WorldWideScience

Sample records for health nursing assessment

  1. Advanced Health Assessment in Nurse Practitioner Programs.

    Kelley, Frances J.; Kopac, Catharine

    2001-01-01

    Responses from 140 nursing schools indicated that most taught health assessment to nurse practitioners as a separate course; public institutions were more involved in computer-assisted instruction. Faculty cited scarce resources and limited time to develop new teaching strategies. Most agreed that graduate courses should focus on differential…

  2. Learning about health: The pupils' and the school health nurses assessment of the health dialogue

    Borup, Ina K.

    Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiential learning, HBSC, health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children, adolescents, health dialouge, school health nurse......Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiential learning, HBSC, health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children, adolescents, health dialouge, school health nurse...

  3. Learning about health: The pupils' and the school health nurses assessment of the health dialogue

    Borup, Ina K.

    Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiental learning, HBSC, health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children, adolescents, health dialogue, school health nurse......Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiental learning, HBSC, health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children, adolescents, health dialogue, school health nurse...

  4. Health Instruction Packages: Nursing--Patient Observation and Assessment.

    Cooper, Freda; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of three learning modules to instruct nurses and nursing students in patient observation and assessment skills. The first module, "The ABC's of Observation" by Freda Cooper, provides psychiatric nurses and technicians with guidelines for determining the mental status of incoming patients…

  5. Measuring compliance of conducting an occupational health risk assessment in the occupational health nurse's practice

    Nicolene de, Jager; Sonya, Beukes; Anna G.W., Nolte.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational health nurses (OHNs) are qualified registered nurses with a postgraduate qualification in occupational health nursing. An important activity of OHNs is to identify and assess health risks in the workplace. Health risk assessments (HRAs) are conducted by OHNs to determine all the occupat [...] ional health stressors, for example noise, vibration and chemical substances. The authors conducted legal compliance occupational health audits and observed that 85% (n = 23) of OHNs in different settings conduct HRAs only to a limited extent. The following objective was formulated for the study: To explore and describe the extent to which OHNs conduct HRAs as it is a legal requirement for compliance; and the possible reasons for not adhering to the regulation and conduct them only to a limited extent. A quantitative, descriptive design was used in this study. A sampling frame was developed from a list of all the members of the South African Society of Occupational Health Nursing Practitioners (SASOHN) in Gauteng. From the target population of OHNs in Gauteng, a systematic cluster sampling method was used. A self-developed questionnaire was distributed by mail and e-mail, and authors sent respondents reminders. The authors ensured that validity, reliability and ethical standards were adhered to. The findings revealed that OHNs are mature, experienced, predominately female practitioners who operate on behalf of a disproportionately large number of workers. Four factors influencing these nurses in conducting an HRA to a limited extent were identified: competence, ignorance about the role of the OHN, workload and attitude.

  6. Risk assessment and absconding: Perceptions, understandings and responses of mental health nurses

    Grotto, J.; Gerace, A.; O'Kane, D.; Simpson, A.; Oster, C.; Muir-Cochrane, E.

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objectives: This paper reports mental health nurses' perspectives of absconding. The aims of the study were to explore nurses' perceptions of risk assessment and management practices regarding absconding from acute inpatient psychiatric settings, and their affective responses when patients absconded. Background: Nurses are directly involved in managing the risk of patients leaving hospital while acutely unwell, as well as dealing with the implications of an absconding event. How...

  7. Assessment of primary care nursing in relation to adolescent health behaviour by means of trigger films.

    Eshed, H; Epstein, L

    1991-01-01

    The patterns of adolescents' behaviour place them at a risk from developing health and social pathology. In order to assess whether primary care nursing meets adolescents' health needs, the reported performance of 306 registered nurses working in different primary health care settings was studied. The research tool developed especially for the study was a video-taped trigger film. Demographic, education and work-related variables were studied by means of a questionnaire. The behaviour patterns studied were smoking, sexual activity, alcohol and drug consumption, and eating habits. The clinical issues were hypertension, obesity and anorexia nervosa. Reported performance was low--35% of the total possible score--with the lowest scores in the areas of preventive care, data gathering and recording, and somewhat higher in the areas of curative care and follow-up. The video-taped trigger films were considered to have face validity; they were found to be reliable, with an ability to assess the nurses' reported performance and to differentiate between the nurses in the three different work settings. This is the first study of its kind in Israel. The results show that primary health nursing of adolescents is insufficient, and that teenagers should get higher priority as a target population from the nursing profession in order to achieve WHO's aims of 'health for all by the year 2000'. PMID:2005286

  8. Assessing Organizational Readiness for a Participatory Occupational Health/Health Promotion Intervention in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

    Zhang, Yuan; Flum, Marian; West, Cheryl; Punnett, Laura

    2015-09-01

    The long-term care sector is characterized by high morbidity and employee turnover, along with associated costs. Effective health protection and health promotion are important to improve physical and psychosocial well-being of caregivers. Assessment of organizational readiness for change is an essential precursor to the successful implementation of workplace programs addressing work climate, structure of tasks and relationships, and other issues that may be perceived as challenging by some within the institution. This study qualitatively assessed readiness of five skilled nursing facilities for a participatory occupational health/health promotion intervention. Selection criteria were developed to screen for program feasibility and ability to conduct prospective evaluations, and information was collected from managers and employees (interviews and focus groups). Three centers were selected for the program, and the first year of formative evaluation and intervention experience was then reviewed to evaluate and modify our selection criteria after the fact. Lessons learned include adding assessment of communication and the structure of problem solving to our selection criteria, improving methods to assess management support in a concrete (potentially nonverbal) form, and obtaining a stated financial commitment and resources to enable the team to function. Assessment of organizational readiness for change is challenging, although necessary to implement effective and sustainable health promotion programs in specific organizations. PMID:25715335

  9. Learning about health: The pupils' and the school health nurses' assessment of the health dialogue

    Borup, Ina K.

    Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiential learning, health behaviour in school-aged children (HBSC), health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children......Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiential learning, health behaviour in school-aged children (HBSC), health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children...

  10. Health Literacy Concepts in Nursing Education.

    Kennard, Deborah K

    2016-01-01

    The impact of low health literacy on the health care system is astronomical. The ability to learn, retain, and apply health information is greatly affected by health literacy and thus greatly affects patient outcomes. The responsibility of patient education is mostly shouldered by nurses and yet nursing is the discipline that is most lacking in knowledge and awareness about health literacy. Providing nursing students with the necessary tools to assess patient health literacy and to assess their own patient teaching is a vital component of patient education. Nursing curricula is the place to start. PMID:27209875

  11. Dental auscultation for nursing personnel as a model of oral health care education: development, baseline, and 6-month follow-up assessments.

