed at implementing the interRAI instrument for Long Term Care Facilities (interRAI LTCF) as a tool to assess and gather uniform information about nursing home (NH) residents across different health systems in European countries; 2. to present the results about the test-retest and inter-rater reliability of the interRAI LTCF instrument translated into the languages of participating countries; 3 to illustrate the characteristics of NH residents at study entry. Methods A 12 months prospective cohort study was conducted in 57 NH in 7 EU countries (Czech Republic, England, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands) and 1 non EU country (Israel). Weighted kappa coefficients were used to evaluate the reliability of interRAI LTCF items. Results Mean age of 4156 residents entering the study was 83.4 ± 9.4 years, 73% were female. ADL disability and cognitive impairment was observed in 81.3% and 68.0% of residents, respectively. Clinical complexity of residents was confirmed by a high prevalence of behavioral symptoms (27.5% of residents), falls (18.6%), pressure ulcers (10.4%), pain (36.0%) and urinary incontinence (73.5%). Overall, 197 of the 198 the items tested met or exceeded standard cut-offs for acceptable test-retest and inter-rater reliability after translation into the target languages. Conclusion The interRAI LTCF appears to be a reliable instrument. It enables the creation of databases that can be used to govern the provision of long-term care across different health systems in Europe, to answer relevant research and policy questions and to compare characteristics of NH residents across countries, languages and cultures.

Onder Graziano; Carpenter Iain; Finne-Soveri Harriet; Gindin Jacob; Frijters Dinnus; Henrard Jean; Nikolaus Thorsten; Topinkova Eva; Tosato Matteo; Liperoti Rosa; Landi Francesco; Bernabei Roberto

2012-01-01

48

Assessment of nursing home residents in Europe: the Services and Health for Elderly in Long TERm care (SHELTER) study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Aims of the present study are the following: 1. to describe the rationale and methodology of the Services and Health for Elderly in Long TERm care (SHELTER) study, a project funded by the European Union, aimed at implementing the interRAI instrument for Long Term Care Facilities (interRAI LTCF) as a tool to assess and gather uniform information about nursing home (NH) residents across different health systems in European countries; 2. to present the results about the test-retest and inter-rater reliability of the interRAI LTCF instrument translated into the languages of participating countries; 3 to illustrate the characteristics of NH residents at study entry. METHODS: A 12 months prospective cohort study was conducted in 57 NH in 7 EU countries (Czech Republic, England, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands) and 1 non EU country (Israel). Weighted kappa coefficients were used to evaluate the reliability of interRAI LTCF items. RESULTS: Mean age of 4156 residents entering the study was 83.4 ± 9.4 years, 73% were female. ADL disability and cognitive impairment was observed in 81.3% and 68.0% of residents, respectively. Clinical complexity of residents was confirmed by a high prevalence of behavioral symptoms (27.5% of residents), falls (18.6%), pressure ulcers (10.4%), pain (36.0%) and urinary incontinence (73.5%). Overall, 197 of the 198 the items tested met or exceeded standard cut-offs for acceptable test-retest and inter-rater reliability after translation into the target languages. CONCLUSION: The interRAI LTCF appears to be a reliable instrument. It enables the creation of databases that can be used to govern the provision of long-term care across different health systems in Europe, to answer relevant research and policy questions and to compare characteristics of NH residents across countries, languages and cultures.

Onder G; Carpenter I; Finne-Soveri H; Gindin J; Frijters D; Henrard JC; Nikolaus T; Topinkova E; Tosato M; Liperoti R; Landi F; Bernabei R

2012-01-01

49

[New technologies and nursing. Use and perception of primary health care nurses about electronic health record].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To analyze the nurses make use of electronic health records (EHR) and assess their perception of it. METHOD: A descriptive cross-sectional observational study was conducted in 2010 analyzing the nurses' perceptions of adult and pediatric consultations of primary health care teams in Baix Llobregat (Catalonia) in which the EHR is used. The study variables were: registration of care, continuity of care, training, usability and sociodemographic composition of the sample. The statistical analysis was descriptive. RESULTS: Nurses agree that EHR provides "continuity of care" in relation to nursing care (mean 2.03, Sd.0.83) and overall (mean 2.19, 5d.0.83). Show indifference to the "usability" of the EHR (mean 3.26, Sd.0.5), to facilitate the "record information" (mean 2.69, Sd.0.68) and the need for "training" in the use of EHR (mean 2.6, 5d.0.59). It has been found that with increasing age of the nurse, it shows more agreement that the EHR provides greater continuity of care overall. The average ratings of the continuum of care nurse, recording of information, continuity of care in general are greater the lead time using the EHR. CONCLUSIONS: The nurses' perceptions regarding the EHR are positive in that it provides continuity of care and to exchange information on patient health data.

Galimany Masclans J; Garrido Aguilar E; Roca Roger M; Girbau García MR

2012-09-01

50

Service user involvement in nurse education: perceptions of mental health nursing students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Increasingly providers of mental health nurse education are required to demonstrate user involvement in all aspects of these programmes including student selection, programme design and student assessment. There has been limited analysis of how nursing students perceive user involvement in nurse education programmes. The aim of this study has been to explore mental health nursing student's perceptions of involving users in all aspects of pre-registration mental health nursing programme. Researchers completed a number of focus group interviews with 12 ex-mental health nursing students who had been recruited by purposeful sampling. Each focus group interview was recorded and analysed using a series of data reduction, data display and verification methods. The study confirms many of the findings reported in earlier user participation in education studies. Three main themes related to user involvement have been identified: the protection of users, enhanced student learning and the added value benefits associated with user involvement.

O' Donnell H; Gormley K

2013-04-01

51

Community health care nursing in Rajasthan. A registered nurse's perspective.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study focused on the great shortage of registered nurses (RNs) in primary health care in Rajasthan, India. It dealt especially with the nurses' own opinions about working in primary health care and their reasons for not working in it. Nurses at different levels in the health care organization were interviewed. The study was based on interviews with six RNs individually, three groups of six to eight nursing students each, and three policy-making chief nurses individually. The Minister of Health in Rajasthan also participated in the study. The study showed that the reasons for the lack of RNs in community health care were as follows: a government policy decision to place less educated nurses in the communities; the great shortage of nurses in general; the system whereby a nurse is not able to choose her/his place of work; unwillingness on the part of the nurses to work in community health care because of the great security problems; lack of support from authorities and lack of equipment. In general, community health care nursing as a work area was despised by society at large in Rajasthan.

Granström M; Lindmark B

2000-01-01

52

An assessment by nurses and mothers of a ‘road-to-health ’ book in the Western Cape  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate English, Afrikaans, and Xhosa mother-retained ‘Road-to- Health Book’ (RTH book) for children, and an electronic calculator. Design: Researchers D Harrison (DH) and H Harker (HH) informed clinic staff about the contents and significance of the RTH book. They requested nurses to use this book in conjunction with the Road-to-Health Card and to issue and explain its use to every visiting client. The use of an electronic calculator that plotted horizontal centile and Z-score charts was demonstrated and explained. To determine the relevance of the book and the electronic calculator, nurses involved in the study for 6 months were given three standardised descriptive questionnaires with ‘yes’, ‘no’ and ‘don’t know’ responses. Clients were traced and interviewed by the researchers after 6 -1 2 months to obtain their views on the book. Setting: Clinics that provided children with healthcare in 24 locations in the Western Cape Province participated in the study. The children lived in informal settlements, in low-, middle- and high-income residential areas, and on farms in the Cape Town. Stellenbosch, and Paarl regions. Subjects: One hundred and fourteen nurses were enrolled in the study as well as 581 clients to whom the RTH book was issued. Outcome measures: The use of and comments on the RTH book by nurses and clients were based on analysis of the questionnaires. Results: The majority of nurses (81.6%) and clients (96%) found the RTH book useful. The horizontal and Z-score growth charts and electronic calculator were less acceptable because their use was time-consuming and less well understood. Conclusion: The RTH book with appropriate modifications should be issued to clients in place of the current Road-to-Health card and educational material.

D Harrison; H Harker; Hde V Heese; MD Mann

2005-01-01

53

The role of the nurse in oral health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The health of the mouth and oral cavity has historically been seen as something separate of medical and dental practice. This has had deleterious effects for Americans of all ages, but has especially jeopardized the oral health of the most vulnerable population groups, including young children. Nurses have the ability to incorporate oral health risk assessments, screenings, application of fluoride varnish, and oral health education into the infant, child, and adolescent health assessment and the school setting. However, nurses may need to acquire further knowledge in this area to become competent and skilled in performing the oral health assessment. Schools of nursing should include oral health assessment in their curriculum to provide the students with the information and skills needed in order to become partners in oral health upon graduation.

Tetuan T

2004-11-01

54

Nursing interventions on sexual health: validation of the NISH Scale in baccalaureate nursing students in Taiwan.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

INTRODUCTION: No widely accepted tool is available to assess nursing interventions on patient's sexual health among nursing students. Consequently, nursing school faculty cannot determine the sexual healthcare-related skills of nursing students. AIM: The aim of this article was to develop and test a scale to assess nursing interventions on sexual health. METHODS: A 19-item instrument Nursing Interventions on Sexual Health (NISH) was developed using 10 semi-structured interviews of senior nursing students, expert review, and comparative analysis of text and field notes. A total of 198 senior nursing students were recruited from two nursing schools in central Taiwan to test the instrument. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was used to measure construct validity and Cronbach's alpha to measure internal consistency. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Validity and reliability of the NISH scale based on the Permission, Limited Information, Specific Suggestion, and Intensive Therapy (PLISSIT) model. RESULTS: Three factors (permission, limited information, and specific suggestion) were retained after EFA of the 19 items of NISH. Cronbach's alpha for the subscales increased from 0.71-0.93 to 0.74-0.94 and from 0.93 to 0.95 for the total scale, with 72.42% of the cumulative variance explained by these three factors. Nursing students' age (P=0.019) correlated positively with total score. CONCLUSIONS: NISH is a useful and reliable scale for assessing the frequency of PLISSIT-related behaviors used by nursing students to address patient's sexual health concerns. Nursing faculties can use this scale to assess students' performance and find their omitted behaviors in clinical practice regarding sexual health care.

Huang CY; Tsai LY; Liao WC; Lee S

2012-10-01

55

Nurse overestimation of patients' health literacy.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Patient education and effective communication are core elements of the nursing profession; therefore, awareness of a patient's health literacy is integral to patient care, safety, education, and counseling. Several past studies have suggested that health care providers overestimate their patient's health literacy. In this study, the authors compare inpatient nurses' estimate of their patient's health literacy to the patient's health literacy using Newest Vital Sign as the health literacy measurement. A total of 65 patients and 30 nurses were enrolled in this trial. The results demonstrate that nurses incorrectly identify patients with low health literacy. In addition, overestimates outnumber underestimates 6 to 1. The results reinforce previous evidence that health care providers overestimate a patient's health literacy. The overestimation of a patient's health literacy by nursing personnel may contribute to the widespread problem of poor health outcomes and hospital readmission rates.

Dickens C; Lambert BL; Cromwell T; Piano MR

2013-01-01

56

Public Health and Nursing: A Natural Partnership  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The health of individuals occurs within the context of their environment and the other individuals they interact with in the communities they live in, work in and visit. Promoting the health of the public requires multiple strategies aimed at improving the environment, the health knowledge of groups and individuals, maintaining adequate food and water, and reducing the spread of disease. Many disciplines are needed to meet these goals, but the largest segment of the professional health work force required to meet these needs is nursing. Historically, nursing leaders in public health such as Florence Nightingale and Lillian Wald made significant inroads related to serious health issues because they were nurses. Today across the globe, nurses provide the key components of public health interventions including well baby care, health education, screening and immunization clinics, disaster management and emergency preparedness. With the growing nursing shortage in acute care settings, the brain drain of nurses from certain areas of the world, the shrinking public dollars for preventive health care, the nursing workforce needed to continue to provide these essential health care services is threatened. It is essential to put the spot light on nursing’s role in public health with the hopes of attracting more public funds and more nurses to provide these essential services.

Christine Savage; Joan Kub

2009-01-01

57

Oral health in Florida nursing homes.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to measure the oral health and hygiene status among 265 South Florida nursing home residents aged between 45 and 98 years. METHODS: The oral health and hygiene status of the residents were assessed by noting the presence of calculus, caries, gingivitis, cheilitis, apthous ulcer, dry mouth and red or white lesions. RESULTS: The incidence of nursing home residents with calculus was 79.6% and the remaining 20.4% were edentulous. More than half of residents had oral problems (50.6%) the commonest was gingivitis (36.6%), followed by caries (26%) and tooth fracture (15.9%). Almost half the residents wore dentures (47.2%). Statistical analysis was conducted using analysis of variance (P-values). Ageing of the residents was statistically correlated to a worsening of oral hygiene status (P<0.0066), absence and presence of one or two dentures (P<0.0034) and a loss of teeth (P<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The ageing of residents is correlated to increasing oral health problems and the loss of teeth. Oral health neglect affects almost all of the nursing home residents. Care providers should receive education and training from dental hygienists to improve the standard of oral hygiene and health of the elderly.

Murray PE; Ede-Nichols D; Garcia-Godoy F

2006-11-01

58

Nuclear education in public health and nursing  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Twenty-three public health schools and 492 university schools of nursing were surveyed to gather specific information on educational programs related to nuclear war. Twenty public health schools and 240 nursing schools responded. Nuclear war-related content was most likely to appear in disaster nursing and in environmental health courses. Three schools of public health report that they currently offer elective courses on nuclear war. Innovative curricula included political action projects for nuclear war prevention

1988-01-01

59

Power inequalities in the assessment of nursing competency within the workplace: implications for nursing management.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article explores the power implications of implementing competency-based assessments within the nursing work environment from a manager's perspective. It discusses how the implementation of competency-based assessments for continuing education may affect workplace culture, in particular, the use of power, within the nursing team. The term "managers" for the purpose of this article is defined as "nurses in senior administrative and educational positions within a health care facility." This article adds to the discourse on competency-based models by emphasizing the effect of the nursing work environment on the competency-based assessment process. It concludes by identifying strategies that can be used by nursing management when designing and implementing an effective and fair competency-based assessment for the nursing workplace.

Cusack L; Smith M

2010-09-01

60

Power inequalities in the assessment of nursing competency within the workplace: implications for nursing management.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article explores the power implications of implementing competency-based assessments within the nursing work environment from a manager's perspective. It discusses how the implementation of competency-based assessments for continuing education may affect workplace culture, in particular, the use of power, within the nursing team. The term "managers" for the purpose of this article is defined as "nurses in senior administrative and educational positions within a health care facility." This article adds to the discourse on competency-based models by emphasizing the effect of the nursing work environment on the competency-based assessment process. It concludes by identifying strategies that can be used by nursing management when designing and implementing an effective and fair competency-based assessment for the nursing workplace. PMID:20839736

Cusack, Lynette; Smith, Morgan

2010-06-08

 
 
 
 
61

The use of physical assessment skills by registered nurses in Australia: issues for nursing education.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The purpose of pre-service nursing education programs is to prepare competent graduates who are able to function as safe, professional registered nurses. An extensive element of these programs is the teaching of physical assessment skills, with most programs educating students to perform over 120 such skills. Previous research from North America suggests that the majority of skills taught to nurses in their pre-service programs are not used in practice. As part of a larger study, an online survey was used to explore use of 121 physical assessment skills by Australian nurses. Recruitment occurred via mailed invitation to members of the Australian Nursing Federation. Data were extracted from 1220 completed questionnaires returned by nurses who were mostly employed in New South Wales, were female and experienced nurses. Respondents indicated that they used only 34% of skills routinely. Results reinforce evidence found in the literature that many of the skills taught to nurses are either not used at all (35.5%) or are used rarely (31%). These findings have implications for the teaching of physical assessment skills in pre-service nursing programs, and raise questions about the value of extensive skills teaching in the context of contemporary health care. Further research into barriers to the use of physical assessment skills in nursing and the need for comprehensive skills preparation for the generalist nurse is likely to offer some solutions to these questions.

Birks M; Cant R; James A; Chung C; Davis J

2013-01-01

62

Public health nursing, ethics and human rights.  

Science.gov (United States)

Public health nursing has a code of ethics that guides practice. This includes the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for Nurses, Principles of the Ethical Practice of Public Health, and the Scope and Standards of Public Health Nursing. Human rights and Rights-based care in public health nursing practice are relatively new. They reflect human rights principles as outlined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and applied to public health practice. As our health care system is restructured and there are new advances in technology and genetics, a focus on providing care that is ethical and respects human rights is needed. Public health nurses can be in the forefront of providing care that reflects an ethical base and a rights-based approach to practice with populations. PMID:23586767

Ivanov, Luba L; Oden, Tami L

2013-01-22

63

Public health nursing, ethics and human rights.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Public health nursing has a code of ethics that guides practice. This includes the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for Nurses, Principles of the Ethical Practice of Public Health, and the Scope and Standards of Public Health Nursing. Human rights and Rights-based care in public health nursing practice are relatively new. They reflect human rights principles as outlined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and applied to public health practice. As our health care system is restructured and there are new advances in technology and genetics, a focus on providing care that is ethical and respects human rights is needed. Public health nurses can be in the forefront of providing care that reflects an ethical base and a rights-based approach to practice with populations.

Ivanov LL; Oden TL

2013-05-01

64

Enacting global health in the nursing classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Globalization presents nurses with the challenges and an ethical responsibility of being competent caregivers within a global society. The link between globalization and global health, and the contributions nursing can make to the global health environment are described in the delivery of a new required course for undergraduate nursing students in a four year degree program. Innovative approaches for the delivery of this course are described, which even though living locally, can encourage nursing students to think globally. The need for nursing programs to acknowledge the shared responsibilities for examining global health challenges is now part of our reality in many countries. PMID:23433848

Macneil, Joan; Ryan, Maureen

2013-02-20

65

Expectations of the child health nurse in Sweden: two perspectives.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: the child health service exists to support and stimulate parents in order to reduce stress and to encourage an advantageous development of the preschool child. AIM: To explore and describe similarities and differences in expectations of the child health nurse, from the perspective of the recently delivered first-time mother, as compared to an expression of what the child health nurse believed mothers of infants expected of them. The data consisted of 15 interviews with child health nurses and 20 interviews with first-time mothers. Thematic content analysis resulted in seven categories of expectations. The child health nurse was expected to be someone to approach, who could assess the child's development and give immunizations and to be a supporter, counsellor, safety provider and a parent group organizer with knowledge. Similarities between the mothers' and the nurses' statements occurred more frequently than differences, which is suggested to depend on the Swedish tradition among new mothers of visiting the child health clinic. The mothers expected participation in parent groups to a higher degree than the nurses thought they did. Child health nurses who fulfil the mothers' expectations appear to require a good relationship with the mother in order to find out what she desires, which the allocation of sufficient time for regular meetings, will facilitate. Moreover, the nurse requires knowledge about children's requirements and the transition to motherhood as well as the father's important role.

Fägerskiöld A; Ek AC

2003-06-01

66

Cost-effectiveness implications based on a comparison of nursing home and home health case mix.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Case-mix differences between 653 home health care patients and 650 nursing home patients, and between 455 Medicare home health patients and 447 Medicare nursing home patients were assessed using random samples selected from 20 home health agencies and 46 nursing homes in 12 states in 1982 and 1983. ...

Kramer, A M; Shaughnessy, P W; Pettigrew, M L

67

Evaluating and improving nurses' health and quality of work life.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article discusses evaluating and improving the health and quality of work life (QOWL) of nurses. Nurses are reported to have higher illness, disability, and absenteeism rates than all other health care workers. Research suggests that QOWL impacts nurses' health and the provision of quality health care, particularly patient safety. Occupational health nurses have a pivotal role in evaluating and improving nurses' QOWL and health. This will ensure quality health outcomes for nurses and patients and reduce costs for the health care system.

Horrigan JM; Lightfoot NE; Larivière MA; Jacklin K

2013-04-01

68

Primary health care nursing staff in Crete: an emerging profile.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: In 2001, the newly established Regional Health and Welfare System of Crete commissioned the first needs' assessment study of nursing personnel employed in the public sector of primary health care (PHC). AIM: To capture the profile and professional needs of nursing staff working in Health Centers throughout the island of Crete and explore variations in nursing practice by educational preparation. METHODS: A newly developed, psychometrically tested questionnaire, was administered to all nursing staff in 14 rural Health Centers. FINDINGS: Vacancy rates are high, indicating a serious staffing deficit. The type of degree earned (2-year vs. 3 or 4-year program) does not differentiate nursing practice, with only two exceptions (obtaining a patient's history and counselling patients). The majority of respondents assess their existing knowledge and skills as 'adequate' while indicating a strong desire for continuing education. Job satisfaction is high in terms of interactions with clients and community recognition, while it is rated 'low' in terms of daily interactions with colleagues and support from work environment. CONCLUSION: Cretan nursing staff in PHC operate within a restricted and task-orientated framework. Their educational preparation has little effect in practice role variations and professional needs. The Regional Health and Welfare System of Crete should address daily supervision and support issues, on-the-job training, continuing education needs, while taking immediate action to avoid potential turnover of existing staff and to aggressively recruit young, qualified nursing staff who will choose a career in PHC nursing.

Markaki A; Antonakis N; Philalithis A; Lionis C

2006-03-01

69

Public health is every nurse's responsibility.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Nurses in all specialties and midwives can influence the public health of individuals, the wider community and the population as a whole. From theory to evidence, education to practice, and implementation to evaluation, there is a clear cycle by which nurses and midwives can have a demonstrable impact on the public's health. Public health is no longer the preserve of a few professionals and can and should be core to all nursing practice.

Winslade J; Barber N; Williams H

2013-06-01

70

A survey on barriers to access health information resources of nursing care from the perspectives of nurses and nursing students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available   Introduction: Access to trustworthy health information is one of the most important factors in nursing care. It is important that the nurses be assured of both importance and quality of information resources to access reliable health information. This study was conducted to assess different methods nurses and nursing students apply to access information resources and to assess the inhibiting factors in this respect.   Methods: This descriptive and analytical study was conducted among 412 nurses and nursing students in hospitals affiliated to Semnan University of Medical Sciences and Social Security Organization of Semnan in 2011. A valid and reliable questionnaire was used for collecting data which were then analyzed by frequency distribution, mean, standard deviation, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal – Wallis tests and Chi-Square.   Results: The nurses appeared to have greater tendency than nursing students to use their colleagues’ and patients’ information. They showed less tendency to use information of printed textbooks in clinical decision making. There was a significant difference between demographic profile of the participants and the use of different information resources (p <0.01). Moreover, there was a significant difference between nurses and nursing students in using different information resources and the inhibiting factors reported (P <0.01).   Discussion: The results indicate that nurses and nursing students are more inclined to use traditional information resources such as the information given by patients, relatives or personnel. This might be due to different reasons one of which might be lack of skills to use hospital libraries. The findings suggest that h ealth information l iteracy is a major challenge in the nursing community, and information system professionals can undoubtedly facilitate the use of quality information in this regard.

Mehdi Kahouei; Hassan Babamohamadi; Soheila Ghazavi; Jamileh Mehdizadeh

2012-01-01

71

Assessment of Physician Assistant (PA), Nurse Practitioner (NP), and Nurse-Midwife (CNM) Training on Meeting Health-Care Needs of the Underserved.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate strategies used by physician assistant (PA), nurse practitioner (NP) and certified nurse-midwife (CNM) training programs to prepare trainees for and deploy them to rural and urban medically underserved...

1993-01-01

72

77 FR 36549 - Nursing Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit-“Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health...  

Science.gov (United States)

...Health Resources and Services Administration Nursing Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit--``Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health Disparities...Bureau of Health Professions, Division of Nursing, will host an invitational summit...

2012-06-19

73

Representing nursing assessment data with the ICNP.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Patient assessment provides the basis for identifying patient problems sensitive to nursing care and aligning nursing interventions to promote positive patient outcomes. We mapped the key concepts and attribute relations extracted from a set of initial patient assessment items to the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP). Although we found the coverage of the ICNP not yet complete, we believe that the ICNP does have the potential to represent the nursing assessment data.

Kim H; Dykes P; Goldsmith D; Zeng-Treitler Q

2007-01-01

74

Representing nursing assessment data with the ICNP.  

Science.gov (United States)

Patient assessment provides the basis for identifying patient problems sensitive to nursing care and aligning nursing interventions to promote positive patient outcomes. We mapped the key concepts and attribute relations extracted from a set of initial patient assessment items to the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP). Although we found the coverage of the ICNP not yet complete, we believe that the ICNP does have the potential to represent the nursing assessment data. PMID:18694109

Kim, Hyeoneui; Dykes, Patricia; Goldsmith, Denise; Zeng-Treitler, Qing

2007-10-11

75

Preparing nurse leaders for global health reforms.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

One of the International Council of Nurses' main remits, on behalf of its member organisations, is to prepare nurses for management and leadership roles. Its Leadership for Change (LFC) programme aims to complement a country's own educational and development schemes, to give nurses confidence in facing the challenges of health reforms in response to demand for services. This article describes the structure of LFC and illustrates how it helps nurses to emerge as effective leaders.

Anazor C

2012-07-01

76

Mental health nurses' views on therapeutic optimism.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Registered nurses (RN) coordinate acute mental health units on a 24-hour basis and it behoves researchers to actually ask these nurses what they think contributes to their ability to work with patients in optimistic ways. In this study, 40 RN working in acute mental health settings were asked a series of questions to explore positive aspects of nursing work, which includes therapeutic optimism. Three themes were identified: (i) different ways nurses foster therapeutic optimism; (ii) perceptions of how an optimistic environment is fostered, and (iii) improvement of ward culture. Findings show the pivotal role mental health nurses have in improving teamwork, good communication, sharing, and collaboration, in addition to preceptoring and supervision. Furthermore, effective clinical management is essential to therapeutic optimism and, in this research, is considered to be the aspect of acute mental health nursing most relevant to improving the ward culture.

Cleary M; Horsfall J; O'Hara-Aarons M; Hunt GE

2012-12-01

77

Mental health triage: towards a model for nursing practice.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Mental health triage/duty services play a pivotal role in the current framework for mental health service delivery in Victoria and other states of Australia. Australia is not alone in its increasing reliance on mental health triage as a model of psychiatric service provision; at a global level, there appears to be an emerging trend to utilize mental health triage services staffed by nurses as a cost-effective means of providing mental health care to large populations. At present, nurses comprise the greater proportion of the mental health triage workforce in Victoria and, as such, are performing the majority of point-of-entry mental health assessment across the state. Although mental health triage/duty services have been operational for nearly a decade in some regional healthcare sectors of Victoria, there is little local or international research on the topic, and therefore a paucity of established theory to inform and guide mental health triage practice and professional development. The discussion in this paper draws on the findings and recommendations of PhD research into mental health triage nursing in Victoria, to raise discussion on the need to develop theoretical models to inform and guide nursing practice. The paper concludes by presenting a provisional model for mental health triage nursing practice.

Sands N

2007-05-01

78

Patient health outcomes in psychiatric mental health nursing.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This integrative literature review examined evidence concerning the relationship between psychiatric mental health nursing interventions and patient-focused outcomes. Empirical studies, published between 1997 and 2007, were identified and gathered by searching relevant databases and specific data sources. Although 156 articles were critically appraised, only 25 of them met the inclusion criteria. Findings from this review showed that the most frequently used outcome instruments assessed psychiatric symptom severity. Most of the instruments targeted two symptom categories: altered thoughts/perceptions and altered mood. Other outcome instruments were categorized in the following domains: self-care, functioning, quality of life and satisfaction. The most important finding of this review is the lack of consistently strong evidence to support decisions concerning which outcome instrument or combination of instruments to recommend for routine use in practice. Based on this review, additional research to conceptualize, measure and examine the feasibility of outcome instruments sensitive to psychiatric mental health nursing interventions is recommended.

Montgomery P; Rose D; Carter L

2009-02-01

79

Assessment of Physician Assistant, Nurse Practitioner and Nurse-Midwife Training in Meeting Health Care Needs of the Underserved (Executive Summary).  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate strategies used by physician assistant (PA), nurse practitioner (NP), and nurse-midwife (CNM) training programs to prepare trainees for and deploy them to rural and urban medically underserved areas. T...

1993-01-01

80

Nursing education to improve global health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In the final decades of the twentieth century world went through a complex process in political, technological, economic, social and health areas. In the process often referred to as globalization, many health problems including global spread have seen and many have still being seen. This situation obliges nurses who are the largest groups of health care providers, to be aware of health problems that result from globalization and to explore solutions these health problems requires them to gain a global perspective. To gain these attributes for nurses it is inevitable that critical elements needed challenges for global health should be intagrated with nursing education. In this article, it is suggested that what to do to improve global health in nursing education.

Hülya Kaya

2010-01-01

 
 
 
 
81

Assessment of quality of life of Iranian nurses  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available IntroductionNurses’ Quality Of Life (QOL) may be affected by many different factors which can in turn influence their competency in their job. The aim of this study is to assess the QOL of Iranian nurses to provide evidence for policy makers to take necessary strides needed to make improvements.Materials and methodsUsing a cross-sectional study design, we evaluated the QOL of Iranian nurses by the assessment of four indicators, namely, physical health, psychological health, social health and environmental health. A total number of 850 nurses from 17 different provinces of Iran were recruited by random sampling. They were requested to complete the WHO QOL-BREF questionnaire. The data were then analyzed using the SPSS version 16.ResultsThe results indicated that half of the nurses scored in the moderate range, suggesting that they had a reasonably good QOL. They scored considerably high in terms of physical health indicators and achieved significantly low scores regarding environmental health issues. Although the chi-square test did not show any significant association between the QOL indicators and different factors such as work experience, gender, job position and patients group. We found a significant association between the subject's position at work in hospitals shift pattern and their overall QOL score.ConclusionsThe results of our study showed that more half of the nurses evaluated their QOL at a moderate level. The results from this study can be used by policy makers to contribute to the improvement of the QOL of nurses which may lead to the enhancement of the quality of care they deliver to their patients. It seems imperative to conduct future research encompassing a group of nurses from the whole country, so that a more representative cohort can be studied. It would also pave the way for the establishment of a QOL database for nurses in Iran that could monitor changes in the nursing population

Maryam Aala; Mahnaz Sanjari; Ali Tootee; Ghazanfar Mirzabeigi; Sedighe Salemi

2012-01-01

82

Clinical nurse specialist assessment of nurses' knowledge of heart failure.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: Patients' self-management of heart failure (HF) is associated with improved adherence and reduced readmissions. Nurses' knowledge about self-management of HF may influence their ability to adequately perform discharge education. Inadequate nurse knowledge may lead to insufficient patient education, and insufficient education may decrease patients' ability to perform self-management. Prior to developing interventions to improve patient education, clinical nurse specialists should assess nurses' knowledge of HF. The purpose of this study was to determine nurses' knowledge of HF self-management principles. DESIGN: This was a prospective, exploratory, and descriptive online test. SETTINGS: There were 3 patient care settings: tertiary care teaching hospital, community hospital, and home healthcare division. SAMPLE: The sample was composed of 90 registered nurses who worked directly with patients with HF. METHODS: Nurses completed an online test of knowledge using the Nurses' Knowledge of Heart Failure Education Principles instrument. FINDINGS: Registered nurses (n = 90) completed the knowledge test instrument; their average score was 71% (SD, 10.8%) (range, 20%-90%). The percentage of correct items on each subscale ranged from 63.9% (SD, 30.0) for medications to 83.3% (SD, 25.0) for exercise. Only 8.9% of respondents achieved a passing score of greater than 85%, and a passing score was not associated with any demographic characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, nursing knowledge of HF self-management principles was low. Scores from our nurses were similar to those found in other studies. IMPLICATIONS: There is a need to develop interventions to improve nursing knowledge of HF self-management principles. Clinical nurse specialists can be instrumental in developing knowledge interventions for nurses.

Mahramus TL; Penoyer DA; Sole ML; Wilson D; Chamberlain L; Warrington W

2013-07-01

83

Democratization of health care: challenge for nursing.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

One of the key foundational principles of primary health care is community involvement. The implementation of meaningful community involvement requires democratic institutions and processes within the health care system. In this context the meaning of substantive democracy and the implications of this concept for the health care system are briefly discussed. The relationship between the purpose, values, and foundational concepts of democracy and those of nursing is examined in greater detail. Based on the congruency between these, the role of nursing in generating and enhancing democratic processes within the health care system is discussed and a model of nursing practice proposed.

Watts RJ

1990-01-01

84

School nurses' contribution to schoolchildren's future health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In the changing contemporary society, certain demands for health care system become evident. In recent years, declining health indicators of Lithuanian schoolchildren prompt to analyze the situation of schoolchildren's health care: whether health care at schools is sufficient and effective and how school nurses deal with schoolchildren's health problems on a daily basis. OBJECTIVE. To analyze how school nursing specialists work at school and what problems they encounter while providing health care to schoolchildren. MATERIAL AND METHODS. A total of 202 school nurses from five main Lithuanian cities participated in the survey in 2005. More than three-fourths (77.7%) of the respondents had been working at school for more than 10 years. For the survey, an original closed questionnaire, consisting of 28 questions, was used. RESULTS. The survey showed that most of school nurses were approached by schoolchildren with the following health problems: visual impairment, anomalous posture, and scoliosis. More than three-fourths (75.5%) of the school nurses noted that schoolchildren's health was getting worse over the last five years. School nurses usually provide care to 11-30 schoolchildren per day. Most of their time is spent on schoolchildren's health check-ups, health education, and documentation. The school nurses noted that the efficiency of health care system at school was reduced by a number of problems, including poor working conditions, the lack of medical equipment, inadequate computer systems. Therefore, the cooperation among nurses, school administration, and parents must be substantially improved. CONCLUSIONS. The competence of school nurses should be maintained through an educational approach by developing their qualification, as well as through a social approach by improving their cooperation with school community and parents.

Griniene E; Liutaite N

2009-01-01

85

[Home care and nursing administration in community health nursing--the integration of individual health care with community health care].  

Science.gov (United States)

There has been a paradigm shift in community health nursing. In 1992, visiting nursing stations were first introduced. In 1994, the Community Health Act came into force and in recent years public health care insurance has become a major issue. In this paradigm shift, one of the roles of nursing in the community is to train people to become more autonomous as consumers of health care services, and to design and implement a system that enhances community members' health and provides support when they are ill. In 1990 and 1996, the national nursing curriculum was revised to reflect changes in the age of the population. Community health nursing now faces the challenge of developing a new nursing model that is in tune with Japanese cultural values. Dr. Katsunuma (1996) proposed two alternative approaches to health care services: the public health approach and the clinical approach. In this paper, it is suggested that home care offers a third alternative, which integrates the clinical approach with the public health approach. This third approach provides a paradigm for community health nursing that integrates individual health care with community health care. New roles and specialties for public health nurses include care management, care planning, community health nursing administration, and supervision. Community-based nursing centers that cooperate with schools of nursing will provide a setting and a concept for community health nursing. PMID:9444239

Noji, A

1997-01-01

86

[Health literacy - a concept for professional nursing?].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Research results show that health literacy is an important concept in nursing. It has a positive effect on the health of individuals as well as on the costs of the healthcare system. The results of a comprehensive literature search (1980 - March 2009) revealed that the concept of health literacy is being increasingly discussed; however, the concept is barely addressed in literature specific to nursing. The existing definitions of health literacy are formulated predominantly within the medical context. Only one study from the United States analyzed the concept within the context of nursing care. The concept of health literacy is highly relevant because its' aim is to empower the patients, along with their relatives, in dealing with health and disease. In order to thoroughly examine health literacy, it must first be reviewed conceptually within the context of the profession of nursing. This has occurred in this article. The specific terms relevant to health literacy were identified. Moreover, an operational definition for health literacy was developed for the professional nursing setting. Possibilities for nursing practice, due to the conceptualization of health literacy, are discussed.

Thilo F; Sommerhalder K; Hahn S

2012-12-01

87

Associations between family characteristics and public health nurses' concerns at children's health examinations.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

RATIONALE: The family and the way it functions have a key role for the health and well-being of children and adolescents. Approximately 10-30% of children grow up in families where their health and well-being may be endangered or weakened. There is very little research data on public health nurses' concerns in connection with children's health examinations related to family characteristics. AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of children's gender, age, family structure, mother's employment status and parents' perception on the sufficiency of income with public health nurses' concerns on physical and psychosocial health at children's health examinations. METHODS: In 2007-2009, information about children's health and well-being and their background factors was collected from the health examinations of altogether 6506 children in Finland using a cross-sectional design. Associations between family characteristics and nurses concern related to physical and psychosocial health and development of children were assessed using logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Physical health and psychosocial issues of school-age children raised most concern in public health nurses. Especially, public health nurses felt concern for the psychosocial development of boys both under and of school age. Family structure and the family's financial situation were associated with public health nurses' concern for children's physical health, psychosocial development and the presence of at least one concern. CONCLUSION: The fact that public health nurses found cause for concern during health examinations was associated with the child's gender, development stage and family characteristic. The research findings may be utilised in planning and targeting health counselling and services in child and school health care. Understanding the role of family characteristics in health and well-being challenges in children is useful in promoting multidisciplinary work in health care.

Poutiainen H; Hakulinen-Viitanen T; Laatikainen T

2013-03-01

88

Nursing informatics competencies: assessment of undergraduate and graduate nursing students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To report the informatics competencies of students in selected undergraduate and graduate nursing programmes, to examine whether informatics competencies differed between the different programmes and to suggest competency-based applications that will strengthen informatics courses and informatics-related content throughout the curricula. BACKGROUND: Nursing students in undergraduate and graduate nursing programmes have different educational backgrounds and different practice experience. Thus, their informatics preparation is apt to be varied, and nursing curricula must reflect this variation while advancing students towards informatics proficiency. However, studies on informatics competency assessment in these nursing students are scarce. DESIGN: A descriptive survey design. METHODS: Data were collected from 289 nursing students using a 30-item Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale via an email sent to students using a LISTSERV mailing list. The email embedded link to the Internet survey package, SurveyMonkey, which included the Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale and demographic questions along with an online consent form. RESULTS: Students in both programmes were competent in three subscale areas: basic computer knowledge and skills, clinical informatics attitude, and wireless device skills. Graduate students reported slightly higher mean competency scores than did undergraduate students in three subscales: clinical informatics role, clinical informatics attitude and wireless device skills. CONCLUSIONS: Findings indicate specific topics for nurse educators to consider when designing informatics curricula. The comparison of undergraduate and graduate students indicates similarities in informatics competencies in terms of areas where students were competent and small mean score differences. Further studies are suggested to examine whether there are differences in informatics competencies between undergraduate and graduate students. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: These results assist nurse educators in determining specific areas of informatics content that need greater focus and inclusion in the design of better nursing educational programmes. Examples of integrating competencies into existing curriculum or informatics courses are suggested.

