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Sample records for health nursing assessment

  1. Assessment of head nurses’ mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesouli-Voltyraki E.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate mental health of head nurses in internal medicine and surgery departments of Athens and province. Material and methods: 79 head nurses and nurse supervisors in internal medicine and surgery departments of secondary health care hospitals in Athens and one provincial town filled in the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28. Results: Mean age of the sample was 40.19±5.30 years old.10% of head nurses and nurse supervisors exhibited considerable mental health burden, while no differences were observed between men and women. Conclusions: Head nurses and nurse supervisors generally exhibit lower mental burden than other nurses. However, in a considerable percentage of them, mental heal problems are still significant, without differentiation between men and women.

  2. Perceptions of health assessment, treatment and care by community nurses

    OpenAIRE

    S S Monamodi; S D Roos

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore and describe whether primary health care nurses are equipped with the skills they require in health assessment, treatment and care.

    Opsomming
    Die doel van hierdie navorsing was om te verken en te beskryfofdie primere gesondheidsorgverpleegkundiges met die nodige vaardighede toegerus is, ten einde in staat te wees om kwaliteit pasientsorg deur gesondheidsberaming, behandeling en verpleegsorg, te verleen. *Plea...

  3. Measuring compliance of conducting an occupational health risk assessment in the occupational health nurse’s practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolene de Jager

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Occupational health nurses (OHNs are qualified registered nurses with a postgraduate qualification in occupational health nursing. An important activity of OHNs is to identify and assess health risks in the workplace. Health risk assessments (HRAs are conducted by OHNs to determine all the occupational health stressors, for example noise, vibration and chemical substances. The authors conducted legal compliance occupational health audits and observed that 85% (n = 23 of OHNs in different settings conduct HRAs only to a limited extent. The following objective was formulated for the study: To explore and describe the extent to which OHNs conduct HRAs as it is a legal requirement for compliance; and the possible reasons for not adhering to the regulation and conduct them only to a limited extent. A quantitative, descriptive design was used in this study. A sampling frame was developed from a list of all the members of the South African Society of Occupational Health Nursing Practitioners (SASOHN in Gauteng. From the target population of OHNs in Gauteng, a systematic cluster sampling method was used. A self-developed questionnaire was distributed by mail and e-mail, and authors sent respondents reminders. The authors ensured that validity, reliability and ethical standards were adhered to. The findings revealed that OHNs are mature, experienced, predominately female practitioners who operate on behalf of a disproportionately large number of workers. Four factors influencing these nurses in conducting an HRA to a limited extent were identified: competence, ignorance about the role of the OHN, workload and attitude.

  4. Measuring compliance of conducting an occupational health risk assessment in the occupational health nurse's practice

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Nicolene de, Jager; Sonya, Beukes; Anna G.W., Nolte.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational health nurses (OHNs) are qualified registered nurses with a postgraduate qualification in occupational health nursing. An important activity of OHNs is to identify and assess health risks in the workplace. Health risk assessments (HRAs) are conducted by OHNs to determine all the occupat [...] ional health stressors, for example noise, vibration and chemical substances. The authors conducted legal compliance occupational health audits and observed that 85% (n = 23) of OHNs in different settings conduct HRAs only to a limited extent. The following objective was formulated for the study: To explore and describe the extent to which OHNs conduct HRAs as it is a legal requirement for compliance; and the possible reasons for not adhering to the regulation and conduct them only to a limited extent. A quantitative, descriptive design was used in this study. A sampling frame was developed from a list of all the members of the South African Society of Occupational Health Nursing Practitioners (SASOHN) in Gauteng. From the target population of OHNs in Gauteng, a systematic cluster sampling method was used. A self-developed questionnaire was distributed by mail and e-mail, and authors sent respondents reminders. The authors ensured that validity, reliability and ethical standards were adhered to. The findings revealed that OHNs are mature, experienced, predominately female practitioners who operate on behalf of a disproportionately large number of workers. Four factors influencing these nurses in conducting an HRA to a limited extent were identified: competence, ignorance about the role of the OHN, workload and attitude.

  5. The practice assessment of student nurses by people who use mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickley, Theodore; Stacey, Gemma; Pollock, Kristian; Smith, Angie; Betinis, Janet; Fairbank, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a participatory action research project focusing upon service-user involvement in the assessment of student mental health nurses in practice. The principle of student nurses being assessed by service-users was found to be desirable in theory. However, its implementation proved to be fraught with difficulty especially with regard to the concerns about increased workload and feelings of vulnerability amongst students. It is recommended that the model of assessment should be adjusted to that of review and that a program of service-users reviewing student nurses on placement be implemented and evaluated. PMID:19564061

  6. Assessing Organizational Readiness for a Participatory Occupational Health/Health Promotion Intervention in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Flum, Marian; West, Cheryl; Punnett, Laura

    2015-09-01

    The long-term care sector is characterized by high morbidity and employee turnover, along with associated costs. Effective health protection and health promotion are important to improve physical and psychosocial well-being of caregivers. Assessment of organizational readiness for change is an essential precursor to the successful implementation of workplace programs addressing work climate, structure of tasks and relationships, and other issues that may be perceived as challenging by some within the institution. This study qualitatively assessed readiness of five skilled nursing facilities for a participatory occupational health/health promotion intervention. Selection criteria were developed to screen for program feasibility and ability to conduct prospective evaluations, and information was collected from managers and employees (interviews and focus groups). Three centers were selected for the program, and the first year of formative evaluation and intervention experience was then reviewed to evaluate and modify our selection criteria after the fact. Lessons learned include adding assessment of communication and the structure of problem solving to our selection criteria, improving methods to assess management support in a concrete (potentially nonverbal) form, and obtaining a stated financial commitment and resources to enable the team to function. Assessment of organizational readiness for change is challenging, although necessary to implement effective and sustainable health promotion programs in specific organizations. PMID:25715335

  7. Lifestyle, harassment at work and self-assessed health of female flight attendants, nurses and teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdottir, Holmfridur K; Sveinsdottir, Herdis; Bernburg, Jon Gunnar; Fridriksdottir, Hildur; Tomasson, Kristinn

    2006-01-01

    Health-related lifestyle, harassment at work, and self-assessed health of female flight attendants in comparison to that of female nurses and female primary school teachers were surveyed. A higher proportion of flight attendants than nurses or teachers were smokers, 26% vs. 15% and 17% respectively; and consumed alcohol at least once a week, 40% vs. 21% and 16%. Repeated sexual harassment at work was more common among the flight attendants, 31% vs. 8% and 4%; whereas bullying, physical violence and threats were less prevalent among the flight attendants (12%) than among nurses (19%). Flight attendants were on average somewhat taller, but weighed on average less, 63.8 kg vs. 72.4 kg and 72.7 kg respectively. Repeated exposure to sexual harassment, bullying, violence and threats was related to less physical and psychological well-being in all the groups. Teachers scored on average significantly lower than did the flight attendants on general health and physical well-being, while nurses did not. PMID:16971763

  8. Assisted living nursing practice: admission assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    Admission assessment, generally conducted by a registered nurse, is autonomous, without opportunity for dialogue with colleagues and other health care professionals and bounded by the nurse's knowledge and skills, state regulations, facility practices, and marketing. The fact that some states permit admission and retention of nursing home level-of-care residents and provision of end-of-life care means that the assessment has to be able to predict the resident's likely trajectory of well-being as well as chronic illness exacerbation. The nurse must have a clear perspective on staff competencies and judge whether additional education or training will be necessary. This article reviews assessment standards of practice as put forth by the American Assisted Living Nurses Association as part of its application for recognition of assisted living nursing as specialty nursing practice by the American Nurses Association. The role of the Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurse in resident assessment is also discussed. PMID:17292794

  9. Virtual Health Library – Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel CF da Cruz

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The Virtual Health Library – Nursing is as the broad of scientific and technical knowledge based in health-entered, organized, and stored in electronic format universally accessible on the WWW and compatible with international databases. The information sources are generated, updated, stored, and manipulated on the Internet by scholars in a decentralized manner using common methodologies for their integration into the Virtual Health Library- Nursing.

  10. Service user involvement in the assessment of a practice competency in mental health nursing - stakeholders' views and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speers, Janey

    2008-03-01

    Competence in building therapeutic relationships is essential for student mental health nurses and therefore requires robust assessment. However, the assessment of such complex skills is problematic. Following policy directives exhorting increased service user involvement in general, there have been recent suggestions that service users could contribute to the assessment of practice. This paper outlines a research project which investigated the views of 24 stakeholders (service users, lecturers, mentors, ex-students and student nurses) about the potential involvement of service users in the assessment of student mental health nurses' competence in forming therapeutic relationships. The findings revealed that service users interviewed had a largely positive attitude towards this potential development. Nurse participants were more ambivalent. Despite citing several key advantages, nurses also expressed some important reservations about how such a proposal could be implemented in practice. Nevertheless, on balance, they were in favour in principle. Key recommendations for the implementation of this potential development included strategies to enable anonymity and freedom of choice for service users. A range of options for obtaining service user feedback were put forward, along with some ideas about how the fairness of the assessment might be protected. PMID:18291328

  11. Assessment of nursing home residents in Europe: the Services and Health for Elderly in Long TERm care (SHELTER) study

    OpenAIRE

    Onder Graziano; Carpenter Iain; Finne-Soveri Harriet; Gindin Jacob; Frijters Dinnus; Henrard Jean; Nikolaus Thorsten; Topinkova Eva; Tosato Matteo; Liperoti Rosa; Landi Francesco; Bernabei Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Aims of the present study are the following: 1. to describe the rationale and methodology of the Services and Health for Elderly in Long TERm care (SHELTER) study, a project funded by the European Union, aimed at implementing the interRAI instrument for Long Term Care Facilities (interRAI LTCF) as a tool to assess and gather uniform information about nursing home (NH) residents across different health systems in European countries; 2. to present the results about the test-...

  12. Undergraduate nurses’ experience of the family health assessment as a learning opportunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana J. Willemse

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The practice of community health nursing (CHN may enhance the life experiences of families and communities, particularly amongst the poor and socially marginalised. CHN provides for a deeper understanding of the health status of families living within communities, for example, where and how they live, their cultural context and their ability to identify resources available to assist with their health care (Allender, Rector & Warner 2010:17.This qualitative phenomenological study reflects on the self-reported lived experiences of undergraduate CHN students at the University of the Western Cape in the City of Cape Town, South Africa. These students conducted a family health assessment (FHA learning task at the homes of families within communities.Purposive and convenience sampling was used by students who had conducted an FHA. Fourteen students agreed to participate in the study, of whom nine were interviewed, two withdrew and the remaining three were not interviewed since no new data were emerging during interviews, indicating that saturation had been reached. During in-depth interviews with seven female and two male students, data for the exploration of the lived experiences was gathered through the following question: ‘How did you experience the FHA?’ Field notes were taken and used to capture non-verbal communication of participants. The focus of the study was to explore the lived experiences of students and not those of the family on whom the FHA was completed.Data collected were categorised into themes, guided by the systematic data analysis process of Tesch (1990 cited in Cresswell (2003:192. Four themes emerged: challenges of family selection, challenges of safety, socio-cultural challenges and academic challenges experiencedby the participants. This study will inform future research and curriculum planning for CHN education in a multifaceted context.

  13. Undergraduate nurses' experience of the family health assessment as a learning opportunity

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Juliana J., Willemse; Elma W., Kortenbout.

    Full Text Available The practice of community health nursing (CHN) may enhance the life experiences of families and communities, particularly amongst the poor and socially marginalised. CHN provides for a deeper understanding of the health status of families living within communities, for example, where and how they li [...] ve, their cultural context and their ability to identify resources available to assist with their health care (Allender, Rector & Warner 2010:17). This qualitative phenomenological study reflects on the self-reported lived experiences of undergraduate CHN students at the University of the Western Cape in the City of Cape Town, South Africa. These students conducted a family health assessment (FHA) learning task at the homes of families within communities. Purposive and convenience sampling was used by students who had conducted an FHA. Fourteen students agreed to participate in the study, of whom nine were interviewed, two withdrew and the remaining three were not interviewed since no new data were emerging during interviews, indicating that saturation had been reached. During in-depth interviews with seven female and two male students, data for the exploration of the lived experiences was gathered through the following question: 'How did you experience the FHA?' Field notes were taken and used to capture non-verbal communication of participants. The focus of the study was to explore the lived experiences of students and not those of the family on whom the FHA was completed. Data collected were categorised into themes, guided by the systematic data analysis process of Tesch (1990) cited in Cresswell (2003:192). Four themes emerged: challenges of family selection, challenges of safety, socio-cultural challenges and academic challenges experienced by the participants. This study will inform future research and curriculum planning for CHN education in a multifaceted context.

  14. Child hearing health: practice of the Family Health Strategy nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suelen Brito Azevedo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective Evaluating the practice of nurses of the Family Health Strategy (FHS in child hearing health care. Method A normative assessment of structure and process, with 37 nurses in the Family Health Units, in the city of Recife, Pernambuco. The data collection instrument originated from the logical model of child hearing health care provided by nurses of the Family Health Strategy, and the matrix of indicators for evaluation of nursing practice. Results All the nurses identified the hearing developmental milestones. At least two risk factors were identified by 94.5% of the nurses, and 21.6% of them carried out educational activities. Conclusion The normative assessment was considered adequate despite existing limitations in the structure and process.

  15. Nurses Readiness and Electronic Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi-Koolaee, Mahdi; Safdari, Reza; Bouraghi, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: The importance of the electronic health records in health care well known to everybody, as well as, the role of nurses to provide clinical care; they have a valuable role in successful implementation of electronic systems. The aim of this paper is to assess the nurses’ readiness for EHR implementation. Methods and Materials: This was a descriptive cross sectional study, conducted in 2013. Using cluster sampling, 310 nurses selected from teaching hospitals at Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). A self-structured questionnaire was used for gathering data. Data management and analysis was performed using SPSS for windows by using descriptive statistics. Results: 85.9% of nurses, participated in the study. The Microsoft Word (58.8%) was the higher level of skill according to ICDL. The mean of computer skills, knowledge and attitude of nurses towards EHR was 43.4%, 51.2% and 65.2%, respectively. In overall, the mean of readiness of nurses was 57.2%. Establish proper communication among providers and prevent duplications was the most positive attitude and complexity of service delivery was the most negative attitude toward EHR. Conclusion: The most obvious finding to emerge from this study is that it should be considered in the education, training and participation of nurses, it should be ensured the level of knowledge and attitude toward EHR and finally, some related courses in Health Information Systems suggested including the curriculum of nursing. PMID:26005277

  16. Agency nurse assessment for competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Karen E

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study is to make the agency nurse's performance standards equivalent to that of hospital nurse levels of performance based in hospital staff observation to provide continuity of safe, quality patient care. To attain this goal, the following should be done: (1) develop orientation process that includes module for general orientation; (2) agencies pay for nurse orientation to include 8-hour session and a 4-hour skills assessment; (3) develop flip cards for agency nurses as a resource tool; (4) annual general assessment for hospital employees to be completed by agency nurses; and (5) develop process to document and distribute information to charge nurses about agency nurse competency. Leaders should ensure that the process for identifying and managing are defined and implemented. The intent of this standard is to hold leaders within the healthcare organizations accountable. PMID:16077285

  17. Assessment of quality of life of Iranian nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Aalaa; Mahnaz Sanjari; Ali Tootee; Ghazanfar Mirzabeigi; Sedighe Salemi

    2012-01-01

    Nurses’ Quality Of Life (QOL) may be affected by many different factors that can in turn influence their job competency. The aim of this study was to assess the QOL of Iranian nurses to provide evidence to enable policy makers to take the necessary steps needed to make improvements. Using a cross-sectional study design, we evaluated the QOL of Iranian nurses by the assessment of four health indicators: physical, psychological, social and environmental. A total of 850 nurses from 17 diff...

  18. Religion, assessment and the problem of 'normative uncertainty' for mental health student nurses: a critical incident-informed qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, A M; Baker, C; Cross, S

    2015-10-01

    There is limited research around how mental health (MH) student nurses interpret and differentiate between people's religious and cultural beliefs and the existence of psychopathological symptomatology and experiences. Here we focus on one cultural issue that arose from research exploring how MH student nurses approach and interpret religion and culture in their practice - that is, the difficulties in determining the clinical significance of the religious beliefs and experiences expressed by the people they care for. While problems with establishing the cultural boundaries of normality in clinical assessments are an important area of debate in cultural psychiatry, it remains a peripheral issue in MH nurse education. An anthropologically informed qualitative research design underpinned 'critical incident' (CI)-focused ethnographic interviews with 36?second and third-year MH nursing field students and seven undergraduate MH branch lecturers. Follow up focus groups were also carried out. Interview transcripts were subject to thematic analysis. Four subthemes were identified under the broad theme of the clinical significance of religious-type expression and experience: (1) identifying the difference between delusions and religious belief; (2) identifying whether an experience was hallucination or religious experience; (3) the clinical implications of such challenges; and (4) applying religion-specific knowledge. There are clinical implications that may result from the difficulties with assessing the clinical significance of religious beliefs and experiences, identified in both our research and within international cultural psychiatry literature and research. Misinterpretation and therefore wrongly assessing someone's experience as pathological is a significant concern. It is suggested that CI analysis could be adapted to help nurses, nursing students and nurse educators recognize the religious dimensions of mental distress, particularly those that then potentially impact upon the accuracy and person centeredness of clinical assessment. Further research is proposed to investigate the clinical assessment and training needs of nurses in the area of religion and mental distress. PMID:26147782

  19. Service user involvement in nurse education: perceptions of mental health nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O' Donnell, H; Gormley, K

    2013-04-01

    Increasingly providers of mental health nurse education are required to demonstrate user involvement in all aspects of these programmes including student selection, programme design and student assessment. There has been limited analysis of how nursing students perceive user involvement in nurse education programmes. The aim of this study has been to explore mental health nursing student's perceptions of involving users in all aspects of pre-registration mental health nursing programme. Researchers completed a number of focus group interviews with 12 ex-mental health nursing students who had been recruited by purposeful sampling. Each focus group interview was recorded and analysed using a series of data reduction, data display and verification methods. The study confirms many of the findings reported in earlier user participation in education studies. Three main themes related to user involvement have been identified: the protection of users, enhanced student learning and the added value benefits associated with user involvement. PMID:22533371

  20. Community Health Nursing through a Global Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Norma; Dallwig, Amber; Abbott, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Community Health Nursing (N456) is a required senior clinical course in the undergraduate nursing curriculum at the University of Michigan in which students learn to assess and address the health of populations and communities. In 2012, we began our efforts to internationalize the curriculum using a globally engaged nursing education framework. Our goal is for all students to have an intercultural learning experience understanding that all students are unable to travel internationally. Therefore, this intercultural learning was implemented through a range of experiences including actual immersion, virtual activities (videoconferencing) and interventions with local vulnerable populations. Grants were obtained to provide immersion experiences in Quito, Ecuador and New Delhi, India. Several technologies were initiated with partner nursing schools in Leogane, Haiti and New Delhi, India. Weekly videoconferencing utilizing BlueJeans software and exchange of knowledge through the Knowledge Gateway facilitated intercultural exchange of knowledge and culture. Local clinical groups work with a variety of vulnerable populations. A private blog was developed for all sections to share community assessment data from local and international communities. Qualitative evaluation data was collected for local and international students to begin to assess cultural competence and student learning. Analysis of data documented increased awareness of culture and identified the many positive benefits of interaction with a global partner. PMID:25980716

  1. Assessment of nursing home residents in Europe: the Services and Health for Elderly in Long TERm care (SHELTER study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onder Graziano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aims of the present study are the following: 1. to describe the rationale and methodology of the Services and Health for Elderly in Long TERm care (SHELTER study, a project funded by the European Union, aimed at implementing the interRAI instrument for Long Term Care Facilities (interRAI LTCF as a tool to assess and gather uniform information about nursing home (NH residents across different health systems in European countries; 2. to present the results about the test-retest and inter-rater reliability of the interRAI LTCF instrument translated into the languages of participating countries; 3 to illustrate the characteristics of NH residents at study entry. Methods A 12 months prospective cohort study was conducted in 57 NH in 7 EU countries (Czech Republic, England, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands and 1 non EU country (Israel. Weighted kappa coefficients were used to evaluate the reliability of interRAI LTCF items. Results Mean age of 4156 residents entering the study was 83.4 ± 9.4 years, 73% were female. ADL disability and cognitive impairment was observed in 81.3% and 68.0% of residents, respectively. Clinical complexity of residents was confirmed by a high prevalence of behavioral symptoms (27.5% of residents, falls (18.6%, pressure ulcers (10.4%, pain (36.0% and urinary incontinence (73.5%. Overall, 197 of the 198 the items tested met or exceeded standard cut-offs for acceptable test-retest and inter-rater reliability after translation into the target languages. Conclusion The interRAI LTCF appears to be a reliable instrument. It enables the creation of databases that can be used to govern the provision of long-term care across different health systems in Europe, to answer relevant research and policy questions and to compare characteristics of NH residents across countries, languages and cultures.

  2. Computerized documentation and community health nursing students

    OpenAIRE

    Nadine M Aktan; Janet Tracy; Connie Bareford

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objective: Proficiency in computerized documentation systems is an essential element of most areas of nursing practice today. Community health is one example of an area of nursing practice where computerized documentation systems help in the provision of high quality care. Nursing students must learn the basic principles of and begin to participate in the practices of computerized nursing documentation. It is, therefore, the responsibility of nursing faculty to promote student invo...

  3. Quantifying Community Health Nursing: The Control is with the Nurse

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Judith L.; Sienkiewicz, Josephine I.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the formation, benefits, and implication to nursing practice of an automated nursing information system in a community health agency based on a service provided framework. The design of the service provided coding system is described. Benefits and future implications to the community health agency are discussed.

  4. Mapping the literature of home health nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Yelena

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to identify core journals in home health nursing and to determine how well these journals were covered by indexing and abstracting services. The study was part of the project for mapping the nursing literature of the Medical Library Association's Nursing and Allied Health Resource Section.

  5. 77 FR 36549 - Nursing Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit-“Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Nursing Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit--``Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health Disparities, and Social Determinants of Health...). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: HRSA's Bureau of Health Professions, Division of Nursing, will...

  6. Do public health nurses in Norway promote information on oral health?

    OpenAIRE

    Skeie, Marit Slåttelid; Skaret, Erik; Espelid, Ivar; Misvær, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Background (i) to describe oral health counselling in Norway to parents with infants and toddlers, ii) to assess existing collaboration and routines in oral health matters between nurses and personnel in the PDS, iii) to evaluate to what extent oral health was integrated in the basic educational curriculum of public health nurses. Methods This study was based on two separate surveys: the sample of Study I was 98 randomly selected child health clinics. A questionnaire covering oral health prom...

  7. Nuclear education in public health and nursing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-three public health schools and 492 university schools of nursing were surveyed to gather specific information on educational programs related to nuclear war. Twenty public health schools and 240 nursing schools responded. Nuclear war-related content was most likely to appear in disaster nursing and in environmental health courses. Three schools of public health report that they currently offer elective courses on nuclear war. Innovative curricula included political action projects for nuclear war prevention

  8. Nuclear education in public health and nursing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winder, A.E.; Stanitis, M.A.

    1988-08-01

    Twenty-three public health schools and 492 university schools of nursing were surveyed to gather specific information on educational programs related to nuclear war. Twenty public health schools and 240 nursing schools responded. Nuclear war-related content was most likely to appear in disaster nursing and in environmental health courses. Three schools of public health report that they currently offer elective courses on nuclear war. Innovative curricula included political action projects for nuclear war prevention.

  9. An assessment by nurses and mothers of a ‘road-to-health ’ book in the Western Cape

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, D.; H Harker; Hde V Heese; MD Mann

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate English, Afrikaans, and Xhosa mother-retained ‘Road-to- Health Book’ (RTH book) for children, and an electronic calculator. Design: Researchers D Harrison (DH) and H Harker (HH) informed clinic staff about the contents and significance of the RTH book. They requested nurses to use this book in conjunction with the Road-to-Health Card and to issue and explain its use to every visiting client. The use of an electronic calculator that plotted horizontal centile and Z-sco...

  10. Do public health nurses in Norway promote information on oral health?

    OpenAIRE

    Espelid Ivar; Skaret Erik; Skeie Marit S; Misvær Nina

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background (i) to describe oral health counselling in Norway to parents with infants and toddlers, ii) to assess existing collaboration and routines in oral health matters between nurses and personnel in the PDS, iii) to evaluate to what extent oral health was integrated in the basic educational curriculum of public health nurses. Methods This study was based on two separate surveys: the sample of Study I was 98 randomly selected child health clinics. A questionnaire covering oral he...

  11. Oral Health Nursing Education and Practice Program

    OpenAIRE

    Donna Shelley; Judith Haber; Dolce, Maria C.

    2012-01-01

    Millions of Americans have unmet oral healthcare needs and profound oral health disparities persist in vulnerable and underserved populations, especially poor children, older adults, and racial and ethnic minorities. Nurses can play a significant role in improving the quality of oral health including access to care with appropriate education and training. The purpose of this paper is to describe New York University College of Nursing's response to this challenge. The Oral Health Nursing Educa...

  12. 77 FR 36549 - Nursing Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit-“Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ...Health Resources and Services Administration Nursing Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit--``Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health Disparities...Bureau of Health Professions, Division of Nursing, will host an invitational summit...

  13. Nurse Overestimation of Patients' Health Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Dickens, Carolyn; Lambert, Bruce L.; Cromwell, Terese; Piano, Mariann R.

    2013-01-01

    Patient education and effective communication are core elements of the nursing profession; therefore, awareness of a patient's health literacy is integral to patient care, safety, education, and counseling. Several past studies have suggested that health care providers overestimate their patient's health literacy. In this study, the authors compare inpatient nurses' estimate of their patient's health literacy to the patient's health literacy using Newest Vital Sign as the health literacy meas...

  14. The Leadership Role of Nurse Educators in Mental Health Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Jan; Lopez, Violeta; Howard, Patricia B; Escott, Phil; Cleary, Michelle

    2015-09-01

    Leadership behaviors and actions influence others to act, and leadership in clinical practice is an important mediator influencing patient outcomes and staff satisfaction. Indeed, positive clinical leadership has been positioned as a crucial element for transformation of health care services and has led to the development of the Practice Doctorate Movement in the United States. Nurse educators in health care have a vital leadership role as clinical experts, role models, mentors, change agents, and supporters of quality projects. By enacting these leadership attributes, nurse educators ensure a skilled and confident workforce that is focused on optimizing opportunities for students and graduates to integrate theory and practice in the workplace as well as developing more holistic models of care for the consumer. Nurse educators need to be active in supporting staff and students in health care environments and be visible leaders who can drive policy and practice changes and engage in professional forums, research, and scholarship. Although nurse educators have always been a feature of the nursing workplace, there is a paucity of literature on the role of nurse educators as clinical leaders. This discursive article describes the role and attributes of nurse educators with a focus on their role as leaders in mental health nursing. We argue that embracing the leadership role is fundamental to nurse educators and to influencing consumer-focused care in mental health. We also make recommendations for developing the leadership role of nurse educators and provide considerations for further research such as examining the impact of clinical leaders on client, staff, and organizational outcomes. PMID:26440875

  15. Evaluación de la capacitación de enfermería en dos institutos nacionales de salud / Nursing training assessment in two national institutes of health

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Julio César, Cadena Estrada; Sandra Sonalí, Olvera Arreola; María Teresa, Pérez López; Carmen L., Balseiro Almario; Reyna, Matus Miranda.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La capacitación de enfermería es un proceso permanente para adquirir, mantener, renovar, reforzar, actualizar e incrementar los conocimientos, es necesario conocer la opinión del personal respecto a la capacitación impartida por sus instituciones. Objetivo: Evaluar la capacitación del [...] personal de enfermería de dos Institutos Nacionales de Salud. Material y métodos: Estudio observacional comparativo y transversal. La muestra fue aleatoria sistematizada (n=415 enfermeras del área operativa). Se midieron tres dimensiones: planeación, desarrollo y evaluación. Datos recolectados con instrumento ex profeso autoadministrado de 38 ítems sometido a prueba piloto y confiabilidad. Los datos se analizaron con frecuencias, porcentajes, medidas de tendencia central, pruebas T Student, ANOVA de una vía, correlación Pearson y Spearman tomando estadísticamente significativo p Abstract in english Introduction: Nursing training is a permanent process to acquire, maintain, renew, strengthen, update, and increment knowledge, and because of this, it is necessary to know the staff's opinion about the nursing training offered by their institutions. Objective: To assess the nursing staff training a [...] t two National Institutes of Health. Materials and methods: Observational, comparative and basic study. The sample was random and systematized (n = 415 nurses from the operative area). Three dimensions were measured: planning, development, and evaluation. Data were collected through a unique self-administered 38 items instrument which was used for a pilot test and further tested for its confidence level Data were analyzed through frequencies, percentages, central tendency measures, student T tests, one way ANOVA, and Pearson and Spearman correlations, having p

  16. Competency assessment of nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Changes in the healthcare industry have created great challenges for leaders of acute-care organizations. One of the greatest challenges is ensuring a competent nursing staff to care for patients within this changing environment (Boylan & Westra, 1998). Patients are more acutely ill and have shorter lengths of stay, placing greater demands on nurses who must demonstrate competency in caring for increasingly complex patients in a continually changing healthcare environment. Competency is defined as "the knowledge, skills, ability and behaviors that a person possesses in order to perform tasks correctly and skillfully" (O'Shea, 2002, p. 175). Competency assessment involves more than a checklist and a test. Hospitals are required to assess, maintain, demonstrate, track, and improve the competence of the staff. Competency assessment is an ongoing process of initial development, maintenance of knowledge and skills, educational consultation, remediation, and redevelopment. Methods to assess competencies include competency fairs, Performance Based Development System and online programs. Certain key people should be involved in the development of competencies. The department managers can give input related to department-specific competencies. Experienced staff members can provide valuable insight into the competencies that need to be assessed. Educators should be involved for providing the input for the methods used to validate competencies. Competencies are an important part of the work world. They are a part of a continual process to help ensure that the organization provides a high-quality care to its customers and patients. PMID:16735851

  17. Challenges in mental health nursing: current opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabella D

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Donna Sabella, Theresa Fay-Hillier College of Nursing and Health Professions, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: The current mental health care system in the US continues to struggle with providing adequate care and services to all that require it due to limited resources, biases from both other professions and the public, and the complexities of treatment of many of those individuals or populations that suffer from mental illness. Mental health nurses, also referred to as psychiatric nurses, are impacted by those same biases, limited resources, and complexities in their role. This paper provides a brief history of mental health nursing and a discussion of the current challenges faced within the profession. It will also include how the public's perception of both those who have mental illness and those who treat it is based on the sensationalism of those who are violent, and misunderstanding of current treatments. It is imperative that mental health nurses continue to define and educate other health care professionals as well as the general public of the role of the mental health nurse and those who suffer from mental illness. Unfortunately, some of the same bias that was present in the 1930s remains today, but perhaps with perseverance and education it will not continue into the future. Keywords: mental health, psychiatric nursing, pre- licensure, post-licensure challenges, professional obstacles, public perception

  18. Perinatal nurses' perceptions of competency assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Brenda L; Waller-Wise, Renece; Weed, Latricia D

    2014-10-01

    Competency assessment should be a changing and continuing process. In addition, it should be appropriate for the organization and the nursing staff. Nursing educators are challenged to provide a competency assessment process that is relevant and meaningful. This qualitative research study describes perinatal nurses' perceptions of a change from a traditional testing competency assessment to a hands-on competency assessment. The setting was a medical center in southeastern Alabama. Thirteen nurses participated in the study. Focus groups were used to explore the new assessment method. Three themes were identified: I am learning, multidimensional learning together, and increasing professional confidence. As the medical center perinatal nursing competency assessment program continues to improve, the expectation is for other departments to assess and revise their competency assessment program. PMID:25280194

  19. Process for Mapping Global Health Competencies in Undergraduate and Graduate Nursing Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Martha; Gakumo, C Ann; Phillips, Jennan; Wilson, Lynda

    2016-01-01

    Determining the extent to which existing nursing curricula prepare students to address global health issues is a critical step toward ensuring competence to practice in an increasingly globalized world. This article describes the process used by nursing faculty at a public university in the southern United States to assess the extent to which global health competencies for nurses were being addressed across nursing programs. Steps used and lessons learned throughout this process are discussed. PMID:26164326

  20. Occupational health among Iranian nursing personnel

    OpenAIRE

    Arsalani, Narges

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is increasing global evidence that today’s work environment results in a higher risk of adverse health among nursing staff than among many other professions. Since nurses constitute the largest group in the healthcare workforce and have a crucial role in providing care services, their impaired health might have an adverse effect on the quality of healthcare. The overall aim of this thesis was to explore work-related health and associated factors. A further aim was to describ...

  1. Challenges in mental health nursing: current opinion

    OpenAIRE

    Sabella D.; Fay-Hillier T

    2014-01-01

    Donna Sabella, Theresa Fay-Hillier College of Nursing and Health Professions, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: The current mental health care system in the US continues to struggle with providing adequate care and services to all that require it due to limited resources, biases from both other professions and the public, and the complexities of treatment of many of those individuals or populations that suffer from mental illness. Mental health nurses, also referred to as ps...

  2. Public health nurses' quality of worklife: responses to organizational changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcox, V; Isaacs, S; Underwood, J; Chambers, L W

    1994-01-01

    The Nursing Division of a local health unit in Ontario reorganized its nursing teams into target population based programs. Nurses involved in this reorganization were asked to report their perceptions of job satisfaction, job design and role stress using standardized instruments before the reorganization and at three points in time after the reorganization. No administratively significant differences in these variables were reported by the nurses through the four time periods. The one exception was an unpredicted decrease in their perception of their task identity, that is, their perception of the significance or importance of their work. Major changes in the organization of a nursing division may be possible with minimal impact on perceptions of job satisfaction, job design and role stress. We caution that further assessment of the measurement tools used in this study should be undertaken. PMID:7922963

  3. Exploring the views of nurses on the cardiometabolic health nurse in mental health services in australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Platania-Phung, Chris; Stanton, Robert; Millar, Freyja

    2015-02-01

    People with serious mental illness experience premature death due to higher rates of cardiometabolic conditions (e.g. cardiovascular disease, diabetes) than the general population. Mental health services often do not provide sufficient cardiometabolic clinical care to address these risks. The cardiometabolic health nurse (CHN) role has been suggested as a strategy for ensuring integrated care is provided and sustained. The views of nurses in mental health would be essential in informing the viability and development for this initiative. This paper presents the findings of open-ended comments from a cross-sectional online survey of nurses working in mental health in Australia (n  =  643) eliciting views about the possible introduction of the cardiometabolic nurse. Thematic analysis was undertaken, of 133 open comments on this topic. The findings suggest that nurses see the specialist role as suitable and valuable for mental health services. Some nurses voiced concern about specialisation leading to fragmentation (e.g. in responsibilities for physical health, division of mental and physical health care, and less emphasis on equipping all nurses with comprehensive care skills), especially for settings where generalist nursing was seen as already available. The findings suggest this role is viewed favourably by nurses, provided that it is consistent with holistic and comprehensive care. Empirical research is needed to see whether this role increases holism (as valued by consumers and nurses) and cardiometabolic outcomes. PMID:25397354

  4. Integrating Sexual Minority Health Issues into a Health Assessment Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Jordon D; Nesteby, J Aleah; Randall, Carla E

    2015-01-01

    The health needs of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) population are traditionally overlooked by the health care community and are rendered invisible by most nursing school curricula. Initial contact with a nurse during a health history and assessment can have an impact on whether the person will feel comfortable disclosing his or her identity, returning for services, or following plans of care. Because the first interaction with a nurse can be critical, the health assessment course is an appropriate place in the curriculum to discuss the needs of the LGBT community. This article includes a discussion of unique health risks to the LGBT population, benefits, and challenges of incorporating these issues into the classroom and recommendations for including the care of this population into a health assessment nursing course. Specific communication techniques are provided that may be helpful during history taking and physical examination with a patient who is LGBT. Guidance regarding physical examination of the transgender patient is also included. These suggestions will be helpful to nurse faculty who teach health assessment, nursing students, educators who design and implement professional development and continuing education for established nurses, preceptors in the clinical setting, and any nurse who is unfamiliar with the needs and concerns specific to the LGBT population. PMID:26653044

  5. Iranian Nurses’ Status in Policymaking for Nursing in Health System: A Qualitative Content Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Aarabi, Akram

    2015-01-01

    Presence of nurses in policy making will result improvement of nursing practice, and increase qualification of patients’ care, but still few nurses are involved in policy debates and health reforms and their status in policy making for nursing is not clear. The aim of this study was to elucidate Iranian nurses’ status in policy making for nursing in health system. This is a qualitative study. Using purposive sampling 22 participants were interviewed to gain deep understanding from the phenome...

  6. Occupational Health Teaching for Pre Registration Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Stuart; Wynn, Philip; Williams, Nerys

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 41 of 66 nursing schools showed that occupational health is taught in 88% of nursing diploma and 80% of nursing degree programs. However, the majority focus on nurses' own occupational safety and health, not how patients' health can be affected by work or can affect the ability to work. (SK)

  7. Evaluating and improving nurses' health and quality of work life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrigan, Judith M; Lightfoot, Nancy E; Larivière, Michel A S; Jacklin, Kristen

    2013-04-01

    This article discusses evaluating and improving the health and quality of work life (QOWL) of nurses. Nurses are reported to have higher illness, disability, and absenteeism rates than all other health care workers. Research suggests that QOWL impacts nurses' health and the provision of quality health care, particularly patient safety. Occupational health nurses have a pivotal role in evaluating and improving nurses' QOWL and health. This will ensure quality health outcomes for nurses and patients and reduce costs for the health care system. PMID:23557346

  8. Hacia la mejora de la salud bucodental del anciano: valoración y diagnóstico enfermero / Towards improving oral health of the elderly: nursing assessment and diagnosis

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Laura, Figueroa-Martín; Gonzalo, Duarte-Clíments; Teodoro, González-Pérez; Trinidad, Rufino-Delgado.

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Identificar las preguntas clave para valorar la salud bucodental del anciano, cuestionarios disponibles en nuestro medio, y diagnósticos de enfermería relacionados. Método: Revisión sistemática de la literatura con búsqueda en Biblioteca Virtual de Salud, Medline, Cochrane Library, Joanna [...] Briggs Institute, Cuiden, INHATA y BiblioPro. Análisis de contenido de valoraciones enfermeras específicas y cuestionarios disponibles en nuestro medio. Selección de diagnósticos de enfermería relacionados mediante método Delphi. Resultado: Se encuentran 1949 artículos, se seleccionan 10. En nuestro medio se utiliza la propuesta de valoración de Gordon y la contenida en la historia clínica informatizada en Atención Primaria de Canarias, Drago-AP. Entre los cuestionarios que exploran la salud bucodental el OHIP-SP (Oral ImpactProfile- Spanish) se muestra como el más completo en constructo. A juicio de expertos, hay 29 diagnósticos enfermeros que guardan relación con la salud bucodental de los ancianos, de los cuales, 15 muestran correspondencia con apartados valorados en el OHIP-SP tras la revisión de las características definitorias. Conclusiones: Identificamos 5 preguntas clave, exploración, cuestionarios y 29 diagnósticos relacionados, de los cuales 14 amplían el cuestionario. Con estas herramientas se puede diseñar un plan de actuación dirigido al logro de resultados de salud bucodental en el anciano, y así, realizar cuidados destinados a la mejora de este aspecto de salud con amplia repercusión sobre la calidad de vida y la salud general. Abstract in english Objective: To identify the key questions to assess the oral health of the elderly, the questionnaires available in our environment for this assessment, and related nursing diagnoses. Method: A systematic review of the literature with a search performed with Biblioteca Virtual de Salud, Medline, Coch [...] rane Library, Joanna Briggs Institute, Cuiden, INHATA and BiblioPro. Analysis of contents of Nursing specific assessments and questionnaires available in our environment. Nursing diagnoses related selected through Delphi method. Result: 1949 are finded, 10are selected. In our environment the proposal of the Marjory Gordon's assessment and the valuation of the clinical history used in primary care Canaries, Drago-AP are applied. Among the questionnaires to explore the oral health, OHIP- SP (Oral Impact Profile- Spanish) is showed as the most complete construct. According to experts, there are 29 nursing diagnoses relevant to the oral health of older people, of which 15 show correspondence with items of the questionnaire OHIP- SP after the revision of the defining characteristics. Conclusion: We identified 5 key questions, exploration, questionnaires and 29 diagnoses related, which 14 extend the questionnaire. With these tools it can be designed an action plan directed to the achievement of oral health results on the elderly, and, by that, take care due to improve in this healthy aspect with abroad repercussion about the quality of life and health in general.

  9. Relationship between nurses’ spiritual intelligence with hardiness and general health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Akbarizadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nursing is one of the stressful jobs that affect nurse's general health. The aim of this study was assessment relationship between Spiritual intelligence, Hardiness and General health among nurses in the hospital of Bushehr in 1388. Methods: Cross- sectional study designed and 125 nurses who have been working in different wards of the hospital enrolled in the study. Data was collected using Spiritual intelligence, Hardiness, General health and characteristics demographic questionnaires. Correlation, t-test, ANOVA, Tukey and regression analysis was applied using SPSS-16 soft ware. Results: The results showed there was significant relationship between spiritual intelligence and hardiness (P<0.005, spiritual intelligence and General health (P<0.005, hardiness and General health (P<0.001. Among the demographic characteristics including age, gender, working section, marital status, job experiences, and education only working section showed significantly correlated with patience (P<0.005. Conclusion: Improvement of spiritual intelligence and reinforcement of hardiness could help to increase the general health of nurses.

  10. Nurses' Perceptions of the Electronic Health Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawley, Rocquel Devonne

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of electronic health records (EHR) by health care organizations has been limited. Despite the broad consensus on the potential benefits of EHRs, health care organizations have been slow to adopt the technology. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to explore licensed practical and registered nurses'…

  11. Quality of Mental Health Care for Nursing Home Residents: A Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Grabowski, David C.; Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Rome, Vincent F.; Bartels, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    Because of the high proportion of nursing home residents with a mental illness other than dementia, the quality of mental health care in nursing homes is a major clinical and policy issue. The authors apply Donabedian's framework for assessing quality of care based on the triad of structure, process, and outcome-based measures in reviewing the literature on the quality of mental health care in nursing homes. Quality measures used within the literature include mental health consultations and h...

  12. Nursing education to improve global health

    OpenAIRE

    Hülya Kaya

    2010-01-01

    In the final decades of the twentieth century world went through a complex process in political, technological, economic, social and health areas. In the process often referred to as globalization, many health problems including global spread have seen and many have still being seen. This situation obliges nurses who are the largest groups of health care providers, to be aware of health problems that result from globalization and to explore solutions these health problems requires them t...

  13. Job stress and occupational health nursing: modeling health affirming choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, S L

    1993-11-01

    1. Job stress is a condition or event in the workplace that induces strain (a physical, psychological, or behavioral response to a stressor). The outcome of unrelieved job stress can be burnout. 2. Occupational health nurses can experience job stress in the areas of intrinsic job factors, organizational structures, reward systems, human resource systems, and leadership. 3. Stress reduction techniques can be grouped into physical, social, spiritual, intellectual, emotional, and environmental strategies. 4. Application of stress reduction strategies to reduce experienced job stress in occupational health nurses is one way occupational health nurses can model health affirming choices. PMID:8259936

  14. Exploring the activity profile of health care assistants and nurses in home nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vliegher, Kristel; Aertgeerts, Bert; Declercq, Anja; Moons, Philip

    2015-12-01

    Are home nurses (also known as community nurses) ready for their changing role in primary care? A quantitative study was performed in home nursing in Flanders, Belgium, to explore the activity profile of home nurses and health care assistants, using the 24-hour recall instrument for home nursing. Seven dates were determined, covering each day of the week and the weekend, on which data collection would take place. All the home nurses and health care assistants from the participating organisations across Flanders were invited to participate in the study. All data were measured at nominal level. A total of 2478 home nurses and 277 health care assistants registered 336 128 (47 977 patients) and 36 905 (4558 patients) activities, respectively. Home nurses and health care assistants mainly perform 'self-care facilitation' activities in combination with 'psychosocial care' activities. Health care assistants also support home nurses in the 'selfcare facilitation' of patients who do not have a specific nursing indication. PMID:26636895

  15. Family Health Nursing – A European Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miros?aw J. Jarosz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Florence Nightingale, while formulating her concept of nursing mentioned, among nurses’ tasks, the popularization of personal hygiene and hygiene of surroundings in workers’ environments, as well as teaching baby care to mothers. The performance of these tasks required cooperation with the families, and at that time, such a cooperation was postulated by William Rathbone (1819–1902. According to him, to the tasks of a nurse providing home care for a patient also belong assistance to the family in the area of hygiene and health care.

  16. Chronic Health Conditions Managed by School Nurses. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgitan, Judith; Bushmiaer, Margo; DeSisto, Marie C.; Duff, Carolyn; Lambert, C. Patrice; Murphy, M. Kathleen; Roland, Sharon; Selser, Kendra; Wyckoff, Leah; White, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that students with chronic health conditions have access to a full-time registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse). School districts should include school nurse positions in their full-time instructional support personnel to provide health services…

  17. Critical Cases Faced by Mental Health Nurses and Assistant Nurses in Psychiatric Hospitals in Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Evmorfia Koukia; Sofia Zyga

    2013-01-01

    Background: Psychiatric Nurses and nurses’ assistants working in an inpatient unit experience a significant number of critical cases. A small number of studies have explored which patients’ problems nurses perceive as ‘critical case or incident’ and particularly which interventions they choose. Aim: The aim of the research was 1. To identify the clinical problems that mental health nurses and assistant nurses characterize as critical 2. To report the main nursing interventions 3. To investiga...

  18. Intellectual disability nursing assessment: student reflections

    OpenAIRE

    Doody, Owen; McInerney, Paula; Linnane, Lynda

    2012-01-01

    Nursing students, Paula and Lynda, reflect on their first academic assessment of their 4-year intellectual disability nursing course. The reflection is conducted by the second and third authors of this article and is guided by Gibbs’ (1998) cycle, highlighting the positive and negative aspects of their ‘workbook’ assignment during their first academic semester. Overall, the use of the workbook as an assessment method enabled the students to discover the importance of time management, attendan...

  19. Infusing oral health care into nursing curriculum: addressing preventive health in aging and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Joan Earle; Fitzgerald, Leah; Markham, Young Kee; Glassman, Paul; Guenther, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Access to oral health care is essential for promoting and maintaining overall health and well-being, yet oral health disparities exist among vulnerable and underserved populations. While nurses make up the largest portion of the health care work force, educational preparation to address oral health needs of elders and persons with disabilities is limited across nursing curricula. This descriptive study reports on the interdisciplinary development, implementation, and testing of an oral health module that was included and infused into a graduate nursing curriculum in a three-phase plan. Phase 1 includes evaluation of a lecture presented to eight gerontological nurse practitioner (GNP) students. Phase 2 includes evaluation of GNP students' perceptions of learning, skills, and confidence following a one-time 8-hour practicum infused into 80 required practicum hours. The evaluation data show promise in preparing nurse practitioner students to assess and address preventive oral health needs of persons aging with disabilities such that further infusion and inclusion in a course for nurse practitioners across five specialties will implemented and tested in Phase 3. PMID:22619708

  20. Developing nursing capacity for health systems and services research in Cuba, 2008-2011

    OpenAIRE

    MPH Nelcy Martínez

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Health systems and services research by nursing personnel could inform decisionmaking and nursing care, providing evidence concerning quality of and patient satisfaction. Such studies are rather uncommon in Cuban research institutes, where clinical research predominates. OBJECTIVE: Assess the results of a strategy implemented between 2008 and 2011 to develop nursing capacity for health systems and services research in 14 national research institutes based in Havana. METHODS: The...

  1. Assessment of quality of life of Iranian nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedighe Salemi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Introduction

    Nurses’ Quality Of Life (QOL may be affected by many different factors which can in turn influence their competency in their job. The aim of this study is to assess the QOL of Iranian nurses to provide evidence for policy makers to take necessary strides needed to make improvements.

    Materials and methods

    Using a cross-sectional study design, we evaluated the QOL of Iranian nurses by the assessment of four indicators, namely, physical health, psychological health, social health and environmental health. A total number of 850 nurses from 17 different provinces of Iran were recruited by random sampling. They were requested to complete the WHO QOL-BREF questionnaire. The data were then analyzed using the SPSS version 16.

    Results

    The results indicated that half of the nurses scored in the moderate range, suggesting that they had a reasonably good QOL. They scored considerably high in terms of physical health indicators and achieved significantly low scores regarding environmental health issues. Although the chi-square test did not show any significant association between the QOL indicators and different factors such as work experience, gender, job position and patients group. We found a significant association between the subject's position at work in hospitals shift pattern and their overall QOL score.

    Conclusions

    The results of our study showed that more half of the nurses evaluated their QOL at a moderate level. The results from this study can be used by policy makers to contribute to the improvement of the QOL of nurses which may lead to the enhancement of the quality of care they deliver to their patients. It seems imperative to conduct future research encompassing a group of nurses from the whole country, so that a more representative cohort can be studied. It would also pave the way for the establishment of a QOL database for nurses in Iran that could monitor changes in the nursing population

  2. The New Nurse in Industry. A Guide for the Newly Employed Occupational Health Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jane A.

    These guidelines for professional nurses and employers in industrial settings present basic and fundamental nursing principles, duties, and responsibilities in the practice of occupational health. The content is presented in four chapters. The first briefly introduces occupational health. Chapter 2 on occupational health nursing service covers…

  3. Origins of Public Health Nursing in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Adams

    1978-09-01

    Full Text Available Israel is now thirty years old, but its community health services date back to the early years of this century when the land was still under Turkish rule. The first written reports on the nursing services appeared in 1912 in New York City in the minutes of a group of Jewish women later known as Hadassah Women’s Organization. Some of the members had visited the Holy Land and, shocked by the state of health of the Jewish poor, saw the urgent need for improving care. It was decided to start with a system of community maternity nursing which would be carried out along the lines of the New York State Legislation. The nurses would be given funds to employ midwives, to supply linen to mothers and babies, and to distribute money for medicine and food to the poor. Furthermore, the nurses were to train probationers for community nursing, give talks to mothers and girls and nursing care to the sick poor. They were to be in contact with Hadassah by letters, monthly reports, and were to use an approved system of bookkeeping.

  4. Outcomes Assessment: Implications for Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cesarina; Bartels, Jean E.

    1999-01-01

    Applies the following outcomes assessment principles to Alverno College's nursing program: begin with educational values; view learning as multidimensional, integrated, and revealed over time; have explicit purposes; include experiences leading to outcomes; make assessment ongoing; include wide representation; and make assessment part of larger…

  5. The use of the nominal group technique as an evaluative tool in the teaching and summative assessment of the inter-personal skills of student mental health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jonathan; Linsley, Sue

    2006-05-01

    Nominal group technique is a semi-quantitative/qualitative evaluative methodology. It has been used in health care education for generating ideas to develop curricula and find solutions to problems in programme delivery. This paper aims to describe the use of nominal group technique and present the data from nominal group evaluations of a developing module which used novel approaches to the teaching and assessment of interpersonal skills. Evaluations took place over 3 years. Thirty-six students took part in annual groups. Analysis of the data produced the following themes based on items generated in the groups: role play, marking, course content, teaching style and user involvement. Findings indicate that students valued the role play, feedback from service users and emphasis on engagement and collaboration elements of the module. The areas which participants found difficult and desired change included anxiety during experiential practice, the "snap shot" nature of assessment and the use of specific interventions. Indications are also given regarding the impact of changes made by teaching staff over the 3 year evaluation period. The findings support themes within the existing literature on the teaching of interpersonal skills and may to some extent point the way toward best practice in this area. The paper discusses these findings and their implications for nurse education. PMID:16481073

  6. Mental Health of Chinese Nurses in Hong Kong: The Roles of Nursing Stresses and Coping Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, D

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the sources of stress and mental health of nurses in Hong Kong. It also attempted to explore the functions of coping strategies in determining the stress and mental health of nurses. Results showed that more than one-third of the nurses could be considered as having poor mental health. While supervisory role produced the highest level of stress, organizational environment also created a substantial amount of stress for nurses. The most frequently used coping strategies wer...

  7. Health behaviour, nursing self-efficacy and egagement among nursing students : A longitudinal cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce, Malin

    2010-01-01

    Nursing students represent one of the largest groups of students in higher education in Sweden. Their future occupation as registered nurses requires professional competencies including working on health promotion. However, nurses are frequently recognised as an occupational group with a high risk of impaired health due to stress in the working environment. Therefore, the higher educational institutions providing nursing education have an important role to play in the health...

  8. Mental health nurses in primary care: quantitative outcomes of the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakeman, R; Bradbury, J

    2014-05-01

    The Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program (MHNIP) is a funding scheme in Australia that enables mental health nurses to work in primary care settings with people with complex mental health problems for as long as necessary. This study examined the outcomes of the programme as reported by nurses. Nurses provided profiles of 64 people with whom they worked, including measures of symptoms and problems on admission to the programme and at a second point in time. The findings showed that people had high levels of symptom severity and distress on admission, and they experienced significant improvements in all problem areas except physical health over their time working with the nurse. The MHNIP appears to be addressing the needs of people with highly complex needs, but more sensitive measures of outcome ought to be routinely collected. The Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program (MHNIP) provides a funding mechanism for credentialed mental health nurses to work in primary care settings in Australia with people with complex and serious psychosocial and mental health problems. This project explored the extent to which the programme contributed to positive outcomes. Sixty-four service user profiles were provided by nurses working within the programme, including the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS), on admission and at the last review point. Mean total HoNOS scores on admission were higher than those typically seen on admission to inpatient care in Australia. Significant reductions in all problem areas except physical health problems were found at the last review point for this sample. These findings support the viewpoint that MHNIP is addressing the needs of people with the most complex needs in primary care and is achieving clinically significant outcomes. PMID:23701440

  9. Informatics: essential infrastructure for quality assessment and improvement in nursing.

    OpenAIRE

    Henry, S. B.

    1995-01-01

    In recent decades there have been major advances in the creation and implementation of information technologies and in the development of measures of health care quality. The premise of this article is that informatics provides essential infrastructure for quality assessment and improvement in nursing. In this context, the term quality assessment and improvement comprises both short-term processes such as continuous quality improvement (CQI) and long-term outcomes management. This premise is ...