    Wårdh, Inger; Berggren, Ulf; Hallberg, Lillemor R M; Andersson, Lars; Sörensen, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Oral health care has been shown to have low priority in nursing and has been only partly successful. To create more positive effects than those achieved through traditional oral health care education, this project tested an educational model for nursing staff personnel. In addition to traditional oral health care education, some of the nursing staff members passed an additional dental auscultation period and served as oral care aides. The aides were responsible for the oral health care of the residents at their nursing facilities (intervention group). The intervention nursing facilities were compared with facilities where nursing personnel only received a traditional oral health care education program. Assessments were made at baseline and at a 6-month follow-up. At follow-up it was shown that the nursing staff in the intervention group gave higher priority to the oral health care work than the nursing staff in the control group. PMID:11905448

  12. Assisted living nursing practice: admission assessment.

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    Admission assessment, generally conducted by a registered nurse, is autonomous, without opportunity for dialogue with colleagues and other health care professionals and bounded by the nurse's knowledge and skills, state regulations, facility practices, and marketing. The fact that some states permit admission and retention of nursing home level-of-care residents and provision of end-of-life care means that the assessment has to be able to predict the resident's likely trajectory of well-being as well as chronic illness exacerbation. The nurse must have a clear perspective on staff competencies and judge whether additional education or training will be necessary. This article reviews assessment standards of practice as put forth by the American Assisted Living Nurses Association as part of its application for recognition of assisted living nursing as specialty nursing practice by the American Nurses Association. The role of the Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurse in resident assessment is also discussed. PMID:17292794

  13. Using nursing perspectives to inform public health nursing workforce development.

    Swearingen, Connie Diaz

    2009-01-01

    Recent national and regional public health workforce development efforts have been conducted through a framework of public health services research. Public health nurses (PHNs) are the single largest professional group in the formal public health system, and thus have the greatest potential for positively impacting our community health systems. Effective public health workforce development is contingent on examination of how PHNs themselves make meaning of their practice. This paper suggests that a nursing perspective should be used from which to conduct research surrounding PHN practice. Literature describing PHN practice and recent workforce assessment efforts are reviewed. Assumptions are identified regarding the nature of nursing knowledge, and a theoretical perspective for inquiry about PHN praxis is developed. Finally, a model is offered to illustrate the reciprocal influence of nursing science and public health nursing practice. PMID:19154195

  14. Child hearing health: practice of the Family Health Strategy nurses

    Suelen Brito Azevedo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective Evaluating the practice of nurses of the Family Health Strategy (FHS in child hearing health care. Method A normative assessment of structure and process, with 37 nurses in the Family Health Units, in the city of Recife, Pernambuco. The data collection instrument originated from the logical model of child hearing health care provided by nurses of the Family Health Strategy, and the matrix of indicators for evaluation of nursing practice. Results All the nurses identified the hearing developmental milestones. At least two risk factors were identified by 94.5% of the nurses, and 21.6% of them carried out educational activities. Conclusion The normative assessment was considered adequate despite existing limitations in the structure and process.

  15. Emancipatory practices of nurses in primary health care: the home visit as an instrument of health needs assessment

    Celia Maria Sivalli Campos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective Identify nurses’ emancipatory practices in primary care, to contribute to the improvement of health care. Method A case study type social research of qualitative nature, in which nurses of a primary health care service unit in São Paulo were interviewed. Results The home visit was identified as a nursing practice possible to be expanded in order to identify social determinants of health, triggering emancipatory practices in the service. This expansion occurred because the design of health care labour intended by the service team changed its focus from the traditional object of health services, the disease. Conclusion First, it is advocated that social policies lead projects with the purpose of improving health needs. On the other hand, the daily labour needs to provide opportunities for reflection and discussion of healthcare projects, leading workers to propose labour-processes targeted to both the social determinants of health and people’s illness.

  16. Objective structured video examination in psychiatric and mental health nursing: a learning and assessment method.

    Selim, Abeer A; Dawood, Eman

    2015-02-01

    In the current study, the Objective Structured Video Examination (OSVE) was conducted to assess undergraduate nursing students' knowledge, observation, and clinical reasoning related to clinical psychiatric nursing competencies. The OSVE showed acceptable reliability and validity (Cronbach's α = 0.714, r = 0.6, respectively). Students highly appraised the OSVE because it covered a wide area of knowledge and clinical skills; the examination instructions were clear, concrete, and easily understood; the sounds and pictures of the videos were clear; and the videos simulated real patients. The examination was fair, well-administered, well-structured, and well-sequenced. The OSVE reflected learned skills, it provided opportunities for learning, grades were clearly identified, and it eliminated personal bias. Overall, the OSVE provided a practical and useful experience. On the other hand, some students negatively perceived the OSVE as being stressful and requiring more time. PMID:25602587

  17. Does Using a Standardised Mental Health Triage Assessment Alter Nurses Assessment of Vignettes of People Presenting with Deliberate Self-Harm

    Richard Tanner; Eugene Cassidy; Iomhar O’Sullivan

    2014-01-01

    Background. The Manchester Triage Scale is used in Irish emergency departments. This fails to provide guidance on triaging psychiatric presentations. A Mental Health Triage scale is recommended by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence. Aim. To examine the effectiveness of a Mental Health Triage scale in assessing patients presenting with self-harm. Method. Ten vignettes were created, detailing cases of deliberate self-harm. Nurses (n=49) were given five vignettes and asked to assign e...

  18. Consulting in occupational health nursing. An overview.

    Roy, D R

    1997-01-01

    1. The term consultant is defined as anyone who provides professional advice or services, which may include internal and external consultants. Consulting is a challenging way to practice occupational health nursing. 2. The consulting process involves problem solving and the creation of change. This process may be illustrated by using the nursing process and the steps of assessment, analysis, planning, implementation, and evaluation. 3. Successful occupational health nursing consultants are excellent communicators, are willing to market themselves, love problem solving, and are self starters. PMID:9043229

  19. Nursing and mHealth

    Catherine Samples

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Innovations in mobile health (mHealth technology offer applications to promote wellness management and health behavior change outside of formal clinical settings. Nurses can help to move mHealth into mainstream health care by understanding its potential to change the landscape of health intervention delivery, incorporating mHealth into patients' day to day preventive care strategies, and supporting the science of mHealth's effectiveness.

  20. Nursing and mHealth

    Catherine Samples; Zhao Ni; Shaw, Ryan J

    2014-01-01

    Innovations in mobile health (mHealth) technology offer applications to promote wellness management and health behavior change outside of formal clinical settings. Nurses can help to move mHealth into mainstream health care by understanding its potential to change the landscape of health intervention delivery, incorporating mHealth into patients' day to day preventive care strategies, and supporting the science of mHealth's effectiveness.

  1. Leadership and mental health nursing.

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; Deacon, Maureen; Jackson, Debra

    2011-01-01

    This discussion paper argues for the critical importance of successful leadership for effective mental health nursing, observing that nursing leadership has long been regarded problematically by the profession. Using empirical and theoretical evidence we debate what leadership styles and strategies are most likely to result in effective, recovery-orientated mental health nursing. Models of transformational and distributed leadership are found to be highly congruent with mental health nursing values, yet the literature suggests it is a type of leadership more often desired than experienced. We note how the scholarly literature tends to ignore the "elephant in the room" that is organizational power, and we question whether transformational leadership pursued within a specific clinical context can influence beyond those confines. Nevertheless it is within these contexts that consumers experience nursing, effective or otherwise, thus we should advocate what is known about effective leadership wherever it is required. PMID:21932925

  2. Asthma education by community child health nurses.

    Mitchell, E A; Ferguson, V.; Norwood, M

    1986-01-01

    A randomised controlled study of an educational programme for children with asthma and their families was carried out by community child health nurses. Three hundred and sixty eight children aged 2 to 14 years were enrolled in the study after admission to hospital for asthma. The intervention group was visited monthly by a nurse for six months. The subjects were assessed six months later by a postal, self administered questionnaire. European children in the intervention group were taking sign...

  3. There is more to risk and safety planning than dramatic risks: Mental health nurses' risk assessment and safety-management practice.