Choi J; De Martinis JE

2013-07-01

89

Assessing the competence of student nurses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Competence is difficult to define. Continuous assessment of practice, which involves reviewing the literature, is complex. The study involved developing a suitable tool for assessing competent practice of student nurses. The problem was investigated using Personal Construct Theory and Repertory Grid Technique. The findings suggest that trained staff assess the socialisation process of becoming a children's nurse rather than the level of competence.

Hill PF

1998-01-01

90

Health Promoting Behaviors in Nursing Students  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Objective: This descriptive study was planned to determine the behavior of a healthy lifestyle in nursing students who assume the role of nursing care services and education in their future lives. Material-Method: The research was conducted in Hitit University School of Health in November-December 2...

Gulay Yilmazel; Fevziye Cetinkaya; Melis Nacar

91

Assessment of quality of life of Iranian nurses  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Nurses’ Quality Of Life (QOL) may be affected by many different factors that can in turn influence their job competency. The aim of this study was to assess the QOL of Iranian nurses to provide evidence to enable policy makers to take the necessary steps needed to make improvements. Using a cross-sectional study design, we evaluated the QOL of Iranian nurses by the assessment of four health indicators: physical, psychological, social and environmental. A total of 850 nurses from 17 different provinces of Iran were recruited by random sampling. They were requested to complete the World Health Organization QOL-BREF questionnaire. Data were then analyzed. Results indicated that half of the nurses scored in the moderate range, suggesting that they had a reasonably good QOL. They scored considerably higher in terms of physical health indicators and achieved significantly lower scores regarding environmental health issues. Although the ?2 test did not show any significant association between the QOL indicators and different factors such as work experience, gender, job position and patients group. We found a significant association between the subject’s position at work in the hospital shift pattern and their overall QOL score. The results of our study showed that more than half the nurses evaluated their QOL to be at a moderate level. The results from this study can be used by policy makers to help make improvements to nurses’ QOL that may enhance the quality of care they deliver to their patients. Future research including a group of nurses from over the whole country is essential so that a more representative cohort can be studied. It would also pave the way for the establishment of a QOL database for nurses in Iran that could monitor changes in the nursing population.

Maryam Aalaa; Mahnaz Sanjari; Ali Tootee; Ghazanfar Mirzabeigi; Sedighe Salemi

2012-01-01

92

Infusing environmental health concepts into an existing nursing course.  

Science.gov (United States)

The updated American Nurses Association Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice's 16th standard delineates that the practice of RNs be environmentally healthy. This makes explicit the need to incorporate learning activities about environmental health into nursing education courses. The authors describe a simple yet very rewarding undergraduate educational intervention that helped nursing students explore environmental health concepts and related nursing implications. PMID:23086073

Savell, Anita D; Sattler, Barbara

93

Infusing environmental health concepts into an existing nursing course.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The updated American Nurses Association Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice's 16th standard delineates that the practice of RNs be environmentally healthy. This makes explicit the need to incorporate learning activities about environmental health into nursing education courses. The authors describe a simple yet very rewarding undergraduate educational intervention that helped nursing students explore environmental health concepts and related nursing implications.

Savell AD; Sattler B

2012-11-01

94

Public health nurses in rural/frontier one-nurse offices.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

INTRODUCTION: Public health nursing is the foundation of the United States' (US) public health system, particularly in rural and remote areas. Recent increasing interest in public health in the USA has highlighted that there is limited information available about public health nursing in the most isolated areas, particularly in the US. The purposes of this study were to: (1) describe the characteristics, competency levels, and practice patterns of public health nurses (PHNs) working in remote one-nurse offices; and (2) compare PHNs working in one-nurse offices with nurses working in multi-nurse offices in Idaho, in relation to their demographic characteristics, practice patterns and competency levels. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional descriptive design, a statewide sample of 124 PHNs in Idaho, including 15 working in one-nurse satellite offices, were assessed in relation to their demographic characteristics, experience, educational background, job satisfaction, practice characteristics, and competency levels in March to May 2007. RESULTS: The solo (nurses working in one-nurse offices) PHNs were based in 15 different counties, 10 frontier (population density of less than 7 persons/1.6 km(2); 7 persons/mile(2)) and 5 rural. The counties ranged in population from 2781 to 28 114 (mean = 11 013), with population densities ranging from 0.9 to 29.4 persons/1.6 km(2) (mean = 8.6; 0.9 to 29.4 persons/mile(2)). The distance from their offices to the district main office ranged from 25.8 to 241.4 km (mean = 104 km; 16 to 150 miles, mean = 64.6 miles). All the solo PHNs were Caucasian females, with a mean age of 46.9 years and a mean of 22.5 years' nursing experience. Educationally, 7 (47%) held a bachelor degree in nursing, 6 (40%) had associates degrees, 1 (7%) had a diploma in nursing, and 1 (7%) was a licensed practical nurse (LPN). These solo PHNs provided a wide array of services with support from other nurses in the district, including epidemiology, family planning/sexually transmitted disease clinics, immunization clinics, communicable disease surveillance, and school nursing. They expressed strong job satisfaction, citing the benefits of autonomy, variety, and close community ties, but also voiced some frustrations related to isolation. Their self-rated levels of competency were highest in the areas of communication, cultural competency, community dimensions of care, and leadership/systems thinking skills; and lowest in the areas of financial management, analytical assessment, policy development/program planning, and basic public health sciences skills. When the solo PHNs were compared with PHNs based in multi-nurse offices, there were no statistically significant differences between the solo and non-solo PHNs in demographics or competency levels, except in the competency area of community dimensions of practice skills. The mean self-rating for solo PHNs in relation to community dimensions of practice skills was significantly higher (3.9) than non-solo PHNs (3.2) (t = 3.547, p = .002). CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that US PHNs practicing in isolated one-nurse offices in rural and remote communities are comparable to PHNs working in less isolated settings; however, solo nurses may have stronger community dimensions of practice skills. Their practice is more generalized than other PHNs and they express high levels of job satisfaction. The study was limited in that it was conducted in only one state and data were collected only by self-report. Further research is indicated to describe this unique subset of PHNs, particularly in terms of factors promoting recruitment and retention. Additional study into the conceptual aspect of isolation is also indicated in relation to public health practice in rural and remote areas.

Bigbee JL; Gehrke P; Otterness N

2009-10-01

95

Reflective assignments in mental health nursing courses: factors to consider.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

It is important that mental health educators are clear about the nature and practice of reflective processes and their appropriate uses and inherent challenges. Active reflection was developed as a strategy for professional self-improvement in practice-based disciplines. Some mental health nursing courses use reflective exercises as a formal student assessment component. In this article, the authors draw on their experience and the literature to identify issues relating to aspects of the course, educators, and students that are associated with incorporating reflection-related activities as compulsory assessable items in an undergraduate nursing course.

Cleary M; Horsfall J; Hunt GE

2013-02-01

96

Computerized documentation and community health nursing students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background/Objective: Proficiency in computerized documentation systems is an essential element of most areas of nursing practice today. Community health is one example of an area of nursing practice where computerized documentation systems help in the provision of high quality care. Nursing students must learn the basic principles of and begin to participate in the practices of computerized nursing documentation. It is, therefore, the responsibility of nursing faculty to promote student involvement in this important process.Methods: Two different faculty experiences with students participating in computerized nursing documentation were described using different electronic systems, a notebook computer system and a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) system.Results/Conclusions: After reviewing the results of this descriptive experience, it is recommended that before students participate in computerized documentation, they receive written instructions. Sample charts, practice under direct faculty and staff guidance, and standardizing the learning experience are imperative. Educating the student in a technological environment is no longer optional for nurse faculty as the accurate documentation, transmission and management of data assures that the best practices are maintained, the proper billing of visits can be ensured, and the communication between the nursing student and community health nurses, as well as all members of the multi-disciplinary team is fostered.

Nadine M Aktan; Janet Tracy; Connie Bareford

2011-01-01

97

Strain and health implications of nurses' shift work.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: The study investigated whether nurses' different working schedules are associated with different levels of job-related strain, health symptoms and behavior. No reports have been accessible in the relevant literature on the possible association between shift work and job-related strain in nurses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at a large university hospital in North-East Italy, involving 806 nurses working in selected departments. A multilevel logistic regression was applied to assess the association between work shift conditions and selected outcomes. RESULTS: Night shifts were associated not only with higher odds of having a high Job Demand, but also with lower odds of having a high Decision Authority and consequently with a stronger likelihood of having higher levels of Job Strain (high Job Demand score ? 38 and Low Decision Authority). The night shift was associated with various symptoms, particularly exhaustion (p = 0.039) and gastric pain (p = 0.020). Nurses' working schedules did not affect their job satisfaction scores. CONCLUSIONS: It has been confirmed that night shifts are a risk factor for nurses' health perception and working night shifts carries a considerable degree of strain. This is a condition that hospital nursing managements need to consider carefully to avoid burnout in nursing personnel and prevent an excessive turnover in this profession, which is a recurring problem for health care organizations.

Buja A; Zampieron A; Mastrangelo G; Pettean M; Vinelli A; Cerne D; Baldo V

2013-09-01

98

Lena Angevine Warner: pioneer public health nurse.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Lena Angevine Warner was a remarkable early southern nurse who, as a result of her Army experience with the Walter Reed Commission yellow fever experiments in Cuba, directed her life work to disease prevention and public health. This biographic sketch traces her long and productive career from 1889 until her retirement in 1946, and illustrates her significant contributions to public health nursing in the mid-South.

Greenhill ED

1994-06-01

99

Adaptation themes for prenatal care delivered by public health nurses.  

Science.gov (United States)

An adaptation process involving three cognitive themes provides the framework for community nursing model for prenatal care on the island of Hawaii. The themes are based on the cognitive adaptation model developed by Taylor (1983) and include search for meaning, sense of mastery, and self-esteem. Each theme is used to guide public health nurses and is identified during designated encounters between the nurse and woman throughout the duration of prenatal care. A focus on adaptation themes for each trimester of pregnancy expands on the medical model of prenatal care to highlight developmental processes of childbearing and broaden the scope of practice for public health nurses responsible for assessment and intervention in the community. PMID:1409344

Affonso, D D; Mayberry, L J; Graham, K; Shibuya, J; Kunimoto, J; Kuramoto, M

1992-09-01

100

Undergraduate nursing students integrating health literacy in clinical settings.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Analyzing students' performance and self-criticism of their roles in promoting health literacy can inform nursing education in a social environment that expects new graduates to be health promoters. OBJECTIVES: The pilot study reported here aimed to a) analyze students' understanding of and sensitivity to issues of health literacy, (b) identify students' perceptions of structural, organizational, and political barriers to the promotion of health literacy in social and health care organizations, and (c) document students' suggestions for curriculum changes that would develop their skills and competencies as health-literacy promoters. DESIGN: A qualitative pilot study. SETTING: A collaborative undergraduate nursing degree program in the metropolitan area of Toronto, Canada. PARTICIPANTS: Sixteen undergraduate, Year 4 nursing students. METHODS: Signed informed consent was obtained from the participants. Participation was unpaid and voluntary. Recruitment was through an email invitation sent by the School of Nursing Student Affairs Coordinator. Three, one-time individual interviews and three focus groups were conducted. All were audio-recorded. Recordings were transcribed, and the transcriptions were coded using the qualitative software ATLAS ti 6.0. The interview data were submitted to thematic analysis. Additional data were gathered from the two-page self-assessments in students' academic portfolios. RESULTS: Sensitivity to health literacy was documented. Students performed best as health promoters in supportive teaching hospitals. Their performance was hindered by clinical settings unsupportive of health education, absence of role models, and insufficient theoretical preparation for health teaching. Students' sensitivity to their clients' diversity reportedly reinforced the interconnection, in multicultural healthcare settings, between health literacy and other social determinants of health and a growing demand for educating future nurses in expanding their role also as health promoters. CONCLUSIONS: Students recommended more socially inclusive and experiential learning initiatives related to health teaching to address education gaps in classrooms and practice.

Zanchetta M; Taher Y; Fredericks S; Waddell J; Fine C; Sales R

2013-09-01

 
 
 
 
101

Adopting nursing health record standards.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The exploratory investigation described in this paper tried to identify and acknowledge the added value created by the adoption of nursing practice standards. It did so using a case study in a large Portuguese hospital. Following a literature review, five assumptions were proposed. Subsequently, a survey was developed and administered to a sample of nursing staff at the hospital in question. Our results confirmed all but our final assumption, leading to the conclusion that the adoption of standards is beneficial to nursing practice.

Rocha A; Rocha B

2013-08-01

102

Development of a respiratory protection survey instrument for occupational health nurses: an educational project.  

Science.gov (United States)

The Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training outlined seven recommendations to improve the competency of occupational health nurses in respiratory protection. An advisory group was convened in December 2011, with stakeholder representation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health/National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory, American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., American Board for Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare, American Nurses Association, and Institute of Medicine Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health. The initial work of the advisory group included developing and administering a survey to assess current occupational health nurse roles and responsibilities relevant to respiratory protection. Development of the survey was led by a master's student and advisor who worked with the advisory group. The process of tool development and preliminary findings are presented in this article. PMID:23380641

Taormina, Deborah; Burgel, Barbara J

2013-02-01

103

Development of a respiratory protection survey instrument for occupational health nurses: an educational project.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training outlined seven recommendations to improve the competency of occupational health nurses in respiratory protection. An advisory group was convened in December 2011, with stakeholder representation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health/National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory, American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., American Board for Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare, American Nurses Association, and Institute of Medicine Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health. The initial work of the advisory group included developing and administering a survey to assess current occupational health nurse roles and responsibilities relevant to respiratory protection. Development of the survey was led by a master's student and advisor who worked with the advisory group. The process of tool development and preliminary findings are presented in this article.

Taormina D; Burgel BJ

2013-02-01

104

[Teaching nursing administration through health education].  

Science.gov (United States)

This article analyzes a teaching experience in the course of Nursing Administration at a Federal University, with fourth-year students majoring in Nursing. Based on the conception by which unit and care managements are associated, since nurses who manage funds should typically aim at the assistance process and cannot lose sight of the assistance quality, students built a health education proposal to be developed with adolescents at a public school by integrating basic health unit, school, and university. Through this work, students were able to associate theory and practice by carrying out an exercise comprehending planning, decision-making, leadership, teamwork, evaluation, and control. PMID:15603498

Greco, Rosangela Maria

105

[Teaching nursing administration through health education].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article analyzes a teaching experience in the course of Nursing Administration at a Federal University, with fourth-year students majoring in Nursing. Based on the conception by which unit and care managements are associated, since nurses who manage funds should typically aim at the assistance process and cannot lose sight of the assistance quality, students built a health education proposal to be developed with adolescents at a public school by integrating basic health unit, school, and university. Through this work, students were able to associate theory and practice by carrying out an exercise comprehending planning, decision-making, leadership, teamwork, evaluation, and control.

Greco RM

2004-07-01

106

Evaluating and improving nurses' health and quality of work life.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article discusses evaluating and improving the health and quality of work life (QOWL) of nurses. Nurses are reported to have higher illness, disability, and absenteeism rates than all other health care workers. Research suggests that QOWL impacts nurses' health and the provision of quality health care, particularly patient safety. Occupational health nurses have a pivotal role in evaluating and improving nurses' QOWL and health. This will ensure quality health outcomes for nurses and patients and reduce costs for the health care system. PMID:23557346

Horrigan, Judith M; Lightfoot, Nancy E; Larivière, Michel A S; Jacklin, Kristen

2013-04-01

107

Florida public health nurse workforce initiative: opportunity through crisis.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The National Public Health Leadership Institute (NPHLI), a partnership between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill invites public health professionals to participate in a 2 year leadership program. Three Florida nurses participated in the NPHLI along with a cadre of 40 to 50 participants from the United States and foreign countries. Part of the commitment involved implementing a leadership project. This team chose to address the nursing shortage by developing and piloting mentorship program. Baseline research included a basic review of the literature and involvement in several work groups addressing various aspects of employing and retaining qualified public health nurses in Florida. During their NPHLI scholar year, team members sought input from a variety of professional sources on the reasons for the shortage of public health nurses in Florida. Based on responses from nurses, professional association members, and employees in the Florida Department of Health, team members developed a nursing mentorship project designed to address public health nursing retention and education. The goal was to develop a two-pronged mentorship program, which supported the attainment of clinical competence and workplace confidence while also improving the public health theoretical knowledge base of more experienced nurses. Nursing leadership at both the state and local levels agreed and embraced the concept. The Florida Team developed a Mentorship Handbook, which contains recruitment criteria, baseline, midterm and end of project assessment tools, and numerous other documents. The Team gained endorsement for the project and a commitment to see it through from the Department of Health's Nursing Office. The Florida Nurses Association partnered with the team to initiate the kickoff and involve team members in important discussion groups. In effecting change it is vital to have engaged and included the targeted "community" in the process. Achieving buy-in and ownership takes some investing. Time is important, everything seems to take longer than expected-therefore maintaining momentum is critical for team members. Finding resources for an unfunded project can be a challenge. Creative thinking in how the project relates to available resources is important.

2005-06-01

108

Relationship between nurses’ spiritual intelligence with hardiness and general health  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Nursing is one of the stressful jobs that affect nurse's general health. The aim of this study was assessment relationship between Spiritual intelligence, Hardiness and General health among nurses in the hospital of Bushehr in 1388. Methods: Cross- sectional study designed and 125 nurses who have been working in different wards of the hospital enrolled in the study. Data was collected using Spiritual intelligence, Hardiness, General health and characteristics demographic questionnaires. Correlation, t-test, ANOVA, Tukey and regression analysis was applied using SPSS-16 soft ware. Results: The results showed there was significant relationship between spiritual intelligence and hardiness (P<0.005), spiritual intelligence and General health (P<0.005), hardiness and General health (P<0.001). Among the demographic characteristics including age, gender, working section, marital status, job experiences, and education only working section showed significantly correlated with patience (P<0.005). Conclusion: Improvement of spiritual intelligence and reinforcement of hardiness could help to increase the general health of nurses.

Fatemeh Akbarizadeh; Fariborz Bagheri; Hamid Reza Hatami; Abdollah Hajivandi

2012-01-01

109

Can mental health nurses diagnose in Australia?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The naming of health related conditions has been the traditional province of the medical profession. Occasional concessions have been made in specific narrow domains, such as psychology or speech-related pathology, but diagnosis typically has been seen as medical practitioner business. "Ownership" of language is worthy of critical discussion. The answer to why the tradition has persisted, and nurses have invested lots of energy within the established rules of who can say what, may well be found through the lens of psycholinguistics. Nurses can name states of health and ill health using the currently accepted nomenclature. The authors argue that there is an unconditional "yes," to the question of can nurses diagnose, as long as they are not holding themselves out to be a medical practitioner by doing so. Additionally it is argued that advanced practice nurses must diagnose in order to fulfill their role as advanced practice clinicians.

Cashin A; Buckley T; Watson N; Newman C; Carey M; Waters C

2010-12-01

110

Graduate nursing student self-assessment: Fundamental technology skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A gap exists in technology demands in the nursing field as well as appropriate educational strategies to assist students in developing skills to meet these demands. This study assesses graduate nursing students’ perceived skills regarding specific technology related to health care. The results of a brief researcher-developed survey indicated that students’ perceived that technology skills were not critical to entering the nursing field, however, they were critical for their present position and essential for promotion. Respondents indicated they had limited opportunities to utilize these technologies and increase their skill sets and the nurses viewed training and barrier reduction as important to adopting new technology skills.  Implications for nursing education and practice are presented.

Thomas James Virgona

2012-01-01

111

A competency-based approach to public health nursing performance appraisal.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: To integrate public health nursing (PHN) competencies into a comprehensive performance review instrument for nurses at multiple practice levels in an urban public health department. DESIGN: Based on thorough review of PHN competency literature, the tool evaluates performance for 5 nursing practice classifications (Staff RN, Public Health Nurse, Nurse Practitioner, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Nursing Supervisor) in eight PHN domains (assessment, policy development/program planning, evaluation, communication, cultural competency, partnership/collaboration, disease prevention/health promotion, leadership/systems thinking). SAMPLE: Tool was piloted with over 50 nurses from PHN workforce (n>400) of Public Health-Seattle & King County (Washington). METHOD: Pilot testing includes all components of the performance appraisal system: Public Health Competency Grid, statement of general workplace expectations, Nursing Performance Appraisal Tool, and supporting documents defining performance elements by job classification. RESULTS: Supervisors find the tool easy to use and report that it provides opportunity for real communication between employee and supervisor. Nurses at all practice levels report that it effectively describes/evaluates their practice. CONCLUSIONS: This tool is an efficient performance appraisal instrument providing meaningful feedback to nursing employees within a framework of PHN competencies. Adopting such tools in PHN practice can help nurses to better understand their role in population-based public health efforts.

Kalb KB; Cherry NM; Kauzloric J; Brender A; Green K; Miyagawa L; Shinoda-Mettler A

2006-03-01

112

Community environmental health concerns and the nursing process. Four environmental health nursing care plans.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

1. Many clients have concerns about environmental exposures. 2. Nursing care plans can be adapted to guide practice related to environmental health issues including physiologic, behavioral, emotional concerns, and educational needs. 3. Experience and education in counseling, along with sensitivity to client needs and beliefs, make nurses particularly valuable members of the environmental health team.

King C; Harber P

1998-01-01

113

Community environmental health concerns and the nursing process. Four environmental health nursing care plans.  

Science.gov (United States)

1. Many clients have concerns about environmental exposures. 2. Nursing care plans can be adapted to guide practice related to environmental health issues including physiologic, behavioral, emotional concerns, and educational needs. 3. Experience and education in counseling, along with sensitivity to client needs and beliefs, make nurses particularly valuable members of the environmental health team. PMID:9481216

King, C; Harber, P

1998-01-01

114

The attitudes of undergraduate nursing students towards mental health nursing: a systematic review.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To present the findings of a systematic review on (1) the attitudes of undergraduate nursing students towards mental health nursing and (2) the influence of undergraduate nursing education on the attitudes of undergraduate nursing students towards mental health nursing. BACKGROUND: Recruitment and retention of mental health nurses is challenging. Undergraduate nursing students' attitudes towards mental health nursing may influence whether they choose to practice in this specialty upon graduation. DESIGN: A systematic review. METHOD: Searches of the CINAHL, MEDLINE and PsycINFO electronic databases returned 1400 records, of which 17 met the inclusion criteria for this review. A further four papers were obtained through scanning the reference lists of those articles included from the initial literature search. RESULTS: Research on the attitudes of undergraduate nursing students towards mental health nursing has consistently shown that mental health is one of the least preferred areas of nursing for a potential career. With respect to the influence of undergraduate nursing education on the attitudes of students towards mental health nursing, quasi-experimental studies have generally demonstrated that students tended to have more favourable attitudes towards mental health nursing when they had received more hours of theoretical preparation and undertaken longer clinical placements. CONCLUSION: Many nursing students regard mental health nursing as the least preferred career option. Education, via classroom teaching and clinical placements, seems to engender more positive attitudes towards mental health nursing. There is no evidence, however, that changing student attitudes results in more graduates beginning careers in mental health nursing. REFERENCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The constancy of negative attitudes to mental health nursing over time suggests the focus of research should shift. Clinicians have the capacity to promote a more positive view of mental health nursing. This requires further exploration.

Happell B; Gaskin CJ

2013-01-01

115

Priorities and challenges of health system chief nursing executives: insights for nursing educators.  

Science.gov (United States)

The health system chief nursing executive (CNE) is responsible for providing high-quality, service-oriented nursing care; delivering such care with disciplined cost management; leading and developing a group of nursing executives and managers at the facility level to establish nursing professional development programs and to build and maintain an effective supply of nurses; and advocating nurses and patients. This article provides insight into the strategies and priorities of large health system CNEs in balancing their obligations to their health systems, to patients and their families, and to the nurses they lead. It is hoped that these insights will provide perspectives that will support the ability of nursing educators to meet their own obligations to their schools of nursing, the faculty and students they represent, and to the profession. These insights will also set a context for further dialogue between two very important groups of nursing leaders-nursing executives and nursing educators. PMID:16873043

Arnold, Lauren; Campbell, Ann; Dubree, Marilyn; Fuchs, Mary Ann; Davis, Nancy; Hertzler, Barbara; Talarek, Diane; Wessman, Joan

116

Mental health learning needs assessment: competency-based instrument for best practice.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A learning needs assessment focused on psychiatric/mental health nursing competency development is a central component of nursing education in specialty mental health nursing practice. The provision of education for mental health nursing relies on the underlying assumption that the learning needs of experienced mental health nurses have been assessed and educational programs implemented to address educational needs for competency in professional practice. Few professional learning needs assessments have been developed to identify learning needs in mental health nursing practice. The majority of available professional learning needs assessments focus on medical nursing practice applications rather than the psychosocial aspects of a mental health assessment. The mental health field addresses very different assessment criteria such as knowledge of suicide assessment and therapeutic interventions. The purpose of this article is to present and describe the process of developing a learning needs assessment focused on competency development for the specialty practice of mental health nursing that addresses and resolves complex learning needs.

McKnight SE

2013-06-01

117

Assessing the competence of student nurses.  

Science.gov (United States)

Competence is difficult to define. Continuous assessment of practice, which involves reviewing the literature, is complex. The study involved developing a suitable tool for assessing competent practice of student nurses. The problem was investigated using Personal Construct Theory and Repertory Grid Technique. The findings suggest that trained staff assess the socialisation process of becoming a children's nurse rather than the level of competence. PMID:10474405

Hill, P F

1998-01-01

118

Oral health education for pediatric nurse practitioner students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of this study was to evaluate whether an interdisciplinary, multifaceted oral health education program delivered to pediatric nurse practitioner students at the University of California, San Francisco, would improve their knowledge, confidence, attitudes, and behaviors regarding the provision of oral health assessments, consultations, referrals, and services to young children during well-child visits. Thirty pediatric nurse practitioner students were included in the study. Participants completed a written survey before and after receiving an interdisciplinary educational intervention that included didactic education, simulation exercises, and clinical observation by a pediatric dental resident. Between pre-intervention and post-intervention, a significant improvement was seen in the pediatric nurse practitioners' knowledge of oral health topics (p<0.001), confidence when providing oral health counseling (p<0.001), and attitudes about including oral health counseling in their examinations (p=0.006). In the post-intervention survey, 83 percent of the subjects reported having incorporated oral examinations into their well-child visits. Our study suggests that providing an interdisciplinary oral health educational program for pediatric nurse practitioner students can improve their knowledge, confidence, attitudes, and behaviors regarding the incorporation of oral health care services during routine well-child visits.

Golinveaux J; Gerbert B; Cheng J; Duderstadt K; Alkon A; Mullen S; Lin B; Miller A; Zhan L

2013-05-01

119

Community health nursing in migrant farm camps.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The author describes a community health nursing experience in the migrant farm camps of south Georgia. While providing primary healthcare to an underserved migrant farm community, students began to understand the complexities of health, policy, and community organization. Examples are presented that reflect crucial elements of student involvement and barriers to learning.

Bechtel GA

1995-07-01

120

High Stakes: Assessing Numeracy for Nursing  

Science.gov (United States)

The importance of numeracy for professional practice in nursing is increasingly recognized in the USA, UK and elsewhere, but there is no consensus on what is meant by numeracy for nursing, nor on how it should be taught, learned and assessed. Meanwhile, studies in various countries indicate a lack of proficiency in numeracy of some students and…

Coben, Diana; Hodgen, Jeremy; Hutton, Meriel; Ogston-Tuck, Sherri

2008-01-01

 
 
 
 
121

Mental health nurse prescribing: using a constructivist approach to investigate the nurse-patient relationship.  

Science.gov (United States)

ACCESSIBLE SUMMARY: Prescribing medication was previously the monopoly of medical doctors but in recent years suitably qualified mental health nurses among others, have been authorized to prescribe. The nurse-patient relationship is considered paramount in mental health nursing but some mental health nurses are concerned that prescribing may somehow conflict with this relationship. However there has been little reported on the views of mental health nurse prescribers and their clients. In this study clients and other stakeholders from one National Health Service Foundation Trust were interviewed or participated in a focus group regarding their experiences of nurses prescribing medication. Clients in this study believed that nurse prescribing was working well and they were satisfied having their medication prescribed by their nurse. Nurse prescribers believed that their prescribing was well received by their clients and by other professionals. ABSTRACT: Nurse prescribing has been embraced in many areas of nursing, but less so in mental health. Relatively few studies have been published in this field with even fewer asking clients who have their medication prescribed by a mental health nurse about their views. This paper reports findings concerning the mental health nurse prescriber-patient relationship. It draws on data from a qualitative study, which was undertaken in one mental health National Health Service Foundation Trust in England to ascertain the views of clients and other stakeholders (nurse prescribers, pharmacist prescribers, nurse managers and doctors) about nurse prescribing. Data were collected by interview (either face to face or telephone) or focus group. Following Framework analysis, findings revealed that clients liked to have their nurse prescribe for them as they valued the pre-established relationship. They also valued the consistency of seeing the same person and the relative ease of access to appointments. Doctors and nurse managers were aware of positive feedback from clients. Nurse prescribers believed that nurse prescribing provided an enhanced service to clients. PMID:23413877

Ross, J D; Clarke, A; Kettles, A M

2013-02-17

122

Mental health nurse prescribing: using a constructivist approach to investigate the nurse-patient relationship.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

ACCESSIBLE SUMMARY: Prescribing medication was previously the monopoly of medical doctors but in recent years suitably qualified mental health nurses among others, have been authorized to prescribe. The nurse-patient relationship is considered paramount in mental health nursing but some mental health nurses are concerned that prescribing may somehow conflict with this relationship. However there has been little reported on the views of mental health nurse prescribers and their clients. In this study clients and other stakeholders from one National Health Service Foundation Trust were interviewed or participated in a focus group regarding their experiences of nurses prescribing medication. Clients in this study believed that nurse prescribing was working well and they were satisfied having their medication prescribed by their nurse. Nurse prescribers believed that their prescribing was well received by their clients and by other professionals. ABSTRACT: Nurse prescribing has been embraced in many areas of nursing, but less so in mental health. Relatively few studies have been published in this field with even fewer asking clients who have their medication prescribed by a mental health nurse about their views. This paper reports findings concerning the mental health nurse prescriber-patient relationship. It draws on data from a qualitative study, which was undertaken in one mental health National Health Service Foundation Trust in England to ascertain the views of clients and other stakeholders (nurse prescribers, pharmacist prescribers, nurse managers and doctors) about nurse prescribing. Data were collected by interview (either face to face or telephone) or focus group. Following Framework analysis, findings revealed that clients liked to have their nurse prescribe for them as they valued the pre-established relationship. They also valued the consistency of seeing the same person and the relative ease of access to appointments. Doctors and nurse managers were aware of positive feedback from clients. Nurse prescribers believed that nurse prescribing provided an enhanced service to clients.

Ross JD; Clarke A; Kettles AM

2013-02-01

123

Getting eHealth into basic nursing education: report of the RCN information in nursing project.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This paper reports the results of a project undertaken in 2008 by the Royal College of Nursing's Information in Nursing Forum. The project, undertaken by the RCN IN Forum in association with the RCN Education Forum and the RCN Association of Nursing Students, was in two parts. The first part consisted of an on-line survey of nursing students to discover their "readiness" for working in an electronic environment. The second part consisted of a workshop for invited stakeholders - organisations responsible for commissioning and providing basic nursing education, regulators, nurse teachers, and nursing students themselves - the objective of which was to consider the results of the survey and other information, in order to develop a consensus on how best to incorporate eHealth issues into basic nursing education. The survey was undertaken during April 2008 via the RCN website. Students were asked how well they felt their nursing education had prepared them for competencies set out in a previously published model curriculum. 1,120 students responded. 565 students who had used electronic patient records during their most recent clinical placement were asked about their experience. Students rated their basic computer skills much higher than their understanding of eHealth. While they felt competent to document assessments and care plans using paper records, few felt competent to do so using electronic records. Few know anything about telehealth (remote diagnosis and delivery of healthcare) or telecare (assistive technology in people's homes). Among those who had used computers in their most recent clinical placement there were clear breaches of the protocols designed to ensure security and confidentiality. Twenty seven invited participants attended the workshop held in October 2008, plus 12 members of the participating Forums and relevant RCN staff. Following presentation and discussion of the findings of the survey, participants worked in three groups to identify and discuss issues arising from the survey, and to identify barriers using a Force Field Analysis. All participants agreed eHealth should be an integral part of nursing education and not an "add-on", and that the responsibility for "Getting eHealth into basic nursing education" had to be shared by university based educators, placement supervisors, and regulators.

Clark J; Baker B; Baker D

2009-01-01

124

Cystic fibrosis research in allied health and nursing professions.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This report is the result of the "Allied Health and Nursing Professions Working Group" meeting which took place in Verona, Italy, November 2009, which was organised by the European Cystic Fibrosis Society, and involved 32 experts. The meeting was designed to provide a "roadmap" of high priority research questions that can be addressed by Allied Health Professionals (AHP) and nursing. The other goal was to identify research skills that would be beneficial to AHP and nursing researchers and would ultimately improve the research capacity and capability of these professions. The following tasks were accomplished: 1) a Delphi survey was used to identify high priority research areas and themes, 2) common research designs used in AHP and nursing research were evaluated in terms of their strengths and weaknesses, 3) methods for assessing the clinimetric and psychometric properties, as well as feasibility, of relevant outcome measures were reviewed, and 4) a common skill set for AHPs and nurses undertaking clinical research was agreed on and will guide the planning of future research opportunities. This report has identified important areas and themes for future research which include: adherence; physical activity/exercise; nutritional interventions; interventions for the newborn with CF and evaluation of outcome measures for use in AHP and nursing research. It has highlighted the significant challenges AHPs and nurses experience in conducting clinical research, and proposes strategies to overcome these challenges. It is hoped that this report will encourage research initiatives that assess the efficacy/effectiveness of AHP and nursing interventions in order to improve the evidence base. This should increase the quality of research conducted by these professions, justify services they currently provide, and expand their skills in new areas, with the ultimate goal of improving care for patients with CF.

Bradley JM; Madge S; Morton AM; Quittner AL; Elborn JS

2012-09-01

125

An assessment of nurses' knowledge of botulism.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To assess nurses' knowledge of botulism, a Centers for Disease Control Category A bioterrorism agent, one case of which constitutes an emergency. DESIGN: The study utilized survey research. SAMPLE: The cluster sample included 1,414 registered nurses. MEASURE: The survey gathered demographic data and nurses' knowledge of the background, manifestation and management of botulism. RESULTS: The mean percentage of correct answers for the sample was 25.95%, with a standard deviation (SD) of ±19.89%. Only 90 (6.3%) achieved 60% or more correct. Educational preparation, experience, specialty/area of practice and whether nurses had a class in disaster medicine were also examined and although differences were noted, none of these factors accounted for a score of 60% or above. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study indicate the need for an assessment of the current education nurses receive about botulism.

Bork CE; Rega PP

2012-03-01

126

Pain assessment in Hawaii nursing homes.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Nursing home personnel from adult long-term care facilities on Oahu were surveyed on their pain assessment practices with demented and non-verbal residents. Many reported having difficulties evaluating pain in these residents. Observation and standardized pain assessment scales were most frequently used pain assessment methods. Recommendations are made about how to improve pain assessment with demented and non-verbal patients.

Levintova-Romero M; Gotay CC

2002-06-01

127

Management of inpatient aggression in forensic mental health nursing : the application of the Early Recognition Method  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Management of Inpatient Aggression in Forensic Mental Health Nursing. The application of the Early Recognition Method. Forensic mental health nurses take care of forensic patients convicted for an offense for which they were assessed not to be fully accountable due to their psychiatric disorder. For...

Fluttert, F.A.J.

128

Health practices of nursing students: a survey.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study describes the health practices of nursing students from several nursing programs in western New York. Findings from a sample of 1,081 female students who responded to a questionnaire showed considerable variability in the extent to which students engage in health-related practices. While the majority obtain six to eight hours of sleep per night, exercise regularly, and have annual dental and physical examinations, less than half those surveyed eat breakfast everyday, over three-quarters eat between meals, and less than one-half limit fat, salt, and sugar in their diets. Most do not wear seat belts consistently; less than one-third perform breast self-examination monthly; and 90% consume alcoholic beverages and one-quarter have five or more drinks per occasion. Analyses demonstrated a statistically significant relationship between preventive-health orientation scores and age and type of basic nursing education. These data suggest that nurse faculty and health educators need to influence students' health-promoting and disease-preventing behaviors. This need is particularly salient since these students are expected to act as exemplars when they complete their education and assume positions in the health-care system.

Dittmar SS; Haughey BP; O'Shea RM; Brasure J

1989-03-01

129

Origins of Public Health Nursing in Israel  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Israel is now thirty years old, but its community health services date back to the early years of this century when the land was still under Turkish rule. The first written reports on the nursing services appeared in 1912 in New York City in the minutes of a group of Jewish women later known as Hadassah Women’s Organization. Some of the members had visited the Holy Land and, shocked by the state of health of the Jewish poor, saw the urgent need for improving care. It was decided to start with a system of community maternity nursing which would be carried out along the lines of the New York State Legislation. The nurses would be given funds to employ midwives, to supply linen to mothers and babies, and to distribute money for medicine and food to the poor. Furthermore, the nurses were to train probationers for community nursing, give talks to mothers and girls and nursing care to the sick poor. They were to be in contact with Hadassah by letters, monthly reports, and were to use an approved system of bookkeeping.

R. Adams

1978-01-01

130

[Nursing classification in collective health--the International Classification of Nursing Practice in Collective Health project].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Words used by Brazilian nurses in their practice in collective health were identified in the project CIPESC developed in Brazil. The project represented the Brazilian contribution to the international project of ICN and it was developed by managers and 115 researchers in the health basic units of 15 research sites selected all over the country. It was applied 10 research tools and 49 focal groups were performed with the participation of 720 individuals of the nursing staff. The information contained in the focal groups were transcribed and it was submitted to processual and semantic analysis in order to characterize the work process and to contribute for a standardized language used by the nursing staff in collective health field. The results showed what the nurses do and the reasons for their nursing actions.