  10. Mental health nursing and stress: maintaining balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Louise

    2011-04-01

    The recruitment and retention of mental health nurses within acute inpatient mental health facilities continues to be an ongoing issue. Literature and current research highlight an environment fraught with pressure and stress, identifying several key factors contributing to job dissatisfaction. These factors include greater patient acuity, unpredictable and challenging workspaces, violence, increased paperwork, and reduced managerial support. This qualitative, critical, feminist exploration investigated the lived experiences of 13 female mental health nurses working in inpatient services. They were asked about their practice and perceptions of workplace culture, and they shared their thoughts on stress management and professional well-being. Positive workplace practice was highlighted, and the participants revealed an environment they were proud to be a part of. Individual interviews, focus groups, and reflective practice were all used to collect data. The findings from the investigation unanimously support current literature that clearly confirms mental health nursing to be stressful. Interestingly, however, the findings also clearly identified that the way in which the nurse participants managed their stress was intrinsically linked to their job satisfaction. The major theme identified throughout the present study revealed that the female participants' ability to manage an at times complex workspace through the notions of teamwork, diversity, and creativity. All of the participants considered these elements as significant to providing a high standard in patient care. This research might provide an opportunity for others to view mental health nursing from a different perspective, and through the lived experiences of the participants, embrace the positive and rewarding aspects of the role. PMID:21371222

  11. Lifestyle practices and the health promoting environment of hospital nurses.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hope, A

    1998-08-01

    Lifestyle practices and the health promoting environment of hospital nurses This paper examined the lifestyle practices of hospital nurses and the impact of specific interventions in the hospital environment. The perception of nurse as health promoter and as carer of AIDS patients was also examined. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data at two different time periods. The sample represented 729 nurses (at pre- and post-time periods), both qualified and student nurses. Qualified nurses reported the highest stress levels while student nurses reported more negative lifestyle practices such as smoking, alcohol consumption and drug use. A greater number of current smokers (29%) consumed alcohol and used drugs than non-smokers. The impact of intervention strategies around compliance with smoking policy and work-site walk routes reduced exposure to passive smoking at work for qualified nurses and increased exercise participation for both groups of nurses. Workplace was identified as the main source of stress which included relationships at work and demands of the job. Hospital nurses experiencing high work stress were more likely to use professional support and personal coping (discuss problems with friends\\/family, have a good cry and eat more) than others. Nurses believed in the importance of health promotion as part of their work; however, qualified nurses felt more confident and gave more health related information than student nurses. Student nurses perceived a lower risk of contacting AIDS through work and a higher concern\\/worry in caring for AIDS patients than qualified nurses.

  12. Inductions Buffer Nurses' Job Stress, Health, and Organizational Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamau, Caroline; Medisauskaite, Asta; Lopes, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Nurses suffer disproportionate levels of stress and are at risk of sickness-absence and turnover intentions, but there is a lack of research clarifying preventions. This study investigated the impact of inductions (job preparation courses) about mental health for nurses' job stress, general health, and organizational commitment. Data from 6,656 nurses were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM), showing that mental health inductions increase nurses' job satisfaction, which reduces their occupational stress and improves their health. SEM showed that these occupational health benefits increase the nurses' commitment to the organization. Job satisfaction (feeling valued, rewarded) also had a direct effect on nurses' intentions to continue working for the organization. Mental health inductions are therefore beneficial beyond job performance: they increase occupational health in the nursing profession. PMID:24971576

  13. Perceptions of public health nursing: views from the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutter, L I; Ford, J S

    1996-07-01

    While there has been considerable debate about future roles for public health nurses, there is little research that explores public health nursing from the practitioner's perspective. The findings reported in this paper are part of a larger study that explored public health nurses' perspectives and experiences of their practice: what they do and how they feel about what they do. Qualitative data were gathered through in-depth individual and focus group interviews with 28 female public health nurses (PHNs) in Alberta, Canada. This paper describes how PHNs feel about their work. The analysis revealed that public health nurses perceived that their work was valuable and worthwhile, enjoyable, demanding, and not well understood by others. These perceptions are discussed in terms of their implications for the future role of public health nursing in a reformed health care system and for the quality of nursing worklife. PMID:8807371

  14. Developing nursing capacity for health systems and services research in Cuba, 2008-2011

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    MPH, Nelcy Martínez.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Health systems and services research by nursing personnel could inform decisionmaking and nursing care, providing evidence concerning quality of and patient satisfaction. Such studies are rather uncommon in Cuban research institutes, where clinical research predominates. OBJECTIVE: Ass [...] ess the results of a strategy implemented between 2008 and 2011 to develop nursing capacity for health systems and services research in 14 national research institutes based in Havana. METHODS: The study comprised four stages: description of approaches to health systems and services research by nurses worldwide and in Cuba; analysis of current capacities for such research in Cuba; intervention design and implementation; and evaluation. Various techniques were used including: literature review, bibliometric analysis, questionnaire survey, consultation with experts, focus groups, and workshops for participant orientation and design and followup of research projects. Qualitative information reduction and quantitative information summary methods were used. Initially, 32 nursing managers participated; a further 105 nurses from the institutes were involved in research teams formed during intervention implementation. RESULTS: Of all published nursing research articles retrieved, 8.9% (185 of 2081) concerned health systems and services research, of which 26.5% (49 of 185) dealt with quality assessment. At baseline, 75% of Cuban nurses surveyed had poor knowledge of health systems and services research. Orientation, design and followup workshops for all institute teams developed individual and institutional capacity for health systems and services research. Post-intervention, 84.7% (27) of nurses reached good knowledge and 14.3% (5) fair; institutional research teams were formed and maintained in 9 institutes, and 13 projects designed and implemented (11 institutional, 2 addressing ministerial-level priorities) to research nursing issues at selected centers. CONCLUSIONS: A systematic strategy to build nursing capacity for health systems and services research can be effective in involving nurses in such research and in developing institutional support for it, fostering compliance with Cuban and international professional development priorities for nursing, as well as contributing to quality of patient services.

  15. Nurses' self-reported attitudes concerning transcultural nursing : LOG-Health Project

    OpenAIRE

    Tolvanen, Suvi; Ritala, Marjo; Siimeslahti, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this final project was to explore the attitudes towards transcultural care and nurses’ self-reported level of cultural competence. The data was collected in the Finnish Helsinki metropolitan area, the participants were nurses, public health nurses and practical nurses. The framework used was the Papadopoulos, Tilki and Taylor model for developing cultural competence. This project is a part of Local and Global Development in Social Services and Health Care (LOG-Sote) –project, w...

  16. mHealth: Technology for nursing practice, education, and research

    OpenAIRE

    Willa Marlene Doswell; Betty Braxter; Annette DeVito Dabbs; Wendy Nilsen; Mary Lou Klem

    2013-01-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) is a rapidly growing field providing the potential to enhance patient education, prevent disease, enhance diagnostics, improve treatment, lower health care costs and increase access to health care services, and advance evidence-based research. For the field of  nursing the potential capabilities of mHealth are not only for patient care but for delivery of nursing education to our future practicing nurses, providing a means of communication between healthcare profession...

  17. School Nurse Role in Electronic School Health Records. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltz, Cynthia; Johnson, Katie; Lechtenberg, Julia Rae; Maughan, Erin; Trefry, Sharonlee

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are essential for the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) to provide efficient and effective care in the school and monitor the health of the entire student population. It is also the position of…

  18. Mapping the literature of public health and community nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Alpi, Kristine M.; Adams, Mary G.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to identify the journals most cited in public health and community nursing and to determine which databases provide the most thorough indexing access to these journals. This study is part of the Medical Library Association Nursing and Allied Health Resource Section's project to map the nursing literature.

  19. Health and safety risks in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fountouki A.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: professional hazards create insecurity and frustration to nurses during their clinical work. Aim of this review is to present and analyze daily risks and aggravating factors during the clinical work of nurses. Method: a systematic evaluation of the International and Greek literature findings was undertaken, according to Rogers’ model of analysis. Results: the frame of analysis showed five categories of risks which include: Biological/contagious risks, Chemical factors, Environmental/mechanical risks, Physical dangers, Psychosocial risks. Discussion: biological dangers can be dealt with by using suitable equipment for trauma avoidance and careful execution of nursing tasks. Chemical risks, including exposure to chemotherapeutic medicines, can be prevented by using protective measures such as gloves, masks, goggles and special appliances for preparing medication. The mechanical strain of the musculaskeletical system should be limited by ergonomic equipment and education, while the physical factors such as noise requires depends also on the personal sensitivity of workers. Conclusions: many preventative measures are based simply on the modification and adoption of a new behaviour and do not demand financial resources or special equipment. The strong-will for protecting the health status of nursing staff and promoting the profession are the two main drives in improving nursing working like conditions and the administration of safe care.

  20. The conceptual model for nursing and health policy revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Gail E; Fawcett, Jacqueline

    2005-11-01

    A conceptual model of nursing and health policy was proposed by the authors in 2001. Revisions in the model have been made, and the model has been used to guide the evolution of a nursing doctoral program and doctoral dissertation research. The revised model provides a framework for analysis and evaluation of public, organizational, and professional policies influencing the quality, cost, and access to nursing and other health care services, as well as for nursing-discipline specific and health services research at any one of four interacting levels: Level 1--efficacy of nursing practice processes; Level 2--effectiveness of nursing practice processes and effectiveness and efficiency of health care delivery subsystems; Level 3--equity of access to effective and efficient nursing practice processes and efficient nursing practice delivery systems, and equity in distribution of costs and burdens of care delivery; Level 4--justice and the social changes and market interventions addressing equity. PMID:16443986

  1. Development of a Nursing Data Set for School Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenkrug, Mary Ann

    2003-01-01

    School nurses need to clearly identify how they promote the health and educational achievement of children. School nurses contribute to student health by providing health assessment and nursing interventions, advocating for healthy living, and contributing to prevention of illness and disease management. A Nursing Data Set for School Nursing can…

  2. Nursing services: an imperative to health care marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Isaac D. Montoya; Olive M. Kimball

    2012-01-01

    Nurses comprise a significant portion of the work force in any health care organization. This work force is one having the maximum exposure to patients. Further, they work hand in hand with the various departments of the organization. Though an unintended consequence of nursing care, nurses form a potential marketing tool for any health care organization. In that marketing tool role, however, there are hindrances that nurses face. These may result in an unhappy work environment and potentiall...

  3. 77 FR 41986 - Division of Nursing, Public Health Nursing Community Based Model of PHN Case Management Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Division of Nursing, Public Health Nursing Community Based Model of...), Community Based Model of Public Health Nursing Case Management Services. This program is authorized under... IHS OCPS Public Health Nursing (PHN) Program serves as the primary source for national...

  4. Exploring occupational health nursing in South America through Brazilian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, OiSaeng

    2012-03-01

    Occupational health nursing is a well-established nursing specialty in many western and developed nations around the world. However, it is still considered a relatively new field in less industrialized countries, including those in South America. This article describes occupational health nursing in South America, primarily Brazil, with the goal of increasing understanding of the region and stimulating new thinking, linkages, and collaboration among occupational health nurses from different parts of the world. This article also gives an overview of the region, including population demographics, industry and economy, occupational risks, regional policies on occupational health, and training and education of occupational health and safety professionals. Occupational health nursing will continue to grow in South America. By collaborating with occupational health educators, researchers, and practitioners from developed countries, occupational health nurses in South America will advance the professional specialty. PMID:22387246

  5. A Learning Needs Assessment of Operating Room Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounds, Elizabeth; Littlefield, John H.

    Operating room nursing is not a formal part of the generic nursing curriculum. A learning needs assessment can serve to identify inservice education needs of operating nurses. In this study, a factor analysis was performed on the responses of 1,201 practicing operating room nurses to a list of 24 behaviorally-stated learning needs. Four factors,…

  6. Nursing homes as a clinical site for training geriatric health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezey, Mathy; Mitty, Ethel; Burger, Sarah G

    2009-03-01

    Nursing homes can be ideal clinical teaching and learning environments for acquiring geriatric specialty and interdisciplinary team skills, particularly those regarding assessment, care planning, management, monitoring, and collaborating in an interdisciplinary milieu. Little is known as to how geriatric specialty training programs use nursing homes to meet expected specialty competencies, or the types of clinical experiences in nursing homes required by academic geriatric training programs. This article describes the expectations of 5 clinical health care disciplines (dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and social work) and nursing home administration regarding desirable nursing home characteristics that support gaining geriatric competencies. The issues involved in using nursing homes as supportive educational environments in geriatric education are discussed. PMID:19233060

  7. From the field: a maternal-child health nursing competence validation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Kathleen Eaton; Leff, Ellen W; Luce, Margaret M; Grady, Martha D; Clark, Edith M; Allen, Elizabeth R

    2004-01-01

    This group of Vermont community health nurses from different agencies collaborated to develop a competence validation framework for maternal and child health nursing in the practice areas of perinatal client teaching, breastfeeding, and prenatal, postpartum, and newborn nursing care. The framework is based on the work of Benner, using the "competent" level of nursing practice, and delineates three parameters of competence: technical skills, interpersonal skills, and critical thinking skills. Learning resource materials, including newborn and maternal assessment guidelines, were developed for each competence area. The four competence validation tools were successfully tested for validity and reliability as well as efficiency and effectiveness by nurses in all 13 home health agencies and 12 public health district offices in Vermont. This system of competence validation is now used to support a consistently high quality of care for all recipients of Vermont's Healthy Babies, Kids, and Families services, and is available for use in other care settings. PMID:15238748

  8. Sleep and health in shift working nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Flo, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, the prevalence of Shift Work Disorder (SWD) in a sample of nurses, and the association between SWD and work characteristics, health outcome and personality (paper 1) have been investigated. Next, the psychometric properties of the “Bergen Shift Work Sleep Questionnaire” (BSWSQ) were evaluated (paper 2). The BSWSQ evaluates sleep and sleepiness problems in relation to day shifts, evening shifts, night shifts and rest-days. The validated BSWSQ was used to investig...

  9. 78 FR 63993 - ``Low-Income Levels'' Used for Various Health Professions and Nursing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... Health Professions and Nursing Programs AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS. ACTION... provide health professions and nursing training for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds. These.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The various health professions and nursing grant and cooperative agreement...

  10. Coping focus counselling in mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Eamon; Jubb-Shanley, Maureen

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to describe a newly-developed system of mental health nurse counselling (coping focus counselling (CFC)) for people with serious and complex mental health needs. The system is based on the recovery alliance theory (RAT) of mental health nursing. The paper identifies shortcomings in current practices in psychotherapy and counselling in the exclusive use of techniques from a single approach, for example, cognitive behaviour therapy, client-centred therapy, attachment theory, or Gestalt theory. It also discusses the opposite dangers of the use of many techniques from different approaches, without a clear rationale for their selection. CFC was developed to avoid these practices. It accommodates the selective use of techniques from different approaches. Techniques selected are viewed as deriving their meanings from the theoretical framework into which they are assimilated, namely RAT, and no longer take the same meaning from the theory from which they originated. Central to this integrative process is the use of the concept of coping. Other distinguishing features of CFC are the use of everyday language in using the system and the reaffirmation of the nurse-client relationship within a working alliance as the basis in which the CFC operates. PMID:22640173

  11. Environmentally Safe Health Care Agencies: Nursing’s Responsibility, Nightingale’s Legacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hollie Shaner-McRae

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Environmentally Safe Health Care Agencies: Nursing’s Responsibility, Nightingale’s LegacyFlorence Nightingale and subsequent nurse scholars have written about the impact of the environment on human health. Nightingale described, and staked out, the nurse’s role in optimizing environments for healing. Since Nightingale’s time numerous scholars have documented that environmental conditions play a major role in the health of individuals and populations. As nurses become more informed about the environment as a determinant of human health, they will be able to advocate more effectively for environmental conditions that promote health. This article provides both theoretical and practical perspectives to integrate environmental concerns into nursing practice. It recommends specific actions nurses can undertake to improve the environment within the health care setting. In particular the article provides a historical review of an environmental focus in nursing, discusses ways to manage both upstream waste and downstream waste (solid, biohazard, and hazardous chemical wastes so as to decrease environmental pollution, and recommends specific nursing actions to promote a healthy environment within our health care agencies.

  12. Reimbursement for school nursing health care services: position statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Janet; Cagginello, Joan; Compton, Linda

    2014-09-01

    Children come to school with a variety of health conditions, varying from moderate health issues to multiple, severe chronic health illnesses that have a profound and direct impact on their ability to learn. The registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) provides medically necessary services in the school setting to improve health outcomes and promote academic achievement. The nursing services provided are reimbursable services in other health care settings, such as hospitals, clinics, and home care settings. The National Association of School Nurses (NASN) believes that school nursing services that are reimbursable nursing services in other health care systems should also be reimbursable services in the school setting, while maintaining the same high quality care delivery standards. Traditionally, local and state tax revenues targeted to fund education programs have paid for school nursing health services. School nurses are in a strategic position to advocate for improving clinical processes to better fit with community health care providers and to align reimbursements with proposed changes. Restructuring reimbursement programs will enable health care funding streams to assist in paying for school nursing services delivered to students in the school setting. Developing new innovative health financing opportunities will help to increase access, improve quality, and reduce costs. The goal is to promote a comprehensive and cost-effective health care delivery model that integrates schools, families, providers, and communities. PMID:25272416

  13. Nurses' Knowledge and Responsibility toward Nutritional Assessment for Patients in Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Al Kalaldeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nutritional assessment is a prerequisite for nutritional delivery. Patients in intensive care suffer from under-nutrition and nutritional failure due to poor assessment. Nursing ability to early detect nutritional failure is the key for minimizing imparities in practice and attaining nutritional goals. Aim of this article is to examine the ability of Jordanian ICU nurses to assess the nutritional status of critically ill patients, considering biophysical and biochemical measures.Methods: This cross sectional study recruited nurses from different health sectors in Jordan. ICU nurses from the governmental sector (two hospitals and private sectors (two hospitals were surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire. Nurses' knowledge and responsibility towards nutritional assessment were examined.Results: A total of 220 nurses from both sectors have completed the questionnaire. Nurses were consistent in regard to knowledge, responsibility, and documentation of nutritional assessment. Nurses in the governmental hospitals inappropriately perceived the application of aspiration reduction measures. However, they scored higher in applying physical examination and anthropometric assessment.  Although both nurses claimed higher use of biochemical measurements, biophysical measurements were less frequently used. Older nurses with longer clinical experience exhibited better adherence to biophysical measurement than younger nurses.Conclusion: Nursing nutritional assessment is still suboptimal to attain nutritional goals. Assessment of body weight, history of nutrition intake, severity of illness, and function of gastrointestinal tract should be considered over measuring albumin and pre-albumin levels.  A well-defined evidence-based protocol as well as a multidisciplinary nutritional team for nutritional assessment is the best to minimize episodes of under-nutrition.

  14. Mental Health of Chinese Nurses in Hong Kong: The Roles of Nursing Stresses and Coping Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong, D

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the sources of stress and mental health of nurses in Hong Kong. It also attempted to explore the functions of coping strategies in determining the stress and mental health of nurses. Results showed that more than one-third of the nurses could be considered as having poor mental health. While supervisory role produced the highest level of stress, organizational environment also created a substantial amount of stress for nurses. The most frequently used coping strategies were positive ones, including direct action coping and positive thinking. This study confirmed the hypotheses that nurses who adopted more positive and fewer negative coping strategies had better mental health, but failed to substantiate the moderating effects of coping on stress and mental health of nurses. Changes in the hospital care delivery system and socio-cultural factors in Hong Kong were put forward to explain the results. Implications of the findings and limitations of the study were discussed.

  15. Work and health conditions of nursing staff in palliative care and hospices in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schröder, Christina

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims of this representative study were to assess the relevant differences between the work and organisational characteristics as well as the subjective resources and health status of nurses occupied in hospice care, compared to nurses from palliative stations. Further, the assessment of the predictive correlations between the work situation of this nurses as a factor influencing their health and perceived strains was also a leading intention.Method: In a written survey conducted in Germany in 2001, 820 nursing staff of 113 palliative stations and stationary hospices were included. A qualified diagnostic procedure for the assessment of health promoting work was implemented. In order of obtaining a secure comparison, a sample of 320 nurses working in 12 homes for old people in Saxony was also considered.Results: The nurses referred generally to favourable working conditions, still they informed about deficiencies in the perceived participation, organizational benefits and experienced gratification. Hospice nurses experienced overall more favourable work conditions than palliative nurses or than the staff of homes for old people (regarding identification with the institution, organizational benefits, accurate gratification and little time pressure during work. Hospice personnel were psychologically and physically healthier than the staff of palliative stations. Important predictors for health stability that could be assessed by multiple regression analysis were: positively evaluated work contents, the identification with the institution, little time pressure and a positive working atmosphere.Conclusions: The assessed organisational framework is generally more favourable in the institutions of professional terminal care than in common hospitals and homes for old people. Therefore, the conditions in hospices could have a modelling function for the inner-institutional work organisation and for the anchorage of the intrinsic motivation of nurses in the health care system.

  16. Work and health conditions of nursing staff in palliative care and hospices in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Christina; Bänsch, Alexander; Schröder, Harry

    2004-01-01

    Aims of this representative study were to assess the relevant differences between the work and organisational characteristics as well as the subjective resources and health status of nurses occupied in hospice care, compared to nurses from palliative stations. Further, the assessment of the predictive correlations between the work situation of this nurses as a factor influencing their health and perceived strains was also a leading intention. Method: In a written survey conducted in Germany in 2001, 820 nursing staff of 113 palliative stations and stationary hospices were included. A qualified diagnostic procedure for the assessment of health promoting work was implemented. In order of obtaining a secure comparison, a sample of 320 nurses working in 12 homes for old people in Saxony was also considered. Results: The nurses referred generally to favourable working conditions, still they informed about deficiencies in the perceived participation, organizational benefits and experienced gratification. Hospice nurses experienced overall more favourable work conditions than palliative nurses or than the staff of homes for old people (regarding identification with the institution, organizational benefits, accurate gratification and little time pressure during work). Hospice personnel were psychologically and physically healthier than the staff of palliative stations. Important predictors for health stability that could be assessed by multiple regression analysis were: positively evaluated work contents, the identification with the institution, little time pressure and a positive working atmosphere. Conclusions: The assessed organisational framework is generally more favourable in the institutions of professional terminal care than in common hospitals and homes for old people. Therefore, the conditions in hospices could have a modelling function for the inner-institutional work organisation and for the anchorage of the intrinsic motivation of nurses in the health care system. PMID:19742056

  17. Occupational Health and Safety Issues Among Nurses in the Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    de Castro, A. B.; Cabrera, Suzanne L.; Gee, Gilbert C.; Fujishiro, Kaori; Tagalog, Eularito A.

    2009-01-01

    Nursing is a hazardous occupation in the United States, but little is known about workplace health and safety issues facing the nursing work force in the Philippines. In this article, work-related problems among a sample of nurses in the Philippines are described. Cross-sectional data were collected through a self-administered survey during the Philippine Nurses Association 2007 convention. Measures included four categories: work-related demographics, occupational injury/illness, reporting be...

  18. Mental Health of Muslim Nursing Students in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Ratanasiripong

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore the mental health and well-being of Muslim nursing students in Thailand. Specifically, the study investigated the factors that impact anxiety and depression among Muslim nursing students. This cross-sectional research was conducted with a half sampling method of Muslim undergraduate students who were studying at a public nursing college in Thailand. From the 220 self-identified Muslim nursing students, 110 were sampled for this study, representing 1...

  19. The impact of health education on the knowledge and attitude of Egyptian nurses towards occupational HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shouman, A E; Fotouh, A A

    1995-01-01

    There is a phobia about nursing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients. This work was carried out to study the impact of health education on the knowledge and attitude of nurses, representing a stratum of health care team, about modes of transmission and prevention of occupational HIV infection. The studied population were students of the High Institute of Nursing, they were subjected to a health education program (HE), and assessment was carried out before and after this intervention. The results revealed that health education is a successful tool in improving the knowledge of the nurses and in minimizing their phobia from occupational HIV infection. PMID:17214199

  20. Assessment of Acute Pain in Nursing Practice in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveta Strode

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: International Association for the Study of Pain defines pain as annoying sensations and emotions associated with actual or potential tissue damage or is described as such damage. Pains always are considered to be subjective sensations with multidimensional nature composed from physical, emotional and cognitive components. One of the main tasks in pain syndrome effective therapy is the option to perform objective assessment of pain intensity and quality utilizing principle of continuity. Independent surveys on pain management in postoperative period are performed in different countries of the world. Studies analyze effectiveness of both - medical and non-medical measurements in order to reduce pain syndrome. Very few investigations of chronic and acute pain influence on recovery process, progress and outcome of illness, assessment of pain intensity and quality are performed in Latvia. In the case of acute pain chronification, pain perception and management can be changed; pains become inadequately long lasting and may combine with psychogenic pains. According to the data obtained by the World Health Organization, fifty percent patients after injuries or operations have severe and insufferable pains despite the development of acute pain treatment and care. Insufficiently controlled postoperative pains become a risk factor for development of various abnormalities. Aim of the study: To study the usage of postoperative period pain intensity and quality assessment scales in the clinical practice of nursing, as well as availability of these methodsMaterial and methods: Survey utilizes quantitative research method. As an investigation tool was chosen questionnaire. Survey was carried out in the surgical profile wards in Riga and regional clinics of Latvia. Questionnaire embraced 309 nurses, working in the surgical profile.Results: Assessment of acute pains should be considered as the fifth vital sign providing more successful achievement of aims in pain care. Respondents recognize that in pain assessment pain evaluation scales are rarely used. In clinical practice prevails assessment of patient’s subjective condition. Only 5% of nurses – respondents utilize visual analogue scale, 22% - verbal pain scale, 16% - numerical pain rating scale. Investigation data confirm the role of professional experience of nurse in organization of pain assessment and care work, because 98% of respondents mention pain assessment as a constituent of nursing. Conclusions: One of the main objectives in effective therapy of pain syndrome is the possibility to perform objective assessment of pain intensity and quality. This objective should be achieved only with a help of shared team work – nurse, physician, anesthetist and other medical staff.

  1. Collaborative learning and competence development in school health nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Wistoft, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the process and learning outcomes of peer collaboration in a Danish health developmental project in school health nursing. The paper explores how peer collaboration influences the school nurses’ collaborative learning and competence development. Design/methodology/approach The article is based on data from a three-year health educational development project at primary schools in Denmark. These data are a) Observations from 12 reflective workshops with school nurses b) Two questionnaire surveys c) 5 focus group interviews with 5 of the 6 subprojects after the project was over. In the workshops, the questionnaire surveys and the focus group interviews the school nurses were asked to reflect on the developmental process, their collaboration, own and mutual pedagogical competence development. Findings Systematic peer collaboration between school nurses’ qualify a) their learning and ability to reflect on practice b) their communication with colleagues and children c) the development of new and innovative approaches to school health nursing. The introduction of peer collaboration, however, takes time and energy and it can be challenge to introduce peer collaboration in a working culture in which school nurses traditionally work alone under a prominent work and time pressure. Research limitations/implications The study is explorative. Further research may explore the connection between collaborative learning among school nurses and the development of their competences in school health nursing. Practical implications The paper outlines how and why collaboration among school nurses should be introduced in a more systematic way in school health nursing. Originality/value The paper investigates the connection between informal educational activities for SNs and possible learning outcomes for practice. Specifically the paper looks into different ways SNs collaborate and the findings contribute to new understandings of how SNs practice can be organisedin order to stimulate the nurses’ participation and collaborative learning and increase the quality of school health nursing.

  2. Nurses’ competencies in primary health care: a Delphy technique study

    OpenAIRE

    Witt, Regina R.; Maria Cecília Puntel de Almeida; Vivian Elizabeth Araujo

    2006-01-01

    An investigation on nurses´ primary health care practice was developed to identify and analyze nurses’ general and specific competencies at the Brazilian Health System. This quantitative-qualitative research adopted the Delphi Technique as a method of study. Two groups of participants were selected. Fifty-two nurses and fifty-seven specialists accepted to participate in the study. Questionnaires were developed for data collection, including a Likert scale. A 75 percentage was adopted as a con...

  3. A Safe and Healthful Work Environment: Development and Testing of an Undergraduate Occupational Health Nursing Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, Marjorie C; Berry, Peggy

    2015-08-01

    Occupational health nursing focuses on promotion and restoration of health, prevention of illness and injury, protection from work-related and environmental hazards, and corporate profitability. Quality education about the relationship between work and health is critical for nurses' success regardless of work setting, and is consistent with Healthy People 2020 goals, but is lacking or limited in some programs. This report introduces an innovative occupational health nursing curriculum for students enrolled in baccalaureate nursing programs. The process of designing and pilot testing this novel curriculum, its alignment with nursing competencies, and its format and learning activities are described. Preparing professional nurses to understand the role of the occupational health nurse and the relationship between work and health is an essential curricular consideration for contemporary nursing education. PMID:26077879

  4. Electronic Health Records: Describing Technological Stressors of Nurse Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Mary S; Ellis, D Michele

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the technological stressors that nurse educators experienced when using electronic health records while teaching clinical courses. Survey results indicated that educators had mild to moderate technological stress when teaching the use of electronic health records to students in clinical nursing courses. PMID:26164324

  5. What is nursing in the 21st century and what does the 21st century health system require of nursing?

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Anne; Matthews, Anne; Kirwan, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    It is frequently claimed that nursing is vital to the safe, humane provision of health care and health service to our populations. It is also recognized however, that nursing is a costly health care resource that must be used effectively and efficiently. There is a growing recognition, from within the nursing profession, health care policy makers and society, of the need to analyse the contribution of nursing to health care and its costs. This becomes increasingly pertinent and urgent in a si...

  6. Community nurses' child protection role: views of public health nurses in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, Susan

    2011-11-01

    Public health nurses in Ireland are generalist practitioners with a wide range of roles that address the needs of clients in the community across their lifespan. Child protection is one of many of the roles of Irish public health nurses. However, with increasing caseloads, birth rates and aging populations, their child protection role is becoming more difficult to define and practise safely. This paper presents a key finding of a qualitative study that explored the views of a group of public health nurses (n = 10) regarding their role with pre-school children. A significant theme following analysis of the interviews were the nurses\\' expressed concerns on their role in child protection. There is a need to define the role practised by public health nurses in child protection and to achieve a standard for this nationally.

  7. Organizational Variables on Nurses Job Performance in Turkey: Nursing Assessments

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Top

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to describe the influence of organizational variables on hospital staff nurses’ job performance as reported by staff nurses in two cities in Turkey. Hospital ownership status, employment status were examined for their effect on this influence.Methods: The reported influence of organizational variables on job performance was measured by a questionnaire developed for this study. Nurses were asked to evaluate the influence of 28 organizational variables ...

  8. Promoting health and safety virtually: key recommendations for occupational health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Debra M; Anton, Bonnie B; Wenskovitch, John

    2014-07-01

    Nurses' use of the Internet and social media has surfaced as a critical concern requiring further exploration and consideration by all health care organizations and nursing associations. In an attempt to support this need, the American Nurses Association (2011) published six principles of social networking that offered guidance and direction for nurses. In addition, the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (2011) published a nurse's guide to using social media. Surfing the Internet and using social media for professional and personal needs is extremely common among nurses. What is concerning is when nurses do not separate their professional and personal presence in the virtual world. This article presents an Institutional Review Board-approved pilot survey that explored nurses' use of social media personally and professionally and offers recommendations specifically directed to the occupational health nurse. PMID:25000549

  9. Health for all: a transnational model for nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, M; Talashek, M; Tichy, A

    1988-01-01

    If nursing is to realize "Health for All by the Year 2000", culturally diverse primary health care approaches should be easily communicated across borders. So agreed a cultural mix of nursing leaders when they met at an international conference at the University of Illinois at Chicago. At the time the conference participants formed small groups to discuss nursing's leadership role in WHO's global strategy. At one group session, which included this paper's authors, the germ was planted for the recent formation of the following conceptual model--transnational, cultural and lingual in its origin--to provide nursing services through a common understanding. PMID:3417391

  10. An innovative approach to health promotion experiences in community health nursing: a university collaborative partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Melondie R; Kelly, Rebecca K; Montgomery, Michele; Cheshire, Michelle

    2013-02-01

    The number of nurses working in community-based practices with a population focus is increasing rapidly, whereas the rate of employment for nurses in hospitals is expected to grow more slowly. The shift in health care toward primary health care and health promotion requires nurse educators to ensure that students learn to practice in collaborative partnerships in community settings. This article describes an innovative collaborative partnership with the Capstone College of Nursing and the Office of Health Promotion and Wellness at The University of Alabama. Through this partnership, community health nursing students provide health promotion for university employees in the University's wellness program. The program provides nursing students with a unique opportunity for interprofessional collaboration while improving their clinical and communication skills. This innovative collaborative approach serves as a useful model for nursing faculty members when delivering community health instruction. PMID:23330668

  11. [Concepts of health education by public health nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscrato, Gisele; Bueno, Sonia Maria Villela

    2013-06-01

    This qualitative study identifies the ideas regarding health education of 12 nurses who are part of the public health service of a city in the São Paulo countryside, and proposes a corresponding educational action. In this study, we used the methodology of action research. Data collection occurred in the second half of 2009 in the public health units of the mentioned municipality. Participant observation and interviews were implemented. The analysis and interpretation of data were conducted through categorization, based on the theory by Paulo Freire. As a result, the reductionism of health education in the pedagogical approach involving the transmission of knowledge was exposed, envisioning a biologicist tendency of academic training. However, in discussion circles, the awakening of political awareness related to the theme and the promotion of health was assumed. In conclusion, there is a need for changes in such training and for the facilitation of new modes of scientific production in the quest for social transformation. PMID:24601151

  12. Nurse’s attributions in the mental health services into context from the psychiatric reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgínia Faria Damásio, Viviane da Costa Melo, Karla Bernardes Esteves

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe and to identify nurse’ attributions in the mental health services according to the Psychiatric Reform. Methods: descriptive and exploratory study, from qualitative approach, developed by recent literature review, in which we searched articles from the Virtual Health Library (BVS, and also the collection of Scielo. The analyses were done by pre and selective readings, and also textual and interpretative investigation of the selected texts. Results: it had been found 7544 publications. We limited the choice to those articles related with the nurse’s attributions and the assistance in the Mental Health Services after the Psychiatric Reform. We selected 34 articles. We defined three categories from the readings: Nursing in the Psychiatric Reform, Strategies for the Psychosocial Rehabilitation, Nurse’s Attributions Mental Health Services. We have observed that the more referred articles to the following Mental Health Services: Daily Hospital, Emergence Care, Specific Day Centres, Family Health Program Therapeutic Residential Services.,Conclusion: This research let us realize that most of the characteristics of nursing attributions in the mental health services owns to the replacement of the asylum model for different services such as Psychosocial Attention Center (CAPS, Day-Hospital, Group Homes and basic attention partnership.

  13. School Nurses' Perceptions and Practices of Assisting Students in Obtaining Public Health Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Megan L.; Hendershot, Candace; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Price, James H.; Thompson, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Background: From January through June 2009, 6.1 million children were uninsured in the United States. On average, students with health insurance are healthier and as a result are more likely to be academically successful. Some schools help students obtain health insurance with the help of school nurses. Methods: This study assessed public school…

  14. Incorporating Environmental Health into Pediatric Medical and Nursing Education

    OpenAIRE

    McCurdy, Leyla Erk; Roberts, James; Rogers, Bonnie; Love, Rebecca; Etzel, Ruth; Paulson, Jerome; Witherspoon, Nsedu Obot; Dearry, Allen

    2004-01-01

    Pediatric medical and nursing education currently lacks the environmental health content necessary to appropriately prepare pediatric health care professionals to prevent, recognize, manage, and treat environmental-exposure–related disease. Leading health institutions have recognized the need for improvements in health professionals’ environmental health education. Parents are seeking answers about the impact of environmental toxicants on their children. Given the biologic, psychological, and...

  15. Public Health Nurses’ Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Polivka, Barbara J.; Chaudry, Rosemary V.; Mac Crawford, John

    2011-01-01

    Background: Climate change affects human health, and health departments are urged to act to reduce the severity of these impacts. Yet little is known about the perspective of public health nurses—the largest component of the public health workforce—regarding their roles in addressing health impacts of climate change.

  16. Organizational Variables on Nurses Job Performance in Turkey: Nursing Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Top

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to describe the influence of organizational variables on hospital staff nurses’ job performance as reported by staff nurses in two cities in Turkey. Hospital ownership status, employment status were examined for their effect on this influence.Methods: The reported influence of organizational variables on job performance was measured by a questionnaire developed for this study. Nurses were asked to evaluate the influence of 28 organizational variables on their job performance using a five-point Likert-type scale (1- Never effective, 5- Very effective. The study used comparative and descriptive study design. The staff nurses who were included in this study were 831 hospital staff nurses. Descriptive statistics, frequencies, t-test, ANOVA and factor analysis were used for data analysis.Results: The study showed the relative importance of the 28 organizational variables in influencing nurses’ job performance. Nurses in this study reported that workload and technological support are the most influential organizational variables on their job performance. Factor analysis yielded a five-factor model that explained 53.99% of total variance.Conclusion: Administratively controllable influence job organizational variables influence job performance of nurses in different magnitude.

  17. Nurse’s action in the wait-room: a question of health’s promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Muniz Assis, Selma Petra Chaves Sá, Acácia Vidon, Vilma Duarte Câmara, Giselle Evangelista, Marcelle Nolasco, Wilayne Atanázio dos Santos

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to search in specific nursing literature productions that highlights the performing of waiting room with elderly people. Methodology the approach used was descriptive about the waiting room next to the elderly. For the development of this research was used as a source for the survey of scientific production, the Virtual Health Library (VHL. We selected three databases for the search of studies: LILACS BEDENF, SCIELO. The operationalization of the survey was used keywords, since the term waiting room is not understood as a descriptor. Thus, we used the following words: waiting room and Nursing, with “booleadores” and in free form. Results: the study allowed to point that the literature about this subject is short. Conclusion: productions are not focusing the witting room as an activity for the elderly one, although it may serve as a space for experience exchange, a stimulus for the exercise of citizenship and health promotion.

  18. Burnout in health-care professionals during reorganizations and downsizing. A cohort study in nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Hall-Lord Marie-Louise; Nordang Kirsten; Farup Per G

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Burnout is a psychological reaction triggered by interaction between personal characteristics and stress factors. Reorganizations and downsizing with increased workload imply stress for health-care professionals. This is a study of burnout in nurses during a period with two comprehensive reorganizations. Methods In this quasi-experimental retrospective cohort study, burnout was assessed in nurses with long work experience in three surveys during a 30 months' period with tw...

  19. Evaluation of the Community Health Nursing Course of First Year Proficiency Certificate Level Nursing in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandira Shahi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Community health is very much important in nursing education. It is essential because it maximizes the health status of individuals, families, groups and the community through direct approach with them. The main purpose of the study was to identify the gap in Community Health Nursing I course in Proficiency Certificate Level first year nursing program in Nepal. METHODS: Mix methods of research having qualitative and quantitative method were used in the study. Data were collected from 12 subject teachers, 35 nursing graduates and 61 Proficiency Certificate Level first year nursing students. The study used structured, five-point rating scale and open ended questions according to Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats analysis for the self-administered questionnaire. FINDINGS: Common view points of the three sector's respondents (student, nursing graduate and teachers regarding the strengths of curriculum are: curriculum is based on Primary Health Care approach and covers preventive and promotive aspects of health. Regarding weaknesses, they said that there is inadequate time for practice, there is lack of innovative methods and materials, the course didn't cover new trends of environmental pollution and changes, global warming, greenhouse effect, climate change and deforestation etc. Similarly, they added that curriculum is not revised regularly and there is insufficient supervision in field. Likewise, regarding opportunities, they said that there is job opportunity in social organization as Community Health Nursing/Public Health Nurse. Moreover, they said that there is lack of employment scope as threats point. CONCLUSION: The paper concludes that new issues and trends of community health nursing should be added, and curriculum should be revised regularly.

  20. Decision Factors Nurses Use to Assess Pain in Nursing Home Residents With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Todd B; Parish, Abby; Mion, Lorraine C

    2015-10-01

    Nurses caring for older people with various psychiatric illnesses face many obstacles when treating pain. One setting with a high percentage of psychiatric conditions is long-term care where more than half of residents have some form of dementia, and behavioral symptoms of dementia (BSDs) may mimic behavioral displays of pain. Furthermore, two-thirds of nursing home residents have pain. Thus, many nursing home residents with dementia have pain that may be confounded by BSDs. Since many people with dementia are at risk for poor pain management, determining current methods in which nurses assess and manage pain in nursing home residents will aid in recognizing potential barriers to using current pain management guidelines and help develop strategies to enhance nurses' assessment and management of pain in this vulnerable population. The aim of this study was to explore nursing home nurses' cues and practices to identify and alleviate pain in nursing home residents with dementia. Nurses use the constructs of 'comfort' and 'quality of life' as key components in their overall pain assessment strategy in people with dementia. Indeed, the extensive process they use involving frequent reassessment and application of interventions is geared towards "appearance of comfort." Nurses reported difficulty in ascertaining whether a person with dementia was in pain, and they expressed further difficulty determining the intensity associated with resident pain. Nurses further reported that residents with dementia who are not well know by the staff were are greater risk of poor pain management. It was not unusual for nurses to discuss the importance of conflict resolution among family members as well as allowing for open expression of family's concerns. Nurses had to focus not only on the resident's comfort, but also the families' level of comfort with pain management, especially at the end-of-life. Findings support further use and development of discomfort behavior scales to help manage pain. PMID:26397435

  1. Physical health screening of school-children. Extended health care responsibilities for school-nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornfält, R; Jönsson, B; Roslund, I

    1979-11-01

    All 410 ten- and twelve-year-old children of a school district underwent two repeated physical examinations within the school services, the first by the school nurse, the second by the school doctor. The aim was to compare their assessments to see if physical class examinations could be delegated to the nurse in future in order to release doctor's time. More than half of the children were found to have slight deviations from normal, most common of the spine and in the skin. The nurse detected many more deviations than the doctor but their assessments showed good agreement concerning functionally important deviations. Newly detected functionally important deviations were noted in 8 children (2%). The routine physical examination could perfectly well be delegated to the school nurse who has the necessary prerequisites to take this responsibility and screen out those children in need of a doctor's assessment, in this study 20%. She would release valuable time for the doctor who could then apply himself to the real health problems of the children of today: chronic diseases, behavioural and school problems, many of which frequently are concerns beyond the boundaries of traditional medical care. PMID:539410

  2. Nursing care at new mental health services - experience report

    OpenAIRE

    Tahissa Frota Cavalcante; Nirla Gomes Guedes; Rafaella Pessoa Moreira; Tatiane Gomes Guedes; Michell Ângelo Marques Araújo

    2006-01-01

    The nursing attendance in mental health has been changing your paradigm, such as psychiatric remodeling and the new role assumed by the nurses. This study aims to describe the activities developed for a group of nursing academics during the practical process of teaching-learning applied at patients with mental disease in therapeutic phase. It is an experience report developed at a Psychosocial Support Center located at the city of Fortaleza-Ceará in the period held from September to November ...

  3. Creating a brand image for public health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kathleen A; Lyons, Roberta L; Issel, L Michele

    2011-01-01

    Public health nurses (PHNs) have declined as a proportion of both the nursing and the public health workforces in the past 2 decades. This decline comes as 30 states report public health nursing as the sector most affected in the overall public health shortage. Taken together, these data point to a need for renewed recruitment efforts. However, the current public images of nurses are primarily those of professionals employed in hospital settings. Therefore, this paper describes the development of a marketable image aimed at increasing the visibility and public awareness of PHNs and their work. Such a brand image was seen as a precursor to increasing applications for PHN positions. A multimethod qualitative sequential approach guided the branding endeavor. From the thoughts of public health nursing students, faculty, and practitioners came artists' renditions of four award-winning posters. These posters portray public health nursing-incorporating its image, location of practice, and levels of protection afforded the community. Since their initial unveiling, these posters have been distributed by request throughout the United States and Canada. The overwhelming response serves to underline the previous void of current professional images of public health nursing and the need for brand images to aid with recruitment. PMID:21198816

  4. Oral Health Measurement in Nursing Research: State of the Science

    OpenAIRE

    Munro, Cindy L.; Grap, Mary Jo; Jablonski, Rita; Boyle, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Oral health can impact general health and systemic disease. Changes in dental plaque, oral microbial flora, and local oral immunity may be important in the development or exacerbation of disease in critically ill patients, trauma patients, adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and frail elderly. Inasmuch as oral health potentially can be influenced by nursing interventions, nursing research in this area can contribute greatly to improved patient outcomes in these diverse populati...

  5. Psychiatric mental health nursing: Why 2011 brings a pivotal moment

    OpenAIRE

    Kathleen R. Delaney

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatric nurses in the United States (US) stand at the edge of a changing mental health care landscape.  Federal initiatives are moving into place; ones that aim to increase access to care, place a greater emphasis on prevention and wellness, and position recovery as the focus of mental health treatment. The Psychiatric Mental Health (PMH) specialty is at a pivotal moment of choice: it can organize around a future vision of PMH nursing or can silently acquiesce to a marginalized position. ...

  6. Nurse Faculty Enrichment and Competency Development in Oral-Systemic Health

    OpenAIRE

    Dolce, Maria C.

    2012-01-01

    Nurses are positioned to play a significant role in oral health promotion and disease prevention across the life cycle. Oral health has not been a high priority in nursing practice, and educating nurses about oral health has been inadequate particularly regarding the interrelationship between oral health and overall health. The first step for developing a nursing workforce with core competencies in oral health promotion and disease prevention is to prepare nurse faculty with the requisite kno...

  7. Health Instruction Packages: Nursing--Administrative Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Malcolm R.; Misko, Helen

    Text and accompanying exercises are utilized in these two learning modules to instruct nurses and nursing administrators in personnel management techniques. The first module, "How to Determine Unit Staffing Needs" by Malcolm R. MacDonald, describes a procedure for determining the number of nurses needed in a patient care unit on the basis of…

  8. [Nursing consultation in child care: the experience of nurses in the Family Health Strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Roseli Márcia Crozariol; Ribeiro, Circéa Amália; Silva, Conceição Vieira da; Saparolli, Eliana Campos Leite

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the meaning that the nurses working in the Family Health Strategy assign to the nursing consultation in child care. The theoretical framework was Symbolic Interactionism, and the methodological was the Grounded Theory. Data collection was performed with seven nurses by means of a semi-structured interview and participant observation. The comparative data analysis identified the conceptual category: Promoting individual and collective changes by means of comprehensive care. It was found that nurses value the nursing consultation in child care, they consider it important and acknowledge its potential to promote significant comprehensive changes regarding children, their families, and in the context of the community, in the preventive as well as in the curative aspect, and thus they feel fulfilled. Nevertheless, nurses deal with personal and structural difficulties, and are affected by the beliefs, values and social conditions of the assisted population, and, therefore, recognize they need better preparation to perform this activity. PMID:21710059

  9. Assessment of quality of life of Iranian nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Sedighe Salemi; Ghazanfar Mirzabeigi; Ali Tootee; Mahnaz Sanjari; Maryam Aala

    2012-01-01

    Introduction

    Nurses’ Quality Of Life (QOL) may be affected by many different factors which can in turn influence their competency in their job. The aim of this study is to assess the QOL of Iranian nurses to provide evidence for policy makers to take necessary strides needed to make improvements.

    Materials and methods

    Using a cross-sectional study design, we evaluated the QOL of Iranian nurses by the assessment of four i...

  10. The Role of Nurses in Community Awareness and Preventive Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjaneh M. Fooladi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With access to multimedia through social networks at global level, one wonders why some of the preventive healthcare services such as children and adult immunizations, annual screening for men and women, prenatal and dental care for childbearing women and adolescents are not provided at a 100% rate. Community awareness is a crucial aspect of preventative healthcare and perhaps those responsible for implementing the national health initiatives seek to realize other key factors influencing community health. In a study of 190 community health nurses caring for blacks, Puerto Ricans and Southeast Asians, the confidence scores for cultural self-efficacy was high when nurses cared for blacks and they were low when they cared for Asians and Latinos. The lowest scores belonged to items related to knowledge of health beliefs and practices regarding respect, authority and modesty within each culture. Scores were higher when interpreters were used correctly to convey meaningful messages. Researchers concluded that nurses lacked confidence when caring for culturally diverse patients and found weaknesses across the nursing curriculum preparing nurses to care for various demographic groups.1 In most countries, including Iran, governmental agencies have the budget and the man- power to apply preplanned initiatives and provide community-based preventive healthcare services to address the majority of the preventable health related issues through satellite clinics, health department and outpatient facilities. Meanwhile, private sectors in metropolitan cities offer cure-based services to urban and suburban communities. Remote and rural areas should be the focus of primary care and preventive health services, because access to multimedia is limited, healthcare providers refuse to work in outreach areas, and unpaved roads are barriers to easy access to the locals and outsiders. To implement an effective community-based preventive program, recognition of resiliency as a theoretical framework within that community should be considered to help explain how communities address adversity.2 In a British study, researchers established the importance of the role of nursing in preventive health when nurses added significant improvement to reduce the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease in middle aged patients. Nurses, compared to other healthcare providers, were able to provide health screening and doubled the recorded blood pressure, quadrupled identification of smoking habit, and increased documented weight related issues by fivefold in a primary care setting.3 Community health nursing theory addresses collective concepts of nursing domains in an attempt to rectify environmental, resiliency, and community abilities for healthcare issues among diverse population and avoids simple groupings of aggregates. Conceptual frameworks are introduced to help urban and rural communities implement preventative measures for health and wellbeing of residents through rural-based community health nursing programs.1,4 With this awareness, Iranian nurses in any practice area will find a golden opportunity to encourage, motivate, inform and guide the public to consider health screening, annual check-ups, childhood and adult immunizations and offer health education to patients across the lifespan. The role of nursing does not begin or end in a hospital-based or clinical facility. It is important to remember “Once a nurse, Always a nurse”, which means a nurse can guide and educate the public every minute and in all places, for the mere fact that medicine does NOT. Community health is a major part of nursing profession as Sarah, who graduated from a baccalaureate nursing program 5 years ago, demonstrates her role as a spiritual journey with a firm belief to bring health awareness through motivation. Her usual day begins by telling a 45 year-old male cashier in a supermarket to go for a prostate cancer screening; a 50 year-old woman sitting in the park to have her bone density screening; asking a young mother on the bus if her children are

  11. Enfermagem na saúde da criança: estudo bibliográfico acerca da avaliação nutricional La enfermería en la salud del niño: estudio bibliográfico sobre la evaluación nutricional Nursing in child's health: bibliography study on assessment nutritional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Paula Magalhães Monteiro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar a produção científica acerca da atuação do enfermeiro na saúde nutricional da criança. Estudo bibliográfico realizado entre abril e maio de 2008, nas bases de dados online, com descritores: avaliação nutricional, antropometria, crescimento, criança. Critérios de inclusão: saúde infantil na avaliação nutricional, enfermeiro/autor e artigos publicados entre 2000 e 2007. Encontraram-se 15 artigos nos seguintes anos: 2000 (1, 2001 (1, 2002 (2, 2003 (4, 2005 (1, 2006 (3 e 2007 (3. Periódicos inscritos nas áreas: enfermagem (1, nutrição (1, saúde pública (3 e médica (1. Tipo de estudo: epidemiológicos (1, descritivos (5, transversais (7, longitudinal (1, estudo de caso (1, revisão de literatura (1 e relato de experiência (1. Unidades temáticas: avaliação nutricional mediante acompanhamento do crescimento e desenvolvimento infantil; fatores determinantes da nutrição infantil e avaliação nutricional como cuidado de enfermagem. Ressalta-se que o enfermeiro tem buscado fundamentação teórica e prática para cuidar da criança com déficit nutricional.Analizar la producción científica que existe sobre el papel que desempeña el enfermero en la salud nutricional del niño. Estudio bibliográfico desarrollado entre abril y mayo/2008 usando bases de datos en línea, a través de los siguientes descriptores: evaluación nutricional, antropometría, crecimiento, niño. Se aplicaron los siguientes criterios de inclusión: salud infantil en la evaluación nutricional, enfermero/autor y artículos publicados entre 2000 y 2007. Se encontraron 15 artículos en los años: 2000 (1, 2001 (1, 2002 (2, 2003 (4, 2005 (1, 2006 (3 e 2007 (3. Periódicos inscriptos en las áreas: enfermería (1, nutrición (1, salud pública (3 y médica (1. Tipo de estudio: epidemiológicos (1, descriptivos (5, transversales (7, longitudinales (1, estudio de caso (1, revisión de literatura (1 y relato de experiencia (1. Unidades temáticas: evaluación nutricional mediante acompañamiento del crecimiento y desarrollo infantil; factores determinantes de la nutrición infantil y evaluación nutricional como cuidado de la enfermería. Descata el hecho que el enfermero ha buscado desarrollar una fundamentación teórico/práctica para cuidar del niño con déficit nutricional.To examine the scientific production about the role of nurses in the nutritional health of child. Bibliographic study, held between April and May 2008 in on line databases, with descriptors: nutritional assessment, anthropometry, growth, child. Criteria for inclusion: child health in nutrition assessment, nurse / author and articles published between 2000 and 2007. Meeting 15 articles in the years: 2000 (1, 2001 (1, 2002 (2, 2003 (4, 2005 (1, 2006 (3 e 2007 (3. Regular subscribers in the areas: nursing (1, nutrition (1, health (3 and medical (1. Type of study: epidemiological (1, descriptive (5, Cross (7, longitudinal (1, the case study (1, review of literature (1 and report of experience (1. Thematic units: nutritional assessment by the monitoring of growth and child development by nurses; determinants of children's nutrition and nutritional assessment and nursing care. It is emphasized that the nurse has sought theoretical and practical reasons to take care of children with nutritional deficiency.

  12. Elementary School Nurse Interventions: Attendance and Health Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weismuller, Penny C.; Grasska, Merry A.; Alexander, Marilyn; White, Catherine G.; Kramer, Pat

    2007-01-01

    Regular school attendance is a necessary part of the learning process; student absenteeism has a direct association with poor academic performance. School nurses can influence student attendance. This study describes the impact of school nurse interventions on student absenteeism and student health. A retrospective review of 240 randomly selected…

  13. School Nurse Case Management: Achieving Health and Educational Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaiuto, Maria M.