    Higgins, Agnes; Doyle, Louise; Downes, Carmel; Morrissey, Jean; Costello, Paul; Brennan, Michael; Nash, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Risk assessment and safety planning are considered a cornerstone of mental health practice, yet limited research exists into how mental health nurses conceptualize 'risk' and how they engage with risk assessment and safety planning. The aim of the present study was to explore mental health nurses' practices and confidence in risk assessment and safety planning. A self-completed survey was administered to 381 mental health nurses in Ireland. The findings indicate that nurses focus on risk to self and risk to others, with the risk of suicide, self-harm, substance abuse, and violence being most frequently assessed. Risk from others and 'iatrogenic' risk were less frequently considered. Overall, there was limited evidence of recovery-oriented practice in relation to risk. The results demonstrate a lack of meaningful engagement with respect to collaborative safety planning, the identification and inclusion of protective factors, and the inclusion of positive risk-taking opportunities. In addition, respondents report a lack of confidence working with positive risk taking and involving family/carers in the risk-assessment and safety-planning process. Gaps in knowledge about risk-assessment and safety-planning practice, which could be addressed through education, are identified, as are the implications of the findings for practice and research. PMID:26632975

  4. PARTNER INVOLVEMENT: NEGOTIATING THE PRESENCE OF PARTNERS IN PSYCHOSOCIAL ASSESSMENT AS CONDUCTED BY MIDWIVES AND CHILD AND FAMILY HEALTH NURSES.

    Rollans, Mellanie; Kohlhoff, Jane; Meade, Tanya; Kemp, Lynn; Schmied, Virginia

    2016-05-01

    Universal screening for maternal depression and assessment of psychosocial risks has been integrated into the routine perinatal care provided in many Australian hospitals, but to date, partners/fathers have been largely excluded from the process. This study explored the ways in which clinicians in health service settings include partners who attend antenatal and postnatal visits with women. Qualitative data were collected using observations (n = 54), interviews (n = 60), and discussion groups (n = 7) with midwives and child and family health nurses who conducted the appointments. Transcripts from observations, interviews, and discussion groups underwent qualitative analysis, and key themes were identified. Results showed partners to have little or no involvement in psychosocial assessment and depression screening. Thematic analysis revealed four key themes: negotiating partner exclusion, partial inclusion, women's business or a couple concern? and they know anyway. Partner involvement appeared to be challenged particularly by mandatory interpersonal violence screening, which, according to health service policy, is to be conducted confidentially. Overall, results highlighted partner involvement in perinatal depression screening and psychosocial assessment processes and identified some of the benefits such as partner disclosure, but also the challenges and complexities of inclusion of partners. Clinical implications and directions for further education and research are discussed. PMID:27111339

  5. Recent Developments in Public Health Nursing in the Americas

    Jose Arturo Ruiz-Larios

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an assessment of the participation and training of nurses in public health areas in the Americas. Information was gathered through a literature review and interviews with key informants from Mexico, Colombia, and Paraguay. Results demonstrate that there is significant variation in definitions of public health nursing across the region and current systematized data about the workforce profile of public health nursing personnel is not available for many countries in the Americas. There are significant regional differences in the levels and types of training of nurses working in public health areas and an increasing number of nurses are pursuing training in public health at the master’s and doctoral levels. Many nurses carry out some or all of the essential functions of public health, but are not considered to be public health nurses. Generally, auxiliary and technical nurses have a broader presence in public health areas than professional nurses. In the future, regional health systems reforms should support increased recruitment and training of public health nurses, as well as stronger roles in public health research and health care at the individual, community, and population levels.

  6. Responsive Assessment: Assessing Student Nurses' Clinical Competence.

    Neary, Mary

    2001-01-01

    A study involving 300 nursing students, 155 nurse practitioners, and 80 assessors tested a model of responsive assessment that includes identification of learning needs and potential, assignment to suitable placements, continuous assessment of clinical practice and patient care, and alignment of teaching and assessment with patient needs and…

  7. Mapping the Future of Environmental Health and Nursing: Strategies for Integrating National Competencies into Nursing Practice

    Larsson, Laura S.; Butterfield, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Nurses are increasingly the primary contact for clients concerned about health problems related to their environment. In response to the need for nursing expertise in the field of environmental health, the Institute of Medicine (IOM), Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) have designed core competencies for the nursing profession. The IOM competencies focus on four areas: (1) knowledge and concepts; (2) assessment and referral; advocacy, ethics, and risk communication; and (4) legislation and regulation. The competencies establish a baseline of knowledge and awareness in order for nurses to prevent and minimize health problems associated with exposure to environmental agents. To address the known difficulties of incorporating new priorities into established practice, nurses attending an environmental health short course participated in a nominal group process focusing on the question, “What specific actions can we take to bring environmental health into the mainstream of nursing practice?” This exercise was designed to bring the concepts of the national initiatives (IOM, NINR, ATSDR) to the awareness of individual nurses involved in the direct delivery of care. Results include 38 action items nurses identified as improving awareness and utilization of environmental health principles. The top five ideas were: (1) get environmental health listed as a requirement or competency in undergraduate nursing education; (2) improve working relationships with interdepartmental persons—a team approach; (3) strategically place students in essential organizations such as NIOSH, ATSDR, or CDC; (4) educate nurse educators; and (5) create environmental health awards in nursing. The 38 original ideas were also reorganized into a five-tiered conceptual model. The concepts of this model include: (1) developing partnerships; (2) strengthening publications; (3) enhancing continuing education; (4) updating nursing practice; and (5) strengthening schools of nursing. The model serves as a road map for action in building environmental health capacity within mainstream nursing. PMID:12071904

  8. Religion, assessment and the problem of 'normative uncertainty' for mental health student nurses: a critical incident-informed qualitative interview study.

    Bassett, A M; Baker, C; Cross, S

    2015-10-01

    There is limited research around how mental health (MH) student nurses interpret and differentiate between people's religious and cultural beliefs and the existence of psychopathological symptomatology and experiences. Here we focus on one cultural issue that arose from research exploring how MH student nurses approach and interpret religion and culture in their practice - that is, the difficulties in determining the clinical significance of the religious beliefs and experiences expressed by the people they care for. While problems with establishing the cultural boundaries of normality in clinical assessments are an important area of debate in cultural psychiatry, it remains a peripheral issue in MH nurse education. An anthropologically informed qualitative research design underpinned 'critical incident' (CI)-focused ethnographic interviews with 36 second and third-year MH nursing field students and seven undergraduate MH branch lecturers. Follow up focus groups were also carried out. Interview transcripts were subject to thematic analysis. Four subthemes were identified under the broad theme of the clinical significance of religious-type expression and experience: (1) identifying the difference between delusions and religious belief; (2) identifying whether an experience was hallucination or religious experience; (3) the clinical implications of such challenges; and (4) applying religion-specific knowledge. There are clinical implications that may result from the difficulties with assessing the clinical significance of religious beliefs and experiences, identified in both our research and within international cultural psychiatry literature and research. Misinterpretation and therefore wrongly assessing someone's experience as pathological is a significant concern. It is suggested that CI analysis could be adapted to help nurses, nursing students and nurse educators recognize the religious dimensions of mental distress, particularly those that then potentially impact upon the accuracy and person centeredness of clinical assessment. Further research is proposed to investigate the clinical assessment and training needs of nurses in the area of religion and mental distress. PMID:26147782

  9. Nursing care and environmental health

    Eveline Pinheiro Beserra, Maria Dalva Santos Alves

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reflect about nursing care in environmental health. Methodology: reflective study that was conducted from August to November 2008, through weekly discussions during the course Research Methodology Program Graduate in Nursing, Federal University of Ceará, with the referrals articles, book chapters and resolutions on thematic care, nursing and environmental health. Results: we observed the necessity of professional commitment in the reduction of risks to the ecosystem, damages to ecological and population welfare. In face of this, health promotion is clearly expressed in man's relationship with the environment, showing the importance of environmental health as a direct human health. It appears that there are many factors involved and there is still need for shared responsibility, which includes the commitment of the professional. Conclusion: in this scenario, the professional nursing should take their cooperation through a careful committed to environmental health, especially in relation to solid waste management of health services, but also intervene in the poor management of such waste, both for preventive actions as corrective.