Antunes MJ; Chianca TC

2002-11-01

131

Assessing the nursing error rate and related factors from the view of nursing staff.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Error is an inevitable aspect of all the professions particularly health and treatment-related jobs and it should be acknowledged that committing it cannot absolutely be preventable. Among the causes that necessitate the evaluation of nursing errors, it should be noted that errors not only lead to damage and mortality for the patients, but also they are one of the obvious and costly problems in the hospitals. It is believed that nurses have the focal role in committing nursing errors.The main objective of this study was to identify nursing errors and the related factors. METHODS: This was a descriptive-correlative study which was conducted in 2010. 239 nurses and head nurses who were working in the selected hospitals in Isfahan were selected randomly and participated in this research. In order to collect the data, two questionnaires were used, each one consisting of three sections of the demographic data, questions about the type of error and the effective factors for making the errors. RESULTS: The highest rate of error was reported about the lack of compiling and reviewing the medical history of the patient (31.75%) and also disregarding the appropriate time for prescription of the medicine (31.75%). Besides, the nurses and head nurses believed in more than one factor for committing the errors and mentioned the managerial factors (84.2%) and patient-related factors (50.5%) as the most important and the least important causes for the commitment of errors respectively. Moreover, there was a direct relationship between gender, ward, and having an extra job with the score of the nursing errors. CONCLUSIONS: Attempts for reducing and controlling the nursing errors can rely on the usage of systemic approaches for assessing the effective factors, removing these factors as much as possible, and designing a system for increasing the level of reporting these errors for identifying the weak points and jeopardizing factors.

Eslamian J; Taheri F; Bahrami M; Mojdeh S

2010-12-01

132

77 FR 41986 - Division of Nursing, Public Health Nursing Community Based Model of PHN Case Management Services  

Science.gov (United States)

...HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Division of Nursing, Public Health Nursing Community Based Model of PHN Case Management Services...OCPS), Community Based Model of Public Health Nursing Case Management Services. This program is...

2012-07-17

133

Mitochondrial health – essential information for nurses  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available One of the most important organelles in the body is the mitochondria. It is crucial for generating energy and producing freeradicals. Mitochondrial health is essential to the prevention and treatment of diseases. However, cellular or molecularmechanisms such as mitochondrial dysfunction are not adequately addressed in the current essentials of the AmericanAssociation of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) for all nursing programs. Thus, mitochondrial function content should beincorporated into all nursing curricula that are practice-based. In this article, we will review the anatomy and physiology ofthe mitochondria (i.e., coenzyme Q10), and the need to include mitochondrial health as a concept in nursing. We willpresent various diseases/conditions that are affected by mitochondrial dysfunction such as coronary artery disease,diabetes, and aging. In the future, with the expanding advances in the biological sciences, nurses need to learn more aboutcellular function particularly the mitochondria. Consequently, there should be a new emphasis on mitochondrial health bynurses in education and practice.

Qiuhua Shen; Elaina Knowles; John B Hiebert; Janet D Pierce

2012-01-01

134

Spirituality and family nursing: spiritual assessment and interventions for families.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: The aim of this paper is to propose a guideline for spiritual assessment and interventions explicitly for families, while considering each family member's unique spirituality. BACKGROUND: Spirituality's positive effect is pervasive in health care and in the lives of many families; therefore, there is a need to integrate spiritual assessment and interventions in total family care. DISCUSSION: The majority of published guidelines on spiritual assessment and interventions are designed predominantly for individuals. They fail to differentiate between individual and family spirituality or offer only brief discussions on family spirituality. Such guidelines are potentially problematic. They may lead nurses to focus only on individual spirituality and neglect to discern family unit spirituality or recognize the presence of conflicts in spiritual perspectives within the family. While other disciplines such as social work and family therapy have several guidelines/strategies to assess family spirituality, there is a dearth of such guidelines in the family health nursing and spirituality literature, in spite of the rhetoric about incorporating spirituality as part of total family assessment. As a beginning solution, guidelines are proposed for spiritual assessment and interventions for the family as a unit, and the category of spiritual interpretation to represent diagnosis is introduced. Case studies exemplify how to integrate the guideline, and illustrate elements that may favour specific interpretations which would guide the interventions. CONCLUSION: As nurses continually strive to assist families with their health needs, they must also attend to their spiritual needs, as one cannot truly assess a family without assessing its spirituality.

Tanyi RA

2006-02-01

135

Public health nursing competencies 1953-1966: effective and efficient.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The Quad Council of Public Health Nursing Organizations developed public health nursing competencies in 2003. They are guides for determining skills at two levels, and they identify public health nurses as providing care to individuals and families or to populations and systems with the nurse having proficiency, awareness, or knowledge. The primary purpose of this paper is to discuss historical nursing roles and qualifications as judged by the 2003 competencies, including educational preparation and experience for the administrative and staff nurse. The historical exemplar for the nursing roles is a combination public/private nursing association, referred to as the partnership, that took place in 1953-1966. Primary sources include archived material from the Instructive Visiting Nurse Association, Richmond, VA. Administrative responsibilities were divided between the chief nurse and the nursing supervisors. Staff nurse responsibilities included clinic activities, home visitation, and referral coordination between health care organizations. The delineation of nursing roles demonstrates nurses' meeting the 2003 competencies. Based on the Quad Council's 2003 public health nursing competencies, the partnership nurses were competent.

Weierbach FM

2007-09-01

136

Are nurses in mental health services providing physical health care for people with serious mental illness? An Australian perspective.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

People with serious mental illness are at high-risk for physical illnesses and premature death, and nurses can contribute to ensuring mental health services address these risks. There is very little research examining the role of nurses in mental health who provide physical health care. To identify the levels of participation in physical health care of people with serious mental illness (SMI), a national Internet-based survey of nurses working in mental health in Australia was conducted (n = 643). The survey included an adapted version of the Robson and Haddad Physical Health Attitude Scale. Data were analysed through comparison of frequencies, correlations, principal components analysis, and Mann-Whitney tests. Nurses reported regular physical health care in 12 of the 17 tasks presented to them. The three most common self-reported physical health care activities were inquiring about consumers' contact with GPs, doing physical assessments, and providing information on drug use and lifestyle. Although some practices were less common (e.g., contraceptive advice) nurses who provided one type of care tended to do other types as well. In addition, credentialing in mental health nursing was associated with slightly more regular engagement in all practice domains except screening and assessments. Nurses in mental health in Australia may be engaged in improving physical health of consumers with SMI more than is assumed.

Happell B; Platania-Phung C; Scott D

2013-03-01

137

Measuring melancholy: a critique of the Beck Depression Inventory and its use in mental health nursing.  

Science.gov (United States)

The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is one of the most commonly used depression measurement instruments. Mental health nurses often utilize the BDI to assess the level of depression in clients, and to monitor the effectiveness of treatments such as antidepressants and electroconvulsive therapy. Despite the widespread use of the BDI in both clinical practice and research, there is surprisingly little nursing literature critically examining the BDI or its use by mental health nurses. This paper reviews the origins, purpose, and format of the BDI, discusses some of the strengths and limitations of the BDI, and concludes with some implications for mental health nursing. PMID:17348961

Hagen, Brad

2007-04-01

138

New Zealand hospice nurses' self-rated comfort in conducting spiritual assessment.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: To measure how comfortable hospice nurses in New Zealand are in conducting spiritual assessment and explore potentially associated factors. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, mixed-methods, descriptive study. SAMPLE AND SETTING: Sixty hospice nurses from three New Zealand hospices. METHODS: An investigator-designed questionnaire measured respondents' comfort with asking patients spiritual assessment questions proposed for use in the health-care literature. Other items assessed personal and work-related factors. Open questions generated data about how these nurses assess spirituality.The data was analysed using measures of central tendency, binomial non-parametric tests, and content analysis. FINDINGS: These nurses were generally comfortable with proposed spiritual assessment questions and perceived spiritual assessment to be important. Personal factors including age, years in nursing, religiosity, and spirituality were not related to this comfort; however, training was associated with comfort. CONCLUSION: These findings underscore the importance of training and show how nurses can be comfortable with and capable of assessing patient spirituality.

Taylor EJ

2013-04-01

139

Assessing and Addressing Health Literacy  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The ability to communicate effectively with patients who have low health literacy depends on our ability to recognize this problem and to create a patient-centered and shame-free healthcare environment. Because of the shame and embarrassment these patients experience, they often use their well-developed coping skills to mask their limited literacy. Although a number of reading- and comprehension-assessment tools are available, there is debate whether or not these tools should be used clinically. This article provides guidance in regard to establishing an environment that promotes health literacy, assessing health literacy levels, utilizing strategies to increase health literacy, evaluating the learning that has occurred, and incorporating health literacy concepts into the nursing curriculum.

Sandy Cornett

2009-01-01

140

Developing nursing capacity for health systems and services research in Cuba, 2008-2011  

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Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Health systems and services research by nursing personnel could inform decisionmaking and nursing care, providing evidence concerning quality of and patient satisfaction. Such studies are rather uncommon in Cuban research institutes, where clinical research predominates. OBJECTIVE: Assess the results of a strategy implemented between 2008 and 2011 to develop nursing capacity for health systems and services research in 14 national research institutes based in Havana. METHODS: The study comprised four stages: description of approaches to health systems and services research by nurses worldwide and in Cuba; analysis of current capacities for such research in Cuba; intervention design and implementation; and evaluation. Various techniques were used including: literature review, bibliometric analysis, questionnaire survey, consultation with experts, focus groups, and workshops for participant orientation and design and followup of research projects. Qualitative information reduction and quantitative information summary methods were used. Initially, 32 nursing managers participated; a further 105 nurses from the institutes were involved in research teams formed during intervention implementation. RESULTS: Of all published nursing research articles retrieved, 8.9% (185 of 2081) concerned health systems and services research, of which 26.5% (49 of 185) dealt with quality assessment. At baseline, 75% of Cuban nurses surveyed had poor knowledge of health systems and services research. Orientation, design and followup workshops for all institute teams developed individual and institutional capacity for health systems and services research. Post-intervention, 84.7% (27) of nurses reached good knowledge and 14.3% (5) fair; institutional research teams were formed and maintained in 9 institutes, and 13 projects designed and implemented (11 institutional, 2 addressing ministerial-level priorities) to research nursing issues at selected centers. CONCLUSIONS: A systematic strategy to build nursing capacity for health systems and services research can be effective in involving nurses in such research and in developing institutional support for it, fostering compliance with Cuban and international professional development priorities for nursing, as well as contributing to quality of patient services.

MPH Nelcy Martínez

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
141

Developing nursing capacity for health systems and services research in Cuba, 2008-2011.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

INTRODUCTION: Health systems and services research by nursing personnel could inform decision-making and nursing care, providing evidence concerning quality of and patient satisfaction. Such studies are rather uncommon in Cuban research institutes, where clinical research predominates. OBJECTIVE: Assess the results of a strategy implemented between 2008 and 2011 to develop nursing capacity for health systems and services research in 14 national research institutes based in Havana. METHODS: The study comprised four stages: description of approaches to health systems and services research by nurses worldwide and in Cuba; analysis of current capacities for such research in Cuba; intervention design and implementation; and evaluation. Various techniques were used including: literature review, bibliometric analysis, questionnaire survey, consultation with experts, focus groups, and workshops for participant orientation and design and followup of research projects. Qualitative information reduction and quantitative information summary methods were used. Initially, 32 nursing managers participated; a further 105 nurses from the institutes were involved in research teams formed during intervention implementation. RESULTS: Of all published nursing research articles retrieved, 8.9% (185 of 2081) concerned health systems and services research, of which 26.5% (49 of 185) dealt with quality assessment. At baseline, 75% of Cuban nurses surveyed had poor knowledge of health systems and services research. Orientation, design and followup workshops for all institute teams developed individual and institutional capacity for health systems and services research. Post-intervention, 84.7% (27) of nurses reached good knowledge and 14.3% (5) fair; institutional research teams were formed and maintained in 9 institutes, and 13 projects designed and implemented (11 institutional, 2 addressing ministerial-level priorities) to research nursing issues at selected centers. CONCLUSIONS: A systematic strategy to build nursing capacity for health systems and services research can be effective in involving nurses in such research and in developing institutional support for it, fostering compliance with Cuban and international professional development priorities for nursing, as well as contributing to quality of patient services.

Martínez N

2012-07-01

142

Implementing and evaluating a professional practice framework in child and family health nursing: a pilot project.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: This paper describes the implementation and evaluation of the NSW Child and Family Health Nursing Professional Practice Framework in one health district in New South Wales, Australia. BACKGROUND: Child and family health nurses provide specialised, community based primary health care to families with children 0-5 years. A state wide professional practice framework was recently developed to support child and family health nurses. METHODS: Online learning, clinical practice consultancies and skill assessments related to routine infant and child health surveillance were developed and implemented. Child and family health nurse reviewers gained competency in the various education and assessment components. Reviewers replicated this process in partnership with 21 child and family health nurses from two rural and one regional cluster. Evaluation questionnaires and focus groups were held with stakeholder groups. FINDINGS: Participation provided nurses with affirmation of clinical practice and competency. Education and assessment processes were user friendly and particularly helpful for rural and remote nurses. Managers reported greater confidence in staff competence following project participation. CONCLUSION: Detailed planning and consultation is recommended before implementation of the Framework. Online learning, skills assessments and model of clinical practice consultancies were identified as central to ongoing orientation, education and professional development.

Guest EM; Keatinge DR; Reed J; Johnson KR; Higgins HM; Greig J

2013-09-01

143

[Improvement of oral health care in geriatric care by training of nurses and nursing assistants for the elderly].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Because oral health among residents of German nursing homes is inadequate, this intervention study evaluated the effects of dental training for nurses and nursing assistants (RN and RA) in homes for the elderly on their assessment of oral health in residents and, as a consequence, on the status of residents' oral health. 53 residents and the RNs and RAs from three homes for the elderly participated in this study. The nursing staff received training in dental health care. As primary outcome, the competence in performing the Brief Oral Health Examination (BOHSE) was measured at baseline date and four months after training. Additional outcome measures were dental and denture hygiene in residents, functional status of dentures, and treatment needs. Dental training was shown to improve the nursing staff's competences in oral health assessment in tendency. Residents' oral hygiene improved significantly, whereas no relevant effects on hygiene and functional status of dentures were registered. The need for dental treatment turned out to be considerable at both measurements. Modifications in test tools with identification of dental treatment needs seem to be indicated in order to improve cooperation between nursing staff and dentists in homes for the elderly.

Jordan R; Sirsch E; Gesch D; Zimmer S; Bartholomeyczik S

2012-04-01

144

[Improvement of oral health care in geriatric care by training of nurses and nursing assistants for the elderly].  

Science.gov (United States)

Because oral health among residents of German nursing homes is inadequate, this intervention study evaluated the effects of dental training for nurses and nursing assistants (RN and RA) in homes for the elderly on their assessment of oral health in residents and, as a consequence, on the status of residents' oral health. 53 residents and the RNs and RAs from three homes for the elderly participated in this study. The nursing staff received training in dental health care. As primary outcome, the competence in performing the Brief Oral Health Examination (BOHSE) was measured at baseline date and four months after training. Additional outcome measures were dental and denture hygiene in residents, functional status of dentures, and treatment needs. Dental training was shown to improve the nursing staff's competences in oral health assessment in tendency. Residents' oral hygiene improved significantly, whereas no relevant effects on hygiene and functional status of dentures were registered. The need for dental treatment turned out to be considerable at both measurements. Modifications in test tools with identification of dental treatment needs seem to be indicated in order to improve cooperation between nursing staff and dentists in homes for the elderly. PMID:22473733

Jordan, R; Sirsch, E; Gesch, D; Zimmer, S; Bartholomeyczik, S

2012-04-01

145

Community health nursing vision for 2020: shaping the future.  

Science.gov (United States)

As health care is shifting from hospital to community, community health nurses (CHNs) are directly affected. This descriptive qualitative study sought to understand priority issues currently facing CHNs, explore development of a national vision for community health nursing, and develop recommendations to shape the future of the profession moving toward the year 2020. Focus groups and key informant interviews were conducted across Canada. Five key themes were identified: community health nursing in crisis now, a flawed health care system, responding to the public, vision for the future, and CHNs as solution makers. Key recommendations include developing a common definition and vision of community health nursing, collaborating on an aggressive plan to shift to a primary health care system, developing a comprehensive social marketing strategy, refocusing basic baccalaureate education, enhancing the capacity of community health researchers and knowledge in community health nursing, and establishing a community health nursing center of excellence. PMID:20660926

Schofield, Ruth; Ganann, Rebecca; Brooks, Sandy; McGugan, Jennifer; Dalla Bona, Kim; Betker, Claire; Dilworth, Katie; Parton, Laurie; Reid-Haughian, Cheryl; Slepkov, Marlene; Watson, Cori

2010-07-26

146

Community health nursing vision for 2020: shaping the future.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

As health care is shifting from hospital to community, community health nurses (CHNs) are directly affected. This descriptive qualitative study sought to understand priority issues currently facing CHNs, explore development of a national vision for community health nursing, and develop recommendations to shape the future of the profession moving toward the year 2020. Focus groups and key informant interviews were conducted across Canada. Five key themes were identified: community health nursing in crisis now, a flawed health care system, responding to the public, vision for the future, and CHNs as solution makers. Key recommendations include developing a common definition and vision of community health nursing, collaborating on an aggressive plan to shift to a primary health care system, developing a comprehensive social marketing strategy, refocusing basic baccalaureate education, enhancing the capacity of community health researchers and knowledge in community health nursing, and establishing a community health nursing center of excellence.

Schofield R; Ganann R; Brooks S; McGugan J; Dalla Bona K; Betker C; Dilworth K; Parton L; Reid-Haughian C; Slepkov M; Watson C

2011-12-01

147

Assessing and appraising nursing students' professional communication  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this research was to define professional communication in nursing and to develop a prototype to assess and appraise communication at a selected college. The research focused on verbal and nonverbal communication between the nurse and the client using a simulated environment. The first objective was to identify the major characteristics of professional communication in nursing. In this study, the characteristics of professional communication emerged from the constant comparison method of the results of research studies in the fields of healthcare and communication. These characteristics became the elements, representative properties, and descriptive dimensions to assess and appraise verbal and nonverbal communication at the college of study. The second objective was to develop a template to assess verbal and nonverbal communication at a selected college. Using a two-fold process, the researcher used the results from the first objective to begin template construction. First, specialists in the fields of communication and nursing established the content validity of the elements, representative properties, and descriptive dimensions. Second, the course educators determined the relevancy and importance of the elements, properties, and descriptive dimensions to the objectives of two courses at the college of study. The third objective was to develop a rubric to appraise nursing students' verbal and nonverbal communication in a videotaped communication review. An appraisal rubric was constructed from an extension of the template. This rubric was then tested by faculty at the selected college to appraise the communication of five students each in the junior and senior years of the nursing program.

Diers, Jane E.

148

Mental health of Chinese nurses in Hong Kong: The roles of nursing stresses and coping strategies  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This study examined the sources of stress and mental health of nurses in Hong Kong. It also attempted to explore the functions of coping strategies in determining the stress and mental health of nurses. Results showed that more than one-third of the nurses could be considered as having poor mental h...

Wong, DFK; Leung, SSK; So, CKO; Lam, DOB

149

Mental Health Promotion among Nursing Students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Problem statement: In the literature, there is no consensus over what constitutes an appropriate model for mental health promotion among nursing students in Thailand. Approach: This quasi-experimental research was conducted to evaluate the effects of mental health promotion intervention. Several activities in this intervention were created for promoting sense of coherence which focused on the manipulation of both internal and external factors that effect mental health. Results: The results revealed that prior to the implementation of mental health promotion intervention, both experimental and control groups demonstrated that there were no significant differences on the mean score of all styles of defense mechanisms and sense of coherence either in total or individual dimensions. After intervention were implemented, however, there were significantly differences between groups using mature defense mechanisms (t = -3.486, pConclusion: These findings reflect the effectiveness of mental health promotion intervention. In order to prepare student nurses most effectively, nursing schools should apply this appropriate interventions with their students.

Choochart Deeromram; Amorn Suwannimitr; Suwadee Jundeekrayom

2010-01-01

150

Pain assessment in Hawaii nursing homes.  

Science.gov (United States)

Nursing home personnel from adult long-term care facilities on Oahu were surveyed on their pain assessment practices with demented and non-verbal residents. Many reported having difficulties evaluating pain in these residents. Observation and standardized pain assessment scales were most frequently used pain assessment methods. Recommendations are made about how to improve pain assessment with demented and non-verbal patients. PMID:12148408

Levintova-Romero, Marya; Gotay, Caroly Cook

2002-06-01

151

An integrative review of spiritual assessment: implications for nursing management.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS: To describe the current 'state of the art' in relation to spiritual assessment, focusing on quantitative, qualitative and generic approaches; to explore the professional implications of spiritual assessment; and to make practical recommendations to managers seeking to promote spiritual assessment in their places of work. METHOD: The paper integrates aspects of a recent systematic review of quantitative approaches to measuring spirituality and a recent meta-synthesis of qualitative research into client perspectives of spiritual needs in health and the principles of generic assessment, before drawing on the wider literature to discuss a number of professional implications and making recommendations to nurse managers. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: The issues to emerge from this paper are (1) that spiritual assessment is an increasingly important issue for nursing practice, (2) that the range of reliable and valid quantitative instruments for use in clinical practice is limited, (3) that there is overlap in the domains and categories of spirituality identified by quantitative and qualitative researchers, and (4) that nurse managers seeking to introduce spiritual assessment will do so in the context of a professional debate about the relevance of spirituality to contemporary practice.

Draper P

2012-12-01

152

Palliative care awareness among Indian undergraduate health care students: A needs-assessment study to determine incorporation of palliative care education in undergraduate medical, nursing and allied health education  

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Full Text Available Purpose: Quality assurance data worldwide suggests that the current healthcare system is providing inadequate care for the dying. Current health care education focuses entirely on cure and care is almost compromised or nonexistent in end-of-life settings. The purpose of this study was to determine palliative care awareness among Indian undergraduate health care students and assess the need for incorporating palliative medicine education into undergraduate health education. Methods: A non-randomized population based study was conducted using 39-point questionnaire. Undergraduate medical, nursing and allied health students of Manipal University were the target population. Results: 326 students participated in the study. 61.7% of students feel that resuscitation is appropriate in advanced metastatic cancer. 67.5% feel that all dying patients need palliative care and most of the students think that palliative care is equivalent to pain medicine, geriatric medicine and rehabilitation medicine. 89% of students think that Morphine causes addiction in palliative care setting. 60.7% of students feel that prognosis should only be communicated to the family. Conclusion: The outcomes of the study showed that the basic knowledge of palliative care among students was inadequate, and students are unprepared and uncertain in their approach of delivering end-of-life care.

Sadhu Sakshi; Salins Naveen; Kamath Asha

2010-01-01

153

Nurses and health information technology: working with and around computers.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Information technology is nearly ubiquitous in health care settings. Nurses need basic computer skills and information literacy to effectively practice nursing. In addition, nurses must be prepared not only to work around complex health information technology, but also to communicate with individuals who can address the underlying problems.

Peace J

2011-07-01

154

ICNP Catalogues for supporting nursing content in electronic health records.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The purpose of this study was to describe sets of nursing concepts including, for example, nursing diagnoses and interventions, which are knowledge-based and clinically relevant to support nursing practice. Health information systems using the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP®) provide a platform for standardized nursing documentation for patients' health care, clinical decision support, and repositories for re-use of clinical data for quality evaluation, research, management decisions and policy development. Clinically relevant sets of ICNP concepts can facilitate implementation of health information systems for nursing. Descriptive analysis was used to examine the types of, and relationships among, existing nursing content sets. Findings included the need for various types of content sets, as represented in ICNP catalogues, for nursing documentation. Five types of ICNP Catalogues included Care Plans, Order Sets, Clinical Templates, Nursing Minimum Data Sets, and Terminology Subsets.

Coenen A; Kim TY; Bartz CC; Jansen K; Hardiker N

2012-01-01

155

ICNP Catalogues for supporting nursing content in electronic health records.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to describe sets of nursing concepts including, for example, nursing diagnoses and interventions, which are knowledge-based and clinically relevant to support nursing practice. Health information systems using the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP®) provide a platform for standardized nursing documentation for patients' health care, clinical decision support, and repositories for re-use of clinical data for quality evaluation, research, management decisions and policy development. Clinically relevant sets of ICNP concepts can facilitate implementation of health information systems for nursing. Descriptive analysis was used to examine the types of, and relationships among, existing nursing content sets. Findings included the need for various types of content sets, as represented in ICNP catalogues, for nursing documentation. Five types of ICNP Catalogues included Care Plans, Order Sets, Clinical Templates, Nursing Minimum Data Sets, and Terminology Subsets. PMID:22874359

Coenen, Amy; Kim, Tae Youn; Bartz, Claudia C; Jansen, Kay; Hardiker, Nicholas

2012-01-01

156

Health and safety risks in nursing  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction: professional hazards create insecurity and frustration to nurses during their clinical work. Aim of this review is to present and analyze daily risks and aggravating factors during the clinical work of nurses. Method: a systematic evaluation of the International and Greek literature findings was undertaken, according to Rogers’ model of analysis. Results: the frame of analysis showed five categories of risks which include: Biological/contagious risks, Chemical factors, Environmental/mechanical risks, Physical dangers, Psychosocial risks. Discussion: biological dangers can be dealt with by using suitable equipment for trauma avoidance and careful execution of nursing tasks. Chemical risks, including exposure to chemotherapeutic medicines, can be prevented by using protective measures such as gloves, masks, goggles and special appliances for preparing medication. The mechanical strain of the musculaskeletical system should be limited by ergonomic equipment and education, while the physical factors such as noise requires depends also on the personal sensitivity of workers. Conclusions: many preventative measures are based simply on the modification and adoption of a new behaviour and do not demand financial resources or special equipment. The strong-will for protecting the health status of nursing staff and promoting the profession are the two main drives in improving nursing working like conditions and the administration of safe care.

Fountouki A.; Theofanidis D.

2010-01-01

157

Mental health nurses in primary care: Qualitative outcomes of the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program.  

Science.gov (United States)

The Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program (MHNIP) is a government-funded programme, which, since 2007, has enabled mental health nurses to work in primary care settings in Australia in collaboration with general practitioners (GPs) or private psychiatrists. To date, small-scale qualitative studies have explored outcomes of the programme from the point of view of nurses, consumers, and the perceptions of GPs. This study reports on an on-line survey of credentialed mental health nurses perceptions of outcomes of the MHNIP. Two hundred and twenty five nurses who worked in MHNIP provided detailed narrative responses that were examined using thematic content analysis. The most commonly-cited outcomes were reductions in symptoms or improved coping, improved relationships, and enhanced community participation. Other reported outcomes included reduced hospitalization or use of state-funded mental health services, better use of health services, the continuation or establishment of meaningful occupation, improved physical health and medication management, less use of coercive interventions, and greater independence. PMID:23528187

Lakeman, Richard

2013-03-26

158

Assessing global partnerships in graduate nursing.  

Science.gov (United States)

North-South partnerships in graduate nursing education can prepare students to address global healthcare issues, increase cultural competence, and build research capacity. However, the current literature does not include a critical and systematic assessment of partnerships using established guidelines. This paper has two objectives: 1) Find and refine a suitable measure to assess a North-South inter-institutional research and clinical partnership in nursing; 2) Pilot test an assessment measure and describe the results of a systematic institutional self-evaluation of a developing North-South research and clinical partnership within a graduate nursing program. The first objective was addressed by searching for, examining and selecting an assessment measure. The second objective was obtained by applying the assessment measure to a developing graduate-level research and clinical partnership between a Canadian School of Nursing and a Malawian College of Nursing; qualitative data collected included information from a document review and subjective experiences of partners. Results showed that when appropriate revisions are made to an existing guideline, it is applicable to use as an assessment measure for North-South inter-institutional research and clinical partnerships. Recommendations for improvement were made, allowing the guideline to be more specific for research and clinical partnerships. Results demonstrated that the existing Canadian-Malawian partnership was strongest in the guideline category of "shaping the purpose and scope of the partnership," and weakest in "partnership implementation and context." This paper implies that: 1) evaluation can strengthen partnerships and enhance educational experience for nursing students; 2) research comparing and contrasting different genres of partnerships could help determine which type is the most appropriate for an institutions' particular outcome goals; and 3) effective establishment and maintenance of North-South partnership occurs through an on-going process of evaluation. PMID:23664107

Birch, Amelia P; Tuck, Jodi; Malata, Address; Gagnon, Anita J

2013-05-09

159

Assessing global partnerships in graduate nursing.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

North-South partnerships in graduate nursing education can prepare students to address global healthcare issues, increase cultural competence, and build research capacity. However, the current literature does not include a critical and systematic assessment of partnerships using established guidelines. This paper has two objectives: 1) Find and refine a suitable measure to assess a North-South inter-institutional research and clinical partnership in nursing; 2) Pilot test an assessment measure and describe the results of a systematic institutional self-evaluation of a developing North-South research and clinical partnership within a graduate nursing program. The first objective was addressed by searching for, examining and selecting an assessment measure. The second objective was obtained by applying the assessment measure to a developing graduate-level research and clinical partnership between a Canadian School of Nursing and a Malawian College of Nursing; qualitative data collected included information from a document review and subjective experiences of partners. Results showed that when appropriate revisions are made to an existing guideline, it is applicable to use as an assessment measure for North-South inter-institutional research and clinical partnerships. Recommendations for improvement were made, allowing the guideline to be more specific for research and clinical partnerships. Results demonstrated that the existing Canadian-Malawian partnership was strongest in the guideline category of "shaping the purpose and scope of the partnership," and weakest in "partnership implementation and context." This paper implies that: 1) evaluation can strengthen partnerships and enhance educational experience for nursing students; 2) research comparing and contrasting different genres of partnerships could help determine which type is the most appropriate for an institutions' particular outcome goals; and 3) effective establishment and maintenance of North-South partnership occurs through an on-going process of evaluation.

Birch AP; Tuck J; Malata A; Gagnon AJ

2013-11-01

160

Lifestyle health promotion interventions for the nursing workforce: a systematic review.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Study aims were to identify the efficacy of lifestyle health promotion interventions intended to improve behavioural health risk factors and/or behavioural or clinical outcomes of working-age nurses. BACKGROUND: Nurses constitute around half the health workforce but global shortages and an ageing profile challenge future supply. The occupational hazards and stresses of nursing are well known. Health promotion, possibly workplace-based, presents opportunities to safeguard the health of nurses. DESIGN: This was a systematic review undertaken in line with guidance for reviews in health care. METHODS: Seven electronic databases were searched from 2000-2011 and references of relevant papers. Two reviewers independently reviewed and critiqued retrieved papers and extracted data. Methodological features were described using the CONSORT checklists; risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Handbook classification. RESULTS: With design inclusion criteria relaxed to include an uncontrolled trial, only three intervention studies were retrieved, from the United States, Canada and Taiwan. All had limitations and high risk of bias, but benefits were reported. Outcomes included fewer cigarettes smoked during the intervention period, down from mean (SD) 20 (8)-12 (9) per day (p < 0·001); significantly reduced fat mass (0·68 vs. 0·07 kg; p = 0·028); and significant gains across a battery of fitness assessments. The paucity of work focused on nurses' health behaviours was the important finding. CONCLUSION: The workplace is a potentially fruitful location for health promotion intervention but nurses have seldom been recognised as a target participant group. Given the international priority ascribed to nursing workforce retention, this is a missed opportunity for occupational health planning. Potential benefits to nurses' welfare and well-being may accrue from well-designed intervention studies. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurse leaders have a key role in driving recognition, spearheading commitment and development of targeted, whole-organisation programmes to promote health profile improvement for the nursing workforce.

Chan CW; Perry L

2012-08-01

 
 
 
 
161

What is good mental health nursing? A survey of Irish nurses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The practice, theory, and preparation associated with nursing people with mental health issues has changed in profound ways in recent decades. This has in part been reflected by a shift in nurses identifying as being mental health rather than psychiatric nurses. Context, theory, and values shape what it means to be a mental health nurse. Thirty experienced mental health nurses in Ireland completed a survey on what good mental health nursing is and a definition induced from their responses. Mental health nursing is a professional, client-centered, goal-directed activity based on sound evidence, focused on the growth, development, and recovery of people with complex mental health needs. It involves caring, empathic, insightful, and respectful nurses using interpersonal skills to draw upon and develop the personal resources of individuals and to facilitate change in partnership with the individual and in collaboration with friends, family, and the health care team. This appears to encapsulate the best of what it meant to be a psychiatric nurse, but challenges remain regarding how to reconcile or whether to discard coercive practices incompatible with mental health nursing.

Lakeman R

2012-06-01

162

Redesigning Nursing Education for Public Health. Report of the Conference, May 23-25, 1973.  

Science.gov (United States)

Proceedings of a conference held May 23-25, 1973 to reassess new approaches to training public health nurses are presented by the Division of Nursing, Public Health Service, DHEW. The 40 participants included nurse educators, nurse practitioners involved ...

D. E. Roberts R. B. Freeman

1973-01-01

163

Nurse education yesterday? A memoir of experiments in mental health nurse education (1987-96).  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

After a decade of community mental health care, the time is ripe for critical evaluation not only of the policy itself, but also of appropriate nurse education. This paper fills some gaps in the historical record of the early years of community care by describing some educational innovations within one of the earliest services to abandon mental hospitals. Whilst it is accepted that the libertarian, experimental nature of the courses described may be accused of contributing to the alleged early failings of community care, it is also suggested that such educational experiences may assist the establishment of positively therapeutic nursing relationships. Current modular courses are generally more tightly structured, highly assessed, research-based and technical. Recent claims suggest that whilst nurses are more highly educated, there may be a reduction in the quality of the caring relationships they establish. This account of largely unreported, process-based courses implicitly suggests that mental health nurse education might be better as a creative synthesis of such theoretical principles with today's more science-based, content-driven courses.

Keen TM

1999-06-01

164

Nursing attitudes and beliefs in pain assessment and management.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS: This paper reports a study to determine nurses' attitudes towards pain assessment tools and the relationship of these attitudes to education and experience. BACKGROUND: The issue of pain management is of interest to caregivers nationally and internationally. For example, in the United States of America, the National Health and Medical Research Council set guidelines to assist clinicians in pain management. Research on whether healthcare teams use pain assessment tools has yielded contradictory findings. METHODS: Using an open-ended questionnaire developed for this study, which was based on Fishbein and Ajzen expectancy-value model, a convenience sample of 52 nurses on an acute care unit were asked: (1) What do you believe about the assessment of pain? (2) What do you believe about the use of pain assessment tools? and (3) What do you believe about the use of pain assessment tools in improving the patient's outcome? The nurses then rated their attitudes about each belief and how each belief made them feel. The data were collected in 2003. Results. When Fishbein and Ajzen's formula for calculating attitude was used, attitude scores ranged from -6 to 28 with an overall mean score of +8.3. The amount of education and experience of each nurse and the attitude measure in regard to the use of pain assessment tools were compared. CONCLUSIONS: The Fishbein and Ajzen model provides a useful way to obtain information on the attitude of nurses towards the use of pain assessment instruments. To provide further information, this study with an open-ended instrument should be followed with a fixed-response survey with a larger sample size and in various settings.

Layman Young J; Horton FM; Davidhizar R

2006-02-01

165

Health issues among nurses in Taiwanese hospitals: National survey.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Few, if any, studies have compared the health issues of nurses working in different hospital settings. The objective of this study was to compare the health status and work-related health hazards among nurses working in different hospital units in Taiwan. METHODS: This study was a cross-sectional survey. The study participants were 21,095 full-time employees with a professional background in nursing, working at 100 hospitals across Taiwan. The study participants responded to a structured questionnaire from May to July, 2011. RESULTS: After adjustment for age, sex, educational level, accredited hospital level, and certification as a health promoting hospital, nurses who worked in administration and in outpatient clinics reported better overall health than nurses who worked in operating rooms/delivery rooms, and these nurses reported better overall health than nurses who worked in emergency rooms/intensive care units and general wards. Depressed mood followed the same trend. Nurses who worked in the operating rooms/delivery rooms, wards, and emergency rooms/intensive care units were at higher risk for occupational incidents than nurses who worked in outpatient clinics and administration. The most prevalent health hazards among nurses were low back pain, sprained/strained muscles, cuts, and verbal or sexual harassment/violence. CONCLUSIONS: Nurses who worked in emergency rooms/intensive care units and in wards had worse health and more depressed moods than nurses in other hospital units. Work-related health hazards were common and varied among nurses working in different hospital units. Worksite-based health promotion programs should take these differences into consideration to tailor wellness programs for nurses working in different hospital settings.

Chiou ST; Chiang JH; Huang N; Wu CH; Chien LY

2013-10-01

166

Nurses' occupational health as a driver for curriculum change emphasising health promotion: An historical research study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Reasons stated for curriculum change in nursing education are usually shifts in knowledge, care delivery, roles, regulatory standards and population health needs. In New Zealand in the 1930s, a curriculum change was driven instead by the need to protect and promote nurses' health. Tuberculosis was an international occupational health risk among nurses. Mary Lambie, New Zealand's chief nurse, considered nursing a "hazardous profession". One remedy she instituted was curriculum change in the national nurse training programme to emphasise health promotion among nurses. Global nursing issues today also impact on nurses' health. Curriculum changes again address this by promoting self-care and resilience. OBJECTIVE: To examine how international and national concern for nurses' occupational health drove a curriculum change in New Zealand nurse training in the 1930s. DESIGN: Historical Research METHODS: International occupational health reports (1930s), Lambie's annual reports (1932-1950), and questions and examiners' comments in a new state examination (1940s-1950s), were analysed to identify the reasons for and direction of the curriculum change. Findings were interpreted within international and national concerns and measures related to occupational health in nursing. RESULTS: Lambie used the political leverage of international and national worry over tuberculosis as a nursing occupational health risk to protect nurses' health more generally. In 1933 she revised the first year of the three-year national nursing curriculum to emphasise personal hygiene and bacteriology related to cross-infection, and in 1938 introduced a State Preliminary Examination at the end of the first year of training to test this knowledge. Analysis of examinations, 1940s-1950s, confirms that the curriculum change driver was a concern to make nursing a less "hazardous profession". CONCLUSION: Nurse educators today should be aware of the variety of factors that can lead to curriculum change in nursing. In addition, concern for nurses' health today demonstrates the continuing need for health promotion in nursing curricula.

Wood PJ

2013-09-01

167

Relationships among nurses' professional self-concept, health, and lifestyles.  