    2007-01-01

    Educators and health care professionals alike understand that healthy students are likely to be successful learners. The goal of school nurse case management is to support students so that they are ready to learn. This article describes the outcomes of a 4-year process improvement project designed to show the impact of school nurse case management…

  14. Nurse educators' perspectives on student development of reflection for psychiatric mental health nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpa, Jane V; Chernomas, Wanda M

    2013-01-01

    Psychiatric nursing, in various parts of the world, including regions of Canada, is recognized as a distinct nursing profession. In psychiatric mental health nursing practice, reflection is considered a foundational skill given the relational nature of nurses' therapeutic work. Communicating the significance of reflection for practice to students and teaching this intangible skill is challenging for educators. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore with psychiatric mental health nurse educators their views on how they develop reflective practitioners. Participants' perspectives and experiences in teaching reflective practice were captured in four themes: building the use of self as an agent of change, building skills of reflection/building the habit of reflection, building a bridge between theory and practice, and building a continuing reflective practice - from student to practitioner. Recommendations include a systematic incorporation of reflection into a curriculum and creating supportive learning environments that facilitate the development of reflective practitioners. PMID:23974046

  15. Conceptualizing structural violence in the context of mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choiniere, Jacqueline A; MacDonnell, Judith A; Campbell, Andrea L; Smele, Sandra

    2014-03-01

    This article explores how the intersections of gendered, racialized and neoliberal dynamics reproduce social inequality and shape the violence that nurses face. Grounded in the interviews and focus groups conducted with a purposeful sample of 17 registered nurses (RNs) and registered practical nurses (RPNs) currently working in Ontario's mental health sector, our analysis underscores the need to move beyond reductionist notions of violence as simply individual physical or psychological events. While acknowledging that violence is a very real and disturbing experience for individual nurses, our article casts light on the importance of a broader, power structure analysis of violence experienced by nurses in this sector, arguing that effective redress lies beyond blame shifting between clients/patients and nurses. Our analysis illustrates how assumptions about gender, race and care operate in the context of global, neoliberal forces to reinforce, intensify and create, as well as obscure, structural violence through mechanisms of individualization and normalization. PMID:23517526

  16. Geriatric nursing assessment and intervention in an emergency department : a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, Elizabeth; Wagner, Lis

    2012-01-01

    rosted e., wagner l., hendriksen c. & poulsen i. (2012)? Geriatric nursing assessment and intervention in an emergency department: a pilot study. International Journal of Older People Nursing doi: 10.1111/j.1748-3743.2012.00323.x Aim.? To describe and test a model for structured nursing assessment and intervention to older people discharged from emergency department (ED). Background.? Older people recently discharged from hospital are at high risk of readmission. This risk may increase when they are discharged straight home from an ED as time pressure requires staff to focus on the presenting problem although many have complex, unresolved, care needs. Method.? A prospective descriptive pilot study was conducted. Older people aged 70 and over and at risk of adverse health and functional outcome were included. Intervention: At discharge, and at 1 and 6?months follow-up, a brief standardised nursing assessment (ISAR 2) developed by McCusker et al. was carried out. The focus was on unresolved problems that required medical or nursing intervention, new or different home care services or comprehensive geriatric assessment. After assessment, the nurse made relevant referrals to the geriatric outpatient clinic, community health centre, general practitioner or made arrangements with next of kin. Results.? One hundred and fifty people participated, mean age was 81.7. At discharge, they had a mean of 1.9 unresolved problems, after 1?month 0.8, and after 6?months 0.4. Older people receiving home care services increased from 79% at discharge to 89% at 1?month and 90% at 6?months follow-up. Conclusion.? ISAR 2 works well in a Danish ED setting and intercepts older peoples' problems. It seems that unresolved problems decrease when a nurse assesses and intervenes at discharge from ED, and at follow-up. However, a randomised controlled test should be carried out to confirm this. Implications for practice.? Nursing assessment and intervention should be implemented in the ED to reduce older peoples' unrevealed problems.

  17. Assessing informatics in Canadian schools of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Lynn M; Clarke, Heather F

    2004-01-01

    The provision of informatics content in the basic education programs for Canadian nurses has been limited to date. In previous years, efforts to engage nurse educators in discussions regarding the significance of informatics for tomorrow's nurses had been met with limited interest and understanding. There was an obvious need to heighten the awareness and active participation of nurse leaders in the development of strategies to attend to the informatics education needs of Canadian nurses. This paper describes the findings of a national study to understand the current state of informatics integration within basic nursing curricula PMID:15360945

  18. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender health: fundamentals for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Fidelindo A; Brown, Donald V; Jones, Henrietta

    2013-04-01

    As the health care needs of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) population become increasingly important, health care professionals require appropriate academic and clinical training in preparation for the increased demand for culturally competent care. Nurses are of particular interest, as they are the core direct caregivers in many health care settings. This article explores the national climate around LGBT individuals and their related health needs. Educators and administrators who work with future nurses should strive to ensure they foster the development of knowledgeable practitioners who will be able to implement best practices in LGBT patient care. Attention should be paid to providing students with diverse clinical placements, access to LGBT interest groups, and clear expectations for LGBT-sensitive nursing care plans and course outcomes selection that promote cultural competence. Recommendations for nursing education and curricular reform are discussed. PMID:23471873

  19. [Men's Health Policy: perspectives of nurses for its implementation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, Willyane Andrade; e Silva, Simone Santos; Silva, Maria Enoia Dantas da Costa; Barbosa, Liana Dantas da Costa e Silva; da Rocha, Silvana Santiago

    2012-01-01

    This is a qualitative research, aiming to describe and analyze the perception of nurses from the Family Health strategy on the importance and perspectives of implementation of the Men's Health Policy. It was developed in July 2011, in the Health Centers of Teresina-PI, with sixteen nurses. The data were obtained through semi-structured interviews; the speeches were categorized according to Bardin and analyzed in the light of the Symbolic Interactionism. The nurses consider this policy important and their prospects of implementation are supportive to the initiative of coping with difficulties for the inclusion of this group and related to the work process. It brings contributions on the current health situation of men and the assistance and consolidation of nursing care. PMID:23559170

  20. Analysis of knowledge and practice of nurses about assessment of pain in the hospital context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Meneses Oliveira, Lucilane Maria Sales da Silva, Ilse Maria Tigre de Arruda Leitão

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to examine knowledge and practices of nurses about pain assessment in the hospital context. Method: this is about a descriptive and analytical cut of an assistance-converging research held in a private hospital at Fortaleza-Ceará, in 2007, approved by the Ethics Committee of Research of Ceara State University (Protocol nº07336264-6. It was applied structured interview with 15 nurses about pain assessment in practice, being performed qualitative data analysis and presentation of results in thematic categories. Results: it was identified that pain is predominantly conceptualized as an unpleasant sensation for humans, because it indicates that something is not right in the body. Pain assessment happens mainly with the evaluation of verbal report of the patient, the pain features and the signs/symptoms associated with painful situacions. About the treatment, the drug is still the prevailing opinion of the nurses, being cited: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, opioids and simple analgesics. Regarding non-pharmacological measures, were cited: the application of cold or heat, promoting peaceful environment, clarification of the procedure and condition of the patient, among others. Conclusion: nurses had demonstrate articulated knowledge and practices about pain management, but was not routinely evaluate it systematically, showing urgently the need to incorporate educational programs about pain assessment in nursing courses and health services in general. Descriptors: pain; pain measurement; nursing; nurses; hospital care.

  1. Faith Community Nursing: Supporting Mental Health during Life Transitions

    OpenAIRE

    Anaebere, Ann Kiki; DeLilly, Carol Rose

    2012-01-01

    Faith Community Nurses consider community cultural practices an essential component in understanding how to effectively support an individual’s mental health during important life transitions. Additionally, as part of their practice, Faith Community Nurses seek to understand how religious beliefs and life transitions such as marriage, divorce, birth, death, and illness impact on spiritual and mental health care. The emotional tolls of family separations due to wars, unexpected life events, or...

  2. Competency-based curriculum education in mental health nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Jamileh Mohtashami; Mahvash Salsali; Mehrnoosh Pazargadi; Homan Manoochehri; Hamid Alavi Majd

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The essential problems in providing quality and safety services to patients, rapid changes in health care settings as well as information technology require educational revision. Competency-based curriculum focuses on set of skills that students should achieve. This study reviewed characteristics of competency-based curriculum in psychiatric nursing. Methods: A literature review about a competency-based curriculum in psychiatric mental health nursing was carried out by sear...

  3. Health insurance exchanges: A call for nursing action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Deborah B

    2013-01-01

    State health insurance exchanges will provide the opportunity for consumers to have options regarding health insurance coverage. Nurses have a vital role to play in the implementation of exchanges. Knowing the basic facts about how these exchanges will work, what the benefits will be, and access to reliable information sources will enable nurses to provide trusted guidance. The development of this new insurance marketplace is also an opportunity to address the long-standing barriers to advance practice registered nurses (APRN) practice. PMID:23923246

  4. The impact of assessment methods on the learning of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Sau Fong; Mok, Esther; Wong, Daniel

    2008-08-01

    Assessment methods can influence the learning approaches of nursing students. Assessments designed to assess understanding rather than rote learning can contribute to a deep learning approach. Multiple-choice questions can be formulated at high cognitive levels for nursing assessments. This study aimed to examine the effect of high quality multiple-choice tests on the learning approaches of students enrolled in a mental health nursing course as measured by the revised two-factor study process questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F). Data were collected from 136 students in a higher diploma (HD) in nursing programme and 142 baccalaureate (BSN) nursing students. Two-step cluster analysis yielded three clusters represented by students who were predominantly deep, predominantly surface or intermediate in their orientation to learning. There was a general decrease in the deep learning score and an increase in the surface learning score of the students on the course, possibly related to the excessive workload in nursing studies. However, there was no direct association with multiple-choice assessment. The academic achievement of students correlated negatively with their surface learning approach. Students (n=31) in four focus group interviews believed that assessments constructed using scenario-based questions, simulated role-play situations and case studies could direct desired learning in order to facilitate their understanding of knowledge, their use of critical thinking, and their application of knowledge. PMID:18164105

  5. Supporting Student Mental Health: The Role of the School Nurse in Coordinated School Mental Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenkamp, Jill H.; Stephan, Sharon H.; Bobo, Nichole

    2015-01-01

    School nurses play a critical role in the provision of mental health services in the school environment and are valuable members of the coordinated student mental health team. They possess expertise to navigate in today's complicated educational and health care systems, and it is estimated that school nurses spend 33% of their time addressing…

  6. Infusing Oral Health Care into Nursing Curriculum: Addressing Preventive Health in Aging and Disability

    OpenAIRE

    Nancy Guenther; Paul Glassman; Young Kee Markham; Leah FitzGerald; Joan Earle Hahn

    2012-01-01

    Access to oral health care is essential for promoting and maintaining overall health and well-being, yet oral health disparities exist among vulnerable and underserved populations. While nurses make up the largest portion of the health care work force, educational preparation to address oral health needs of elders and persons with disabilities is limited across nursing curricula. This descriptive study reports on the interdisciplinary development, implementation, and testing of an oral health...

  7. Patterns of Self-Disclosure among Mental Health Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, David; Ashmore, Russell

    2001-01-01

    Sample of nursing students in mental health (n=173) completed a self-disclosure questionnaire; results were compared with earlier samples (n=50, 25). The mental health group would disclose significantly fewer items to patients than to parents or friends. Results have implications for the care of mental health patients. (Contains 53 references.)…

  8. Reliability and Validity of a New Survey to Assess Global Health Competencies of Health Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Mirella Veras; Kevin Pottie; Vivian Welch; Ron Labonte; Javier Eslava-Schmalbach; Borkhoff, Cornelia M; Elizabeth  A. Kristjansson; Peter Tugwell

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Health professionals are paying increased attention to issues of global health. However, there are no current competency assessment tools appropriate for evaluating their competency in global health. This study aims to assess the validity and reliability of a global health competency survey for different health disciplines. Methods: A total of 429 students participated in the Global Health Competency Survey, drawn from family medicine residency, nursing, physiotherapy and occupatio...

  9. Home visits as a strategy for health promotion by nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jucelia Salgueiro Nascimento

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the domiciliary visit performed by nurses in the Family Health Strategy as an activity to promote health. Methods: Exploratory/descriptive study with qualitative approach. The subjects were nine nurses of the Primary Health Units from Health Districts in Maceió-AL. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews in the months from April to August 2012 and were analyzed using content analysis and in light of the theoretical framework of Health Promotion. Results: The nurses recognize that the domiciliary visit can be a way to promote the health of individuals, families and community, but, in daily life, action maintains focus on disease, with curative actions of individual character, which do not take into account the social context where the user and his family are inserted. Conclusion: It is considered that the use of home visits by nurses in the family health strategy as a health promotion activity is still incipient because, although the nurses recognize the need for change in the model of care, in practice, it is observed that the focus of this action is directed to the biological model. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5020/18061230.2013.p513

  10. Nurses’ competencies in primary health care: a Delphy technique study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina R Witt

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available An investigation on nurses´ primary health care practice was developed to identify and analyze nurses’ general and specific competencies at the Brazilian Health System. This quantitative-qualitative research adopted the Delphi Technique as a method of study. Two groups of participants were selected. Fifty-two nurses and fifty-seven specialists accepted to participate in the study. Questionnaires were developed for data collection, including a Likert scale. A 75 percentage was adopted as a consensus criterion for scores 4 or 5 of this scale. Results showed 17 general and 8 specific competencies for the nursing group and 19 general and 9 specific competencies for the specialist group. These competencies were classified into ten areas of domain. This paper presents and discusses health care competencies found in this investigation.

  11. The African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarthy Carey F

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than thirty-five sub-Saharan African countries have severe health workforce shortages. Many also struggle with a mismatch between the knowledge and competencies of health professionals and the needs of the populations they serve. Addressing these workforce challenges requires collaboration among health and education stakeholders and reform of health worker regulations. Health professional regulatory bodies, such as nursing and midwifery councils, have the mandate to reform regulations yet often do not have the resources or expertise to do so. In 2011, the United States of America Centers for Disease Control and Prevention began a four-year initiative to increase the collaboration among national stakeholders and help strengthen the capacity of health professional regulatory bodies to reform national regulatory frameworks. The initiative is called the African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives. This article describes the African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives and discusses its importance in implementing and sustaining national, regional, and global workforce initiatives. Discussion The African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives convenes leaders responsible for regulation from 14 countries in East, Central and Southern Africa. It provides a high profile, south-to-south collaboration to assist countries in implementing joint approaches to problems affecting the health workforce. Implemented in partnership with Emory University, the Commonwealth Secretariat, and the East, Central and Southern African College of Nursing, this initiative also supports four to five countries per year in implementing locally-designed regulation improvement projects. Over time, the African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives will help to increase the regulatory capacity of health professional organizations and ultimately improve regulation and professional standards in this region of Africa. The African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives will measure the progress of country projects and conduct an annual evaluation of the initiative’s regional impact, thereby contributing to the global evidence base of health workforce interventions. Conclusion The African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives is designed to address priority needs in health workforce development and improve regulation of the health workforce. This model may assist others countries and regions facing similar workforce challenges.

  12. Providing nursing leadership in a community residential mental health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Frances A; Bamford, Anita

    2011-07-01

    The worldwide burden of mental illness is increasing. Strong leadership is increasingly emerging as a core component of good mental health nursing. The aim of this article is to demonstrate the ways in which nurses can provide strong and consistent leadership in a values-based practice environment that embodies respect for individuals' dignity and self-determination within a community residential mental health service, which provides a structural foundation for effective action. This is accomplished through the presentation of two vignettes, which highlight how the seemingly impossible becomes possible when an economic paradigm such as agency theory is exchanged for a sociological and psychological paradigm found in leadership as stewardship at the point of service. It is through stronger nursing leadership in mental health that stigma and discrimination can be reduced and better access to treatments and services can be gained by those with mental illness. Nurse leadership in mental health services is not new, but it is still relatively uncommon to see residential services for "high needs" individuals being led by nurses. How nurses meet the challenges faced by mental health services are often at the heart of effective leadership skills and strategies. PMID:21702426

  13. Nursing: promoting the health of overweight children and adolescents in the school context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalia Costa Gonzaga

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to analyze the nursing interventions related to the competencies of health promotion of overweight children and adolescents in the school context, in light of the Galway Consensus through an integrative review. Articles published between 1988 and June, 2013 were found in the databases CINAHL, SCOPUS, MEDLINE/PubMed, Cochrane, LILACS and SciELO. A total of 139 publications were obtained from indexed descriptors. Ten articles were selected after reading. The most evident competencies for health promotion were: catalyzing change, needs assessment and impact assessment. The highlights were activities of health education and partnerships with other health professionals and the families of students. It was found that the skills of health promotion developed by nurses can contribute to the adoption of healthy habits by overweight children and adolescents.

  14. Mental Health Survey on Shift Work Nurses in Shiraz Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Kakooei

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: There are no occupational health data concerning the prevalence of mental disorders in Iranian hospital nurses. Such information may be a prerequisite for efficient occupational mental health interventions. The aim of this study was to determine mental health status among shift work hospital nurses.Materials and Methods: This paper reports the findings of a cross-sectional survey that was part of a larger quasi-experimental study. We selected and evaluated 1195 nurses in 12 general hospitals in Shiraz (capital of Fars Province, using the 28-item version of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ. We used structured observations in accordance with an occupational health checklist to assess working environment during the work period.Results: Results indicated that 28.7% of nurses were in poor mental health. Mental disease was more common among females than males (p<0.05. Prevalence rates for anxiety and somatic symptoms were 42.2% and 35.5% respectively. The prevalence of depression was 11.9% and social dysfunction, 79.5%. There was a significant relationship between shift work and anxiety as well as sleep disorders (p< 0.05. Associations were also found between marital status and depression and between gender and social dysfunction (p< 0.001. Conclusion: Prevalence figures for mental disorders are similar to those from nationwide surveys but it seems that social dysfunction and anxiety disorders are more common in nurses compared to the general population aged 15 and over. More attention must be paid to the health of shift work nurses (especially female staff. This can take the form of shift work health education programs, occupational health counseling, and periodic examinations.

  15. Strategic management of health care information systems: nurse managers' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammintakanen, Johanna; Kivinen, Tuula; Saranto, Kaija; Kinnunen, Juha

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe nurse managers' perceptions of the strategic management of information systems in health care. Lack of strategic thinking is a typical feature in health care and this may also concern information systems. The data for this study was collected by eight focus group interviews including altogether 48 nurse managers from primary and specialised health care. Five main categories described the strategic management of information systems in health care; IT as an emphasis of strategy; lack of strategic management of information systems; the importance of management; problems in privacy protection; and costs of IT. Although IT was emphasised in the strategies of many health care organisations, a typical feature was a lack of strategic management of information systems. This was seen both as an underutilisation of IT opportunities in health care organisations and as increased workload from nurse managers' perspective. Furthermore, the nurse managers reported that implementation of IT strengthened their managerial roles but also required stronger management. In conclusion, strategic management of information systems needs to be strengthened in health care and nurse managers should be more involved in this process. PMID:19592814

  16. National Association of School Nurses ISSUE BRIEF: School Health Nurse's Role in Education: Privacy Standards for Student Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, Katherine; Schwab, Nadine

    2003-01-01

    This article is a reprint of the National Association of School Nurses' "Issue Brief" on Privacy Standards for Student Health Records. It distinguishes between the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HI-PAA), clarifies which of these laws governs the privacy of student health

  17. Examination of cultural knowledge and provider sensitivity in nurse managed health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Roberta; Nardi, Deena; Killian, Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    It is important to examine empirical evidence of cultural competence among health care providers and to understand how it is assessed from an organizational context. There is a dearth of information about these concepts. Given its relevance to caring for diverse patient populations, the purpose of this paper is to present findings from a mixed method study which conducted a general cultural assessment survey of Nurse Managed Health Centers (NMHCs) that were affiliates of the National Nursing Centers Consortium. Findings enabled the authors to formulate recommendations that could strengthen the cultural competence of staff Organizational leadership and advanced practice nurses would benefit from more intentional efforts to increase proficiency of NMHC staff members in their cultural knowledge and sensitivity skills when delivering care to the populations they serve. PMID:25011210

  18. "Never in All My Years... ": Nurses' Education About LGBT Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabez, Rebecca; Pellegrini, Marion; Mankovitz, Andrea; Eliason, Mickey; Ciano, Mark; Scott, Megan

    2015-01-01

    In spite of recent calls for patient-centered care and greater attention to the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients, nurses still lack basic education about LGBT patient care and, as a result, may have negative attitudes, endorse stereotypes, and/or feel uncomfortable providing care. This study reports on education/training of practicing nurses and explores some of the reasons for nurses reporting feelings of discomfort with LGBT patient care. Transcripts from structured interviews with 268 nurses in the San Francisco Bay Area revealed that 80% had no education or training on LGBT issues. Although most said they were comfortable with LGBT patient care, some of their comments indicated that they might not be providing culturally sensitive care. Implications for nursing education and for policies and procedures of health care institutions are addressed. PMID:26194964

  19. Understanding the unconscious mind: Jungian psychology and mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alan; Cross, Wendy

    2014-04-01

    How might the unconscious part of the mind affect mental health patients' emotions or behaviour? How might the unconscious motivations of mental health nurses affect their patients? The discovery of "the unconscious" two centuries ago has allowed philosophers and scientists, such as C. G. Jung, to explore the field. Contemporary mental health care subscribes to a dominance of neurobiological approaches, neglecting the unconscious or relegating it to that of a merely biological process. Approaching this subject from the perspective of Jung, we make a case for the inclusion of theoretical concepts about the unconscious in the discourse of mental health nursing. Such awareness may help mental health nurses to better understand the mental disease, disorder, and distress found in patients. It also may help them understand their own conflicts and motivations that, in turn, can have an affect on their patients. PMID:24702216

  20. Assessment of dementia in nursing home residents by nurses and assistants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Uhrskov; Foldspang, Anders; Gulmann, Nils Christian; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To describe the criterion validity of nursing home staff's assessment of organic disorder compared with ICD-10 criteria, and to identify determinants of staff assessment of organic disorder. Method Two hundred and eighty-eight residents were diagnosed using the GMS-AGECAT. Nursing staff members were interviewed about the residents' activities of Daily Living, behavioural problems, orientation in surroundings and communication skills, and asked if the resident had an organic disorder. ...

  1. Increasing Racial/Ethnic Diversity in Nursing to Reduce Health Disparities and Achieve Health Equity

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Janice M.; Malone, Beverly

    2014-01-01

    As nursing continues to advance health care in the 21st century, the current shift in demographics, coupled with the ongoing disparities in health care and health outcomes, will warrant our ongoing attention and action. As within all health professions, concerted efforts are needed to diversify the nation's health-care workforce. The nursing profession in particular will be challenged to recruit and retain a culturally diverse workforce that mirrors the nation's change in demographics. This i...

  2. Health As Expanding Consciousness: Clinical Reasoning in Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stec, Mary W

    2016-01-01

    Clinical reasoning has been identified as a necessary skill to practice nursing. Multiple studies suggested that a gap exists between the education of nurses and their ability to transition into practice. Newman's theory of health as expanding consciousness and research as paxis methodology was used to collect and analyze data of seven senior baccalaureate nursing students. Patterns of individual and across participants revealed the emergence of patterns of relating, knowing, and clinical decision-making as contributing to the evolving pattern of clinical reasoning. The findings of this study were consistent with Newman's theory and support the theoretical framework and methodology. PMID:26660777

  3. Patients' needs assessment documentation in multidisciplinary electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häyrinen, Kristiina; Saranto, Kaija

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe and discuss physicians' and nurses' documentation of the patient's needs assessment in electronic health records (EHR) in the neurological care setting. Both physicians and nurses collect, record and interpret data during patient care episodes. Assessment of patient's need for care and treatment is an important part of the care process. Planning, implementation and outcome assessment of the care process are based on needs assessment data. The data of this study consist of 48 neurological medical narratives and nursing care plans. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and content analysis. Physician's medical narratives include referrals to physiotherapy and consultations in other care specialties in which they have recorded the reason for the care, anamnesis and status praesens data. Nurses have documented patient's needs assessment in nursing care plans using Finnish Classification of Nursing Diagnoses (FiCND) and additional narrative text. Physicians' and nurses' patient needs assessment documentation complement each other. Nursing documentation includes more detailed information about patients' needs for care due the use of FiCND in documentation. The use of standardised documentation improves quality documentation and retrieval of data from EHR. PMID:20841691

  4. Burnout and work environments of public health nurses involved in mental health care

    OpenAIRE

    IMAI, H.; Nakao, H; Tsuchiya, M.; Kuroda, Y; Katoh, T.

    2004-01-01

    Aims: (1) To examine whether prevalence of burnout is higher among community psychiatric nurses working under recently introduced job specific work systems than among public health nurses (PHNs) engaged in other public health services. (2) To identify work environment factors potentially contributing to burnout.

  5. Primary care nurses’ awareness of and willingness to perform children’s oral health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of young children receive no early dental examination while attending primary health care for routine check-ups. Our aim was to study primary care nurses’ knowledge of oral health care (OHC) and their attitudes toward delivering OHC, as well as to assess their willingness to obtain OHC information. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of all primary-care nurses working in the public health centres of Tehran city. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire queried their knowledge in paediatric-, general and medicine-related areas of dentistry, providing knowledge scores for three domains. The nurses’ attitudes toward OHC and their willingness to obtain OHC information underwent evaluation with statements utilizing a five-point Likert scale. Altogether 680 nurses took part in the survey. The Chi-square test, t-test, one-way ANOVA and logistic regression model served for statistical analyses. Result The mean score for the paediatric dentistry domain (3.6, SD: 1.5) was lower than for the medical (4.4, SD: 2.3) and dental domains (5.8, SD: 1.5). Obtaining higher scores in the paediatric (OR?=?1.2) and dental (OR?=?1.3) domains, and a greater willingness to receive OHC information (OR?=?5.3), were associated with a positive attitude toward OHC. Nurses with a lower education (OR?=?1.9) and better oral health behaviour (OR?=?1.1) as well as those working in a non-affluent region (OR?=?1.6) had a more positive attitude toward OHC. Conclusion Primary care nurses’ low level of knowledge in OHC and their positive attitude and willingness to obtain more information point to the need for appropriate OHC training and encouragement for the nurses to promote oral health and prevent dental diseases. PMID:24670004

  6. Empathy toward Patients with Mental Illness among Baccalaureate Nursing Students: Impact of a Psychiatric Nursing and Mental Health Educational Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Marwa Abd El-Gawad Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Empathy is an ability and skill that can be learned and developed through appropriate education and practice. While the importance of nurses' empathy is widely acknowledged, little is known about the impact of passing through the psychiatric nursing and mental health educational experience at the Faculty of Nursing, Alexandria University on…

  7. Genomic-Based Health Care in Nursing: A Bidirectional Approach to Bringing Genetics into Nursing's Body of Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Dale Halsey; Feetham, Suzanne L.; Monsen, Rita Black

    2002-01-01

    A survey of 15 genetics nurses reveals both grassroots and top-down approaches to advancing genetics in nursing practice, research, and education. As genome-based health care spreads, nursing should concentrate on bringing genetics into clinical practice and scholarship. (Contains 33 references.) (SK)

  8. [The INHES cohort study on the health status of nurses in Italy: research protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzoni, L; Filippone, A M; Mannocci, A; Germani, T; Menafra, R; Pulimeno, A; Cicolini, G; Manzoli, L; Boccia, A; La Torre, G

    2011-01-01

    Due to the intense emotional involvement and the often problematic working conditions characterizing their profession, Nurses appear to be especially susceptible to the negative effects of a complex set of stressors, with important repercussions to their health. Nevertheless, scientific literature assessing the health status of Nurses in Italy is still scarce. With INHES (Italian Nurses' HEalth Study), we propose to remedy this gap by implementing a cohort study which will start from the analysis of some local healthcare facilities and which may subsequently extend throughout the country. Study participants will be Nurses selected according to the following inclusion criteria: 1) age between 30 and 55 years; 2) having been employed in the current healthfacilityfor the last five years; 3) having performed care duties in wards or in day care services for the last five years. The objectives of this study, which will be carried out through the administration of a validated questionnaire, are the following: to measure the incidence and prevalence rates of a series of diseases in the nursing population, highlighting potential correlations with working activity, job-related stress or environmental and personal risk factors; to assess the quality of life and psychological health of the participants, evaluating the interference of psychophysical disorders with their work and social activities; to investigate the implementation of wellness promotion, prevention, case management and disability management policies by healthcare facilities. The evidence gathered will provide a valid scientific support for the development of more effective policies for protecting Nurses' health, with positive social and economic repercussions for the entire community. PMID:22403993

  9. Using an academic-community partnership model and blended learning to advance community health nursing pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeonwu, Mabel; Berkowitz, Bobbie; Vlasses, Frances R

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a model of teaching community health nursing that evolved from a long-term partnership with a community with limited existing health programs. The partnership supported RN-BSN students' integration in the community and resulted in reciprocal gains for faculty, students and community members. Community clients accessed public health services as a result of the partnership. A blended learning approach that combines face-to-face interactions, service learning and online activities was utilized to enhance students' learning. Following classroom sessions, students actively participated in community-based educational process through comprehensive health needs assessments, planning and implementation of disease prevention and health promotion activities for community clients. Such active involvement in an underserved community deepened students' awareness of the fundamentals of community health practice. Students were challenged to view public health from a broader perspective while analyzing the impacts of social determinants of health on underserved populations. Through asynchronous online interactions, students synthesized classroom and community activities through critical thinking. This paper describes a model for teaching community health nursing that informs students' learning through blended learning, and meets the demands for community health nursing services delivery. PMID:24720659

  10. Nursing entrepreneurship: motivators, strategies and possibilities for professional advancement and health system change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Sarah

    2013-06-01

    In Canada, as well as internationally, efficiency-focused organizational restructuring in healthcare has resulted in stressful job change for nurses, although nurses continue to work in a system that values technology-based, physician-provided services. Employed nurses have had to participate in organizational activities that undermine their professional values and goals. Nursing entrepreneurship presents an opportunity to explore nursing's professional potential in nursing practice that is uniquely independent. In this study, a focused ethnographic approach was used to explore the experiences of self-employed nurses, who see themselves as leaders in advancing the profession of nursing and its contribution to healthcare. Key themes in the findings include the responses of self-employed nurses to health system change, expanded roles for nurses, the consequences of this non-traditional approach to nursing work and the possibilities for change that arise from nursing entrepreneurship. This research has implications for healthcare policy, professional advocacy and nursing education. PMID:23809640

  11. Stress, mental health & job satisfaction among nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C L; Manning, C A; Poteet, G

    1988-03-01

    This study investigated sources of stress and their effects on mental health and job satisfaction among nurse managers in the United States. One hundred and forty-four nurse managers completed questionnaires containing information concerning three kinds of variables: the degree of stress experienced at work, the personality of the individual, and characteristics of life situations away from work. It was found that in general the nurse managers were satisfied with their jobs, although they reported high stress on the job. They reported better mental health than normative groups. Using multivariate analysis, it was found that all three types of variables were necessary for prediction of mental health and job satisfaction. This finding supports the person-environment fit theory of occupational stress. PMID:10296898

  12. Leveraging public health nurses for disaster risk communication in Fukushima City: a qualitative analysis of nurses' written records of parenting counseling and peer discussions

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, Aya; Rudd, Rima E; Lai, Alden Y; Yoshida, Kazuki; Suzuki, Yuu; Halstead, Donald D; Yoshida-Komiya, Hiromi; Reich, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Local public health nurses (PHNs) have been recognized as the main health service providers in communities in Japan. The Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011 has, however, created a major challenge for them in responding to mothers’ concerns. This was in part due to difficulties in assessing, understanding and communicating health risks on low-dose radiation exposure. In order to guide the development of risk communication plans, this study sought to investigate mothers’ primary con...

  13. Nursing in the Next Decade: Implications for Health Care and for Patient Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Kany, K

    2004-01-01

    Nursing faces yet another divergence between demand and supply that is evidenced in insufficient nurse staffing with significant implications for patient safety. Many believe this shortage of registered nurses is entrenched in long-standing problems related to the value and image of nursing and the limited role nursing has had in identifying priorities within health care delivery systems. Nursing's Agenda for the Future is a plan resulting from the experience and wisdom of a broad representat...

  14. Nursing Assessment and Intervention to Geriatric Patients Discharged From Emergency Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, Elizabeth Emilie; Poulsen, Ingrid

    Background: Geriatric patients recently discharged from hospital are at risk of unplanned readmissions and admission to nursing home. When discharged directly from Emergency Department (ED) the risk increases, as time pressure often requires focus on the presenting problem, although 80 % of geriatric patients have complex and often unresolved caring needs. Objective: To examine the effect of a two-stage nursing assessment and intervention to address the patients uncompensated problems given just after discharge from ED and one and six months after. Method: We conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled trial with follow-up at one and six months. Included were patients >70 at increased risk of readmission and functional decline (had an ISAR 1 score of 2-6 points) and discharged home in the period 16th of February 2009 to 31st of January 2011, N=271. Intervention: A nurse did a brief nursing assessment comprising a checklist of 10 physical, mental, medical and social items. The focus was on unresolved problems which require medical intervention, new or different home care services, or comprehensive geriatric assessment. Following this the nurses made relevant referrals to the geriatric outpatient clinic, community health centre, primary physician or arrangements with next-of-kin. Findings: Primary endpoints will be presented as unplanned readmission to ED; admission to nursing home; and death. Secondary endpoints will be presented as physical function; depressive symptoms; health related quality of life; and hours of help received from the community. Conclusion: The presentation at the conference will include results collected at one and six months follow-up, this will show if a two-stage intervention consisting of screening with the ISAR 1 tool followed by structured nursing assessment and intervention in the ED could be a way of discovering geriatric patients’ unresolved problems and preventing further functional decline and readmission.

  15. Examining Pre-migration Health Among Filipino Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, A B; Gee, Gilbert; Fujishiro, Kaori; Rue, Tessa

    2015-12-01

    The healthy immigrant hypothesis asserts that immigrants arrive in the receiving country healthier than same race/ethnic counterparts born there. Contemporary research, however, has not evaluated pre-migration health among migrants, nor has explicitly considered comparisons with non-migrants in the country of origin. Pre-migration health was examined among 621 Filipino nurses, including self-reported physical health, mental health, health behaviors, and social stress. Measures were compared by intention to migrate and also tested as predictors of actual migration using time-to-event analysis. Nurses intending to migrate had higher proportion of depression and reported higher general perceived stress compared to those not. Predictors of actual migration included age, mentally unhealthy days, social strain, and social support. Physical health and health behavior measures had no association with migration intention or actual migration. Findings suggest that, relative to those not intending to migrate, nurses intending to migrate have worse mental health status and social stress; and, do not have a physical health advantage. Future research must span the pre- to post-migration continuum to better understand the impact of moving from one country to another on health and well-being. PMID:25385090

  16. 78 FR 63993 - ``Low-Income Levels'' Used for Various Health Professions and Nursing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ...offer graduate programs in behavioral health...nonprofit health or education entities to assist...professions and nursing schools. Some programs provide for the...professions or nursing education loans for disadvantaged...recognition of same-sex spouses and...

  17. Community Nurses' Role as Counselors in Primary Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Papathanasiou I.; Psychogiou M.; Lavdaniti M.; Kotrotsiou S.; Paralikas Th.; Lahana E.

    2008-01-01

    B A C K G R O U N D : Counselling is regarded as an interactive process during which help is usually provided toindividuals with health problems. In the framework of nursing, nurses also play a counselling role.A I M : The present study aims at determining the general public’s attitudes and opinions about the role that nursescan play as counsellors in health related topics.M A T E R I A L - M E T H O D : Our sample consisted of 246 participants randomly chosen; 104 (43.2%) were menand 137 (56...

  18. Palliative care awareness among Indian undergraduate health care students: A needs-assessment study to determine incorporation of palliative care education in undergraduate medical, nursing and allied health education

    OpenAIRE

    Sadhu Sakshi; Salins Naveen; Kamath Asha

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Quality assurance data worldwide suggests that the current healthcare system is providing inadequate care for the dying. Current health care education focuses entirely on cure and care is almost compromised or nonexistent in end-of-life settings. The purpose of this study was to determine palliative care awareness among Indian undergraduate health care students and assess the need for incorporating palliative medicine education into undergraduate health education. Methods: A non-ra...

  19. Geriatric Nursing Assessment and Intervention in an Emergency Department – a Pilot Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, Elizabeth Emilie; Wagner, Lis

    2012-01-01

    Aim To describe and test a model for structured nursing assessment and intervention to older people discharged from Emergency Department (ED). Background Older people recently discharged from hospital are at high risk of readmission. This risk may increase when they are discharged straight home from an ED as time pressure requires staff to focus on the presenting problem although many have complex, unresolved, care needs. Method A prospective descriptive study was conducted. Older people aged 70 and over and at risk of adverse health and functional outcome were included. Intervention: At discharge, and at 1 and 6 month follow-up, a brief standardised nursing assessment (ISAR 2) developed by McCusker et al. was carried out. The focus was on unresolved problems that required medical or nursing intervention, new or different home care services or comprehensive geriatric assessment. After assessment the nurse made relevant referrals to the geriatric outpatient clinic, community health centre, general practitioner or made arrangements with next-of-kin. Results One hundred and fifty people participated, mean age was 81.7. At discharge they had a mean of 1.9 unresolved problems, after 1 month 0.8, and after 6 months 0.4. Older people receiving home care services increased from 79% at discharge to 89% at 1 month and 90% at 6 month follow-up. Conclusion ISAR 2 works well in a Danish ED setting and intercepts older peoples’ problems. It seems that unresolved problems decrease when a nurse assesses and intervenes at discharge from ED, and at follow-up. However a randomized controlled test should be carried out to confirm this. Relevance to clinical practice Nursing assessment and intervention should be implemented in the ED to reduce older peoples’ unrevealed problems.

  20. Too much knowledge for a nurse? Use of physical assessment by final-semester nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Clint; Windsor, Carol; Lewis, Peter

    2015-12-01

    There is debate around the scope of physical assessment skills that should be taught in undergraduate nursing programs. Yet this debate is largely uninformed by evidence on what is learned and practiced by nursing students. This study examined the pattern and correlates of physical assessment skill utilization by 208 graduating nursing students at an Australian university, including measures of knowledge, frequency of use, and perceived barriers to physical assessment skills during clinical practice. Of the 126 skills surveyed, on average, only five were used every time students practiced. Core skills reflected inspection or general observation of the patient; none involved complex palpation, percussion, or auscultation. Skill utilization was also shaped by specialty area. Most skills (70%) were, on average, never performed or learned and students perceived nursing physical assessment was marginalized in both university and workplace contexts. Lack of confidence was, thus, a significant barrier to use of skills. Based on these findings, we argue that the current debate must shift to how we might best support students to integrate comprehensive physical assessment into nursing practice. PMID:26138523

  1. The Use of Competency Models to Assess Leadership in Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Andreja Kvas; Janko Seljak; Janez Stare

    2013-01-01

    Background: The efficiency of the health care system is significantly dependent on the appropriate leadership and guidance of employees. One of the most frequently used new approaches in human resources management is the study of competencies and competency models. The aim of this research is to develop a competency model for leaders in nursing, and to compare it with the leadership competency model for state administration.Methods: A survey was conducted among 141 nurse leaders in Slovenia. ...

  2. Implementation of the nursing process in a health area: models and assessment structures used / Implantación del proceso de enfermería en un área de salud: modelos y estructuras de valoración utilizados / Implementação do processo de enfermagem em uma área da saúde: modelos e estruturas de avaliação utilizados

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Joseba Xabier, Huitzi-Egilegor; Maria Isabel, Elorza-Puyadena; Jose Maria, Urkia-Etxabe; Carmen, Asurabarrena-Iraola.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: analisar quais modelos de enfermagem e estruturas de avaliação de enfermagem têm sido utilizados na implementação do processo de enfermagem, nos centros públicos e privados da área de saúde de Gipuzkoa (País Basco). MÉTODO: foi realizado um estudo retrospectivo, baseado na análise do [...] s registros de enfermagem que utilizaram os 158 centros estudados. RESULTADOS: o modelo de Henderson, a estrutura bifocal de Carpenito, a estrutura de avaliação de Gordon e a estrutura Resident Asessment Instrument Home 2.0 foram os modelos e estruturas de avaliação de enfermagem utilizados na implementação do processo de enfermagem. Em alguns centros, o modelo ou estrutura de avaliação escolhido mudou ao longo do tempo. CONCLUSÃO: foi concluído que o modelo de Henderson foi o mais utilizado na implementação do processo de enfermagem. Além disso, foi observada a tendência de complementar ou substituir o modelo de Henderson com estruturas de avaliação de enfermagem. Abstract in spanish OBJETIVO: analizar qué modelos de enfermería y estructuras de valoración de enfermería se han utilizado a la hora de implantar el proceso de enfermería en los centros públicos y privados del área de salud de Gipuzkoa (País Vasco). MÉTODO: se realizó un estudio retrospectivo, basado en el análi [...] sis de los registros de enfermería que han utilizado los 158 centros estudiados. RESULTADOS: el modelo de Henderson, la estructura bifocal de Carpenito, la estructura de valoración de Gordon y la estructura Resident Assessment Instrument Nursing Home 2.0 han sido los modelos y estructuras de valoración de enfermería utilizados a la hora de implantar el proceso de enfermería. En algunos centros el modelo o estructura de valoración elegido ha ido variando con el paso del tiempo. CONCLUSIÓN: se concluye que el modelo de Henderson ha sido el más utilizado a la hora de implantar el proceso de enfermería. Asimismo, se observa la tendencia de complementar o sustituir el modelo de Henderson con estructuras de valoración de enfermería. Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: to analyze what nursing models and nursing assessment structures have been used in the implementation of the nursing process at the public and private centers in the health area Gipuzkoa (Basque Country). METHOD: a retrospective study was undertaken, based on the analysis of the nur [...] sing records used at the 158 centers studied. RESULTS: the Henderson model, Carpenito's bifocal structure, Gordon's assessment structure and the Resident Assessment Instrument Nursing Home 2.0 have been used as nursing models and assessment structures to implement the nursing process. At some centers, the selected model or assessment structure has varied over time. CONCLUSION: Henderson's model has been the most used to implement the nursing process. Furthermore, the trend is observed to complement or replace Henderson's model by nursing assessment structures.

  3. Shift work a reality in life and health nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Mercedes Gago López

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The need to provide care 24 hours of the day, 365 days of the year, means for nurses, compulsory work in a system of rotating shifts, including the realization of nights. This system has repercussions on the life, health and well-being of nurses.In order to identify evidence on the relationship between the work to shift and/or night the health and well-being of nurses and develop recommendations to improve the adaptation to the system of rotating shifts and/or night, have carried out a review of the literature.After detailed analysis of the literature, we can conclude that the quality of the care provided is in direct relation to the health and well-being of the nursing professional. Implement measures to reduce the physical, psychic, social and family wear must be priority, being necessary to educate professionals, families, society and business. Among the recommendations highlight, those directed to the company; set realistic goals, to reduce workloads in the night shift adapting them to the actual number of nurses, flexible schedules and recommendations addressed to the professional related: diet, sleep, exercise, family life and social hygiene. The implementation of these measures will mean: increase satisfaction, reduce absenteeism, increase productivity, reduce the number of errors and decrease spending.

  4. Perspectives of Australian nursing directors regarding educational preparation for mental health nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; McAllister, Margaret

    2014-11-01

    There is an ongoing global shortage of mental health nurses. Within Australia, the principal strategy of offering a postgraduate education programme with various incentives to encourage nurses back to study has not been successful. This has led to the consideration of radical alternatives, including the return to pre-registration specialisation in mental health. The successful introduction of this strategy would require the full support of industry partners. To date, the voice of industry has not been heard in relation to this issue. The aim of this paper is to present the views of an Australian sample of mental health nursing directors regarding the resources and other factors required, should undergraduate specialist programmes in mental health be developed, to ensure they are relevant and likely to be successful. A qualitative exploratory research project was undertaken to explore the perspectives and opinions of industry partners. In-depth interviews were conducted with nursing directors (n = 12) in Queensland Australia. Five main themes were identified: relationships with universities; clinical placement preparation and support; workplace culture; facilitators and preceptors; and practical student learning. Genuine collaboration between the two organisations was considered crucial for delivering a quality programme and providing the required support for students. Transformative leadership could inform this collaboration by promoting acknowledgement of and respect for differences. PMID:25353302

  5. Nurses' preparedness to care for women exposed to Intimate Partner Violence: a quantitative study in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundborg Eva M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intimate partner violence (IPV has a deep impact on women's health. Nurses working in primary health care need to be prepared to identify victims and offer appropriate interventions, since IPV is often seen in primary health care. The aim of the study was to assess nurses' preparedness to identify and provide nursing care to women exposed to IPV who attend primary health care. Method Data was collected using a questionnaire to nurses at the primary health care centres. The response rate was 69.3%. Logistic regression analysis was used to test relationships among variables. Results Shortcomings were found regarding preparedness among nurses. They lacked organisational support e.g. guidelines, collaboration with others and knowledge regarding the extensiveness of IPV. Only half of them always asked women about violence and mostly when a woman was physically injured. They felt difficulties to know how to ask and if they identified violence they mostly offered the women a doctor's appointment. Feeling prepared was connected to obtaining knowledge by themselves and also to identifying women exposed to IPV. Conclusion The majority of the nurses were found to be quiet unprepared to provide nursing care to women exposed to IPV. Consequences might be treatment of symptoms but unidentified abuse and more and unnecessary suffering for these women. Improvements are needed on both at the level of the organisation and individual.

  6. Introducing human rights and health into a nursing curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mayers

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available An important component of nursing programmes in South Africa has been teaching of the principles of ethical practice and relevant ethical codes. A number of factors have contributed to the need to include human rights as an integral component of nursing curricula in South Africa. These include the Bill of Rights in the Constitution of South Africa and the implications thereof for health care delivery, the primary health care approach in the delivery of health care in South Africa, the development and acceptance o f Patients’ Rights Charters, and the recognition of the role that health professionals played - whether through lack of knowledge and awareness or direct involvement - in the human rights violations in the health sector exposed during the hearings of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

  7. Marketing strategies nurses can employ to promote health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, D

    1994-01-01

    Marketing strategies are employed to ensure the success of new products, services or programs. Both profit and non-profit organizations have used social marketing strategies to inform, to motivate interest, and to engage the involvement of the consumer. A client-dependent health care system did not find it necessary to market services, but a health care system that encourages clients to choose the most appropriate health promotion service available must market services. Nurses are in the business of promoting the health of clients. Therefore, it is essential that nurses become familiar with, and involved in, the development of marketing plans and strategies. The connection between the four variables of the marketing mix (product, promotion, place, and price) and promoting the health of clients is described. A case example recapitulating the marketing strategies employed to raise public awareness of a self-help group for family caregivers is related, the marketing response is evaluated, and future recommendations are proposed. PMID:7888407

  8. Reducing health care's carbon footprint--the power of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Aliria

    2012-11-01

    Global warming and environmentalism continue to be national and international issues as their complexities and implications become better understood. One ironic contributor to the degradation of the environment is the health care system. Serving as clinical laboratories, hotels, restaurants, and offices that never close, U.S. hospitals produce more than 2 million tons of waste annually. Although the consequences and significance of health care's carbon footprint are undeniable, strategies to reduce this impact are challenging. This article discusses how the role, traits, and knowledge of nurses combined with their positions in the health care system make them key players in creating an environmentally sustainable health care industry. With an analysis of environmental action versus inaction, this article explores how nurses at the forefront of health care are equipped to change practice that will reach far beyond the bedside. PMID:23413481

  9. [Continuous nursing education to improve the quality of health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumi?, Nera; Marinovi?, Marin; Brajan, Dolores

    2014-10-01

    Health care and today's medical and technical achievements and approved standards of treatment provide comprehensive quality, safety and traceability of medical procedures respecting the principles of health protection. Continuous education improves the quality of nursing health care and increases the effectiveness of patient care, consequently maintaining and enhancing patient safety. Patient health problems impose the need of appropriate, planned and timely nursing care and treatment. In providing quality nursing care, attention is focused on the patient and his/her needs in order to maintain and increase their safety, satisfaction, independence and recovery or peaceful death, so the health and nursing practices must be systematized, planned and based on knowledge and experience. Health and nursing care of patients at risk of developing acute and chronic wounds or already suffering from some form of this imply preventive measures that are provided through patient education, motivation, monitoring, early recognition of risk factors and causes, and reducing or removing them through the prescribed necessary medical treatment which is safe depending on the patient health status. Except for preventive measures, nursing care of patients who already suffer from some form of acute or chronic wounds is focused on the care and treatment of damaged tissue by providing appropriate and timely diagnosis, timely and proper evaluation of the wound and patient general status, knowledge and understanding of the wide range of local, oral and parenteral therapy and treatment, aiming to increase patient safety by preventing progression of the patient general condition and local wound status and reducing the possibility of developing infection or other complications of the underlying disease. In the overall patient management, through nursing process, medical interventions are implemented and aimed to maintain and optimize health status, prevent complications of existing diseases and conditions, provide appropriate wound treatment, increase satisfaction, reduce pain, increase mobility, reduce and eliminate aggravating factors, and achieve a satisfactory functional and aesthetic outcome. Many scientific researches and knowledge about the pathophysiological processes of wound formation and healing are currently available. Modern achievements can accelerate independence, reduce pain and encourage faster wound healing, thus it is important to continuously develop awareness, knowledge and experience, along with the treatment to achieve, maintain and enhance the quality of health care and patient safety. PMID:25326985

  10. The relationship between burnout and mental health among nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdi masooleh F

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burnout is one of the most important factors in reduced productivity in organizations and involves physical and mental signs, especially in the human service professions. The role of nurses in the healthcare system is vital and motivation to ensure health security is extremely important. We carried out this research to examine the relationship between burnout and mental health in the nursing staff of educational hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted among 200 nurses selected via probable multistage sampling. We used three instruments in this study: 1 demographic questionnaire 2 General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28 and 3 Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI.Results: On the whole, using the MBI subscale, we found low levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization and high levels of reduced sense of personal accomplishment, both in frequency and intensity. The prevalence of symptomatic samples in the GHQ-28 was 43%, and two variables, burnout and poor mental health, were related (p<0.001. Burnout was to be related to gender, age and years of work. The correlation between poor mental health and years of work as well as hours of work in a week were significant. Conclusions: Our results suggest that there is a strong correlation between poor mental health and burnout. Furthermore, the prevalence of symptomatic samples detected in our study using the GHQ-28 was much higher than that reported in studies of the general population. The high prevalence of symptomatic samples and high prevalence of burnout in the dimension of self accomplishment, especially in younger nurses, combined with the strong correlation between poor mental health and burnout all show that care should be taken to improve the stressful conditions that nurses face.

  11. Correlation of the health-promoting lifestyle, enrollment level, and academic performance of College of Nursing students in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kandari, Fatimah; Vidal, Victoria L

    2007-06-01

    This descriptive study of 224 nursing students assessed their health-promoting lifestyle profile and correlated it with the levels of enrollment in nursing courses and academic performance. The health-promoting lifestyle profile was measured by Walker's Health-promoting Lifestyle Profile II instrument. Academic performance was measured by assessing the nursing grade point average and general grade point average of the students. The students had positive health-promoting lifestyles with significant differences noted between males and females in the overall profile, physical activity, interpersonal relations, and stress management. Sociodemographic variables, such as age, nationality, and marital status, but not income, showed an association with students' health-promoting lifestyles. A significant correlation was noted between students' nursing enrollment and level of health responsibility. No significant correlation was established between a health-promoting lifestyle and academic performance. This study poses a challenge for nurse educators to provide an effective environment to maximize students' potential to be future vanguards of health. PMID:17470185

  12. Health Reform: the health knowledge printed in the annals of Brazilian Nursing (1977-1980

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Toledo de Mendonça

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The study has as object in nursing knowledge built during the Brazilian Sanitary Reform Movement, printed in the Annals of the Brazilian Nursing for the period 1977-1980. Objective: To analyze the content relating to this national health policy in the annals of the Brazilian Congress of Nursing in force from 1977 to 1980. This is a social-historical study, exploratory analysis that used the documentary as a research technique. We analyzed the Annals of the Brazilian Nursing the period 1977-1980, and categorization of selected themes in the corpus. The nurses, as actors engaged in national health system, they made a scientific output that showed signs of incorporation of political and social reality, building a knowledge in public health in line with the ideals sanitarians.

  13. [The promotion of women's autonomy during family health nursing consultations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Michelle Kuntz; Heidemann, Ivonete Teresinha Schülter Buss

    2013-04-01

    We adopted a qualitative approach combined with the methodological framework of Paulo Freire, consisting of thematic investigation, coding and decoding, and critical unveiling, to understand whether nursing consultation promotes women's autonomy in a health center. Six Culture Circles that were each two hours long were conducted, with an average of nine participants each, between May and July 2011. The investigation revealed eight topics of importance, although two were particularly important: the need for dialogue on domestic violence and the relationship between nurses and participants during consultations. The results indicate that consultations may present a space for women to take actions that they may otherwise be fearful to take. Our results highlight the need for multidisciplinary training of nurses with regard to strategies for promotion and intensification of their practices in the Unified Health System. PMID:23743892

  14. Health promotion in nursing and cost-effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadelhack, Raja

    2012-01-01

    Close examination of the different healthcare systems and the present economic crisis worldwide suggests that all health organizations should re-evaluate the concept of health promotion and its relationship to cost-effectiveness. When choosing the most efficient and cost-effective system, each nation's healthcare system must seriously start to implement strategies for the change. Health professions, including nursing, must change their vision of education both in academic and practice settings, to focus on health promotion and illness prevention. The key principle underlying this paper is to illustrate the importance of health promotion and cost-effectiveness being adopted by all health organizations worldwide, as well as to observe the experiences of selected counties in developing a health policy related to education in primary healthcare. The paper will include a plan adopted by the General Nursing Directorate (GND) in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (SA), which contains a health promotion policy for the nursing administrations in all governmental primary healthcare centers in Saudi Arabia. PMID:22924205

  15. Musculoskeletal Load Assessment in Hospital Nurses with Patient Transfer Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Roghayeh Abedini; Alireza Choobineh; Jafar Hasanzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Manual patient handling is known to be the major source ofmusculoskeletal load among hospital nurses. The objectives of the present study were determination of frequency ofmusculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and its associatedfactors together with assessment of musculoskeletal loaddue to patient transfer by PTAI method in hospitalnursing staff of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS), Iran. In this cross-sectional study, 400 randomlyselected nurses of SUMS hospital participated. Data were...