  10. Assessment of the characteristics of the medical care teachers who train the Maternal and Child Health Nursing specialists

    Norma Mur Villar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: The features of the Mother and Child Health Nursing specialist’s teaching care training are paramount to form appropriate teaching behaviors. Aim: To determine the features of the medical care teacher who trains the Mother and Child Health Nursing specialist. Methods: An exploratory research was carried out during the years 2008-2009 in the “Gustavo Aldereguía Lima” General University Hospital of Cienfuegos, Decision Theory was applied to select the criteria taken into account in the Multicriterial model, by means of a variation of the Delphi Method. The universe was made up by the coordinators and methodologists who run the Mother and Child Health Nursing specialty on a national level, and a non-probabilistic sampling was conducted to obtain the Sample (Experts Sampling. Results: 23 criteria exceeding the PC4 cutoff point corresponding to the “much” category are needed, which links the professional model to the social demands to know, relate and apply the contents of nursing using the material resources that connect the concrete to the abstract to promote the continuity of medical care and the use of the potential of assistance in the training the specialists in which the professional’s behavior was demonstrated. Conclusions: By means of the stated criteria, it is evidenced that medical care is the basis for the kind of teaching training our professional needs to organize the teaching process, starting from medical care issues. That training allows them to accomplish their social task as health trainers.

  11. Community Health Nursing through a Global Lens.

    Sarkar, Norma; Dallwig, Amber; Abbott, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Community Health Nursing (N456) is a required senior clinical course in the undergraduate nursing curriculum at the University of Michigan in which students learn to assess and address the health of populations and communities. In 2012, we began our efforts to internationalize the curriculum using a globally engaged nursing education framework. Our goal is for all students to have an intercultural learning experience understanding that all students are unable to travel internationally. Therefore, this intercultural learning was implemented through a range of experiences including actual immersion, virtual activities (videoconferencing) and interventions with local vulnerable populations. Grants were obtained to provide immersion experiences in Quito, Ecuador and New Delhi, India. Several technologies were initiated with partner nursing schools in Leogane, Haiti and New Delhi, India. Weekly videoconferencing utilizing BlueJeans software and exchange of knowledge through the Knowledge Gateway facilitated intercultural exchange of knowledge and culture. Local clinical groups work with a variety of vulnerable populations. A private blog was developed for all sections to share community assessment data from local and international communities. Qualitative evaluation data was collected for local and international students to begin to assess cultural competence and student learning. Analysis of data documented increased awareness of culture and identified the many positive benefits of interaction with a global partner. PMID:25980716

  12. Mental health and learning disability nursing students' perceptions of the usefulness of the objective structured clinical examination to assess their competence in medicine administration.

    Hemingway, Steve; Stephenson, John; Roberts, Bronwyn; McCann, Terence

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate mental health and learning disability nursing students' perceptions of the usefulness of the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in assessing their administration of medicine competence. Learning disability (n = 24) and mental health (n = 46) students from a single cohort were invited to evaluate their experience of the OSCE. A 10-item survey questionnaire was used, comprising open- and closed-response questions. Twelve (50%) learning disability and 32 (69.6%) mental health nursing students participated. The OSCE was rated highly compared to other theoretical assessments; it was also reported as clinically real and as a motivational learning strategy. However, it did not rate as well as clinical practice. Content analysis of written responses identified four themes: (i) benefits of the OSCE; (ii) suggestions to improve the OSCE; (iii) concern about the lack of clinical reality of the OSCE; and (iv) OSCE-induced stress. The themes, although repeating some of the positive statistical findings, showed that participants were critical of the university setting as a place to conduct clinical assessment, highlighted OSCE-related stress, and questioned the validity of the OSCE as a real-world assessment. The OSCE has an important role in the development of student nurses' administration of medicine skills. However, it might hinder their performance as a result of the stress of being assessed in a simulated environment. PMID:25180411

  13. Computerized documentation and community health nursing students

    Nadine M Aktan; Janet Tracy; Connie Bareford

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objective: Proficiency in computerized documentation systems is an essential element of most areas of nursing practice today. Community health is one example of an area of nursing practice where computerized documentation systems help in the provision of high quality care. Nursing students must learn the basic principles of and begin to participate in the practices of computerized nursing documentation. It is, therefore, the responsibility of nursing faculty to promote student invo...

  14. Public Health Interventions for School Nursing Practice.

    Schaffer, Marjorie A; Anderson, Linda J W; Rising, Shannon

    2016-06-01

    School nurses (SNs) use public health nursing knowledge and skills to provide nursing services to school populations. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a practice framework that can be used to explain and guide public health nursing interventions. SNs who were also members of the National Association of School Nurses completed an electronic survey on their use of public health interventions as defined by the wheel. Although 67% of the participants were not familiar with the Public Health Intervention Wheel, respondents reported conducting activities that were consistent with the Wheel interventions. Screening, referral and follow-up, case management, and health teaching were the most frequently performed interventions. Intervention use varied by educational level, age of nurse, years of practice, and student population. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a relevant and useful framework that provides a language to explain population-based school nursing practice. PMID:26404552

  15. Quantifying Community Health Nursing: The Control is with the Nurse

    Miller, Judith L.; Sienkiewicz, Josephine I.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the formation, benefits, and implication to nursing practice of an automated nursing information system in a community health agency based on a service provided framework. The design of the service provided coding system is described. Benefits and future implications to the community health agency are discussed.

  16. Does occupational health nursing exist in India?

    Rajnarayan R Tiwari; Sharma, Anjali; Zodpey, Sanjay P.; Shobha M Khandare

    2014-01-01

    Background: Occupational health services are important to develop healthy and productive work forces, which should be delivered through occupational health team. Occupational health nurse (OHN) is an important member of this team and is required to apply nursing principles in conserving the health of workers in occupational settings. Purpose: This article attempts to map the occupational health nursing courses in India and design competencies and curriculum for such a course. Materials and Me...

  17. Future of advanced practice public health nursing education.

    Duffy, Sonia A; McCullagh, Marjorie; Lee, Corinne

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct an assessment of the need for advanced practice, master's-prepared public health nurses in Michigan. A cross-sectional design was used to conduct interviews with former students, community leaders, and faculty. Content was analyzed qualitatively for themes. Participants were enthusiastic about the practice environment, but funding was a major concern. Almost all participants thought jobs were available and that public health nursing was cost-effective, yet there was concern about the aging work force and the need for higher education. Other disciplines serving in public health roles and hospitals were identified as competition to the public health nurse. Epidemiology, prevention, community assessment/program planning, health policy/law/ethics, leadership, health services, informatics, research, and grant writing were noted as skills needed. The results of this study are favorable for the future of advanced practice public health nursing practice and education. PMID:25802903

  18. Professional activities of experienced occupational health nurses.

    Harber, Philip; Alongi, Gabriela; Su, Jing

    2014-06-01

    Occupational health nurses have diverse backgrounds and their practices require the ability to perform unique professional tasks. This study empirically evaluated their activities and skills using a web-based log system to describe activities at 15 specific sampled times. A national sample of 128 occupational health nurses provided 1,893 activity logs revealing occupational health nurses use both clinical and management skills on a regular basis; indirect client care is as common as direct "hands-on" client care. Most occupational health nurses are directly paid by their employer and activities serve to benefit both individual workers and their employers. Occupational health nurses have specific knowledge and skills in addition to general nursing competencies. Understanding the actual work of occupational health nurses is necessary to align training, certification, and competency maintenance systems such as continuing education with the unique skills used in actual practice activities. PMID:24971818

  19. [E-health--the role of nurses].