Science.gov (United States)

According to the American Nurses Association, the entire profession of nursing exists to serve and improve society's health. Thus, to become a nurse, individuals must master a body of knowledge surrounding numerous health aspects. While acquiring the unique knowledge, skills, and values of their profession, nurses form perceptions of personal adequacy in their role, known as professional or nurse self-concept. Given the centrality of health to the profession, it would seem logical that nurses would personally value health and integrate core health behaviors into their professional self-concept and everyday lives. Yet the prevailing evidence leaves in question whether nurses associate their personal health and lifestyles with their professional roles. This article explores the relationships among nurse self-concept, health status, and healthy lifestyle practices in a sample of Midwestern nurses in an attempt to better understand if nurses who integrate healthy behaviors into their everyday lives feel a stronger sense of professional adequacy relative to nurses who do not. PMID:20647550

Hensel, Desiree

2010-07-20

168

Relationships among nurses' professional self-concept, health, and lifestyles.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

According to the American Nurses Association, the entire profession of nursing exists to serve and improve society's health. Thus, to become a nurse, individuals must master a body of knowledge surrounding numerous health aspects. While acquiring the unique knowledge, skills, and values of their profession, nurses form perceptions of personal adequacy in their role, known as professional or nurse self-concept. Given the centrality of health to the profession, it would seem logical that nurses would personally value health and integrate core health behaviors into their professional self-concept and everyday lives. Yet the prevailing evidence leaves in question whether nurses associate their personal health and lifestyles with their professional roles. This article explores the relationships among nurse self-concept, health status, and healthy lifestyle practices in a sample of Midwestern nurses in an attempt to better understand if nurses who integrate healthy behaviors into their everyday lives feel a stronger sense of professional adequacy relative to nurses who do not.

Hensel D

2011-02-01

169

Diabetes: increasing the knowledge base of mental health nurses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Physical health assessment for people with a serious mental illness (SMI) has been a neglected issue, with all the evidence showing that mental health nurses (MHNs) and associated practitioners need to develop such skills. The University of Huddersfield and South West Yorkshire Partnership Foundation Trust collaborated in a Physical Skills Project with the aim of facilitating knowledge and skills for MHNs. The development of the education and training workshop is presented. The results of a pre- and post-test evaluation of diabetes, evaluation of the workshop and, finally, implications for practice with regard to transferable knowledge and skill, are discussed.

Hemingway S; Trotter F; Stephenson J; Holdich P

2013-09-01

170

Diabetes: increasing the knowledge base of mental health nurses.  

Science.gov (United States)

Physical health assessment for people with a serious mental illness (SMI) has been a neglected issue, with all the evidence showing that mental health nurses (MHNs) and associated practitioners need to develop such skills. The University of Huddersfield and South West Yorkshire Partnership Foundation Trust collaborated in a Physical Skills Project with the aim of facilitating knowledge and skills for MHNs. The development of the education and training workshop is presented. The results of a pre- and post-test evaluation of diabetes, evaluation of the workshop and, finally, implications for practice with regard to transferable knowledge and skill, are discussed. PMID:24067307

Hemingway, Steve; Trotter, Fiona; Stephenson, John; Holdich, Phillip

2013-09-26

171

The Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program: desirable knowledge, skills and attitudes from the perspective of nurses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: To enhance the understanding of the skills and attitudes of mental health nurses working in the Australian Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program. BACKGROUND: The Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program places qualified mental health nurses alongside community-based general practitioners, private psychiatric practices and other appropriate organisations to provide clients with mental health conditions with a more integrated treatment plan. DESIGN: An exploratory, qualitative approach was undertaken, given the paucity of relevant research in this area. METHODS: Exploratory individual interviews were conducted with ten mental health nurses working in this scheme. Data analysis was organised and managed using QSR NVivo qualitative analysis software. RESULTS: Respondents identified specific skills and attitudes required for practice under the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program. Eight areas of skill and attitude were identified as essential for mental health nurses working in this field. This study highlights that many of these skills and attitudes are specific to the setting where mental health nurses are working. CONCLUSION: Mental health nurses working under this programme have a role to play in the dissemination of knowledge about their practice. More needs to be done by governments and other institutions to ensure that general practitioners and other health professionals understand the role played by mental health nurses in the provision of care. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The extent to which the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program becomes a sustainable strategy to promote quality and accessible mental health care will depend to some degree on the capacity to identify the skills and attitudes necessary for practice. The findings presented in this paper provide a significant contribution to articulating the essential characteristics required for this area of practice.

Happell B; Palmer C; Tennent R

2011-03-01

172

Workforce integration of new graduate nurses: evaluation of a health human resources employment policy.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Historically, economic changes have negatively affected the nursing workforce in Ontario. The trend towards part-time and casual employment emerged from healthcare restructuring in the 1990s. The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in 2003 alerted the Ontario government to the issue of part-time and casual nursing. In 2007, the Nursing Graduate Guarantee (NGG), a health human resources employment policy, was developed as a financial incentive for employers to hire and mentor new graduate nurses for a six-month period. The purpose of this study was to examine facilitators and barriers to policy implementation and assess the impact of the NGG on full-time employment and workforce integration of new graduate nurses in Ontario. A mixed-methods approach was used and included surveys, interviews and focus groups. Results indicated that full-time employment of new graduate nurses increased during the study period and that mentorship facilitated workforce integration of new graduate nurses.

Baumann A; Hunsberger M; Crea-Arsenio M

2011-11-01

173

Health Promoting Behaviors in Nursing Students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: This descriptive study was planned to determine the behavior of a healthy lifestyle in nursing students who assume the role of nursing care services and education in their future lives. Material-Method: The research was conducted in Hitit University School of Health in November-December 2011. All of the 262 students who were studying in the Department of Nursing were included in the study. The survey was applied to 234 students whom can be accessed. A questionnaire included descriptive items and health perceptions of students with the 48-item scale consists of healthy lifestyle behaviors (HPLP) was used as a tool for collecting the data. Results: The mean age of students who participated in this study was 20.40±1.96. The 72.6% of students were female and 27.4% were male, 67.1% of declared that their levels of economic status was moderate, 14.1% of currently smoked, and 70.1% of general health situation was good. It was seen that the average scale scores of HPLP was 121.57±19, 65. The total mean score is 2.53 ± 0:11 according to four scale of likert. The lowest mean score obtained from the subscales was exercise and the highest scores were interpersonal support and self-realization. Total scores of female students taken from the scale of healthy lifestyle behaviors were lower than the male students, but no significant difference was found between the groups. Exercise and stress management scores were higher in male students and the difference between the groups was statistically significant (p<0.05). Health responsibility subscale was highest in second year students. The average scores of self-realization and nutrition sub-groups were high in students whose perception of general health as "good". Conclusion: We determined that student’ scores taken from healthy lifestyle behaviors scale was moderate level. The issues about health protection and health promotion should be more take place in nursing school curricula. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(3.000): 261-270

Gulay Yilmazel; Fevziye Cetinkaya; Melis Nacar

2013-01-01

174

Impact of an educational program on the use of standardized nursing languages for nursing documentation among public health nurses in Nigeria.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: To measure the effect of an educational package on documentation of care among public health nurses (PHNs). METHOD: A quasi-experimental design was adopted. Forty PHNs working in primary healthcare settings were selected. Education was given through a 5-day workshop. Documentation of care was assessed using a modified "Muller-Staub Q-DIO instrument." Data were analyzed using t test third and twelfth months postintervention. FINDINGS: There was a significant improvement on documentation of care at p = .0001. CONCLUSION: Educating PHNs and providing them with standardized nursing care plans enhance documentation of care. IMPLICATION TO PRACTICE: A combination of education on the use of standardized nursing languages and standardized nursing care plans can enhance documentation of care. There is a need for more research on the use of standardized nursing languages in developing nations.

Odutayo PO; Olaogun AA; Oluwatosin AO; Ogunfowokan AA

2013-06-01

175

Nursing services: an imperative to health care marketing  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Nurses comprise a significant portion of the work force in any health care organization. This work force is one having the maximum exposure to patients. Further, they work hand in hand with the various departments of the organization. Though an unintended consequence of nursing care, nurses form a potential marketing tool for any health care organization. In that marketing tool role, however, there are hindrances that nurses face. These may result in an unhappy work environment and potentially impact the overall image of the organization. Added to this, nurses may not always be equipped with the knowledge and expertise they need to meet current demands of their position and thus not promote the best nursing role for marketing purposes. Interestingly, good nursing care goes hand-in-hand with good marketing efforts in spite of this being an unintended consequence. The promotion of a strong and highly capable nursing image is an important strategy in marketing of health care services. The evolution of professional organizations and accreditation agencies has resulted in setting specific standards of practice for nursing graduates. These standards help to ensure delivery of patient care of some predetermined quality. Indirectly this offers marketability to the organization by promotion of the nursing image. At the executive level, nurse leaders can play an important role in development of nursing strategy formulation and at the same time influence strategic marketing design. This paper provides an overview of the role nurses may play in certain aspects of marketing. 

Isaac D. Montoya; Olive M. Kimball

2012-01-01

176

Assessing registered nurses' clinical skills in orthopaedics.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of this article is to explore the views of registered nurses undertaking the new Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), incorporating an integrated preparatory skills workshop. The workshop and the OSCE were audited with particular regard to the student experience. This article describes the audit process and the results of three questionnaires: one carried out before the OSCE assessment, a second immediately after the workshop and a third four days after the assessment. The results provide an insight into the student experience.

Clarke S; McDonald S; Rainey D

2012-06-01

177

Mental Health of Chinese Nurses in Hong Kong: The Roles of Nursing Stresses and Coping Strategies  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study examined the sources of stress and mental health of nurses in Hong Kong. It also attempted to explore the functions of coping strategies in determining the stress and mental health of nurses. Results showed that more than one-third of the nurses could be considered as having poor mental health. While supervisory role produced the highest level of stress, organizational environment also created a substantial amount of stress for nurses. The most frequently used coping strategies were positive ones, including direct action coping and positive thinking. This study confirmed the hypotheses that nurses who adopted more positive and fewer negative coping strategies had better mental health, but failed to substantiate the moderating effects of coping on stress and mental health of nurses. Changes in the hospital care delivery system and socio-cultural factors in Hong Kong were put forward to explain the results. Implications of the findings and limitations of the study were discussed.

Wong, D

2001-01-01

178

Health Beliefs of Nurses about Breast Self Examination  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Breast Self-examination (BSE) appears to be an effective method for earlier detection of breast cancer. Because health behaviors usually result from healthy beliefs, so the cognition of these beliefs related to breast self examinations is essential to design program for promoting this activity. The present study evaluates the healthy beliefs of 420 nurses about BSE in 21 therapeutic centers of Tabriz. Most (90%) of nurses received information about breast cancer and BSE and most (70.2%) nurses had practiced it and frequency of BSE in majority (39%) of nurses was every 2 months and more. Level of perceived susceptibility in most nurses (58.1%) was moderate, level of perceived seriousness in most nurses (56.6%) was good, level of perceived benefits in most nurses (81%) was good, level of perceived barriers in most nurses (52.9%) was poor and level of perceived confidence in most nurses (57.4%) was moderate. Also, there was significant relations between some nurses characteristic and variables of Health Belief Model (p<0.05). Because level of perceived susceptibility and confidence in most nurses was moderate, the provision of specialized training programs in BSE may reinforce positive health beliefs, modify poor health beliefs, increase the awareness of breast cancer and improve the practice of BSE among nurses.

Sousan Valizadeh; Neda Akbari; Aleheh Seyyed Rasuli

2006-01-01

179

Nurses must take lead in health care reform.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The following is excerpted from a speech delivered by Sheila Burke, RN, chief of staff to Sen. Robert Dole (R-KS), to long term care nurses at the American Health Care Association/American Nurses Association Long Term Care Nurses Forum in Orlando, Fla.

Burke S

1992-04-01

180

Teaching caring in nursing: a needs assessment  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Despite the fact that caring is the heart of nursing, there is growing evidence that nurses are not as effective as they ought to be in their caring role. This signifies that more attention needs to be given to the teaching of caring. The aim of this study was to pave the way to initiate the process of research on teaching caring, by suggesting priority areas. The needs assessment design was used for the study. Five steps were involved to achieve the aims. The first was to explore the nature and meaning of caring as presented in the literature. The second was to review completed research on aspects of caring within the nursing context. The third was to investigate the position of caring in the present nursing education system. The fourth was to investigate ways of promoting the teaching of caring as advocated in the literature and the final step based on inferences made from the first four steps was to suggest priority areas for research on teaching caring in nursing.

Hilla Brink

1990-01-01

 
 
 
 
181

The health of nurses aged over 50 in New Zealand.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Abstract The mean age of registered nurses in New Zealand has been rising steadily, and 40% are now aged 50 or over (Nursing Council of New Zealand [NCNZ], 2010). However little is known of this cohort's health-related quality of life. An anonymous on-line survey was emailed to nurses aged over 50 years and members of the New Zealand Nurses Organisation in February and March 2012. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of the 3,273 responses received were undertaken. Nurses aged over 50 remaining in the workforce report their health-related quality of life as better for all measures than standardised scores for age-matched women in New Zealand. Nurses working in more physical environments report higher pain scores than those working in less physical environments, and nurses reporting lower levels of health-related quality of life are more likely to retire sooner and to move to more casual and flexible hours of work as they age.

Clendon J; Walker L

2013-08-01

182

mHealth: Technology for nursing practice, education, and research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Mobile health (mHealth) is a rapidly growing field providing the potential to enhance patient education, prevent disease, enhance diagnostics, improve treatment, lower health care costs and increase access to health care services, and advance evidence-based research. For the field of  nursing the potential capabilities of mHealth are not only for patient care but for delivery of nursing education to our future practicing nurses, providing a means of communication between healthcare professionals located close and at greater geographic distances, and provides access to information and personal monitoring for geographically isolated clients. Although mHealth capabilities’ value appears significant for training, and practice, there remains a significant need for research and evaluation of the devices that now appearing in the health care marketplace. The National Institute of Nursing Research’s strategic plan includes supporting research to develop and test the flood of health apps to assist clients in the management of their health. The purposes of this paper are to: 1) discuss the importance of mHealth in nursing practice, education, and research, and 2) describe the mHealth initiatives underway at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing as exemplars to stimulate mHealth research and promote nursing role in providing health care to patients in this age of information technology.

Willa Marlene Doswell; Betty Braxter; Annette DeVito Dabbs; Wendy Nilsen; Mary Lou Klem

2013-01-01

183

Nurse Staffing and Quality of Patient Care. Evidence Report/Technology Assessment Number 151.  

Science.gov (United States)

To assess how nurse to patient ratios and nurse work hours were associated with patient outcomes in acute care hospitals, factors that influence nurse staffing policies, and nurse staffing strategies that improved patient outcomes. Higher registered nurse...

C. Mueller R. L. Kane S. Duval T. Shamliyan T. J. Wilt

2007-01-01

184

Continuing education and self-assessment of knowledge of nurse leaders.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: The rapid increase in the scope and quality of knowledge in the health care field requires continuing education for nurses, especially nurse leaders. METHODS: A survey was conducted among 296 nurse leaders from 15 hospitals, accounting for 87% of all hospital nurses in Slovenia. RESULTS: The survey showed that participation in continuing education was lowest among younger nurse leaders, those with lower leadership positions, and those employed at medium-sized general hospitals and specialized (nonpsychiatric) hospitals. The total number of continuing education hours did not affect self-assessment of knowledge among nurse leaders. CONCLUSION: Slovenia's experiences in this area indicate that greater attention must be paid to an equal distribution of continuing education programs among the various groups of nurse leaders. Additionally, it is important to monitor the quality of program implementation.

Kvas A; Seljak J

2013-08-01

185

77 FR 60128 - Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide Program Grantees  

Science.gov (United States)

...Administration Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide Program...expansion supplements of $100,000 to 10 Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide (NAHHA...Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) School of Nursing, 302 Pine Street, Abilene, TX...

2012-10-02

186

42 CFR 413.87 - Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs.  

Science.gov (United States)

...Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs. 413.87 Section 413...Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs. (a) Statutory basis...for approved nursing and allied health education programs and the methodology for...

2012-10-01

187

42 CFR 413.85 - Cost of approved nursing and allied health education activities.  

Science.gov (United States)

...Cost of approved nursing and allied health education activities. 413.85 Section 413...of approved nursing and allied health education activities. (a) Statutory basis...of approved nursing and allied health education activities. (b) Scope....

2012-10-01

188

Assessment of Acute Pain in Nursing Practice in Latvia  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: International Association for the Study of Pain defines pain as annoying sensations and emotions associated with actual or potential tissue damage or is described as such damage. Pains always are considered to be subjective sensations with multidimensional nature composed from physical, emotional and cognitive components. One of the main tasks in pain syndrome effective therapy is the option to perform objective assessment of pain intensity and quality utilizing principle of continuity. Independent surveys on pain management in postoperative period are performed in different countries of the world. Studies analyze effectiveness of both - medical and non-medical measurements in order to reduce pain syndrome. Very few investigations of chronic and acute pain influence on recovery process, progress and outcome of illness, assessment of pain intensity and quality are performed in Latvia. In the case of acute pain chronification, pain perception and management can be changed; pains become inadequately long lasting and may combine with psychogenic pains. According to the data obtained by the World Health Organization, fifty percent patients after injuries or operations have severe and insufferable pains despite the development of acute pain treatment and care. Insufficiently controlled postoperative pains become a risk factor for development of various abnormalities. Aim of the study: To study the usage of postoperative period pain intensity and quality assessment scales in the clinical practice of nursing, as well as availability of these methodsMaterial and methods: Survey utilizes quantitative research method. As an investigation tool was chosen questionnaire. Survey was carried out in the surgical profile wards in Riga and regional clinics of Latvia. Questionnaire embraced 309 nurses, working in the surgical profile.Results: Assessment of acute pains should be considered as the fifth vital sign providing more successful achievement of aims in pain care. Respondents recognize that in pain assessment pain evaluation scales are rarely used. In clinical practice prevails assessment of patient’s subjective condition. Only 5% of nurses – respondents utilize visual analogue scale, 22% - verbal pain scale, 16% - numerical pain rating scale. Investigation data confirm the role of professional experience of nurse in organization of pain assessment and care work, because 98% of respondents mention pain assessment as a constituent of nursing. Conclusions: One of the main objectives in effective therapy of pain syndrome is the possibility to perform objective assessment of pain intensity and quality. This objective should be achieved only with a help of shared team work – nurse, physician, anesthetist and other medical staff.

Iveta Strode; Sandra Seimane

2011-01-01

189

Research Methodology for Real-Time Stress Assessment of Nurses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article presents a research methodology for analysis of stress effects and allostatic load of nurses during daily activities. Stress-related health issues are critical in healthcare workers, in particular nurses. Typical causes of stress include inadequate staffing of nurses for the number and acuity of patients, dealing with difficult patients and families, and lack of autonomy in care delivery decisions. This is all compounded by lack of recovery time while on shift, variable shifts with limited recovery time between days worked, and fatigue from dealing with difficult patients, families, and healthcare workers. Under unresolved stress, the heart rate and other vital parameters may fail to return to the baseline. This study examined the physiological responses of nurses during care on a high-fidelity patient simulation to develop a research methodology and identify physiological parameters suitable for real-time assessment of allostatic load during work. Our results demonstrated that heart rate and heart rate variability can be reliably measured using wearable sensors to assess allostatic load. During this study and our previous related work, we acquired valuable experience regarding selection and deployment of commercially available sensors, system integration, recruitment of subjects, and general research methodology. The research methodology developed and presented in this article can be applied to a number of other applications and experimental protocols.

Milosevic M; Jovanov E; Frith KH

2013-10-01

190

Nurses and teachers: partnerships for green health promotion.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: The term green health promotion is given to health promotion underpinned by the principles of ecological health and sustainability. Green health promotion is supported philosophically by global health promotion documents such as the 1986 Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion and the ecological public health movement. Green health promotion in schools means the practice, the principles of ecological health, and sustainability. METHODS: A literature review revealed a paucity of publications about green health promotion in schools. Literature about nurses and health promotion in schools is generally found in nursing publications. Literature about ecological sustainability in schools is mostly found in teaching publications. RESULTS: This article explores the nexus between nursing and health promotion, and teachers and ecological sustainability. Collaborative partnerships between health and education do not capitalize on programs such as Health Promoting Schools and the School Based Youth Health Nurse Program in Queensland, Australia. The authors consider how collaborative partnerships between health and education in schools can work toward green health promotion. CONCLUSION: Nursing's approach to health promotion and education's approach to ecological sustainability need to be aligned to enhance green health promotion in schools.

Sendall MC; Lidstone J; Fleming M; Domocol M

2013-07-01

191

Spirituality, communication and mental health nursing: the tacit interdiction.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Spirituality was embedded in the underpinnings of nursing when care of the sick was a 'good work' in the medieval monastic Christian tradition and human beings were recognized as spiritual beings. Contemporary mental health nursing practice is slow to recognize the value of the spiritual. This paper explores the nature of spirituality and communication about spirituality in mental health nursing practice. Philosophical, biological, psychiatric and psychological arguments antithetical to spirituality are explored. Effective mental health nursing practice incorporates conceptual frameworks and skills that reflect universal spiritual wisdom by means of various therapeutic modalities.

Fry A

1998-03-01

192

Spirituality, communication and mental health nursing: the tacit interdiction.  

Science.gov (United States)

Spirituality was embedded in the underpinnings of nursing when care of the sick was a 'good work' in the medieval monastic Christian tradition and human beings were recognized as spiritual beings. Contemporary mental health nursing practice is slow to recognize the value of the spiritual. This paper explores the nature of spirituality and communication about spirituality in mental health nursing practice. Philosophical, biological, psychiatric and psychological arguments antithetical to spirituality are explored. Effective mental health nursing practice incorporates conceptual frameworks and skills that reflect universal spiritual wisdom by means of various therapeutic modalities. PMID:9708064

Fry, A

1998-03-01

193

Mental health nurse independent prescribing: what are nurse prescribers' views of the barriers to implementation?  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper reports a pilot study exploring mental health nurse prescribers' perceptions of barriers to prescribing independently but also includes perceptions of barriers to supplementary prescribing. Current prescribing practice as experienced by mental health nurses suggests a need to identify and highlight these barriers. A mixed methodology explanatory sequential study was carried out over 3 months in Scotland in 2008 as part of a Master's degree. A questionnaire was completed by 33 mental health nurse prescribers. A focus group was conducted with 12 mental health nurse prescribers. Participants' views exposed a number of barriers to prescribing previously unidentified in a review of the relevant literature, and concurred with some previously documented barriers. Sixty per cent of mental health nurse prescribers in the study were not prescribing. Barriers identified in the study included concern about how prescribing impacts on the therapeutic relationship, role conflict, lack of support, inappropriateness of prescriber training, remuneration, qualifying to prescribing time, supervision, prescribing policies, clinical governance and nurse management. Nurse prescribing involves increased accountability and responsibility which is not currently recognized in job status or pay banding. Mental health nurse prescribing has the potential to enhance service provision, but until barriers to prescribing have been identified and addressed as part of the process of organizational change, nurse prescribing cannot achieve its maximum potential. PMID:22295995

Ross, J D; Kettles, A M

2012-02-01

194

Mental health nurse independent prescribing: what are nurse prescribers' views of the barriers to implementation?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This paper reports a pilot study exploring mental health nurse prescribers' perceptions of barriers to prescribing independently but also includes perceptions of barriers to supplementary prescribing. Current prescribing practice as experienced by mental health nurses suggests a need to identify and highlight these barriers. A mixed methodology explanatory sequential study was carried out over 3 months in Scotland in 2008 as part of a Master's degree. A questionnaire was completed by 33 mental health nurse prescribers. A focus group was conducted with 12 mental health nurse prescribers. Participants' views exposed a number of barriers to prescribing previously unidentified in a review of the relevant literature, and concurred with some previously documented barriers. Sixty per cent of mental health nurse prescribers in the study were not prescribing. Barriers identified in the study included concern about how prescribing impacts on the therapeutic relationship, role conflict, lack of support, inappropriateness of prescriber training, remuneration, qualifying to prescribing time, supervision, prescribing policies, clinical governance and nurse management. Nurse prescribing involves increased accountability and responsibility which is not currently recognized in job status or pay banding. Mental health nurse prescribing has the potential to enhance service provision, but until barriers to prescribing have been identified and addressed as part of the process of organizational change, nurse prescribing cannot achieve its maximum potential.

Ross JD; Kettles AM

2012-12-01

195

Participatory Design of an Integrated Information System Design to Support Public Health Nurses and Nurse Managers.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

CONCLUSION: Persona-driven design and scenario-based design are feasible methods to design for common work activities in different local health departments. Public health nurses and nurse managers should be engaged in the design of systems that support their work.

Reeder B; Hills RA; Turner AM; Demiris G

2013-09-01

196

[Nursing and environmental health: possibilities of action for health promotion].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This qualitative study aimed at understanding the meanings of participation of the members of the Sub Watershed Committee of the Salgado River, CE, Brazil, subsidizing the health promotion for a sustainable environment as regards water resources; reflecting on the interface between nursing and environment focusing on the component water. The subjects were 18 representatives of the committee. Information were collected through interviews, analyzed by a collective subject's discourse. The understanding of participation by the subjects were summarized in speech synthesis: participation involves social awareness, information, communication in search of solutions that represent the community. The interface of nursing on the committee is presented as a possibility for extension of its object to incorporate the environment in the actions of health promotion.

Lopes Mdo S; Ximenes LB

2011-01-01

197

School Based Youth Health Nurses and a true health promotion approach: The Ottawa what?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Abstract Aim: The purpose of this research is to examine School Based Youth Health Nurses experience of a true health promotion approach. Background: The School Based Youth Health Nurse Program is a state-wide school nursing initiative in Queensland, Australia. The program employs more than 120 fulltime and fractional school nurses who provide health services in state high schools. The role incorporates two primary components: individual health consultations and health promotion strategies. Design/Methods: This study is a retrospective inquiry generated from a larger qualitative research project about the experience of school based youth health nursing. The original methodology was phenomenography. In-depth interviews were conducted with sixteen school nurses recruited through purposeful and snowball sampling. This study accesses a specific set of raw data about School Based Youth Health Nurses experience of a true health promotion approach. The Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion (1986) is used as a framework for deductive analysis. Results: The findings indicate school nurses have neither an adverse or affirmative conceptual experience of a true health promotion approach and an adverse operational experience of a true health promotion approach based on the action areas of the Ottawa Charter. Conclusions: The findings of this research are important because they challenge the notion that school nurses are the most appropriate health professionals to undertake a true health promotion approach. If school nurses are the most appropriate health professionals to do a true health promotion approach, there are implications for recruitment and training and qualifications. If school nurses are not, who are the most appropriate health professionals to do school health promotion? Implications for Practice: These findings can be applied to other models of school nursing in Australia which emphasises a true health promotion approach because they relate specifically to school nurses' experience of a true health promotion approach.

Su YE; Sendall MC; Fleming M; Lidstone J

2013-02-01

198

[Family, home visiting and nursing: reviewing the work process of nursing in collective health  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The authors discuss the conceptualization of the therm family through sociohistorical transformations of the societies. The finality of this study was to retake the discussion concerning home visiting as a health care instrument in Collective Health Nursing.

Egry EY; da Fonseca RM

2000-09-01

199

Selecting CD-ROM databases for nursing students: a comparison of MEDLINE and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL).  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

With the introduction of the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) on CD-ROM, research was initiated to compare coverage of nursing journals by CINAHL and MEDLINE in this format, expanding on previous comparison of these databases in print and online. The study assessed s...

Okuma, E

200

The kind of health service that nurses want.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

What nurses see as an effective, efficient health service: In summary, an effective efficient health service in New Zealand will be based on: 1) Keeping what's good in our current service. 2) A nursing voice in decision-making about services. 3) Looking for successful models to follow. 4) The government having a major role. 5) Collective responsibility for funding. 6) Accountability and consultation. 7) Stability in industrial relations. 8) A strong, diverse nursing and midwifery service.

Bickley J

1991-06-01

 
 
 
 
201

Health insurance exchanges: A call for nursing action.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

State health insurance exchanges will provide the opportunity for consumers to have options regarding health insurance coverage. Nurses have a vital role to play in the implementation of exchanges. Knowing the basic facts about how these exchanges will work, what the benefits will be, and access to reliable information sources will enable nurses to provide trusted guidance. The development of this new insurance marketplace is also an opportunity to address the long-standing barriers to advance practice registered nurses (APRN) practice.

Gardner DB

2013-05-01

202

Occupational health nursing and the quest for professional authority.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Occupational health nurses provide most of the in-plant health care services in U.S. industry but have dubious credentials to provide care for many of the injuries and illnesses they encounter. The nurses work directly for the employer in an atmosphere designed to control employer costs and employee benefits. Their loyalty to the company and limited autonomy make it unlikely that they will represent the workers' interests. They generally embrace any expansion of their roles within the company. However, employers and government have made no serious effort to determine whether nurses can adequately take on these new functions and advance occupational health. A nurse-directed model carries the risk that nurses who are not knowledgeable enough about the law, or are overly committed to reducing costs, may overdelegate responsibilities, thereby aiding and abetting the unlicensed practice of nursing. This overreaching is part of an ill-conceived effort to establish nursing as a profession with the greater independence, expertise, and control over training that longstanding professions such as medicine and law have achieved. An extensive literature devoted to the approval and acceptance of occupational health nursing exists, yet constructive criticism of occupational health nursing is almost nonexistent. Occupational health and safety is much too important to be largely relegated to an inadequately defined semi-profession, striving to attain higher professional status and control while lacking the expertise, power, professional standards, and autonomy required of a profession.

Draper E; Ladou J; Tennenhouse DJ

2011-01-01

203

Promoting critical perspectives in mental health nursing education.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

ACCESSIBLE SUMMARY: Contested philosophical, conceptual, social and ethical dimensions of contemporary mental health nursing practice should be addressed in pre-registration educational curricula. By interlinking knowledge and being, educational curricula can encourage students to become 'critical practitioners'. Issues of students' knowledge, self-awareness and personal development can be promoted via engagement with selected literary texts. ABSTRACT: This paper explores themes relevant to mental health nursing using the example of one educational module of a nursing degree. The authors argue that the educational preparation of mental health nursing students in higher education must address certain contested philosophical, conceptual, social and ethical dimensions of contemporary mental health care practice. These themes are discussed within the context of a third-year mental health nursing module within a Scottish nursing degree programme. By interlinking epistemology and ontology, the notion of student as 'critical practitioner', involving the encouragement of 'critical thinking', is developed. This is shown via engagement with parallel perspectives of the sciences and the humanities in mental health. Narratives of student nurse engagement with selected literary texts demonstrate the extent to which issues of knowledge, self-awareness and personal development are central to a student's professional journey as they progress through an academic course. The paper concludes by suggesting that these 'critical perspectives' have important wider implications for curriculum design in nursing education. Insights from critical theory can equip nurse educators to challenge consumerist tendencies within contemporary higher education by encouraging them to remain knowledgeable, critical and ethically sensitive towards the needs of their students.

McKie A; Naysmith S

2013-04-01

204

Improving information technology competencies: implications for psychiatric mental health nursing.  

Science.gov (United States)

While substantial evidence links information technology (IT) with improved patient safety, care quality, access, and efficiency, nurses must demonstrate competencies in computers, informatics, and information literacy in order to use IT for practice, education, and research. The nursing profession has established IT competencies for all nurses at beginning and experienced levels. Newly revised standards also articulate role-specific expectations for advanced practice nurses. Unfortunately, there is a concern that many nurses may not possess these capabilities and that nurse educators are not prepared to teach them. IT competency evaluations, which have focused predominately on nursing education, indicate novice skill levels for most faculty and students. In numerous studies, again conducted largely in nursing education, significant improvement in IT competencies has been achieved only with intensive interventions. Deficits in IT competencies are a significant concern, because the federal government has mandated full implementation of Electronic Health Records (EHR) by 2014. EHR will require all nurses to use IT to deliver, document, and obtain reimbursement for patient care. In response to these concerns, two recent initiatives, the "Health Information Technology Scholars (HITS)" and "Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER)" projects, have been launched. By enhancing IT competencies, these projects will enable nurses to use evidence-based practice and other innovations to transform clinical care, education, and research. This report updates psychiatric-mental health nurses on the IT competencies literature, recent enhancement initiatives and innovations, and their implications for the specialty. PMID:19148816

Fetter, Marilyn S

2009-01-01

205

Improving information technology competencies: implications for psychiatric mental health nursing.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

While substantial evidence links information technology (IT) with improved patient safety, care quality, access, and efficiency, nurses must demonstrate competencies in computers, informatics, and information literacy in order to use IT for practice, education, and research. The nursing profession has established IT competencies for all nurses at beginning and experienced levels. Newly revised standards also articulate role-specific expectations for advanced practice nurses. Unfortunately, there is a concern that many nurses may not possess these capabilities and that nurse educators are not prepared to teach them. IT competency evaluations, which have focused predominately on nursing education, indicate novice skill levels for most faculty and students. In numerous studies, again conducted largely in nursing education, significant improvement in IT competencies has been achieved only with intensive interventions. Deficits in IT competencies are a significant concern, because the federal government has mandated full implementation of Electronic Health Records (EHR) by 2014. EHR will require all nurses to use IT to deliver, document, and obtain reimbursement for patient care. In response to these concerns, two recent initiatives, the "Health Information Technology Scholars (HITS)" and "Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER)" projects, have been launched. By enhancing IT competencies, these projects will enable nurses to use evidence-based practice and other innovations to transform clinical care, education, and research. This report updates psychiatric-mental health nurses on the IT competencies literature, recent enhancement initiatives and innovations, and their implications for the specialty.

Fetter MS

2009-01-01

206

The perceived health promotion practice of nurses in Saudi Arabia.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The health promotion practice of nurses working in Saudi Arabia is unidentified. The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceived health promotion practice of staff nurses in Saudi Arabia. This was achieved by surveying the views of nurses (n = 614), doctors (n = 130) and patients (n = 322) in 10 hospitals located in the Eastern Province of the country using a self-report questionnaire. There was agreement that nurses had the necessary skills to promote health in general and had sufficient knowledge to promote health in the three specific areas explored: physical activity, smoking cessation and weight control. However, the findings also showed that the majority of participants wanted nurses to give priority to acute care over health promotion within the hospital setting and that patients dislike nurses asking about health-related behaviours when these are not directly relevant to their presenting health problems. Concerns were also raised about the language and cultural competency of a largely migrant nursing workforce to effectively communicate health promotion messages to patients. In view of the findings, policy-makers in Saudi Arabia need to consider providing appropriate training programmes for nurses to introduce the wider concept of their health promotion role. Health promotion protocols, strategies and standards to support nurses to more effectively implement health promotion with their routine practice are also required. It is suggested that, while reliance on a largely migrant workforce who do not speak Arabic continues, the potential benefits of a good quality interpretation service to improve nurse-patient communication should be considered.

Aldossary A; Barriball L; While A

2013-09-01

207

Perceived competence and comfort in respiratory protection: results of a nationwide survey of occupational health nurses.  

Science.gov (United States)

In response to the Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training, a nationwide survey was conducted in May 2012 to assess occupational health nurses' educational preparation, roles, responsibilities, and training needs in respiratory protection. More than 2,000 occupational health nurses responded; 83% perceived themselves as competent, proficient, or expert in respiratory protection, reporting moderate comfort with 12 respiratory program elements. If occupational health nurses had primary responsibility for the respiratory protection program, they were more likely to perceive higher competence and more comfort in respiratory protection, after controlling for occupational health nursing experience, highest education, occupational health nursing certification, industry sector, Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare membership, taking a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health spirometry course in the prior 5 years, and perceiving a positive safety culture at work. These survey results document high perceived competence and comfort in respiratory protection. These findings support the development of targeted educational programs and interprofessional competencies for respiratory protection. PMID:23429638

Burgel, Barbara J; Novak, Debra; Burns, Candace M; Byrd, Annette; Carpenter, Holly; Gruden, MaryAnn; Lachat, Ann; Taormina, Deborah

2013-02-25

208

Perceived competence and comfort in respiratory protection: results of a nationwide survey of occupational health nurses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In response to the Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training, a nationwide survey was conducted in May 2012 to assess occupational health nurses' educational preparation, roles, responsibilities, and training needs in respiratory protection. More than 2,000 occupational health nurses responded; 83% perceived themselves as competent, proficient, or expert in respiratory protection, reporting moderate comfort with 12 respiratory program elements. If occupational health nurses had primary responsibility for the respiratory protection program, they were more likely to perceive higher competence and more comfort in respiratory protection, after controlling for occupational health nursing experience, highest education, occupational health nursing certification, industry sector, Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare membership, taking a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health spirometry course in the prior 5 years, and perceiving a positive safety culture at work. These survey results document high perceived competence and comfort in respiratory protection. These findings support the development of targeted educational programs and interprofessional competencies for respiratory protection.

Burgel BJ; Novak D; Burns CM; Byrd A; Carpenter H; Gruden M; Lachat A; Taormina D

2013-03-01

209

Are premenstrual symptoms associated with health anxiety in nursing graduates?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: This study examined retrospectively the relationship between premenstrual symptoms and health anxiety. Methods: Premenstrual symptoms of nursing school graduates were assessed in 1985 and again in 1991 using the Premenstrual Assessment Form (PAF). A total of 571 women completed the survey in 1991, along with items relating to their physical and mental health. The latter included depression, anxiety, and panic attacks. Health anxiety was also assessed using the Whiteley Index (WI). After women who were amenorrheic for any reason were excluded, a final sample of 410 women aged 25 to 52 years was obtained. Factor analyses yielded 57 items that were useful for calculating a total PAF score. A stepwise multivariate linear regression model was used to find the association of PAF scores with various participant characteristics. Results: Thirty-kone of the 410 (7.6%) women had WI scores of ?5 and were considered to have significant health-related anxiety. The PAF score had statistically significant associations with health anxiety, as well as depression and anxiety. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the premenstrual symptoms often coexist with health anxiety as well as other psychological symptoms. Clinicians should be alert to the fact that PMS may be associated with treatable psychiatric conditions.

Yinghui Xu; Russell Noyes; Arthur J. Hartz; Barcey T. Levy; Jeanette M. Daly; Susan R. Johnson

2011-01-01

210

Public health nursing pioneer: Jane Elizabeth Hitchcock 1863-1939.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Jane Elizabeth Hitchcock was one of many distinguished nursing leaders of the 19th and early 20th centuries who attended a women's college before enrolling in a nurse training school. Like many of her contemporaries with equally impeccable family credentials, Hitchcock was something of an enigma to her family for choosing nursing over teaching, the most common acceptable career for women of her social class. Hitchcock's endowment of character, according to contemporary Lavinia Dock, exemplified the best of her Puritan roots. Her contributions to the evolution of public health nursing and the integration of public health nursing content into curriculums of training schools rivalled the achievements in higher education of her famous father, grandfather, and brother but garnered no comparable recognition. Her life presents an interesting case for analysis of an independent woman, a characteristic shared by many pioneers in the early years of public health nursing: 1893 to 1920.