  16. Alleviating perinatal depressive symptoms and stress: a nurse-community health worker randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Lee Anne; Gardiner, Joseph C; Lindsay, Judith K; Moore, Joseph S; Luo, Zhehui; Baer, Lawrence J; Goddeeris, John H; Shoemaker, Allen L; Barton, Lauren R; Fitzgerald, Hiram E; Paneth, Nigel

    2009-12-01

    To determine whether a Nurse-Community Health Worker (CHW) home visiting team, in the context of a Medicaid enhanced prenatal/postnatal services (EPS), would demonstrate greater reduction of depressive symptoms and stress and improvement of psychosocial resources (mastery, self-esteem, social support) when compared with usual Community Care (CC) that includes Medicaid EPS delivered by professionals. Greatest program benefits were expected for women who reported low psychosocial resources, high stress, or both at the time of enrollment. Medicaid eligible pregnant women (N = 613) were randomly assigned to either usual CC or the Nurse-CHW team. Mixed effects regression was used to analyze up to five prenatal and postnatal psychosocial assessments. Compared to usual CC, assignment to the Nurse-CHW team resulted in significantly fewer depressive symptoms, and as hypothesized, reductions in depressive symptoms were most pronounced for women with low psychosocial resources, high stress, or both high stress and low resources. Outcomes for mastery and stress approached statistical significance, with the women in the Nurse-CHW group reporting less stress and greater mastery. Women in the Nurse-CHW group with low psychosocial resources reported significantly less perceived stress than women in usual CC. No differences between the groups were found for self-esteem and social support. A Nurse-CHW team approach to EPS demonstrated advantage for alleviating depressive symptoms in Medicaid eligible women compared to CC, especially for women at higher risk. PMID:19551471

  17. A Survey of Nurse Training Needs in Oklahoma Health Care Institutions. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, William D.

    A study was conducted to identify staffing patterns for nursing personnel in the health care institutions of Oklahoma in order to predict future needs for nursing education and training. Structured interviews with administrators and directors of nursing from eighteen hospitals and eighteen nursing homes were used to elicit demographic data…

  18. A Perspective Of Nursing In Zimbabwe.

    OpenAIRE

    Mapanga, K. G., Mapanga, M. B

    2000-01-01

    This article describes nursing in Zimbabwe within the context of primary health care, delineating various levels of delivery of nursing practice, educational preparation levels and implications for practice. This picture is intended to capture the quality of nursing care that is congruent to clients’ expectations of the ever-changing Zimbabwean society. Nursing programs at various levels include health assessment, nursing process and nursing research. Clinical specialization including functio...

  19. International School Children's Health Needs: School Nurses' Views in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Annika; Clausson, Eva; Janlov, Ann-Christin

    2012-01-01

    Rapid globalization and the integration of national economies have contributed to the sharp rise in enrollment in international schools. How does this global nomadism affect international school children and their individual health needs? This study attempts to find an answer by interviewing 10 school nurses, with varying degrees of experience in…

  20. School Nurses and Health Education: The Classroom Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Julie; Sendall, Marguerite C.; Fleming, Marylou; Lidstone, John; Domocol, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study is to explore school nurses' experience of health education. Design: A qualitative approach, phenomenology was used to answer the question. Method: Sixteen participants were recruited through purposeful and snowball sampling. Participants undertook an audio-recorded interview which was transcribed and analysed.…

  1. The relationship between weight status and the need for health care assistance in nursing home residents.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between underweight status and weight loss events on the need for health care assistance among a sample of Danish nursing home residents over 12-months. Design: Longitudinal, repeated measures design with three data collection points at baseline (2004) and six and 12 months post baseline. Setting: 11 Danish nursing home facilities. Participants: 441 Danish nursing home residents over the age of 65. Measurements: Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI-NH) data were abstracted for each participant at each of three data collection points. RAI-NH data related to facility staff ratings of residents’ physical functioning (Activities of Daily Living, ADL) status and their need for health care staff assistance related to ADLs were collected at each time point in addition to the resident weight status and experience of weight loss according to three criterion (i.e., > 1%, >5% or >10% of baseline body weight at 6 or 12 months) and Body Mass Index (BMI) values. Results: Low BMI (< 18.5) and weight loss were both significantly associated with the need for staff assistance with ADLs during a 12-month timeframe. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that elderly nursing home residents with a low BMI or weight loss may add to the substantial and costly burden of nursing home care due to the associated need for higher levels of ADL assistance.

  2. Development of a conceptual model of the role of hospital nurses in health promotion in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoqirat, N

    2015-03-01

    International evidence reveals that hospital nurses have not been able to incorporate health promotion effectively into the framework of their care. This can be attributed to unclear conceptualizing of the barriers and facilitators to the role of nurses in health promotion. An integrative review was carried out to develop a conceptual model to assist hospital nurses in Jordan to understand how health promotion activities can be developed. Factors affecting the involvement of nurses in health promotion - ranging from limited knowledge about health promotion to the social image of nursing - can be structured into three levels: the micro (individual), meso (organizational) and macro (population). By understanding the interplay of factors between and within the levels, nurses and other health professionals can draw on the individual, social and organizational factors that influence nurses' role in health promotion. The proposed model can be considered as a springboard for developing health promotion activities related to hospitals in other Muslim-majority contexts. PMID:26074221

  3. Latent or Manifest Observers: Two Dichotomous Approaches of Surveillance in Mental Health Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Henrik Eriksson; Martin Salzmann-Erikson

    2011-01-01

    Background. Surveillance is a central activity among mental health nursing, but it is also questioned for its therapeutic value and considered to be custodial. Aim. The aim of this study was to describe how mental health nurses use different approaches to observe patients in relation to the practice of surveillance in psychiatric nursing care. Methods. In this study, Spradley's twelve-step ethnographic method was used. Results. Mental health nurses use their cultural knowing to observe patien...

  4. Swedish Child Health Care nurses conceptions of overweight in children: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Isma Gabriella E; Bramhagen Ann-Cathrine; Ahlstrom Gerd; Östman Margareta; Dykes Anna-Karin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Registered Sick Children’s Nurses and District Nurses employed at Child Health Care centres are in a position to help prevent childhood overweight and obesity. Prevention of this challenging public health threat could be improved through having a better understanding of how this group of nurses perceives childhood obesity. The aim of this study was to elucidate the conceptions of childhood overweight, including obesity, among nurses working in Child Health Care. Method A q...

  5. Introducing Health Impact Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mannheimer, L N; Gulis, G; Lehto, J; Ostlin, P

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intersectoral Action for Health (IAH) and its Health Impact Assessment (HIA) tool are built on collaboration between actors and sectors, requiring multidimensional and horizontal way of working. The study aims to analyse the enablers and barriers when such a new way of working and tool have been initiated to replace a traditional, vertical operation at the local level in Slovakia-a country in transition-in 2004. METHODS: Up to date, there are few studies that have analysed intersecto...

  6. Developing a manual for strengthening mental health nurses' clinical supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Cassedy, Paul; Gonge, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report findings from a study aimed at developing the content and implementation of a manual for a research-based intervention on clinical supervision of mental health nursing staff. The intervention was designed to strengthen already existing supervision practices through educational preparation for supervision and systematic reflection on supervision. The intervention consists of three sessions and was implemented on two groups of mental health hospital staff. We present an ...

  7. Computerized Management Information System in a Community Health Nursing Agency

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, DeLanne A.

    1981-01-01

    The Visiting Nurse Association of Omaha is a nonprofit, voluntary agency providing home health care, preventive care, clinical services, and school health services in an urban-rural setting. It has developed a computerized system which provides for: (1) centralized dictation by service delivery staff; (2) the printing of a uniform clinical, family problem-oriented record; (3) an integrated data base, statistical system, and financial system; and (4) the communication capability to remote stat...

  8. The role of the nurse on health promotion and health maintenance of adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülümser

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Nurses have an indispensable role in maintenance and promotion of adolescens’ health. Nurses must know the basic principles of appropriate approach to adolescents, should be able to guide the adolescent and family in the promotion and maintenance of health. In this article, general observation principles of adolescent and family, the appropriate nursing approach to the major adolescent health issues, how to evaluate gathered data about adolescent’s such as nutrition, physical activity, mental health and, development and growth, the properties of therapeutic communication with adolescent and family, physical activity to be integrated into the life of the adolescent and family, nursing approach to illness and accident prevention has been handled. (Turk Arch Ped 2011; 46 Suppl: 4-8

  9. Investigating the Quitting Decision of Nurses: Panel Data Evidence from the British National Health Service

    OpenAIRE

    Frijters, Paul; Shields, Michael A.; Price, Stephen Wheatley

    2003-01-01

    There is currently a worldwide shortage of registered nurses, driven by large shifts in both the demand for and supply of nurses. Consequently, various policies to increase the recruitment and retention of nurses are under discussion, in particular, the role that wage increases might have in promoting nurse labour supply. In this paper we provide the first detailed empirical investigation into the quitting behaviour of nurses in the British National Health Service (NHS), using a newly constru...

  10. Relationship between nursing care quality, nurse staffing, nurse job satisfaction, nurse practice environment, and burnout: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virya Koy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this literature review is to explore the relationship between nurse staffing, nurse job satisfaction, nurse practice environment, burnout, and nursing care quality through a consideration of what is meant by perceptions of nursing care quality. Different people define nursing care quality in many ways. It is complex, multi-faceted and multi-dimensional, and attempts to assess, monitor, evaluate and improve nursing care quality have evolved over a number of years. Of particular interest is the way in which changes in nurse staffing, nurse job satisfaction, nurse practice environment, and burnout may affect the quality of nursing care delivery. A search was conducted using the CINAHL, Medline and Embase databases, HINARI, Science Direct, Google, and PubMed. The terms searched included quality of health care; nursing care quality; nurse job satisfaction; nurse practice environment; burnout; and nurse staffing. Papers were included for their relevance to the field of enquiry. The original search was conducted in 2003 and updated in 2004. Quality of care is a complex, multi-dimensional concept, which presents researchers with a challenge when attempting to evaluate it. Many different tools have assessed nursing care quality. In addition, the review found that there were relationships between nurse staffing, nurse job satisfaction, nurse practice environment, burnout, and nursing care quality. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(8.000: 1825-1831

  11. Health needs assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim A Bani

    2008-01-01

    The findings of the assessment of the health needs of Jazan presented in this review could be utilized as a baseline and reference information for policy formulation, subsequent planning and cost effective intervention programs. It could also be utilized for the curriculum development or review for a community oriented medical schools.

  12. Undergraduate nursing education to address patients' concerns about sexual health: the perceived learning needs of senior traditional four-year and two-year recurrent education (rn-bsn) undergraduate nursing students in taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Li-Ya; Huang, Cheng-Yi; Shih, Fen-Fen; Li, Chi-Rong; Lai, Te-Jen

    2014-08-01

    The aims of this study were to identify learning needs among traditional four-year and two-year recurrent education (RN-BSN) undergraduate nursing students in Taiwan with regard to patients' concerns about sexual health. A 24-item instrument (Learning Needs for Addressing Patients' Sexual Health Concerns) was used to collect data. Compared to RN-BSN undergraduate nursing students, traditional four-year undergraduate nursing students had more learning needs in the aspects of sexuality in health and illness (2.19 ± 0.66 vs. 1.80 ± 0.89, P = 0.005) and approaches to sexual health care (2.03 ± 0.72 vs. 1.76 ± 0.86, P = 0.033). After adjustment for other variables by the backward selection approach, those with experience in assessing patient's sexual functioning had fewer learning needs in sexuality in health and illness (? = -0.375, P = 0.001), communication about patient's intimate relationships (? = -0.242, P = 0.031), and approaches to sexual health care (? = -0.288, P = 0.013); those who agreed that sexual health care was a nursing role also expressed greater needs to learn about these 3 aspects (all P strengthened in the traditional undergraduate nursing curriculum in order to support sexual health related competence, build a positive attitude regarding sexual health care as a nursing role, and strengthen the experience of assessing patient's sexual functioning. A different, simplified program may be more suitable for those with clinical experience. PMID:25741036

  13. School Nurse Communication Effectiveness with Physicians and Satisfaction with School Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkman, Julie E.; Hillemeier, Marianne M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined school nurses' communication with community physicians and its relationship to school nurse satisfaction with school health services. A stratified random sample of school nurses in Pennsylvania (N = 615) were surveyed about communication effectiveness with community physicians, satisfaction with school health services for…

  14. The Use of Competency Models to Assess Leadership in Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Kvas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The efficiency of the health care system is significantly dependent on the appropriate leadership and guidance of employees. One of the most frequently used new approaches in human resources management is the study of competencies and competency models. The aim of this research is to develop a competency model for leaders in nursing, and to compare it with the leadership competency model for state administration.Methods: A survey was conducted among 141 nurse leaders in Slovenia. The respondents were asked to complete questionnaire with 95 leadership behaviours that form the leadership competency model for leaders in nursing. The data were analysed by ANOVA and Tukey's honestly significant differences test.Results: The levels of competencies set for themselves by leaders at the third leadership level in nursing (leaders of small units and teams are significantly lower than those set by all other leaders, both in nursing and in state administration. Statistically significant differences were apparent in the majority of areas.Conclusion: Within the context of the comparison of competency models, the greatest need for training can be observed at the third level of leadership in nursing. A comparison of models formulated in this way enables the exchange of good practices among leaders from various professional groups and easier identification of the training needs of individual groups of leaders in public administration. The proposed concept is designed to significantly simplify and unify the building of competency-based leadership models in public sector.

  15. Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing - "Evidence for Psychiatric Nursing Practice: An Analysis of Three Years of Published Research

    OpenAIRE

    Zauszniewski, J., Suresky, J

    2003-01-01

    Psychiatric and mental health nursing practice continues to be strongly influenced by tradition, unsystematic trial and error, and authority. Yet the need for quality care that is based on the best and most current empirical research is well documented. Achieving evidence-based practice in the psychiatric nursing specialty will require that qualified nurse researchers conduct research relevant for practice and appropriately disseminate that research to those who can best use it, practicing nu...

  16. Designing of Electronic Health Record Software in the Nursing and Midwifery Faculty of Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Azizi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: much effort was conducted to support the use of electronic record systems in nursing process. Some of the most important reasons for its application are efficiency, security and the quality of the patients’ data registration. The purpose of this study is to present electronic registration software of patients, health assessment and to determine the attitude of nurses towards it. Methods: this is a R&D leading to construction of the patient’s health assessment software. In the beginning, Gordon Model and the daily charts of the patients were prepared to paper. During the next 8 months these charts were converted into the software programs. The databases were implemented using “the SQL server” and “C#Net” programming language. Results: the software used in this study included 4 parts; the first one contained information of Gordon health assessment model in 11 items, the second contained charts of the study, the third part consisted of Lund-Browder table and dummy data table for 4 age groups, and the fourth one was image infor-mation storage part for burn wounds pictures. Conclusion: despite barriers, electronic systems could lead to confidential information, increase the quality of nursing records, and also reduce the amount of expenses.

  17. Too little, too late: mental health nursing education in Western Australia, 1958-1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Anthony R; Martyr, Philippa

    2013-06-01

    Mental health nursing education in Australia has undergone a significant transition in the last 50?years, influenced by national inquiries, national decisions, and international trends in nursing education. But mental health nursing education had also accumulated decades of history in each state, including sometimes unequal relations with general nursing. Complex inter- and intra-professional relationships at state level influenced this educational transition in each state, and Western Australia provides an example of this influence. Using a range of published and unpublished sources, including oral histories, this paper describes the revision of the mental health nursing curriculum in Western Australia from 1958, responses to the call for transition to the tertiary sector between 1976 and 1984, and the final transition of mental health nursing education to university level in Western Australia in 1994. Mental health nursing's educational standards improved only gradually in Western Australia from 1958 onwards, compared with professional advances in general nursing in the same period. Factors which may have held back these improvements include mental health nursing's professional conservatism, which was outpaced by general nursing's growing radicalization at the national level. A lack of professional confidence and cohesion left mental health nursing unable to respond effectively to rapid external changes in the 1960s and 1970s, and vulnerable to absorption and dominance by general nursing education programs. PMID:22809369

  18. Investigation of health anxiety and its related factors in nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Yuqun Zhang,1,2 Yueqiu Zhao,3 Shengqin Mao,1 Guohong Li,4 Yonggui Yuan1 1Department of Psychosomatics and Psychiatry, Affiliated Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 2Nursing Faculty of Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 3Nanjing Health School, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 4Nursing Department, Affiliated Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Objective: To explore health anxiety in a sample of nursing students to determine the relationships between health anxiety and life satisfaction, personality, and alexithymia.Methods: Two thousand and eighty-six nursing students in junior college, which were divided into five groups, were evaluated by questionnaires, including the Life Satisfaction Scales Applicable to College Students, the Chinese version of the Short Health Anxiety Inventory, the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20, and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Results: The mean age, whether the individual was an only child, residence (urban or rural, and were significantly different between the groups. The self-assessment scores were also significantly different between the groups. The Short Health Anxiety Inventory total score and the factor of fearing the likelihood of becoming ill were significantly negatively correlated with the Life Satisfaction Scales Applicable to College Students total score and its two factors, but were significantly positively correlated with psychoticism, neuroticism, and TAS-20 total scores and its scores of the three TAS-20 factors. The negative consequence scale of Short Health Anxiety Inventory was not significantly correlated with externally oriented thinking, but was significantly negatively correlated with extraversion. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicted that objective satisfaction, subjective satisfaction, neuroticism, and the three factors of TAS-20 were predictors of health anxiety.Conclusion: Health anxiety was correlated with life satisfaction, personality, and alexithymia in junior college nursing students. Subjective and objective satisfaction, neuroticism, and the identification and expression of emotions may be predictors of health anxiety in nursing students. Keywords: life satisfaction, personality, alexithymia

  19. Mental health disaster response: nursing interventions across the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, S M; Dolfie, E K; Feren, S S; Love, R A; Taylor, S W

    1999-11-01

    In the aftermath of a natural disaster, adult survivors often move through the following phases of disaster response: Heroic Phase, Honeymoon Phase, Disillusionment Phase, and Reconstruction Phase. Understanding age-related responses to traumatic events such as a tornado enables mental health clinicians to individualize appropriate interventions and prevent or diminish emotional sequelae such as post-traumatic stress disorders. Psychiatric-mental health nurses are encouraged to attend local Red Cross disaster training to be prepared should the need arise for mobilization of mental health disaster response teams in your community. PMID:10572851

  20. Mental Health Nurses’ Experiences of Caring for Patients Suffering from Self-Harm

    OpenAIRE

    Randi Tofthagen; Anne-Grethe Talseth; Lisbeth Fagerstr#xf6;m

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore mental health nurses' experiences of caring for inpatients who self-harm during an acute phase. The setting was four psychiatric clinics in Norway. Fifteen mental health nurses (MHNs) were recruited. Semistructured interviews comprised the method for data collection, with content analysis used for data analysis. Two main categories emerged: challenging and collaborative nurse-patient relationship and promoting well-being through nursing interventions. The ...

  1. The Use of the Cultural Competence Assessment Tool (Ccatool In Community Nurses: The Pilot Study and Test-Retest Reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marios Vasiliou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses are responsible and accountable for their nursing practice and there is a need to be culturally and linguistically competent in all of their encounters. To be culturally competent community nurses should have the appropriate transcultural education. It is therefore important to assess the level of cultural competence of the community nurses, within their everyday practice.Aim: The aim of the article was the cultural adaptation of the cultural competence assessment tool based on Papadopoulos,Tilki and Taylor Model in a sample of Cypriot community nurses.Methodology: To explore the psychometric properties of the Cultural Competence Assessment Tool that has been distributed in a sample of 28 community nurses. Also, a pre and post-measurement has been applied as to assess the test-retest reliability of the tool.Results: The analysis has shown that the Cultural Competence Assessment Tool has good psychometric properties and it iseasy to understand by the community healthcare professionals. Results showed that 60.7% disagreed that there is the samelevel of cultural competency with other European countries and 89.3% reported that assessment of their cultural competence is needed. Using the special analysis software for this tool, the pilot study showed that Cypriot community nurses have some degree of cultural awareness.Conclusion: Culturally competent care is both a legal and a moral requirement for health and social care professionals.Valuing diversity in health and social care enhances the delivery and effectiveness of care for all people, whether they are members of a minority or a majority cultural group. Using an appropriate tool for assessing cultural competence is very important and useful for health professionals to be culturally competence.

  2. Telematics and nursing: does the German electronic Health Card improve patient care for persons with nursing needs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hübner, Ursula

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Current developments towards a German electronic Health Card raise the question whether the card is capable of improving care also for persons with special nursing needs including short-term as well as long-term care patients. The aging of the population - also in Germany - is coupled with an increase in the number of long-term care patients. They are patients who need medical as well as nursing care and who often need care provided by changing care settings (ambulatory care/home care vs. hospital during the course of their illness. Nursing Science has been recognizing the importance of an uninterrupted way of providing patient care (continuity of care as a central issue and has been developing concepts and instruments for case management and discharge management. Both approaches provide mechanisms proven under real life conditions for transferring patients safely from one to another setting. Although nursing telematics covers a wide range of topics, from semantic interoperability to telecare solutions, its primary applications, namely case management and discharge management, are only poorly supported by information and communication technology. It is therefore not surprising, that the electronic Health Card in Germany was planned without making any reference to case management and discharge management. Current concepts for the applications of the card simply ignore the scenario of transferring patients with special nursing needs between care settings. Though adjustments of the legal foundations of the electronic Health Card had been made recently, nurses will still not be able to exchange nursing summaries electronically by means of the card because nurses working in nursing homes and for ambulatory nursing services have no access rights for the data on the card. The full exploitation of the card and its potential for innovation does not only depend, however, on granting access rights to all nurses but also on issuing electronic Health Professional Cards (eHPC to nurses similar to the ones of physicians and pharmacists. As the eHPC is a basic prerequisite for using the electronic Health Card its implementation for nurses is required within a short time frame. In conclusion, only when the electronic health card and its applications are available to professional nursing care the growing number of patients with special nursing needs will benefit from its introduction.

  3. Musculoskeletal Load Assessment in Hospital Nurses with Patient Transfer Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghayeh Abedini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Manual patient handling is known to be the major source ofmusculoskeletal load among hospital nurses. The objectives of the present study were determination of frequency ofmusculoskeletal disorders (MSDs and its associatedfactors together with assessment of musculoskeletal loaddue to patient transfer by PTAI method in hospitalnursing staff of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, 400 randomlyselected nurses of SUMS hospital participated. Data were collected by anonymousdemographic and Nordic Musculoskeletal Disorders Questionnaires together with PTAI index checklist. Statistical analyses wereundertaken using SPSS, version 16. Age and job tenure means of participantswere 30.76±6.44 and 6.92±5.75 years, respectively. 88.2% of the nursing staffreported some forms of musculoskeletal symptoms during the 12 months prior tothe study. The results of PTAI index assessment demonstrated that in 4%, 8.5% and87.5% of the subjects, musculoskeletal load were at levels 1, 2 and 3,respectively. The results revealed that PTAI index score was significantlyassociated with musculoskeletal disorders occurrence (p<0.001.Musculoskeletal load was high among nurses with patient transfer activity. Age, nurse to bed ratio, marital status, shiftwork and PTAI score were associated risk factors for MSDs in the studiednursing staff.

  4. The impact of health care restructuring and baccalaureate entry to practice on nurses in New Brunswick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhéaume, Ann; Dykeman, Margaret; Davidson, Patricia; Ericson, Penny

    2007-05-01

    Health care restructuring during the 1990s resulted in major changes in the way nurses' work is defined and implemented. The adoption of the baccalaureate degree as basic preparation for entry into nursing has further complicated the lives of nurses. The purpose of this qualitative study is to explore the impact of health care reforms and changing educational requirements on nurses in New Brunswick, Canada. Sixty-three nurses representing different practice settings were interviewed and three focus groups were held with the nurses that were interviewed. Study findings indicate that nurses' practice has changed as a result of the reforms. Nurses give less direct care to patients and have taken on a greater administrative role. The requirement of a baccalaureate degree for entry to practice has placed a strain on working relationships between older and younger nurses, accentuating differences in working knowledge and work ethic among these groups. PMID:17652630

  5. An Occupational Health Nursing Computer Application in Medical Care: An Army Approach

    OpenAIRE

    McKenna, Mary K.

    1983-01-01

    Occupational health nursing has become an increasingly important specialty in the field of nursing during this century. In the broadest concept, occupational health is concerned with all factors which influence the health of people at work. Nurses, as well as other health care professionals, are attempting to apply the evolving technology of the computer to direct client care applications in the workplace. One such relevant use of the computer has been that of targeted disease surveillance in...

  6. Health problems of nursing workers in a public educational institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Luiza Bernardes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the issues occurred with nursing workers through a Health Monitoring System for Nursing Workers (SIMOSTE and to describe the consequences of those problems. Method: This is a quantitative, exploratory and descriptive study realized in a teaching hospital in the west region of the city of São Paulo. Results: From the SIMOSTE, 1.847 occurrences were registered in a six month period. Within the main occurrences, medical licenses, work related accidents with and without removals; psychiatric consultations and psychotherapy were highlighted. Conclusion: The data points out to the need for the development of new health vigilance actions to notify accidents and illness related to work, besides the prevention of issues.

  7. [Movements in high education, in health and nursing education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rosa Maria; Caldeira, Sebastião

    2008-01-01

    We present data about the higher education from a review of the national context to particularize the higher education in health and nursing and teaching trends in this field. We systematize data on education in Lula's government, noting the continuity and deepening of politics for higher education in Brazil, especially in regard to privatization and the transfer of resources to the private sector. In higher education in health we found that the official politic points to the adoption of innovative/active methodologies; the methodology of problematization as the only way to propose innovative curricular changes and acceptable when you receive the state incentive for the initiatives of change that are also observed in the experiences of curricular reforms of Brazilian nursing. PMID:18982228

  8. Assessing Suicide Risk in Veterans: The Role of the Nurse Practitioner

    OpenAIRE

    Kathy Puskar; Giuliana Mazza

    2012-01-01

    Background: Statistics have shown that veteran men and women are at greater risk for suicide than the general population. In order to decrease the incidence of suicide in veterans, nurse practitioners (NPs) and other health care professionals must not only become more aware of the risk factors for veteran suicides but also develop strong psychiatric interviewing skills. Purpose: To discuss the risk factors associated with veteran suicide, the assessment tools to ensure a comprehensive...

  9. Enfermagem na equipa de saúde ocupacional / Nursing in the occupational health team / Salud laboral en enfermería

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Mónica, Santos; Armando, Almeida.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A lei portuguesa não define com rigor as habilitações do Enfermeiro de Saúde Ocupacional nem o seu papel na Equipa de Saúde Ocupacional. Pretende-se com esta revisão bibliográfica, que utiliza as palavras-chave: “Enfermagem do trabalho e Saúde do trabalhador”, nas bases de dados MedLine with Full Te [...] xt, MedicLatina, Academic Search Complete, CINAHL Plus with full text, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews, Cochrane Methodology Register, Nursing and Allied Health Collection, Health Technology Assess e NHS Economic Evaluation Database, perceber qual o lugar que a Enfermagem tem na equipa de Saúde Ocupacional, descrevendo como esta é executada em diferentes países, com variadas perspetivas e objetivos. A Saúde Ocupacional comporta hoje uma abordagem abrangente, onde se inserem aspetos não laborais que interferem com a saúde do trabalhador, podendo englobar a família e/ou comunidade. A nível internacional, as tarefas predominantemente curativas deram lugar a outras de prevenção e de gestão, sendo inúmeros os programas que o Enfermeiro de Saúde Ocupacional tem capacidade para orientar, assumindo um papel central, completo e integrativo dentro da equipa. Finalmente, é fundamental quantificar custos, pré- e pós-atuação, para valorizar o seu trabalho financeiramente, perante a gestão da entidade empregadora. Abstract in spanish La legislación portuguesa no define con rigor la cualificación de la enfermera de salud laboral ni tampoco su papel dentro del equipo de salud laboral. Se pretende con esta revisión de la literatura, utilizando las palabras clave: “el trabajo de enfermería” y “salud en el trabajo” MedLine with Full [...] Text, MedicLatina, Academic Search Complete, CINAHL Plus with full text, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews, Cochrane Methodology Register, Nursing and Allied Health Collection, Health Technology Assess e NHS Economic Evaluation Database, entender qué lugar ocupa la enfermería en el equipo de salud laboral y describir cómo esta se lleva a cabo en diferentes países con diversas perspectivas y objetivos. La salud laboral incluye actualmente un enfoque integral, que abarca aspectos no laborales que interfieren en la salud del trabajador y puede englobar a la familia y/o a la comunidad. A nivel internacional, las tareas predominantemente curativas han dado paso a otras de prevención y de gestión, con numerosos programas que la enfermera de salud laboral está capacitada para dirigir, asumiendo así un papel central, completo e integrativo dentro del equipo. Por último, es fundamental cuantificar los costes de las actividades previas y posteriores para valorizar su trabajo financieramente, atendiendo así a la gestión de la entidad empleadora. Abstract in english Portuguese law does not define the precise qualifications of occupational health nurses or their role in the occupational health team. A literature review was carried out using the keywords “nursing work and occupational health,” in the databases Medline with Full Text, MedicLatina, Academic Search, [...] CINAHL Plus with Full Text, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews, Cochrane Methodology Register, Nursing and Allied Health Collection, Health Technology Assess and NHS Economic Evaluation Database, The aim was to understand the place of nursing in occupational health, describing how this is implemented in different countries with different perspectives and goals. Occupational health now uses a comprehensive approach which includes non-work aspects that interfere with worker health and may include family and/or community. Internationally, predominantly curative tasks have given way to others centered on prevention and management, with numerous programs that the occupational health nurse is able to lead, assuming a central role, fully integrated within the team. Finally, it is crucial to quantify costs, before and after activi

  10. The Role of Bright Light during Night Work on Stress and Health Status of Shift Work Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa Hosseini; Mohammad Hadi Rahimi; Hossein Kakooei

    2009-01-01

    Research has shown that shift work, in particular night work, can have negative effects on the health, safety and well-being of workers. Our study assessed, in a hospital setting, the effects of bright light (BL) on general health and psychological problems during night shift work. In an experimental design, 15 female nurses at a general hospital that located in Tehran were exposed to moderate bright light (2000 lx) during night work. The evaluation of general health status, job stress, and b...

  11. The occupational health nurse in Natal

    OpenAIRE

    B.N. Hunt; Grainger, L

    1983-01-01

    The Commission of Enquiry on Occupational Health, appointed in 1975, published its findings in 1976. The general impression gained by members of the Commission, after a series of visits and interviews pertinent to the field, is summed up thus in the fourth chapter of the Report: Although industrialists in the Republic and the Territory of South-West Africa are aware of the workers' position, it has regrettably to be stated categorically that, except in the mining industry, industrial health n...

  12. Oral Health and Hygiene Content in Nursing Fundamentals Textbooks

    OpenAIRE

    Jablonski, Rita A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the quantity and quality of oral hygiene content in a representative sample of before-licensure nursing fundamentals textbooks. Seven textbooks were examined. Quantity was operationalized as the actual page count and percentage of content devoted to oral health and hygiene. Quality of content was operationalized as congruency with best mouth care practices. Best mouth care practices included evidence-based and consensus-based practices as published pri...

  13. Clinical Skills of Nurses in Mobile Health Services

    OpenAIRE

    DB Mofukeng

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore and describe the acceptability of the clinical skills of community nurses in mobile health services. An explorative, descriptive design was employed. After a literature study, interviews were conducted with patients, and analysed, the results were verified by means of observation of the mobile services. The clinical skills were described as favourable and not favourable by patients some of which were confirmed during the observation phase. Guidelines fo...

  14. The leadership exercise by a nurse in a context of labor organization in health and nursing: some considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luís Guedes dos Santos, Rosângela Marion da Silva, Adelina Giacomelli Prochnow, Carmem Lúcia Colomé Beck, Maria de Lourdes Rodrigues Pedroso, Joséte Luzia Leite

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to reflect on nurse leadership in a health and nursing work organizational context, as well as to provide material for nurses and nursing students that aim to study and/or improve the exercise of leadership. Methods: a theoretical essay based on a bibliographical narrative review of books, papers, and dissertations; from which three axes of analysis and reflection have been built: searching for a leadership concept, potential development for the exercise of leadership and nurse leadership in the past, present, and future. Results: leadership is an important competence for the nurse in managing the work process and coordinating the activities involving health and nurse care. Thus, the exercise of leadership requires nurses to develop entrepreneurial postures based on the setting of teams, negotiation, power relations share, and exploring human motivation at work. Conclusion: the nurse must be sure of his/her leadership role and try to develop coherently and with a critical view on the reality before different contexts, valuing the multidimensionality of the human being that provides and receives care.

  15. Health promotion in Family Health Strategy: the perception of the nursing staff Crato - CE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Lopes de Alencar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the perception of the nursing staff of the Family Health Strategy (FHS on health promotion. Methods: This was a qualitative and descriptive study, which occurred in nine FHS of the city of Crato-CE in the period October-December 2010. The subjects were nine nurses and eight of the nursing technicians with service time of three to eight years at FHS investigated. Randomly chosen and electing the criterion of saturation data, we used semi-structured interview, which was recorded. During data analysis, we opted for collective subject discourse (CSD, which emerged the central ideas that enabled the formation of CSD for each professional category. The subjects were informed about the research objectives by submitting the Term of Consent, which was signed by all. The project was approved by the Ethics Committee at the Rural University of Cariri (RUCA, with approval No. 21/2010. Results: It was observed that the conceptual and practical vision on health promotion approaches the concept of prevention, however, nurses recognize health more broadly, in the context of the social construction of individual, differing from the CSD of the nursing technicians. The actions taken in the field of health promotion are still delimited by lectures. Conclusion: Perceptions of professionals are constituted by a weakness related to CSD and the actions performed by them, constituting an obstacle to the consolidation of a new model of care that has as central to health promotion.

  16. Health care for the homeless: a partnership between a city and a school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Karen; Coast, Mary Jo; Kroh, Maura

    2010-12-01

    Although there is extant research on the homeless, less is available suggesting an innovative community partnership such as Project HOPE. This partnership provided baccalaureate nursing students with greater understanding of underserved populations and health care delivery systems, and encouraged their future work with marginalized populations upon graduation. Students collected descriptive information on the homeless population. Correlations were found among site placement: age, clothing and supplies given, wound care, referrals given, assessments, and season of the year. Student evaluations revealed paradigm shifts in attitudes and inspired advocacy toward this population. Through the descriptive information and qualitative comments, we gained insight on demographics, conditions observed, and interventions offered, which provided direction for quality improvement in curriculum design for the Community Health Nursing course, direction for future student groups working in shelters and with street outreach workers, and information useful to strengthening partnerships with local organizations working with the homeless population. PMID:20954573

  17. The process of community health nursing clinical clerkship: A grounded theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ildarabadi, Eshagh; Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi; Heydari, Abbas; Taghipour, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: The performance of the community health nurse depends on a combination of scientific and practical competencies acquired by educational experiences during the nursing course. Curriculum planners of nursing education need to understand nursing education to train professional and community-oriented nurses. The aim of this article is to explore the experiences of nursing students during their community health nursing clinical clerkship courses. Materials and Methods: A grounded theory approach was used to conduct this study. Twelve nursing students, 13 health-care staff members, and 10 nursing instructors were interviewed individually in 2011-2012. The interviews were tape-recorded and later transcribed verbatim. The transcriptions were analyzed using the method of Strauss and Corbin. Results: Ambivalence of motivation was the main category and included five subcategories: Professional identity, educational atmosphere, educational management, motivation-based approaches, and inadequate productivity. This paper presents the aspects of the community health nursing clerkship course from the viewpoint of students in areas such as the role of the community health nurse, attitude toward the course, medical orientation, prerequisite skills/knowledge, poor administrative planning, rotation of students, insufficient activity for students, passiveness, providing service to clients, responsibility, and inproductivity. These categories could explain the nature of the community health nursing clerkship of the Mashhad Faculty of Nursing and probably others in Iran. Conclusions: The findings revealed inadequate productivity of the community health nursing education; so, it is suggested to define a position for nurses in this setting and remove barriers and provide conditions for them to play more important roles in the promotion of community health. PMID:24554943

  18. International survey of occupational health nurses' roles in multidisciplinary teamwork in occupational health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Bonnie; Kono, Keiko; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Peurala, Marjatta; Radford, Jennifer; Staun, Julie

    2014-07-01

    Access to occupational health services for primary prevention and control of work-related injuries and illnesses by the global workforce is limited (World Health Organization [WHO], 2013). From the WHO survey of 121 (61%) participating countries, only one-third of the responding countries provided occupational health services to more than 30% of their workers (2013). How services are provided in these countries is dependent on legal requirements and regulations, population, workforce characteristics, and culture, as well as an understanding of the impact of workplace hazards and worker health needs. Around the world, many occupational health services are provided by occupational health nurses independently or in collaboration with other disciplines' professionals. These services may be health protection, health promotion, or both, and are designed to reduce health risks, support productivity, improve workers' quality of life, and be cost-effective. Rantanen (2004) stated that basic occupational health services must increase rather than decline, especially as work becomes more complex; workforces become more dynamic and mobile, creating new models of work-places; and jobs become more precarious and temporary. To better understand occupational health services provided by occupational health nurses globally and how decisions are made to provide these services, this study examined the scope of services provided by a sample of participating occupational health nurses from various countries. PMID:25000546

  19. Leadership Opportunities for Mental Health Nurses in the Field of Disaster Preparation, Response, and Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranse, Jamie; Hutton, Alison; Wilson, Rhonda; Usher, Kim

    2015-05-01

    Disasters occur internationally and are nondiscriminatory. The loss resulting from the destruction associated with disasters leads to the development of various levels of psychological trauma in survivors. Health teams provide assistance to survivors before, during and after disasters, and mental health nurses make an important contribution to these teams. However, the leadership role of mental health nurses in disaster situations has not been extensively explored in the literature. This article discusses aspects of mental health nursing leadership in preparation for, response to and recovery from disasters. In particular, recommendations are made to enhance the leadership of mental health nurses in the context of disasters. PMID:26091078

  20. Comparison of general health status and sleep quality between nurses with fixed working shifts and nurses with rotating working shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Ghaljeh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses are vulnerable to various sleep disorders because of the nature of their job. If nurses do not experience a good general health, they will not be able to do their job (patient care well. Materials and Method: We conducted a descriptive-comparative study in 180 nurses that were selected with the stratified sampling method who have been working in different work shift hours in teaching hospitals. We used PSQI and GHQ-28 questionnaire for collecting data.Results: The study results showed a statistically significant difference in sleep quality and general health of nurses based on two questionnaires (p=0.01; p=0.05 respectively. Conclusion: According to our findings we suggest fixed working shifts versus rotating one for nurses to reduce the side effects

  1. Training Needs Assessment for Leaders in Nursing Based on Comparison of Competency Models

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    Kvas Andreja

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The main purpose behind the formation of leadership competency models must be the improvement of leadership. A competency model should serve as one of the tools for selecting the most suitable leaders, appraising their work, assessing training needs and preparing programmes of functional and formal education. The objective of this research is to assess the training needs of leaders in health care. A comparison of leadership competency models between different professional groups should serve as one of the tools with which to assess the training needs of various levels of leaders. Design/Methodology/Approach: A descriptive study using a survey design was conducted on 141 nurse leaders in Slovenia. Respondents indicated to what extent each of 95 different behaviours was characteristic of a person at their leadership level. Results: The most important competence dimensions (groups of behaviours for leaders in health care are (1 at the first - top leadership level: strategic thinking, openness to change and responsibility; (2 for leaders at the second - middle leadership level: relations with co-workers, animation, resistance to stress; and (3 for leaders at the third leadership level: realisation skills, execution of procedures, communication. Training needs assessments were done for three leadership levels in nursing care. Conclusions: The greatest need for training of nurse leaders can be observed at the third leadership level. Special training programmes should be organised in the competency areas of realisation skills, execution of procedures, communication, education and ethics

  2. Frequent flyer business travelers. The role of the occupational health nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Olga S; Randolph, Susan A; Ostendorf, Judith S

    2005-03-01

    When managing frequent flyer business travelers, occupational health nurses focus on health promotion and health protection goals. The three types of prevention (i.e., primary, secondary, tertiary) follow a timeline beginning with complete prevention, and proceeding through and ending with management of a disease process. Occupational health nurses design and implement practice strategies based on this progression. Travel health nursing is rapidly expanding as the number of travelers, immunizations, and modes of transportation increase. Physicians focus on disease, industrial hygienists focus on hazard exposure, and safety professionals address occupational issues related to illnesses and injuries. Occupational health nurses are the professionals who focus on all three areas, in addition to health promotion and health protection. Frequent flyer business travelers have specific and complex needs that occupational health nurses are in a unique position to address. PMID:15789968

  3. Enabling professional development in mental health nursing: the role of clinical leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, G; Happell, B; Reid-Searl, K

    2015-10-01

    Clinical leadership is acknowledged as important to the nursing profession. While studies continue to identify its significance in contributing to positive outcomes for consumers, the role that clinical leadership has in enabling and supporting professional development in mental health nursing is poorly understood. This study utilized a grounded theory methodology to explore the characteristics clinicians consider important for clinical leadership and its significance for mental health nursing in day-to-day clinical practice. Individual face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with nurses working in mental health settings. Participants described the important role that clinical leaders play in enabling professional development of others through role modelling and clinical teaching. They describe how nurses, whom they perceive as clinical leaders, use role modelling and clinical teaching to influence the professional development of nursing staff and undergraduate nursing students. Attributes such as professionalism and honesty were seen, by participants, as enablers for clinical leaders in effectively and positively supporting the professional development of junior staff and undergraduate nurses in mental health nursing. This paper examines clinical leadership from the perspective of mental health nurses delivering care, and highlights the important role of clinical leaders in supporting professional development in mental health nursing. PMID:26010165

  4. Role of the registered nurse in primary health care: meeting health care needs in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolowitz, Janice; Speakman, Elizabeth; Wojnar, Danuta; Whelan, Ellen-Marie; Ulrich, Suzan; Hayes, Carolyn; Wood, Laura

    2015-01-01

    There is widespread interest in the redesign of primary health care practice models to increase access to quality health care. Registered nurses (RNs) are well positioned to assume direct care and leadership roles based on their understanding of patient, family, and system priorities. This project identified 16 exemplar primary health care practices that used RNs to the full extent of their scope of practice in team-based care. Interviews were conducted with practice representatives. RN activities were performed within three general contexts: episodic and preventive care, chronic disease management, and practice operations. RNs performed nine general functions in these contexts including telephone triage, assessment and documentation of health status, chronic illness case management, hospital transition management, delegated care for episodic illness, health coaching, medication reconciliation, staff supervision, and quality improvement leadership. These functions improved quality and efficiency and decreased cost. Implications for policy, practice, and RN education are considered. PMID:25261382

  5. Factors influencing mental health nurses' attitudes towards people with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chiu-Yueh; Lu, Huei-Lan; Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the factors influencing mental health nurses' attitudes towards people with mental illness. A descriptive correlation design was used. A sample of 180 Taiwanese mental health nurses was recruited from mental health-care settings. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, Pearson's product-moment correlation, Student's t-test, one-way anova, and a hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Negative attitudes were found among mental health nurses, especially with respect to individuals with substance abuse compared with those with schizophrenia and major depression. Mental health nurses who were older, had more clinical experiences in mental health care, and demonstrated greater empathy expressed more positive attitudes towards people with mental illness. Mental health nurses working at acute psychiatric units demonstrated more negative attitudes towards mental illness compared with those working in psychiatric rehabilitation units and outpatient clinics or community psychiatric rehabilitation centres. Particularly, length of mental health nursing practice and empathy significantly accounted for mental health nurses' attitudes towards mental illness. Understanding nurses' attitudes and their correlates towards people with mental illness is critical to deliver effective mental health nursing care. PMID:25963120

  6. School Nurses' Descriptions of Concerns Arising during Pupils' Health Check-Ups: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poutiainen, Hannele; Holopainen, Arja; Hakulinen-Viitanen, Tuovi; Laatikainen, Tiina

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the concerns and modes of action of Finnish school nurses during pupils' health check-ups. Methods: Focus group interviews with 17 school nurses were performed in 2011 and again in 2013. Data were analysed using inductive content analysis. Results: School nurses' concerns were mostly associated with the psychosocial…

  7. Community health nursing, wound care, and...ethics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Sue Ellen

    2003-09-01

    Because of changing demographics and other factors, patients receiving care for wounds, ostomies, or incontinence are being referred in increasing numbers to community health nursing organizations for initial or continued care. As home-based wound care becomes big business, little discussion is being focused on the moral and ethical issues likely to arise in the high-tech home setting. Progressively more complex and expensive home care relies on family members to take on complicated care regimens in the face of decreasing numbers of allowable skilled nursing home visits. A framework and a principle-based theory for reflection on the character and content of moral and ethical conflicts are provided to encourage informed and competent care of patients in the home. Common moral and ethical conflicts for WOC nurses in the United States are presented. These conflicts include issues of wound care supply procurement; use of documentation to maximize care or profit; problems of quality, care consistency, and caregiver consent; and dilemmas of tiered health care options. The advantages of a framework to address ethical conflicts are discussed. PMID:14560284

  8. ADHERENCIA DE LAS ENFERMERAS/OS A UTILIZAR UN MODELO TEÓRICO COMO BASE DE LA VALORACIÓN DE ENFERMERÍA / ADHERENCE OF NURSES TOWARD USING A NURSING MODEL AS A GUIDELINE FOR NURSING ASSESSMENT

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    JUAN, REYES LUNA; PATRICIA, JARA CONCHA; JOSE M, MERINO ESCOBAR.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudio cuasiexperimental que describe la adherencia de enfermeras hospitalarias a utilizar un modelo teórico como base de la valoración de enfermería, medida por la actitud y conducta hacia: valoración de enfermería, planificación del cuidado, conocimiento de modelos teóricos e importancia a realiz [...] ar la valoración de enfermería en base aun modelo teórico. Una vez que el grupo experimental se capacitó en relación a modelos y teorías de enfemería y participó activamente en la elaboración de un instrumento de valoración, la adherencia se midió a través de las escalas de Actitud y de Conducta en Salud de Miller, adaptadas por los autores, y por la evidencia escrita en los registros. Para el análisis de los datos se usó la diferencia en diferencia mediante t de Student. Los resultados muestran que la adherencia medida por la actitud fue aceptada con una asociación estadística significativa; en cambio la adherencia medida por la conducta, no mostró diferencias significativas, resultados que fueron respaldados por la evidencia en los registros de enfermería de sólo un 11% de adherencia. Se concluye que los profesionales de enfermería, en términos de conductas adherentes, no evidenciaron cambios significativos antes y después del tratamiento experimental, pero se obtuvieron resultados positivos en términos cognitivos, ya que manifestó una actitud adherente a trabajar con un modelo teórico lo que es muy positivo para la profesión y es, por tanto, la motivación necesaria para lograr los cambios en el nuevo marco de la gestión del cuidado en enfermería Abstract in english This quasi-experimental research study describes the adherence of hospital nurses toward using a nursing model as a guideline for nursing assessment. Adherence was measured according to nurses' attitude and behavior toward nursing assessment, nursing care plan, nurses' knowledge of nursing models, a [...] nd the significance of performing their nursing assessment based on a theoretical model. Once the experimental group received training about nursing theories and models and actively participated in constructing an assessment tool, adherence was measured according to the Miller's Health Attitude Scale and Miller's Behaviour Scale both revised and adapted by the authors. Evidence of adherence was also sought in nursing notes from patients'charts. For data analysis the t test difference in difference was used. Results showed that adherence measured by attitude was statistically significant. On the other hand, no significant differences were observed when adherence was measured according to the behaviour scale. These findings were supported by nurses' notes where little adherence was found. We conclude that in terms of adherence behaviour, nurses did not show significant changes after the initial training. Significant findings were found in terms of nurses' attitude toward working with a nursing model as they showed a tendency to adhere to a model in the attitude scale. The latter is very significant for the nursing profession and it motivates us to continue to enact the current nursing reform focused on nursing care management

  9. Child health nurses in the Solomon Islands: lessons for the Pacific and other developing countries

    OpenAIRE

    Colquhoun Samantha; Ogaoga Divi; Tamou Mathias; Nasi Titus; Subhi Rami; Duke Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To understand the roles of nurses with advanced training in paediatrics in the Solomon Islands, and the importance of these roles to child health. To understand how adequately equipped child health nurses feel for these roles, to identify the training needs, difficulties and future opportunities. Design Semi-structured interviews. Settings Tertiary hospital, district hospitals and health clinics in the Solomon Islands. Participants Twenty-one paediatric nurses were intervi...

  10. Genetic and Genomic Public Health Strategies: Imperatives for Neonatal Nursing Genetic Competency

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Pamela S Holtzclaw

    2002-01-01

    Genetics and genomics are emerging as the central science for 21st century health care. Proficient nursing care incorporates this central science. Nursing genetic competency includes anticipating future demands spurred by knowledge advancement. Three emerging public health areas that call for future neonatal nursing genetic competency development will be discussed here: increasing emphasis on neonatal family health histories, population genetic biobanking, and family genetic advocacy. Neonata...

  11. Knowledge of School Nurses in the U.K. regarding Sexual Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westwood, Jo; Mullan, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    In the U.K., a current government health strategy indicates that school nurses should be key contributors to sexual health education because they have access to the school-age population. However, there appears to be little research that investigates whether school nurses are the most appropriate health care professionals or indeed have sufficient…

  12. Navajo nation public health nurses inspire thoughts on health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Kathy S

    2012-01-01

    The wisdom and experience of pubic health nurses serving on a Navajo Reservation, who work far from the typical hospital setting, may well hold some of the keys to how we can successfully plan for and navigate the future of our shifting health care system. As more of the nursing workforce moves outside the walls of the hospital, competencies in autonomy, clinical judgment, decision making, and communication will increase in importance. long with safety and quality implications, this may also influence changes in nursing education, job requirements, hiring, and measuring performance. In addition, there may be implications around how new nurses are oriented and how they get the experience needed to function in more independent roles. Within their routine days, the conditions they work in, the situations they face, and the many ways public health nurses find to meet the needs of the people they serve, is a wealth of knowledge that may well translate into solutions for some of the challenges our nation's health care system is facing. PMID:22970554

  13. Role of Health Beliefs, Somatization Tendency and Mental Health on Low Back Pain among Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Sadeghian

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Low back pain is one of the widespread problems among nurses which can cause disability, absenteeism, work restriction, and negative economic impacts. This study aimed at determining the role of health beliefs, somatization tendency and mental health on back pain among nurses. Methods: The present research was a cross sectional study among 246 nursing personnel (all nurses and nurse aids working in Shahrood hospitals in 2008. CPUID questionnaire was used to collect data. Chi-square test, multiple logistic regressions and Mann Whitney test for analysis were performed. Results: The mean age of participants was 33.7 ± 0.2 yrs, and the mean work hours per day were 47.5 ± 8 hours. 69% of them had more than 5 years work experience. 59% (n=145 of the study population reported back pain in previous 12 months. Significant relationships were found between work experience, working with hands above shoulder height, Familiarity with people suffering from back pain outside of work environment, somatisation tendency, health beliefs P>0.05.Conclusion: Results indicated that in addition to physical work related risk factors, health beliefs and somatisation tendency can be risk factors for back pain which confirms results of similar studies in other countries.

  14. Nurse migration: a challenge for the profession and health-care systems

    OpenAIRE

    Habermann, Monika; Stagge, Maya

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction and questions of exploration In a first step this paper outlines the global context of and international influences on nurse migration. Liberalization of health markets is identified as a trigger point steering movements of nurses globally. Facts and figures concerning nurse migration are highlighted in a second section focusing on developments in the USA and UK, which are recruiting nurses from Europe and overseas on a large scale, ...

  15. Extent of East-African Nurse Leaders’ Participation in Health Policy Development

    OpenAIRE

    N. Shariff; E Potgieter

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports part of a bigger study whose aim was to develop an empowerment model that could be used to enhance nurse leaders' participation in health policy development. A Delphi survey was applied which included the following criteria: expert panelists, iterative rounds, statistical analysis, and consensus building. The expert panelists were purposively selected and included national nurse leaders in leadership positions at the nursing professional associations, nursing regulatory bod...

  16. The need to include obstetric nurses in prenatal care visits in the public health system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Aparecida Lagrosa Garcia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate, with a qualitative approach, the role of Obstetric Nurses at the primary level of care given to women’s health as a vital component of the multidisciplinary team, which today is fundamental for providing care, prevention as well as health education and promotion, especially in programs whose activities are geared towards primary care of pregnant, parturient, and puerpera women. Methods: Brazilian laws and the determinations of Nursing Councils in reference to the activities of the obstetric nurse were researched, including the nurse’s responsibilities and limits. The bibliographic search was conducted in health-related journals, lay publications, and the Internet. Results: The conflicts between professional physicians and nurses were discussed. Conclusions: It was concluded that the activities of the nurse, conducting low-risk prenatal clinical visits in the basic healthcare network, has legal and ethical support and provides true benefit to the clients.

  17. Whistleblower protection for nurses and other health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Melinda; Garrahan, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    Because most employees in the United States, including health care professionals, are employed "at will" (which means their employment can be terminated for any reason or no reason, as long as the reason isn't illegal), retaliatory actions by employers toward employees who speak out (i.e., blow the whistle) are not uncommon. Additionally, the law protecting whistleblowing employees varies greatly depending on the state where the employee works or if he or she works for the federal government. This article examines when and under what conditions a nurse or other health care professional may be protected from having an adverse employment action taken against him or her for reporting such issues as patient safety violations or health care fraud. The authors offer issues a nurse or other health care professional should consider before making the decision to blow the whistle. Finally, the authors also discuss the remedies such as reinstatement, back pay, or other compensatory mechanisms that may be available to employees terminated for reporting wrongdoing. PMID:16317841

  18. Updating the definition and role of public health nursing to advance and guide the specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekemeier, Betty; Walker Linderman, Tessa; Kneipp, Shawn; Zahner, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    National changes in the context for public health services are influencing the nature of public health nursing practice. Despite this, the document that defines public health nursing as a specialty--The Definition and Role of Public Health Nursing--has remained in wide use since its publication in 1996 without a review or update. With support from the American Public Health Association (APHA) Public Health Nursing Section, a national Task Force, was formed in November 2012 to update the definition of public health nursing, using processes that reflected deliberative democratic principles. A yearlong process was employed that included a modified Delphi technique and various modes of engagement such as online discussion boards, questionnaires, and public comment to review. The resulting 2013 document consisted of a reaffirmation of the one-sentence 1996 definition, while updating supporting documentation to align with the current social, economic, political, and health care context. The 2013 document was strongly endorsed by vote of the APHA Public Health Nursing Section elected leadership. The 2013 definition and document affirm the relevance of a population-focused definition of public health nursing to complex systems addressed in current practice and articulate critical roles of public health nurses (PHN) in these settings. PMID:25284433

  19. Avaliação de competências de médicos e enfermeiros das Equipes de Saúde da Família da Região Norte do Brasil / Assessment of competence of physicians and nurses of the Family Health Team in the Northern Region of Brazil

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Hesio, Cordeiro; Valéria Ferreira, Romano; Elaine Franco dos, Santos; Amílcar, Ferrari; Eliane, Fernandes; Telma Ruth, Pereira; Ana Tereza da Silva, Pereira.