    Kici?, Miroslava

    2014-03-01

    Nurses, the largest part of the health care team, spend most time with the patient. The advisory role of nurses/technicians working with patients and their families is one of the most common nursing interventions. Communication is the basis of private and professional life of nurses/technicians. In the last decade of the 20th century, virtual communication has joined the usual verbal and nonverbal communication. Virtual communication in nursing is practiced between health institutions and health professionals, but virtual communication of nurses to patients is also ever more employed. In the process of computerization of the health care system, particularly nursing, we are faced with many difficulties. One of the key issues in practice is that nurses, as users of health information systems, are not included in the design of health information systems. Consequently, as a rule, they are not satisfied with the application designed for nursing. Many nurses still lack adequate IT knowledge, so they do not know how to participate in the improvement of the system. Therefore, the Committee for e-health of the Croatian Academy of Medical Sciences has published a declaration, which, along with the scope of application of modern technology, defines an educational framework for both health and IT professionals participating in the health care system, as well as a framework that will help upgrade the quality of e-health, and thus the quality of health care systems. PMID:24979900

  20. Thought Processes of Nurses in Nursing Assessment: Analysis of Nursing Problems and Patient Strengths, Patient Information

    Kasumi Mikami; Ryoko Tsuchiya; Keiko Aizu; Yoshiko Nishizawa

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this study was to clarify the thought processes of nurses in performing nursing assessment. Methods: The participants comprised 20 nurses working in a surgery ward. Patient information on a case, including presenting illness, vital signs, and other findings from admission until 09:00 on the day after surgery, was shown to the participants. After reading the case report, the nurses presented their assessments. Based on these assessments, nursing problems, patient strengths...

  1. Nuclear education in public health and nursing

    Twenty-three public health schools and 492 university schools of nursing were surveyed to gather specific information on educational programs related to nuclear war. Twenty public health schools and 240 nursing schools responded. Nuclear war-related content was most likely to appear in disaster nursing and in environmental health courses. Three schools of public health report that they currently offer elective courses on nuclear war. Innovative curricula included political action projects for nuclear war prevention

  2. Public health nursing, ethics and human rights.

    Ivanov, Luba L; Oden, Tami L

    2013-05-01

    Public health nursing has a code of ethics that guides practice. This includes the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for Nurses, Principles of the Ethical Practice of Public Health, and the Scope and Standards of Public Health Nursing. Human rights and Rights-based care in public health nursing practice are relatively new. They reflect human rights principles as outlined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and applied to public health practice. As our health care system is restructured and there are new advances in technology and genetics, a focus on providing care that is ethical and respects human rights is needed. Public health nurses can be in the forefront of providing care that reflects an ethical base and a rights-based approach to practice with populations. PMID:23586767

  3. The nature of mental health nurses' knowledge

    Barker, Janet H.

    2002-01-01

    There is a need to develop a clear understanding of the knowledge used by mental health nurses in day to day practice. Knowledge relating to holistic/therapeutic activities form the basis of mental health nurse education, however various studies have consistently shown the majority of mental health nurses activity relates to administrative and routine tasks and containment. This disparity between the knowledge bases prescribed, those described and the inability of education reforms to resolve...

  4. The leadership role of nurse educators in mental health nursing.

    Sayers, Jan; Lopez, Violeta; Howard, Patricia B; Escott, Phil; Cleary, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Leadership behaviors and actions influence others to act, and leadership in clinical practice is an important mediator influencing patient outcomes and staff satisfaction. Indeed, positive clinical leadership has been positioned as a crucial element for transformation of health care services and has led to the development of the Practice Doctorate Movement in the United States. Nurse educators in health care have a vital leadership role as clinical experts, role models, mentors, change agents, and supporters of quality projects. By enacting these leadership attributes, nurse educators ensure a skilled and confident workforce that is focused on optimizing opportunities for students and graduates to integrate theory and practice in the workplace as well as developing more holistic models of care for the consumer. Nurse educators need to be active in supporting staff and students in health care environments and be visible leaders who can drive policy and practice changes and engage in professional forums, research, and scholarship. Although nurse educators have always been a feature of the nursing workplace, there is a paucity of literature on the role of nurse educators as clinical leaders. This discursive article describes the role and attributes of nurse educators with a focus on their role as leaders in mental health nursing. We argue that embracing the leadership role is fundamental to nurse educators and to influencing consumer-focused care in mental health. We also make recommendations for developing the leadership role of nurse educators and provide considerations for further research such as examining the impact of clinical leaders on client, staff, and organizational outcomes. PMID:26440875

  5. Nurse Overestimation of Patients' Health Literacy

    Dickens, Carolyn; Lambert, Bruce L.; Cromwell, Terese; Piano, Mariann R

    2013-01-01

    Patient education and effective communication are core elements of the nursing profession; therefore, awareness of a patient's health literacy is integral to patient care, safety, education, and counseling. Several past studies have suggested that health care providers overestimate their patient's health literacy. In this study, the authors compare inpatient nurses' estimate of their patient's health literacy to the patient's health literacy using Newest Vital Sign as the health literacy meas...

  6. Does occupational health nursing exist in India?

    Rajnarayan R Tiwari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational health services are important to develop healthy and productive work forces, which should be delivered through occupational health team. Occupational health nurse (OHN is an important member of this team and is required to apply nursing principles in conserving the health of workers in occupational settings. Purpose: This article attempts to map the occupational health nursing courses in India and design competencies and curriculum for such a course. Materials and Methods: Information through the Internet, printed journals, and perspectives of the key stakeholders were the principal sources of data. Discussion: In India, there is a need to initiate a course on occupational health nursing to provide occupational health services for the organized and unorganized sector workforce. A certificate course for occupational health nursing for 3-4 months duration offered through contact session mode can be an opportune beginning. However, to cater employed nurses an online course can be another effective alternative. The theoretical part should essentially include modules on occupational diseases, industrial hygiene, and occupational health legislation, whereas the modules on practical aspects can include visits to industries. Taking into account the existing norms of Indian Factories Act for hazardous units of organized sector an estimated 1,34,640 OHNs are required. Conclusion: There is a need-supply gap in the number of occupational health nursing manpower in India, which can be attributed to the absence of any course to train such manpower.