Hawkins JW; Watson JC

2003-05-01

211

Kibbutz Nursing: An Exemplar of Primary Health Care  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Kibbutz nursing has long been established as a role that addresses the needs of a community’s health that arises from the underlying philosophy of the kibbutz communal structure. Despite the number of years of this nursing practice, there is a paucity of literature concerning its development and scope. While parallels may exist with other rural and remote nursing services throughout the world, the kibbutz philosophy of "each according to his ability and to each according to his needs" has governed the important areas of education, labor, and the provision of health to its members. This model of nursing care illustrates a number of examples of primary health principles that can be adapted and applied in other rural nursing practices. The article discusses problems nurses face in such an intimate setting as the kibbutz.

Ellen Ben-Sefer

2006-01-01

212

Kibbutz Nursing: An Exemplar of Primary Health Care  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Kibbutz nursing has long been established as a role that addresses the needs of a community’s health that arises from the underlying philosophy of the kibbutz communal structure. Despite the number of years of this nursing practice, there is a paucity of literature concerning its development and scope. While parallels may exist with other rural and remote nursing services throughout the world, the kibbutz philosophy of "each according to his ability and to each according to his needs" has governed the important areas of education, labor, and the provision of health to its members. This model of nursing care illustrates a number of examples of primary health principles that can be adapted and applied in other rural nursing practices. The article discusses problems nurses face in such an intimate setting as the kibbutz.

Ellen Ben-Sefer

2005-01-01

213

An innovative approach to health promotion experiences in community health nursing: a university collaborative partnership.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The number of nurses working in community-based practices with a population focus is increasing rapidly, whereas the rate of employment for nurses in hospitals is expected to grow more slowly. The shift in health care toward primary health care and health promotion requires nurse educators to ensure that students learn to practice in collaborative partnerships in community settings. This article describes an innovative collaborative partnership with the Capstone College of Nursing and the Office of Health Promotion and Wellness at The University of Alabama. Through this partnership, community health nursing students provide health promotion for university employees in the University's wellness program. The program provides nursing students with a unique opportunity for interprofessional collaboration while improving their clinical and communication skills. This innovative collaborative approach serves as a useful model for nursing faculty members when delivering community health instruction.

Carter MR; Kelly RK; Montgomery M; Cheshire M

2013-02-01

214

Japanese development and testing of the network establishment practices scale for community and public health nurses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The practices required by community and public health nurses to establish community networks mainly involve communicative competencies. Assessment through development and testing of such competencies is necessary for community and public health nurse educators and practitioners around the world to create and maintain a mutual support network. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a scale for community and public health nurse practices to establish and maintain community networks, and to then determine construct validity in a factorial structure model. The participants were 3970 community and public health nurses in Japan. A 43-item list was developed from a literature review, individual interviews, and repeated examinations. The secondary structural model consisted of four factors with 21 items. The internal consistency of the 21 items was highly reliable (Cronbach's ??=?0.915). Confirmatory factor analysis by structural equation modeling showed the fit criteria to be statistically significant. Attributes of the community and public health nurses (age, years of experience, work municipalities, work positions, and educational institutions) showed significant relationships with the scale scores. The findings validated the efficacy of the Network Establishment Practices Scale to assess community and public health nurse practices to establish community networks.

Koshida M; Morita T

2013-03-01

215

Japanese development and testing of the network establishment practices scale for community and public health nurses.  

Science.gov (United States)

The practices required by community and public health nurses to establish community networks mainly involve communicative competencies. Assessment through development and testing of such competencies is necessary for community and public health nurse educators and practitioners around the world to create and maintain a mutual support network. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a scale for community and public health nurse practices to establish and maintain community networks, and to then determine construct validity in a factorial structure model. The participants were 3970 community and public health nurses in Japan. A 43-item list was developed from a literature review, individual interviews, and repeated examinations. The secondary structural model consisted of four factors with 21 items. The internal consistency of the 21 items was highly reliable (Cronbach's ??=?0.915). Confirmatory factor analysis by structural equation modeling showed the fit criteria to be statistically significant. Attributes of the community and public health nurses (age, years of experience, work municipalities, work positions, and educational institutions) showed significant relationships with the scale scores. The findings validated the efficacy of the Network Establishment Practices Scale to assess community and public health nurse practices to establish community networks. PMID:23205766

Koshida, Mihoko; Morita, Takae

2012-12-04

216

Impaired work functioning due to common mental disorders in nurses and allied health professionals: the Nurses Work Functioning Questionnaire.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: Common mental disorders (CMD) negatively affect work functioning. In the health service sector not only the prevalence of CMDs is high, but work functioning problems are associated with a risk of serious consequences for patients and healthcare providers. If work functioning problems due to CMDs are detected early, timely help can be provided. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop a detection questionnaire for impaired work functioning due to CMDs in nurses and allied health professionals working in hospitals. METHODS: First, an item pool was developed by a systematic literature study and five focus group interviews with employees and experts. To evaluate the content validity, additional interviews were held. Second, a cross-sectional assessment of the item pool in 314 nurses and allied health professionals was used for item selection and for identification and corroboration of subscales by explorative and confirmatory factor analysis. RESULTS: The study results in the Nurses Work Functioning Questionnaire (NWFQ), a 50-item self-report questionnaire consisting of seven subscales: cognitive aspects of task execution, impaired decision making, causing incidents at work, avoidance behavior, conflicts and irritations with colleagues, impaired contact with patients and their family, and lack of energy and motivation. The questionnaire has a proven high content validity. All subscales have good or acceptable internal consistency. CONCLUSION: The Nurses Work Functioning Questionnaire gives insight into precise and concrete aspects of impaired work functioning of nurses and allied health professionals. The scores can be used as a starting point for purposeful interventions.

Gärtner FR; Nieuwenhuijsen K; van Dijk FJ; Sluiter JK

2012-02-01

217

Promoting self awareness in undergraduate nursing students in relation to their health status and personal behaviours.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The purpose of this article is to report the experience of facilitating, delivering and evaluating a health assessment workshop as part of Assessing and Promoting Health module on the Bachelor of Nursing Science (BNSc) General and Intellectual Disability programme. This module is delivered to 65 nursing students (40 general and 25 intellectual disability) undertaking the first year of the four year programme. The aim of the workshop is to promote health awareness among these undergraduate students. The objectives are to provide students with time to self assess their health knowledge and lifestyle practices. From this students' current health behaviours are discussed in conjunction with recommendations from the Department of Health and Children (DOHC) (2005). Students are then provided with an opportunity to assess the stresses they perceive in their own lives and this is followed by a relaxation session guided by the facilitators. The teaching methods focus mostly on active student participation, demonstration and experience sharing.

Healy D; Mc Sharry P

2011-07-01

218

Community health nursing and cooperative extension: a natural partnership.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Community health nursing and cooperative extension represent two influential and respected disciplines in rural and frontier communities. The history and philosophy of the two disciplines reveal commonalities related to community-based health promotion and dissemination of research. A review of the extension and health sciences literature revealed some evidence of collaboration between extension and health science professionals, however very little documentation specifically of nurses' involvement with extension professionals. An exemplar of a highly effective ongoing cooperation between rural public health nurses and extension educators in one Idaho county is provided. This local interdisciplinary effort has resulted in enhanced community health promotion services, positive interprofessional relationships, and maximization of scarce resources. Nursing-extension collaboration presents creative opportunities for interdisciplinary practice, research, and educational innovations to enhance the health of rural and frontier communities.

Bigbee JL; Hampton C; Blanford D; Ketner P

2009-10-01

219

Community health nursing and cooperative extension: a natural partnership.  

Science.gov (United States)

Community health nursing and cooperative extension represent two influential and respected disciplines in rural and frontier communities. The history and philosophy of the two disciplines reveal commonalities related to community-based health promotion and dissemination of research. A review of the extension and health sciences literature revealed some evidence of collaboration between extension and health science professionals, however very little documentation specifically of nurses' involvement with extension professionals. An exemplar of a highly effective ongoing cooperation between rural public health nurses and extension educators in one Idaho county is provided. This local interdisciplinary effort has resulted in enhanced community health promotion services, positive interprofessional relationships, and maximization of scarce resources. Nursing-extension collaboration presents creative opportunities for interdisciplinary practice, research, and educational innovations to enhance the health of rural and frontier communities. PMID:19866387

Bigbee, Jeri L; Hampton, Carol; Blanford, Diane; Ketner, Paulette

2009-10-01

220

School based youth health nurses and a true health promotion approach: the Ottawa what?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: The purpose of this research is to examine School Based Youth Health Nurses (SBYHN) experience of a true health promotion approach. BACKGROUND: The School Based Youth Health Nurse Program is a state-wide school nursing initiative in Queensland, Australia. The programme employs more than 120 fulltime and fractional school nurses who provide health services in state high schools. The role incorporates two primary components: individual health consultations and health promotion strategies. DESIGN/METHODS: This study is a retrospective inquiry generated from a larger qualitative research project about the experience of school based youth health nursing. The original methodology was phenomenography. In-depth interviews were conducted with 16 school nurses recruited through purposeful and snowball sampling. This study accesses a specific set of raw data about SBYHN experience of a true health promotion approach. The Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion (1986) is used as a framework for deductive analysis. RESULTS: The findings indicate school nurses have neither an adverse or affirmative conceptual experience of a true health promotion approach and an adverse operational experience of a true health promotion approach based on the action areas of the Ottawa Charter. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this research are important because they challenge the notion that school nurses are the most appropriate health professionals to undertake a true health promotion approach. If school nurses are the most appropriate health professionals to do a true health promotion approach, there are implications for recruitment and training and qualifications. If school nurses are not, who are the most appropriate health professionals to do school health promotion? Implications for practice: These findings can be applied to other models of school nursing in Australia which emphasises a true health promotion approach because they relate specifically to school nurses' experience of a true health promotion approach.

Su YE; Sendall MC; Fleming M; Lidstone J

2013-04-01

 
 
 
 
221

Nursing home administrator self-assessed preparedness.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND:: Nursing home administrators (NHAs) are in key positions to improve nursing home quality. NHAs require state-level licensure, which involves passing a national NHA licensure examination and fulfilling state-level licensure requirements that vary widely across states. With multiple pathways to NHA licensure, little is known about NHAs' preparation and training to meet the complex demands of this position. PURPOSE:: The aim of this study was to explore NHAs' self-assessed person-job fit based on NHAs' self-rated preparedness and the importance of the activities that supported their preparation. METHODOLOGY/APPROACH:: A descriptive cross-sectional design was used to collect data from NHAs (N = 175) randomly recruited from nursing homes in five states, with a mailed self-administered questionnaire. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, correlations, and t tests/ANOVA. FINDINGS:: Thirty percent of respondents reported they were well prepared, overall, for their first NHA position. The findings suggest NHA preferences for more formalized ways to develop their entry-level competencies, with lower preference for On-the-job training, Previous job experience, and Self-study and higher preference for Administrator-in-training, Bachelor's degree programs, and Mentoring. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:: There is an urgent need for NHAs who are well prepared to effectively address our nation's mandates for nursing home quality improvement. With multiple pathways to NHA licensure, this exploratory study provides initial insights about NHAs' self-assessed preparation and training. The findings suggest that NHAs prefer more formalized ways to prepare for the NHA position. Research is needed to identify specific teaching/learning practices and on-the-job training that maximize the NHAs' preparation to meet their job demands.

Siegel EO; Leo MC; Young HM; Castle NG

2013-05-01

222

Mental health nurses working in primary care: Perceptions of general practitioners.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program (MHNIP) was established across Australia during 2007. Under the guidelines for the program, mental health nurses work in partnership with general practitioners (GPs) to assist in the assessment and treatment of those with more severe mental health problems. This paper provides insights, from the perspective of GPs, on the qualities required of mental health nurses seeking employment in the primary care setting. A descriptive, exploratory approach was employed to isolate relevant themes. Discussion groups were conducted with 25 GPs involved with the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program. These discussion groups were audio-taped, transcribed, and analyzed using content analysis. Five overarching thematic clusters emerged from the data: (i) 'fitting in'; (ii) knowledge; (iii) skills; (iv) supporting GPs; and (v) educating GPs. While GPs recognize the valuable contribution that mental health nurses can make in the treatment of those with mental health problems, this appears to be dependent on the knowledge and skills of the nurses involved and their ability to engage with GPs. Ongoing education and other practical interventions are required to ensure that GPs are better informed about the initiative.

Meehan T; Robertson S

2013-10-01

223

Mental health nurses working in primary care: Perceptions of general practitioners.  

Science.gov (United States)

The Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program (MHNIP) was established across Australia during 2007. Under the guidelines for the program, mental health nurses work in partnership with general practitioners (GPs) to assist in the assessment and treatment of those with more severe mental health problems. This paper provides insights, from the perspective of GPs, on the qualities required of mental health nurses seeking employment in the primary care setting. A descriptive, exploratory approach was employed to isolate relevant themes. Discussion groups were conducted with 25 GPs involved with the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program. These discussion groups were audio-taped, transcribed, and analyzed using content analysis. Five overarching thematic clusters emerged from the data: (i) 'fitting in'; (ii) knowledge; (iii) skills; (iv) supporting GPs; and (v) educating GPs. While GPs recognize the valuable contribution that mental health nurses can make in the treatment of those with mental health problems, this appears to be dependant on the knowledge and skills of the nurses involved and their ability to engage with GPs. Ongoing education and other practical interventions are required to ensure that GPs are better informed about the initiative. PMID:23020105

Meehan, Tom; Robertson, Samantha

2012-10-01

224

The development and evaluation of a measure assessing school nurses' perceived barriers to addressing pediatric obesity.  

Science.gov (United States)

School nurses represent an important resource for addressing pediatric obesity and weight-related health. However, school nurses perceive numerous barriers that prevent them from addressing the weight-related health of students. The current study developed and tested a new, comprehensive measure of nurses' perceptions of 10 types of barriers to addressing pediatric weight in a nationally representative sample of 214 school nurses. The measure was developed in the context of Bronfenbrenner's (1979) ecological systems theory and includes subscales assessing nurses' perceptions of skills-based, job-related, and societal barriers. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) provided evidence for the validity of the measure, including the three barrier subscales. In addition, the subscales demonstrated adequate internal consistencies. Results indicate that school nurses perceive barriers to addressing weight-related health on multiple ecological levels, which may inform intervention or continuing education efforts. Future pediatric weight programs that involve school nurses might consider using the measure to assess nurses' perceptions of barriers. PMID:21705515

Wu, Yelena P; Steele, Ric G

2011-06-24

225

Assessing the impact on nursing practice of CDMS.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Two perspectives for assessing the impact of clinical data management systems on nursing are suggested. The microscopic view is the unit-level, direct patient care perspective. A macroscopic view entails consideration of national nursing issues. Nursing role issues can arise during system selection and implementation and these issues can affect system effectiveness. Professional issues influence the decisions made about CDMS and subsequent system usefulness to nursing. A shift in evaluation emphasis from time savings to assessment of effect is necessary. Suggested nursing areas to be examined are system impact on the development and use of nursing theory in practice, support for the cognitive work of nursing, and changes in the physical work of nursing.

Milholland K

1986-01-01

226

Assessing the impact on nursing practice of CDMS.  

Science.gov (United States)

Two perspectives for assessing the impact of clinical data management systems on nursing are suggested. The microscopic view is the unit-level, direct patient care perspective. A macroscopic view entails consideration of national nursing issues. Nursing role issues can arise during system selection and implementation and these issues can affect system effectiveness. Professional issues influence the decisions made about CDMS and subsequent system usefulness to nursing. A shift in evaluation emphasis from time savings to assessment of effect is necessary. Suggested nursing areas to be examined are system impact on the development and use of nursing theory in practice, support for the cognitive work of nursing, and changes in the physical work of nursing. PMID:3794509

Milholland, K

1986-01-01

227

Screening physical health? Yes! But...: nurses' views on physical health screening in mental health care.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore nurses' views on the role of nurses in screening and monitoring for physical care of consumers with serious mental illness, at a regional mental health care service. BACKGROUND: People with serious mental illness experience heightened incidence of preventable and treatable physical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Screening and monitoring are considered universal clinical safeguards. Nurses can potentially facilitate systematic screening, but their views on physical health care practices are rarely investigated. DESIGN: Qualitative exploratory study. METHOD: Focus group interviews with 38 nurses of a regional mental health care service district of Australia. To facilitate discussion, participants were presented with a screening system, called the Health Improvement Profile (HIP), as an exemplar of screening of physical health risks by nurses. Inductive data analysis and theme development were guided by a thematic analysis framework. RESULTS: Nurses argued that treatable and preventable physical health problems were common. Four main themes were identified: screening - essential for good practice; the policy-practice gap; 'screening then what?' and, is HIP the answer? Screening and monitoring were considered crucial to proper diagnosis and treatment, however, were not performed systematically or consistently. Nurse readiness for an enhanced role in screening was shaped by: role and responsibility issues, legal liability concerns, funding and staff shortages. Participants were concerned that lack of follow up would limit effectiveness of these interventions. CONCLUSIONS: Screening was considered an important clinical step in effective diagnosis and treatment; however, identified barriers need to be addressed to ensure screening is part of a systemic approach to improve physical health of consumers with serious mental illness. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses have potential to influence improvement in physical health outcomes for consumers of mental health services. Such potential can only be realised if a systematic approach to physical health care is taken.

Happell B; Scott D; Nankivell J; Platania-Phung C

2013-08-01

228

Nurses' perceptions about health sector privatization in Turkey.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: The aim of this study is to identify the perceptions of the nurses about the privatization implementation, as it pertains to privatization, health services privatization and the impact of privatization on nursing in Turkey. BACKGROUND: Turkey is taking important steps in health services privatization but the related choices made in political arena are not shared with the employees of the health institutions where the privatization implementations are to take place. METHODS: The study was conducted among nurses who are working for the state health institutions and the members of professional organizations of healthcare workers, which are operating in Istanbul in Turkey. Data were collected via Nurses' Privatization Perception Scale in 2009 and were analysed using mean calculations, analysis of variance, Mann-Whitney U-test, t-test, Kruskal-Wallis test and Cronbach's alpha analyses. FINDINGS: Nurses' perceptions of privatization in general, health services privatization and the impact of privatization on nursing were found to be negative in all of the three sub-domains of the scale, as well as their perceptions of privatization implementations measured throughout the scale. The conducted comparisons showed that nurses' perceptions of the privatization implementations varied in accordance with independent variables. CONCLUSIONS: The privatization implementations put in place in health services are perceived negatively by nurses. Policy makers in relevant fields are recommended to take the findings of this study into consideration.

Harmanci Seren AK; Yildirim A

2013-09-01

229

School Nurses' Perceptions and Practices of Assisting Students in Obtaining Public Health Insurance  

Science.gov (United States)

|Background: From January through June 2009, 6.1 million children were uninsured in the United States. On average, students with health insurance are healthier and as a result are more likely to be academically successful. Some schools help students obtain health insurance with the help of school nurses. Methods: This study assessed public school…

Rickard, Megan L.; Hendershot, Candace; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Price, James H.; Thompson, Amy

2010-01-01

230

Developing nursing capacity for health systems and services research in Cuba, 2008-2011  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in english INTRODUCTION: Health systems and services research by nursing personnel could inform decisionmaking and nursing care, providing evidence concerning quality of and patient satisfaction. Such studies are rather uncommon in Cuban research institutes, where clinical research predominates. OBJECTIVE: Assess the results of a strategy implemented between 2008 and 2011 to develop nursing capacity for health systems and services research in 14 national research institutes based in (more) Havana. METHODS: The study comprised four stages: description of approaches to health systems and services research by nurses worldwide and in Cuba; analysis of current capacities for such research in Cuba; intervention design and implementation; and evaluation. Various techniques were used including: literature review, bibliometric analysis, questionnaire survey, consultation with experts, focus groups, and workshops for participant orientation and design and followup of research projects. Qualitative information reduction and quantitative information summary methods were used. Initially, 32 nursing managers participated; a further 105 nurses from the institutes were involved in research teams formed during intervention implementation. RESULTS: Of all published nursing research articles retrieved, 8.9% (185 of 2081) concerned health systems and services research, of which 26.5% (49 of 185) dealt with quality assessment. At baseline, 75% of Cuban nurses surveyed had poor knowledge of health systems and services research. Orientation, design and followup workshops for all institute teams developed individual and institutional capacity for health systems and services research. Post-intervention, 84.7% (27) of nurses reached good knowledge and 14.3% (5) fair; institutional research teams were formed and maintained in 9 institutes, and 13 projects designed and implemented (11 institutional, 2 addressing ministerial-level priorities) to research nursing issues at selected centers. CONCLUSIONS: A systematic strategy to build nursing capacity for health systems and services research can be effective in involving nurses in such research and in developing institutional support for it, fostering compliance with Cuban and international professional development priorities for nursing, as well as contributing to quality of patient services.

Nelcy Martínez, MPH

2012-07-01

231

Health promotion: the conception among nurses working in the Family Health Program  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the conception of Health Promotion among nurses working in the Family Health Program. Methods: This was a qualitative descriptive study, conducted in five Primary Health Care Units that are connected to the Family Health Program, in the city of Juiz de Fora - MG, Brazil, from March to April, 2010. Subjects were five nurses, one from each participating unit, randomly selected, according to their availability and acceptance to participate in the study. Data collection used semi-structured interview technique. The speeches were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results: From the analysis of the speeches it was evident that nurses misunderstand health promotion and prevention. They unanimously cited the role of educator played by nurses. Conclusion: The nurses were found to have a distorted conception of health promotion and health practices are still developed based on a preventive approach. Concept of health promotion generates questions among the studied group, therefore, it should be more discussed by nurses.

Priscila Araújo Rocha; Teresa Cristina Soares; Beatriz Francisco Farah; Denise Barbosa de Castro Friedrich

2012-01-01

232

42 CFR 413.85 - Cost of approved nursing and allied health education activities.  

Science.gov (United States)

...2009-10-01 false Cost of approved nursing and allied health education activities...DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.85 Cost of approved nursing and allied health education...

2009-10-01

233

42 CFR 413.87 - Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs.  

Science.gov (United States)

...false Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education programs...PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs...87 Payments for Medicare+Choice nursing and allied health education...

2009-10-01

234

78 FR 54255 - HRSA's Bureau of Health Professions Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship Program  

Science.gov (United States)

...Health Professions Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship Program AGENCY: Health Resources...announcing a change to its Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship (AENT) program. Effective...Joan Wasserman, DrPH, RN, Advanced Nursing Education Branch Chief, Division of...

2013-09-03

235

Enfermagem na saúde da criança: estudo bibliográfico acerca da avaliação nutricional La enfermería en la salud del niño: estudio bibliográfico sobre la evaluación nutricional Nursing in child's health: bibliography study on assessment nutritional  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar a produção científica acerca da atuação do enfermeiro na saúde nutricional da criança. Estudo bibliográfico realizado entre abril e maio de 2008, nas bases de dados online, com descritores: avaliação nutricional, antropometria, crescimento, criança. Critérios de inclusão: saúde infantil na avaliação nutricional, enfermeiro/autor e artigos publicados entre 2000 e 2007. Encontraram-se 15 artigos nos seguintes anos: 2000 (1), 2001 (1), 2002 (2), 2003 (4), 2005 (1), 2006 (3) e 2007 (3). Periódicos inscritos nas áreas: enfermagem (1), nutrição (1), saúde pública (3) e médica (1). Tipo de estudo: epidemiológicos (1), descritivos (5), transversais (7), longitudinal (1), estudo de caso (1), revisão de literatura (1) e relato de experiência (1). Unidades temáticas: avaliação nutricional mediante acompanhamento do crescimento e desenvolvimento infantil; fatores determinantes da nutrição infantil e avaliação nutricional como cuidado de enfermagem. Ressalta-se que o enfermeiro tem buscado fundamentação teórica e prática para cuidar da criança com déficit nutricional.Analizar la producción científica que existe sobre el papel que desempeña el enfermero en la salud nutricional del niño. Estudio bibliográfico desarrollado entre abril y mayo/2008 usando bases de datos en línea, a través de los siguientes descriptores: evaluación nutricional, antropometría, crecimiento, niño. Se aplicaron los siguientes criterios de inclusión: salud infantil en la evaluación nutricional, enfermero/autor y artículos publicados entre 2000 y 2007. Se encontraron 15 artículos en los años: 2000 (1), 2001 (1), 2002 (2), 2003 (4), 2005 (1), 2006 (3) e 2007 (3). Periódicos inscriptos en las áreas: enfermería (1), nutrición (1), salud pública (3) y médica (1). Tipo de estudio: epidemiológicos (1), descriptivos (5), transversales (7), longitudinales (1), estudio de caso (1), revisión de literatura (1) y relato de experiencia (1). Unidades temáticas: evaluación nutricional mediante acompañamiento del crecimiento y desarrollo infantil; factores determinantes de la nutrición infantil y evaluación nutricional como cuidado de la enfermería. Descata el hecho que el enfermero ha buscado desarrollar una fundamentación teórico/práctica para cuidar del niño con déficit nutricional.To examine the scientific production about the role of nurses in the nutritional health of child. Bibliographic study, held between April and May 2008 in on line databases, with descriptors: nutritional assessment, anthropometry, growth, child. Criteria for inclusion: child health in nutrition assessment, nurse / author and articles published between 2000 and 2007. Meeting 15 articles in the years: 2000 (1), 2001 (1), 2002 (2), 2003 (4), 2005 (1), 2006 (3) e 2007 (3). Regular subscribers in the areas: nursing (1), nutrition (1), health (3) and medical (1). Type of study: epidemiological (1), descriptive (5), Cross (7), longitudinal (1), the case study (1), review of literature (1) and report of experience (1). Thematic units: nutritional assessment by the monitoring of growth and child development by nurses; determinants of children's nutrition and nutritional assessment and nursing care. It is emphasized that the nurse has sought theoretical and practical reasons to take care of children with nutritional deficiency.

Flávia Paula Magalhães Monteiro; Joselany Áfio Caetano; Thelma Leite de Araujo

2010-01-01

236

Enfermagem na saúde da criança: estudo bibliográfico acerca da avaliação nutricional/ Nursing in child's health: bibliography study on assessment nutritional/ La enfermería en la salud del niño: estudio bibliográfico sobre la evaluación nutricional  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar a produção científica acerca da atuação do enfermeiro na saúde nutricional da criança. Estudo bibliográfico realizado entre abril e maio de 2008, nas bases de dados online, com descritores: avaliação nutricional, antropometria, crescimento, criança. Critérios de inclusão: saúde infantil na avaliação nutricional, enfermeiro/autor e artigos publicados entre 2000 e 2007. Encontraram-se 15 artigos nos seguintes anos: 2000 ( (more) 1), 2001 (1), 2002 (2), 2003 (4), 2005 (1), 2006 (3) e 2007 (3). Periódicos inscritos nas áreas: enfermagem (1), nutrição (1), saúde pública (3) e médica (1). Tipo de estudo: epidemiológicos (1), descritivos (5), transversais (7), longitudinal (1), estudo de caso (1), revisão de literatura (1) e relato de experiência (1). Unidades temáticas: avaliação nutricional mediante acompanhamento do crescimento e desenvolvimento infantil; fatores determinantes da nutrição infantil e avaliação nutricional como cuidado de enfermagem. Ressalta-se que o enfermeiro tem buscado fundamentação teórica e prática para cuidar da criança com déficit nutricional. Abstract in spanish Analizar la producción científica que existe sobre el papel que desempeña el enfermero en la salud nutricional del niño. Estudio bibliográfico desarrollado entre abril y mayo/2008 usando bases de datos en línea, a través de los siguientes descriptores: evaluación nutricional, antropometría, crecimiento, niño. Se aplicaron los siguientes criterios de inclusión: salud infantil en la evaluación nutricional, enfermero/autor y artículos publicados entre 2000 y 200 (more) 7. Se encontraron 15 artículos en los años: 2000 (1), 2001 (1), 2002 (2), 2003 (4), 2005 (1), 2006 (3) e 2007 (3). Periódicos inscriptos en las áreas: enfermería (1), nutrición (1), salud pública (3) y médica (1). Tipo de estudio: epidemiológicos (1), descriptivos (5), transversales (7), longitudinales (1), estudio de caso (1), revisión de literatura (1) y relato de experiencia (1). Unidades temáticas: evaluación nutricional mediante acompañamiento del crecimiento y desarrollo infantil; factores determinantes de la nutrición infantil y evaluación nutricional como cuidado de la enfermería. Descata el hecho que el enfermero ha buscado desarrollar una fundamentación teórico/práctica para cuidar del niño con déficit nutricional. Abstract in english To examine the scientific production about the role of nurses in the nutritional health of child. Bibliographic study, held between April and May 2008 in on line databases, with descriptors: nutritional assessment, anthropometry, growth, child. Criteria for inclusion: child health in nutrition assessment, nurse / author and articles published between 2000 and 2007. Meeting 15 articles in the years: 2000 (1), 2001 (1), 2002 (2), 2003 (4), 2005 (1), 2006 (3) e 2007 (3). Reg (more) ular subscribers in the areas: nursing (1), nutrition (1), health (3) and medical (1). Type of study: epidemiological (1), descriptive (5), Cross (7), longitudinal (1), the case study (1), review of literature (1) and report of experience (1). Thematic units: nutritional assessment by the monitoring of growth and child development by nurses; determinants of children's nutrition and nutritional assessment and nursing care. It is emphasized that the nurse has sought theoretical and practical reasons to take care of children with nutritional deficiency.

Monteiro, Flávia Paula Magalhães; Caetano, Joselany Áfio; Araujo, Thelma Leite de

2010-06-01

237

Public health nursing: an autonomous career for World War II nurse veterans.  

Science.gov (United States)

The 1944 G.I. Bill increased accessibility of higher education to male veterans. Less is known about how its availability affected opportunities for female veterans. The purpose of this study was to examine nurse veterans' use of the G. I. Bill at one large public university. Primary sources included archival documents of one large public university as well as articles published in professional nursing and medical journals of the 1940s and 1950s. Secondary sources addressing nursing and nursing education history, and the history of the G. I. Bill provided further context. Historical research methodology was conducted. Findings demonstrate that nurse veterans desired more independence in practice following the war. Archival documents of one large public university show that nurse veterans used G. I. Bill funds to seek degrees in public health nursing. The specialty of public health provided increased independence and autonomy of practice not experienced in hospital based care. G.I. Bill educational funds provided these nurse veterans the means to attain degrees in public health nursing, providing them the opportunity for more autonomous practice. PMID:21736616

Barnum, Nancy C

2011-04-11

238

Public health nursing: an autonomous career for World War II nurse veterans.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The 1944 G.I. Bill increased accessibility of higher education to male veterans. Less is known about how its availability affected opportunities for female veterans. The purpose of this study was to examine nurse veterans' use of the G. I. Bill at one large public university. Primary sources included archival documents of one large public university as well as articles published in professional nursing and medical journals of the 1940s and 1950s. Secondary sources addressing nursing and nursing education history, and the history of the G. I. Bill provided further context. Historical research methodology was conducted. Findings demonstrate that nurse veterans desired more independence in practice following the war. Archival documents of one large public university show that nurse veterans used G. I. Bill funds to seek degrees in public health nursing. The specialty of public health provided increased independence and autonomy of practice not experienced in hospital based care. G.I. Bill educational funds provided these nurse veterans the means to attain degrees in public health nursing, providing them the opportunity for more autonomous practice.

Barnum NC

2011-07-01

239

Creating a brand image for public health nursing.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Public health nurses (PHNs) have declined as a proportion of both the nursing and the public health workforces in the past 2 decades. This decline comes as 30 states report public health nursing as the sector most affected in the overall public health shortage. Taken together, these data point to a need for renewed recruitment efforts. However, the current public images of nurses are primarily those of professionals employed in hospital settings. Therefore, this paper describes the development of a marketable image aimed at increasing the visibility and public awareness of PHNs and their work. Such a brand image was seen as a precursor to increasing applications for PHN positions. A multimethod qualitative sequential approach guided the branding endeavor. From the thoughts of public health nursing students, faculty, and practitioners came artists' renditions of four award-winning posters. These posters portray public health nursing-incorporating its image, location of practice, and levels of protection afforded the community. Since their initial unveiling, these posters have been distributed by request throughout the United States and Canada. The overwhelming response serves to underline the previous void of current professional images of public health nursing and the need for brand images to aid with recruitment.

Baldwin KA; Lyons RL; Issel LM

2011-01-01

240

Nursing, sexual health and youth with disabilities: a critical ethnography.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: To explore the experiences of nurses providing sexual health care to adolescents with physical and/or developmental disabilities, with attention to the institutional and social discourses that shape these interactions. BACKGROUND: Previous research has shown that nurses demonstrate a lack of attention to the impact of illness or disability on sexual health. However, in their therapeutic relationship with patients and families, nurses are in an ideal position to promote sexual health. DESIGN: A critical ethnography study was conducted in an urban paediatric rehabilitative facility. METHOD: Field work occurred over 4 months (2008-2009) and data collection included interviews (n = 9), key informant discussions, collection of documentary evidence and observation of the institutional setting. FINDINGS: Four themes were identified (institutional space, professional interactions, engaging with sexuality, nursing experience), which revealed that nurse-patient interactions about sexual health were affected by a complex network of discourses. These encounters were shaped by practical discourses, such as time and space and by more complex discourses, such as professional relationships, normalization and asexuality. CONCLUSION: Nurses occupy and strive to maintain, the role of a caring agent. However, aspects of the clinical, institutional and broader social environments may undermine their ability to promote sexual health. In nurses' efforts to maintain therapeutic relationships with clients, sexual health is often medicalised to legitimize it as an appropriate topic of discussion with patients and families. Facilities serving youth with disabilities should take steps to address barriers to the delivery of sexual health promotion and several solutions are proposed.

McCabe J; Holmes D

2013-04-01

 
 
 
 
241

Organizational variables on nurses' job performance in Turkey: nursing assessments.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to describe the influence of organizational variables on hospital staff nurses' job performance as reported by staff nurses in two cities in Turkey. Hospital ownership status, employment status were examined for their effect on this influence. METHODS: The reported influence of organizational variables on job performance was measured by a questionnaire developed for this study. Nurses were asked to evaluate the influence of 28 organizational variables on their job performance using a five-point Likert-type scale (1- Never effective, 5- Very effective). The study used comparative and descriptive study design. The staff nurses who were included in this study were 831 hospital staff nurses. Descriptive statistics, frequencies, t-test, ANOVA and factor analysis were used for data analysis. RESULTS: The study showed the relative importance of the 28 organizational variables in influencing nurses' job performance. Nurses in this study reported that workload and technological support are the most influential organizational variables on their job performance. Factor analysis yielded a five-factor model that explained 53.99% of total variance. CONCLUSION: Administratively controllable influence job organizational variables influence job performance of nurses in different magnitude.

Top M

2013-01-01

242

Organizational Variables on Nurses' Job Performance in Turkey: Nursing Assessments  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: The purpose of this study was to describe the influence of organizational variables on hospital staff nurses’ job performance as reported by staff nurses in two cities in Turkey. Hospital ownership status, employment status were examined for their effect on this influence. Methods: The reported influence of organizational variables on job performance was measured by a questionnaire developed for this study. Nurses were asked to evaluate the influence of 28 organizational variables on their job performance using a five-point Likert-type scale (1- Never effective, 5- Very effective). The study used comparative and descriptive study design. The staff nurses who were included in this study were 831 hospital staff nurses. Descriptive statistics, frequencies, t-test, ANOVA and factor analysis were used for data analysis. Results: The study showed the relative importance of the 28 organizational variables in influencing nurses’ job performance. Nurses in this study reported that workload and technological support are the most influential organizational variables on their job performance. Factor analysis yielded a five-factor model that explained 53.99% of total variance. Conclusion: Administratively controllable influence job organizational variables influence job performance of nurses in different magnitude.

TOP, Mehmet

2013-01-01

243

Organizational Variables on Nurses Job Performance in Turkey: Nursing Assessments  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to describe the influence of organizational variables on hospital staff nurses’ job performance as reported by staff nurses in two cities in Turkey. Hospital ownership status, employment status were examined for their effect on this influence.Methods: The reported influence of organizational variables on job performance was measured by a questionnaire developed for this study. Nurses were asked to evaluate the influence of 28 organizational variables on their job performance using a five-point Likert-type scale (1- Never effective, 5- Very effective). The study used comparative and descriptive study design. The staff nurses who were included in this study were 831 hospital staff nurses. Descriptive statistics, frequencies, t-test, ANOVA and factor analysis were used for data analysis.Results: The study showed the relative importance of the 28 organizational variables in influencing nurses’ job performance. Nurses in this study reported that workload and technological support are the most influential organizational variables on their job performance. Factor analysis yielded a five-factor model that explained 53.99% of total variance.Conclusion: Administratively controllable influence job organizational variables influence job performance of nurses in different magnitude.

Mehmet Top

2013-01-01

244

Factors associated with psychological distress of Public Health Nurse in Kagawa prefecture, Japan: A pilot study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available We evaluated the psychological distress using a scale of the K6, the 6-item scale of psychological distress on public health nurse in Kagawa prefecture, Japan. We send the questionnaire to all public health nurses (n = 419) in Kagawa prefecture. Then, a total of 256 public health nurses (1 man and 255 women), had completely answered the questionnaires, were analyzed in a cross-sectional investigation study. The association between psychological distress and considerable factors were evaluated by using the K6, with psychological distress defined as 13 or more points out of a total of 24 points. A total of 15 public health nurses (5.9%) were defined as psychological distress. Clear relationships between the K6 score and age, experience duration as public health nurse were not noted. The K6 score in subjects with anxiety of preventing suicide was significantly higher than that without. In addition, the K6 score in subjects who feel their own mental status was excellent was also lower than that in subjects without that. In conclusion, some factors might be associated with psychological distress, as assessed by the K6, in public health nurse in Kagawa prefecture, Japan.