    Full Text Available Trata-se de um estudo quantitativo, realizado com base na análise de questionários aplicados a médicos e enfermeiros dos Estados do Maranhão, Tocantins, Pará e Amapá, no ano de 2006. A pesquisa é parte integrante do Projeto de Expansão do Programa de Saúde da Família (PROESF), subsidiado pela Fundaç [...] ão Cesgranrio. Foram respondidos 346 questionários, sendo 160 por médicos e 186 por enfermeiros. Dentre os resultados encontrados, está o fato de que médicos e enfermeiros que trabalham na Saúde da Família da Região Norte estabelecem um perfil profissional de competência onde há necessidades específicas de educação permanente. Conclui-se, portanto, que a mera adesão à Estratégia de Saúde da Família não garante por si só a dinâmica e o sucesso das ações voltadas à reorganização da rede, à melhoria da gestão e aperfeiçoamento da gerência do SUS. Além disso, a capacitação profissional é precária frente à demanda de formação exigida. Abstract in english In 2006, a quantitative study was accomplished, based on the analysis of questionnaires, applied to both physicians and nurses in the States of Maranhão, Tocantins, Pará and Amapá. The research is part of the Family Health Expansion Project (PROESF), subsided by the Health Ministry and conducted by [...] the Cesgranrio Foundation. Competences were analyzed and grouped according to the parameters of WONCA Europe (European Society of Family Medicine), and supported by the World Health Organization (WHO, WONCA, 2002). A total of 346 questionnaires were answered - 160 by physicians and 186 by male/female nurses. The questionnaire comprised the same questions to physicians and nurses and, after computing data, the results in both groups were quite similar, what made us infer that there is a nucleus of shared competences. As a result, it is clear that both physicians and nurses working with Family Health in this region establish a personal competence profile that shows specific needs in continuing education. As a conclusion, the mere compliance with Family Health strategies does not assure the dynamics and success of actions related to network re-organization and improvement of SUS management. Furthermore, professional capacity is poor, as compared to the exigencies of the required formation.

  20. The journey of positioning self as both mental health nurse and qualitative researcher: a critical reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunero, S J; Jeon, Y H; Foster, K

    2015-09-01

    This paper discusses the development of a mental health nurse clinician to a mental health nurse researcher. Understanding the theoretical and professional drives that shape mental health nurses clinical practice and how that links to becoming a researcher is discussed. Mental health nurses who conduct research have to often move between their clinical roles and that of the researcher, doing this safely using a reflective supervision approach enables the nurse to conduct the research from a stronger professional and ethical standpoint. The intention of the paper is to encourage mental health nurses to engage in research and development. Shifting between the positions of a mental health nurse clinician and a qualitative researcher has some parallels to the processes in the nurse-service user relationship. This paper addresses this development from practitioner to researcher in one mental health nurse's journey through a PhD study using constructivist grounded theory. The paper examines theoretical and professional drives that have shaped my clinical practice and the role of the researcher in constructivist grounded theory, the notion of the researcher shifting between insider and outsider status, and the importance of reflexivity in conducting research. These influences will be discussed in the context of the development of a constructivist grounded theory study of the delivery of health care to service users with a mental illness in general hospital wards. PMID:26234189

  1. Burnout in health-care professionals during reorganizations and downsizing. A cohort study in nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall-Lord Marie-Louise

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burnout is a psychological reaction triggered by interaction between personal characteristics and stress factors. Reorganizations and downsizing with increased workload imply stress for health-care professionals. This is a study of burnout in nurses during a period with two comprehensive reorganizations. Methods In this quasi-experimental retrospective cohort study, burnout was assessed in nurses with long work experience in three surveys during a 30 months' period with two comprehensive reorganizations and downsizing of a hospital unit with mostly seriously ill patients with cancer. Burnout was measured with Bergen Burnout Indicator (BBI at each survey, and "Sense of Coherence" (SOC with Antonovsky's questionnaire at the last survey. Results One man and 45 women aged 30 to 65 years were invited to the surveys. There was a significant increase in burnout during the study period, the mean increase in BBI-score was 12.5 pr year (p Conclusions There was a significant development of burnout in a group of nurses during a period with two reorganizations and downsizing. Burnout was associated with low SOC. Working with seriously ill patients with cancer has probably made the nurses exceptionally vulnerable to the stress and workload related to the reorganizations.

  2. Enfermería como profesión / Nursing assessed as a profession

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Mónica, Burgos Moreno; Tatiana, Paravic Klijn.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo pretende presentar a enfermería desde el concepto de profesión, con el propósito de argumentar si cumple con los criterios para ser considerada en propiedad como tal. Para ello es necesario considerar la evolución histórica del concepto profesión en enfermería, asociado a los cuidados [...] de salud y la instrucción formal impartida a partir de Florence Nightingale. El análisis de enfermería como profesión es realizado según las características señaladas por Ellis y Hartley, las que consideran aspectos tales como; conocimientos, metodología, nivel educacional, autonomía, ética, contribución social y compensación. Se puede concluir que enfermería es una profesión joven, y que existen fundamentados elementos para argumentar, que se dispone de las herramientas necesarias para seguir desarrollándose. Abstract in english This article aims to introduce the concept of nursing as a profession in order to argue whether it meets the criteria to be considered as such. It is therefore necessary to take into account the historical evolution of the professional concept in nursing, which is associated with health care and the [...] formal instruction that has been taught since the time of Florence Nightingale. Nursing as a profession is analyzed according to the characteristics identified by Ellis and Hartley, including issues such as: knowledge, methodology, education level, autonomy, ethics, social contribution, and compensation. It can be concluded that nursing is a young profession and there are grounds to argue that there are tools available to further develop this occupation.

  3. Enfermería como profesión Nursing assessed as a profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Burgos Moreno

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo pretende presentar a enfermería desde el concepto de profesión, con el propósito de argumentar si cumple con los criterios para ser considerada en propiedad como tal. Para ello es necesario considerar la evolución histórica del concepto profesión en enfermería, asociado a los cuidados de salud y la instrucción formal impartida a partir de Florence Nightingale. El análisis de enfermería como profesión es realizado según las características señaladas por Ellis y Hartley, las que consideran aspectos tales como; conocimientos, metodología, nivel educacional, autonomía, ética, contribución social y compensación. Se puede concluir que enfermería es una profesión joven, y que existen fundamentados elementos para argumentar, que se dispone de las herramientas necesarias para seguir desarrollándose.This article aims to introduce the concept of nursing as a profession in order to argue whether it meets the criteria to be considered as such. It is therefore necessary to take into account the historical evolution of the professional concept in nursing, which is associated with health care and the formal instruction that has been taught since the time of Florence Nightingale. Nursing as a profession is analyzed according to the characteristics identified by Ellis and Hartley, including issues such as: knowledge, methodology, education level, autonomy, ethics, social contribution, and compensation. It can be concluded that nursing is a young profession and there are grounds to argue that there are tools available to further develop this occupation.

  4. Determinants of the intention of elementary school nurses to adopt a redefined role in health promotion at school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godin Gaston

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quest for greater efficiency in the provision of primary healthcare services and the implementation of a "health-promoting school" approach encourage the optimal redefinition of the role of school nurses. School nurses are viewed as professionals who might be significant actors in the promotion of youth health. The aim of this study was to identify the determinants of the intention of elementary school nurses to adopt a new health-promotion role as a strategic option for the health-promoting school. Methods This study was based on an extended version of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB. A total of 251 respondents (response rate of 70% from 42 school health programs across the Province of Québec completed a mail survey regarding their intention to adopt the proposed health-promotion role. Multiple hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between key independent variables and intention. A discriminant analysis of the beliefs was performed to identify the main targets of action. Results A total of 73% of respondents expressed a positive intention to accept to play the proposed role. The main predictors were perceived behavioural control (? = 0.36, moral norm (? = 0.27, attitude (? = 0.24, and subjective norm (? = 0.21 (ps Conclusions Results suggest that leadership is a skill that should be addressed to increase the ability of school nurses to assume the proposed role. Findings also indicate that public health administrators need to ensure adequate nurse staffing in the schools in order to increase the proportion of nurses willing to play such a role and avoid burnout among these human resources.

  5. Involving patients in the assessment of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Deborah; Clark, Liz

    2014-07-29

    Enabling patients, service users and carers to participate in the education of students in the healthcare sector is widely espoused, both in the literature and by professional regulatory bodies. This article focuses on one aspect of this: the issue of patient involvement in the assessment of nursing students in the practice setting. The challenges and complexities that may arise are explored, and recommendations are made for further work in this area. PMID:25052675

  6. Selected correlates of job performance of community health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerner, B L

    1981-01-01

    Using a study sample of 32 community health nurses employed by the Visiting Nurse Association of Hartford, Inc., the relationship of selected attribute and environmental variables was studied, and a quantitative rating of the nurses' job performances was developed. A nonhierarchical stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between job performance and the independent variables: age, education, work experience, five state board licensure examinations, job satisfaction, and leadership behavior. A principal component analysis with Varimax rotation was used to reduce the independent variables to three components: state board examinations, biographical information, and attitude toward the work environment. The raw score model produced a larger multiple correlation (p < .05) than the reduced rank model in the regression analyses. This result was due, in part, to the small sample size in relation to the number of independent variables for the raw score model. However, the rank reduction of the raw scores captured only 38 percent of the variation among the items. PMID:6906016

  7. Nursing care at new mental health services - experience report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahissa Frota Cavalcante

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The nursing attendance in mental health has been changing your paradigm, such as psychiatric remodeling and the new role assumed by the nurses. This study aims to describe the activities developed for a group of nursing academics during the practical process of teaching-learning applied at patients with mental disease in therapeutic phase. It is an experience report developed at a Psychosocial Support Center located at the city of Fortaleza-Ceará in the period held from September to November of 2004. The activities implemented by the academics were the group of community therapy, the wait room group and the therapeutic relationship. The community therapy and the therapeutic relationship obtained larger success due to the deep interaction between patients and academics, in addiction to the confort and sence of valuable the activities caused them. The development of the experience revealed itself important once it provided the mutual learning, obtaining satisfactory results and certainty that these activities are susceptible of implementation in other services.

  8. Quality of work life among primary health care nurses in the Jazan region, Saudi Arabia: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Almalki Mohammed J; FitzGerald Gerry; Clark Michele

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Quality of work life (QWL) is defined as the extent to which an employee is satisfied with personal and working needs through participating in the workplace while achieving the goals of the organization. QWL has been found to influence the commitment and productivity of employees in health care organizations, as well as in other industries. However, reliable information on the QWL of primary health care (PHC) nurses is limited. The purpose of this study was to assess the Q...

  9. Children's bone health, calcium and vitamin D--how much do nurses and health visitors know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garton, Lynne

    2008-01-01

    Two focus groups of health visitors, practice nurses and community nursery nurses were held to find out how much health visitors and nurses know about children's bone nutrition, and whether they are able to identify dietary sources of these nutrients. Results showed that these professionals spend a significant part of their time giving nutritional advice about children and young people and answering questions on a range of dietary matters. They were well informed about the importance for bone health of calcium, vitamin D, exercise and a healthy, balanced diet. The biggest misconception was that dairy products in the UK contain vitamin D. Most of the professionals knew that bone strength develops quickly during childhood, and some that it does so in adolescence but few were aware that 90% of the full genetic potential for bone strength is achieved before adulthood. The groups reported confusion over the Government's initiatives for vitamin D supplements, and lack of guidance from Primary Care Trusts on making Healthy Start vitamins available at clinics for mothers and babies. Overall, health visitors and nurses have a good knowledge of bone health but there are gaps and more educational resources are needed, including on dietary sources of vitamin D. The Government needs to give clear guidelines about its initiatives for vitamin D supplements for mothers and children aged under five years. It is disappointing that the Dairy Council's 3-a-Day message on meeting essential calcium needs through three daily servings of dairy foods has not got through. PMID:18973090

  10. Work Related Stress, Burnout, Job Satisfaction and General Health of Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Khamisa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate. Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Staff issues are best associated with burnout as well as job satisfaction. Burnout explained the highest amount of variance in mental health of nurses. These are known to compromise productivity and performance, as well as affect the quality of patient care. Issues, such as security risks in the workplace, affect job satisfaction and health of nurses. Although this is more salient to developing contexts it is important in developing strategies and intervention programs towards improving nurse and patient related outcomes.

  11. Work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamisa, Natasha; Oldenburg, Brian; Peltzer, Karl; Ilic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate). Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Staff issues are best associated with burnout as well as job satisfaction. Burnout explained the highest amount of variance in mental health of nurses. These are known to compromise productivity and performance, as well as affect the quality of patient care. Issues, such as security risks in the workplace, affect job satisfaction and health of nurses. Although this is more salient to developing contexts it is important in developing strategies and intervention programs towards improving nurse and patient related outcomes. PMID:25588157

  12. Use of Electronic Health-Related Datasets in Nursing and Health-Related Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawajfah, Omar M; Aloush, Sami; Hewitt, Jeanne Beauchamp

    2015-07-01

    Datasets of gigabyte size are common in medical sciences. There is increasing consensus that significant untapped knowledge lies hidden in these large datasets. This review article aims to discuss Electronic Health-Related Datasets (EHRDs) in terms of types, features, advantages, limitations, and possible use in nursing and health-related research. Major scientific databases, MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, and Scopus, were searched for studies or review articles regarding using EHRDs in research. A total number of 442 articles were located. After application of study inclusion criteria, 113 articles were included in the final review. EHRDs were categorized into Electronic Administrative Health-Related Datasets and Electronic Clinical Health-Related Datasets. Subcategories of each major category were identified. EHRDs are invaluable assets for nursing the health-related research. Advanced research skills such as using analytical softwares, advanced statistical procedures, dealing with missing data and missing variables will maximize the efficient utilization of EHRDs in research. PMID:25421544

  13. Emotional Intelligence: A Critical Evaluation of the Literature with Implications for Mental Health Nursing Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Kimberly R; Mabry, Jennifer Lynn; Mixer, Sandra J

    2015-05-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is necessary for the development of interpersonal and professional competence in nurses. We argue that the concept of emotional intelligence has particular relevance for mental health nursing leadership. In this critique, we examine the recent empirical evidence (2010-2014) related to emotional intelligence, in general, and nursing, specifically. Correlations between emotional intelligence and better overall health, increased work satisfaction, higher spiritual well-being, and decreased risk of job burnout are noted. We offer suggestions for mental health nurse leaders in developing successful project management teams and improving retention of current leaders. We also provide suggestions for future research. PMID:26091240

  14. Gamification: An Innovative Teaching-Learning Strategy for the Digital Nursing Students in a Community Health Nursing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-Black, Crystal; Merrill, Earline B; Konzelman, Lois; Williams, Tammie T; Hart, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Serious games have "re-emerged" as innovative teaching-learning strategies that researchers have shown to be effective in improving student learning outcomes. "Serious games" refer to games that are driven by educational goals, not entertainment. The use of serious games as part of the teaching-learning experience in nursing education fits into the philosophy and strategies of active learning. The "digital" nursing student needs engagement, stimulation, realism, and entertainment not more readings and Powerpoint supplements in the classroom to support learning. Nursing faculty at a mid-Atlantic Historical Black College and University introduced "serious gaming" technology into a Community Health Nursing course by using two web-based gamed simulations, Outbreak at WatersEdge: A Public Health Discovery Game, and EnviroRisk. This innovation proved to be effective in reinforcing learning and improving student learning outcomes. PMID:26665503

  15. Service user involvement in undergraduate mental health nursing in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneebeli, Carole; O'Brien, Anthony; Lampshire, Debra; Hamer, Helen P

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes a service user role in the mental health component of an undergraduate nursing programme in New Zealand. The paper provides a background to mental health nursing education in New Zealand and discusses the implications of recent reforms in the mental health sector. The undergraduate nursing programme at the University of Auckland has a strong commitment to service user involvement. The programme aims to educate nurses to be responsive and skillful in meeting the mental health needs of service users in all areas of the health sector and to present mental health nursing as an attractive option for nurses upon graduation. We outline the mental health component of the programme, with an emphasis on the development of the service user role. In the second half of the paper, we present a summary of responses to a student satisfaction questionnaire. The responses indicate that the service user role is an important element of the programme and is well received by a substantial proportion of students. We consider the implications for nursing education and for recruitment into mental health nursing. Finally, we discuss some issues related to service user involvement in the development of new models of mental health service delivery. PMID:20074201

  16. Managing parental groups during early childhood: New challenges faced by Swedish child health-care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Åsa; Pia, Lundqvist; Eva, Drevenhorn; Inger, Hallström

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe child health centre (CHC) nurses' views of managing parental groups during early childhood. All 311 CHC nurses working within the Swedish CHC system in one county were asked to complete a web-based questionnaire. Findings showed that although the CHC nurses were experienced, several found group leadership challenging and difficult. The need for specialized groups for young parents, single parents and parents whose first language was not Swedish was identified by 57% of the nurses. The CHC nurses found the participation of fathers in their parental groups to be low (an estimate of 10-20%), and 30% of the nurses made special efforts to make the fathers participate. Education in group dynamics and group leadership can strengthen CHC nurses in managing parental groups. It is recommended that specialized parental groups are organized by a few family centres so CHC nurses can develop their skill in managing such groups. PMID:24298189

  17. Determinants of the use of specialist mental health services by nursing home residents.

    OpenAIRE

    Shea, D G; Streit, A. (Arnold); Smyer, M A

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study examines the effects of resident and facility characteristics on the probability of nursing home residents receiving treatment by mental health professionals. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING. The study uses data from the Institutional Population Component of the 1987 National Medical Expenditure Survey, a secondary data source containing data on 3,350 nursing home residents living in 810 nursing homes as of January 1, 1987. STUDY DESIGN. Andersen's health services use model (...

  18. Work Related Stress, Burnout, Job Satisfaction and General Health of Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Khamisa, Natasha; Oldenburg, Brian; Peltzer, Karl; Ilic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate). Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was us...

  19. Job satisfaction of nurses in Ministry of Health Hospitals in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    OpenAIRE

    Hanan A. Al-Ahmadi

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine the magnitude and determinants of job satisfaction in nurses working in Ministry of Health hospitals Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. METHODS A modified version of the Minnesota Job Satisfaction Questionnaire is used to survey 500 nurses in 9 Ministry of Health hospitals in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Three hundred and sixty six nurses from different nationalities responded to the questionnaire (response rate 73%). Data analysis consisted of descriptive sta...

  20. Global health diplomacy: an integrative review of the literature and implications for nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Anita; Wilson, Lynda; Stanhope, Marcia; Hatcher, Barbara; Hattar, Marianne; Hilfinger Messias, Deanne K; Powell, Dorothy

    2013-01-01

    The increasing interconnectedness of the world and the factors that affect health lay the foundation for the evolving practice of global health diplomacy. There has been limited discussion in the nursing literature about the concept of global health diplomacy or the role of nurses in such initiatives. A discussion of this concept is presented here by the members of a Task Force on Global Health Diplomacy of the American Academy of Nursing Expert Panel on Global Nursing and Health (AAN EPGNH). The purpose of this article is to present an integrative review of literature on the concept of global health diplomacy and to identify implications of this emerging field for nursing education, practice, and research. The steps proposed by Whittemore and Knafl (2005) were adapted and applied to the integrative review of theoretical and descriptive articles about the concept of global health diplomacy. This review included an analysis of the historical background, definition, and challenges of global health diplomacy and suggestions about the preparation of global health diplomats. The article concludes with a discussion of implications for nursing practice, education, and research. The Task Force endorses the definition of global health diplomacy proposed by Adams, Novotny, and Leslie (2008) but recommends that further dialogue and research is necessary to identify opportunities and educational requirements for nurses to contribute to the emerging field of global health diplomacy. PMID:22999856

  1. School Nursing Documentation: Knowledge, Attitude, and Barriers to Using Standardized Nursing Languages and Current Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yearous, Sharon Kay Guthrie

    2011-01-01

    The independent, complex role of a school nurse requires accurate documentation of assessments, interventions, and outcomes. Consistent documentation by all school nurses is crucial to study the impact of nursing interventions on children's health and success in school. While standardized nursing languages are available, the actual use of…

  2. The practice of physicians and nurses in the Brazilian Family Health Programme – evidences of change in the delivery health care model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Ana M

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The article analyzes the practice of physicians and nurses working on the Family Health Programme (Programa de Saúde da Família or PSF, in Portuguese. A questionnaire was used to assess the evidences of assimilation of the new values and care principles proposed by the programme. The results showed that a great number of professionals seem to have incorporated the practice of home visits, health education actions and planning of the teams' work agenda to their routine labour activities.

  3. Assessing outcomes of a study abroad course for nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Linda J; Garcia, Alexandra A

    2012-01-01

    There is little debate about the importance of preparing nursing graduates to provide culturally sensitive care to an increasingly diverse society. However, it is difficult for nurse educators to fit learning experiences that help students develop cultural competence into already full programs and create mechanisms to evaluate the results. This article describes a study to assess the impact of a study abroad program on developing cultural competence, including cultural awareness, sensitivity, knowledge, and skills. Results from the Cultural Awareness Survey, reflective journals, and interviews illustrate how the study abroad experience influenced the development of components of cultural competence and might influence clinical practice. Results suggest effective teaching strategies to assist students in becoming culturally competent are experiential in nature and include role modeling, reflective activities, and group discussion. PMID:22616405

  4. Quality assessment in nursing home facilities: measuring customer satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostyn, M M; Race, K E; Seibert, J H; Johnson, M

    2000-01-01

    A national study designed to assess the reliability and validity of a nursing home customer satisfaction survey is summarized. One hundred fifty-nine facilities participated, each responsible for the distribution and collection of 200 questionnaires randomly sent to the home of the resident's responsible party. A total of 9053 completed questionnaires were returned, for an average adjusted response rate of 53%. The factor analysis identified 4 scales: Comfort and Cleanliness, Nursing, Food Services, and Facility Care and Services, each with high reliability. Based on a multiple regression analysis, the scales were shown to have good criterion-related validity, accounting for 64% of the variance in overall quality ratings. Comparisons based on select characteristics indicated significantly different satisfaction ratings among facilities. The results are interpreted as providing evidence for the construct validity of a multidimensional customer satisfaction scale with measured reliability and criterion-related validity. Moreover, the scale can be used to differentiate satisfaction levels among facilities. PMID:10763218

  5. Determinants of primary care nurses' intention to adopt an electronic health record in their clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Genevieve; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Sanderson, Duncan

    2012-09-01

    A provincial electronic health record is being developed in the Province of Quebec (and in all other provinces in Canada), and authorities hope that it will enable a safer and more efficient healthcare system for citizens. However, the expected benefits can occur only if healthcare professionals, including nurses, adopt this technology. Although attention to the use of the electronic health record by nurses is growing, better understanding of nurses' intention to use an electronic health record is needed and could help managers to better plan its implementation. This study examined the factors that influence primary care nurses' intention to adopt the provincial electronic health record, since intention influences electronic health record use and implementation success. Using a modified version of Ajzen's Theory of Planned Theory of Planned Behavior, a questionnaire was developed and pretested. Questionnaires were distributed to 199 primary care nurses. Multiple hierarchical regression indicated that the Theory of Planned Behavior variables explained 58% of the variance in nurses' intention to adopt an electronic health record. The strong intention to adopt the electronic health record is mainly determined by perceived behavioral control, normative beliefs, and attitudes. The implications of the study are that healthcare managers could facilitate adoption of an electronic health record by strengthening nurses' intention to adopt the electronic health record, which in turn can be influenced through interventions oriented toward the belief that using an electronic health record will improve the quality of patient care. PMID:22592453

  6. Intent to migrate among nursing students in Uganda: Measures of the brain drain in the next generation of health professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Luboga Sam; Zuyderduin Anneke; Nderitu Esther; Ropers Steven; Nguyen Lisa; Hagopian Amy

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background There is significant concern about the worldwide migration of nursing professionals from low-income countries to rich ones, as nurses are lured to fill the large number of vacancies in upper-income countries. This study explores the views of nursing students in Uganda to assess their views on practice options and their intentions to migrate. Methods Anonymous questionnaires were distributed to nursing students at the Makerere Nursing School and Aga Khan University Nursing ...

  7. Creating archetypes for patient assessment with nurses to facilitate shared patient centred care in the older person

    OpenAIRE

    Hussey, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    The process of what information is captured in documenting patient care assessment and how it is summarised, communicated and interpreted by nurses across different healthcare services is the main focus of this thesis. Currently in Ireland, systems within the domain of healthcare are undergoing transformation. Existing practices where health information is collected at one local health organisation level and often duplicated across differing services will not support the strategic goals of th...

  8. Portfolio assessment and evaluation: Implications and guidelines for clinical nursing education

    OpenAIRE

    M.M. Chabeli

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of Outcomes-Based Education in South Africa, the quality of nursing education is debatable, especially with regard to the assessment and evaluation of clinical nursing education, which is complex and renders the validity and reliability of the methods used questionable. This paper seeks to explore and describe the use of portfolio assessment and evaluation, its implications and guidelines for its effective use in nursing education. Firstly, the concepts of assessment, evaluati...

  9. Using Social Determinants of Health to Link Health Workforce Diversity, Care Quality and Access, and Health Disparities to Achieve Health Equity in Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Shanita D.; Hansen, Kristen; Smithey, Marian; Burnley, Josepha; Koplitz, Michelle; Koyama, Kirk; Young, Janice; Bakos, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that diversifying the nation's health-care workforce is a necessary strategy to increase access to quality health care for all populations, reduce health disparities, and achieve health equity. In this article, we present a conceptual model that utilizes the social determinants of health framework to link nursing workforce diversity and care quality and access to two critical population health indicators—health disparities and health equity. Our proposed model suggests t...

  10. Work environment, health outcomes and magnet hospital traits in the Canadian nephrology nursing scene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Jane; Wilson, Barbara; Harwood, Lori; Laschinger, Heather K

    2009-01-01

    Nephrology, like others areas of health care, is confronting a nursing shortage. Unless action is taken to address nursing shortages, patient care may be negatively affected (American Nephrology Nurses' Association, 2007). Previous studies have been conducted on magnet hospital traits, quality of nursing worklife, empowerment, job satisfaction, burnout, health outcomes, and their influence on nursing retention in Canada. However, there is little research in this area specific to nephrology nursing. This descriptive study examined whether magnet hospital traits, empowerment, and organizational support contribute to Canadian nephrology nurses' job satisfaction, health outcomes, and perceived quality of patient care. A randomly selected sample of 300 nurse members of the Canadian Association of Nephrology Nurses and Technologists (CANNT) was asked to complete a survey consisting of four instruments: The Nursing Work Index (Lake, 2002), the Conditions of Work Effectiveness Questionnaire II (Laschinger, Finegan, Shamian, & Wilk, 2001), the Pressure Management Indicator (Williams & Cooper, 1998), and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (Maslach, Jackson, & Leiter, 1996). There was a 48.1% response rate. Results demonstrated that some aspects of the Canadian nephrology nursing environment were rated quite favourably (e.g., high standards of care are expected; good working relationships with peers), but areas requiring improvement were evident (e.g., assignments that foster continuity of care). Overall, the nurses felt empowered. The results of the Pressure Management Indicator and Maslach Burnout Inventory indicated that nephrology nurses are generally coping well, but that some of them are struggling. Strategies that improve work environments could promote the recruitment and retention of nephrology nurses. Further research in this area is warranted. PMID:19354155

  11. Reliability, validity, and health issues arising from questionnaires used to measure Psychosocial and Organizational Work Factors (POWFs) among hospital nurses: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneterre, Vincent; Liaudy, Sylvette; Chatellier, Gilles; Lang, Thierry; de Gaudemaris, Régis

    2008-01-01

    This systematic review assesses the validity of epidemiological questionnaires used to measure psychosocial and organizational work factors (POWFs) in nurses. Of the 632 articles published between 1980 and July 2008 identified in this review, 108 provide some data concerning analysis of the intrinsic characteristics of such instruments (content validity or conceptual basis, reliability, validation of internal construction) and their external validity with respect to health aspects (concurrent validity and predictive validity). Psychometric properties of generalist questionnaires validated among blue collar or white collar workers were also assessed in the nurse population. The Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ), because of its longevity and reputation, was the generalist questionnaire most used among this population. Although its structure often raises questions in the nurse population, its dimensions (mainly the control one) have been shown to be predictive of some health outcomes measured with "objective" indicators concerning absenteeism, injuries, and musculoskeletal disorders. Effort Reward Imbalance (ERI), which has a structure more stable among the nurse population, has shown concurrent validity in terms of intent to leave the nursing profession. No questionnaire specifically designed for nurses can claim to satisfy all of the recommendations in terms of internal validity. Nevertheless, the Practice Environment Scale-Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI) seems to be one of the most promising instruments because of its appropriateness (content validity), its structure, which has a rather good fit (construct validity), its ability to discriminate magnet hospitals like other NWI derivates (discriminant validity), and it has also been associated in cross-sectional studies with health outcomes, especially nurses' self-assessed mental health but also with patients' health outcomes objectively assessed (concurrent validity). However, elements for predictive validity are still lacking with NWI derivates. The Discussion provides recommendations for measuring POWFs, encompassing the use of external validated measurements. PMID:19886473

  12. The nursing consultation focuses on the nurse's role in prenatal low risk: a practice of health education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geilsa Soraia Cavalcanti Valente, Maira Muniz Assis, Vera Maria Saboia; Adriana Passos Bento, Ademir do Canto; Joana Lídia Rodrigues Vilhena; Maria Inez de Oliveira Porto; Sheila Lopes da Silva

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify the practices of nurses' performance during the prenatal low risk in the Basic Health Method: a descriptive exploratory qualitative approach with the type of literature review, held in the Virtual Health Library (VHL, the bases LILACS, BDENF and SCIELO. After the data collection took place an exploratory reading, selective, analytical and interpretive. Results: selected to be two categories: the nursing consultation in favor of a proposed new nursing work and educational activities in prenatal care: reflections, and overcoming obstacles. Please note that the process of entering a nursing consultation in prenatal care in the content of graduation is a major resource for the contribution of expanding healthcare coverage to pregnant women. This coverage is through the educational role/participation, valuing the customer as a citizen, enabling the knowledge of your body, stimulating self-care and addressing issues of sexuality and gender, arising in everyday woman, intended to improve the quality of life of the female population. Conclusion: This study reinforces and encourages the continuation and improvement of care to pregnant women by nurses in clinical nursing considering guidelines, educational practices and knowledge dissemination.

  13. NANDA-NIC-NOC methodology for the mental health resident nurse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Cámara Conde

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available As residents of the mental health specialty, we take great care plan with methodology NANDA-NOC-NIC (NNN in each of our rotations. Because of that there is still no consensus on how to use this methodology; we made this poster with our proposal. To do this, we propose a practical and standardized to carry out the care plans to guide future resident nurse of mental health in their care plans.Taking into account the review of various models of existing ratings of nursing at present, as well as taxonomy NNN, we carried out the development of a poster in which we show a practical example of how our proposed structure of a care plan:Evaluation: through functional patterns of M. Gordon Diagnosis: respecting the PES format: - (P Problem: Using with the NANDA taxonomy - (E Etiology: related factors- (S Signs and symptoms: definitorial characteristics Planning: depending on the diagnosis set forth, the NOCs will agree. Performance indicators are also defined, specifying the current state, as well as the level to maintain /achieve and the time to be assessed. Lastly proposed interventions (NIC and developed activities to be carried out to achieve the expected results. Implementation: implementation of interventions and activities Evaluation: we review the performance indicators, assessing the level reached in light of the current situation of the patient, and proposing corrective measures if necessary. As discussion could conclude that we used in our rotations this structure, so that we standardized "way we do." In turn, we have disseminated this structure in the National Congress of Mental Health Nursing.

  14. Swedish Child Health Care nurses conceptions of overweight in children: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isma Gabriella E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Registered Sick Children’s Nurses and District Nurses employed at Child Health Care centres are in a position to help prevent childhood overweight and obesity. Prevention of this challenging public health threat could be improved through having a better understanding of how this group of nurses perceives childhood obesity. The aim of this study was to elucidate the conceptions of childhood overweight, including obesity, among nurses working in Child Health Care. Method A qualitative study using a phenomenographic approach, based on open-ended interviews with 18 Child Health Care nurses (CHC-nurses strategically selected from 17 Child Health Care Centres in the southern part of Sweden. Results Four categories of description emerged from the data: Perception of childhood overweight changes, Overweight in younger children a neglected concern, Overweight a delicate issue and Importance of family lifestyle. The participating CHC-nurses conceived overweight in children, primarily obesity in children to be an extensive and serious problem which affects children, families and the surrounding society. Overweight in children was further perceived as a consequence of their parent’s lifestyle and their awareness of the problem, which was considered by the CHC-nurses as a sensitive and a provoking issue. It was also perceived that overweight in children is not taken seriously during the pre-school period and that concerns regarding overweight in younger children were mainly about the appearance and not the health of the child. The CHC-nurses perceived that the proportion of overweight children has increased, which Swedish society and the CHC-nurses have adapted to. This adaptation makes it difficult for CHC-nurses to define those children who are overweight. Conclusion CHC-nurses provide a comprehensive and complex picture of childhood overweight, which includes several difficulties dealing with this issue. Attention to CHC-nurse’s conceptions of overweight in children is important since it can affect the parent-nurse relationship and thereby the nurse’s, as well as the parent’s efforts to influence the children’s weight. It is suggested that CHC- nurses should work with person centered counseling and empowerment concerning parent to child relations in cases involving overweight.

  15. Night work and health of nurses and midviwes – A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weronika Burdelak

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Night shift work has been thought to play a role in the etiology of chronic diseases through a disruption of the circadian rhythm, decreased synthesis of melatonin and sleep deprivation. Our aim was to review the epidemiological studies on the association between night shift work and some pathologies in nurses and midwives. We reviewed publications available in the MEDLINE database and published before June 2012, describing the cross-sectional (almost two thirds of all papers and cohort studies. In total, we identified 26 original papers, including 5 epidemiological studies addressing diseases or disorders of the digestive system, 3 - metabolic syndrome, 2 - diabetes type 2, 9 - cardiovascular diseases and CVD risk factors, 5 - obesity/overweight, 2 - menstrual disorders and 3 - poor pregnancy outcomes. The analysis of the literature indicates that night shift work of nurses and midwives is most strongly associated with a higher risk of obesity/overweight. In each of the five studies, which we identified this association was observed (confirmed by the statistical significance of the results, also after adjustment for confounders. The results for diabetes type 2 and disorders of the menstrual cycle are also suggestive. Epidemiological data on the other disorders or pathologies discussed in this article seem to be less certain - their results are inconsistent or their number is too small to draw definite conclusions. Further epidemiological studies of nurses and midwives working on night shifts and prospective observations in particular are recommended to find out whether potential association between the night work and discussed health issues is causal. Med Pr 2013;64(3:397–418

  16. Addressing the community/public health nursing shortage through a multifaceted regional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Staci; Acord, Lea; Schuler, Sue; Hansen, Judith M

    2014-01-01

    Despite increasing needs resulting from emerging societal and health care issues, the number of trained community/public health (C/PH) nurses in the United States is facing a precipitous decline. Numerous factors contribute to this shortage including an aging workforce, a poorly funded public health system, inconsistencies in C/PH nursing educational approaches and opportunities, and a shortage of sites for clinical training. Determined to address the C/PH nursing shortage in their region, a consortium of public health professionals, university deans and faculty, and state nursing leaders in southeastern Wisconsin came together to address these issues from three perspectives: (a) curricular analysis and redesign, (b) expansion of clinical placement opportunities, and (c) paid community/public health nursing internships for seniors in baccalaureate nursing programs. This article outlines briefly the activities undertaken related to curricular review and clinical placements, and then describes in detail the approach, challenges and results of the senior internship program. Together, these programs produced long-lasting results including an unprecedented level of collaboration between academic institutions and public health nursing professionals, the expansion of both traditional and nontraditional clinical sites in the region, and a transformative learning experience for seventeen senior nursing students from five participating universities. PMID:24517169

  17. Achieving Excellence Through Contemporary and Relevant Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Standards of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnis-Perry, Gloria; Greene, Ann; Mina, Elaine Santa

    2015-09-01

    Standards of practice (SOPs) comprise competency statements, which are grounded in current knowledge and research, and provide foundations for performance that support professional accountability. The nursing profession, and specifically the psychiatric-mental health specialty of nursing practice in Canada, develops and revises practice standards regularly. The current article describes the collaborative, evidence-informed journey of the Canadian Federation of Mental Health Nurses during its fourth revision of the Canadian Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing SOPs. An intraprofessional team of psychiatric-mental health nurses from the clinical, academic, research, and policy areas developed and nurtured collaborative processes that emphasize collegial and authentic relationships. Effective communication and a respectful learning environment supported the process for all members of the team. The current article provides recommendations for other professional organizations considering developing and/or revising SOPs. PMID:26325171

  18. Scientific production on sexuality of elder women journals of nursing, public health and gerontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz de Carvalho Cavalheiro, Silvana Sidney Costa dos Santos

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to verify the scientific production on elder women, gender and sexuality in journals of Nursing, Public Health and Gerontology. Methods: a systematic review of literature, in journals of Nursing, Public Health and Gerontology in Brazil, in the years 2003 to 2007. Results: the 362 articles were pre-selected (111 in nursing, 95 in Public Health and 156 in Gerontology, of these, seven focus on elderly women, gender and sexuality. It was possible to understand that sexuality and gender issues of elder women remain invisible, and few significant. From the seven articles three categories were abstracted: feminization of aging, social of women’s aging and asexualized elderly. Conclusion: the nurses and the groups of studies and research on gender began to dawn, showing interest in the issues. Requires that the educational projects of graduate programs in health, especially in nursing, bringing more thoughts on gender and sexuality of older women.

  19. Solid waste management in health services: overview of nurses and technicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Gonçalves de Barros, Adriana Maria Pereira da Silva, Luiz Carlos Gomes Costa Júnior, Viviane Euzébia Pereira Santos, Caroline Araújo Fonseca

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze how the team describes the Nursing Management of Solid Waste in Health. Methodology: consisted of an exploratory, descriptive, from quantitative approach. The study was conducted with 20 members of Nursing group, 10 nurses and 10 technicians Nursing hospitalization units of a public hospital in Petrolina / PE. The data was collected through a questionnaire with open and closed in november 2009 and data analysis took place with the help of EPI INFO 3.5.1 (august/2008. Results: most health professionals have a distorted view of what is the waste of health services and how to classify them. Conclusion: after data analysis, it is necessary to conduct training with a view to raising awareness among professionals about the proper handling of solid waste, and thus prevent accidents and improve the quality of life of the team and its clients. Descriptors: waste of health services; nursing team; solid residues

  20. Self-rated health, work characteristics and health related behaviours among nurses in Greece: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimoliatis Ioannis DK

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies on self-rated health among nurses have indicated an association of low job satisfaction and stress in relation to poor self-rated health. The relationship between self rated health and the specific work characteristics and health related behaviours of nurses to our knowledge have not been adequately studied. Objective To investigate the health profile of nurses working in hospitals in North West Greece and to examine the associations between self rated health (SRH and health related behaviours and work characteristics in this group of hospital employees. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to a random sample of 443 nurses working in all the hospitals in North West Greece. Regression analysis was used to examine the relationship of health related behaviours and work characteristics with self rated health among the nurses. Results A total of 353 responded to the questionnaire (response rate 80% of which 311 (88% were female and 42 (12% male. The mean age (standard deviation of the respondents was 36 years (5.6 and their mean years of working as nurses were 13.5 years (5.9. Almost half of the nurses' smoked, and about one third were overweight or obese. About 58% (206 of the nurses reported having poor health while 42% (147 reported having good health. Self-rated health was independently associated with gender, effort to avoid fatty foods and physical activity, according to multiple logistic regression analysis. Conclusion The population studied presented a relatively poor health profile, and a high proportion of poor SRH. Though female gender and effort to avoid fatty foods were associated with poor SRH, and exercise and white meat consumption with good SRH, specific work characteristics were not associated with SRH.

  1. Quality of work life among primary health care nurses in the Jazan region, Saudi Arabia: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almalki Mohammed J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality of work life (QWL is defined as the extent to which an employee is satisfied with personal and working needs through participating in the workplace while achieving the goals of the organization. QWL has been found to influence the commitment and productivity of employees in health care organizations, as well as in other industries. However, reliable information on the QWL of primary health care (PHC nurses is limited. The purpose of this study was to assess the QWL among PHC nurses in the Jazan region, Saudi Arabia. Methods A descriptive research design, namely a cross-sectional survey, was used in this study. Data were collected using Brooks’ survey of quality of nursing work life and demographic questions. A convenience sample was recruited from 134 PHC centres in Jazan, Saudi Arabia. The Jazan region is located in the southern part of Saudi Arabia. A response rate of 91% (n?=?532/585 was achieved (effective response rate?=?87%, n?=?508. Data analysis consisted of descriptive statistics, t-test and one way-analysis of variance. Total scores and subscores for QWL items and item summary statistics were computed and reported using SPSS version 17 for Windows. Results Findings suggested that the respondents were dissatisfied with their work life. The major influencing factors were unsuitable working hours, lack of facilities for nurses, inability to balance work with family needs, inadequacy of vacations time for nurses and their families, poor staffing, management and supervision practices, lack of professional development opportunities, and an inappropriate working environment in terms of the level of security, patient care supplies and equipment, and recreation facilities (break-area. Other essential factors include the community’s view of nursing and an inadequate salary. More positively, the majority of nurses were satisfied with their co-workers, satisfied to be nurses and had a sense of belonging in their workplaces. Significant differences were found according to gender, age, marital status, dependent children, dependent adults, nationality, nursing tenure, organizational tenure, positional tenure, and payment per month. No significant differences were found according to education level of PHC nurses and location of PHC. Conclusions These findings can be used by PHC managers and policy makers for developing and appropriately implementing successful plans to improve the QWL. This will help to enhance the home and work environments, improve individual and organization performance and increase the commitment of nurses.

  2. Child health nurses in the Solomon Islands: lessons for the Pacific and other developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colquhoun Samantha

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To understand the roles of nurses with advanced training in paediatrics in the Solomon Islands, and the importance of these roles to child health. To understand how adequately equipped child health nurses feel for these roles, to identify the training needs, difficulties and future opportunities. Design Semi-structured interviews. Settings Tertiary hospital, district hospitals and health clinics in the Solomon Islands. Participants Twenty-one paediatric nurses were interviewed out of a total of 27 in the country. Results All nurses were currently employed in teaching, clinical or management areas. At least one or two nurses were working in each of 7 of the 9 provinces; in the two smaller provinces there were none. Many nurses were sole practitioners in remote locations without back-up from doctors or other experienced nurses; all had additional administrative or public health duties. Different types of courses were identified: a residential diploma through the University of Papua New Guinea or New Zealand and a diploma by correspondence through the University of Sydney. Conclusions Child health nurses in the Solomon Islands fulfill vital clinical, public health, teaching and administrative roles. Currently they are too few in number, and this is a limiting factor for improving the quality of child health services in that country. Current methods of training require overseas travel, or are expensive, or lack relevance, or remove nurses from their work-places and families for prolonged periods of time. A local post-basic child health nursing course is urgently needed, and models exist to achieve this.

  3. Precautions used by occupational health nursing students during clinical placements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M.M. Maja

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Protection of health care workers including students from being infected when caring for high risk patients is a major cause for concern to all promoting occupational health. Safety of every employee is mandatory. Furthermore, universal guidelines for precautions must be used by all interacting with high risk patients and clients to protect themselves and prevent the spread of infection. The aim of this paper was to ascertain the availability of universal guidelines for precautions against the spread of infection in clinical settings and determine the precautions used by OHN students during their clinical placements. To realise these objectives, a quantitative and descriptive design was followed. A purposive sampling method was used to select 45 Occupational health nursing students who participated in the study.Data was collected with the use of a structured questionnaire and the results revealed that: most units where OHN students were placed for clinical experience had guidelines for universal precautions although these were not always accessible to them; regarding compliance to universal precautions, OHN students were reportedly aware of the hazards of failure to comply although in some emergencies and where personal protective material was not available, they had to provide care without using protective equipments. Recommendations made include that employers and staff at all occupational settings must ensure that updated guidelines for universal precautions are available and accessible to every body interacting with high risk patients; health care providers and students must be fully informed about and should always adhere to universal precautions.

  4. Assessing Teaching Med-Nursing Physics Replacing Introductory Physics in Nursing College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Ruey; Lin, Y.; Chen, K.

    2006-12-01

    The introductory physics is taught by a physics teacher who integrated nursing technique with the text in the nursing format, in nursing language and demonstrating in class the operation of nursing instruments, with lecture support from a nursing teacher. This is teaching med-nursing physics. The null hypothesis is rejected under the alternative hypothesis that teaching med-nursing physics is superior than teaching traditional introductory physics in the nursing college of the study university, by a traditional trained physics teacher. The study design is a case group comparing with 6 groups of controls, who from 24and 5-year-discipline systems are taking or took the introductory physics. The superiority testing is relied on the accessment form that has 10 questions on the introductory physics, and 10 questions on nursing technique. The SAS procedure of GLM has been employed for the 1-way ANOVA on the 20 accessment questions, under scoring systems.

  5. Changing the conversation--the occupational health nurse's role in integrated HS3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Marjorie D

    2009-07-01

    Occupational health nurses have the skills and knowledge to provide a holistic perspective in advancing their company's triple bottom line, healthy people, healthy planet, and healthy profits. The HS3 model provides a road map for integrating health, safety, sustainability, and stewardship, all of which directly impact every company's triple bottom line. Occupational health nurses can use the HS3 model to promote healthy lifestyles, reduce risk and injuries, protect the natural environment, and improve resource alignment. Occupational health nurses have a unique opportunity to demonstrate the value they bring to their employers using synergistic HS3 planning that cost-effectively links work injury management, health promotion, environmental protection, safety training and surveillance, and regulatory compliance. Implementing the HS3 model requires occupational health nurses to be innovators who can change the conversation. PMID:19639861

  6. Private nursing homes: contribution to long stay care of the elderly in the Brighton Health District.

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, J.

    1986-01-01

    Two surveys of private nursing homes, designated geriatric wards, and a sample of social service part III homes were carried out in the Brighton Health District using questionnaires supplemented (in the second survey) by some interviews. The dependency of old people in the private nursing homes was more like that of long stay hospital patients rather than that of residents in social services homes. In the private nursing homes, however, a smaller proportion of patients were in the medium to h...

  7. Managing parental groups during early childhood: New challenges faced by Swedish child health-care nurses.

    OpenAIRE

    Lefevre, Åsa; Lundqvist, Pia; Drevenhorn, Eva; Hallström, Inger

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe child health centre (CHC) nurses' views of managing parental groups during early childhood. All 311 CHC nurses working within the Swedish CHC system in one county were asked to complete a web-based questionnaire. Findings showed that although the CHC nurses were experienced, several found group leadership challenging and difficult. The need for specialized groups for young parents, single parents and parents whose first language was not Swedish wa...

  8. Workforce Integration of New Graduate Nurses: Evaluation of a Health Human Resources Employment Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Baumann, Andrea; Hunsberger, Mabel; Crea-Arsenio, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Historically, economic changes have negatively affected the nursing workforce in Ontario. The trend towards part-time and casual employment emerged from healthcare restructuring in the 1990s. The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in 2003 alerted the Ontario government to the issue of part-time and casual nursing. In 2007, the Nursing Graduate Guarantee (NGG), a health human resources employment policy, was developed as a financial incentive for employers to hire and mentor new...

  9. Re-envisioning paediatric nurse training in a re-engineered health care system

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Minette, Coetzee.

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: South African's infant and child mortality rates remain high and at the current rate of decline will not meet the Millennium Development Goals of a two thirds decrease by 2015. At the latest available count, there were fewer than 1500 qualified paediatric nurses on the National South Afr [...] ican Nursing Council register, with only about 100 nurses graduating with this qualification from South African nursing schools annually. It is not clear, however, if current paediatric nurse training programmes adequately equip nurses to make a real impact on reducing the under-5 mortality rate. In their 2011 interim report, the Ministerial Committee on Morbidity and Mortality in Children under 5 years recommended strengthening paediatric nurses' training as a strategy to reduce the under-5 mortality rate. METHOD: In response to the Committee on Morbidity and Mortality in Children recommendation, a colloquium was convened as a national forum for schools of nursing, departments of health, health care facilities, clinicians and regulatory bodies to advance children's nursing in South Africa. OBJECTIVES: The goals of the colloquium were to thoroughly investigate the situation in South Africa's paediatric nurse training, plot ways to strengthen and expand postgraduate paediatric programmes to meet priority child health needs, and to build relationships between the various schools and stakeholders. RESULTS: Outcomes included the clarification and strengthening of a 'stakeholder grid' in nurse training, recognition of the need for more active teaching and learning strategies in curricula linked to national child health priorities, as well as the need to develop and support clinical nursing practice in facilities.

  10. Re-envisioning paediatric nurse training in a re-engineered health care system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minette Coetzee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: South African’s infant and child mortality rates remain high and at the current rate of decline will not meet the Millennium Development Goals of a two thirds decrease by 2015. At the latest available count, there were fewer than 1500 qualified paediatric nurses on the National South African Nursing Council register, with only about 100 nurses graduating with this qualification from South African nursing schools annually. It is not clear, however, if current paediatric nurse training programmes adequately equip nurses to make a real impact on reducing the under-5 mortality rate. In their 2011 interim report, the Ministerial Committee on Morbidity and Mortality in Children under 5 years recommended strengthening paediatric nurses’ training as a strategy to reduce the under-5 mortality rate.Method: In response to the Committee on Morbidity and Mortality in Children recommendation, a colloquium was convened as a national forum for schools of nursing, departments of health, health care facilities, clinicians and regulatory bodies to advance children’s nursing in South Africa.Objectives: The goals of the colloquium were to thoroughly investigate the situation in South Africa’s paediatric nurse training, plot ways to strengthen and expand postgraduate paediatric programmes to meet priority child health needs, and to build relationships between the various schools and stakeholders.Results: Outcomes included the clarification and strengthening of a ‘stakeholder grid’ in nurse training, recognition of the need for more active teaching and learning strategies in curricula linked to national child health priorities, as well as the need to develop and support clinical nursing practice in facilities.

  11. Health effects assessment summary tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document is an excellent pointer system to identify current literature or changes in assessment criteria for many chemicals of interest to Superfund. It was prepared for Superfund use by the Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office (ECAO-Cin) in EPA's Office of Health and Environmental Assessment. Chemicals considered are those for which Health Effects Assessment Documents, Health and Environmental Effects Profiles, Health Assessment Documents or Air Quality Criteria Documents have been prepared by ECAO. Radionuclides considered are those believed to be most common at Superfund sites. Tables summarize reference doses (RfDs) for toxicity from subchronic and chronic inhalation, oral exposure, slope factors and unit risk values for carcinogenicity based on lifetime inhalation and oral exposure, and radionuclide carcinogenicity

  12. Application of Criterion-Meeting Assessment Method in Fundamentals of Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Xueyan Chen; Jihong Wang; Wenjuan Li

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the results of criterion-meeting assessment method used for the operation test in fundamentals of nursing, 101 nursing undergraduates who entered Nursing College, Beihua University in 2007, were randomly divided into experimental group and control group. The students in the control group were examined with the traditional assessment method, namely, the points were given the students one-time and estimated in a way of quantitative analysis. The students in...

  13. Nursing assessment: Research/Care through the sensible listening in the heart failure clinic.

    OpenAIRE

    Liana Amorim Corrêa; Iraci dos Santos; Denilson Campos de Albuquerque

    2008-01-01

    Assuming that nursing assessment for heart failure clients help us to face the changes in your daily, we enquire what the contribution of sensible listening applied to nursing assessment. The purpose is to identify the needs of care creating a new way to care/research sensibly through nursing appointment. The methodology of quantitative character and exploratory applied in the form of evaluation was performed by 50 clients in an hospital in Rio de Janeiro. It was found that 100% of the people...

  14. Transforming Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Education With Team Based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Rebecca Bouterie; Hills, Robin L

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the team-based learning (TBL) instructional approach on learning outcomes in an undergraduate psychiatric mental health (PMH) nursing course. An uncontrolled, before and after design was employed. Data were collected over eight consecutive semesters (N=347) before and after implementation of TBL. Two variables were selected for comparison before and after implementation: scores on PMH portion of the Evolve® practice exit examination and time (in hours) students reported preparing for class. After implementation, students scored higher on the PMH practice exit examination and reported increased study time. Qualitatively, students reported enjoying working in teams despite the increased study time required with the TBL method. PMID:26577556

  15. Nurse practitioners changing health behaviours: one patient at a time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangster-Gormley, Esther; Griffith, Janessa; Schreiber, Rita; Feddema, April; Boryki, Elizabeth; Thompson, Joanne

    2015-10-01

    In 2005, legislation was enacted allowing nurse practitioners (NPs) to practise in British Columbia, Canada. Although substantial human and financial resources had been dedicated to the implementation of the role, no evaluation has been conducted to date. As part of a larger multiphase, mixed-methods study design, which evaluated the integration of NPs into the British Columbia healthcare system, this article describes findings related to changes that result for patients and the implications for the healthcare system when NPs become part of the care process. Using survey and interview data, themes that emerged were patient satisfaction, access to care, and behavioural changes. Findings suggest that patients are satisfied with the care they receive from NPs and that NPs make positive changes to health behaviour. PMID:26419574

  16. Boot Camp for Occupational Health Nurses: Understanding Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Debra M; Olszewski, Kimberly

    2015-08-01

    Social media is a buzzword frequently referred to in marketing materials, general media, and personal conversations. Although many refer to the term social media, some individuals do not understand its meaning or how it affects their daily lives at work and home. Since the expansion of the Internet to web 2.0, multiple platforms of communication occur virtually through various social media. Understanding and learning how to use these platforms are essential to stay connected with friends, family, and colleagues; advance connections to professional organizations; and extend educational opportunities. This article presents basic information for occupational health nurses to improve their understanding of social media and how to communicate virtually using different platforms safely and securely. PMID:26240119

  17. Influence of the stress in the occupational nurseshealth who works in hospital emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Castilho Martins, Geilsa Soraia Cavalcanti Valente

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to describe the influences patterns of work of nurses in the hospital emergency on their mental health, identifying the types of nurses' perceptions of the risks of illness in their work and to discuss strategies for self-care performed by nurses of the emergency. Methodology: this is a qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study. Interviews were conducted with seven nurses, who agreed to participate in the study in accordance with Resolution 196/96 of CONEP whose project was approved by the research ethics under the HUAP record n. 001/2009. Data were transcribed and later analyzed from the thematic content analysis. Results: influences patterns of work of nurses in the emergency room for their mental health forms of perception nurse about the risks of illness in their work, and strategies of self-care performed by nurses of the hospital emergency. Conclusion: the symptoms and signs that are provided by the nursing professionals are related to the triggering factors of burn-out, and a pressing need for nursing professionals to pay attention to prevention of stress as a factor protecting their own health.