  7. Assessing Competencies in Nursing and Midwifery Education. Final Report.

    Bedford, Helen; And Others

    This report examines the assessment of competence in nursing and midwifery education in Britain within a context of changes in health needs, values about health care and service provision, policy/ideology, and education. Chapter 1 explores alternative approaches to conceptualizing the issues involved in the study of assessment, competence, and…

  8. Health Communications: Nursing Education for Increased Visibility and Effectiveness.

    Chaffee, Mary

    2000-01-01

    To improve the visibility of nurses in mass media, health communications content should be integrated into nursing education. Nurses equipped with advanced communication skills, media expertise and teaching strategies can empower the profession to influence the health care environment. (SK)

  9. Public health nursing education in Russia.

    Ivanov, L Louise; Paganpegara, Galina

    2003-07-01

    The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1990 brought many changes to Russia, including changes in nursing education. However, the changes did not include content in public health nursing. Most health care in Russia is provided at the tertiary level in hospitals. Health promotion and health education are new concepts in Russia and are not well understood. When health education does occur, it is at the individual level, taught by physicians, and in response to new diagnoses. Health promotion at the primary level and with aggregates is not often practiced. Russia currently is in a demographic crisis where health indicators continue to decline. Russian nurses trained in public health principles, such as health promotion, health education, and providing primary and secondary prevention services at the population and aggregate level, can positively affect the current demographic crisis. PMID:12873058

  10. Challenges in mental health nursing: current opinion

    Sabella D.; Fay-Hillier T

    2014-01-01

    Donna Sabella, Theresa Fay-Hillier College of Nursing and Health Professions, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: The current mental health care system in the US continues to struggle with providing adequate care and services to all that require it due to limited resources, biases from both other professions and the public, and the complexities of treatment of many of those individuals or populations that suffer from mental illness. Mental health nurses, also referred to as ps...

  11. Service Learning and Community Health Nursing: A Natural Fit.

    Miller, Marilyn P.; Swanson, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Community health nursing students performed community assessments and proposed and implemented service learning projects that addressed adolescent smoking in middle schools, home safety for elderly persons, industrial worker health, and sexual abuse of teenaged girls. Students learned to apply epidemiological research methods, mobilize resources,…

  12. School Nurses' Perceived Prevalence and Competence to Address Student Mental Health Problems

    Stephan, Sharon H.; Connors, Elizabeth H.

    2013-01-01

    Due to under-identification of student mental health problems and limited specialty mental health providers in schools, school nurses are often faced with identifying and addressing student mental health needs. This exploratory study assessed prevalence and types of student mental health problems encountered by school nurses, as well as their…

  13. Primary Health Care Theory to Practice: Experience of First-Year Nursing Students in Hong Kong.

    Simpson, Peggy; Chan, Mun Che; Cheung, Lai Yin; Hui, Tze Shau; Li, Ka Ying; Tang, Hiu Tung; Tong, Hoi Ning; Wong, Sik Kwan; Wong, Po Ming

    2002-01-01

    Eight first-year nursing students in Hong Kong implemented a primary health care project involving health assessments of older adults. Clients improved health knowledge and were satisfied with assessments. Students demonstrated high competence in health assessment, needs assessment, evaluation strategies, and health promotion skills. (Contains 27…

  14. Mixed methods research in mental health nursing.

    Kettles, A M; Creswell, J W; Zhang, W

    2011-08-01

    Mixed methods research is becoming more widely used in order to answer research questions and to investigate research problems in mental health and psychiatric nursing. However, two separate literature searches, one in Scotland and one in the USA, revealed that few mental health nursing studies identified mixed methods research in their titles. Many studies used the term 'embedded' but few studies identified in the literature were mixed methods embedded studies. The history, philosophical underpinnings, definition, types of mixed methods research and associated pragmatism are discussed, as well as the need for mixed methods research. Examples of mental health nursing mixed methods research are used to illustrate the different types of mixed methods: convergent parallel, embedded, explanatory and exploratory in their sequential and concurrent combinations. Implementing mixed methods research is also discussed briefly and the problem of identifying mixed methods research in mental and psychiatric nursing are discussed with some possible solutions to the problem proposed. PMID:21749560

  15. Future preparation of occupational health nurse managers.

    Scalzi, C C; Wilson, D L; Ebert, R

    1991-03-01

    This article presents the results of a national survey of job activities of corporate level occupational health nurse managers. The survey was designed to identify the relative amount of time spent and importance attributed to specific areas of their current job. In general this sample tended to have more management experience and educational preparation than previously cited studies: over 50% had completed a graduate degree. The scores for importance and time spent were highly correlated. That is, occupational health corporate nurse managers seemed to allocate their time to job responsibilities they considered most important. Management activities related to policy, practice standards, quality assurance, staff development, and systems for client care delivery appear to represent the core responsibilities of occupational health nursing management. Curriculum recommendations for management positions in occupational health include: health policy, program planning, and evaluation; business strategy; applications of management information systems; quality assurance; and marketing. PMID:2001272

  16. Family Health Nursing – A European Perspective

    Miros?aw J. Jarosz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Florence Nightingale, while formulating her concept of nursing mentioned, among nurses’ tasks, the popularization of personal hygiene and hygiene of surroundings in workers’ environments, as well as teaching baby care to mothers. The performance of these tasks required cooperation with the families, and at that time, such a cooperation was postulated by William Rathbone (1819–1902. According to him, to the tasks of a nurse providing home care for a patient also belong assistance to the family in the area of hygiene and health care.

  17. Assault experiences: Lessons learned from mental health nurses in Taiwan.

    Yang, Cheng-I; Hsieh, Wen-Po; Lee, Li-Hung; Chen, Shu-Ling

    2016-06-01

    Mental health nurse are frequently subjected to patients' violent and aggressive behaviour. These assault experiences have given rise to mental health nurses' physical and psychological trauma, and negatively impact the quality of patient care. The purpose of the present qualitative study was to understand mental health nurses' experiences of being assaulted, the influences on their patient care, and their perspectives of the effectiveness of in-service, violence-prevention education. Ten mental health nurses from two different inpatient mental health facilities were interviewed using a semistructured interview guide. Thematic analysis of interview data found six themes: (i) violence is unpredictable; (ii) violence is normal; (iii) lasting psychological trauma; (iv) limited support from peers and the administrator; (v) violence prevention requires team cooperation; and (vi) doubting the effectiveness of in-service education on violence prevention. Psychiatric ward administrators should assess nurses' learning and skill needs to determine whether these needs are met by existing in-service training programmes. A culture of safety should also be promoted by building a warm and supportive ward climate for both staff and patients, which would include team cooperation and support for colleagues who suffer a violent incident. PMID:27170463

  18. Chronic Health Conditions Managed by School Nurses. Position Statement. Revised

    Morgitan, Judith; Bushmiaer, Margo; DeSisto, Marie C.; Duff, Carolyn; Lambert, C. Patrice; Murphy, M. Kathleen; Roland, Sharon; Selser, Kendra; Wyckoff, Leah; White, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that students with chronic health conditions have access to a full-time registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse). School districts should include school nurse positions in their full-time instructional support personnel to provide health services…

  19. Integrating Sexual Minority Health Issues into a Health Assessment Class.

    Bosse, Jordon D; Nesteby, J Aleah; Randall, Carla E

    2015-01-01

    The health needs of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) population are traditionally overlooked by the health care community and are rendered invisible by most nursing school curricula. Initial contact with a nurse during a health history and assessment can have an impact on whether the person will feel comfortable disclosing his or her identity, returning for services, or following plans of care. Because the first interaction with a nurse can be critical, the health assessment course is an appropriate place in the curriculum to discuss the needs of the LGBT community. This article includes a discussion of unique health risks to the LGBT population, benefits, and challenges of incorporating these issues into the classroom and recommendations for including the care of this population into a health assessment nursing course. Specific communication techniques are provided that may be helpful during history taking and physical examination with a patient who is LGBT. Guidance regarding physical examination of the transgender patient is also included. These suggestions will be helpful to nurse faculty who teach health assessment, nursing students, educators who design and implement professional development and continuing education for established nurses, preceptors in the clinical setting, and any nurse who is unfamiliar with the needs and concerns specific to the LGBT population. PMID:26653044

  20. Predictors for Assessing Electronic Messaging Between Nurses and General Practitioners as a Useful Tool for Communication in Home Health Care Services: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Lyngstad, Merete; Hofoss, Dag; Grimsmo, Anders; Hellesø, Ragnhild

    2015-01-01

    Background Nurses providing home health care services are dependent on access to patient information and communicating with general practitioners (GPs) to deliver safe and effective health care to patients. Information and communication technology (ICT) systems are viewed as powerful tools for this purpose. In Norway, a standardized electronic messaging (e-messaging) system is currently being established in health care. Objective The aim of this study was to explore home health care nurses’ a...