Noriko Sakano; Takeshi Suzue; Nobuyuki Miyatake; Yoshikazu Miyamae; Taichi Nagatomi; Takeshi Yoda; Akira Yoshioka; Wataru Shiraki; Tomohiro Hirao

2012-01-01

245

Nurses' misperceptions of weight status associated with their body weight, demographics and health status.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To assess the agreement between self-perceived weight status and BMI status, calculated from self-reported height and weight, in nurses and to evaluate the relationship between weight status misperceptions and personal body weight, demographics and health status. DESIGN: Cross-sectional questionnaire survey. SETTING: A large university in London, UK. SUBJECTS: Four hundred and fifty-six student nurses and 588 qualified nurses attending university were surveyed; 355 student nurses and 409 qualified nurses completed questionnaires representing a response rate of 78 % and 70 %, respectively. RESULTS: The respondents were mainly female (90·0 %), 66·5 % were white and their mean age was 31 years. Sixty-eight per cent of qualified nurses and 77 % of student nurses correctly perceived their weight status. In logistic regression, (mixed) black ethnicity (OR = 2·53, 95 % CI 1·01, 6·32), overweight by BMI (OR = 3·10, 95 % CI 1·31, 7·33) and ?3 family histories of obesity co-morbidities (OR = 2·51, 95 % CI 1·04, 6·08) were significantly associated with misperceptions in the sample of student nurses, whereas overweight by BMI (OR = 5·32, 95 % CI 2·66, 10·67) was the only significant variable in the sample of qualified nurses. CONCLUSIONS: A substantial proportion of nurses misclassified their weight status. Nurses' misperception of weight status was related to their own BMI status, ethnic background and obesity-related family histories. Being aware of this may help nurses not only promote their own healthy weight, but also fulfil their public health role to practise weight management successfully with both patients and the public. While limitations of the sample mean that the study findings cannot be generalized, they do provide grounds for future larger-scale research.

Zhu D; Norman IJ; While AE

2013-02-01

246

Family-school nurse partnership in primary school health care.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: The foundation of the health and well-being of a child in primary school age is the family. To promote the child's comprehensive health, we must develop the cooperation between the family and the primary school nurse. AIM: The aim of the study was to develop a family nursing oriented substantive theory of cooperation between primary school nurses and families. METHOD: The study used grounded theory based on Straussian principles. Data were collected from sixth-graders (N = 22) using group discussions. Interviews were conducted with parents (N = 19), and the views of school nurses (N = 20) on their cooperation with families were obtained via free form essays. FINDINGS: The core concept of the theory describing cooperation between primary school nurses and families is problem-based communication. As a result of the analysis, nine-2-dimensional concepts were formed to describe this cooperation. The theory is structured further by four dimensions, which contain concepts explaining them and which also describe the relationships between the different concepts. These dimensions are the meeting between the school nurse and the family, mutual exchange of information, attending to the child's health monitoring and being at school for the child and family. The substantive theory describing cooperation between the primary school nurse and family entails the concepts formed in the analysis, their interrelationships, as well as, the core concept. CONCLUSIONS: Primary school nurses can apply the resulting theory while working with families and while developing this cooperation. This theory can also be implemented in developing nursing education.

Mäenpää T; Paavilainen E; Åstedt-Kurki P

2013-03-01

247

A Learning Needs Assessment of Parish Nurses  

Science.gov (United States)

|Parish Nursing is relatively new, having its original Scope and Standards from the American Nurses Association published in 1998. At the same time the Basic Preparation Curriculum for Parish Nursing, which had been developed through the International Parish Nurse Resource Center, was distributed to Educational Partners of the Center and used for…

Tormoehlen, Lucy

2009-01-01

248

Nurses' dilemmas concerning support of relatives in mental health care.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Relatives of persons with severe mental illness face a straining life situation and need support. Exclusion of relatives in mental health care has long been reported. The aim of this study was to describe conceptions of nurses in mental health care about supporting relatives of persons with severe mental illness. Focus group interviews with nurses from all levels of mental health care in Norway were performed. A phenomenographic approach was used. The nurses found that their responsibility first and foremost was the patient, especially to develop an alliance with him or her. Additional premises for supporting relatives were the context framing the nursing care, aspects of the actors, and relational concerns between them. Competing or contradictory demands were found within these premises. Two paths were identified concerning the nurses' support of relatives: seeing the relative in the shadow of the patient or as an individual person.

Weimand BM; Sällström C; Hall-Lord ML; Hedelin B

2013-05-01

249

Nursing leadership in addressing the social determinants of health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Social determinants of health have a profound impact on health status and the prevalence of health disparities in the United States. Significant improvements in national health indices are not possible without addressing social determinants of health. Drawing on their historical legacy as patient advocates, patient care expertise, and community focused education, nurses are ideally positioned to lead the nation in strategies to promote health equity. Nurses can embrace this new leadership role through the use of interdisciplinary collaboration, advocacy, political involvement, and community partnerships.

Lathrop B

2013-02-01

250

[The process of nursing care in mental health  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This is an essay about the nursing working process in mental health. Several conceptions have substantiated the psychiatric assistance, as well as the proposals of reorientation of those practices; nursing practices have been related to that process. The professionals' standpoint determines the choice of a tendency and the understanding of the health-illness process. The need of reviewing the nursing working object, as well as its practice in view of the transformations in mental health assistance, has pointed towards new professional attitudes regarding the person with psychic disorders, as well as towards the acquisition of knowledge besides that one obtained at college courses.

Campos CM; Barros S

2000-09-01

251

Glutaraldehyde: a potential health risk to nurses  

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This article discusses the potential toxicity of glutaraldehyde, a chemical commonly used in endoscopy units. The literature review cites adverse health effects experienced by workers exposed to glutaraldehyde. The sampling methodology for glutaraldehyde relative to the Occupational Safety and Health standard for glutaraldehyde is presented. Air monitoring should be performed to assess employee exposure to airborne glutaraldehyde in endoscopy departments. Recommendations for reducing exposure to glutaraldehyde in endoscopy units are included.

Newman, M.A.; Kachuba, J.B.

1992-06-01

252

Development of detailed clinical models for nursing assessments and nursing interventions.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to develop and validate Detailed Clinical Models (DCMs) for nursing assessments and interventions. METHODS: First, we identified the nursing assessment and nursing intervention entities. Second, we identified the attributes and the attribute values in order to describe the entities in more detail. The data type and optionality of the attributes were then defined. Third, the entities, attributes and value sets in the DCMs were mapped to the International Classification for Nursing Practice Version 2 concepts. Finally, the DCMs were validated by domain experts and applied to case reports. RESULTS: In total 481 DCMs, 429 DCMs for nursing assessments and 52 DCMs for nursing interventions, were developed and validated. The DCMs developed in this study were found to be sufficiently comprehensive in representing the clinical concepts of nursing assessments and interventions. CONCLUSIONS: The DCMs developed in this study can be used in electronic nursing records. These DCMs can be used to ensure the semantic interoperability of the nursing information documented in electronic nursing records.

Park HA; Min YH; Kim Y; Lee MK; Lee Y

2011-12-01

253

Perceived level of knowledge and difficulty in applying family assessment among senior undergraduate nursing students  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Because the structure, development, and functioning of a family plays an important role in health and illness, preparing nursing students to assess families in health care settings is of critical importance. A quasi-experimental design using a pre- and postcourse questionnaire was used to examine st...

Lee, ACK; Leung, SO; Chan, PSL; Chung, JOK

254

Social determinants of health in nursing education, research, and health policy.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The adoption of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the recent Institute of Medicine report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, have brought about a resurgence of interest in the social determinants of health as the basis for healthcare decisions in nursing education, research, and health policy. Nurses are positioned to be at the forefront of crucial healthcare reform to affect health outcomes and reduce health disparities profoundly. However, for nurses of the 21st century to improve the health of U.S. citizens and promote health equity effectively, we must first intently address the social determinants of health in our current nursing educational models, research agendas, and public health policies.

Mahony D; Jones EJ

2013-07-01

255

Meeting baccalaureate public/community health nursing education competencies in nurse-managed wellness centers.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The purpose of this article is to describe how community health competencies for baccalaureate nursing education have been met by locating clinical experiences in nurse-managed wellness centers. Such centers are an ideal setting for students to integrate theoretical concepts into clinical practice while building on previous learning. Students are able to develop skills in community health nursing practice at individual, family, and population level. In addition, the practice setting provides other advantages. Clients who represent a vulnerable population group receive valuable health services. Students gain learning opportunities that are broader than community health competencies, and faculty are provided clinical practice, research, and scholarship opportunities. The challenges to year-round sustainability of nurse-managed centers are burdensome; however, the benefits outweigh the difficulty of those challenges.

Thompson CW; Bucher JA

2013-05-01

256

A public health nursing research agenda.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Public health nurses (PHNs) use many interventions to prevent illness and promote the health of populations. Unfortunately, generating evidence regarding PHN practice is not explicitly identified as a research priority area of the major national funding agencies. Nor has PHN, as a profession, had a strong enough research agenda to drive practice improvement on a population-level and to drive funding to support such areas of research. To further advance the science needed to guide PHN practice, a national conference to set the research agenda was held in October 2010 with grant support from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The conference was part of a multimethod, participatory, multistage approach taken to generate the final research priority themes and corresponding priority research questions. The process yielded four high priority PHN research themes: PHN intervention models, Quality of population-focused PHN practice, Metrics of/for PHN, and comparative effectiveness and PHN outcomes. As the agenda is adopted by funding agencies, researchers, and practice-based partners, a more focused program of research will produce evidence that can guide population-focused PHN practice.

Issel LM; Bekemeier B; Kneipp S

2012-07-01

257

A public health nursing research agenda.  

Science.gov (United States)

Public health nurses (PHNs) use many interventions to prevent illness and promote the health of populations. Unfortunately, generating evidence regarding PHN practice is not explicitly identified as a research priority area of the major national funding agencies. Nor has PHN, as a profession, had a strong enough research agenda to drive practice improvement on a population-level and to drive funding to support such areas of research. To further advance the science needed to guide PHN practice, a national conference to set the research agenda was held in October 2010 with grant support from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The conference was part of a multimethod, participatory, multistage approach taken to generate the final research priority themes and corresponding priority research questions. The process yielded four high priority PHN research themes: PHN intervention models, Quality of population-focused PHN practice, Metrics of/for PHN, and comparative effectiveness and PHN outcomes. As the agenda is adopted by funding agencies, researchers, and practice-based partners, a more focused program of research will produce evidence that can guide population-focused PHN practice. PMID:22765245

Issel, L Michele; Bekemeier, Betty; Kneipp, Shawn

2012-04-05

258

The training of nurses for the family health strategy  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: to think about the formation of the nursing senior student having family health strategy as a base. Methodology: this paper describes a bibliographic research done based on Virtual Health Library (BVS - Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde) on the site Scientific Electronic Library on-line (Scielo) and Latin-America and Caribbean Literature in Health Science (Lilacs), along the period of 2002 to 2009 in Portuguese. For the selection of the articles were the following keywords: national health care system, family health, education, nursing. The selection was made using an instrument constructed for this purpose. After the analysis, which were performed independently by three researchers were selected from 13 publications that had relation with the theme. Result: the Family Health Strategy demand a special profile from the professionals who must change the individual /illness/ cure approach to a holistic assistance promoting health in a integrated way. Under these perspectives it´s necessary a reformulation in the nursing graduation curriculum having projects centered in the student working together theory and practice and adapting to the epidemiology profile in which it is inserted. Although there have been changes for the graduating students, there are still some gaps and challenges to be overcome. Conclusion: the importance of an early introduction of ESF subject is emphasize in order to promote the nurse formation making him/her able to work bearing this interdisciplinary perspective in mind at SUS matching with this new demand of health profile. Descriptors: single health system; health family; education; nursing.

Alyne Gonçalves, Eid Lara de Araújo Reis, Natalia C. A. Araujo, Cristiane Aparecida Silveira

2010-01-01

259

Nurse educators' perspectives on student development of reflection for psychiatric mental health nursing practice.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Abstract Psychiatric nursing, in various parts of the world, including regions of Canada, is recognized as a distinct nursing profession. In psychiatric mental health nursing practice, reflection is considered a foundational skill given the relational nature of nurses' therapeutic work. Communicating the significance of reflection for practice to students and teaching this intangible skill is challenging for educators. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore with psychiatric mental health nurse educators their views on how they develop reflective practitioners. Participants' perspectives and experiences in teaching reflective practice were captured in four themes: building the use of self as an agent of change, building skills of reflection/building the habit of reflection, building a bridge between theory and practice, and building a continuing reflective practice - from student to practitioner. Recommendations include a systematic incorporation of reflection into a curriculum and creating supportive learning environments that facilitate the development of reflective practitioners.

Karpa JV; Chernomas WM

2013-01-01

260

Nurse educators' perspectives on student development of reflection for psychiatric mental health nursing practice.  

Science.gov (United States)

Abstract Psychiatric nursing, in various parts of the world, including regions of Canada, is recognized as a distinct nursing profession. In psychiatric mental health nursing practice, reflection is considered a foundational skill given the relational nature of nurses' therapeutic work. Communicating the significance of reflection for practice to students and teaching this intangible skill is challenging for educators. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore with psychiatric mental health nurse educators their views on how they develop reflective practitioners. Participants' perspectives and experiences in teaching reflective practice were captured in four themes: building the use of self as an agent of change, building skills of reflection/building the habit of reflection, building a bridge between theory and practice, and building a continuing reflective practice - from student to practitioner. Recommendations include a systematic incorporation of reflection into a curriculum and creating supportive learning environments that facilitate the development of reflective practitioners. PMID:23974046

Karpa, Jane V; Chernomas, Wanda M

2013-08-24

 
 
 
 
261

Assessment of Acute Pain in Nursing Practice in Latvia  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: International Association for the Study of Pain defines pain as annoying sensations andemotions associated with actual or potential tissue damage or is described as such damage. Pains alwaysare considered to be subjective sensations with multidimensional nature composed from physical,emotional and cognitive components. One of the main tasks in pain syndrome effective therapy is theoption to perform objective assessment of pain intensity and quality utilizing principle of continuity.Independent surveys on pain management in postoperative period are performed in different countries ofthe world. Studies analyze effectiveness of both - medical and non-medical measurements in order toreduce pain syndrome. Very few investigations of chronic and acute pain influence on recovery process,progress and outcome of illness, assessment of pain intensity and quality are performed in Latvia. In thecase of acute pain chronification, pain perception and management can be changed; pains becomeinadequately long lasting and may combine with psychogenic pains.According to the data obtained by the World Health Organization, fifty percent patients after injuries oroperations have severe and insufferable pains despite the development of acute pain treatment and care.Insufficiently controlled postoperative pains become a risk factor for development of variousabnormalities.Aim of the study: To study the usage of postoperative period pain intensity and quality assessment scalesin the clinical practice of nursing, as well as availability of these methodsMaterial and methods: Survey utilizes quantitative research method. As an investigation tool waschosen questionnaire. Survey was carried out in the surgical profile wards in Riga and regional clinics ofLatvia. Questionnaire embraced 309 nurses, working in the surgical profile.Results: Assessment of acute pains should be considered as the fifth vital sign providing more successfulachievement of aims in pain care. Respondents recognize that in pain assessment pain evaluation scalesare rarely used. In clinical practice prevails assessment of patient’s subjective condition. Only 5% ofnurses – respondents utilize visual analogue scale, 22% - verbal pain scale, 16% - numerical pain ratingscale. Investigation data confirm the role of professional experience of nurse in organization of painassessment and care work, because 98% of respondents mention pain assessment as a constituent ofnursing.Conclusions: One of the main objectives in effective therapy of pain syndrome is the possibility toperform objective assessment of pain intensity and quality. This objective should be achieved only with ahelp of shared team work – nurse, physician, anesthetist and other medical staff.

Iveta Strode; Sandra Seimane

2011-01-01

262

The importance of communication for clinical leaders in mental health nursing: the perspective of nurses working in mental health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Communication has been identified as an important attribute of clinical leadership in nursing. However, there is a paucity of research on its relevance in mental health nursing. This article presents the findings of a grounded theory informed study exploring the attributes and characteristics required for effective clinical leadership in mental health nursing, specifically the views of nurses working in mental health about the importance of effective communication in day to day clinical leadership. In-depth interviews were conducted to gain insight into the participants' experiences and views on clinical leadership in mental health nursing. The data that emerged from these interviews were constantly compared and reviewed, ensuring that any themes that emerged were based on the participants' own experiences and views. Participants recognized that effective communication was one of the attributes of effective clinical leadership and they considered communication as essential for successful working relationships and improved learning experiences for junior staff and students in mental health nursing. Four main themes emerged: choice of language; relationships; nonverbal communication, and listening and relevance. Participants identified that clinical leadership in mental health nursing requires effective communication skills, which enables the development of effective working relationships with others that allows them to contribute to the retention of staff, improved outcomes for clients, and the development of the profession.

Ennis G; Happell B; Broadbent M; Reid-Searl K

2013-11-01

263

The importance of communication for clinical leaders in mental health nursing: the perspective of nurses working in mental health.  

Science.gov (United States)

Communication has been identified as an important attribute of clinical leadership in nursing. However, there is a paucity of research on its relevance in mental health nursing. This article presents the findings of a grounded theory informed study exploring the attributes and characteristics required for effective clinical leadership in mental health nursing, specifically the views of nurses working in mental health about the importance of effective communication in day to day clinical leadership. In-depth interviews were conducted to gain insight into the participants' experiences and views on clinical leadership in mental health nursing. The data that emerged from these interviews were constantly compared and reviewed, ensuring that any themes that emerged were based on the participants' own experiences and views. Participants recognized that effective communication was one of the attributes of effective clinical leadership and they considered communication as essential for successful working relationships and improved learning experiences for junior staff and students in mental health nursing. Four main themes emerged: choice of language; relationships; nonverbal communication, and listening and relevance. Participants identified that clinical leadership in mental health nursing requires effective communication skills, which enables the development of effective working relationships with others that allows them to contribute to the retention of staff, improved outcomes for clients, and the development of the profession. PMID:24131413

Ennis, Gary; Happell, Brenda; Broadbent, Marc; Reid-Searl, Kerry

2013-11-01

264

The community mental health nurse: a new professional role.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This review of recent literature explores the similarities and differences between the work of community psychiatric nurses and their mental handicap counterparts. The comparisons which have been made between these groups of nurses are related to the authors' own research studies. These included an observational study of one community mental handicap nursing team and a national survey of all such teams in England and Wales. The importance of trad union membership, the place of the Community Psychiatric Nursing Association and the implications of joint training courses are discussed. The emergence of a new professional role, that of the "community mental health nurse" is discussed and the implications which this might have for the future organization of community psychiatric nursing services is outlined.

Hall V; Russell O

1982-01-01

265

Conceptualizing structural violence in the context of mental health nursing.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article explores how the intersections of gendered, racialized and neoliberal dynamics reproduce social inequality and shape the violence that nurses face. Grounded in the interviews and focus groups conducted with a purposeful sample of 17 registered nurses (RNs) and registered practical nurses (RPNs) currently working in Ontario's mental health sector, our analysis underscores the need to move beyond reductionist notions of violence as simply individual physical or psychological events. While acknowledging that violence is a very real and disturbing experience for individual nurses, our article casts light on the importance of a broader, power structure analysis of violence experienced by nurses in this sector, arguing that effective redress lies beyond blame shifting between clients/patients and nurses. Our analysis illustrates how assumptions about gender, race and care operate in the context of global, neoliberal forces to reinforce, intensify and create, as well as obscure, structural violence through mechanisms of individualization and normalization.

Choiniere JA; Macdonnell JA; Campbell AL; Smele S

2013-03-01

266

Lithuanian nurses' assessments of their empowerment.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim was to explore nurse empowerment and the factors associated with it from the viewpoint of surgical nurses. DESIGN: A multicentre cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational study design was used. Setting and participants:? The data were collected from 11 units of seven largest Lithuanian hospitals located in three major cities during the period of 11/2007 to 01/2008. All the nurses (N = 270) working in the abdominal perioperative settings were invited to participate in the study; 247 questionnaires were returned giving the response rate of 91 %. The data were analyzed on the basis of 218 responses. The statistical analysis was performed by SPSS (12.0 version). INSTRUMENTS: Two instruments, both originally developed in Finland and adapted to the Lithuanian cultural context, were used: Nurse Empowerment Scale (NES) and Good Nursing Care Scale for Nurses (GNCS-N). RESULTS: Surgical nurses evaluated their work empowerment positively. Several background factors were associated with nurse empowerment, such as nurse education, type of nurse license (working area), the continuing nurse education (completed courses during last 5 years), the workload at hospital, the work independence, and work satisfaction. The connection between nurse empowerment and quality of nursing care was also identified (r = 0.139-0.525, p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Surgical nurses feel empowered at their work when they have higher education and have completed the continuing education courses. Nurses should have possibility to continue their studies at the university. Independent at work, satisfied, and motivated nurses have more power at their work in the surgical units in Lithuania. However, further research is needed to explore nurse empowerment in other fields of nursing care nationally and internationally.

Istomina N; Suominen T; Razbadauskas A; Martinkenas A; Kuokkanen L; Leino-Kilpi H

2012-03-01

267

To assess role of staffing in nursing productivity: a qualitative research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background & Aim: Nurses have the major role at care continuity and health promotion. They frequently affect total productivity in a organization. However, the nurses believe that due to several barriers they have not desire productivity, therefore the health care have been left at level of quality. The aim of this research are assessing nurses' view about productivity and role of human resource on it. Methods & Materials: This study has been done based on grounded theory method. Open interviews has been used for gathering of data. Sampling was purposive in beginning study but so that study was proceeding and categories were completed, it changes to theoretic sampling. Constant comparative analysis was method of data analyses. Results: Essential themes emerged from the data in human resource category. These are: systemic calculating number of staff, accurate staff select and use criteria for them, provide adequate staff from various categories in total year's day, accept patient when as coordinate to in charge nurse and well communication. These make necessary groundwork for productivity. Then accidents that emerged from inappropriate quantity and quality of human resource will be decreased. These enhance nursing productivity the biggest group of health care services. Model of Productivity and human resource effects on it’s, from nurses' view, has concluded of this research. Conclusion: In nurses' view that participates in this research, human resource can affect on productivity process and improve it, then it lead to develop quality care- health care vision and goal.

Dehghan nayeri N; Nazari A; Salsali M; Ahmadi F

2006-01-01

268

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender health: fundamentals for nursing education.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

As the health care needs of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) population become increasingly important, health care professionals require appropriate academic and clinical training in preparation for the increased demand for culturally competent care. Nurses are of particular interest, as they are the core direct caregivers in many health care settings. This article explores the national climate around LGBT individuals and their related health needs. Educators and administrators who work with future nurses should strive to ensure they foster the development of knowledgeable practitioners who will be able to implement best practices in LGBT patient care. Attention should be paid to providing students with diverse clinical placements, access to LGBT interest groups, and clear expectations for LGBT-sensitive nursing care plans and course outcomes selection that promote cultural competence. Recommendations for nursing education and curricular reform are discussed.

Lim FA; Brown DV Jr; Jones H

2013-04-01

269

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender health: fundamentals for nursing education.  

Science.gov (United States)

As the health care needs of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) population become increasingly important, health care professionals require appropriate academic and clinical training in preparation for the increased demand for culturally competent care. Nurses are of particular interest, as they are the core direct caregivers in many health care settings. This article explores the national climate around LGBT individuals and their related health needs. Educators and administrators who work with future nurses should strive to ensure they foster the development of knowledgeable practitioners who will be able to implement best practices in LGBT patient care. Attention should be paid to providing students with diverse clinical placements, access to LGBT interest groups, and clear expectations for LGBT-sensitive nursing care plans and course outcomes selection that promote cultural competence. Recommendations for nursing education and curricular reform are discussed. PMID:23471873

Lim, Fidelindo A; Brown, Donald V; Jones, Henrietta

2013-03-11

270

Restructuring health care through nursing and business acumen.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This nurse entrepreneur owns two companies that help others restructure health care processes. Utilizing knowledge from her managerial and business background, as well as clinical innovations in cardiovascular disease, set the stage for this author's successful business ventures.

Goodroe JH

1998-03-01

271

The Transition to Registered Professional Nurse: One Health System's Response.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article explores one large health system's approach to the challenges that both organizations and newly graduated nurses experience. A few of the available transitional support programs are highlighted. J Contin Educ Nurs 2013;44(9):387-388.

Lindner I

2013-09-01

272

Nurse staffing, burnout, and health care-associated infection.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Each year, nearly 7 million hospitalized patients acquire infections while being treated for other conditions. Nurse staffing has been implicated in the spread of infection within hospitals, yet little evidence is available to explain this association. METHODS: We linked nurse survey data to the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council report on hospital infections and the American Hospital Association Annual Survey. We examined urinary tract and surgical site infection, the most prevalent infections reported and those likely to be acquired on any unit within a hospital. Linear regression was used to estimate the effect of nurse and hospital characteristics on health care-associated infections. RESULTS: There was a significant association between patient-to-nurse ratio and urinary tract infection (0.86; P = .02) and surgical site infection (0.93; P = .04). In a multivariate model controlling for patient severity and nurse and hospital characteristics, only nurse burnout remained significantly associated with urinary tract infection (0.82; P = .03) and surgical site infection (1.56; P < .01) infection. Hospitals in which burnout was reduced by 30% had a total of 6,239 fewer infections, for an annual cost saving of up to $68 million. CONCLUSIONS: We provide a plausible explanation for the association between nurse staffing and health care-associated infections. Reducing burnout in registered nurses is a promising strategy to help control infections in acute care facilities.

Cimiotti JP; Aiken LH; Sloane DM; Wu ES

2012-08-01

273

Experiences of nursing students in caring for patients with behaviors suggestive of low health literacy: a qualitative analysis  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Health literacy is the ability to obtain, process, and understand health information in order to take appropriate health actions. Low health literacy is associated with poor health knowledge and self-management of chronic disease, inadequate utilization of preventive services, and increased hospital admissions. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing recommends that nursing schools incorporate health literacy into curricula. Little, however, has been reported about what nursing students have learned and done about health literacy in clinical. This study explored undergraduate nursing students’ experiences in caring for patients with low health literacy. Methods: A qualitative content analysis method was used to analyze 59 narratives written by undergraduate nursing students. Results: Three themes were uncovered: sensing low health literacy by behavioral cues, promoting health literacy with multiple strategies, and closing the health information loop with positive and negative feelings. Noncompliance, knowledge deficits, anxiety/concerns, and language barriers were behavioral cues indicating low health literacy, and these cues triggered the students’ information support actions. Students promoted patient understanding and utilization of information by using many interventions: simplifying information, reinforcing information, giving written information, and demonstration/teach-back. Many students felt good about being able to help increase knowledge and self-care skills of their patients. Some were frustrated because they were unable to promote lifestyle modifications of the patients with complicated chronic diseases. Students, however, did not employ standardized tools to assess the health literacy of the patient or the patient’s knowledge of specific diseases, nor did they assess readability of patient education materials or provide patient empowerment interventions to encourage active information-seeking and participation in self-care. Conclusions: Nursing students could identify behavioral cues suggestive of low health literacy and provide solutions to increase the patient’s health literacy. To enhance student practice, nursing curricula, however, can integrate relevant health literacy assessment tools and empowerment interventions.

Carol Shieh; Anne E. Belcher; Barbara Habermann

2012-01-01

274

Reflecting on holistic nursing: the contribution of an academic with lived experience of mental health service use.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The educational preparation of registered nurses is presumed to reflect a holistic approach with emphasis on the bio-psycho-social model of care. The broader literature suggests this goal is not always realised. The aim of this study is to present the views, experiences, and perceptions of undergraduate nursing students who were taught by an academic with a lived experience of mental health service use. In particular, we wanted to look at the expected impact of this approach to learning on their nursing practice. A qualitative, exploratory approach was used, involving in-depth individual interviews with 12 undergraduate nursing students completing the course, "recovery for mental health nursing practice," as part of a major in mental health nursing in a university in Queensland, Australia. Students were asked to reflect upon and discuss their experiences of being taught by a person with lived experience of mental health service use. Data were analysed following Colaizzi's steps to identify the main themes. The three main themes were (1) recovery--bringing holistic nursing to life; (2) influencing practice; and (3) gaining self-awareness through course assessment: challenge and opportunity. These themes suggest an appreciation for holistic nursing and an increased capacity for reflective understanding. The responses from participants suggest the Recovery course had a significant impact on their attitudes to nursing and that their nursing practice would be positively enhanced as a consequence.

Byrne L; Happell B; Welch A; Moxham L

2013-04-01

275

Reflecting on holistic nursing: the contribution of an academic with lived experience of mental health service use.  

Science.gov (United States)

The educational preparation of registered nurses is presumed to reflect a holistic approach with emphasis on the bio-psycho-social model of care. The broader literature suggests this goal is not always realised. The aim of this study is to present the views, experiences, and perceptions of undergraduate nursing students who were taught by an academic with a lived experience of mental health service use. In particular, we wanted to look at the expected impact of this approach to learning on their nursing practice. A qualitative, exploratory approach was used, involving in-depth individual interviews with 12 undergraduate nursing students completing the course, "recovery for mental health nursing practice," as part of a major in mental health nursing in a university in Queensland, Australia. Students were asked to reflect upon and discuss their experiences of being taught by a person with lived experience of mental health service use. Data were analysed following Colaizzi's steps to identify the main themes. The three main themes were (1) recovery--bringing holistic nursing to life; (2) influencing practice; and (3) gaining self-awareness through course assessment: challenge and opportunity. These themes suggest an appreciation for holistic nursing and an increased capacity for reflective understanding. The responses from participants suggest the Recovery course had a significant impact on their attitudes to nursing and that their nursing practice would be positively enhanced as a consequence. PMID:23566189

Byrne, Louise; Happell, Brenda; Welch, Anthony; Moxham, Lorna

2013-04-01

276

Cultural sensitivity and related factors among community health nurses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Community health nurses are on the frontline of providing healthcare to multiethnic groups. Managing and providing effective, culture-specific healthcare can increase the health quality of Taiwan's recently immigrant women, a significant component of this country's population. PURPOSE: This study analyzes the cultural sensitivity of community health nurses and related factors. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was applied in this study. Participants were nurses who work at health centers in Kaohsiung City and Pingtung County. A total of 230 valid questionnaires were completed. Structure questionnaires used in this study included (a) scale of nurses' cultural sensitivity, (b) scale of multicultural sources, (c) scale of multicultural competence training programs, and (d) table of personal characteristics. Statistical software SPSS 14.0 was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Survey results show an average score of community health nurse cultural sensitivity of 49.41 (SD = 7.48). The index score was 65.88. Thus, survey participants in this study earned a cultural sensitivity score below the index score. "Interaction confidence" earned the lowest item score. "Multicultural resources," "self-perceived English proficiency," "multicultural competence training programs," and "having friends with different cultural backgrounds" were significant predictor variables of cultural sensitivity and, together, explained 34.9% of total variance. CONCLUSIONS: Study results may be referenced in designing future in-service and cultural care education programs for community health nurses to improve healthcare quality for new immigrants.

Chang HY; Yang YM; Kuo YL

2013-03-01

277

Embracing the population health framework in nursing research.  

Science.gov (United States)

Individuals' health outcomes are influenced not only by their knowledge and behavior, but also by complex social, political and economic forces. Attention to these multi-level factors is necessary to accurately and comprehensively understand and intervene to improve human health. The population health framework is a valuable conceptual framework to guide nurse researchers in identifying and targeting the broad range of determinants of health. However, attention to the intermediate processes linking multi-level factors and use of appropriate multi-level theory and research methodology is critical to utilizing the framework effectively. Nurse researchers are well equipped to undertake such investigations but need to consider a number of political, societal, professional and organizational barriers to do so. By fully embracing the population health framework, nurse researchers have the opportunity to explore the multi-level influences on health and to develop, implement and evaluate interventions that target immediate needs, more distal factors and the intermediate processes that connect them. PMID:23217099

MacDonald, Shannon E; Newburn-Cook, Christine V; Allen, Marion; Reutter, Linda

2012-12-06

278

Oral Health Measurement in Nursing Research: State of the Science  

Science.gov (United States)

Oral health can impact general health and systemic disease. Changes in dental plaque, oral microbial flora, and local oral immunity may be important in the development or exacerbation of disease in critically ill patients, trauma patients, adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and frail elderly. Inasmuch as oral health potentially can be influenced by nursing interventions, nursing research in this area can contribute greatly to improved patient outcomes in these diverse populations. The authors’ research teams have conducted several federally funded projects focused on oral health and have developed synergy in research methods. A unifying theme for these research projects is the measurement of oral health. Standardized measures of components of oral health are available and applicable across populations, and their uses and relationship to nursing research and patient outcomes will be discussed.

Munro, Cindy L.; Grap, Mary Jo; Jablonski, Rita; Boyle, Anne

2008-01-01

279

Embracing the population health framework in nursing research.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Individuals' health outcomes are influenced not only by their knowledge and behavior, but also by complex social, political and economic forces. Attention to these multi-level factors is necessary to accurately and comprehensively understand and intervene to improve human health. The population health framework is a valuable conceptual framework to guide nurse researchers in identifying and targeting the broad range of determinants of health. However, attention to the intermediate processes linking multi-level factors and use of appropriate multi-level theory and research methodology is critical to utilizing the framework effectively. Nurse researchers are well equipped to undertake such investigations but need to consider a number of political, societal, professional and organizational barriers to do so. By fully embracing the population health framework, nurse researchers have the opportunity to explore the multi-level influences on health and to develop, implement and evaluate interventions that target immediate needs, more distal factors and the intermediate processes that connect them.

MacDonald SE; Newburn-Cook CV; Allen M; Reutter L

2013-03-01

280

[Comprehensive health care: indications from the training of nurses].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study has the objective of understanding the training of nurses for comprehensive health care. It used data from interviews with teachers, students and service nurses submitted to discourse analysis. There is an understanding of comprehensive care in the training of nurses from the perspective of establishing a healthcare model in which care is directed to the patient. There are reflections regarding the technologies and the form of organization of the work, expressed in a permanent tension: Clinical versus Collective Health as a challenge for comprehensive care. It was identified that building completeness in the formation implies assuming acting in health as an educative principle in a new form of learning-teaching in health, which breaks up with pre-formed, out-of-context knowledge. The conclusion is that comprehensive health care is taken as an object of reflection in the movement for change in the pedagogical practices, and that it is reflected in health attention.

Silva KL; de Sena RR

2008-03-01

 
 
 
 
281

Critical service learning in community health nursing: enhancing access to cardiac health screening.  

Science.gov (United States)

Critical service learning (CSL) offers promise for preparing community health nursing students to be advocates for social justice and social change. The purpose of this article is to describe a community based CSL project designed to provide cardiac health screening to an underserviced population, wherein nursing's role in social justice is integrated into nursing practice. First, the relationship between social justice and CSL is explored. Then, the CSL approach is examined and differentiated from the traditional service learning models frequently observed in the nursing curriculum. The CSL project is described and the learning requisites, objectives, requirements, and project outcomes are outlined. While not a panacea for system reform, CSL offers nursing students avenues for learning about social justice and understanding the social conditions that underlie health inequalities. Nurse educators may benefit from the new strategies for incorporating social justice into nursing curriculum; this paper suggests that CSL offers one possibility. PMID:23629462

Gillis, Angela; Mac Lellan, Marian A

2013-04-23

282

Critical service learning in community health nursing: enhancing access to cardiac health screening.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Critical service learning (CSL) offers promise for preparing community health nursing students to be advocates for social justice and social change. The purpose of this article is to describe a community based CSL project designed to provide cardiac health screening to an underserviced population, wherein nursing's role in social justice is integrated into nursing practice. First, the relationship between social justice and CSL is explored. Then, the CSL approach is examined and differentiated from the traditional service learning models frequently observed in the nursing curriculum. The CSL project is described and the learning requisites, objectives, requirements, and project outcomes are outlined. While not a panacea for system reform, CSL offers nursing students avenues for learning about social justice and understanding the social conditions that underlie health inequalities. Nurse educators may benefit from the new strategies for incorporating social justice into nursing curriculum; this paper suggests that CSL offers one possibility.

Gillis A; Mac Lellan MA

2013-01-01

283

Implementing Family Health Nursing in Tajikistan: from policy to practice in primary health care reform.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The health systems of former Soviet Union countries are undergoing reform away from the highly centralised, resource-intensive, specialised and hierarchical Soviet system, towards a more generalist, efficient health service with greater focus on primary health care. Family Health Nursing is a new model designed by WHO Europe in which skilled generalist community nurses deliver primary health care to local communities. This paper presents a qualitative evaluation of the implementation of Family Health Nursing in Tajikistan. Using Stufflebeam's 'Context, Input, Process, and Product' model, the paper aims to evaluate the progress of this reform, and to understand the factors that help or hinder its implementation. A four-phase research design investigates the development of the Family Health Nurse role over time. In 5 rural areas, 6 focus groups and 18 interviews with Family Health Nurses, 4 observations of their practice, 7 interviews with families and 9 interviews with physicians were carried out. Data were analysed according to the components of Stufflebeam's model. Although the legacy of the Soviet health system did not set a precedent for a nurse who is capable of decision-making and who works in partnership with the physician, Family Health Nurses were successfully implementing new practices. Crucial to their ability to do so were the co-operation of physicians and families. Physicians were impressed by the nurses' development of knowledge, and families were impressed that the nurses could offer real solutions to their problems. However, failure to pay the nurses regular salaries had led to serious attrition of the workforce. We conclude that the success of the Family Health Nurse role in other countries will depend upon its position in relation to the historical health care system.

Parfitt BA; Cornish F

2007-10-01

284

Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program: Facilitating physical health care for people with mental illness?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

People with serious mental illness have increased rates of physical ill-health and reduced contact with primary care services. In Australia, the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program (MHNIP) was developed to facilitate access to mental health services. However, as a primary care service, the contribution to physical health care is worthy of consideration. Thirty-eight nurses who were part of the MHNIP participated in a national survey of nurses working in mental health about physical health care. The survey invited nurses to report their views on the physical health of consumers and the regularity of physical health care they provide. Physical health-care provision in collaboration with general practitioners (GPs) and other health-care professionals was reported as common. The findings suggest that the MHNIP provides integrated care, where nurses and GPs work in collaboration, allowing enough time to discuss physical health or share physical health activities. Consumers of this service appeared to have good access to physical and mental health services, and nurses had access to primary care professionals to discuss consumers' physical health and develop their clinical skills in the physical domain. The MHNIP has an important role in addressing physical health concerns, in addition to the mental health issues of people accessing this service.

Happell B; Platania-Phung C; Scott D

2013-10-01

285

Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program: Facilitating physical health care for people with mental illness?  