  18. Assessing undergraduate nursing students' knowledge, attitudes, and cultural competence in caring for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Kristy L; Folse, Victoria N

    2015-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients experience barriers to health care that include fear of discrimination, as well as insensitivity and lack of knowledge about LGBT-specific health needs among providers. This study examined the effectiveness of an educational intervention designed to improve knowledge and attitudes of baccalaureate nursing students regarding LGBT patient care. Education focused on key terminology, health disparities, medical needs of transgender patients, and culturally sensitive communication skills for competent LGBT patient care. Knowledge level and attitudes were evaluated before and after the intervention using a survey based on a modified Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men Scale and two assessment tools developed for this study. A statistically significant increase in positive attitudes and knowledge level was found immediately after the intervention. Findings from this study support the inclusion of education related to LGBT patient health care in undergraduate nursing curricula to promote cultural competence and sensitivity. PMID:25535762

  19. Health impact assessment in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, Health Impact Assessment has gained great attention in Korea. First, the Ministry of Environment introduced HIA within existing Environment Impact Assessment. Second, the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs began an HIA program in 2008 in alliance with Healthy Cities. In this short report, these two different efforts are introduced and their opportunities and challenges discussed. We believe these two approaches complement each other and both need to be strengthened. We also believe that both can contribute to the development of health in policy and project development and ultimately to improvements in the Korean population's health.

  20. Situational analysis of teaching and learning of medicine and nursing students at Makerere University College of Health Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiguli Juliet

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS in Uganda is undergoing a major reform to become a more influential force in society. It is important that its medicine and nursing graduates are equipped to best address the priority health needs of the Ugandan population, as outlined in the government’s Health Sector Strategic Plan (HSSP. The assessment identifies critical gaps in the core competencies of the MakCHS medicine and nursing and ways to overcome them in order to achieve HSSP goals. Methods Documents from the Uganda Ministry of Health were reviewed, and medicine and nursing curricula were analyzed. Nineteen key informant interviews (KII and seven focus group discussions (FGD with stakeholders were conducted. The data were manually analyzed for emerging themes and sub-themes. The study team subsequently used the checklists to create matrices summarizing the findings from the KIIs, FGDs, and curricula analysis. Validation of findings was done by triangulating information from the different data collection methods. Results The core competencies that medicine and nursing students are expected to achieve by the end of their education were outlined for both programs. The curricula are in the process of reform towards competency-based education, and on the surface, are well aligned with the strategic needs of the country. But implementation is inadequate, and can be changed: • Learning objectives need to be more applicable to achieving competencies. • Learning experiences need to be more relevant for competencies and setting in which students will work after graduation (i.e. not just clinical care in a tertiary care facility. • Student evaluation needs to be better designed for assessing these competencies. Conclusion MakCHS has made a significant attempt to produce relevant, competent nursing and medicine graduates to meet the community needs. Ways to make them more effective though deliberate efforts to apply a competency-based education are possible.

  1. An integrated system's nursing shared governance model: a system chief nursing officer's synergistic vehicle for leading a complex health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkman, Karen; Sellers, Diana; Rowder, Cheryl; Batcheller, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    Seton Nursing reengineered previous models of care and leadership to accommodate rapid growth of its health care system from individual acute care sites to a health care system with consistent quality and standardization of like units across the system. Shared governance promotes collaboration with shared decision making and accountability; however, the role and methods of a system chief nursing officer to connect shared governance across a new system has not been previously described. A system chief nursing officer can significantly influence and guide the nursing strategic direction at all the health care system-related facilities by utilizing a single, systemwide nursing shared governance structure. Using this structure provides a venue to maximize the influence of a transformational leader and creates efficiencies in workforce development, resource management, best practice identification, and spread of initiatives and improvements to adapt to an ever-changing health care landscape. This is the story of one such system chief nursing officer. PMID:22955224

  2. Health Literacy Training for Public Health Nurses in Fukushima: A Case-Study of Program Adaptation, Implementation and Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, Aya; Rudd, Rima E; LAI, Alden Yuanhong; Yoshida-Komiya, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Health literacy comprises not only an individual’s ability to gain access to, understand and use health information, but also health care providers’ ability to make health information accessible and usable. The Fukushima nuclear accident has posed challenges related to the communication of radiation-related health information. Public health nurses are gatekeepers of community health in Japan, and have primary responsibility for communicating this complex information about science and risk to ...

  3. Benchmarking occupational stressors and strain levels for rural nurses and other health sector workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albion, Majella J; Fogarty, Gerard J; Machin, M Anthony

    2005-09-01

    This study was conducted with 1097 employees (866 females, 217 males, 14 did not indicate gender) in a regional Health Service District who completed the Queensland Public Agency Staff Survey in 2002. Nurses' results on measures of organizational climate and psychological outcomes were compared with those of other employees in the Health Service District. Nurses reported less favourable outcomes on all but one of the organizational climate scales, and also were found to have more distress (strain), and lower levels of morale, Job Satisfaction and Quality of Worklife than others. Results were generally less favourable for nurses working in the large regional hospital and in mental health than for nurses in other facilities. The study has implications for recruiting and retaining nurses at a time when shortages within the profession are chronic. PMID:16108779

  4. Mental health service user involvement in nurse education: exploring the issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, S; Risk, I; Masters, H; Brown, N

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports on findings and issues arising from a study designed to promote mental health service users' involvement in a preregistration nursing curriculum. Users' views about the knowledge, skills and attributes required by mental health nurses were explored to inform the curriculum design. Strategies that would facilitate long term, active user involvement in the design and delivery of the curriculum were also explored. Findings are presented with concurrent discussion of issues arising from the research process in relation to user involvement in education. The issue of 'conflict' explores findings relating to users' views of a 'good' mental health nurse and inherent conflicts between user and professional views are highlighted. The representativeness of the research participants is explored and debated in relation to service user involvement in nurse education. Finally, the concepts of 'involvement' and 'tokenism' are discussed and recommendations made about how active user involvement in nurse education can be achieved. PMID:11022511

  5. Undergraduate nurses reflections on Whatsapp use in improving primary health care education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana J. Willemse

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The global use of mobile devices with their connectivity capacity, and integrated with the affordances of social media networks, provides a resource-rich platform for innovative student-directed learning experiences.Objective: The objective of this study was to review the experiences of undergraduate nurses on the improvement of primary health care education at a School of Nursing at a University in the Western Cape, South Africa, through the incorporation of a social media application, WhatsApp.Method: A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive, and contextual design was used to explore and describe data collected from a purposive sample of 21 undergraduate nursing students. The study population was engaged in a WhatsApp discussion group to enhance their integration of theory and clinical practice of the health assessment competency of the Primary Health Care Module. Participants submitted electronic reflections on their experiences in the WhatsApp discussion group via email on completion of the study. Thematic analysis of the qualitative data collected was done according to Tesch’s (1990 steps of descriptive data analysis in order to identify the major themes in the study. The electronic reflections were analysed to explore their rich, reflective data.Results: Seven themes were identified that included: positive experiences using the WhatsApp group; the usefulness of WhatsApp for integrating theory and clinical practice; the availability of resources for test preparation; opportunity for clarification; anonymity; exclusion of students as a result of the lack of an appropriate device, and the application caused the battery of the device to run flat quickly.Conclusion: The results of the experiences of students in the WhatsApp discussion group could be used to inform the use of social media applications in teaching and learning, with the purpose of enhancing the integration of the theory and clinical practice.

  6. Occupational Risk Factors and Health Problems Faced by Nurses that Working Dialysis Unit and Nephrology Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehtap Curcani

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study is carried out descriptively with the aim of determining occupational risks the nurses working in dialysis units and nephrology services. METHOD: 47 nurses working in dialysis and nephrology units of the hospitals in Erzurum were included in the study content. In the collection of the data, questionnaire form prepared in the light of literature and including the preventions taken by nurses themselves or their organizations against the professional risks they faced, or personal problems the nurses experienced, professional risk or professional-personal features was used. RESULTS: In the result of the study, it was detected that 48.9% of the nurses was at 28-32 age group, and that 38.3% of the nurses graduated from nursing higher school, and that 72.3% of the nurses worked in dialysis unit. It was found out that while practicing their professions, the nurses expressed that infection risk (97.9%, stress (83%, verbal abuse (80.9%, psychiatric trauma (66%, allergic substance (63.8%, the noise (36.2%, and physical abuse (23.4% were the risk factors they raced in working medium .In the health problem seen in the nurses, in the first row is lumbago. CONCLUSION: In the result of the study, it was found out that while practicing their professions, the nurses expressed that infection risk was the highest rate among the risk factors they raced in working medium and, in the health problem seen in the nurses, in the first row is lumbago and that the nurses and organizations’ attempts which will reduce the risks were not sufficient. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(4.000: 339-344

  7. Health care leadership academy: a statewide collaboration to enhance nursing leadership competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Marla J; Falter, Betty; Lamb, Gerri S; Mahon, Gary; Malloch, Kathy; Provan, Keith G; Roe, Sue; Werbylo, Linda

    2008-10-01

    Competency in leadership skills is necessary to manage in the current chaotic health care environment and proactively participate in the creation of a better environment. Although interest in pursuing a career in health care is growing, lack of leadership competence contributes to employee frustration and dissatisfaction, which directly and indirectly impacts the supply of health care workers. To addressthe lack of leadership competence and its disturbing consequences, the Arizona nursing community designed a model for nursing leadership and created a partnership to provide a high-quality, affordable leadership education program focused on enhancing the leadership competencies of frontline nursing supervisors. PMID:18990893

  8. The pricing of nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, J; Baume, P

    1997-03-01

    Despite the poor performance of the general economy, the health care industry in Australia has experienced constant growth for several decades. Overall, Australia's expenditure on health is relatively high and, with an increasingly aged population, this expenditure is not likely to decrease. With the current concerns over cost-containment in the health sector it is important to assess the value of nursing care in economic terms. This paper explores the issue of valuing of nursing care within the framework of the Australian Health Care System. Questions are posed of nurses as to whether they are prepared to confront the realities of the health care arena and whether they are ready to value nursing practice in terms of economic value. As well as answering these questions, the paper argues that nursing costs are not sufficiently reimbursed under the current Australian health benefits, and that this poor estimation of the worth of health care may stem from the historical and social influences of nursing and the care provided by nurses. The paper concludes that the Australian health care system is clearly no longer static and that the public cannot afford to support the costs associated with a growing health care industry. Moreover, nursing can no longer afford not to be viewed as an entity in it's own right. A greater awareness of nursing's output will result if organisational or institutional changes are encouraged for the benefit of the Australian society, as a whole, as well as for the nursing profession. PMID:9080270

  9. Development of an Electronic Role-Play Assessment Initiative in Bioscience for Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Judy; Ainscough, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Devising authentic assessments for subjects with large enrolments is a challenge. This study describes an electronic role-play assessment for approximately 600 first-year nursing students to learn and apply pathophysiology (bioscience) concepts to nursing practice. Students used Microsoft Office PowerPoint[R] to prepare electronic role-plays both…

  10. Assisted living nursing practice: health literacy and chronic illness management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2008-01-01

    Functional illiteracy is an inability to read sufficient to function in society. In the high-tech, information-dependent environment of postindustrial society, being illiterate is being at risk. Health literacy is the ability to access, understand, and use basic information about health conditions and services that is necessary to make informed decisions. Older adults (>/=65 years of age) have lower health literacy than all other age groups. Limited health literacy is associated with greater use of emergency department visits, increased rates of hospitalization, and failure to take important diagnostic tests. To maintain independence and self-determination, assisted living (AL) residents need to be able to understand a new or changed diagnosis, as well as oral and written instructions, especially with regard to their medication management. This article discusses health literacy, "plain language," and assessment and interventions to maintain health literacy. PMID:18694698

  11. Extent of East-african nurse leaders' participation in health policy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, N; Potgieter, E

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports part of a bigger study whose aim was to develop an empowerment model that could be used to enhance nurse leaders' participation in health policy development. A Delphi survey was applied which included the following criteria: expert panelists, iterative rounds, statistical analysis, and consensus building. The expert panelists were purposively selected and included national nurse leaders in leadership positions at the nursing professional associations, nursing regulatory bodies, ministries of health, and universities in East Africa. The study was conducted in three iterative rounds. The results reported here were gathered as part of the first round of the study and that examined the extent of nurse leaders' participation in health policy development. Seventy-eight (78) expert panelists were invited to participate in the study, and the response rate was 47%. Data collection was done with the use of a self-report questionnaire. Data analysis was done by use of SPSS and descriptive statistics were examined. The findings indicated that nurse leaders participate in health policy development though participation is limited and not consistent across all the stages of health policy development. The recommendations from the findings are that health policy development process needs to be pluralistic and inclusive of all nurse leaders practicing in positions related to policy development and the process must be open to their ideas and suggestions. PMID:23091715

  12. Environmental Psychology Effects on Mental Health Job Satisfaction and Personal Well Being of Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sodeh Tavakkoli

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available  Objective: Environmental psychology as a science could be useful in understanding the dissociation between the man and the environment. The aim of this study was to compare mental health, job satisfaction and well-being of nurses who work in hospital environments with different designs.  Material:This was a quasi-experimental study, in which 250 nurses filled out the mental health, well-being and job satisfaction questionnaires. They were categorized into 3 groups randomly. Group1 included 63 nurses who worked in an environment without any natural elements; group 2 included 100 nurses who worked in an environment with natural elements and group 3 included 87 nurses who worked in an environment without any psychological and ergonomic design. The last group was only stimulated by demonstrating visual stimulus. Data were analyzed using the ANOVA and Tukey’s pursuit statistical method. Results:The nurses who were working in an environment without any natural elements reported significantly lower scores on mental health, well-being and job satisfaction compared to those who were working in other groups, with the exception of social functioning . Moreover, depression and anxiety were more common in nurses who were working in environments without any natural elements compared to those in the other groups (p<0.05.Conclusions:We can increase job satisfaction, and mental health and well-being of the nurses through the use of natural design and environmental psychology indexes in hospital buildings.

  13. The Impact of Nursing Students' Prior Chemistry Experience on Academic Performance and Perception of Relevance in a Health Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddey, Kerrie; de Berg, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Nursing students have typically found the study of chemistry to be one of their major challenges in a nursing course. This mixed method study was designed to explore how prior experiences in chemistry might impact chemistry achievement during a health science unit. Nursing students (N = 101) studying chemistry as part of a health science unit were…

  14. Making Connections: Linking Generalist and Specialist Essentials in Baccalaureate Community/Public Health Nursing Education and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Katherine Laux; Carter, Kimberly Ferren; O'Hare, Patricia A.; Callister, Lynn Clark

    2002-01-01

    Describes the work of a task force to revise public health nursing curriculum that combined the expertise of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and specialty organizations. Discusses the current state of community/public health nursing and the model used to identify core professional knowledge and values underpinning the curriculum.…

  15. HEALTH EFFECTS ASSESSMENT FOR ACRYLONITRILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report summarizes and evaluates information relevant to a preliminary interim assessment of adverse health effects associated with specific chemicals or compounds. The Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (Superfund) uses these documents in preparing cost-benefit analyse...

  16. Health Technology Assessment in Osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hiligsmann, M.; Kanis, JA; Compston, J.; Cooper, C.; Flamion, B; Bergmann, P.; Body, JJ; Boonen, S.; Bruyere, O; Devogelaer, JP; Goemaere, S.; Kaufman, JM; Rozenberg, S.; Reginster, JY

    2013-01-01

    We review the various aspects of health technology assessment in osteoporosis, including epidemiology and burden of disease, and assessment of the cost-effectiveness of recent advances in the treatment of osteoporosis and the prevention of fracture, in the context of the allocation of health-care resources by decision makers in osteoporosis. This article was prepared on the basis of a symposium held by the Belgian Bone Club and the discussions surrounding that meeting and is based on a review...

  17. The informatics nurse specialist role in electronic health record usability evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Crystal L; Seckman, Charlotte A

    2014-05-01

    Health information technology is revolutionizing the way we interact with health-related data. One example of this can be seen in the rising adoption rates of electronic health records by healthcare providers. Nursing plays a vital role in electronic health record adoption, not only because of their numbers but also their intimate understanding of workflow. The success of an electronic health record also relies on how usable the software is for clinicians, and a thorough usability evaluation is needed before implementing a system within an organization. Not all nurses have the knowledge and skills to perform extensive usability testing; therefore, the informatics nurse specialist plays a critical role in the process. This article will discuss core usability principles, provide a framework for applying these concepts, and explore the role of the informatics nurse specialist in electronic health record evaluation. Health information technology is fundamentally changing the clinical practice environment, and many nurses are seeking leadership positions in the field of informatics. As technology and software become more sophisticated, usability principles must be used under theguidance of the informatics nurse specialist to provide a relevant, robust, and well-designed electronic health record to address the needs of the busy clinician. PMID:24473121

  18. Knowledge in health technology assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2011-01-01

    Health systems are placing more and more emphasis on designing and delivering services that are focused on the patient, and there is a growing interest in patient aspects of health policy research and health technology assessment (HTA). Only a few HTA agencies use and invest in scientific methods to generate knowledge and evidence about the patient aspects of a given technology. This raises questions about how knowledge is produced in HTA reports and what kind of knowledge is considered relevant...

  19. Engineering a learning healthcare system: using health information technology to develop an objective nurse staffing tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Ellen M

    2012-01-01

    Nurses represent the largest proportion of direct healthcare providers. Overstaffed or understaffed units will have implications for the quality, cost, patient, and nurse satisfaction. It is vital that nurses are armed with appropriate instruments and data to help them plan and implement efficient and effective nursing teams. A compelling case is made for the association between nursing care and clinical, quality, and financial outcomes. Even though there is a great body of work on the correlation, there is little agreement on the best approach to determine the correct balance between the patient-to-nurse ratios. The sheer number of variables depicted in the literature suggests why precise evidenced based formulas are difficult to achieve. This paper will describe a practice based knowledge generation mixed methods study using detailed observation and electronic health record abstraction to generate a structural equation for use in predicting staffing needs. PMID:24199075

  20. Nurse Practitioner Led Health Facility (Role 1 on Exercise Precision Support, 2011: A nurse practitioners observational report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny O'Neill

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Late in 2011, the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF deployed a Role One enhanced health facility in support of Exercise Precision Support. The Role One health facility was deployed to the Shoalwater Bay military training area and tasked with providing 24 hour care during the pre-deployment exercise for Australian forces headed to operations overseas. The Precision Support exercise integrates with air operations, large scale logistic movements and austere base establishment elements, to aid in the preparation, training and sustainment of service personnel for operational roles, both in a conflict environment as well as humanitarian aid roles. The Role One provided this medical support with 2 Emergency Nurse Practitioners (ENPs, Registered Nurses (RNs, Medical Assistants (MAs and Radiographers. The ENPs took on the role of the senior clinicians during this exercise, competently managing all of the health complaints that presented during the exercise period. This article will discuss and review the role of the Nurse Practitioner (NP within a Role One, deployed Defence health facility, build on international evidence whilst supporting the utilisation of NPs in the RAAF Health Service and subsequently more widely in the greater Australian Defence Force (ADF. This article will provide some practical evidence enabling health commanders to recognise, deploy and fully utilise NPs, in order to support current and future ADF operations.

  1. Psychiatric nurses’ communication with psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Sibeko

    1995-05-01

    Full Text Available The psychiatric nurse, as a member of the multi-professional mental health team, utilises a goal-directed approach to assist the psychiatric patient in mobilising resources to promote, restore and maintain his mental health as an integral part of his quest for wholeness. This goal-directed approach is the nursing process which comprises assessment, planning, implementing and evaluation. All four steps of the nursing process and the nurse’s interaction with the patient are dependent upon therapeutic communication. Therapeutic communication remains important as the core of all nurse-patient interactions. The aim of this research was to explore and describe the viewpoints of psychiatric nurses on their communication with psychiatric patients and to formulate guidelines for psychiatric nurses. Such guidelines should assist nurses with their communication with psychiatric patients, helping in the restoration and maintenance phases of the patients’ mental health.

  2. A comparative study of the experiences of violence of English and Swedish mental health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, P; Soares, J; Dallender, J; Thomsen, S; Arnetz, B

    2001-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that violence in health care environments, especially mental health care, appears to be increasing. Although there is a lack of cross-cultural studies to prove it, this increase in violence would seem to be an international phenomenon. The present study sought to compare the extent and nature of violence encountered by mental health nurses in Sweden and England. Systematic studies of violence have previously been carried out independently in both countries but this was the first attempt to compare levels of violence. Clearly defined study protocols were put in place, an operational definition of 'violence' adhered to, and random samples recruited. A specially designed questionnaire was sent to every subject (Swedish nurses n=720; English nurses n=296) enquiring about the extent of nurses' exposure to violence, the nature and severity of the violence experienced, and the effect of violence on self-esteem and job satisfaction. Significant differences were found with English nurses experiencing more violence than their Swedish counterparts. Yet support for English nurses appeared to be less good than for Swedish nurses. Reasons for the differences are discussed along with possible measures to minimise the frequency of violence against nurses and the negative effects on their work. PMID:11470100

  3. Challenges in mental health nursing: working in institutional or community settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmakas, A; Papastavrou, E; Siskou, O; Karayiannis, G; Theodorou, M

    2014-02-01

    Professional environments likely affect patient safety, quality of care provided, and nurses' satisfaction and retention. The aim of this study was to explore mental health nurses' perceptions of their professional practice environment and examine differences in perceptions between nurses working at institutions and those practising in community care. The methodology used was descriptive and comparative. The sample consisted of 248 mental health nurses working within the public sector (76% response rate) drawn from a psychiatric hospital (n = 163) and community settings (n = 85). We administered the Revised Professional Practice Environment (RPPE) questionnaire. Comparisons of the two groups were made using eight subscales of the RPPE. The results indicated that mental health nurses' ratings of their practice environment were slightly positive (M = 2.69; range = 1-4). Nurses working in a psychiatric hospital perceived the professional practice environment more negatively (M = 2.66) than their colleagues in community care (M = 2.73). A t-test comparison revealed statistically significant differences between the two groups within subcategories of work motivation (P = 0.04) and leadership and autonomy (P = 0.03). Nurses working in the community gave higher ratings in comparison with their colleagues working in institutional settings. In conclusions, an in-depth analysis of differences in practice environments is required to define causes of these differences and how they might influence nurses' abilities to provide quality care. PMID:23413921

  4. Nurses’ Perceptions of Spirituality and Spiritual Care in Different Health Care Settings in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René van Leeuwen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows similarities and differences in perceptions and competences regarding spirituality and spiritual care of nurses in different health care settings. Research on this specific topic is limited and can contribute towards a nuanced implementation of spiritual care in different nursing care settings. Four hundred forty nine nurses in different health care settings completed a questionnaire concerning spirituality and spiritual care, spiritual care competence, and personal spirituality. Respondents reported a generic (instead of more specific view of spirituality and spiritual care, and they perceived themselves to be competent in providing spiritual care. Compared to nurses in hospital settings, nurses in mental health care and home care have a more generic view of spirituality and spiritual care and report a higher level of competence. Next to this, they perceive themselves more as spiritual persons. Future research is needed to develop further understanding in setting specific factors and their influence on nurses’ views and competence regarding spiritual care. Nursing education and management should consider an emphasis on spiritual competence development related to working settings of nurses.

  5. The relationship between quality of work life and turnover intention of primary health care nurses in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Almalki Mohammed J; FitzGerald Gerry; Clark Michele

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Quality of work life (QWL) has been found to influence the commitment of health professionals, including nurses. However, reliable information on QWL and turnover intention of primary health care (PHC) nurses is limited. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between QWL and turnover intention of PHC nurses in Saudi Arabia. Methods A cross-sectional survey was used in this study. Data were collected using Brooks’ survey of Quality of Nursing Work Life, the A...

  6. Health complaints among nurses working near MRI scanners-A descriptive pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A questionnaire-based descriptive pilot study was conducted among all nurses routinely working with MRI in the Northern part of Sweden to provide an indication of the self-reported prevalence of health complaints related to working with MRI systems. Fifty-nine nurses (88% response rate), with on average 8 (±6) years experience with MRI scanning procedures, returned the questionnaire. In total, 9 nurses (15%) reported regularly experiencing at least one of the health complaints (1-5% for specific health complaints) attributed to arise or be aggravated by their presence in the MRI scanning room. Stratification of the results indicated that reporting of adverse symptoms was not related to the level of occupational workload/stress. However, reporting of health complaints was related to the strength of the magnet(s) the nurses worked with, with 57% of symptoms reported by those nurses working with the strongest systems (both 1.5 and 3 T scanners in this population). Although this descriptive study did not include a control population and was based on self-reporting of health complaints, these data indicate that the prevalence of reported health complaints is not related to perceived work load or occupational stress, but does confirm data from other occupational sectors and indicates that the prevalence of adverse health complaints increases with the strength of the MRI system for nurses as well.

  7. The experiences and perceptions of nursing service managers regarding transformation of health services in selected provincial academic health complexes

    OpenAIRE

    R Buys; Muller, M.

    2000-01-01

    Nursing service managers are challenged with enormous transformations within the new political dispensation in South Africa. The objective of the study was to explore and describe the experiences and perceptions of the nursing service managers regarding transformation of health services in selected Provincial Academic Health Complexes. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and phenomenological design was employed utilising focus group interviews and narratives as methods of data collection....

  8. The effects of organizational culture on nursing professionalism: implications for health resource planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manojlovich, M; Ketefian, S

    2002-03-01

    The organizational structure of many hospitals conflicts with the practice of professional nursing, adversely affecting patient outcomes. The ability of nurses to practise in a professional manner may be influenced by the organizational culture of their work environment. Personal attributes may also play a role. Patient outcomes depend on the identification and promotion of scarce health resources. Personal investment theory was used as the conceptual foundation for this study because of its ability to blend environmental context and personal behaviours associated with motivation. Secondary data analysis was undertaken to determine whether organizational culture and personal sense of accomplishment can predict nursing professionalism. Multiple regression analysis showed that organizational culture predicted over 16% of the variance in nursing professionalism. Therefore, nursing professionalism and hospital environment featuring a strong organizational culture are two health resources that can promote improved patient outcomes. PMID:11998192

  9. Spiritual Health among Nursing and Midwifery Students at Kerman University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Rahimi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available   Background & Aim: The present study aimed to investigate the spiritual health among nursing and midwifery students at Kerman University of Medical Sciences in 2012 .   Methods & Materials: This was a cross-sectional study in which all 222 nursing and midwifery students studying at Kerman University of Medical Sciences were recruited to study. Data were gathered using t he Palutzian & Ellison questionnaire of spiritual well-being. The obtained data were then analyzed in the SPSS-20 using parametric statistical tests such as independent t-test and Anova .   Results: Results showed that spiritual well-being of nursing and midwifery students was in the good range. Except gender, no statistically significant relationships were observed between the mean of spiritual well-being and parameters such as age, marital status, academic year, and field of study .   Conclusion: According to the findings , spiritual health among nursing and midwifery students was moderate. It is necessary to promote spirituality among nursing and midwifery students .   

  10. Demonstrating the cost effectiveness of an expert occupational and environmental health nurse: application of AAOHN's success tools. American Association of Occupational Health Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J A; Smith, P S

    2001-12-01

    According to DiBenedetto, "Occupational health nurses enhance and maximize the health, safety, and productivity of the domestic and global work force" (1999b). This project clearly defined the multiple roles and activities provided by an occupational and environmental health nurse and assistant, supported by a part time contract occupational health nurse. A well defined estimate of the personnel costs for each of these roles is helpful both in demonstrating current value and in future strategic planning for this department. The model highlighted both successes and a business cost savings opportunity for integrated disability management. The AAOHN's Success Tools (1998) were invaluable in launching the development of this cost effectiveness model. The three methods were selected from several tools of varying complexities offered. Collecting available data to develop these metrics required internal consultation with finance, human resources, and risk management, as well as communication with external health, safety, and environmental providers in the community. Benchmarks, surveys, and performance indicators can be found readily in the literature and online. The primary motivation for occupational and environmental health nurses to develop cost effectiveness analyses is to demonstrate the value and worth of their programs and services. However, it can be equally important to identify which services are not cost effective so knowledge and skills may be used in ways that continue to provide value to employers (AAOHN, 1996). As evidence based health care challenges the occupational health community to demonstrate business rationale and financial return on investment, occupational and environmental health nurses must meet that challenge if they are to define their preferred future (DiBenedetto, 2000). PMID:11806494

  11. The Practices of Critical Thinking Component and Its Impact in Malaysian Nurses Health Education

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Ghani Kanesan Abdullah; Naser Jamil Alzaidiyeen; Ng Mooi Yee

    2010-01-01

    AbstractThe purpose of this research is to study the impact of the critical thinking component in the health education curriculum of nurses for patients with different health needs. Data for this research was gathered from mixed approaches, quantitative and qualitative approaches. For the quantitative approach 84 student nurses were selected randomly to represent the experiment and control groups in a private medical college in  Northern part of Pennisular Malaysia. The 2 groups of students h...

  12. Eustress at work: the relationship between hope and health in hospital nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, B L; Nelson, D L

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between eustress, the positive response to work demands, and health in 158 hospital nurses. The positive psychological states hope, positive affect, and meaningfulness were used as indicators of eustress, and the psychological state negative affect was used as an indicator of distress. Hope, the belief that one has both the will and the way to accomplish one's goals, had a significant, positive relationship with the perception of health in this sample of hospital nurses. PMID:11721311

  13. Health of ageing people with intellectual disability and the role of the nurse in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Doody, Catriona M.; Markey, Kathleen; Doody, Owen

    2012-01-01

    The number of people with intellectual disability living into old age continues to increase. As one ages, generally, functional ability decreases and health issues increase, with recognising and responding to the health needs of the person with intellectual disability of great importance and the responsibility of the intellectual disability nurse. The nurse must review and adjust the way they deliver care to ageing people with intellectual disability, not only in terms of respo...

  14. Swedish student nurses knowledge of health statutes : a descriptive survey

    OpenAIRE

    Kapborg, Inez D; Berterö, Carina

    2009-01-01

    The nurses function, no matter the working area, is guided by ethical approaches, grounded in science and well-tried experiences, and has to be conducted according to national laws, statutes and instructions. To survey newly graduated Swedish nurses knowledge about current statutes and laws that govern their healthcare system. A questionnaire was developed from facts in relevant statutes and laws presented and used in the nursing education programmes. Following a pilot study testing the items...

  15. Nurses' health, age and the wish to leave the profession--findings from the European NEXT-Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselhorn, H M; Tackenberg, P; Kuemmerling, Angelika; Wittenberg, J; Simon, M; Conway, Paul Maurice; Bertazzi, P A; Beermann, Beate; Büscher, A; Camerino, Donatella; Caillard, J F; D'Hoore, W; Estryn-Behar, Madeleine; Fontenla, Marina; Gould, Dinah; van der Heijden, Beate; Josephson, Malin; Kiss, P; Kovarova, Maria; Kuhn, Klaus; Laine, Marjukka; Le Nezet, O; Lindberg, P; Oginska, Halszka; Pokorski, J; Pokorska, Joanna; Radkiewicz, P; Rimarcik, M; van der Schoot, Esther; Stelzig, Stephanie; Stordeur, Sabine; Wickstroem, G; Widerszal-Bazyl, Maria; Mueller, Beate

    2006-01-01

    In many industrialised countries the number of workers with low health is expected to increase in the nursing profession. This will have implications for occupational health work in health care. The European NEXT-Study (www. next-study. net, funded by EU) investigates working conditions of nurses in ten European countries and provides the opportunity to evaluate the role of health with respect to age and the consideration of leaving nursing.

  16. Multicultural Nursing: Providing Better Employee Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittle, Chad

    2015-12-01

    Living in an increasingly multicultural society, nurses are regularly required to care for employees from a variety of cultural backgrounds. An awareness of cultural differences focuses occupational health nurses on those differences and results in better employee care. This article explores the concept of culturally competent employee care, some of the non-verbal communication cues among cultural groups, models associated with completing a cultural assessment, and how health disparities in the workplace can affect delivery of employee care. Self-evaluation of the occupational health nurse for personal preferences and biases is also discussed. Development of cultural competency is a process, and occupational health nurses must develop these skills. By developing cultural competence, occupational health nurses can conduct complete cultural assessments, facilitate better communication with employees from a variety of cultural backgrounds, and improve employee health and compliance with care regimens. Tips and guidelines for facilitating communication between occupational health nurses and employees are also provided. PMID:26199294

  17. Assisted living nursing practice: medication management: Part 1. Assessing the resident for self-medication ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    Self-administration of medication suggests that individuals are functionally and cognitively competent to manage their health care. Older adults take a significant number of medications (borderline polypharmacy) as well as an unaccounted for number of over-the-counter, as necessary, and herbal remedies. Assisted living residences, moving from a social to a more medical model, are responsible for the safety and well-being of their residents. In addition, the prospect of aging-in-place in the residence is increasingly associated with appropriate medical and medication management. Assisted living services in most states include assistance with medication, but the nature of the assistance varies widely, at times approaching what even a nonclinical observer would regard as medication administration. Although state assisted living regulations can be quite specific regarding medication storage, there are scant guidelines about the components of a thorough assessment as to whether a resident can safely self-administer his or her medications. This article discusses assessment criteria of self-medication ability, drawn from a variety of instruments. In keeping with assisted living nursing standards of practice, the assisted living nurse has a critical responsibility in assessment of this self-care ability. PMID:17430743

  18. Stress assessment by anaesthesiologists and nurses working in paediatric intensive care units

    OpenAIRE

    Grzeskowiak, Malgorzata; Bartkowska-Sniatkowska, Alicja; Rosada-Kurasinska, Jowita; Kielbasiewicz-Drozdowska, Iwona; Janicki, Piotr K.

    2013-01-01

      Abstract. Paediatric intensive care units (PICU) play a special role in the therapy of critically ill children. The physicians (anaesthesiologists) and nurses are at a particular risk of job-related stress because continuous work stress can lead to psychological and physical disturbances. The aim of the study was to assess the stress level among the anaesthesiologists and nurses in the PICU. The anaesthesiologists and nurses (104), recruited from five university hospital centres in Poland, ...

  19. Nurses' Role in Cardiovascular Risk Assessment and Management in People with Inflammatory Arthritis : A European Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Jette; Ferreira, Ricardo J O

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cardiovascular risk (CVR) assessment and management in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA) is recommended but European nurses' involvement in this role has not been well studied. AIM: The aim of the present study was to explore European nurses' role in assessing and managing CVR, in order to suggest topics for practice development and research in this area regarding persons with IA. METHODS: We searched Embase, Cinahl, Cochrane, PsycInfo and PubMed databases and included European articles from the past ten years if they described how nurses assess and/or manage CVR. In addition to the systematic review, we provided case studies from five different countries to illustrate national guidelines and nurses' role regarding CVR assessment and management in patients with IA. RESULTS: Thirty-three articles were included. We found that trained nurses were undertaking CVR assessment and management in different settings and groups of patients. The assessments include blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, glucose and lipid-profile, adherence to medication and behavioural risk factors (unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, alcohol and smoking). Different tools were used to calculate patients' risk. Risk management differed from brief advice to long-term follow-up. Nurses tended to take a holistic and individually tailored approach. Clinical examples of inclusion of rheumatology nurses in these tasks were scarce. CONCLUSION: Nurses undertake CVR assessment, communication and management in different types of patients. This is considered to be a highly relevant task for rheumatology nursing, especially in patients with IA. Further studies are needed to assess patients' perspective, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of nurse-led CVR. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Performance of the nurse in arterial hypertension control in family’s health units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia de França Medeiros

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the nurse male performance in the control of the arterial hypertension in the Family’s Health Units of the city of Patos-PB. Methods: this is about a descriptive exploratory study, from quantitative approach. The sample was composed by 19 nurses. It was used a semi-structured script for data collection. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the Federal University of Campina Grande (protocol number 95/2008. Results: most of the nurses male included in the study were women young, unmarried women, graduate in Faculty Integrated of Patos and with specialization, mainly in the area of Public Health. The nurses male great majority has up to three years as much of academic formation as of time of performance in Family’s Health Units; didn't receive trainings returned to the theme of arterial hypertension. The mentioned professionals, with effective involvement in the program Hiperdia were, the doctor, the nurse male and the nursing technician, the excessive demand was mentioned as to main difficulty to execute referred program, while, the support of Municipal Health Secretariat and the accomplishment of Hiperdia in specific consultation were identified as facilities to exercise such program. Conclusion: the nurse male has an important role within of the context of arterial hypertension, embracing aspects that are going from the participation in program of early detection, until the development of strategies to ensure adherence to treatment.

  1. The health system consequences of agency nursing and moonlighting in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia C. Rispel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Worldwide, there is an increased reliance on casual staff in the health sector. Recent policy attention in South Africa has focused on the interrelated challenges of agency nursing and moonlighting in the health sector. Objective: This paper examines the potential health system consequences of agency nursing and moonlighting among South African nurses. Methods: During 2010, a cluster random sample of 80 hospitals was selected in four South African provinces. On the survey day, all nurses providing clinical care completed a self-administered questionnaire after giving informed consent. The questionnaire obtained information on socio-demographics, involvement in agency nursing and moonlighting, and self-reported indicators of potential health system consequences of agency nursing and moonlighting. A weighted analysis was done using STATA® 13. Results: In the survey, 40.7% of nurses reported moonlighting or working for an agency in the preceding year. Of all participants, 51.5% reported feeling too tired to work, 11.5% paid less attention to nursing work on duty, and 10.9% took sick leave when not actually sick in the preceding year. Among the moonlighters, 11.9% had taken vacation leave to do agency work or moonlighting, and 9.8% reported conflicting schedules between their primary and secondary jobs. In the bivariate analysis, moonlighting nurses were significantly more likely than non-moonlighters to take sick leave when not sick (p=0.011 and to pay less attention to nursing work on duty (p=0.035. However, in a multiple logistic regression analysis, the differences between moonlighters and non-moonlighters did not remain statistically significant after adjusting for other socio-demographic variables. Conclusion: Although moonlighting did not emerge as a statistically significant predictor, the reported health system consequences are serious. A combination of strong nursing leadership, effective management, and consultation with and buy-in from front-line nurses is needed to counteract the potential negative health system consequences of agency nursing and moonlighting.

  2. [How to develop advanced practice nursing in complex health care systems?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecocq, Dan; Mengal, Yves; Pirson, Magali

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few decades, advanced nursing practitioners (ANP) have developed new roles in health care systems and this tendency is continuing to grow. Postgraduate trainedANP interact directly with the person, i.e. the individual and his/her family - in many fields of practice and in a context of collaboration withfellow nurses and other health care professionals. The potential benefits of ANP interventions have been demonstrated in many fields. In particular, ANP are public health actors, able to participate in the interdisciplinary response to supportive care ofpatients with chronic diseases. However, the development of advanced practice nursing (APN) in a complex health care system requires a systemic approach coordinated with the various levels of training of nursing practitioners and other health care professionals. This is an essential prerequisite to allow ANPs to develop new roles adapted to their capacities (legal qualification, high level, specialist training, modalities of collaboration, etc.). To achieve an added value for patients, for the health care system in terms ofresults and to ensure adequate nursing conditions, the authors emphasize the importance of structured development of APN and propose an awareness phase comprising adoption of a conceptual model of APN and the establishment of a structured list of existing nursing practices in order to prepare a methodical implementation strategy. PMID:26168623

  3. Nursing students' perceptions of their knowledge of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender issues: effectiveness of a multi-purpose assignment in a public health nursing class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabez, Rebecca; Pellegrini, Marion; Mankovitz, Andrea; Eliason, Michele J; Dariotis, Wei Ming

    2015-01-01

    Nurses work with diverse populations, but the nursing literature lacks research, theoretical frameworks, or practice guidelines regarding lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health. Through diverse teaching strategies, students explored issues related to LGBT patients, families, and nurses using a cultural humility lens. Diverse teaching strategies included readings, a 2-hour presentation on LGBT health issues, and an assignment to conduct a scripted interview with two nurse key informants, based on the Health Care Equality Index (HEI). Students completed an online LGBT awareness preinterview survey, completed interviews, and completed a postinterview survey. Students showed a significant increase in knowledge about sexual orientation and gender identity and research and interview methods from pretest to posttest. The diverse teaching strategies involved in this assignment can enhance student knowledge, attitudes, and skills related to LGBT health care needs and increase appreciation of nursing research. PMID:25545145

  4. There's an "App" for That: Tips for Preparing Nurses for Roles in Mobile Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Diane M

    2015-09-01

    As health care services shift to being provided in the home and in the community, nurses must be prepared to use mobile health applications for diagnosis, monitoring, managing transitions of care, and health coaching. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2015;46(9):390-391. PMID:26352040

  5. An Investigation into the Public Health Roles of Community Learning Disability Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafuba, Kay; Gates, Bob

    2015-01-01

    International studies have shown poor uptake of public health initiatives by people with learning disabilities. In addition, studies have shown that people with learning disabilities experience poor access to public health services. The contribution of community learning disability nurses in meeting the public health needs of people with learning…

  6. Using scenarios to assess the future supply of NHS nursing staff in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchan James

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper examines issues related to the future supply of registered nursing staff, midwives and health visitors in the National Health Service (NHS in England at a time when there are major public sector funding constraints and as more of these staff are reaching retirement age. Based on available workforce data, the paper reviews different possible scenarios for the supply of NHS nurses over a ten year period, assessing the impact of different numbers of new staff being trained and of varying retirement patterns from the ageing profession. The government in England has more policy levers available than is the case in many other countries. It determines the number of pre-registration training places that are commissioned and funded, it is the major employer, and it also controls the inflow of nurses from other countries through migration policies. Scenario models provide a picture of what the future might look like under various assumptions. These outcomes can be quantified and the results used to assess the risks and opportunities of alternate policy decisions. The approach used in this paper is that of the aggregate deterministic supply model. As part of this exercise, eight scenarios were selected and modelled. These were: A. “No change”- current inflows and outflows B. “Redundancies” - current inflow with higher outflow C. “Improved retention” - current inflow with lower outflow D. “Reduced training intakes A” - lower inflows with lower outflow E. “Reduced training intakes B” - lower inflow with higher outflows F. “Pension time-bomb”- current inflow with a higher rate of retirement G. “Pension delayed”- current inflow with a lower rate of retirement H. “Worst case” - lower inflow and higher outflow including higher retirement Most of the scenarios indicate that a reduction in the supply of nursing staff to NHS England is possible over the next ten years. Small changes in assumptions can make a substantial difference to outcomes and therefore emphasize the point that it is unwise to base policy decisions on a single projection. It is important that different scenarios are considered that may be regarded as possible futures, based on a realistic assessment of the available workforce data, policies and broader labour market and funding outlook.

  7. Role of community nurses in the prevention of tuberculosis in the Tshwane Health District of Gauteng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siphiwe D. Mnisi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to identify the role of community nurses in the prevention of tuberculosis (TB and to identify problems experienced by them when fulfilling this role in the Tshwane Health District of Gauteng. A non-experimental, descriptive, quantitative research design method was used to collect data from community nurses. The sample included 59 registered nurses who voluntarily agreed to participate in the study. A questionnaire was used to collect data and quantitative data analysis methods were employed. Various opinions and ideas on the role of community nurses in the prevention of TB and the problems experienced were identified. Based on the results of this research, measures to protect community nurses from contracting TB whilst on duty should be a priority. Government should support TB programmes by providing money to non-governmental organisations and direct observed treatment short course (DOTS supporters to make follow-up visits to patients possible, thus reducing the number of defaulters. Stringent measures should be taken at all border points to ensure that foreigners are screened for TB, multidrug-resistant TB and extensively drugresistant TB. This study was limited to community nurses in the Tshwane Health District of Gauteng who were registered with the South African Nursing Council (SANC and therefore this study could not be generalised to registered nurses in the hospital setting or even to clinics in the rest of South Africa.

  8. Role of community nurses in the prevention of tuberculosis in the Tshwane Health District of Gauteng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siphiwe D. Mnisi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to identify the role of community nurses in the prevention of tuberculosis (TB and to identify problems experienced by them when fulfilling this role in the Tshwane Health District of Gauteng. A non-experimental, descriptive, quantitative research design method was used to collect data from community nurses. The sample included 59 registered nurses who voluntarily agreed to participate in the study. A questionnaire was used to collect data and quantitative data analysis methods were employed. Various opinions and ideas on the role of community nurses in the prevention of TB and the problems experienced were identified. Based on the results of this research, measures to protect community nurses from contracting TB whilst on duty should be a priority. Government should support TB programmes by providing money to non-governmental organisations and direct observed treatment short course (DOTS supporters to make follow-up visits to patients possible, thus reducing the number of defaulters. Stringent measures should be taken at all border points to ensure that foreigners are screened for TB, multidrug-resistant TB and extensively drugresistant TB. This study was limited to community nurses in the Tshwane Health District of Gauteng who were registered with the South African Nursing Council (SANC and therefore this study could not be generalised to registered nurses in the hospital setting or even to clinics in the rest of South Africa.

  9. An Analysis of Canadian Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing through the Junctures of History, Gender, Nursing Education, and Quality of Work Life in Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mary; Khanlou, Nazilla

    2013-01-01

    A society that values mental health and helps people live enjoyable and meaningful lives is a clear aspiration echoed throughout our Canadian health care system. The Mental Health Commission of Canada has put forth a framework for a mental health strategy with goals that reflect the virtue of optimal mental health for all Canadians (Mental Health Commission Canada, 2009). Canadian nurses, the largest group of health care workers, have a vital role in achieving these goals. In Canada, two-thirds of those who experience mental health problems do not receive mental health services (Statistics Canada, 2003). Through a gendered, critical, and sociological perspective the goal of this paper is to further understand how the past has shaped the present state of psychiatric mental health nursing (PMHN). This integrative literature review offers a depiction of Canadian PMHN in light of the intersections of history, gender, education, and quality of nursing work life. Fourteen articles were selected, which provide a partial reflection of contemporary Canadian PMHN. Findings include the association between gender and professional status, inconsistencies in psychiatric nursing education, and the limitations for Canadian nurse practitioners to advance the role of the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner. PMID:23710367

  10. Weight Care Project: Health professionals' attitudes and ability to assess body weight status - Study protocol

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moorhead, Anne

    2011-03-31

    Abstract Background Health professionals working in primary care and public health have opportunities to address body weight status issues with their patients through face-to-face contact. The objectives of this all-Ireland project are: 1. to assess the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups on body weight status; 2. to assess the health professional groups\\' ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The health professional groups are: (a) community related public health nurses; (b) school public health nurses; (c) GPs and practice nurses (primary care); and (d) occupational health nurses (workplace) from both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Methods\\/Design This all-Ireland multi-disciplinary project follows a mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and consists of four components: 1. Literature review - to explore the role of health professionals in managing obesity through spontaneous intervention in a variety of health promotion settings. 2. Telephone interviews and focus groups - to gain an in-depth insight into the views of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 3. Survey (primarily online but also paper-based) - to determine the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 4. Online evaluation study - an online interactive programme will be developed to assess health professionals\\' ability to identify the body weight status of adults and children. Discussion This project will assess and report the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups within Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on body weight status, and their ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The results of this project will generate recommendations for clinical practice in managing obesity, which may inform policy guidelines.

  11. Weight Care Project: Health professionals' attitudes and ability to assess body weight status - Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Kathy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health professionals working in primary care and public health have opportunities to address body weight status issues with their patients through face-to-face contact. The objectives of this all-Ireland project are: 1. to assess the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups on body weight status; 2. to assess the health professional groups' ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The health professional groups are: (a community related public health nurses; (b school public health nurses; (c GPs and practice nurses (primary care; and (d occupational health nurses (workplace from both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Methods/Design This all-Ireland multi-disciplinary project follows a mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and consists of four components: 1. Literature review - to explore the role of health professionals in managing obesity through spontaneous intervention in a variety of health promotion settings. 2. Telephone interviews and focus groups - to gain an in-depth insight into the views of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 3. Survey (primarily online but also paper-based - to determine the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 4. Online evaluation study - an online interactive programme will be developed to assess health professionals' ability to identify the body weight status of adults and children. Discussion This project will assess and report the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups within Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on body weight status, and their ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The results of this project will generate recommendations for clinical practice in managing obesity, which may inform policy guidelines.

  12. Epidemiology and biostatistics content in baccalaureate education for community health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, G P

    1992-03-01

    Community health nursing leaders recommend including epidemiology and biostatistics in baccalaureate curricula but do not define essential content. Topic coverage and emphasis vary across schools; students differ in academic achievement and in readiness for an epidemiologic approach to nursing. A review of textbooks showed wide variance in topic presentation. A survey of baccalaureate community health nursing faculty in a southeastern state uncovered a core of epidemiology course work comparable to that in graduate programs. Biostatistical content was sparse, and participatory learning strategies were seldom noted. Definition of essential introductory epidemiology and biostatistics content and greater linkage between knowledge and application is necessary to show their congruence with community health nursing practice, and enable differentiation between the level and scope of learning appropriate for undergraduate and graduate education. PMID:1565603

  13. The impact of caring for persons living with HIV and AIDS on the mental health of nurses in the Limpopo Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Davhana-Maselesele

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the impact of caring for AIDS sufferers on the mental health of nurses. This assessment was measured against the level of burnout, stress and depression among 174 nurses caring for people living with HIV and AIDS in Limpopo Province, South Africa. A structured questionnaire was used for data collection. The questionnaire incorporated the AIDS Impact Scale (AIS, Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the participants’ demographic and professional profiles. Participants were conveniently selected from five selected hospitals in Limpopo Province. The study participants’ valuation using the AIS showed that nurses tended to develop strong bonds and relationships with the patients; felt frustrated by their inability to help the terminally ill AIDS sufferers and were subsequently affected by the death of their patients. Personal accomplishments of the nurses remained high and the levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization levels were low. The BDI showed that over 3 out of 4 nurses were experiencing between mild mood disturbance and extreme depression. Higher average scores were noted for items of the depression scale like sadness, dissatisfaction, fatigue and low level of energy. The findings highlight the need to develop psychological support programmes for nurses caring for AIDS patients and promote the provision of social incentives and recognition of the role of nurses in AIDS care.

  14. The impact of caring for persons living with HIV and AIDS on the mental health of nurses in the Limpopo Province

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    M, Davhana-Maselesele; JO, Igumbor.

    Full Text Available This study assessed the impact of caring for AIDS sufferers on the mental health of nurses. This assessment was measured against the level of burnout, stress and depression among 174 nurses caring for people living with HIV and AIDS in Limpopo Province, South Africa. A structured questionnaire was u [...] sed for data collection. The questionnaire incorporated the AIDS Impact Scale (AIS), Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the participants' demographic and professional profiles. Participants were conveniently selected from five selected hospitals in Limpopo Province. The study participants' valuation using the AIS showed that nurses tended to develop strong bonds and relationships with the patients; felt frustrated by their inability to help the terminally ill AIDS sufferers and were subsequently affected by the death of their patients. Personal accomplishments of the nurses remained high and the levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization levels were low. The BDI showed that over 3 out of 4 nurses were experiencing between mild mood disturbance and extreme depression. Higher average scores were noted for items of the depression scale like sadness, dissatisfaction, fatigue and low level of energy. The findings highlight the need to develop psychological support programmes for nurses caring for AIDS patients and promote the provision of social incentives and recognition of the role of nurses in AIDS care.

  15. Using a Vulnerability Theoretical Model to Assess the Malignant Hyperthermia Susceptible Population: Implications for Advanced Practice Emergency Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denholm, Bonnie G

    2015-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a high-risk, low-occurrence medical emergency with symptoms that include a severe increased rate of metabolic activity and rigid skeletal muscles. Clinicians should be knowledgeable and prepared for an MH event because it can occur in areas outside the operating room and without anesthetic triggers. Patients who have this rare genetic condition may come to the emergency department (ED) presenting with symptoms of heat stroke. However, the incidence of suspected MH in the ED or other critical care areas is not easily quantifiable because clinicians may not report cases to a centralized registry. The purpose of this article is to describe the MH-susceptible vulnerable population, to apply a vulnerability theoretical model to assess patients and families, to identify strategies for health promotion to reduce vulnerability, and to discuss how advanced practice nurses who specialize in emergency care can help decrease the vulnerability of MH-susceptible patients and families. By using a vulnerability model to assess the MH-susceptible population, nurses can effectively sort out strategies to prevent poor patient outcomes related to MH and promote health for this high-risk population. Measuring accurate core temperatures, applying effective cooling methods, and administering dantrolene are key concepts in caring for a patient who is experiencing an MH event. Advanced practice emergency nurses can participate in reducing vulnerability for this population by applying the Emergency Nurses Association Clinical Nurse Specialist competencies to MH-related vulnerabilities. Enhancing preparedness, evaluating and coordinating education programs, advocating for report submissions to the North American Malignant Hyperthermia Registry, and assessing opportunities for community collaboration are among the strategies discussed for reducing vulnerability for the MH-susceptible population. PMID:26218487

  16. Using Self-Efficacy to Assess the Readiness of Nursing Educators and Students for Mobile Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Richard F.; Van Neste-Kenny, Jocelyne M. C.; Burton, Pamela A.; Park, Caroline L.; Qayyum, Adnan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the self-efficacy of nursing faculty and students related to their potential use of mobile technology and to ask what implications this technology has for their teaching and learning in practice education contexts. We used a cross-sectional survey design involving students and faculty in two nursing

  17. Mental Health promotion of a hospital through the nurse in the liaison psychiatry team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Cámara Conde

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We show a proposal to increase the quality of nursing cares, improving mental health care of hospitalized patients by creating the figure of the liaison nurse within the liaison psychiatry team. This nurse would not only be a reference to support the nursing staff at the level of patient care, but also the psycho-emotional self-care professional.Objectives: Justifying the need to include the figure of the specialist mental health team liaison psychiatry nurse. Method: The rotation as residents, for a month, with the interconsultation team psychiatric hospital Gregorio Marañón and literature review. Results: There have been partially unmet needs, these could be covered with the existence of a nurse specialist in mental health consultation in this hospital. Discussion: Possibly it poses difficulties in defining the roles of various liaison team professionals, which we expect can be defined at the start implementing the new member.The hospital itself has an own field defined, articulated through the NANDA, NIC, NOC methodology, which covers aspects that so far have not being made, there is not a nurse figure into the psychiatric consultation liaison team.

  18. FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE SELECTION OF LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDENT NURSES IN PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L F Small

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available T he researcher, being a nursing lecturer, questioned the method of selection of learning opportunities for student nurses in two training hospitals in the Northern part of Namibia.

    The study therefore focused on the following objective: To identify the factors that influence the selection of learning opportunities for primary health care in hospital units. A qualitative research design utilising focus group discussions were used. The population consisted of conveniently selected lecturers, student nurses and registered nurses. The same initial question was asked in each focus group to initiate the discussions. The data were analysed according to Tesch's method.