  1. Information-seeking behavior of nursing students and clinical nurses: implications for health sciences librarians*

    Dee, Cheryl; Stanley, Ellen E.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This research was conducted to provide new insights on clinical nurses' and nursing students' current use of health resources and libraries and deterrents to their retrieval of electronic clinical information, exploring implications from these findings for health sciences librarians.

  2. Florence Nightingale: nurse and public health pioneer.

    Ellis, Harold

    2010-01-01

    August 2010 marks the centenary of the death of Florence Nightingale, who must be, without doubt, the most famous name in nursing. Most people, even those in the health professions, think of her as 'The Lady with the Lamp'; the heroine of the Crimean War, who tended the sick and wounded soldiers at Scutari. Important though this was, her main contribution, which continued long after Crimea, was in the organization of nursing training, in hospital planning, public and military health, and in effective collection of medical statistics. PMID:20081644

  3. Public health nursing competencies 1953-1966: effective and efficient.

    Weierbach, Florence M

    2007-01-01

    The Quad Council of Public Health Nursing Organizations developed public health nursing competencies in 2003. They are guides for determining skills at two levels, and they identify public health nurses as providing care to individuals and families or to populations and systems with the nurse having proficiency, awareness, or knowledge. The primary purpose of this paper is to discuss historical nursing roles and qualifications as judged by the 2003 competencies, including educational preparation and experience for the administrative and staff nurse. The historical exemplar for the nursing roles is a combination public/private nursing association, referred to as the partnership, that took place in 1953-1966. Primary sources include archived material from the Instructive Visiting Nurse Association, Richmond, VA. Administrative responsibilities were divided between the chief nurse and the nursing supervisors. Staff nurse responsibilities included clinic activities, home visitation, and referral coordination between health care organizations. The delineation of nursing roles demonstrates nurses' meeting the 2003 competencies. Based on the Quad Council's 2003 public health nursing competencies, the partnership nurses were competent. PMID:17714233

  4. Mental Health of Chinese Nurses in Hong Kong: The Roles of Nursing Stresses and Coping Strategies

    D. Wong

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the sources of stress and mental health of nurses in Hong Kong. It also attempted to explore the functions of coping strategies in determining the stress and mental health of nurses. Results showed that more than one-third of the nurses could be considered as having poor mental health. While supervisory role produced the highest level of stress, organizational environment also created a substantial amount of stress for nurses. The most frequently used coping strategies wer...

  5. Development and validation of a nutritional and nursing risk assessment method for diabetic patients

    WANG Jing; Lin, Yun; ZENG, KAIHONG; Yang, YongTao; Hu, Xuefei; Zhao, Rong; LI, ZEYUE

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to develop and evaluate a nutritional and nursing risk assessment method for diabetic inpatients to improve healthcare and risk management. Diabetic inpatients diagnosed according to the World Health Organization guidelines, together with their nursing staff, were divided into two groups for nutritional and nursing risk assessment. Data from one group were used to establish the assessment method, and data from the other group were used to evaluate the reliability and e...

  6. Geriatric nursing assessment and intervention in an emergency department

    Rosted, Elizabeth Emilie; Wagner, Lis; Hendriksen, Carsten; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    an ED as time pressure requires staff to focus on the presenting problem although many have complex, unresolved, care needs. Method. A prospective descriptive pilot study was conducted. Older people aged 70 and over and at risk of adverse health and functional outcome were included. Intervention: At......To describe and test a model for structured nursing assessment and intervention to older people discharged from emergency department (ED). Background. Older people recently discharged from hospital are at high risk of readmission. This risk may increase when they are discharged straight home from...... discharge, and at 1 and 6 months follow-up, a brief standardised nursing assessment (ISAR 2) developed by McCusker et al. was carried out. The focus was on unresolved problems that required medical or nursing intervention, new or different home care services or comprehensive geriatric assessment. After...

  7. Developing nursing capacity for health systems and services research in Cuba, 2008-2011

    MPH Nelcy Martínez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Health systems and services research by nursing personnel could inform decisionmaking and nursing care, providing evidence concerning quality of and patient satisfaction. Such studies are rather uncommon in Cuban research institutes, where clinical research predominates. OBJECTIVE: Assess the results of a strategy implemented between 2008 and 2011 to develop nursing capacity for health systems and services research in 14 national research institutes based in Havana. METHODS: The study comprised four stages: description of approaches to health systems and services research by nurses worldwide and in Cuba; analysis of current capacities for such research in Cuba; intervention design and implementation; and evaluation. Various techniques were used including: literature review, bibliometric analysis, questionnaire survey, consultation with experts, focus groups, and workshops for participant orientation and design and followup of research projects. Qualitative information reduction and quantitative information summary methods were used. Initially, 32 nursing managers participated; a further 105 nurses from the institutes were involved in research teams formed during intervention implementation. RESULTS: Of all published nursing research articles retrieved, 8.9% (185 of 2081 concerned health systems and services research, of which 26.5% (49 of 185 dealt with quality assessment. At baseline, 75% of Cuban nurses surveyed had poor knowledge of health systems and services research. Orientation, design and followup workshops for all institute teams developed individual and institutional capacity for health systems and services research. Post-intervention, 84.7% (27 of nurses reached good knowledge and 14.3% (5 fair; institutional research teams were formed and maintained in 9 institutes, and 13 projects designed and implemented (11 institutional, 2 addressing ministerial-level priorities to research nursing issues at selected centers. CONCLUSIONS: A systematic strategy to build nursing capacity for health systems and services research can be effective in involving nurses in such research and in developing institutional support for it, fostering compliance with Cuban and international professional development priorities for nursing, as well as contributing to quality of patient services.

  8. Mental Health Nurse Prescribing: Challenges in Theory and Practice

    Evans, David

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the historical context of mental health nursing and its relationship to nurse prescribing.; examines some of the theoretical and philosophical forces that have molded modern mental health nursing, discussing the tensions between the medical model and the psychosocial models favoured by many mental health nurse academics and practitioners over the last forty years; and finally discusses the issues and challenges around commencing prescribing in practice, especially when ...

  9. Public Health Promotion: Autonomy of the Emergency Nurse Practitioner

    Cheryl Ann Alexander

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to examine several key issues in health care reform. From the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 to the cholera epidemic in Haiti, global health care reform is necessary to promote health and wellness among all nations. There is an international shortage of nurses and nursing faculty. Among the providers, it is also necessary to examine autonomy of the most up and coming nurse provider: the emergency nurse practitioner.