Science.gov (United States)

People with serious mental illness have increased rates of physical ill-health and reduced contact with primary care services. In Australia, the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program (MHNIP) was developed to facilitate access to mental health services. However, as a primary care service, the contribution to physical health care is worthy of consideration. Thirty-eight nurses who were part of the MHNIP participated in a national survey of nurses working in mental health about physical health care. The survey invited nurses to report their views on the physical health of consumers and the regularity of physical health care they provide. Physical health-care provision in collaboration with general practitioners (GPs) and other health-care professionals was reported as common. The findings suggest that the MHNIP provides integrated care, where nurses and GPs work in collaboration, allowing enough time to discuss physical health or share physical health activities. Consumers of this service appeared to have good access to physical and mental health services, and nurses had access to primary care professionals to discuss consumers' physical health and develop their clinical skills in the physical domain. The MHNIP has an important role in addressing physical health concerns, in addition to the mental health issues of people accessing this service. PMID:23279365

Happell, Brenda; Platania-Phung, Chris; Scott, David

2012-12-24

286

Analysis of knowledge and practice of nurses about assessment of pain in the hospital context  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: to examine knowledge and practices of nurses about pain assessment in the hospital context. Method: this is about a descriptive and analytical cut of an assistance-converging research held in a private hospital at Fortaleza-Ceará, in 2007, approved by the Ethics Committee of Research of Ceara State University (Protocol nº07336264-6). It was applied structured interview with 15 nurses about pain assessment in practice, being performed qualitative data analysis and presentation of results in thematic categories. Results: it was identified that pain is predominantly conceptualized as an unpleasant sensation for humans, because it indicates that something is not right in the body. Pain assessment happens mainly with the evaluation of verbal report of the patient, the pain features and the signs/symptoms associated with painful situacions. About the treatment, the drug is still the prevailing opinion of the nurses, being cited: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids and simple analgesics. Regarding non-pharmacological measures, were cited: the application of cold or heat, promoting peaceful environment, clarification of the procedure and condition of the patient, among others. Conclusion: nurses had demonstrate articulated knowledge and practices about pain management, but was not routinely evaluate it systematically, showing urgently the need to incorporate educational programs about pain assessment in nursing courses and health services in general. Descriptors: pain; pain measurement; nursing; nurses; hospital care.

Roberta Meneses Oliveira, Lucilane Maria Sales da Silva, Ilse Maria Tigre de Arruda Leitão

2010-01-01

287

Prevalence of hepatitis B markers in occupational health nurses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A seroprevalence study was undertaken at the 14th Annual Conference of the Occupational Health Nurses Association of Ontario. A total of 151 self-selected registrants (33%) provided demographic, health, and occupational information. Blood was drawn for hepatitis B serology (hepatitis B surface antigen, core antibody, and surface antibody). Vaccine-induced seropositivity was found in 11 persons (7.3%) while naturally occurring markers were present in 13 nurses (8.6%). This exceeds the natural prevalence of markers in Canada (4% to 6%) but is less than that seen in emergency and renal dialysis nurses. It implies that occupational health nurses are at less risk for hepatitis B virus infection than their acute care hospital colleagues.

Strickler AC; Bradshaw ED

1987-08-01

288

[The family in mental health: support for clinical nursing care].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This is a theoretical reflection on the clinical nursing care in mental health that is offered to the family. In view of having a family member with mental suffering, the family would delegate the care to that relative to the mental institution, thus there should be collaboration between the nursing and medical team to organize the environment and ensure family and social isolation. With the Psychiatric Reform, based on the proposal for psychosocial care, the family becomes the center of attention for health care professionals. The necessary support for clinical nursing care includes making conceptual changes in implementing health education, interdisciplinary work, and in the broadened clinic, so as to ensure comprehensiveness and subjects' autonomy. Clinical nursing care should permeate the subjects' politicalization, in which the actors militate to reach autonomy, and the practices involve dignity, creativity, welcoming, interdisciplinarity, hearing, and knowledge sharing.

da Silva KV; Monteiro AR

2011-10-01

289

Health status of nurses and yoga. I. Baseline data.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In this ongoing ICMR project on "Effect of Yoga on the Health of Nurses", some baseline data on the health of nurses of Nehru Hospital, P.G.I., Chandigarh are reported. This was obtained before the start of yoga therapy in selected cases and collected with the help of six psychological tools. Out of a total of 501 nurses, 452 (90.2%) could be contacted and studied. Mean age was 30.43 years and mean years of service 9.93 years. Mean scores on the psychological tests indicated poor health status of nurses, average neuroticism, depressive tendencies and role stress. Sense of Well-Being was high in them. The data is discussed in the light of researches in this area. This is the first of a series of three articles to be published in the Journal.

Walia IJ; Mehra P; Grover P; Earnest C; Verma SK; Sanjeev

1989-09-01

290

Nurses’ competencies in primary health care: a Delphy technique study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available An investigation on nurses´ primary health care practice was developed to identify and analyze nurses’ general and specific competencies at the Brazilian Health System. This quantitative-qualitative research adopted the Delphi Technique as a method of study. Two groups of participants were selected. Fifty-two nurses and fifty-seven specialists accepted to participate in the study. Questionnaires were developed for data collection, including a Likert scale. A 75 percentage was adopted as a consensus criterion for scores 4 or 5 of this scale. Results showed 17 general and 8 specific competencies for the nursing group and 19 general and 9 specific competencies for the specialist group. These competencies were classified into ten areas of domain. This paper presents and discusses health care competencies found in this investigation.

Regina R Witt; Maria Cecília Puntel de Almeida; Vivian Elizabeth Araujo

2006-01-01

291

Health and safety at work: a guide for district nurses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Sickness absence across the NHS costs a billion pounds a year with accidents at work accounting for a significant proportion of that absence. Over half the major injuries in the health service are caused by avoidable slips and falls. Under the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 the NHS as an employer and district nurses as employees have a duty to manage health and safety effectively and to ensure that others are not put at risk by work-related activities. Breaching a requirement of health and safety law is a criminal offence so it is essential that district nurses are able to fulfil their duty and so avoid prosecution.

Griffith R; Tengnah C

2010-02-01

292

Nurses' opinions of pain and the assessed need for pain medication for the elderly.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The undertreatment of pain in the elderly living in nursing homes is a significant problem. In Swedish nursing homes, the registered nurse on duty is often responsible for 20-40 patients during the day with no daily contact from attending physicians. The aim of this study was to investigate the opinions of registered nurses regarding pain and the assessed need for pain medication for elderly patients using patient scenarios. Two patient scenarios were used in this study; a questionnaire and background information was provided. The scenarios consisted of one smiling patient and one grimacing patient, both with the same numeric rating scale value of pain, blood pressure, pulse rate, and respiration rate. Three questions regarding pain assessment and management followed the scenarios. The questionnaire was sent to all 128 registered nurses working daytime in elderly care in both municipal nursing homes and municipal home care in the mid-Sweden region. A total of 56 nurses participated, providing an answering frequency of 45%. Results showed that registered nurses with more experience did not have the same opinion about pain as the smiling patient and gave inadequate medication, which was not in accordance with recommendations from the county hospital and the World Health Organization.

Alm AK; Norbergh KG

2013-06-01

293

Needle stick injuries in nurses at a tertiary health care facility.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Needle-stick injury (NSI) is a major occupational health and safety issue faced by healthcare professionals globally. This study was aimed to assess the frequency and factors associated with NSIs in nurses of a tertiary health care facility in Lahore, Pakistan. It also focuses on safety measures adopted by these nurses after a needle stick injury. METHODS: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in Ghurki Trust Teaching Hospital, Lahore from October 2009 to January 2010. All nurses have participated in the study with a response rate of 99%. These responses were obtained via a pretested self-administered questionnaire. The data was analysed using SPSS-16. Percentages of the categorical variables were computed and represented in various statistical data presentation forms, for analysis and comparison. Chi-square test was applied as a test of significance with fixing the p-value of 0.05 as significant. RESULTS: Out of 77 nurses who participated in our study, only 33 (42%) nurses were aware of the occupational hazards of their profession when they joined nursing. Needle stick injury was reported by 40 (71.9%) of the nurses in last one year. About 17 (31.5%) were injured at the time of recapping the syringe. The availability of needle cutters in the hospital was reported by 75 (97.4%) nurses while only 46 (60%) of them had undertaken a sharp management training course. Approximately 50 (64.9%) nurses failed to use gloves while administering injections. After getting stuck by a contaminated needle 71 (92%) of the nurses cleaned the wound with a spirit swab, 67 (87%) washed the area with soap and water and 58 (75%) applied a readily available bandage. Only 38 (49%) went on to inform the higher officials about a needle stick injury. Fifty-seven (74%) of the nurses were vaccinated against HBV, and 56 (72.2%) of needle stick injured nurses proceeded for HBV screening, while 53 (68.6%) for HCV and 37(48.5%) for HIV. CONCLUSION: Needle stick injury is the most important occupational health hazard in nurses with alarmingly high rates. Reporting to the concerned authorities, screening of nurses after needle stick injury and promotion of safety measures against it should be greatly encouraged.

Manzoor I; Daud S; Hashmi NR; Sardar H; Babar MS; Rahman A; Malik M

2010-07-01

294

Strategic management of health care information systems: nurse managers' perceptions.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of this study is to describe nurse managers' perceptions of the strategic management of information systems in health care. Lack of strategic thinking is a typical feature in health care and this may also concern information systems. The data for this study was collected by eight focus group interviews including altogether 48 nurse managers from primary and specialised health care. Five main categories described the strategic management of information systems in health care; IT as an emphasis of strategy; lack of strategic management of information systems; the importance of management; problems in privacy protection; and costs of IT. Although IT was emphasised in the strategies of many health care organisations, a typical feature was a lack of strategic management of information systems. This was seen both as an underutilisation of IT opportunities in health care organisations and as increased workload from nurse managers' perspective. Furthermore, the nurse managers reported that implementation of IT strengthened their managerial roles but also required stronger management. In conclusion, strategic management of information systems needs to be strengthened in health care and nurse managers should be more involved in this process.

Lammintakanen J; Kivinen T; Saranto K; Kinnunen J

2009-01-01

295

International school children's health needs: school nurses' views in Europe.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Rapid globalization and the integration of national economies have contributed to the sharp rise in enrollment in international schools. How does this global nomadism affect international school children and their individual health needs? This study attempts to find an answer by interviewing 10 school nurses, with varying degrees of experience in international schools in Sweden, Germany, and Switzerland. Through qualitative semistructured interviews, the school nurses described that the international school children expressed common health needs similar to the ones faced by children in other school settings. However, children in the international schools expressed additional context-specific health needs related to their transient lifestyle, such as language and cultural difficulties, emotional distress, vulnerability, homesickness, alienation, and increased physical health needs related to their expatriate lifestyle. These factors often present a challenge for the school nurse whose profession is to interpret the child's health needs, which may be obscured by cultural diversity.

Hansson A; Clausson E; Janlöv AC

2012-04-01

296

The family planning’s health policy from the nurse’s perspective  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: to investigate obstacles faced by nurses for implementation of the Family Planning’s Health Policy. Method: phenomenological research with qualitative approach. The sample consisted of twelve nurses who work in assistance at Basic Health Units/GO. Data gathering occurred in recorded semi-structured interviews after approval of the Ethics Committee in Research of UniEVANGÉLICA (number protocol 204/2007), according to the determination 196/96 of the National Health Counsel. The content analysis systematized data into two categories: a) the nurse’s role and its appreciation in assistance to the family planning at Basic Health Units; b) obstacles faced during assistance to this family planning. Results: they were verified institutional and professional obstacles; nurses help excited to the family planning what makes connection with community they are working with easier; difficulties to offer integral assistance due to the lack of adherence of women to the program; lack to offer contraceptive methods, lack of autonomy to prescribe nursing cares and scarcity of professional training. Conclusion: it is suggested creation of protocol of assistance, ongoing trainings; participation of doctor in regular assistance to women; offering on quantity and diversity contraceptive methods to soften difficulties of returning of users and insertion of men to the program.

Maria Madelena Costa, Zeile da Mota Crispim

2010-01-01

297

Assessing the attitudes and perceptions towards nursing profession among nursing students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Nursing education is a challenge in a developing country like India. This cross sectional study assessed the attitudes and perceptions of nursing professionals and their desired future practices. The study was conducted using a modified version of Beliefs, Attitudes and Perceived Practice questionnaire among 129 students who were undergoing undergraduate nursing programme at a selected college of nursing in Bangalore. Data was analysed and interpreted by using descriptive and inferential statistics. Forty-four (34.1%) of the subjects agreed that they were enrolled of their own interest; 43 (33.3%) of them reported that they enrolled in nursing out of their own interest and also to improve their financial situations. Only 4 (3.1%) stated that they have to protect the rights and dignity of the patients. 45 (34.9%) of the subjects indicated that the nurse-patient relationship should be both professional and a relation of sympathy. Upon graduation 69 (53.5%) of the subjects preferred to pursue the nursing career, 36 (27.9%) in academics, 12 (9.30%) wanted to change the profession. Nearly 63 (48.8%) of the subjects agreed that social prejudice has a great influence on nursing students in choosing nursing profession as their career. An urgent need is seen in the area of educating nursing students regarding patient's rights. There is also a need to improve the image of nurses in the society to attract more number of students into this noble profession. Counselling and introduction to nursing course should be introduced by all the universities, to develop positive attitudes towards nursing profession.

Poreddi V; Ramachandra; Konduru R; Math SB

2012-02-01

298

A training course for oncology nurses in familial cancer risk assessment: evaluation of knowledge and practice.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: With the availability of genetic testing for cancer, a variety of health professionals are needed to counsel individuals seeking cancer risk information. To address the educational needs of oncology nurses, a training course in familial cancer risk assessment and counseling was developed at Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. METHODS: Four training sessions were conducted with 164 nurses. Knowledge was assessed from pretest to posttest using Wilcoxon's signed-rank test. Comparison of practice in cancer risk assessment (CRA) was measured at baseline and six months with McNemar's procedures. RESULTS: There was statistically significant improvement in knowledge from pre to post test. There was self-reported improvement in collecting family histories and assessing cancer risk. Those reporting current practice in risk assessment post-training were more likely to collect required family history information and had greater confidence in skills. CONCLUSIONS: With education and opportunity to practice, nurses can play key roles in CRA.

Masny A; Daly M; Ross E; Balshem A; Gillespie D; Weil S

2003-01-01

299

A systematic review of the psychiatric/mental health nursing research literature 1982-1992.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of quantitative psychiatric/mental health nursing research articles published in English between 1982 and 1992, worldwide. Criteria for selection of articles included nurse authorship or co-authorship, use of a quantitative design and pertinence to an aspect of the nursing process with psychiatric/mental health patients. One hundred and ninety-four articles met these criteria. The quality of each article was assessed by two nurse experts using Duffy's Research Appraisal Checklist (RAC). Forty-six point nine per cent of the articles were rated as superior, 50% as average and 3.1% as below average. Other findings identified journals that published research articles, countries in which research was completed, applicability of funding and qualifications of the authors. The major implications of this study are that nurses can be directed to superior articles; more publication of research by nurse authors is warranted, research is being completed with little financial support, highly rated research publications tend to get funding and editorial policies affect the quality of publication. PMID:9325797

Yonge, O; Austin, W; Qiuping, P Z; Wacko, M; Wilson, S; Zaleski, J

1997-06-01

300

A systematic review of the psychiatric/mental health nursing research literature 1982-1992.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of quantitative psychiatric/mental health nursing research articles published in English between 1982 and 1992, worldwide. Criteria for selection of articles included nurse authorship or co-authorship, use of a quantitative design and pertinence to an aspect of the nursing process with psychiatric/mental health patients. One hundred and ninety-four articles met these criteria. The quality of each article was assessed by two nurse experts using Duffy's Research Appraisal Checklist (RAC). Forty-six point nine per cent of the articles were rated as superior, 50% as average and 3.1% as below average. Other findings identified journals that published research articles, countries in which research was completed, applicability of funding and qualifications of the authors. The major implications of this study are that nurses can be directed to superior articles; more publication of research by nurse authors is warranted, research is being completed with little financial support, highly rated research publications tend to get funding and editorial policies affect the quality of publication.

Yonge O; Austin W; Qiuping PZ; Wacko M; Wilson S; Zaleski J

1997-06-01

 
 
 
 
301

Developing advanced mental health nursing practice: a process of change.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In the current economic climate of restructuring and rationalization it is important for mental health nurses to define their realm of expertise in order to demonstrate professional accountability and to validate their position in relation to unqualified but cheaper caregivers. If mental health nurses are to act in the best interests of patients and the community, they need to challenge current trends in health-care delivery that are preoccupied with economic efficiency and lack of consideration of broader social issues. To substantiate mental health nursing practice and defend against the undermining of clinical expertise by policies and service delivery that advances economic interests, mental health nurses need to corroborate their claims to expertise by articulating a patient-centred rationale for their practice. The ideas presented in this paper have evolved through the development of two postgraduate programmes for advanced mental health nursing practice--one in Australia at Griffith University and the other in New Zealand at the Department of Psychological Medicine, Christchurch School of Medicine.

Crowe M

1998-09-01

302

Exploring the need for hepatology nurses and allied health professionals in Victorian liver clinics.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To examine the need for hepatology nurses and allied health professionals in Victorian liver clinics to meet the increasing demand from people seeking treatment for hepatitis C infection. DESIGN: We reviewed the literature, analysed data from nine Victorian liver clinics, and conducted a qualitative rapid assessment with key stakeholders including hepatology nurses. PARTICIPANTS: Fourteen key stakeholders including clinicians and directors of liver clinics were invited to take part in interviews; two declined to participate. All ten members of the Victorian Hepatology Nurses Group were invited to participate in a focus group discussion, and six attended. RESULTS: Participants reported that hepatology nurses played a critical role in improving treatment uptake and compliance, in particular, in educating, counselling and managing treatment for people with hepatitis C infection. Psychiatric and social work staff assisted patients to overcome side effects associated with treatment. Interpreters increased access for those from culturally and linguistically diverse communities. CONCLUSIONS: Hepatology nurses and allied health professionals are central to enhancing treatment outcomes for people who are infected with hepatitis C. Further research is necessary to estimate the number of nurses and allied health professionals required to meet the current and future needs of people receiving treatment for hepatitis C infection.

Ehsani JP; Vu T; Karvelas M

2006-05-01

303

The role of occupational health nurses in terrorist attacks employing radiological dispersal devices.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The potential for biological, chemical, radiological, or nuclear terrorism has been widely acknowledged since the events of September 11, 2001. Terrorists' use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD), or dirty bomb, is considered to be a threat for which Americans must prepare. Occupational health nurses must have the knowledge and skill set to plan for, respond to, and recover from a radiologic event potentially affecting significant numbers of first responders as well as businesses and their workers. This article describes the hazards related to RDDs and provides resources supporting occupational health nurses' roles in such events occurring near or at their workplaces. Occupational health nurses are prepared to assess and treat RDD causalities using current information to identify signs and symptoms of exposed and contaminated RDD victims. Decontamination, treatment, and recovery methods for workers and businesses affected by an RDD event are described.

Cabrera SL; Beaton RD

2009-03-01

304

Health promotion in mental health care: perceptions from patients and mental health nurses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To gain insight into the factors influencing the integration of physical activity and healthy eating into the daily care of individuals with mental disorders (MD) living in sheltered housing and to increase the understanding of the relationships between and complexities of these factors. BACKGROUND: Growing attention is given to the implementation of health promotion activities in mental health care. By improving the understanding of perceptions of patients and mental health nurses, health promotion programmes targeting physical activity and healthy eating can be developed that better meet the patients' needs. DESIGN: A descriptive qualitative study. METHODS: Based on a purposive sampling strategy, three focus groups including 17 mental health nurses and individual interviews with 15 patients were conducted. RESULTS: Although physical and mental health benefits of physical activity and healthy eating were identified, several barriers to integrate healthy lifestyles into the daily life of patients were reported. Important barriers identified by the patients consisted of lack of energy and motivation as a result of the MD, side effects of psychotropic drug use, and hospitalisation. Lack of time and personal views and attitudes towards health promotion were reported by the mental health nurses as important elements influencing the way in which they integrate health promotion in the care provided. Support from the mental health nurse was considered important by the patients in changing their unhealthy lifestyle behaviour. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the study provide insight into important factors influencing the integration of health promotion activities targeting physical activity and healthy eating in individuals with MD living in sheltered housing. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The information derived from this study is useful and relevant in the design and implementation of health promotion interventions targeting physical activity and healthy eating in people with MD living in sheltered housing.

Verhaeghe N; De Maeseneer J; Maes L; Van Heeringen C; Annemans L

2013-06-01

305

[Work-satisfaction and Health of Hospital Nursing and Medical Personnel  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The implementation of new service demands and increasing rationalisation measures exercise stress and pressure on medical and nursing personnel in German hospitals. However, their satisfaction and health are important quality criteria in the ranking of a hospital. Basing on the introduction of a new tool, an inquiry was conducted among the medical and nursing personnel of two hospitals (A and B) in respect of the quality of their working conditions. The scope of the questionnaires covered the nature and kind of the work, opportunities of professional success, management of co-operation and conflicts, physical and structural obstacles to smooth working as well as the management of quality. Finally, a scale of complaints and a burn-out scale served to assess the personnel's subjective health situation. The questionnaire was submitted in hospital A between November 1999 and February 2000 to a total of 39 doctors (58 % compliance) and 84 nursing personnel (47 % compliance) of the specialist departments concerned with internal medicine, rheumatology, urology, general and accident surgery. In hospital B the questionnaire was completed between March and July 2001 by a total of 40 doctors (54 %) and 91 nursing personnel (68 %) of two departments of internal medicine, surgery, neurosurgery and gynaecology. Comparable to other studies, the nursing personnel in both the hospitals rated the working conditions more negatively than the medical personnel. The differences, however, are more of a quantitative (number of frequency of problems) than of a qualitative nature (type or kind of problems). With both groups, problems connected with structural difficulties in working and with quality management were by far most important while the nursing personnel also underlined physical stress. Individual health condition were also classified more negatively by the nursing personnel than by the doctors, and the overall physical complaints of the nursing personnel were generally greater than with the average population, whereas medical personnel registered fewer complaints. Health promotion measures in hospitals may help to prevent negative developments. Such measures are too rarely translated into reality.

Trojan A; Nickel S; Werner S

2002-04-01

306

Practical implications of pre-employment nurse assessments.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Hiring nurses is a difficult task that can have serious repercussions for medical facilities. If nurses without proper skills are hired, patients can suffer from insufficient quality of care and potentially life-threatening conditions. Nurse applicants' technical knowledge is extremely important to avoid negative outcomes; however, there are soft skills that factor into their success, such as bedside manner, personality, communication, and decision making. In order for medical facilities to select and maintain high-performing nurse staff, hiring managers must incorporate evaluations for these types of skills in their hiring process. The current study focused on using content/criterion-related validation design to create assessments by which nurse applicants can be evaluated for both technical knowledge/skills and soft skills. The study included participation of more than 876 nursing staff members. To rank applicants on divergent skills, 3 assessment types were investigated, resulting in the creation of an assessment with 3 components. The clinical, situational, and behavioral components that were created measure applicants' job knowledge, interpersonal competency in medical facility-related situations, and aspects of personality and behavior, respectively. Results indicate that using the assessment can predict 45% of a nurse applicant's future job performance. Practical implications include hiring and maintaining a higher quality of nurses and decreased hiring costs.

Kuthy JE; Ramon C; Gonzalez R; Biddle DA

2013-04-01

307

Standardized mapping of nursing assessments across 59 U.S. military treatment facilities.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: Create an interoperable set of nursing flowsheet assessment measures within military treatment facility electronic health records using the 3M Healthcare Data Dictionary (HDD). DESIGN: The project comprised three phases: 1) discovery included an in-depth analysis of the Essentris data to be mapped in the HDD; 2) mapping encompassed the creation of standard operating procedures, mapping heuristics, and the development of mapping tools; and 3) quality assurance incorporated validation of mappings using inter-rater agreement. RESULTS: Of 569,073 flowsheet concepts, 92% were mapped to the HDD. Of these, 31.5% represented LOINC concepts, 15% represented SNOMED CT and 1% represented both. 52.5% were mapped to HDD concepts with no standardized terminology representations. CONCLUSIONS: Nursing flowsheet data can be mapped to standard terminologies but there is not the breadth of coverage necessary to represent nursing assessments. Future work is necessary to develop a standard information model for the nursing process.

Harman TL; Seeley RA; Oliveira IM; Sheide A; Kartchner T; Woolstenhulme RD; Wilson PS; Lau LM; Matney SA

2012-01-01

308

Production of nursing care in primary health care services.  

Science.gov (United States)

This descriptive and quantitative study aimed to characterize the production of nursing care in primary health care services in a region of the city of Ribeirão Preto, state of São Paulo, Brazil. The study sample comprised care actions delivered by nurses and registered in the HygiaWeb Information System, from 2006 to 2009. Statistical analysis was performed. Results showed that nursing care delivered by nurses accounted for 9.5 to 14.6% of total professional care provided by professionals. Eventual care actions were the most frequent. The concentration of programmatic care was higher for children, women, pregnant and postpartum women. In conclusion, the predominance of eventual care demonstrated that the health system has been focused on acute conditions. Little of nursing work has been directed at the achievement of comprehensiveness, considering the inexpressive share of longitudinal follow up in total care delivery. The expansion of nursing staff represents potential for care delivery to the population, but further qualification of nursing actions is needed. PMID:22990156

Matumoto, Silvia; Vieira, Kátia Cristina dos Santos; Pereira, Maria José Bistafa; dos Santos, Claudia Benedita; Fortuna, Cinira Magali; Mishima, Silvana Martins

309

Postpartum depression: a nursing perspective on women's health and behaviors.  

Science.gov (United States)

Postpartum depression is examined from different disciplinary perspectives including obstetrics, psychiatry, psychology and nursing. These perspectives are compared in relation to knowledge development, research designs and interventions for clinical practice. Nursing's contributions to understanding women's health and behaviors are highlighted in three areas: exploring women's experiences with symptoms of depression; delineating the character of women's affective changes during childbearing; and further study of another form of symptom distress conceptualized as dysphoria. Three alternative hypotheses are presented as new directions for future nursing research. PMID:1521850

Affonso, D D

1992-01-01

310

How military nurses rationalize their postoperative pain assessment decisions.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: This paper is a report of a study to explore how military nurses rationalize their postoperative pain assessment decisions, particularly when these differ from patients' pain self-reports. BACKGROUND: Postoperative pain is a complex phenomenon influenced by many factors that make assessment difficult. Nurses are taught to believe what patients say about their pain. However, their attitudes to pain are influenced by their cultural background and they may disagree with patients' self-reports. Military nurses belong to a military culture with different pain attitudes that may also influence their postoperative pain assessment. METHOD: An ethnomethodological ethnography study was carried out in 2003. A purposive sample of 29 British military surgical/orthopaedic Registered Nurses were interviewed to identify their taken-for-granted assumptions and commonsense cultural knowledge surrounding postoperative pain assessment. The data were analysed using a systematic process of inductive reasoning aided by Non-numerical, Unstructured Data for Indexing, Searching and Theorizing (QSR N6, NUD*IST). FINDINGS: Participants told two distinct stories in their postoperative pain narratives. The first, the cultural story, described how military nurses normally assess postoperative pain and revealed taken-for-granted assumptions surrounding this assessment. However, when military nurses believe that patients over- or under-report their pain, the cultural story was challenged through a collective story in which nurses used their commonsense knowledge to account for these differences. CONCLUSION: Postoperative pain assessment within a military culture is complex, but all nurses need to be aware that their socialization into different nursing cultures may influence their attitudes to postoperative pain assessment.

Harper P; Ersser S; Gobbi M

2007-09-01

311

Nursing Informatics: Decades of Contribution to Health Informatics  

Science.gov (United States)

Objectives In this paper we present a contemporary understanding of "nursing informatics" and relate it to applications in three specific contexts, hospitals, community health, and home dwelling, to illustrate achievements that contribute to the overall schema of health informatics. Methods We identified literature through database searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library. Database searching was complemented by one author search and hand searches in six relevant journals. The literature review helped in conceptual clarification and elaborate on use that are supported by applications in different settings. Results Conceptual clarification of nursing data, information and knowledge has been expanded to include wisdom. Information systems and support for nursing practice benefits from conceptual clarification of nursing data, information, knowledge, and wisdom. We introduce three examples of information systems and point out core issues for information integration and practice development. Conclusions Exploring interplays of data, information, knowledge, and wisdom, nursing informatics takes a practice turn, accommodating to processes of application design and deployment for purposeful use by nurses in different settings. Collaborative efforts will be key to further achievements that support task shifting, mobility, and ubiquitous health care.

Maeland Knudsen, Lina Merete

2013-01-01

312

76 FR 14417 - ``Low Income Levels'' Used for Various Health Professions and Nursing Programs Included in Titles...  

Science.gov (United States)

...Used for Various Health Professions and Nursing Programs Included in Titles III, VII...programs that provide health professions and nursing training for individuals from disadvantaged...INFORMATION: The various health professions and nursing grant and cooperative agreement...

2011-03-16

313

Oral health in nursing home residents with different cognitive statuses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To compare oral health in nursing home (NH) residents with different cognitive statuses. BACKGROUND: Oral health is a significant issue for NH residents because of its relationships to quality of life, systemic health and well-being. It is known that oral health is poor in NH residents. However, how oral health differs in NH residents with different cognitive statuses remains unclear. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nine hundred and two NH residents were retrospectively recruited from a community-based geriatric dental clinic in Minnesota, USA. Comprehensive medical, dental, cognitive and functional assessments were completed for the participants. On the basis of medical history and cognitive status, participants were categorized into three groups: without cognitive impairment (non-impaired group), with cognitive impairment but no dementia (impaired group) and with dementia (demented group). ANOVA, Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to compare medical, dental and functional statuses between groups. RESULTS: Oral hygiene was poor in NH residents. Forty per cent of participants in the impaired group were edentulous, significantly higher than the edentulism rate in the demented group (29%, p = 0.01). More than 60% of the participants lost 16 or more teeth prior to examination. Depending on their cognitive status, 82-92% of the participants arrived with one or more caries or retained root. Dentate participants in the impaired and demented groups averaged about six caries or retained roots, significantly more than 4.7 caries or retained roots in the non-impaired group (p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Oral health was poor but slightly different in NH residents with different cognitive and functional statuses.

Chen X; Clark JJ; Naorungroj S

2013-03-01

314

[The INHES cohort study on the health status of nurses in Italy: research protocol].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Due to the intense emotional involvement and the often problematic working conditions characterizing their profession, Nurses appear to be especially susceptible to the negative effects of a complex set of stressors, with important repercussions to their health. Nevertheless, scientific literature assessing the health status of Nurses in Italy is still scarce. With INHES (Italian Nurses' HEalth Study), we propose to remedy this gap by implementing a cohort study which will start from the analysis of some local healthcare facilities and which may subsequently extend throughout the country. Study participants will be Nurses selected according to the following inclusion criteria: 1) age between 30 and 55 years; 2) having been employed in the current healthfacilityfor the last five years; 3) having performed care duties in wards or in day care services for the last five years. The objectives of this study, which will be carried out through the administration of a validated questionnaire, are the following: to measure the incidence and prevalence rates of a series of diseases in the nursing population, highlighting potential correlations with working activity, job-related stress or environmental and personal risk factors; to assess the quality of life and psychological health of the participants, evaluating the interference of psychophysical disorders with their work and social activities; to investigate the implementation of wellness promotion, prevention, case management and disability management policies by healthcare facilities. The evidence gathered will provide a valid scientific support for the development of more effective policies for protecting Nurses' health, with positive social and economic repercussions for the entire community.

Calzoni L; Filippone AM; Mannocci A; Germani T; Menafra R; Pulimeno A; Cicolini G; Manzoli L; Boccia A; La Torre G

2011-09-01

315

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk assessment: rural nurses' knowledge and use in a rural acute care hospital.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

It is estimated that about 2000 people die as a result of venous thromboembolism (VTE) each year, with a further 30,000 being hospitalized. Prophylaxis significantly reduces VTE morbidity and mortality, and thus represents a real long-term health-care benefit. The aim of this study was twofold: (i) to assess the current level of compliance to VTE risk assessment and prophylaxis best practice guidelines within an Australian rural hospital; and (ii) to determine the effectiveness of nurse education on that compliance. VTE compliance information was obtained from auditing patient notes for a 3-month period prior to nurse education and was repeated after the education. Nurse knowledge of VTE risk assessment and prophylaxis use was also measured. Both compliance with and knowledge of best practice VTE risk assessment and prophylaxis increased following nurse education. Although the sample size was relatively small, this study has shown nurse education to be effective at increasing VTE compliance and awareness within an Australian rural hospital. This relatively inexpensive and simple intervention bears consideration and could lead to reductions in the morbidity and mortality associated with VTE, as well as reduction in associated health-care costs.

Gaston S; White S

2013-02-01

316

Mental health nurses' views of recovery within an acute setting.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

How the principles of a recovery-oriented mental health service are incorporated in the day-to-day nursing practice of mental health nurses in inpatient settings is unclear. In this study, we interviewed 21 mental health nurses working in acute inpatient mental health units about a range of recovery-focused topics. Three overlapping themes were identified: (i) the perception of recovery; (ii) congruent humanistic approaches; and (iii) practical realities. Only four interviewees had some formal training about recovery. Most respondents recognize that positive attitudes, person-centred care, hope, education about mental illness, medication and side-effects, and the acknowledgement of individual recovery pathways are necessary to prevent readmission, and are central to a better life for people who live with a mental illness. This research supports the view that ideas and practices associated with the recovery movement have been adopted to some degree by nurses working at the acute end of the services continuum. However, most saw the recovery orientation as rhetoric rather than as an appropriately resourced, coordinated, and integrated program. These nurses, however, speak of much more detailed aspects of working with patients and being required to prepare them for the exigencies of living in the community post-discharge.

Cleary M; Horsfall J; O'Hara-Aarons M; Hunt GE

2013-06-01

317

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING IN MISSISSIPPI: CHANGES IN CONTEXT AND PRACTICE.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Current standards and competencies guiding public health nursing (PHN) practice promote population-focused practice, but few studies have examined the extent to which change toward this type of practice has occurred. A cross-sectional, mail-back survey was conducted among public health nurses in Mississippi to examine recent changes in their practice, contextual factors related to population-focused practice, and recommendations for improving practice and educational preparation for practice. The survey response rate was 54% (n=150 [of 277]). Participants were predominantly female (95%), White (85%), 46 years or older (62%) and held an associate degree in nursing (69%). Most experienced nurses (n=106, 70%) reported perceived practice changes compared to five years prior, but did not consistently report changes toward greater population-focused practice. Participants reported funding decreases and negative effects on practice stemming from the nursing shortage. Recommendations for improving practice conditions included increasing resources, improving workplace environment and management practices, changing the focus of services, and promoting awareness of public health and PHN. Recommendations for improving education included providing more clinical experiences in public health settings and increasing financial supports and distance learning options. Additional research is needed to determine the nature and characteristics of population-focused PHN as practiced in Mississippi and elsewhere.

Kaiser BL; Zahner SJ; Simani J

2010-12-01

318

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING IN MISSISSIPPI: CHANGES IN CONTEXT AND PRACTICE  

Science.gov (United States)

Current standards and competencies guiding public health nursing (PHN) practice promote population-focused practice, but few studies have examined the extent to which change toward this type of practice has occurred. A cross-sectional, mail-back survey was conducted among public health nurses in Mississippi to examine recent changes in their practice, contextual factors related to population-focused practice, and recommendations for improving practice and educational preparation for practice. The survey response rate was 54% (n=150 [of 277]). Participants were predominantly female (95%), White (85%), 46 years or older (62%) and held an associate degree in nursing (69%). Most experienced nurses (n=106, 70%) reported perceived practice changes compared to five years prior, but did not consistently report changes toward greater population-focused practice. Participants reported funding decreases and negative effects on practice stemming from the nursing shortage. Recommendations for improving practice conditions included increasing resources, improving workplace environment and management practices, changing the focus of services, and promoting awareness of public health and PHN. Recommendations for improving education included providing more clinical experiences in public health settings and increasing financial supports and distance learning options. Additional research is needed to determine the nature and characteristics of population-focused PHN as practiced in Mississippi and elsewhere.

Kaiser, Betty L.; Zahner, Susan J.; Simani, Julie

2010-01-01

319

Nursing students' attitudes to health promotion to: implications for teaching practice.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

For several decades now the World Health Organization has indicated the need for a reorientation of the health services away from focusing solely on illness and disease to one that considers both disease prevention and health promotion. Successive publications that guide public health policy both nationally and internationally reiterate the need for health promotion and the principles of health for all to become integral to the fabric of health care delivery. The role of the nurse as health promoters is well recognized. However despite acknowledgement by professional nursing bodies and nurse educators that health promotion forms a central tenet of undergraduate nurse education curricula, there are varied approaches to teaching and learning and little formal evaluation of the consequences of approaches taken. The aims of this study are to identify current health promotion curricular content within the Irish undergraduate nursing programme context; to measure nursing students' attitudes towards health promotion and to examine nursing students' reported lifestyle behaviours.

Mooney B; Timmins F; Byrne G; Corroon AM

2011-11-01

320

Nursing students' attitudes to health promotion to: implications for teaching practice.  

Science.gov (United States)

For several decades now the World Health Organization has indicated the need for a reorientation of the health services away from focusing solely on illness and disease to one that considers both disease prevention and health promotion. Successive publications that guide public health policy both nationally and internationally reiterate the need for health promotion and the principles of health for all to become integral to the fabric of health care delivery. The role of the nurse as health promoters is well recognized. However despite acknowledgement by professional nursing bodies and nurse educators that health promotion forms a central tenet of undergraduate nurse education curricula, there are varied approaches to teaching and learning and little formal evaluation of the consequences of approaches taken. The aims of this study are to identify current health promotion curricular content within the Irish undergraduate nursing programme context; to measure nursing students' attitudes towards health promotion and to examine nursing students' reported lifestyle behaviours. PMID:21215497

Mooney, Bróna; Timmins, Fiona; Byrne, Gobnait; Corroon, Ann Marie

2011-01-06

 
 
 
 
321

Assessments of Safe Medication Administration in Nursing Education  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: QSEN has a variety of suggested strategies for teaching safe medication administration; however they do not have a recommendation for how to assess it.  The purpose of this study was to gain information on how safe medication administration is assessed in nursing education.Methods: A survey was developed to identify methods used by nursing faculty members to assess nursing students’ knowledge and skills of safe medication administration.  The specific research questions addressed in the survey were: 1) How is safe medication administration assessed prior to students entering the clinical area, 2) How is safe medication administration assessed during clinical, 3) How is knowledge of “right drug” assessed in the classroom and 4) How is knowledge of “right dose” assessed in the classroom setting. Results: The results of the survey indicated no standardized method for assessing safe medication administration in nursing education.Conclusions: There is much variation in how and when safe medication administration is assessed in the education setting. There is a need for a valid and reliable comprehensive assessment of safe medication administration in order to evaluate whether nursing students have the knowledge, skills and attitude to safely administrate medications.