    The results indicated that there is positive commitment from the lecturers and registered nurses to be involved in selecting appropriate learning opportunities. The student nurses also demonstrated a willingness to learn and to be exposed to learning opportunities in primary health care. There were however certain constraints that emerged as themes, namely:
    • Managerial constraints • Educational constraints
    Under the theme "managerial constraints" categories such as workload, nursing staff shortages and communication problems were identified. Under the theme "educational constraints" categories such as a lack of guidance, and the correlation of theory and practice emerged.

    Recommendations based on this research report include improvement of in-service education on managerial and educational aspects to facilitate the primary health care approach in hospitals.

  19. Nurse Mentors to Advance Quality Improvement in Primary Health Centers: Lessons From a Pilot Program in Northern Karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Elizabeth A; Jayana, Krishnamurthy; Cunningham, Troy; Washington, Maryann; Mony, Prem; Bradley, Janet; Moses, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    High-quality care during labor, delivery, and the postpartum period is critically important since maternal and child morbidity and mortality are linked to complications that arise during these stages. A nurse mentoring program was implemented in northern Karnataka, India, to improve quality of services at primary health centers (PHCs), the lowest level in the public health system that offers basic obstetric care. The intervention, conducted between August 2012 and July 2014, employed 53 full-time nurse mentors and was scaled-up in 385 PHCs in 8 poor rural districts. Each mentor was responsible for 6 to 8 PHCs and conducted roughly 6 mentoring visits per PHC in the first year. This paper reports the results of a qualitative inquiry, conducted between September 2012 and April 2014, assessing the program's successes and challenges from the perspective of mentors and PHC teams. Data were gathered through 13 observations, 9 focus group discussions with mentors, and 25 individual and group interviews with PHC nurses, medical officers, and district health officers. Mentors and PHC staff and leaders reported a number of successes, including development of rapport and trust between mentors and PHC staff, introduction of team-based quality improvement processes, correct and consistent use of a new case sheet to ensure adherence to clinical guidelines, and increases in staff nurses' knowledge and skills. Overall, nurses in many PHCs reported an increased ability to provide care according to guidelines and to handle maternal and newborn complications, along with improvements in equipment and supplies and referral management. Challenges included high service delivery volumes and/or understaffing at some PHCs, unsupportive or absent PHC leadership, and cultural practices that impacted quality. Comprehensive mentoring can build competence and improve performance by combining on-the-job clinical and technical support, applying quality improvement principles, and promoting team-based problem solving. PMID:26681711

  20. Nursing Assessment and Intevention for Older People after Acute Medical Admission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, Elizabeth Emilie

    2012-01-01

    Geriatric patients recently discharged from hospital are at risk of unplanned readmissions and admission to nursing home. The risk increases when they are discharged directly from Emergency Department (ED). Time pressure there often requires focus on the presenting problem, although 80 % of geriatric patients have complex and often unresolved caring needs. To ensure seamless transition from the ED to the patients’ home, assessment and intervention carried out by an aged care nursing specialist is suggested as a model for assessing unresolved caring needs. Thus, the aim of this thesis was to examine the use and effect of a two-stage model for structured nursing assessment and problem solving intervention, ISAR II, carried out immediately following discharge from ED and again after 30 days and 180 days in order to assess older peoples’ unresolved problems. This thesis comprises two separate studies. Study A presents a prospective and descriptive pilot study covering 30 days and 180 days follow-ups in which the ISAR II model for structured nursing assessment and problem solving intervention was tested; 154 older persons, 70 years and over participated, their mean age was 82 (SD 7.0) and 113 (73%) were female. Study B presents a randomised controlled study where it was investigated whether the ISAR II model is effective in preventing acute hospital readmissions, permanent admission to nursing home or mortality; 271 older persons 70 years and over were included. Their mean age was 82 (SD 6.6), 180 (66%) were female and 128 (32%) refused to participate. To identify the older persons who were in greatest need of assistance a screening instrument was used, ISAR I. ISAR I comprise six questions and when scoring 2 or more the older person was considered at increased risk of readmission to hospital or functional decline and thus offered to participate in our study. Intervention: After detecting the older people at risk who were planned to be discharged, the research nurse assessed physical, emotional, and cognitive functional status and did a brief standardised nursing assessment and intervention, ISAR II, developed by McCusker et al.. ISAR II comprises a checklist of physical, mental, medical and social problems. Focus was on unresolved problems that required medical intervention, new/different community assistant services, or comprehensive geriatric assessment. After assessment the nurse made relevant referrals to geriatric outpatient clinic, community health centre, primary physician, or arrangements with next-of-kin. The assessments and ISAR II were repeated at follow-up home visits 30 days and 180 days after discharge. In Study A, it was found that the rate of readmission to hospital was 22% after 30 days and 32% after 180 days. A decrease in participants’ unresolved problems was found from 2 at baseline to 0.5 at 180 days follow-up and an increase of 13% in participants receiving community service assistance from baseline to 30 days follow-up. The ISAR II model worked well in the ED and thus it should be investigated further in a randomised controlled study. In Study B no effect was found on acute readmission to hospital, permanent admission to nursing home, or death. Though, a tendency toward earlier readmission to hospital was found in the intervention group. Effect was found in emotional wellbeing as participants in the intervention group were less likely to be at risk of depression after 180 days measured by GDS5 (P=0.05). Also a significant difference was found in participants’ tiredness scores. While fewer reported they felt not tiered, more reported they felt tiered in four to six items in the control group (p<0.0001). Participants in both groups maintained their level of physical function. In the intervention group participants’ unresolved problems diminished from 2 to 0.6 at 180 days follow-up though no significant differences in assistance provided either by the community nurse or by home help was found. A subgroup analyses of participants with an ISAR I score of 2 showed that the intervention group had li

  1. Teaching Job Survival Skills in Nursing: A Look at Occupational Health Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S. Lee

    1980-01-01

    Most nursing assistant programs place emphasis primarily on the cognitive and psychomotor aspects of the student's education. The school must focus on career exploration to meet fully its responsibility for helping students prepare for work. (JOW)

  2. Assessment on nursing serviceat hospital external consulting rooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Dolores Poyatos Ruiz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The social needs and requests change constantly, so that health care is evolving to a more focused on the users, in order to meet users´ needs and expectations of those who are going to get our assistance. Aim: We have developed a research to evaluate the quality of the assistance received by the patientst in their first encounter in the hospital external consulting rooms of traumathology at Santa Bárbara Hospital, letting us know about the patient´s satisfaction after the consulting has finished. Material and method: A transverse descriptive study on the traumathology consulting room of Santa Bárbara Hospital in Puertollano was developed for two months. The research is formed by the patients who attend this consulting room for their first time. A self made multiple choice questionnaire, which was designe by experts, and patients were asked to answer it once their first consulting at traumathology service had finished. Results: 95.6% of the patients considered as good or very good the nursing kindness (confidence/reliabitity when seeing them; 93.5% of them considered as good or very good the information given to them and 90.6% of them considered as good or very good the medical explanations they got. We also noticed a significant statistical difference among nursing kindness (confidence/reliabitity, enough consultation time and explanations received, with regard to the variant high resolution. Conclusions: The study reveals that more than 90% of the interviewed people considered as good or very good the clinical assistance and service given. The research has allowed us to know the areas that we can work on and improve.

  3. Exploring the compatibility of mental health nursing, recovery-focused practice and the welfare state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, M M M; Bush, C J; Ariyaratnam, M I; Brennan, G K; Owtram, R

    2015-06-01

    Mental health nurses are expected to adhere to a range of professional values. The values of social integration that mental health nurses practise are somewhat at odds with the values of the British welfare state. Alternative systems of welfare support are demonstrated in other countries. Mental health nurses must consider models of practice, such as that described by Clifton et?al. (2013b), to manage the disconnection between what is expected and what can be achieved. This discussion paper considers the implications for mental health nursing practice when working alongside individuals in receipt of state benefits. There is arguably a profound impact on an individual's recovery from mental ill health when that individual is also dependent on financial support from the government. Access to welfare benefits can have a significant impact on the recovery journey of that individual. This discussion paper will consider the practice implications for mental health nurses whose professional values include maxims such as 'challenging inequality' and 'respecting diversity', and will seek to examine the implications for practice when such values are divergent from those demonstrated in government policy. The paper will make comparisons with international welfare systems to demonstrate the way in which alternative configurations of state welfare can promote a system of social justice that is in greater equilibrium with the professional values of mental health nurses. Finally, the discussion will focus on the options for mental health nurses to either subscribe to government policy or to find compromise solutions that enable attention to remain focused and active on a strong value base of social justice and recovery-focused practice. PMID:26014831

  4. The Role of the Community Nurse in Promoting Health and Human Dignity-Narrative Review Article.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Muntean

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Population health, as defined by WHO in its constitution, is out "a physical, mental and social complete wellbeing". At the basis of human welfare is the human dignity. This dimension requires an integrated vision of health care. The ecosystemical vision of Bronfenbrenner allows highlighting the unexpected connections between social macro system based on values and the micro system consisting of individual and family. Community nurse is aimed to transgression in practice of education and care, the respect for human dignity, the bonds among values and practices of the community and the physical health of individuals. In Romania, the promotion of community nurse began in 2002, through the project promoting the social inclusion by developing human and institutional resources within community nursery of the National School of Public Health, Management and Education in Healthcare Bucharest. The community nurse became apparent in 10 counties included in the project. Considering the respect for human dignity as an axiomatic value for the community nurse interventions, we stress the need for developing a primary care network in Romania. The proof is based on the analysis of the concept of human dignity within health care, as well as the secondary analysis of health indicators, in the year of 2010, of the 10 counties included in the project. Our conclusions will draw attention to the need of community nurse and, will open directions for new researches and developments needed to promote primary health in Romania.

  5. Opportunities for Nurses to Increase Parental Health Literacy: A Discussion Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Robyn; Fowler, Cathrine; Wilson, Valerie; Kelly, Michelle

    2015-12-01

    Most families can access a range of health information and advice. Information and advice sources often include nurses, the Internet, social media, books, as well as family and friends. While the immediate aim may be to find information, it can also be to assist with parenting skills, solve parenting problems or as part of decision-making processes about their child's health. These processes are strongly influenced by the parent's level of health literacy. Health literacy describes a person's capacity to obtain and utilize health related information. Although there are numerous health literacy definitions all have clearly defined steps. These steps are: obtaining relevant information; then understanding this information; and finally being able to use the information to achieve the expected outcome. Previous research has linked low levels of parental health literacy with poorer child health outcomes. Given this link, increasing health literacy levels would be advantageous for both families and health services. Nurses working with families are in a position to support the family to increase their health literacy through the use of a variety of strategies. This article outlines how health literacy can influence the way parents seek help when they are concerned about child health issues, the relevance of parental health literacy for nurses and suggests some tools that could be used to support the increase of health literacy. PMID:26368012

  6. The role of auxiliary nurse-midwives and community health volunteers in expanding access to medical abortion in rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Mahesh; Tamang, Anand; Shrestha, Prabhakar; Joshi, Deepak

    2015-02-01

    Medical abortion was introduced in Nepal in 2009, but rural women's access to medical abortion services remained limited. We conducted a district-level operations research study to assess the effectiveness of training 13 auxiliary nurse-midwives as medical abortion providers, and 120 female community health volunteers as communicators and referral agents for expanding access to medical abortion for rural women. Interviews with service providers and women who received medical abortion were undertaken and service statistics were analysed. Compared to a neighbouring district with no intervention, there was a significant increase in the intervention area in community health volunteers' knowledge of the legal conditions for abortion, the advantages and disadvantages of medical abortion, safe places for an abortion, medical abortion drugs, correct gestational age for home use of medical abortion, and carrying out a urine pregnancy test. In a one-year period in 2011-12, the community health volunteers did pregnancy tests for 584 women and referred 114 women to the auxiliary nurse-midwives for abortion; 307 women in the intervention area received medical abortion services from auxiliary nurse-midwives. There were no complications that required referral to a higher-level facility except for one incomplete abortion. Almost all women who opted for medical abortion were happy with the services provided. The study demonstrated that auxiliary nurse-midwives can independently and confidently provide medical abortion safely and effectively at the sub-health post level, and community health volunteers are effective change agents in informing women about medical abortion. PMID:25702073

  7. Necessidades de saúde de nutrizes e qualidade de vida / Health needs and quality of life of nursing mothers

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Gilcéria Tochika, Shimoda; Ilva Marico Mizumoto, Aragaki; Clóvis Arlindo de, Sousa; Isilia Aparecida, Silva.

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Relacionar as necessidades de saúde e a qualidade de vida de nutrizes. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com 219 nutrizes selecionadas por amostra consecutiva de conveniência. O instrumento de pesquisa utilizado foi o WHOQOL-bref. RESULTADOS: O não atendimento das necessidades de saúde das nutri [...] zes esteve associado às menores médias de qualidade de vida, com diferença estatística significativa: no domínio Físico, para mulheres com necessidade de sono e repouso, apoio familiar e tempo para si; no domínio Relações Sociais, para mulheres com necessidade de apoio familiar; no domínio Meio Ambiente, para aquelas com necessidade de acesso aos serviços de saúde, ambiente adequado para amamentar e apoio profissional; no domínio Psicológico para nutrizes com necessidade de ter boa saúde mental. CONCLUSÃO: As nutrizes com necessidades de saúde não supridas apresentaram média de qualidade de vida inferior. Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: Establish a relationship between nursing mothers' health needs and their quality of life. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with 219 nursing mothers selected by consecutive convenience sampling. The assessment instrument WHOQOL-bref was used in this study. RESULTS: A significant statistical [...] difference was found between the non-satisfaction of the nursing mothers' health needs and a lower mean quality of life score as follows: in the physical domain, for women who needed sleep and rest, family support and time for themselves; in the social relationships domain, for women who needed family support; in the environment domain, for those who needed access to health services, an appropriate environment to breastfeed and professional support; in the psychological domain, for mothers who needed good mental health. CONCLUSION: Nursing mothers with unsatisfied health needs presented a lower mean quality of life score.

  8. Social media for school nurses: promoting school health in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Regina

    2015-05-01

    People across the globe use social media to connect with one another, stay in touch with friends and family, and exchange information. Health care has embraced social media, and nursing organizations such as the American Nurses Association (ANA) and NASN have a presence in the social media landscape. The students in our schools today are digital natives who grew up with and are at home in the world of technology. With so many options in the digital world, the question is how can school nurses harness this technology to connect with their students and families? More importantly, how can school nurses use social media in a professional and responsible manner and help to enhance the profession of school nursing overall? This article will outline the planning and implementation of an ongoing social media campaign on wellness and healthy behaviors by one Texas suburban school district. PMID:25816429

  9. Emotional Intelligence and Communication Skills of Nursing Students: Example of Harran University School of Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülsün Erigüç

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Nursing is a profession providing services directly to people through interpersonal relationships. Using emotional intelligence and communication skills, nurses, while taking care, could detect more accurately the needs of patients and create a positive impact on patients by providing effective care. Emotional intelligence and communication skills should get involved and developed in the nursing education process. The purpose of this study is to evaluate nursing students’ levels of emotional intelligence and communication skills and to determine the relationship between them. The data were obtained from 195 students studying in Harran University Nursing Department of School of Health through Personal Information Form, Emotional Intelligence Evaluation Scale and Communication Skills Evaluation Scale. To analyze the data t-test, variance analysis and Pearson’s correlation analysis were used. As a result, a significant positive relationship was found between students’ emotional intelligence and communication skills.

  10. AÇÕES DE PROMOÇÃO DA SAÚDE REALIZADAS POR ENFERMEIROS NA AVALIAÇÃO DO CRESCIMENTO E DESENVOLVIMENTO INFANTIL / NURSING HEALTH PROMOTION ACTIONS IN THE ASSESSMENT OF CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT / ACCIONES DE PROMOCIÓN DE LA SALUD REALIZADAS POR LAS ENFERMERAS EN LA EVALUACIÓN DE CRECIMIENTO Y DESARROLLO INFANTIL

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    FLÁVIA PAULA, MAGALHÃES MONTEIRO; THELMA LEITE, DE ARAUJO; LORENA, BARBOSA XIMENES; NEIVA FRANCENELY, CUNHA VIEIRA.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se identificar as ações de promoção da saúde pelo enfermeiro na avaliação do crescimento e do desenvolvimento infantil e analisá-las quanto às competências essenciais da promoção da saúde preconizadas pela Public Health Agency of Canada. Realizou-se uma Revisão integrativa em cinco bases d [...] e dados, utilizando uma combinação dos termos: crescimento e desenvolvimento, criança, promoção da saúde e enfermagem. Procedeu-se a análise de 10 artigos na íntegra. Os estudos apontam que as ações de enfermagem são bem diversificadas e relacionam-se às medidas de investigação, avaliação e/ou intervenções, porém enfatizam apenas os aspectos nutricionais nesse processo, em detrimento às diferentes dimensões que contemplam o desenvolvimento infantil. Entre as sete competências identificadas, houve predomínio da avaliação e análise. Ademais, a competência diversidade e inclusão social foram identificadas em apenas dois estudos. Por fim, os enfermeiros vêem aplicando suas habilidades/competências na promoção da saúde, no entanto integram-nas sem utilizar um referencial teórico que norteie suas ações de crescimento e desenvolvimento infantil. Abstract in spanish El objetivo de este trabajo fue identificar las acciones para promoción de la salud por enfermeras en la evaluación del crecimiento y desarrollo del niño y analizar las competencias básicas de promoción de la salud recomendadas por la Agencia de Salud Pública de Canadá. Se llevó a cabo una revisión [...] integradora en cinco bases de datos, utilizando una combinación de términos: crecimiento y desarrollo, niño, promoción de la salud y enfermería. Se procedió al análisis de los 10 artículos. Los autores señalaron que las Acciones de enfermería se encuentran diversificadas, y se refieren a las medidas de investigación, evaluación y/o intervenciones, sin embargo insisten en los aspectos nutricionales de este proceso, en lugar de las diferentes dimensiones que incluyen el desarrollo del niño. Entre las siete competencias identificadas, hubo predominio de la evaluación y análisis. Además, las competencias diversidad e inclusión social se identificaron en sólo dos estudios. Por último, las enfermeras ven aplicados sus conocimientos/competencias en promoción de la salud, sin utilizar un referencial teórico que oriente sus acciones en el crecimiento y desarrollo infantil. Abstract in english Aimed to identify the actions of health promotion by nurses in the assessment of child growth and development and to analyze them as core competencies of health promotion recommended by the Public Health Agency of Canada. Carried out a integrative review of five databases, using a combination of the [...] terms: growth and development, child health promotion and nursing. Proceeded to the analysis of articles 10 in its entirety. The authors pointed out that nursing actions are well diversified and relate to measures of research, assessment and /or interventions, however they only emphasize on the nutritional aspects in this process, rather than the different dimensions that include child development. Among the seven competencies identified, evaluation and analysis were predominant. Moreover, the competence diversity and inclusion were identified in only two studies. Finally, the nurses see that their skills/competencies are being applied in health promotion, incorporating them without using a theoretical framework that guides their actions in child growth and development.

  11. Reflective practice enhances public health nurse implementation of nurse-family partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Rita J; O'Brien, Ruth A; Neal, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Reflective practice is defined as a cyclical process involving a series of phases in which an individual describes a salient event, attends to his/her positive and negative feelings about the event, and ultimately reexamines the experience in an effort to understand and to plan how he or she would act in a similar situation in the future. This paper describes how the concept of reflective practice is integrated into the evidence-based Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) program. The pivotal role of the nursing supervisor in guiding nurses to engage in reflection on their work with families is emphasized. Exemplars drawn from the experience of 2 NFP nursing supervisors are presented to illustrate how reflection in the NFP program is operationalized. The benefits as well as the challenges to the use of reflective practice are also discussed. While anecdotal comments from NFP nurses and supervisors are cited to suggest how the regular use of reflective practice has the potential to improve implementation of the program with families, the authors further propose that research is needed to more rigorously examine the benefits that reflective practice may have on the quality of program implementation, family outcomes, and the retention of nurses working in the NFP program. PMID:20433667

  12. Determinants of the intention of elementary school nurses to adopt a redefined role in health promotion at school

    OpenAIRE

    Godin Gaston; Chabot Guylaine; Gagnon Marie-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The quest for greater efficiency in the provision of primary healthcare services and the implementation of a "health-promoting school" approach encourage the optimal redefinition of the role of school nurses. School nurses are viewed as professionals who might be significant actors in the promotion of youth health. The aim of this study was to identify the determinants of the intention of elementary school nurses to adopt a new health-promotion role as a strategic option f...

  13. 76 FR 14417 - ``Low Income Levels'' Used for Various Health Professions and Nursing Programs Included in Titles...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ...optometry, pharmacy, allied health podiatric medicine, nursing...graduate programs in behavioral health and mental health practice, and other public or...individuals related by birth, marriage, or adoption who live...

  14. 77 FR 22790 - ``Low Income Levels'' Used for Various Health Professions and Nursing Programs Included in Titles...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ...optometry, pharmacy, allied health podiatric medicine, nursing...graduate programs in behavioral health and mental health practice, and other public or...individuals related by birth, marriage, or adoption who live...

  15. Integrative Nursing and Health Sciences Initiatives for the 21st Century: Vision and Pedagogy at One Jesuit University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Suzanne Hetzel; Crabtree, Robbin D.; Kelly, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The powerful and complex mandates arising from reports such as "The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health" and "Health Professionals for a New Century: Transforming Education to Strengthen Health Systems in an Interdependent World" challenge colleges and universities to reconsider how they deliver nursing

  16. Experiences of nursing students in caring for patients with behaviors suggestive of low health literacy: a qualitative analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Carol Shieh; Anne E. Belcher; Barbara Habermann

    2012-01-01

    Background: Health literacy is the ability to obtain, process, and understand health information in order to take appropriate health actions. Low health literacy is associated with poor health knowledge and self-management of chronic disease, inadequate utilization of preventive services, and increased hospital admissions. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing recommends that nursing schools incorporate health literacy into curricula. Little, however, has been reported about what n...

  17. Nursing in the Next Decade: Implications for Health Care and for Patient Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kany, K

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Nursing faces yet another divergence between demand and supply that is evidenced in insufficient nurse staffing with significant implications for patient safety. Many believe this shortage of registered nurses is entrenched in long-standing problems related to the value and image of nursing and the limited role nursing has had in identifying priorities within health care delivery systems. Nursing's Agenda for the Future is a plan resulting from the experience and wisdom of a broad representation of general nursing and nursing specialty organizations. Efforts to realize the priorities and objectives have evolved over the past two years in order to make larger strides, or quantum leaps, toward reaching the objectives contained within the plan. This article reviews the activities leading up to the development of this plan, presents the key areas of concern addressed in this plan, describes what has been accomplished since the publication of this plan in 2002, and outlines the work that lies ahead to bring to fruition the objectives the plan established.

  18. The experience of maternal and child health nurses responding to women with postpartum depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Penelope

    2012-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that maternal and child health nurses (MCH nurses) are in a unique position to help mothers with postpartum depression (PPD), but little has been done to understand the MCH nurses' day-to-day experience. This Australian study addresses that issue by analyzing the results of eight in-depth interviews with MCH nurses. The data obtained from these interviews was analyzed using the phenomenological method described by Creswell, adapted from Moustakas. From this analysis five themes emerge: how MCH nurses recognize symptoms of PPD; the importance of having treatment options available; the role of rapport; the limits of MCH nurses in responding to PPD; and how MCH nurses respond when recognizing new cases of PPD. The results of the study reveal several areas for policy review, most significantly the need for more MCH nurse training to recognize the symptoms of PPD and identify the appropriate treatment option. In addition, a review of staff retention and mobility policies is recommended to improve rapport with mothers and maintain and grow knowledge of local treatment options. PMID:20924660

  19. Health technology assessment in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, G

    2000-01-01

    Italy has a national health service (SSN) dating to 1978. Italy's system of government is characterized by a rather high degree of decentralization of power, and the health system is likewise decentralized. Most of the responsibilities for health care have been ceded to the regions. The state retains only limited coordinating and supervisory powers. The state has a financial responsibility for the national health service, but state contributions are limited and expenditures in excess of this made by the region must be financed from other sources. Health reforms of 1992-93 aimed at making the regions more sensitive to the need to control aggregate expenditure and to monitor measures to promote efficiency, quality, and citizen-patient satisfaction. The diffusion of individual health technologies has been relatively uncontrolled in many regions in Italy, although tight central constraints on capital spending have contained diffusion of new technology. Regulation of placement of services is a planning function and is the responsibility of both the Ministry of Health and the regions. Health technology assessment (HTA) activities have been expanding since the early 1990s, but these activities tend to be untargeted, uncoordinated, and without priorities. Nonetheless, the principal actors in the SSN at national, regional, and local levels are becoming more sensitive to the need to apply criteria of clinical and cost-effectiveness and to be more rigorous in deciding what services to guarantee. There are reasons to be guardedly optimistic about the future of HTA in Italy. PMID:10932419

  20. A job analysis of selected health workers in a district health system in KwaZulu Natal - Part two: Job analysis of nurses in primary health care settings

    OpenAIRE

    S Mbambo

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this descriptive survey was to do a job analysis of different categories of nurses in a District Health System in order to clarify job expectations, describe current practice of nurses in hospitals and clinics and to make recommendations about skills mix in district services. This article deals with the clinics only.

  1. Nurse-midwives' attitudes towards adolescent sexual and reproductive health needs in Kenya and Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warenius, Linnéa U; Faxelid, Elisabeth A; Chishimba, Petronella N; Musandu, Joyce O; Ong'any, Antony A; Nissen, Eva B-M

    2006-05-01

    Adolescent sexuality is a highly charged moral issue in Kenya and Zambia. Nurse-midwives are the core health care providers of adolescent sexual and reproductive health services but public health facilities are under-utilised by adolescents. The aim of this study was to investigate attitudes among Kenyan and Zambian nurse-midwives (n=820) toward adolescent sexual and reproductive health problems, in order to improve services for adolescents. Data were collected through a questionnaire. Findings revealed that nurse-midwives disapproved of adolescent sexual activity, including masturbation, contraceptive use and abortion, but also had a pragmatic attitude to handling these issues. Those with more education and those who had received continuing education on adolescent sexuality and reproduction showed a tendency towards more youth-friendly attitudes. We suggest that critical thinking around the cultural and moral dimensions of adolescent sexuality should be emphasised in undergraduate training and continuing education, to help nurse-midwives to deal more empathetically with the reality of adolescent sexuality. Those in nursing and other leadership positions could also play an important role in encouraging wider social discussion of these matters. This would create an environment that is more tolerant of adolescent sexuality and that recognises the beneficial public health effect for adolescents of greater access to youth-friendly sexual and reproductive health services. PMID:16713886

  2. A comparative analysis of the changes in nursing practice related to health sector reform in five countries of the Americas

    OpenAIRE

    Guevara Edilma B.; Mendias Elnora P.

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To identify changes in nursing practice and the nursing-practice environment that have occurred with implementation of health sector reform in five countries in the Americas. Methods. An exploratory study of selected settings in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, and the United States of America was conducted between 1997 and 1999 to collect narrative data from 125 professional nurses about their perceptions of nursing practice and changes in work environments. Descriptions of ch...

  3. An Analysis of Canadian Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing through the Junctures of History, Gender, Nursing Education, and Quality of Work Life in Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Smith; Nazilla Khanlou

    2013-01-01

    A society that values mental health and helps people live enjoyable and meaningful lives is a clear aspiration echoed throughout our Canadian health care system. The Mental Health Commission of Canada has put forth a framework for a mental health strategy with goals that reflect the virtue of optimal mental health for all Canadians (Mental Health Commission Canada, 2009). Canadian nurses, the largest group of health care workers, have a vital role in achieving these goals. In Canada, two-thir...

  4. How Nursing Should Respond to the Third Report of the Pew Health Professions Commission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fagin, Claire

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The Third Report of the Pew Health Professions Commission, "Critical Challenges: Revitalizing the Health Professions for the Twenty-First Century" (1995, describes a transformed U.S. health care industry characterized by systems of integrated care combining primary, specialty, and hospital services. Forecasting the success of such systems, the Report states that they will produce better management, accountability, responsiveness, more effective use of resources, innovation, and diversity in health delivery, inclusivity in the definition of health, more concern about education, prevention and care management rather than treatment, more orientation to what is improving the health of the entire population, and more reliance on outcomes data and evidence. The Report predicts that these changes will cause closure of as many as half of the nation's hospitals, expansion of primary care, surpluses in the supply of physicians, nurses, and pharmacists, consolidation of allied health professions, and demand for public health professionals. The Commission's seven recommendations for nursing deal with maximizing opportunities presented by the profession's educational diversity, regulation, and educational change, downsizing particularly in diploma and associate degree programs, expanding Master's level practitioner programs, developing new models of integration between education and the systems of health care, and "recovering" the clinical management role of nursing. This paper examines and critiques the recommendations of the Commission regarding nursing and discusses the challenges they present.

  5. [Extended nursing consultation: education possibilities for the practice of integrality in health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Maria Luiza Paz; de Oliveira, Dora Lúcia Leidens Corrêa; Manica, Silvia Troyahn

    2013-12-01

    The objective was to analyze an intervention in the traditional way of teaching nursing consultation and its potential for nurses' education aiming for the practice of integrality in health. This is a participative research carried out from August to November 2011 with eight students attending the School of Nursing in a public university from the south of Brazil. The study context comprised outpatient consultations and daily life experiences of the patients. Data were collected through focus group and submitted to thematic analysis, in which two categories emerged: "The interactivity between the traditional and the extended scenario:possibilities for the integrality in education" and "The extended nursing consultation, knowledge from experience". The analysis evidenced that the experience produced knowledge coherent with the integrality in education. We conclude that the diversification of learning scenarios may configure a pedagogical strategy with potential to foster changes in the existing health care and education model. PMID:25080700

  6. Determining the Level of Satisfaction of Patients in Nursing Care and Health Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevban Arslan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine patients’ satisfaction with nursing care and health services. This descriptive study was performed with 320 inpatients at University Hospital’s internal diseases and surgical units in July and November 2011. The data were collected by a questionnaire and the Visual Analog Patient Satisfaction Scale and the Scale of Patient Perception of Hospital Experience With Nursing. For statistical evalution , SPSS(Statistical Package for Social Science 15 percent by using the program, the Student t-test, ANOVA and Kruskal- Wallis analysis was done with. The mean total score was 8.65±1.52 on the Visual Analog Patient Satisfaction Scale. The Scale of Patient Perception of Hospital Experience With Nursing, the mean total score was 65.90±11.00. Consequently, Patients were satisfied with the nursing care and health services. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(6.000: 717-724

  7. A STUDY TO ASSESS KNOWLEDGE AND AWARENESS ABOUT THE HEPATITIS B AND C AMONG NURSING COLLEGE STUDENTS OF CENTRAL INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramniwas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND: The lives of millions of adolescents worldwide are at risk because they do not have the information; skills, health services and support which they need to go through sexual development during adolescence. The epidemic of Hepatitis B/HCV is now progressin g at a rapid pace among young people. AIMS& OBJECTIVE: To assess knowledge of nursing students towards Hepatitis B/HCV Awareness, Prevention & Control . T o assess knowledge increase after educational intervention by means of lectures and discussions among n ursing students. MATERIAL& METHOD: An educational interventional study was conducted in Kushabhau Thakre Nursing College, Kolar Road, Bhopal. Study population included all Nursing students. Sample size was 200 students. Inclusion Criteria included all Nursing students present at the time of pre intervention interview and who gave informed consent. The data was analyzed using appropriate statistical software (MS excel and SPSS version 20. Mc Nemar test was applied for statistical significance of knowledge improvement by intervention. RESULT: Most of the Nursing students (95% were correctly known that Hepatitis B/HCV is a viral disease and an effective vaccine against Hepatitis B is available in the market but they are not able to differentiate between Hepatitis B and C, in fact they have a m is - conception that both are the same entity. After intervention 87% of the students were aware about preventive measures against Hepatitis B/HCV. Health care providers (55%, Teaching (25 and Mass media (22% were main source of knowledge for them. More t han two thirds of students had positive attitude towards Hepatitis B/HCV infected patients. CONCLUSION: The study revealed that although a significant proportion of students were aware of Hepatitis B/HCV, their knowledge on prevention modalities was low as majority of them are unable to differentiate Hepatitis B from Hepatitis C. Students also harbored misconceptions on the modes of Hepatitis B/HCV transmission. Television, newspapers and internet were quoted as the most common source of information.

  8. Making the transition: an interview with nurse chief executive officers at Catholic Health Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Pat

    2012-01-01

    Nurses have long been leaders in health care, and many possess the skills and talents not only to provide superior patient care but also to lead institutions as chief executive officers (CEO). It is not surprising that nurses are moving into the role of CEOs in their organizations. Some nurses have purposefully obtained MHA or MBA graduate degrees to pursue administrative careers. Others have advanced to top organizational positions of leadership with non-business-related graduate degrees. This article interviews 6 such professionals to understand their journey to becoming CEO/president of their organization. PMID:22157788

  9. Evaluation of the implementation of advanced nursing competencies in the Basque health care system

    OpenAIRE

    Galder Abos-Mendizabal; Roberto Nuño-Solinis; Leticia San Martin-Rodriguez

    2013-01-01

    In 2011 advanced competences in nursing were defined and pilot tested in the Basque Healthcare System, in order to meet the needs of chronic patients. It is assumed that nursing professionals, in a functional sense, can fulfil a liaison role both within the health system and with external stakeholders. Integration between levels of care, the mobilisation of resources and case management are fundamental factors in achieving this objective. Background: In 2010, an overall strategy for tackling...

  10. Investigation of health anxiety and its related factors in nursing students

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Y,; Zhao Y.; Mao S; Li G; Yuan Y

    2014-01-01

    Yuqun Zhang,1,2 Yueqiu Zhao,3 Shengqin Mao,1 Guohong Li,4 Yonggui Yuan1 1Department of Psychosomatics and Psychiatry, Affiliated Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 2Nursing Faculty of Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 3Nanjing Health School, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 4Nursing Department, Affiliated Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s ...

  11. Developing nurse educators' computer skills towards proficiency in nursing informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalahti, Elina; Heinonen, Jarmo; Saranto, Kaija

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess nurse educators' competence development in nursing informatics (NI) and to compare their competence to the NI competence of other healthcare professionals. Electronic health records (EHR) have been in use for many years. However, the adoption of the nursing care plan finally made it possible for nurses in Finland to develop a model for structured documentation with nursing terminology. A total of n?=?124 (n?=?85 pre-test and n?=?39 post-test) participants from Universities of Applied Sciences (UAS), hospitals, hospitals' information management and health centres were surveyed with a e-questionnaire designed to assess the development of their NI competences during the nursing documentation development project. The questionnaire included 145 structured questions and 6 open questions. Data analysis focused on classification and comparison of NI competences through data description and statistical parameters using figures and tables. The basic NI competences of the nurse educators were good at the end of project and the nurse educators had better information literacy and information management competences than other participants. The information retrieval skills varied greatly, but they improved evenly towards the end. The nurse educators mastered better evidence-based nursing and use of nursing process models in their work. PMID:24152130

  12. Older adult mental health: Teaching senior-level baccalaureate nursing students what they need to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, William J; Bradway, Christine K; Aselage, Melissa

    2010-07-01

    Within the older adult population, certain idiosyncratic aspects of mental illness add to the challenges of helping clients manage these disorders. Older adults are more likely than younger populations to experience physiologically based comorbidities, a dynamic that further strains coping capacities. Barriers to the provision of comprehensive mental health nursing care for older adults include myths and stigmas about aging and mental health. Nurse educators are challenged to move students toward a more positive, empirically based approach to the care of older adults' mental health. In this article, background information supporting the importance of working to improve students' knowledge of and attitudes toward mental illness in older adults is provided. Specific teaching strategies in the areas of older adult mental health, dementia, and delirium are discussed. Resources to support the incorporation of these strategies into nursing curricula are described. PMID:20608592

  13. Postnatal Depression Is a Public Health Nursing Issue: Perspectives from Norway and Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Kari Glavin; Patricia Leahy-Warren

    2013-01-01

    The framework provided by the Millennium Development Goals includes maternal health as an area of priority. Postnatal depression (PND) is a serious public health issue because it occurs at a crucial time in a mothers' life, can persist for long periods, and can have adverse effects on partners and the emotional, behavioural, and cognitive development of infants and children. Internationally, public health nurses (PHNs) are key professionals in the delivery of health care to mothers in the pos...

  14. Designing a process for simulation-based annual nurse competency assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterval, Eugene M E; Stephan, Kelly; Peczinka, Denise; Shaw, Amber

    2012-01-01

    The education council at Orlando Regional Medical Center identified a need to improve the annual nurse competency assessment. A revision process was implemented to improve the method and efficiency of assessing nurse competency. This process included evaluating population-specific competencies using simulation-based scenarios that were developed by a multidisciplinary team. The results showed high participant satisfaction scores and cost savings because of an individualized, efficient approach and bundling of resources. PMID:23222424

  15. Nurses' Role in Cardiovascular Risk Assessment and Management in People with Inflammatory Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Jette; Ferreira, Ricardo J O; Garcia-Diaz, Silvia; Ndosi, Mwidimi; Palmer, Deborah; van Eijk-Hustings, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cardiovascular risk (CVR) assessment and management in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA) is recommended but European nurses' involvement in this role has not been well studied. AIM: The aim of the present study was to explore European nurses' role in assessing and managing CVR, in order to suggest topics for practice development and research in this area regarding persons with IA. METHODS: We searched Embase, Cinahl, Cochrane, PsycInfo and PubMed databases and included Euro...

  16. PICU Nurses' Pain Assessments and Intervention Choices for Virtual Human and Written Vignettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFond, Cynthia M; Van Hulle Vincent, Catherine; Corte, Colleen; Hershberger, Patricia E; Johnson, Andrew; Park, Chang G; Wilkie, Diana J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this concurrent mixed-methods study was to 1) examine the factors pediatric intensive care unit nurses consider when assessing and intervening for children who report severe pain and to 2) determine the effect of child behavior and diagnosis on the nurses' pain ratings and intervention choices for written and virtual human vignettes. Quantitative and qualitative results substantiated that despite recommendations to use self-report, many PICU nurses use behavior as the primary indicator to assess and treat pain, even when a child is old enough to articulate pain intensity and there is sufficient cause for pain to be present. PMID:25682019

  17. Exploring nurses' and patients' perspectives of limit setting in a forensic mental health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Tessa; Daffern, Michael; Martin, Trish

    2014-04-01

    Limit setting is an intervention that is frequently used by mental health nurses. However, limit setting is poorly conceptualized, its purpose is unclear, and there are few evidence-based guidelines to assist nurses to set limits in a safe and effective manner. What is known is that the manner in which nurses set limits influences patients' perceptions of the interactions and their emotional and behavioural responses. In this qualitative study, 12 nurses and 12 patients participated in personal, semistructured interviews that aimed to explore limit setting and to propose principles to guide practice. The findings suggested that: (i) limit setting is important to safety in mental health hospitals; (ii) engaging patients in an empathic manner is necessary when setting limits (when nurses engage in an empathic manner, the therapeutic relationship is more likely to be preserved and the risk of aggressive responses is reduced); and (iii) an authoritative (fair, respectful, consistent, and knowledgeable), rather than authoritarian (controlling and indifferent), limit-setting style enhances positive outcomes with regards to adherence, reduced likelihood of aggression, and preservation of the therapeutic relationship. In conclusion, a limit-setting style characterized by empathic responding and an authoritative, rather than authoritarian interpersonal, style is recommended. Elucidating the components of this style is critical for effective training and best practice of mental health nurses, and to reduce aggressive responses from limit setting. PMID:23822138

  18. Towards (re)conciliation: (re)constructing relationships between indigenous health workers and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, D; Brady, W; Stein, I

    1999-01-01

    Currently in Australia, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians are attempting to reconcile themselves with a history of colonization/invasion, which resulted in human rights violations against Australia's indigenous people. Australian nursing has to examine its past in relation to the treatment of Aboriginal Australians. Relationships between nurses and Aboriginal health workers are the most commonly occurring professional relationships between nurses and Aboriginal people and are of key importance to the successful delivery of health services to Aboriginal communities. This qualitative study, grounded in feminism, aimed to explore the professional relationships between Aboriginal health workers and nurses and to develop insights which could assist the Australian nursing profession through a process of reconciliation with Aboriginal Australians. Feminist analysis of narrative text revealed several key themes as being crucial to this process. These were: learning to know and understand; towards workplace equity; and skill sharing -- learning from each other. Implications for nursing, in its journey toward reconciliation with Aboriginal Australians, are drawn from this study. PMID:10064287

  19. Teachers' and Pupils' Perceptions of the School Nurse in Relation to Sexual Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westwood, Jo; Mullan, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The current government in the United Kingdom has made a commitment to reducing the high rates of teenage conceptions and sexually transmitted infections by implementing various sexual health strategies. It emphasises an increased public health role for school nurses by identifying that they have access to the school-age population and the…

  20. Evaluating Long Term Impact of Nursing and Other Health Care Professionals Continuing Education Workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henschke, John A.

    From October, 1977, through December, 1979, 13 one-day continuing education workshops were given by the University of Missouri Extension for nurses and other health-care professionals. A total of 520 different health care professionals attended the sessions, with multiple registrations bringing the total enrollment in the program to 925. Programs…

  1. The self-medication in elderly people and the role of health professionals and nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Nogueira Valença, Raimunda Medeiros Germano, Rejane Maria Paiva de Menezes

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the complex theme of self-medication in the elderly people and the role of health professionals and nursing. Methodology: this is a theoretical essay based on a literature review of the narrative type. It was selected articles indexed in databases Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO and the Database of Nursing (BDENF, from 2003 to 2009, using as descriptors: self-medication, nursing and elderly people. It was also used books and manuals of the ministry of health. From the reading and qualitative synthesis of abstracts, were set up two axes of analysis and reflection: Aging and self: views on the issue and Medication in the elderly people: the role of health professionals and nursing. Results: the elderly people are the age group that uses more drugs. Self-medication is a practice that can generate serious health risks such as intoxication. The qualified professional should guide the public about the medicine to lessen the risk and effectively as possible. Conclusion: it was conclude that the use of knowledge of health professionals and nurses to help to reduce the risks associated with self-medication and problems related to use of medicines, contributing to the improvement of quality of life of older people.

  2. Indoor air quality, ventilation and respiratory health in elderly residents living in nursing homes in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentayeb, M; Norback, D

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Few data exist on respiratory effects of indoor air quality and comfort parameters in the elderly. In the context of the GERIE study, we investigated for the first time the relationships of these factors to respiratory morbidity among elderly people permanently living in nursing homes in seven European countries. 600 elderly people from 50 nursing homes underwent a medical examination and completed a standardised questionnaire. Air quality and comfort parameters were objectively assessed in situ in the nursing home. Mean concentrations of air pollutants did not exceed the existing standards. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity ratio was highly significantly related to elevated levels of particles with a 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameter of <0.1 ?m (PM0.1) (adjusted OR 8.16, 95% CI 2.24–29.3) and nitrogen dioxide (aOR 3.74, 95% CI 1.06–13.1). Excess risks for usual breathlessness and cough were found with elevated PM10 (aOR 1.53 (95% CI 1.15–2.07) and aOR 1.73 (95% CI 1.17–10.3), respectively) and nitrogen dioxide (aOR 1.58 (95% CI 1.15–2.20) and aOR 1.56 (95% CI 1.03–2.41), respectively). Excess risks for wheeze in the past year were found with PM0.1 (aOR 2.82, 95% CI 1.15– 7.02) and for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and exhaled carbon monoxide with formaldehyde (aOR 3.49 (95% CI 1.17–10.3) and aOR 1.25 (95% CI 1.02–1.55), respectively). Breathlessness and cough were associated with higher carbon dioxide. Relative humidity was inversely related to wheeze in the past year and usual cough. Elderly subjects aged ?80 years were at higher risk. Pollutant effects were more pronounced in the case of poor ventilation. Even at low levels, indoor air quality affected respiratory health in elderly people permanently living in nursing homes, with frailty increasing with age. The effects were modulated by ventilation.

  3. Perception of evidence-based practice and the professional environment of Primary Health Care nurses in the Spanish context: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    González-Torrente Susana; Pericas-Beltrán Jordi; Bennasar-Veny Miguel; Adrover-Barceló Rosa; Morales-Asencio José M; De Pedro-Gómez Joan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The study of the factors that encourage evidence-based clinical practice, such as structure, environment and professional skills, has contributed to an improvement in quality of care. Nevertheless, most of this research has been carried out in a hospital context, neglecting the area of primary health care. The main aim of this work was to assess the factors that influence an evidence-based clinical practice among nursing professionals in Primary Health Care. Methods A mult...

  4. An Overview of Health Care Spending Patterns in the United States: Using National Data Sources to Explore Trends in Nursing Services

    OpenAIRE

    Sochalski, Julie &Patrician, Patrica A

    1998-01-01

    National health care spending trends have been tracked through the federal governmental for much of the latter half of the 20th century. A review of these spending trends illustrates not only health care's contribution to the overall national economy, but more importantly it allows us to assess our priorities for spending that money. Nursing has long sought information about the "cost" of its care, at the micro-level, and has desired to articulate its share of national expenditures, at the ma...

  5. Indoor air quality, ventilation and respiratory health in elderly residents living in nursing homes in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentayeb, M; Norback, D; Bednarek, M; Bernard, A; Cai, G; Cerri, S; Lavaud, F; Holst, Gitte Juel; Nasilowski, J; Sestini, P; Sarno, G; Sigsgaard, T; Wieslander, G; Zielisnki, J; Viegi, G; Annesi-Maesano, I

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Few data exist on respiratory effects of indoor air quality and comfort parameters in the elderly. In the context of the GERIE study, we investigated for the first time the relationships of these factors to respiratory morbidity among elderly people permanently living in nursing homes in seven European countries. 600 elderly people from 50 nursing homes underwent a medical examination and completed a standardised questionnaire. Air quality and comfort parameters were objectively assesse...

  6. Job Satisfaction and Work Environment of Primary Health Care Nurses in Ekiti State, Nigeria: an Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday Joseph Ayamolowo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Job satisfaction, quality of work environment and morale of health practitioners is beginning to receive attention worldwide.Objectives: This study examined the nature of the work environment of community health nurses, and determined the level of job satisfaction among these nurses. It further explored the relationship between work environment and job satisfaction of these nurses, and perceived factors in the work environment that would increase their job satisfaction. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional design was employed. The study was conducted in public primary health care facilities in Ekiti State, Nigeria. All the 216 nurses in these facilities were recruited but only 161 nurses responded to the instrument administered. A 58- item semi-structured questionnaire was used to survey nurses currently practicing in the above health setting. Data analysis was done using descriptive and inferential statistics.Results: Findings from the study revealed the mean score of nurses’ perception of their work environment to be 64.65±19.77. Forty four percent (44% of the nurses perceived their WE as of an average quality while 31% reported high quality WE. A majority (67.1% of the nurses had low degree of job satisfaction while only few nurses (3.1% reported high degree of satisfaction with job. A significant positive strong correlation was found between overall work environment and the general job satisfaction of the nurses(r = 0.55, p = < 0.01. “Provisions of modern equipment for work” and “increment/prompt payment of salary” were the most prominent factors in work environment that the nurses perceived as capable of increasing their job satisfaction (54.7% and 49.7% respectively. The least reported factor was “recommendation when one does a good job” (1.9%.Conclusion: The study concluded that a healthy work environment for nurses in the primary health care settings is an important factor in improving work satisfaction, reducing turnover intention and improving nursing care outcomes.

  7. Attitudes of midwives and maternal child health nurses towards suicide: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Rosalind; McCauley, Kay; Barnfield, Jakqui; Moss, Cheryle; Cross, Wendy

    2015-12-01

    Perinatal women are at risk of depression and/or suicidality. Suicide is the highest cause of indirect maternal deaths in the perinatal period. Midwives and maternal child health nurses (MCHN), as key clinicians, need to be able to detect these mental health issues. Little is known about these clinicians' attitudes to suicide. In this paper, we report on the results of a cross-sectional study of midwives' and MCHN attitudes to suicide. A convenience sample of midwives (n?=?95) and MCHN (n?=?86) from south-eastern Victoria, Australia, was recruited into the study. Participants completed the Attitudes to Suicide Prevention Scale. The results showed that MCHN have more positive attitudes towards suicide prevention than midwives, and younger participants have more positive attitudes to suicide prevention compared to older participants. Midwives and MCHN could benefit from continuing professional education to build their knowledge and skills in assessing suicide risk for childbearing women and their families, increasing positive attitudes, improving detection, and mental health referrals. PMID:26350295

  8. Evidence-based nursing: effects of a structured nursing program for the health promotion of Korean women with Hwa-Byung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Lee, Kwang-Ja

    2007-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a culturally tailored nursing program for patients with Hwa-Byung (HB) and to test the effects of the nursing intervention. The structured nursing intervention program was based on a transcultural theoretical framework in which patients with HB received therapies consisting of music therapy, drama, and group therapy. Hwa-Byung is a culture-bound syndrome, literally translated as anger syndrome, attributed to the suppression of anger. Individuals experience a decrease in quality of life as a result of insufficient treatment. Current health care programs do not meet the needs of these individuals, who still need nursing interventions. A culturally tailored therapy is effective and appropriate for patients with illnesses related to their cultural background. Evidence-based nursing is a crucial approach in verifying the effects of nursing care and in enhancing the body of knowledge on nursing science. A nonequivalent, nonsynchronized, and controlled study design was applied to experimental and control groups of an even number of women. The nursing program was generally effective in the mental health condition test; the mental health condition of the experimental group was significantly more improved as compared with that of the control group. The program was particularly effective in the categories of somatization, depression, psychoticism, and hostility. The data indicate that the mental health of patients with HB could be improved with the use of nursing intervention programs. Nurses need to understand the cultural background of patients and provide culture-sensitive interventions for effective patient-oriented care. PMID:17258104

  9. Effect of cognitive therapy training in groups on health anxiety among nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Mohamadkhani Shali

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health anxiety is one of the most common anxiety disorders among medical students which can affect their activities in professional and educational fields. Therefore, the main objective of the present research is to study the effects of cognitive therapy training in groups on health anxiety among nursing students. Materials and Methods: This is a quasi-experimental study conducted on 30 nursing students with health anxiety score more than average. The students were randomly divided into two groups of experimental and control. After the short form health anxiety questionnaire was filled in by participants, cognitive therapy was taught to the experimental group in twelve ninety- minute sessions. Then both experimental and control groups filled in the health anxiety questionnaire again. Data were analyzed using co-variance test (Ancova. Results: The findings of this research showed that cognitive therapy training in groups in the significance level of P?0.05 reduced the rate of health anxiety among nursing students (P?0.017. Conclusion: The cognitive therapy training in groups has an important role in reducing health anxiety rate among nursing students. So the results of this research can be used in designing interventions such as deployment of educational programs for medical students.

  10. [Gender mainstreaming and nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiu-Hung

    2011-12-01

    Gender mainstreaming is one of the most important strategies in promoting global gender equality. The Taiwan government launched policies on gender mainstreaming and gender impact assessment in 2007 in response to strong public and academic advocacy work. With rising awareness of gender issues, nursing professionals in Taiwan should keep pace with global trends and become actively involved in advancing gender-mainstreaming policies. This article shows that nursing professionals should prepare themselves by cultivating gender competence, understanding gender-related regulations, recognizing the importance of gender impact assessment implementation, integrating gender issues into nursing education, conducting gender-related research and participating in decision-making processes that promote gender mainstreaming. Nursing professionals should enhance their knowledge and understanding of gender mainstreaming-related issues and get involved in the gender-related decision-making process in order to enhance gender awareness and women's health and further the professional development of nurses. PMID:22113627

  11. Job Satisfaction and Work Environment of Primary Health Care Nurses in Ekiti State, Nigeria: an Exploratory Study

    OpenAIRE

    Sunday Joseph Ayamolowo; Omolola Irinoye; Mayowa Antony Oladoyin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Job satisfaction, quality of work environment and morale of health practitioners is beginning to receive attention worldwide.Objectives: This study examined the nature of the work environment of community health nurses, and determined the level of job satisfaction among these nurses. It further explored the relationship between work environment and job satisfaction of these nurses, and perceived factors in the work environment that would increase their job satisfaction. Methods: A...

  12. Tactile massage and hypnosis as a health promotion for nurses in emergency care-a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Nordby-Hörnell Elisabeth; Forsberg Christina; Falkenberg Torkel; Andersson Susanne K; Airosa Fanny; Öhlén Gunnar; Sundberg Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background This study explores nursing personnel's experiences and perceptions of receiving tactile massage and hypnosis during a personnel health promotion project. Nursing in a short term emergency ward environment can be emotionally and physically exhausting due to the stressful work environment and the high dependency patient care. A health promotion project integrating tactile massage and hypnosis with conventional physical activities was therefore introduced for nursing personn...

  13. [Survey on the satisfaction regarding their studies and the health habits of nursing students in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamaurt, Florence; Estryn-Behar, Madeleine; Le Moël, Romain; Chrétien, Thomas; Mathieu, Béatrice

    2011-06-01

    The French Federation of Nursing Student (FNESI) conducted a study in nursing studies institutions from 6 administrative Regions in order to understand risk factors linked with stress or satisfaction of students. Conducted from september 2008 to june 2009, the response rate was 71.2%. Bivariate analysis were conducted on a sample selected by random of 1450 students, to determine potentials risk factors linked with poorer estimated general health and stress. Students declare more and more frequently stress or poor general health in second and third year of nursing studies. Their life habits are inadequate and do not improve when their knowledge increases: lack of sport practice, tobacco smoke, alcohol consumption, other addictive substances ... Among students who declare a too much supported rhythm of training or a poor quality of training, the majority qualify their health of bad. Practical training is considered by a quarter of first year student and 44% of second and third year students. Existence of "speech groups" and free discussion groups have a major influence on satisfaction or stress and poor general health declaration. This study demonstrated the major influence of good mentorship quality by trained nurses and that this nurse in a tutorial position has to be the same all along the training in each department. These aspects have to be improved in order to attract and retain motivated students. PMID:21800641

  14. The reality of Nursing Continuing Education in the Public Health Services. A descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Motta Lino

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study has as an objective to discover how the proposal for the nursing continuing education are constituted in the public health services of Florianopolis/SC; to describe and analyze the conceptions that fundamental the development of these proposals in the services in the form of constructing a political institutional of Continuing Education and knowledge of the political Permanent Education of the Health Ministry. The analytic procedure of data collected, through the means of semi – structured interviews, were the content analysis, including pre – analysis; analytical description and interferential interpretation. The study group, were 10 nursing professionals responsible for the continuing education of the health institution studied. The results indicates that continuing nursing education in the public services of Florianopolis needs a better attention on the part of the representation of the Permanent Education Polo, such as focalize as a political strategy bettered systematized.

  15. Effectiveness of community-based health services by nurse practitioners: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Mikiko; Ota, Erika; Fukuda, Hiromi; Miyauchi, Shinji; Gilmour, Stuart; Kono, Yuko; Nakagama, Erika; Murashima, Sachiyo; Shibuya, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To realise universal health coverage in an ageing society, adequate provision of appropriately trained human resources is essential. The nurse practitioner (NP) is an autonomous and independent, advanced practice nurse capable of providing treatment and care that can be substituted for some aspects of a medical doctor's (MD's) role, especially in a community setting. Previous systematic reviews found higher levels of patient satisfaction with services provided by NPs than those provided by MDs. As non-communicable diseases become a major health burden requiring long-term healthcare in community settings, this systematic review aims to assess the equivalence of NP services to standard care provided by MDs, and to determine whether their practice is an effective alternative to that of MDs in community settings. Methods and analysis Relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster RCTs will be searched in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and the British Nursing Index. We will assess patient and health system utilisation outcomes of interventions comparing treatment and care provided by NPs in community settings with that provided by MDs. Two authors will independently screen studies for inclusion, consulting with a third author where necessary to resolve discrepancies. The risk of bias of included studies will be assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool, and quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. Meta-analysis of included studies will be conducted using fixed-effect or random-effects models depending on the degree of between-study heterogeneity. Results will be presented using risk ratios with 95% CI for dichotomous outcomes and standardised mean differences with 95% CI for continuous outcomes. Ethics and dissemination This systematic review and meta-analysis protocol does not require ethical approval. We will disseminate the findings of this systematic review and meta-analysis via publications in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number PROSPEROCRD42014009627. PMID:26105030

  16. Lived experience in teaching mental health nursing: issues of fear and power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Bennetts, Wanda; Harris, Scott; Platania-Phung, Chris; Tohotoa, Jenny; Byrne, Louise; Wynaden, Dianne

    2015-02-01

    Australian mental health policy clearly articulates recovery focus as the underpinning of mental health services. Barriers to achieving a recovery focus are identified in the literature, with negative attitudes of health professionals receiving particular attention. The involvement of people with lived experience of significant mental health challenges and mental health service use is essential to enhancing more positive attitudes. Lived-experience involvement in the education of nurses is evident; however, it is generally limited and implemented on an ad hoc basis. Overall, there is a paucity of literature on this topic. A qualitative exploratory study was undertaken to elicit the views and perceptions of nurse academics and lived-experience educators about the inclusion of lived experience in mental health nursing education. One major theme to emerge from the research was issues of fear and power, which included three subthemes: facing fear, demystifying mental illness, and issues of power. Lived-experience involvement has an important role to play in the education of nurses in addressing fear and demystifying the experience of mental illness. The power that lived-experience educators exercised in their roles varied considerably, and for many, was limited. Therefore, the effectiveness of lived-experience involvement requires a more equitable distribution of power. PMID:25366907

  17. Analysis of the publications about child health in journals of nursing from 2000 to 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vera Lúcia Moreira Leitão Cardoso

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Publications of research in child health have been increasing every year. This study’s objective was to analyze the content of articles about health child from abstracts published in Brazilians journals of nursing classified on “Qualis CAPES” as International B and C, in the period between 2000 and 2005. Descriptive and documentary study, which the sample consisted of 202 abstracts which had as focus child health in their titles. They were consulted on BVS/BIREME site, universities’ libraries and personal collection of the authors. After that, they were photocopied, read and examined from March to May, 2006. The data about the name of journal, year of publication, title of the article, authors, city, theme, objective and type of research were noted in a specific instrument. The findings revealed that the themes most investigated were nursing care (16.0% and nutrition (12.3%; the themes least researched were domestic accidents (2.0%, HIV (2.0%, and pain (1.2%. In relation to year of publication, 2004 had the highest number of articles/abstracts (23.3%. The Southeast Region published 53.6% of the abstracts and the North 0.6%. Nursing have been doing studies about child health, but it is necessary to stimulate and support continuing these researches, on a broader variety of topics about child health, especially in regions like North and Central-West of Brazil. Keywords: Nursing, child health, periodicals.

  18. Issues in health technology assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In general, the main justification for the provision of health services is to improve the health of individuals and populations. Some experts focus on other goals for the health care systems, such as promoting health care innovation and increasing employment. Information on the efficacy of a diagnostic or therapeutic procedure has become more widely available during the last 25 years, both through increased research and increased availability of data based on, e.g. the Cochrane Collaboration and the Health Technology Assessment Database (INAHTA). At the same time, the most relevant information is often in proprietary hands, that is, in private organizations such as the manufacturing industry or in organizations that collect health information. The American Food and Drug Administration routinely assesses efficacy of devices and makes this information openly accessible. Unfortunately, the European Union focuses on trade issues, including innovation, and does not have a strong focus on public health. Competition for health care resources is a major concern even in segments of the population living in the richest countries. The problem of limited resources is, of course, much more pronounced in poor countries, in particular in the poorest countries. Although cost effectiveness of health care is very important conceptually, data are often not available. Cost effectiveness is often developed within the context of national needs and is very difficult to transfer to other jurisdictions. In addition, data on cost effectiveness are often not available to compare different options in health care. There is thus enormous scope for such studies in the future. Broader issues, such as health care organization and morals and ethics are also important. For example, is it ethical to promote advanced technology in poor countries that cannot provide even basic health care services? Is it ethical for researchers to overlook the basic needs of poor countries when working on new technological systems? The problems for developing countries include the relative lack of information, but also other issues, for example: 1) Equipment is often purchased by donors, which often requires the purchase of the national product of the donning country in the case of bilateral aid. This makes it difficult to develop effective international equipment policies. 2) Industry plays a key role in promoting equipment and furnishing information. International industry is relatively good at furnishing technical information and purchasers can make contracts that also require reasonable support to ensure continued operation of the equipment. However, industry does not often furnish information that helps to determine if the equipment is actually useful in the particular context of limited resources or poor countries. 3) Developing countries rarely have a policy structure that encourages comparisons between different options. Frequently, policy-makers in developing countries point out that they feel they must accept what is offered or be left with little or nothing. 4) R and D focuses on the market in industrialized countries, paying little attention to the specific needs of poorer countries, which may result in a general lack of appropriate technology. In the 1970s, the WHO defined a basic radiology system for developing countries, which was marketed by companies such as General Electric and Siemens. Although this effort failed due to various reasons, in general, such attempts by industry to design products for developing countries are rare. So what is to be done? From the standpoint of those working in industrialized countries, the key point is probably to develop and help develop better information on equipment and its efficacy in providing health benefits. From the standpoint of those working in developing countries, there is an urgent need to develop policy structures. A key point is that developing countries must be prepared to say 'no, thank you,' in order to have ownership of their health care systems. Essential elements of national policies for ef fect

  19. 77 FR 41986 - Division of Nursing, Public Health Nursing Community Based Model of PHN Case Management Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-17

    ...training for the community based case management...applicable to the health issues addressed...recommendation of a community assessment tool...problems, if travel funds are available and...Identify priority health issues and high...a comprehensive community assessment....

  20. Using standardized patients to assess communication skills in medical and nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgoyne Louise

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of recent developments in medical and nursing education have highlighted the importance of communication and consultation skills (CCS. Although such skills are taught in all medical and nursing undergraduate curriculums, there is no comprehensive screening or assessment programme of CCS using professionally trained Standardized Patients Educators (SPE's in Ireland. This study was designed to test the content, process and acceptability of a screening programme in CCS with Irish medical and nursing students using trained SPE's and a previously validated global rating scale for CCS. Methods Eight tutors from the Schools of Nursing and Medicine at University College Cork were trained in the use of a validated communication skills and attitudes holistic assessment tool. A total of forty six medical students (Year 2 of 5 and sixty four nursing students (Year 2/3 of 4 were selected to under go individual CCS assessment by the tutors via an SPE led scenario. Immediate formative feedback was provided by the SPE's for the students. Students who did not pass the assessment were referred for remediation CCS learning. Results Almost three quarters of medical students (33/46; 72% and 81% of nursing students (56/64 passed the CCS assessment in both communication and attitudes categories. All nursing students had English as their first language. Nine of thirteen medical students referred for enhanced learning in CCS did not have English as their first language. Conclusions A significant proportion of both medical and nursing students required referral for enhanced training in CCS. Medical students requiring enhanced training were more likely not to have English as a first language.

  1. Using standardized patients to assess communication skills in medical and nursing students

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, C Anthony

    2010-03-17

    Abstract Background A number of recent developments in medical and nursing education have highlighted the importance of communication and consultation skills (CCS). Although such skills are taught in all medical and nursing undergraduate curriculums, there is no comprehensive screening or assessment programme of CCS using professionally trained Standardized Patients Educators (SPE\\'s) in Ireland. This study was designed to test the content, process and acceptability of a screening programme in CCS with Irish medical and nursing students using trained SPE\\'s and a previously validated global rating scale for CCS. Methods Eight tutors from the Schools of Nursing and Medicine at University College Cork were trained in the use of a validated communication skills and attitudes holistic assessment tool. A total of forty six medical students (Year 2 of 5) and sixty four nursing students (Year 2\\/3 of 4) were selected to under go individual CCS assessment by the tutors via an SPE led scenario. Immediate formative feedback was provided by the SPE\\'s for the students. Students who did not pass the assessment were referred for remediation CCS learning. Results Almost three quarters of medical students (33\\/46; 72%) and 81% of nursing students (56\\/64) passed the CCS assessment in both communication and attitudes categories. All nursing students had English as their first language. Nine of thirteen medical students referred for enhanced learning in CCS did not have English as their first language. Conclusions A significant proportion of both medical and nursing students required referral for enhanced training in CCS. Medical students requiring enhanced training were more likely not to have English as a first language.

  2. Kaizen: a process improvement model for the business of health care and perioperative nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetteh, Hassan A

    2012-01-01

    Kaizen is a proven management technique that has a practical application for health care in the context of health care reform and the 2010 Institute of Medicine landmark report on the future of nursing. Compounded productivity is the unique benefit of kaizen, and its principles are change, efficiency, performance of key essential steps, and the elimination of waste through small and continuous process improvements. The kaizen model offers specific instruction for perioperative nurses to achieve process improvement in a five-step framework that includes teamwork, personal discipline, improved morale, quality circles, and suggestions for improvement. PMID:22201574

  3. Influence of health, lifestyle, working conditions, and sociodemography on early retirement among nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Karina; Ekholm, Ola; Hundrup, Yrsa A; Obel, Erik B; Grønbaek, Morten

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of the study was to analyze the relationship between health, lifestyle, work-related and sociodemographic factors, and older nurses' exit from the labor market to Post-Employment Wage (PEW). PEW is an early retirement scheme to make it possible for workers to retire at the age of 60. METHODS: The study was based on 5,538 nurses in the age of 51-59 who in 1993 completed a questionnaire on health, lifestyle, working environment, and sociodemographic factors. The survey information wa...

  4. Troubling 'lived experience': a post-structural critique of mental health nursing qualitative research assumptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, A

    2014-08-01

    Qualitative studies in mental health nursing research deploying the 'lived experience' construct are often written on the basis of conventional qualitative inquiry assumptions. These include the presentation of the 'authentic voice' of research participants, related to their 'lived experience' and underpinned by a meta-assumption of the 'metaphysics of presence'. This set of assumptions is critiqued on the basis of contemporary post-structural qualitative scholarship. Implications for mental health nursing qualitative research emerging from this critique are described in relation to illustrative published work, and some benefits and challenges for researchers embracing post-structural sensibilities are outlined. PMID:24118139

  5. Psychiatric nurse practitioners’ experiences of working with mental health care users presenting with acute symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Mataboge, Sanah M.L.; Van Rensburg, Elsie S.J.; Kgalabi J. Ngako

    2012-01-01

    Psychiatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) working with mental health care users presenting with acute symptoms work in a complex environment. This environment is characterised by mental health care users who may present with a history of violence, sexual assault and substance misuse.The objectives of this study were twofold: firstly, to explore and describe the experiences of PNPs working with mental health care users (MHCUs) presenting with acute symptoms; and secondly, to make recommendations ...

  6. University Collaboration in Delivering Applied Health and Nursing Services Research Training

    OpenAIRE

    DiCenso, Alba; D'Amour, Danielle; Kearney, Anne J.; Sheps, Sam

    2008-01-01

    In 2001-2002, the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF) and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) committed 10 years of funding for the creation and implementation of three Regional Training Centres to build capacity in health services and policy research in the Atlantic, Ontario and Western regions of Canada and one training centre in Quebec to focus on the development of nursing services researchers. Each RTC comprises several universities that collaborate to deli...

  7. Analysis of the publications about child health in journals of nursing from 2000 to 2005

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Vera Lúcia Moreira Leitão Cardoso; Débora Feitosa de França; Wiliane Resende Sousa; Ingrid Martins Leite Lúcio

    2008-01-01

    Publications of research in child health have been increasing every year. This study’s objective was to analyze the content of articles about health child from abstracts published in Brazilians journals of nursing classified on “Qualis CAPES” as International B and C, in the period between 2000 and 2005. Descriptive and documentary study, which the sample consisted of 202 abstracts which had as focus child health in their titles. They were consulted on BVS/BIREME site, universities’ libraries...

  8. Health technology assessment in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleemput, I; Kesteloot, K

    2000-01-01

    The Belgian healthcare system has a Bismarck-type compulsory health insurance, covering almost the entire population, combined with private provision of care. Providers are public health services, independent pharmacists, independent ambulatory care professionals, and hospitals and geriatric care facilities. Healthcare responsibilities are shared between the national Ministries of Public Health and Social Affairs, and the Dutch-, French-, and German-speaking Community Ministries of Health. The national ministries are responsible for sickness and disability insurance, financing, determination of accreditation criteria for hospitals and heavy medical care units, and construction of new hospitals. The six sickness and disability insurance funds are responsible for reimbursing health service benefits and paying disability benefits. The system's strength is that care is highly accessible and responsive to patients. However, the healthcare system's size remained relatively uncontrolled until recently, there is an excess supply of certain types of care, and there is a large number of small hospitals. The national government created a legal framework to modernize the insurance system to control budgetary deficits. Measures for reducing healthcare expenditures include regulating healthcare supply, healthcare evaluation, medical practice organization, and hospital budgets. The need to control healthcare facilities and quality of care in hospitals led to formal procedures for opening hospitals, acquiring expensive medical equipment, and developing highly specialized services. Reforms in payment and regulation are being considered. Health technology assessment (HTA) has played little part in the reforms so far. Belgium has no formal national program for HTA. The future of HTA in Belgium depends on a changing perception by providers and policy makers that health care needs a stronger scientific base. PMID:10932412

  9. Nursing Positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids Deal With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Nursing Positions KidsHealth > Parents > Pregnancy & Baby > All About Breastfeeding > ... and actually needs to feed. Getting Comfortable With Breastfeeding Nursing can be one of the most challenging ...

  10. An Overview of Health Care Spending Patterns in the United States: Using National Data Sources to Explore Trends in Nursing Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sochalski, Julie &Patrician, Patrica A

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available National health care spending trends have been tracked through the federal governmental for much of the latter half of the 20th century. A review of these spending trends illustrates not only health care's contribution to the overall national economy, but more importantly it allows us to assess our priorities for spending that money. Nursing has long sought information about the "cost" of its care, at the micro-level, and has desired to articulate its share of national expenditures, at the macro-level. This quest has been fueled largely by the profession's desire to more accountably argue the value of its services. This article reviews national health expenditure trends, and explores how the analysis of these trends can be used to shape nursing's own research agenda for assessing the value of its services.

  11. Nursing assessment: Research/Care through the sensible listening in the heart failure clinic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Amorim Corrêa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Assuming that nursing assessment for heart failure clients help us to face the changes in your daily, we enquire what the contribution of sensible listening applied to nursing assessment. The purpose is to identify the needs of care creating a new way to care/research sensibly through nursing appointment. The methodology of quantitative character and exploratory applied in the form of evaluation was performed by 50 clients in an hospital in Rio de Janeiro. It was found that 100% of the people have lack of knowledge about HF, followed by diet and medicines. Analyzing social field, there is a majority of 38% with no commitment to treatment, 36% with poor economic conditions and 32% related to bad nutrition. Nursing interventions were applied to solve problems identified beyond medicative therapy, allowing the client to have an exclusive treatment extended to its mental/intellectual and spiritual dimensions.

  12. Consumer sexual relationships in a forensic mental health hospital: perceptions of nurses and consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Chris; Happell, Brenda

    2015-04-01

    The management of consumer-related risk is paramount in a secure forensic mental health facility. However, the consequent risk aversion presents a major barrier to consumers forming sexual relationships in a manner that is open and accepted. Investigation of the views of nurses working in forensic mental health settings on this topic is limited, and even more so for consumers of services. This qualitative exploratory study was undertaken to elicit the views of consumers and nurses about forming sexual relationships within this long-term and secure setting. Individual in-depth interviews were conducted with 12 nurses and 10 consumers. The benefits of, and barriers to, sexual relationships was identified as a major theme, and these findings are the focus of this paper. Nurse responses included the subthemes 'supportive factors' and 'potential dangers', reflecting their qualified support. Consumer responses included the subthemes 'therapeutic', 'feeling normal', 'restrictions and barriers', and 'lack of support and secrecy'. The importance of sexual relationships was clearly articulated, as was the difficulties in forming and maintaining them within the forensic setting. More open discussion about this commonly-avoided issue and the education of nurses and other health professionals is required. PMID:25522062

  13. [Health, death, illness, and nursing care concepts in Malagasi Antemoro Tribe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradellini, Martina; Fiaccadori, Cianzia

    2010-01-01

    A collaboration experience with the Fondation Médical d'Ampasimanjeva nurses, in an international cooperation project,permits to analyse the basic nursing concepts, starting from the local cultural approach. Research main outcome is to describe health, death, illness, and nursing care concepts in the Malgasi Antemoro tribe. Closing to the ethnographic research, work has been developed in three different moments: a first job organization starting from a spread literature analysis, the follow work on field about collecting data, and the last data elaboration and discussion Collecting data tool was the focus group which has done with the complete hospital nursing staff, divided by ward places. A fourth one was addressed to a twenty medical patients group. Focus group questions came from the Rising Sun Model guide, by Madeleine Leininger, adapted to the research own needs. Outcomes show an important traditional medicine influence, explained by the way people conceive health, illness, and even life, all elements directly affected the nursing care. It stands out a strong belief that health depends by the ability of person to work. The death concept is saw as a passage's phase to the Razana's spiritual condition. This is the reason supporting fatalism as approach to the death, that appear as an inevitable event managed by God. Disease's concept is related to traditional healers; as a matter of facts, it exists a strong belief that diseases find origin from magician. PMID:20943096

  14. Nursing diagnosis in pregnant women assisted at family’s health unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Clerya Alvino Leite, Maria Mirtes da Nóbrega, Maria Miriam Lima da Nóbrega

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to elaborate the profile of nursing diagnoses in pregnant women assisted in a Family’s Health Unit based on NANDA-I’s Taxonomy II. Methods: this is about a retrospective study, analytic descriptive, regards to analysis from 20 pregnant women handbooks registered in the prenatal program from a family’s health unit. Data were collected in July 2008, with a form composed of three parts: partner-demographic data, obstetric data and referring data to defining characteristics and related factors (of risk of the nursing diagnoses. Diagnoses were analyzed based on the descriptive statistics and discussed according to obstetrics references. Results: 13 nursing diagnoses were elaborated: risk for infection of the genital tract, ineffective maintenance of the health, risk for infection of the urinary tract, prejudiced urinary elimination, nauseas, sharp pain (head, pelvis and lumbar, fatigues, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, risk of paternity or prejudiced maternity, volume of excessive liquid, constipation, anxiety. Conclusion: the objective of the study was researched and we hope from the nursing diagnoses elaborated, some nursing interventions specific be addressed to the problems identified in the pregnant women during the prenatal consultations.

  15. Ogres and Angels in the madhouse. Mental health nursing identities in film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carlo, Keri

    2007-10-01

    This project applied ethnographic content analysis to examine 19 American films made during the period 1942-2005. The purpose of this examination is to consider how the medium of American film portrays psychiatric mental health nursing and its world within the hospital. It critiques the way film frames mental health nursing and the profession's interactions with other disciplines, such as psychiatry, that might reveal a disposition that is peculiar to this group. It concludes that Hollywood film genre continues to perpetuate the notion that mental health nursing occupies an aberrant, secret, and dangerous world and that its role remains one of custodial companionship. If Chiari, Pinel, and Tuke, the founders of moral therapy during the Age of Reason observed these films, they could be forgiven if they wondered whether psychiatric mental nursing remained trapped in the Middle Ages While some of the films reviewed may be considered vacuous nonsense, its discourses reflect how society views people with serious mental illness and those who nurse them. This critique is a challenge for the profession to educate society regarding the profession's true work, reclaiming its commitment to affirming the dignity and human rights of those with mental illness by instigating political strategies that will destabilize the subversive and dividing practices that film merely manipulates. PMID:17845553

  16. Teaching methods in community health nursing clerkships: experiences of healthcare staff in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshagh Ildarabadi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Healthcare staff educate nursing students during their clerkships at community health nursing programs. Their teaching methods play an important role in nursing students’ acquisition of competencies; however, these methods have not been studied thoroughly. Thus, this study aims to describe, interpret, and understand the experiences of healthcare staff’s teaching methods in clerkships at a community health nursing program. Methods: This study was conducted using purposeful sampling and semi-structured interviews with 13 members of the staff of three urban healthcare centers in Iran. The data were analyzed through qualitative content analysis and thematic analysis. Results: Multiplicity of teaching was identified as the main category of teaching method, and the five subcategories were teaching through lecture, demonstration, doing, visits and field trips, and readiness. The most common method used by the healthcare staff was lecturing. Conclusion: The healthcare staff used multiple methods to teach students in the nursing clerkship of the community health program, which was the strength of the course. However, they should be familiar with, and utilize additional methods, such as discussion rather than lecture.

  17. Using Self-Efficacy to Assess the Readiness of Nursing Educators and Students for Mobile Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Richard F. Kenny Caroline L. Park; Jocelyne M. C. Van Neste-Kenny; Pamela Burton; Caroline L. Park; Adnan Qayyum

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the self-efficacy of nursing faculty and students related to their potential use of mobile technology and to ask what implications this technology has for their teaching and learning in practice education contexts. We used a cross-sectional survey design involving students and faculty in two nursing education programs in a western Canadian college. In January, 2011, 121 faculty members and students completed the survey. Results showed a high level of ow...

  18. Nursing Assessment and Intervention to Geriatric Patients Discharged From Emergency Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, Elizabeth Emilie; Poulsen, Ingrid; Hendriksen, Carsten; Wagner, Lis

    2012-01-01

    Background: Geriatric patients recently discharged from hospital are at risk of unplanned readmissions and admission to nursing home. When discharged directly from Emergency Department (ED) the risk increases, as time pressure often requires focus on the presenting problem, although 80 % of geriatric patients have complex and often unresolved caring needs. Objective: To examine the effect of a two-stage nursing assessment and intervention to address the patients uncompensated problems given just...

  19. Implementation of a competency assessment tool for agency nurses working in an acute paediatric setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hennerby, Cathy

    2012-02-01

    AIM: This paper reports on the implementation of a competency assessment tool for registered general agency nurses working in an acute paediatric setting, using a change management framework. BACKGROUND: The increased number of registered general agency nurses working in an acute children\\'s hospital alerted concerns around their competency in working with children. These concerns were initially raised via informal complaints about \\'near misses\\

  20. Nursing Assessment and Intevention for Older People after Acute Medical Admission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, Elizabeth Emilie

    2012-01-01

    Geriatric patients recently discharged from hospital are at risk of unplanned readmissions and admission to nursing home. The risk increases when they are discharged directly from Emergency Department (ED). Time pressure there often requires focus on the presenting problem, although 80 % of geriatric patients have complex and often unresolved caring needs. To ensure seamless transition from the ED to the patients’ home, assessment and intervention carried out by an aged care nursing specialist i...

  1. A model to assess the quality-cost tradeoff in nursing homes.

    OpenAIRE

    Leiken, A; Sexton, T R; Silkman, R H

    1986-01-01

    We develop a model for assessing quality-cost tradeoffs as they arise in nurse staffing and task assignment decisions commonly faced by nursing home administrators and industry regulators. As prospective reimbursement schemes and resource utilization groups (RUGs) are implemented, we expect that tradeoffs such as these will become even more critical than they are now. The model permits the inclusion of quality-related considerations, such as restricting tasks to personnel at specified skill l...

  2. Using standardized patients to assess communication skills in medical and nursing Students

    OpenAIRE

    Burgoyne Louise; Shanks Andrew; Gaffney Robert; Walshe Nuala; Ryan C Anthony; Wiskin Connie M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background A number of recent developments in medical and nursing education have highlighted the importance of communication and consultation skills (CCS). Although such skills are taught in all medical and nursing undergraduate curriculums, there is no comprehensive screening or assessment programme of CCS using professionally trained Standardized Patients Educators (SPE's) in Ireland. This study was designed to test the content, process and acceptability of a screening programme in...

  3. Critical Care Nurses Inadequately Assess SAPS II Scores of Very Ill Patients in Real Life

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Merlani; Marco Previsdomini; Andreas Perren; Ilaria Perren

    2012-01-01

    Background. Reliable ICU severity scores have been achieved by various healthcare workers but nothing is known regarding the accuracy in real life of severity scores registered by untrained nurses. Methods. In this retrospective multicentre audit, three reviewers independently reassessed 120 SAPS II scores. Correlation and agreement of the sum-scores/variables among reviewers and between nurses and the reviewers' gold standard were assessed globally and for tertiles. Bland and Altman (gold st...

  4. Nursing doctoral education in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Meryem

    2004-10-01

    Quality health care is an issue of concern worldwide, and nursing can and must play a major and global role in transforming the healthcare environment. Doctorally prepared nurses are very much needed in the discipline to further develop and expand the science, as well as to prepare its future educators, scholars, leaders, and policy makers. In 1968, the Master of Science in Nursing Program was initiated in Turkey, followed by the Nursing Doctoral Education Program in 1972. Six University Schools of Nursing provide nursing doctoral education. By the graduating year of 2001, 154 students had graduated with the Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing (Ph.D.), and 206 students were enrolled in related courses. Many countries in the world are systematically building various collaborative models in their nursing doctoral education programs. Turkey would like to play an active role in creating collaborative nursing doctoral education programs with other countries. This paper centres on the structure and model of doctoral education for nurses in Turkey. It touches on doctoral programs around the world; describes in detail nursing doctoral education in Turkey, including its program structure, admission process, course units, assessment strategies and dissertation procedure; and discusses efforts to promote Turkey as a potential partner in international initiatives to improve nursing doctoral education. PMID:15465171

  5. Using the Electronic Health Record in Nursing Research: Challenges and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Joanne G; McGrath, Robert J; Fetzer, Susan J; Mittal, Prashant; Bourgoine, Derek

    2015-10-01

    Changes in the patient record from the paper to the electronic health record format present challenges and opportunities for the nurse researcher. Current use of data from the electronic health record is in a state of flux. Novel data analytic techniques and massive data sets provide new opportunities for nursing science. Realization of a strong electronic data output future relies on meeting challenges of system use and operability, data presentation, and privacy. Nurse researchers need to rethink aspects of proposal development. Joining ongoing national efforts aimed at creating usable data output is encouraged as a means to affect system design. Working to address challenges and embrace opportunities will help grow the science in a way that answers important patient care questions. PMID:25819698

  6. From Judgment to Understanding: Mental Health Nurses' Perceptions of Changed Professional Behaviors Following Positively Changed Attitudes Toward Self-Harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karman, Pieter; Kool, Nienke; Gamel, Claudia; van Meijel, Berno

    2015-12-01

    Nurses experience feelings of frustration, anger and fear when caring for patients who self-harm. Training programmes were developed that aimed to positively influence nurses' knowledge, attitudes and skills. The aim of this study was to investigate professional behavior of mental health nurses with positively changed attitudes after following a training program. Using grounded theory, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 mental health nurses. Participants reported using less restrictive interventions, being more patient oriented, and choosing a more empathic and exploratory approach after the training. A work environment conductive to making autonomous professional decisions with supportive colleagues enabled these changes. PMID:26577554

  7. Approaches to health assessment related to housing:

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra Santin, O.

    2006-01-01

    This research had the purpose of providing more information about possible approaches and indicators to measure indoor health in relation to housing. In researches related with health and some Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) databases, the model used for health assessment is the Impact Pathway Analysis adopted from Risk Assessment. It has the objective of expressing possible effects to human health in damage indicators, such as DALYs (Disability-Adjusted Life Years). Calculating damage in the ind...

  8. The Heart of Rural Health Care: Programs Supply Nurses, Allied Health Workers to Nation's Most Remote Locales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Corey; Fulcher, Roxanne

    2008-01-01

    This article reports that across the United States, rural communities rely on local community colleges to provide a steady pipeline of emergency responders, well-educated qualified nurses, and allied health professionals capable of staffing local medical centers and hospitals and complementing physicians in the delivery of care, from emergency…

  9. Study of general health of traumatic nursing team members of Bam one year after earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sistanehei F

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is necessary to understand that psychological reactions after a natural disaster are as complex as disaster itself. Following a catastrophic earthquake like Bam’s, such reactions can be seen in nursing team members as well. Materials and Methods: This study is a descriptive cross sectional analytic research, conducted with cooperation of Japanese Nursing Association to identify somatic and psychological problems of nursing team members of Bam. A total of 92 members of nursing team affiliated to healthcare centers of Bam were studied. Data collection tools were 2 questionnaires; first for evaluating demographic characteristics and general health and second- questionnaire of Goldberg and Williams- for evaluation of four domains of psychosomatic problems, anxiety and insomnia, psychosocial functioning and severe depression. Each domain contained seven questions, each scored from 0 to 3 based on Likert score. Complete score of general health was 0-84. Scores were classified in four groups: 0-20 as optimal, 21-4 as approximately optimal, 41-6 as approximately suboptimal and 61 and higher as suboptimal. Results: One year after the earthquake, evaluation of general health of nursing team members showed 30.3% of subjects had optimal psychosomatic status, 34.8% had moderate problems of anxiety and insomnia, 40.2% had approximately optimal psychosocial functioning and 44.2% of subjects were not severely depressed. Overall, 38.4% of nursing team members had approximately optimal general health. Conclusion: This study showed that following a catastrophic earthquake, most of the victims suffer from several psychological and somatic reactions. In addition to on time rescue procedures, other important allaying factors are cultural and religious values and believing in God.

  10. Perception of evidence-based practice and the professional environment of Primary Health Care nurses in the Spanish context: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Torrente Susana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study of the factors that encourage evidence-based clinical practice, such as structure, environment and professional skills, has contributed to an improvement in quality of care. Nevertheless, most of this research has been carried out in a hospital context, neglecting the area of primary health care. The main aim of this work was to assess the factors that influence an evidence-based clinical practice among nursing professionals in Primary Health Care. Methods A multicentre cross-sectional study was designed, taking the 619 Primary Care staff nurses at the Balearic Islands’ Primary Health Care Service, as the study population. The methodology applied consisted on a self-administered survey using the instruments Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire (EBPQ and Nursing Work Index (NWI. Results Three hundred and seventy seven surveys were received (60.9% response rate. Self-assessment of skills and knowledge, obtained 66.6% of the maximum score. The Knowledge/Skills factor obtained the best scores among the staff with shorter professional experience. There was a significant difference in the Attitude factor (p?=?0.008 in favour of nurses with management functions, as opposed to clinical nurses. Multivariate analysis showed a significant positive relationship between NWI and level of evidence-based practice (p? Conclusions Institutions ought to undertake serious reflection on the lack of skills of senior nurses about Evidence-Based Clinical Practice, even when they have more professional experience. Leadership emerge as a key role in the transferral of knowledge into clinical practice.

  11. [The role of the nurse in the Brazilian Unified Heath System: from community health to the family health strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Dirce Stein; Backes, Marli Stein; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Büscher, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to take a retrospective look at the professional role of the nurse in the Brazilian Unified Health System and understand the meaning of their social practice in this field of discussions and theoretical-practical meanings. The Grounded Theory was used as a methodological reference and interviews were the technique for data collection, conducted between May and December of 2007, with 35 health professionals and others. The codification and data analysis revealed that the Unified Health System and especially the Family Health Strategy, should be considered facilitating and stimulating strategies of the process of expansion and consolidation of nursing care as a social entrepreneurial practice, since they pave the way to a new approach in community intervention, through seeing the human being as a multi-dimensional and singular being, inserted in a real and concrete context. PMID:22218555

  12. Let's go outside: using photography to explore values and culture in mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, K; de Goeas, S; Davies, S; Radcliffe, M; Christoforou, A

    2015-06-01

    Creative and imaginative approaches to mental healthcare education are known to help students explore emotions, empathy and others' experiences, as well as address ambivalence and ambiguity. Very few studies in mental health nursing education specifically utilise photography as a participatory pedagogic tool, with even fewer utilising photography to explore understandings of culture, values and diversity. Photography makes visible complex, collaborative forms of learning and previously unidentified, unarticulated ideas about culture and values. Photography as a critical pedagogic method helps develop critical, politicized understandings of culture and values. Increasing culturally diverse populations means complex and conflicting values have become a common feature in mental health nursing. In education the need to critically examine such topics necessitates creative and engaging pedagogy, and visual methods are readily acknowledged as such. Yet while many studies advocate and demonstrate the value of art-based methods in student learning, very few studies in mental health nursing specifically utilize photography as a participatory pedagogic tool, and fewer still use photography to explore understandings of culture, values and diversity. In this paper, we discuss a qualitative study where mental health nursing students used photography to create images in order to explore their own and often dominant culture and attendant values. Findings suggest that photography makes visible situated, relational and collaborative learning, and surfaces previously unidentified, unarticulated ideas about culture and values. These practices mimic important processes central to mental health nursing practice and contemporaneous understandings of diverse cultures. We argue that photography provides an important resource with which to unearth subjugated knowledge, promote critical understandings of culture and values, and thereby help address inequalities in mental health care. PMID:25753461

  13. IDPH - Skilled Nursing Facilities (Nursing Homes)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Nursing Facility Services are provided by Medicaid certified nursing homes, which primarily provide three types of services: Skilled nursing or medical care and...

  14. 42 CFR 90.11 - Reporting of results of health assessments and health effects studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...results of health assessments and health effects studies. 90.11 Section...SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES...results of health assessments and health effects studies. (a) ATSDR...

  15. 42 CFR 90.8 - Conduct of health assessments and health effects studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...Conduct of health assessments and health effects studies. 90.8 Section 90...SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES...Conduct of health assessments and health effects studies. (a) Any...

  16. Humanizing health care: what do nursing students think?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyane Rocha

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the degree of knowledge undergraduatenursing students have concerning humanizing hospital care. Methods:This was a descriptive level 1 survey with quantitative data analysis.The sample comprised 36 students enrolled in the 8th semester of theundergraduate nursing course. Data was collected at the NursingSchool of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein by means of a questionnairewith identification data and specific questions concerning humanization.Results: Students defined humanization of hospital care as treatingclients with respect and addressing their needs; most students (22%or 61.1% are familiar with the National Program to Humanize HospitalCare (PNHAH; the course subjects that more thoroughly covered thehumanization issue were Intensive Care, Oncology, and Psychiatry;the major advantages in implementing humanized hospital care wereimprovement in the nurse/client relationship, quality of servicesrendered, client satisfaction; major difficulties to implement humanizedhospital care were lack of knowledge by professionals concerning thehumanization of hospital care and lack of compliance in implementingactions; primary actions to implement humanization of hospital careare to give individualized and holistic care. Conclusion: The studentsdefined humanization; most of them are familiar with the PNHAH; theycited the third-year syllabus subjects as those that best cover the topicof humanization; and they emphasized the advantages and difficultiesof these practices and suggested actions to implement humanizationof medical assistance at a hospital level.

  17. Lonely Parents: Observations by Public Health Nurses of Alienation in Child Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Marjorie

    Public health nurses (n=191) were queried regarding their observations of alienation in families who abuse their children. Comparison was made of social isolation and powerlessness in abusive families and a control group of non-abusive families, through the Internal-External Locus of Control Scale and FIRO-B, with significant differences noted in…

  18. Occupational Wellbeing in a School Community--Staff's and Occupational Health Nurses' Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaranen, Terhi; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Turunen, Hannele; Vertio, Harri

    2006-01-01

    This study is part of an action research project titled "Promotion of School Community Staff's Occupational Wellbeing in Co-operation with Occupational Health Nurses" (2001-04), which aims to promote occupational wellbeing by actions that maintain the staff's ability to work in 12 school communities in Eastern Finland. This paper describes…

  19. The Role of Electronic Health Records in Structuring Nursing Handoff Communication and Maintaining Situation Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghenaimi, Said

    2012-01-01

    In healthcare institutions, work must continue 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. A team of nurses is needed to provide around-the-clock patient care, and this process requires transfer of patient care responsibilities, a process known as a "handoff." The present study explored the role of electronic health records in structuring handoff…

  20. Bioelectrodynamics: A New Patient Care Strategy for Nursing, Health, and Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnell, Marcy C; Whitt, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Bioelectrodynamics is an interdisciplinary subject that offers a pathway for nursing to develop a new patient care strategy in health care. The application of bioenergy to living organisms has the potential to advance medical science in the areas of prevention, cancer, wound care, pain, and many other chronic diseases. PMID:26633720

  1. Job Satisfactions of Nurses and Physicians Working in the Same Health Care Facility in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Züleyha Alper

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Job satisfaction is defined as the degree to which employees like or enjoy their jobs and the degreeof satisfaction is based on the importance placed upon this reward and benefit.Objective: Aim of this study was to determine the job satisfaction levels of nurses and physicians working in thesame health care facility, analyze the factors that may affect job satisfaction levels. This study was conducted asa descriptive study and was carried out in one Medical Care Center Northwestern Region of Turkey, Bursa.Results:A job satisfaction scale developed by researchers according to literature review. The scale contained 36items related to measure job satisfaction levels of the participants. Data were collected from 65 nurses and 15physicians. Motivation of nurses is significantly higher than physicians. There is no affect of nurses’ educationlevels on general job satisfaction levels (p>0.05. No significant association was found between gender andmotivation (p>0.05. Payments and organization–related factors affect job satisfaction among nurses andphysicians.Conclusion:This scale yielded significant results in all subgroups except for satisfaction with patient treatment,care services and age. Seniority in the profession and age correlates with general job satisfaction level. Futurestudies need to focus on if job dissatisfaction affects health care workers to quit their jobs, differences amonggenders and profession.

  2. Constructivism applied to psychiatric-mental health nursing: an alternative to supplement traditional clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoux Hampton, Michelle

    2012-02-01

    With the popularity of accelerated pre-licensure nursing programmes and the growth in nursing student enrolments, traditional clinical education continues to be a challenge to deliver. Nursing faculty members are required to develop and implement educational innovations that achieve effective learning outcomes, while using fewer resources. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the effectiveness of a constructivism-based learning project to achieve specific learning outcomes and to supplement approximately 30 clinical hours in a psychiatric-mental health nursing course. Students participated in a 10-week, multistage project that examined life histories, treatment resources, and evidence-based practice, as applied to a single individual with a mental illness. Students reported increased understanding of mental health and illness, developed personal relevance associated with the knowledge gained, and learned to problem solve with regard to nursing care of individuals diagnosed with mental illness. For many students, there also appeared to be a reduction in stigmatized attitudes towards mental illness. Constructivism-based learning is a promising alternative to supplement clinical hours, while effectively achieving learning outcomes. Future research is needed to further validate the use of this method for the learning of course content, as well as the reduction of stigma. PMID:21676137

  3. How is Primary Health Care conceptualised in nursing in Australia? A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Julie; Koehne, Kristy; Verrall, Claire; Gebbie, Kristine; Fuller, Jeffrey

    2014-07-01

    Australia, in common with many other countries, is expanding the role of Primary Health Care (PHC) to manage the growing burden of chronic disease and prevent hospitalisation. Australia's First National Primary Health Care Strategy released in 2010 places general practice at the centre of care delivery, reflecting a constitutional division of labour in which the Commonwealth government's primary means of affecting care delivery in this sector is through rebates for services delivered from the universal healthcare system Medicare. A review of Australian nursing literature was undertaken for 2006-2011. This review explores three issues in relation to these changes: How PHC is conceptualised within Australian nursing literature; who is viewed as providing PHC; and barriers and enablers to the provision of comprehensive PHC. A review of the literature suggests that the terms 'PHC' and 'primary care' are used interchangeably and that PHC is now commonly associated with services provided by practice nurses. Four structural factors are identified for a shift away from comprehensive PHC, namely fiscal barriers, educational preparation for primary care practice, poor role definition and interprofessional relationships. The paper concludes that while moves towards increasing capacity in general practice have enhanced nursing roles, current policy and the nature of private business funding alongside some medical opposition limit opportunities for Australian nurses working in general practice. PMID:23952616

  4. Fostering health equity: clinical and research training strategies from nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deatrick, Janet A; Lipman, Terri H; Gennaro, Susan; Sommers, Marilyn; de Leon Siantz, Mary Lou; Mooney-Doyle, Kim; Hollis, Genevieve; Jemmott, Loretta S

    2009-09-01

    Racism, ethnocentrism, segregation, stereotyping, and classism are tightly linked to health equity and social determinants of health. They lead to lack of power, money, resources, and education which may result in poor health care access and outcomes. Health profession faculties must address the complex relationships that exist between individual, interpersonal, institutional, social and political factors that influence health outcomes in both clinical and research training. Thus, the purposes of this paper are to provide examples of training strategies from nursing education that foster cultural sensitivity. First, assumptions about health equity, culture, ethnicity and race are explored. Second, clinical training within an undergraduate and graduate context are explored, including an undergraduate cancer case study and in a graduate pediatric nursing program are described to demonstrate how cultural models can be used to integrate the biomedical and psychosocial content in a course. Third, research training for summer scholars and doctoral and post doctoral fellows (short and long term) is described to demonstrate how to increase the number and quality of scholars prepared to conduct research with vulnerable populations. Research training strategies include a summer research institute, policy fellowship, and a scholars "pipeline" program. A unique perspective is presented through collaboration between a nursing school and a center for health disparities research. PMID:19717366

  5. Using relationship marketing to develop and sustain nurse loyalty: a case of a rural health care institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, J W; Boyt, T; Westfall, J

    1999-01-01

    The prosperity of a health care organization is contingent on its ability to compete for and retain a high quality staff of "loyal" nurses. Although the benefits of maintaining a loyal nursing staff are obvious, turnover in the health care industry is dangerously high. One solution for reducing turnover is to develop and sustain a loyal nursing staff. The purpose of this article is to apply customer-oriented marketing theories and practices to better understand how strong nurse-provider relationships can be developed and maintained over time. The authors first examine relationship marketing literature as it applies to nurse relationship and management issues. Second, a framework for conceptualizing internal marketing efforts devoted to enhancing nursing staff satisfaction and retention in tested. Finally, strategies for practicing relationship marketing will be provided. PMID:10848197

  6. Evaluation of NANDA nursing diagnoses of healthcare college final year students during the clinical application of the mental health and disease nursing course

    OpenAIRE

    Gülay Ta?demir; Mehtap K?z?lkaya

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this descriptive study was to evaluate the NANDA nursing diagnoses of Pamukkale University Denizli Healthcare College final year students for the patients they undertook the care of and to determine the aims and interventions relevant to these diagnoses.The study universe consisted of all Pamukkale University Denizli Healthcare College final year students who were continuing their education during the 2009-2010 educational year and took the Mental Health and Disease Nursing course ...

  7. Facilitating nurses’ knowledge of the utilisation of reflexology in adults with chronic diseases to enable informed health education during comprehensive nursing care

    OpenAIRE

    Christa Van der Walt; Belinda Scrooby; Elna Steenkamp

    2012-01-01

    An integrative literature review of identified scientific evidence, published from January 2000 to December 2008, of the utilisation of reflexology as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities to promote well-being and quality of life in adults with chronic diseases was done to facilitate nurses to give informed health education during comprehensive nursing care to patients with chronic diseases. Selected accessible databases were searched purposefully for research articles (<...

  8. Involving mental health service users in nurse education through enquiry-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Brenda; Barker, Janet H

    2006-09-01

    Service user involvement and enquiry-based learning (EBL) are two modern approaches to nurse education, which previously have remained separate entities. This article describes an innovative project that brought together the two learning methods within the University of Nottingham. Mental health service users participated actively in the EBL process with student nurses to facilitate learning in the classroom before, during and after mental health placements. The process is described and an evaluation presented with examples of student responses showing how the experience inspired the students and contributed to the development of their understanding of mental health issues in both theory and practice. It is hoped that the article will encourage other health and social care professionals nationally and internationally to realise the potential of integrating service user involvement and EBL. PMID:19040886

  9. Assessment of early learning curves among nurses and physicians using a high-fidelity virtual-reality colonoscopy simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruglikova, Irina; Grantcharov, Teodor P; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Funch-Jensen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, it has been suggested that nurses can perform diagnostic endoscopy procedures, which traditionally have been a physician's responsibility. The existing studies concerning quality of sigmoidoscopy performed by nurses are small, used assessment tools with insufficient validation and to date there is very little knowledge of the learning curve patterns for physicians and nurses. The aim of a present study was to assess early learning curves on a virtual-reality colonoscopy sim...

  10. Critical Care Nurses Inadequately Assess SAPS II Scores of Very Ill Patients in Real Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perren, Andreas; Previsdomini, Marco; Perren, Ilaria; Merlani, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Background. Reliable ICU severity scores have been achieved by various healthcare workers but nothing is known regarding the accuracy in real life of severity scores registered by untrained nurses. Methods. In this retrospective multicentre audit, three reviewers independently reassessed 120 SAPS II scores. Correlation and agreement of the sum-scores/variables among reviewers and between nurses and the reviewers' gold standard were assessed globally and for tertiles. Bland and Altman (gold standard-nurses) of sum scores and regression of the difference were determined. A logistic regression model identifying risk factors for erroneous assessments was calculated. Results. Correlation for sum scores among reviewers was almost perfect (mean ICC = 0.985). The mean (±SD) nurse-registered SAPS II sum score was 40.3 ± 20.2 versus 44.2 ± 24.9 of the gold standard (P 32 points) scores. The lowest agreement was found in high SAPS II tertiles for haemodynamics (k = 0.45-0.51). Conclusions. In real life, nurse-registered SAPS II scores of very ill patients are inaccurate. Accuracy of scores was not associated with nurses' characteristics. PMID:22548157

  11. The Role of Nursing Informatics on Promoting Quality of Health Care and the Need for Appropriate Education

    OpenAIRE

    Asieh Darvish; Fatemeh Bahramnezhad; Sara Keyhanian; Mojdeh navidhamidi

    2014-01-01

    In today’s dynamic health systems, technology plays an important role in education and nursing work. So it seems necessary to study the role of nurses and highlight the need for appropriate information technology educational programs to integrate with the ever-increasing pace of technology. A review accompanied by an extensive literature search in databases and a library search focused on the keywords were used. The criteria used for selecting studies primarily focused on nursing informatics ...

  12. An introduction to music and sound approaches for health professionals: overview of an undergraduate web-based nursing course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeNavenec, Carole-Lynne; McEachern, Outi H; Epstein, Marcia

    2003-10-01

    Nursing educators have been constantly striving to develop a curriculum which enhances holistic patient care. In this article, a descriptive overview is given of a senior level, 3 credit, nursing course designed to provide nurses and other health professionals with a background in the uses of music and the importance of auditory environments for patient care and well-being. This course, which was developed by LeNavenec and Epstein, has been available via the internet since Spring 2003. PMID:19175280

  13. Can script concordance testing be used in nursing education to accurately assess clinical reasoning skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Tyia; Comer, Linda; Kossick, Mark A; Neubrander, Judy

    2014-05-01

    The Script Concordance Test (SCT) has been used successfully in medical schools to assess clinical reasoning in medical students, but it has not been widely used in nursing education. The purpose of this study was to provide additional evidence of the validity and reliability of the SCT in evaluating clinical reasoning in nursing students by replicating a previous study. The test was administered to 48 first-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing students. A scoring grid was developed using the aggregate scores method based on the modal responses of 13 panel members. The reliability of the scores was measured by Cronbach's alpha coefficient, and the scores of the students and the panel were compared using a t test. The difference between the panel's and the students' scores was statistically significant, and the reliability of the scores is high. The SCT provides a reliable, standardized, and easy-to-administer method of evaluating clinical reasoning in nursing students. PMID:24641082

  14. The Role of the Community Nurse in Promoting Health and Human Dignity-Narrative Review Article

    OpenAIRE

    Muntean, Ana; Tomita, Mihaela; Ungureanu, Roxana

    2013-01-01

    Background: Population health, as defined by WHO in its constitution, is out “a physical, mental and social complete wellbeing”. At the basis of human welfare is the human dignity. This dimension requires an integrated vision of health care. The ecosystemical vision of Bronfenbrenner allows highlighting the unexpected connections between social macro system based on values and the micro system consisting of individual and family. Community nurse is aimed to transgression in practice of educat...

  15. Promoting Usability in Organizations with a New Health Usability Model: Implications for Nursing Informatics

    OpenAIRE

    Staggers, Nancy; Rodney, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    Usability issues with products such as Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are of global interest to nursing informaticists. Although improvements in patient safety, clinical productivity and effectiveness are possible when usability principles and practices are in place, most organizations do not embrace usability. This paper presents a new Health Usability Maturity Model consisting of 5 phases: unrecognized, preliminary, implemented, integrated and strategic. Within each level various aspects ...

  16. Factors influencing self-efficacy in breastfeeding support among public health nurses in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Noriko Toyama; Kayoko Kurihara; Mineko Muranaka; Kiyoko Kamibeppu

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated self-efficacy in breastfeeding support among public health nurses (PHNs) working at maternal and child health (MCH) services in Japanese municipalities, and its related factors such as education, working experience, breastfeeding experience, and postgraduate/continuous education. Directors of the MCH divisions were requested to select one PHN to answer the self-report questionnaires sent. The questionnaires were collected from October 2010 to January 2011. Of the ...

  17. Health technology assessment in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauslahti, K; Roine, R; Semberg, V; Kekomäki, M; Konttinen, M; Karp, P

    2000-01-01

    Finland has a long tradition of supporting social programs that promote equality and the welfare state. The healthcare system is financed mainly by taxation. Everyone is insured against illness. Each of Finland's five provinces is run by a provincial government that monitors the provision of social welfare and health care. However, the municipalities actually provide the services and regulate medical equipment and regionalization of services. During the early 1990s, gross domestic product (GDP) fell dramatically, and healthcare expenditure rose to 9.4% of GDP. Due to the economy's rapid recovery, the share of healthcare expenditure has again decreased and now matches the average level of OECD countries of approximately 7.7%. The former Finnish method of central planning and norm setting has guaranteed a fairly uniform development of necessary services throughout the country and free or low-cost access. Tight central planning did not, however, create incentives to contain costs. Therefore, in the beginning of the 1990s, decision-making power was largely decentralized to the municipalities, and the principles of state subsidies were reformed. In 1995, the Finnish Office for Health Care Technology Assessment (FinOHTA) was set up as a new unit of the National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health (STAKES). FinOHTA is intended to function as a national central body for advancing HTA-related work in Finland, with the ultimate goal of promoting the effectiveness and efficiency of Finnish health care. At present, the importance of HTA is widely recognized in Finland, especially in the face of rising healthcare costs. PMID:10932414

  18. Selected Publications of the Division of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Arlington, VA. Div. of Nursing.

    Publications are organized under the following topics: (1) Division of Nursing Program, (2) Nurse Training Act of 1964, (3) Nursing (general interest), (4) Nursing Manpower, (5) Nursing Services in Hospitals, (6) Public Health Nursing, (7) Nursing Education, (8) Nursing Research and Research Training, and (9) Nurse Training Manuals. Single copies…

  19. Leukemia from dermal exposure to cyclophosphamide among nurses in The Netherlands: quantitative assessment of the risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransman, Wouter; Kager, Hans; Meijster, Tim; Heederik, Dick; Kromhout, Hans; Portengen, Lützen; Blaauboer, Bas J

    2014-04-01

    Several studies showed that oncology nurses are exposed to antineoplastic drugs via the skin during daily activities. Several antineoplastic drugs (including cyclophosphamide) have been classified as carcinogenic to humans. This study aims to assess the leukemia risk of occupational exposure to cyclophosphamide. Average task frequencies from the population of oncology nurses in the Netherlands and task-based dermal exposure intensities were used to calculate oncology nurses' dermal exposure levels. A dermal absorption model in combination with a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was used to assess the delivered dose of cyclophosphamide and its active metabolites in the bone marrow. This delivered dose was subsequently related to pharmacodynamic and epidemiological information from a longitudinal study with cyclophosphamide-treated patients to estimate the excess lifetime leukemia risk at age 80 for Dutch oncology nurses after 40 years of exposure to cyclophosphamide. The excess lifetime leukemia risk at age 80 of an exposed oncology nurse after 40 years of dermal exposure to cyclophosphamide was estimated to be 1.04 per million oncology nurses. This risk could potentially increase to a maximum of 154 per million if a nurse performs all cyclophosphamide-related tasks with the maximum frequency (as observed in this population) and is exposed to maximum exposure intensities for each task without using protective gloves for 40 years. This study indicates that the risk of an oncology nurse in a Dutch hospital with an average dermal exposure to cyclophosphamide is well below the maximum tolerable risk of one extra death from cancer per 250 deaths after 40 years of occupational exposure, and that this level is not exceeded in a worst-case scenario. PMID:24412718

  20. Teaching Emotional Intelligence to Intensive Care Unit Nurses and their General Health: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ghadakpoor

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emotion and how people manage it is an important part of personality that would immensely affect their health. Investigations showed that emotional intelligence is significantly related to and can predict psychological health.Objective: To determine the effect of teaching emotional intelligence to intensive care unit nurses on their general health.Methods: This randomized clinical trial (registered as IRCT201208022812N9 was conducted on 52 of 200 in intensive care unit nurses affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. They were recruited through purposeful convenience sampling and then randomly categorized into two groups. The intervention group members were trained in emotional intelligence. Bar-on emotional intelligence and Goldberg's general health questionnaires were administered to each participant before, immediately after, and one month after the intervention.Results: While the mean score of general health for the intervention group decreased from 25.4 before the intervention, to 18.1 immediately after the intervention and to 14.6 one month later, for the control group, it increased from 22.0, to 24.2 and to 26.5, respectively (pConclusion: Teaching emotional intelligence improved the general health of intensive care unit nurses.