Kelly J. Gonzales

2012-01-01

322

Expanding the nurse's role through formal assessment of the neonate.  

Science.gov (United States)

At Medical Center Hospital of Vermont a program was designed and implemented to expand the nurse's role through formal assessment and documentation of the neonate. Assessment criteria from NAACOG's Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing Functions and Standards were used to develop new Newborn Nursery Standards. The staff prepared for the expanded role through inservice programs that were videotaped for future orientation of new staff members. Over one year after implementation of the new standards, the nursing staff is functioning easily in its expanded role. PMID:6560046

Plante, D; Stiles, B

323

Health consumers' experiences in Australian critical care units: postgraduate nurse education implications.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: To explore critical care patients and families experiences and seek their input into nurses' postgraduate educational preparation and practice. BACKGROUND: There is an inconsistency in the expected standard of practice to 'qualify' Australian critical care nurses. There has also been a lack of health consumer input in the development of postgraduate course curriculum and content. METHOD: Following institutional ethics committee approval, purposive sampling was used to select participants for focus groups and individual interviews who had experienced intensive care or coronary care. FINDINGS: Seventeen participants provided data which created two main thematic categories; the role of the critical care nurse and; minimum practice standards for postgraduate critical care course graduates. Both physical patient care and socio-emotional support of patients and family were identified as important for the critical care nurse role. The level of socio-emotional support provided by nurses was reported to be inconsistent. Components of socio-emotional support included communication, people skills, facilitating family presence and advocacy. These components were reflected in participants' concepts of minimum practice standards for postgraduate critical care course graduates; talking and listening skills, relating to and dealing with stressed people, individualizing care and patient and family advocacy. CONCLUSION: Health consumers' views emphasize that socio-emotional skills and behaviours need to be explicitly described in postgraduate critical care nursing course curricula and instruments developed to consistently assess these core competencies.

Gill FJ; Leslie GD; Grech C; Latour JM

2013-03-01

324

The nurse's role in changing health policy related to patient safety.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Nurses' roles in shaping health policy in the United States related to patient safety have not been fully expanded. This article explores various patient safety issues and how nurses can become involved to shape health policy in this area.

Mrayyan MT; Huber DL

2003-03-01

325

Health disparities of coal miners and coal mining communities: the role of occupational health nurses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article investigates how the health disparities of Appalachian coal miners and coal mining communities could be decreased through a partnership with occupational health nurses. On-site health clinics managed by occupational health nurses working in the coal mining industry are proposed as a means to improve health care outcomes. Health effects, economic considerations, environmental impacts, and U.S. coal mining legislation and regulation are examined. An epidemiological approach is presented to the unique health effects experienced by Appalachian coal miners and coal mining communities within the context of existent socioeconomic disparities. The long-standing health crisis in Appalachian coal mining communities requires a multidisciplinary approach led by occupational health nurses.

Apostle EP; O'Connell ME; Vezeau TM

2011-07-01

326

Public health nursing job descriptions: are they aligned with professional standards?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: The American Nurses' Association (ANA) 2007 Public Health Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice along with the Quad Council's PHN competencies frame the practice of public health nurses (PHNs). The preface for ANA's PHN Scope and Standards encourages using the standards as the basis of PHN job descriptions. This study sought to assess the extent to which PHN job descriptions are aligned with the ANA's PHN Scope and Standards and the Quad Council competencies. DESIGN: We obtained PHN job descriptions from 3 local health departments in Illinois and 3 in Washington. Statements from the job descriptions were content analyzed, categorizing statements into the 16 ANA PHN Scope and Standards and using Quad Council competencies as additional definitions of each category. To code all job statements related to PHN practice, 2 categories were added which were MPH competencies from the Associations of Schools of Public Health. Interrater reliability was established. RESULTS: All 18 PHN job descriptions had statements related to Standard 5 Implementation, followed by 94% of the job descriptions having statements related to assessment, planning, coordination of services, health education/health promotion, and collaboration. The least frequently (22%) included standard was outcome identification. CONCLUSIONS: Attention to human resource management is necessary to align job descriptions with current professional scope and standards for basic and advanced PHN practice. The lack of statements regarding Outcome Identification has serious implications for PHN involvement in quality improvement and health planning.

Issel LM; Ashley M; Kirk H; Bekemeier B

2012-05-01

327

Health hazards of nursing: identifying workplace hazards and reducing risks.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Nurses often work in settings in which they may be exposed to a wide array of psychosocial, chemical, biological, and physical hazards. The authors outline several ways in which occupational exposures occur and the general process for reducing or preventing workplace hazards. Several commonly encountered workplace hazards and their potential health risks are identified and discussed. Specific health hazards that are addressed include the chemical hazards of antineoplastic and antiviral drugs; the biological hazards of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B, herpes viruses, rubella, and tuberculosis; and the physical hazards of noise and ionizing and nonionizing radiation. The authors suggest specific preventive measures that nurses can take to make their workplaces safer.

Hewitt JB; Misner ST; Levin PF

1993-01-01

328

No place to turn: Nursing students' experiences of moral distress in mental health settings.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

While researchers have documented the significant issue of moral distress among nurses, few have explored moral distress among mental health nurses. In addition, no research to date has explored nursing students' experiences of moral distress during mental health clinical rotations, despite nursing students typically reporting negative attitudes towards mental health nursing. This manuscript reports on a qualitative study involving seven Canadian baccalaureate nursing students, who reported on their experiences of moral distress during a 13-week clinical rotation on inpatient psychiatric units. Overall, nursing students reported significant moral distress related to the perceived lack of nurses talking meaningfully to patients on the unit, a hierarchical power structure for physicians, a lack of information given to patients about their psychiatric medications, and an inability of their nursing instructors to advocate for ethical change on the units. Several students made a specific connection between their moral distress and not wanting to pursue a career in mental health nursing.

Wojtowicz B; Hagen B; Van Daalen-Smith C

2013-08-01

329

Nursing entrepreneurship: motivators, strategies and possibilities for professional advancement and health system change.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In Canada, as well as internationally, efficiency-focused organizational restructuring in healthcare has resulted in stressful job change for nurses, although nurses continue to work in a system that values technology-based, physician-provided services. Employed nurses have had to participate in organizational activities that undermine their professional values and goals. Nursing entrepreneurship presents an opportunity to explore nursing's professional potential in nursing practice that is uniquely independent. In this study, a focused ethnographic approach was used to explore the experiences of self-employed nurses, who see themselves as leaders in advancing the profession of nursing and its contribution to healthcare. Key themes in the findings include the responses of self-employed nurses to health system change, expanded roles for nurses, the consequences of this non-traditional approach to nursing work and the possibilities for change that arise from nursing entrepreneurship. This research has implications for healthcare policy, professional advocacy and nursing education.

Wall S

2013-06-01

330

Nursing entrepreneurship: motivators, strategies and possibilities for professional advancement and health system change.  

Science.gov (United States)

In Canada, as well as internationally, efficiency-focused organizational restructuring in healthcare has resulted in stressful job change for nurses, although nurses continue to work in a system that values technology-based, physician-provided services. Employed nurses have had to participate in organizational activities that undermine their professional values and goals. Nursing entrepreneurship presents an opportunity to explore nursing's professional potential in nursing practice that is uniquely independent. In this study, a focused ethnographic approach was used to explore the experiences of self-employed nurses, who see themselves as leaders in advancing the profession of nursing and its contribution to healthcare. Key themes in the findings include the responses of self-employed nurses to health system change, expanded roles for nurses, the consequences of this non-traditional approach to nursing work and the possibilities for change that arise from nursing entrepreneurship. This research has implications for healthcare policy, professional advocacy and nursing education. PMID:23809640

Wall, Sarah

2013-06-01

331

Marketing strategies nurses can employ to promote health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Marketing strategies are employed to ensure the success of new products, services or programs. Both profit and non-profit organizations have used social marketing strategies to inform, to motivate interest, and to engage the involvement of the consumer. A client-dependent health care system did not find it necessary to market services, but a health care system that encourages clients to choose the most appropriate health promotion service available must market services. Nurses are in the business of promoting the health of clients. Therefore, it is essential that nurses become familiar with, and involved in, the development of marketing plans and strategies. The connection between the four variables of the marketing mix (product, promotion, place, and price) and promoting the health of clients is described. A case example recapitulating the marketing strategies employed to raise public awareness of a self-help group for family caregivers is related, the marketing response is evaluated, and future recommendations are proposed.

McCormack D

1994-11-01

332

Marketing strategies nurses can employ to promote health.  

Science.gov (United States)

Marketing strategies are employed to ensure the success of new products, services or programs. Both profit and non-profit organizations have used social marketing strategies to inform, to motivate interest, and to engage the involvement of the consumer. A client-dependent health care system did not find it necessary to market services, but a health care system that encourages clients to choose the most appropriate health promotion service available must market services. Nurses are in the business of promoting the health of clients. Therefore, it is essential that nurses become familiar with, and involved in, the development of marketing plans and strategies. The connection between the four variables of the marketing mix (product, promotion, place, and price) and promoting the health of clients is described. A case example recapitulating the marketing strategies employed to raise public awareness of a self-help group for family caregivers is related, the marketing response is evaluated, and future recommendations are proposed. PMID:7888407

McCormack, D

333

Reducing health care's carbon footprint--the power of nursing.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Global warming and environmentalism continue to be national and international issues as their complexities and implications become better understood. One ironic contributor to the degradation of the environment is the health care system. Serving as clinical laboratories, hotels, restaurants, and offices that never close, U.S. hospitals produce more than 2 million tons of waste annually. Although the consequences and significance of health care's carbon footprint are undeniable, strategies to reduce this impact are challenging. This article discusses how the role, traits, and knowledge of nurses combined with their positions in the health care system make them key players in creating an environmentally sustainable health care industry. With an analysis of environmental action versus inaction, this article explores how nurses at the forefront of health care are equipped to change practice that will reach far beyond the bedside.

Muñoz A

2012-11-01

334

Reducing health care's carbon footprint--the power of nursing.  

Science.gov (United States)

Global warming and environmentalism continue to be national and international issues as their complexities and implications become better understood. One ironic contributor to the degradation of the environment is the health care system. Serving as clinical laboratories, hotels, restaurants, and offices that never close, U.S. hospitals produce more than 2 million tons of waste annually. Although the consequences and significance of health care's carbon footprint are undeniable, strategies to reduce this impact are challenging. This article discusses how the role, traits, and knowledge of nurses combined with their positions in the health care system make them key players in creating an environmentally sustainable health care industry. With an analysis of environmental action versus inaction, this article explores how nurses at the forefront of health care are equipped to change practice that will reach far beyond the bedside. PMID:23413481

Muñoz, Aliria

2012-11-01

335

Nursing Assessment and Intervention to Geriatric Patients Discharged From Emergency Department  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Background: Geriatric patients recently discharged from hospital are at risk of unplanned readmissions and admission to nursing home. When discharged directly from Emergency Department (ED) the risk increases, as time pressure often requires focus on the presenting problem, although 80 % of geriatric patients have complex and often unresolved caring needs. Objective: To examine the effect of a two-stage nursing assessment and intervention to address the patients uncompensated problems given just after discharge from ED and one and six months after. Method: We conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled trial with follow-up at one and six months. Included were patients >70 at increased risk of readmission and functional decline (had an ISAR 1 score of 2-6 points) and discharged home in the period 16th of February 2009 to 31st of January 2011, N=271. Intervention: A nurse did a brief nursing assessment comprising a checklist of 10 physical, mental, medical and social items. The focus was on unresolved problems which require medical intervention, new or different home care services, or comprehensive geriatric assessment. Following this the nurses made relevant referrals to the geriatric outpatient clinic, community health centre, primary physician or arrangements with next-of-kin. Findings: Primary endpoints will be presented as unplanned readmission to ED; admission to nursing home; and death. Secondary endpoints will be presented as physical function; depressive symptoms; health related quality of life; and hours of help received from the community. Conclusion: The presentation at the conference will include results collected at one and six months follow-up, this will show if a two-stage intervention consisting of screening with the ISAR 1 tool followed by structured nursing assessment and intervention in the ED could be a way of discovering geriatric patients’ unresolved problems and preventing further functional decline and readmission.

Rosted, Elizabeth Emilie; Poulsen, Ingrid

336

Assessing nursing student intent for PHD study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Nursing faculty shortages threaten a country's ability to produce the amount of nurses necessary to sustain the delivery of healthcare services. Programs that "fast track" graduate education options for registered nurses are one solution to the problem. OBJECTIVES: To 1) evaluate admission criteria into PhD programs for direct entry from a bachelor's degree; 2) ascertain bachelors and masters degree nursing students' perspectives on pursuing a BSN to PhD course of study; 3) clarify factors that influence students' decision-making processes behind pursuing a PhD and identify characteristics of those who would be likely recruits for PhD study; 4) to test the survey questions to develop an instrument for future use. DESIGN: A cross-sectional pilot study. SETTING: A nursing program at a large urban university in the United States of America with an enrollment of over 1400 students. PARTICIPANTS: Currently enrolled bachelor's, master's, and doctor of nursing practice students. METHODS: Students were sampled via a 10-question (including one open-ended question) electronic mail survey that included 1385 eligible subjects. RESULTS: Among the 606 respondents (57% response rate), 63% were between ages 18 and 30 and 87% indicated that full tuition funding with a living stipend would make them more interested in pursuing a PhD. Current program track was a significant predictor of course of study and area of interest (p=.029). Analysis of the 427 respondents to the open-ended question revealed themes around "time" and "money" as the main barriers to study. The desire to gain clinical experience prior to PhD study was the third theme and an unanticipated finding. CONCLUSIONS: The questionnaire offered some predictive ability for gauging intent to study for a PhD among bachelor's and graduate degree prepared nurses. The results do offer some suggestions for nursing workforce development to help address faculty shortages.

Squires A; Kovner C; Faridaben F; Chyun D

2013-09-01

337

[Assessment of the Polish occupational medicine service (oms) system made by OMS nurses].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

UNLABELLED: This paper presents the results of an assessment of the Polish occupational medicine service (OMS) system made by OMS nurses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The survey was carried out on a random group of OMS nurses. RESULTS: OMS nurses form a professional group comprised of rather experienced personnel. In the opinion of almost 70% of respondents the system guarantees good occupational heath care, whereas 20% took the opposite view. The great majority of respondents think that all employees have to undergo mandatory prophylactic examinations. The nurses have rather critical opinion about the legal regulations pertaining to occupational health care--their number and complexity, and also express negative opinion about the quality of cooperation with employers (who are contractors for OMS units). OMS nurses believe that prophylactic examinations are the strongest point of the system. They are often the only opportunity for establishing contact between an employee and a physician and learning about diseases he or she was previously unaware of. CONCLUSIONS: Although the general assessment of the OMS system is rather positive, it is not free of shortcomings. Improvements in such fields as legislation, financing of service, professional attitude towards responsibilities of the OMS staff, cooperation with employers (contractors) and primary health care units would undoubtedly result in even better assessment, and what is more important in better functioning of the Polish OMS system.

Sakowski P

2012-01-01

338

The relationship between burnout and mental health among nurses  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Burnout is one of the most important factors in reduced productivity in organizations and involves physical and mental signs, especially in the human service professions. The role of nurses in the healthcare system is vital and motivation to ensure health security is extremely important. We carried out this research to examine the relationship between burnout and mental health in the nursing staff of educational hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted among 200 nurses selected via probable multistage sampling. We used three instruments in this study: 1) demographic questionnaire 2) General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28) and 3) Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI).Results: On the whole, using the MBI subscale, we found low levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization and high levels of reduced sense of personal accomplishment, both in frequency and intensity. The prevalence of symptomatic samples in the GHQ-28 was 43%, and two variables, burnout and poor mental health, were related (p<0.001). Burnout was to be related to gender, age and years of work. The correlation between poor mental health and years of work as well as hours of work in a week were significant. Conclusions: Our results suggest that there is a strong correlation between poor mental health and burnout. Furthermore, the prevalence of symptomatic samples detected in our study using the GHQ-28 was much higher than that reported in studies of the general population. The high prevalence of symptomatic samples and high prevalence of burnout in the dimension of self accomplishment, especially in younger nurses, combined with the strong correlation between poor mental health and burnout all show that care should be taken to improve the stressful conditions that nurses face.

Abdi masooleh F; Kaviani H; Khaghanizade M; Momeni Araghi A.

2007-01-01

339

O enfermeiro e a avaliação na gestão de Sistemas de Saúde/ Nurses and the assessment in health system management/ El enfermero y la evaluación en la gestión de Sistemas de Salud  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese Este artigo teve como objetivo refletir criticamente acerca da avaliação, enquanto ferramenta gerencial que favorece a inserção do enfermeiro no processo de gestão de sistemas de saúde. Em decorrência de sua formação, que engloba conhecimentos da área assistencial e gerencial, tendo como centralidade o cuidado, o enfermeiro tem potencial para assumir postura diferenciada na gestão e condições de tomar posições decisórias e de proposição de políticas de (more) saúde. Entretanto, ainda há que se construir e consolidar inserção expressiva em níveis decisórios nos espaços de gestão. A avaliação é um componente da gestão, cujos resultados podem contribuir para tomada de decisão mais objetiva que possibilite a melhoria das intervenções de saúde e a reorganização das práticas de saúde, dentro de um contexto político, econômico, social e profissional; é também uma área de aplicação de conhecimentos que tem potência para mudar o panorama atual da inserção do enfermeiro na gestão. Abstract in spanish Se objetivó reflexionar críticamente acerca de la evaluación, como herramienta gerencial que facilita la inserción del enfermero en el proceso de gestión de sistemas de salud. Como derivación de su formación, que incluye conocimientos del área asistencial y gerencial, haciendo foco en el cuidado, el enfermero tiene potencial para asumir una postura diferenciada en la gestión, tiene condiciones para asumir posiciones decisorias y de proposición de políticas sani (more) tarias. Mientras tanto, aún debe construirse y consolidarse la inserción expresiva en niveles decisorios en los espacios de gestión. La evaluación es un componente de la gestión, cuyos resultados pueden ayudar en la toma de decisiones más objetivas, facilita la mejora de intervenciones de salud y la reorganización de las prácticas de salud, dentro de un contexto político, económico, social y profesional; se trata de un área de aplicación con potencial para cambiar el panorama actual de inserción del enfermero en la gestión. Abstract in english The objective of this study was to undertake a critical reflection regarding assessment as a managerial tool that promotes the inclusion of nurses in the health system management process. Nurses, because of their education and training, which encompasses knowledge in both the clinical and managerial fields and is centered on care, have the potential to assume a differentiated attitude in management, making decisions and proposing health policies. Nevertheless, it is neces (more) sary to first create and consolidate an expressive inclusion in decisive levels of management. Assessment is a component of management, the results of which may contribute to making decisions that are more objective and allow for improving healthcare interventions and reorganizing health practice within a political, economic, social and professional context; it is also an area for the application of knowledge that has the potential to change the current panorama of including nurses in management.

Chaves, Lucieli Dias Pedreschi; Tanaka, Oswaldo Yoshimi

2012-10-01

340

The different health care practices in the history of brazilian public health nursing  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: to recover the different health care practices performed throughout the history of public health nursing in Brazil, since the 20th century. Methodology: the research was conducted through literature review, in February 2010, the databases Scielo and Database of Nursing. Moreover, it was researched in the Library of the Faculty of Nursing, University of Rio de Janeiro. For the screening of the studies used the analysis of titles and abstracts. Results: it was observed that nursing care was founded care practices on religion and charity; and evolved from 20th century repressive health practices and strictly curative and individualizing biomedicine techniques to humanized and comprehensive practices, as proposed by the new nursing theories, and collective practices, as recommended by principles and guidelines of the Unique Health System. Conclusion: the individualizing and curative care practices used throughout nursing history still permeate nurses’ work. Although today a number of care practices are focused on collectivity, comprehensive care and health promotion, the hospital-centric approach remains strong, hence promoting stratified and palliative health care.

Luciana Valadão Alves Kebian, Sonia Acioli

2010-01-01

 
 
 
 
341

Factors associated with psychological distress of Public Health Nurse in Kagawa prefecture, Japan: A pilot study  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

We evaluated the psychological distress using a scale of the K6, the 6-item scale of psychological distress on public health nurse in Kagawa prefecture, Japan. We send the questionnaire to all public health nurses (n = 419) in Kagawa prefecture. Then, a total of 256 public health nurses (1 man and 2...

Noriko Sakano; Takeshi Suzue; Nobuyuki Miyatake; Yoshikazu Miyamae; Taichi Nagatomi; Takeshi Yoda; Akira Yoshioka

342

[Competences of nurses acting as educators of health].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This is an evaluative study, with qualitative analysis, which has as an objective in evaluate the impact of the specialization in Assistant Projects of Nursing - ESPENSUL created in the working process of specialist nurses, in what relates to the competence of acting as an educator of health together as a team, clients and families in carrying out their functions. This course was develop in five Federal Institutions: UFSC, UFPR, UFSM, UFPL e FURG. An example of a propose selection shows that 10% of the total specialist, understand 32 people. The reference in health education as a process of dialogue, inclusive and problematical, stimulant the nurses of the changes in the educational process of their daily practice and, henceforth not only intentionally of the course and its professors, but, the compromise of all in this process of change.

Backes VM; Lino MM; Prado ML; Reibnitz KS; Canaver BP

2008-11-01

343

Authentic leadership and nurse-assessed adverse patient outcomes.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: Our purpose was to test a model examining relationships among authentic leadership, nurses' trust in their manager, areas of work life and nurse-assessed adverse patient outcomes. BACKGROUND: Although several work environment factors have been cited as critical to patient outcomes, studies linking nursing leadership styles with patient outcomes are limited suggesting the need for additional research to investigate the mechanisms by which leadership may influence patient outcomes. METHODS: Secondary analysis of data collected in a cross-sectional survey of 280 (48% response rate) registered nurses working in acute care hospitals in Ontario was conducted using structural equation modelling. RESULTS: The final model fit the data acceptably (?(2) = 1.30, df = 2, P = 0.52, IFI = 0.99, CFI = 1.00, RMSEA = 0.00). Authentic leadership was significantly associated with decreased adverse patient outcomes through trust in the manager and areas of work life. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that nurses who see their managers as demonstrating high levels of authentic leadership report increased trust, greater congruence in the areas of work life and lower frequencies of adverse patient outcomes. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Managers who emphasize transparency, balanced processing, self-awareness and high ethical standards in their interactions with nurses may contribute to safer work environments for patients and nurses.

Wong CA; M Giallonardo L

2013-07-01

344

Nurses' preparedness to care for women exposed to Intimate Partner Violence: a quantitative study in primary health care  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Intimate partner violence (IPV) has a deep impact on women's health. Nurses working in primary health care need to be prepared to identify victims and offer appropriate interventions, since IPV is often seen in primary health care. The aim of the study was to assess nurses' preparedness to identify and provide nursing care to women exposed to IPV who attend primary health care. Method Data was collected using a questionnaire to nurses at the primary health care centres. The response rate was 69.3%. Logistic regression analysis was used to test relationships among variables. Results Shortcomings were found regarding preparedness among nurses. They lacked organisational support e.g. guidelines, collaboration with others and knowledge regarding the extensiveness of IPV. Only half of them always asked women about violence and mostly when a woman was physically injured. They felt difficulties to know how to ask and if they identified violence they mostly offered the women a doctor's appointment. Feeling prepared was connected to obtaining knowledge by themselves and also to identifying women exposed to IPV. Conclusion The majority of the nurses were found to be quiet unprepared to provide nursing care to women exposed to IPV. Consequences might be treatment of symptoms but unidentified abuse and more and unnecessary suffering for these women. Improvements are needed on both at the level of the organisation and individual.

Sundborg Eva M; Saleh-Stattin Nouha; Wändell Per; Törnkvist Lena

2012-01-01

345

Are older patients comfortable discussing sexual health with nurses?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Sexual health is an important component of quality of life, yet practitioners do not routinely query older adults about their sexual health concerns. PURPOSE: The aims of this study were to ascertain whether older adults (a) have unanswered questions about their sexual health; (b) are asked about their sexual health, disease, and medications that could affect their sexual health and their knowledge of STDs and HIV/AIDS; (c) would welcome a care provider initiating the conversation about their sexual health; (d) would be comfortable with discussing their sexual health with a nurse; and (e) identify some barriers to discussing sexual health for the older adult. METHOD: This was a quantitative cross-sectional study that used a 24-item investigator-developed survey which was distributed to residents of retirement communities and participants in fitness classes in the Puget Sound, Washington, region. RESULTS: A total of 101 surveys were completed. The participants' average age was 81 years (range = 62-96 years); 70.3% were women (n = 71) and 25.7% were men (n = 26). When asked what sexual health meant, participants said it encompassed physical pleasure with one's partner or oneself and psychological and physiological health; 47.1% (n = 41) want to be asked about their sexual health at their healthcare visit, and 86% (n = 78) reported that they were comfortable discussing sexual health and were not embarrassed or offended. Male respondents preferred discussing with a physician rather than a nurse (52.2%, p = .01, n = 12), whereas female respondents indicated that they were willing to talk with either a physician or a nurse (56.9%, p = .01, n = 37). IMPLICATIONS: The results of this study have the potential to inform treatment approaches, improve outcomes, and enhance communication with older adults regarding issues of sexual health that impact quality of life.

Farrell J; Belza B

2012-01-01

346

The integration of oral health care into day-to-day care in nursing homes: a qualitative study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: This qualitative study explored barriers and enabling factors to the implementation of an oral hygiene protocol in nursing homes. BACKGROUND: Oral health care in nursing homes in Flanders (Belgium) is inadequate. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Qualitative data were obtained from nurses employed in 13 nursing homes involved in two randomised controlled trials in Flanders-Belgium. Data were collected by focus group and face-to-face interviews during April 2005 and December 2009. All transcripts were analysed with support of NVivo 8 (Version 2008). Transcripts were intuitively analysed in a two-step method. RESULTS: Most revealed barriers were consistent with previous findings in the literature. Newly reported barriers were respect for residents' self-determination, experience based oral health care by nurses, residents' oral health status and nurses' inability to notice residents' oral health status. Demand-driven oral health care was found to be a strong enabling factor. CONCLUSION: The integration of oral health care into day-to-day care seems to be a major problem due to a multitude of barriers. In future implementation innovations in oral health care an a priori assessment of influencing factors is recommended.

De Visschere L; de Baat C; De Meyer L; van der Putten GJ; Peeters B; Söderfelt B; Vanobbergen J

2013-06-01

347

Clinical skills for nurses in medical assessment units.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: To identify the skills possessed by nurses working in medical assessment units (MAUs) and those that are needed to enable them to undertake a detailed, holistic assessment of the patient. METHOD: A qualitative study was undertaken using mixed methods to obtain data. A postal survey using Delphi methodology was sent to a group of advanced nurse practitioners educated at master's degree level. Four focus groups were conducted with 38 qualified nurses working in a MAU. FINDINGS: The first round of the Delphi survey identified 27 skills deemed pertinent to nurses working in this setting. A second round resulted in 11 skills and a further five skills for the most senior nurses were identified by the postal survey participants. Focus groups also identified skills that nurses working in MAUs should possess. There was widespread agreement between participants that the degree of expertise pertaining to each skill would be dependent on their experience in the clinical area and would reflect their seniority. CONCLUSION: There is broad agreement between a body of expert opinion and staff working in a MAU that there are core skills nurses working in MAUs should possess. The author plans to use the results of the study to develop future training in the MAU.

Carroll L

2004-06-01

348

Moving beyond the therapeutic relationship: a selective review of intimacy in the sexual health encounter in nursing practice.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: For the purposes of this study, a selective review of the literature was undertaken with the aim of examining nurses' preparedness to engage in intimate interactions within the context of sexual health care. Kirk's (2007) model of interactional intimacy is used as a lens to examine the literature. BACKGROUND: The provision of sexual health care is often a neglected area of nursing care despite being recognised as a component of holistic nursing practice. Despite theoretical discussion about various forms of intimacy and intimate care, there has been little examination of the interface between intimacy and sexual health care that usefully informs practice. DESIGN: Selective review and synthesis of the literature. CONCLUSION: The literature of humanistic interpretations of caring that has dominated nursing discourse over the last half-century has limited progress on defining and developing forms of clinical interaction that are suited to promoting nurses engagement in sexual health care. We propose that Kirk's model has useful utility in preparing nurses to engage more readily with sexual health care as a routine component of their practice. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Sexual health adversity can often accompany ill health, and therefore, the provision of appropriate care is required to negate detrimental outcomes and promote positive well-being. Although sexual health care is often not prioritised in practice, nurses are in a prime position to promote sexual health care and well-being. By conducting sexual health assessments and providing sexual health care routinely, the gap that exists between patients' sexual healthcare needs and the lack of sexual health care provided can be minimised.

East L; Hutchinson M

2013-06-01

349

Determinants of the intention of elementary school nurses to adopt a redefined role in health promotion at school.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: The quest for greater efficiency in the provision of primary healthcare services and the implementation of a "health-promoting school" approach encourage the optimal redefinition of the role of school nurses. School nurses are viewed as professionals who might be significant actors in the promotion of youth health. The aim of this study was to identify the determinants of the intention of elementary school nurses to adopt a new health-promotion role as a strategic option for the health-promoting school. METHODS: This study was based on an extended version of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). A total of 251 respondents (response rate of 70%) from 42 school health programs across the Province of Québec completed a mail survey regarding their intention to adopt the proposed health-promotion role. Multiple hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between key independent variables and intention. A discriminant analysis of the beliefs was performed to identify the main targets of action. RESULTS: A total of 73% of respondents expressed a positive intention to accept to play the proposed role. The main predictors were perceived behavioural control (? = 0.36), moral norm (? = 0.27), attitude (? = 0.24), and subjective norm (? = 0.21) (ps < .0001), explaining 83% of the variance. The underlying beliefs distinguishing nurses who had a high intention from those who had a low intention referred to their feelings of being valued, their capacity to overcome the nursing shortage, the approval of the school nurses' community and parents of the students, their leadership skills, and their gaining of a better understanding of school needs. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that leadership is a skill that should be addressed to increase the ability of school nurses to assume the proposed role. Findings also indicate that public health administrators need to ensure adequate nurse staffing in the schools in order to increase the proportion of nurses willing to play such a role and avoid burnout among these human resources.

Chabot G; Godin G; Gagnon MP

2010-01-01

350

Health and safety at work: a guide for district nurses.  

Science.gov (United States)

Sickness absence across the NHS costs a billion pounds a year with accidents at work accounting for a significant proportion of that absence. Over half the major injuries in the health service are caused by avoidable slips and falls. Under the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 the NHS as an employer and district nurses as employees have a duty to manage health and safety effectively and to ensure that others are not put at risk by work-related activities. Breaching a requirement of health and safety law is a criminal offence so it is essential that district nurses are able to fulfil their duty and so avoid prosecution. PMID:20220618

Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

2010-02-01

351

The experiences of migrant health nurses employed in seasonal satellite nurse-managed centers: a qualitative study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This research study describes the unique experiences of nurses who are employed in migrant health seasonal satellite nurse-managed centers in the upper Midwest. Data were generated through semistructured interviews with 10 seasonal nurses. Phenomenology served as the research method. Four themes were identified including seeking seasonal employment, establishing migrant seasonal satellite nurse-managed centers, learning the culture of Hispanic migrant farmworkers, and referring Hispanic migrant farmworkers for medical care. During their seasonal employment, nurses learned to establish and operate satellite nurse-managed centers. Due to the migrant health nurses' daily contact with their clients, they were able to establish rapport that led to a trusting relationship. This enabled them to provide culturally sensitive and lifestyle appropriate care to the migrant farmworker population.

Lausch C; Heuer L; Guasasco C; Bengiamin M

2003-01-01

352

[Assessment of the implementation of an educational intervention on developmental surveillance with nurses].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The objective of this study was to assess the difficulties experienced by Family Health Strategy nurses in implementing an educational intervention regarding developmental surveillance. A qualitative approach was used with the assistance of eleven nurses, who participated in developmental surveillance workshops in the context of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness. Data were collected from May to June 2009 and were analyzed on the basis of content analysis methodology, using the theme modality. Four thematic nuclei were identified: evaluation of the training course regarding developmental surveillance; difficult areas which hinder the application of the acquired knowledge; facilitating points provided by the course, and practice transformation based on the knowledge acquired during the training course. The study highlighted the urgency of incorporating contents that give priority to questions concerning the infants' developmental surveillance in undergraduate nursing education, as well as in the family health internship.

Reichert AP; Lucena de Vasconcelos MG; Eickmann SH; Lima Mde C

2012-10-01

353

The role of the nurse on health promotion and health maintenance of adolescents  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Nurses have an indispensable role in maintenance and promotion of adolescens’ health. Nurses must know the basic principles of appropriate approach to adolescents, should be able to guide the adolescent and family in the promotion and maintenance of health. In this article, general observation principles of adolescent and family, the appropriate nursing approach to the major adolescent health issues, how to evaluate gathered data about adolescent’s such as nutrition, physical activity, mental health and, development and growth, the properties of therapeutic communication with adolescent and family, physical activity to be integrated into the life of the adolescent and family, nursing approach to illness and accident prevention has been handled. (Turk Arch Ped 2011; 46 Suppl: 4-8)

Gülümser; Sevil; Figen

2011-01-01

354

Advanced practice nursing in performing arts health care.  

Science.gov (United States)

Performing arts medicine is a growing health care profession specializing in the needs of performing artists. As part of the performing arts venue, the dancer, a combination of athlete and artist, presents with unique health care needs requiring a more collaborative and holistic health care program. Currently there are relatively few advanced practice nurses (APNs) who specialize in performing arts health care. APNs, with focus on collaborative and holistic health care, are ideally suited to join other health care professionals in developing and implementing comprehensive health care programs for the performing artist. This article focuses on the dancer as the client in an APN practice that specializes in performing arts health care. PMID:20644180

Weslin, Anna T; Silva-Smith, Amy

2010-06-01

355

The Potential for Nurse Practitioners in Health Care Reform.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In Canada, health care reform is underway to address escalating costs, access and quality of care issues, and existing personnel shortages in various health disciplines. One response of the nursing profession to these stimuli has been the development of the advanced practice nurse, namely, the nurse practitioner (NP). NPs are in an excellent position to address current shortcomings through increasing points of access to the health care system, providing an emphasis on education and disease prevention, and delivering high-quality, cost-effective care in a multitude of practice settings. With an emphasis on the social determinants of health, NPs are in a prime position to provide care to underserved and vulnerable populations across Canada. Despite the potential for NPs to be instrumental in health care reform, there is a lack of support and regulation necessary for their optimal use. Barriers to mobilizing NPs in Canada exist and impede the integration of NPs into the Canadian health care system, which has both quality of care and social justice implications.

Archibald MM; Fraser K

2013-09-01

356

Technology, health and the home: eHealth and the community nurse.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Twenty-first century methods of communication are changing. Technology and the way it is used has the potential to revolutionise health care. In the same way information technology (IT) has had a massive impact on commerce and industry, it is also having a substantial impact on the practice of community nurses and the ways in which care is delivered. In order for the impact of IT to be a positive one, community nurses and other health professionals will have to learn and develop a range of new skills. Nurses can and should be directing and becoming involved in the ways in which the IT revolution unfolds. Nurses working with systems development teams also need to make known their needs making clear what information the various IT systems have to contain and how these will fit in with their nursing practice.

Peate I

2013-05-01

357

Cross-mapping the ICNP with NANDA, HHCC, Omaha System and NIC for unified nursing language system development. International Classification for Nursing Practice. International Council of Nurses. North American Nursing Diagnosis Association. Home Health Care Classification. Nursing Interventions Classification.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Nursing language plays an important role in describing and defining nursing phenomena and nursing actions. There are numerous vocabularies describing nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes in nursing. However, the lack of a standardized unified nursing language is considered a problem for further development of the discipline of nursing. In an effort to unify the nursing languages, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) has proposed the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) as a unified nursing language system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inclusiveness and expressiveness of the ICNP terms by cross-mapping them with the existing nursing terminologies, specifically the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) taxonomy I, the Omaha System, the Home Health Care Classification (HHCC) and the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC). Nine hundred and seventy-four terms from these four classifications were cross-mapped with the ICNP terms. This was performed in accordance with the Guidelines for Composing a Nursing Diagnosis and Guidelines for Composing a Nursing Intervention, which were suggested by the ICNP development team. An expert group verified the results. The ICNP Phenomena Classification described 87.5% of the NANDA diagnoses, 89.7% of the HHCC diagnoses and 72.7% of the Omaha System problem classification scheme. The ICNP Action Classification described 79.4% of the NIC interventions, 80.6% of the HHCC interventions and 71.4% of the Omaha System intervention scheme. The results of this study suggest that the ICNP has a sound starting structure for a unified nursing language system and can be used to describe most of the existing terminologies. Recommendations for the addition of terms to the ICNP are provided.

Hyun S; Park HA

2002-06-01

358

[Current state of competence assessment in nursing].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Competency measurement is central to the optimisation of outcome oriented educational processes in nursing, similar to the concept of evidence based practice. The classification of measurement tools provides the basis for describing the current state of research and development in relation to competence measurement in nursing science, and any gaps are identified. The article concludes with questioning the importance of outcome oriented quality orientation in order to achieve an increase in quality during training. Further methodological developments and qualitative studies are needed to examine the context specific processes of interaction and learning, beyond competence diagnostics.

Darmann-Finck I; Reuschenbach B

2013-01-01

359

The future of the population-focused, public health clinical nurse specialist.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article addresses the need for continued certification of community and public health nurses at the advanced practice registered nurse level, and explores curricular avenues and policy recommendations with regard to certification and education of these nurses. The transformation of health care and burgeoning access to information has changed what the public expects and needs from health professionals. Nursing roles have expanded and transformed, in turn requiring that the education, licensure, certification, and accreditation of the professional likewise change.

Doutrich D; Dotson JA

2012-06-01

360

Evaluation of child health matters: a web-based tutorial to enhance school nurses' communications with families about weight-related health.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The goal of the current study was to assess the efficacy and acceptability of a web-based tutorial (Child Health Matters, CHM) designed to improve school nurses' communications with families about pediatric weight-related health issues. Using a randomized wait-list control design, a nationally representative sample of school nurses was assigned to immediate or delayed access conditions. Pre-, post-, and follow-up assessments of knowledge, barriers to providing obesity treatment, and intended practices were conducted. Results indicated that, relative to wait-list controls, immediate-access nurses demonstrated significant increases in knowledge and decreases in perceived barriers to discussing weight-related health, and sign