  10. Lifestyle practices and the health promoting environment of hospital nurses.

    Hope, A

    1998-08-01

    Lifestyle practices and the health promoting environment of hospital nurses This paper examined the lifestyle practices of hospital nurses and the impact of specific interventions in the hospital environment. The perception of nurse as health promoter and as carer of AIDS patients was also examined. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data at two different time periods. The sample represented 729 nurses (at pre- and post-time periods), both qualified and student nurses. Qualified nurses reported the highest stress levels while student nurses reported more negative lifestyle practices such as smoking, alcohol consumption and drug use. A greater number of current smokers (29%) consumed alcohol and used drugs than non-smokers. The impact of intervention strategies around compliance with smoking policy and work-site walk routes reduced exposure to passive smoking at work for qualified nurses and increased exercise participation for both groups of nurses. Workplace was identified as the main source of stress which included relationships at work and demands of the job. Hospital nurses experiencing high work stress were more likely to use professional support and personal coping (discuss problems with friends\\/family, have a good cry and eat more) than others. Nurses believed in the importance of health promotion as part of their work; however, qualified nurses felt more confident and gave more health related information than student nurses. Student nurses perceived a lower risk of contacting AIDS through work and a higher concern\\/worry in caring for AIDS patients than qualified nurses.

  11. Assessing and appraising nursing students' professional communication

    Diers, Jane E.

    The purpose of this research was to define professional communication in nursing and to develop a prototype to assess and appraise communication at a selected college. The research focused on verbal and nonverbal communication between the nurse and the client using a simulated environment. The first objective was to identify the major characteristics of professional communication in nursing. In this study, the characteristics of professional communication emerged from the constant comparison method of the results of research studies in the fields of healthcare and communication. These characteristics became the elements, representative properties, and descriptive dimensions to assess and appraise verbal and nonverbal communication at the college of study. The second objective was to develop a template to assess verbal and nonverbal communication at a selected college. Using a two-fold process, the researcher used the results from the first objective to begin template construction. First, specialists in the fields of communication and nursing established the content validity of the elements, representative properties, and descriptive dimensions. Second, the course educators determined the relevancy and importance of the elements, properties, and descriptive dimensions to the objectives of two courses at the college of study. The third objective was to develop a rubric to appraise nursing students' verbal and nonverbal communication in a videotaped communication review. An appraisal rubric was constructed from an extension of the template. This rubric was then tested by faculty at the selected college to appraise the communication of five students each in the junior and senior years of the nursing program.

  12. Health and safety risks in nursing

    Fountouki A.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: professional hazards create insecurity and frustration to nurses during their clinical work. Aim of this review is to present and analyze daily risks and aggravating factors during the clinical work of nurses. Method: a systematic evaluation of the International and Greek literature findings was undertaken, according to Rogers’ model of analysis. Results: the frame of analysis showed five categories of risks which include: Biological/contagious risks, Chemical factors, Environmental/mechanical risks, Physical dangers, Psychosocial risks. Discussion: biological dangers can be dealt with by using suitable equipment for trauma avoidance and careful execution of nursing tasks. Chemical risks, including exposure to chemotherapeutic medicines, can be prevented by using protective measures such as gloves, masks, goggles and special appliances for preparing medication. The mechanical strain of the musculaskeletical system should be limited by ergonomic equipment and education, while the physical factors such as noise requires depends also on the personal sensitivity of workers. Conclusions: many preventative measures are based simply on the modification and adoption of a new behaviour and do not demand financial resources or special equipment. The strong-will for protecting the health status of nursing staff and promoting the profession are the two main drives in improving nursing working like conditions and the administration of safe care.

  13. Community health nursing vision for 2020: shaping the future.

    Schofield, Ruth; Ganann, Rebecca; Brooks, Sandy; McGugan, Jennifer; Dalla Bona, Kim; Betker, Claire; Dilworth, Katie; Parton, Laurie; Reid-Haughian, Cheryl; Slepkov, Marlene; Watson, Cori

    2011-12-01

    As health care is shifting from hospital to community, community health nurses (CHNs) are directly affected. This descriptive qualitative study sought to understand priority issues currently facing CHNs, explore development of a national vision for community health nursing, and develop recommendations to shape the future of the profession moving toward the year 2020. Focus groups and key informant interviews were conducted across Canada. Five key themes were identified: community health nursing in crisis now, a flawed health care system, responding to the public, vision for the future, and CHNs as solution makers. Key recommendations include developing a common definition and vision of community health nursing, collaborating on an aggressive plan to shift to a primary health care system, developing a comprehensive social marketing strategy, refocusing basic baccalaureate education, enhancing the capacity of community health researchers and knowledge in community health nursing, and establishing a community health nursing center of excellence. PMID:20660926

  14. Nurse Practitioners' Use of Communication Techniques: Results of a Maryland Oral Health Literacy Survey

    Koo, Laura W.; Horowitz, Alice M; Radice, Sarah D.; Wang, Min Q.; Kleinman, Dushanka V

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We examined nurse practitioners’ use and opinions of recommended communication techniques for the promotion of oral health as part of a Maryland state-wide oral health literacy assessment. Use of recommended health-literate and patient-centered communication techniques have demonstrated improved health outcomes. Methods A 27-item self-report survey, containing 17 communication technique items, across 5 domains, was mailed to 1,410 licensed nurse practitioners (NPs) in Maryland in 2...

  15. Inductions Buffer Nurses' Job Stress, Health, and Organizational Commitment.

    Kamau, Caroline; Medisauskaite, Asta; Lopes, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Nurses suffer disproportionate levels of stress and are at risk of sickness-absence and turnover intentions, but there is a lack of research clarifying preventions. This study investigated the impact of inductions (job preparation courses) about mental health for nurses' job stress, general health, and organizational commitment. Data from 6,656 nurses were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM), showing that mental health inductions increase nurses' job satisfaction, which reduces their occupational stress and improves their health. SEM showed that these occupational health benefits increase the nurses' commitment to the organization. Job satisfaction (feeling valued, rewarded) also had a direct effect on nurses' intentions to continue working for the organization. Mental health inductions are therefore beneficial beyond job performance: they increase occupational health in the nursing profession. PMID:24971576

  16. mHealth: Technology for nursing practice, education, and research

    Willa Marlene Doswell; Betty Braxter; Annette DeVito Dabbs; Wendy Nilsen; Mary Lou Klem

    2013-01-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) is a rapidly growing field providing the potential to enhance patient education, prevent disease, enhance diagnostics, improve treatment, lower health care costs and increase access to health care services, and advance evidence-based research. For the field of  nursing the potential capabilities of mHealth are not only for patient care but for delivery of nursing education to our future practicing nurses, providing a means of communication between healthcare profession...

  17. Family health nursing: a response to the global health challenges.

    Martin, Paul; Duffy, Tim; Johnston, Brian; Banks, Pauline; Harkess-Murphy, Eileen; Martin, Colin R

    2013-02-01

    The European Family Health Nursing Project is a revitalized World Health Organization initiative led by the University of the West of Scotland. Partner countries include Armenia, Austria, Germany, Italy, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, and Spain. European Union Lifelong Learning funding was received in 2011 to facilitate a consistency of approach in the development of a definition of family health nursing, required core competencies and capabilities, and consequent education and training requirements. Global health challenges have informed the development of the project: increasingly aging populations, the increasing incidence in noncommunicable diseases that are currently the main cause of death, and the significant progress made in the way health systems have developed to meet the demands in relation to access and equality of health services. Governments and policy makers should develop a health workforce based on the principles of teamwork and interdisciplinarity while recognizing the core contribution of the "specialist generalist" role in the primary care setting. PMID:23288887

  18. Prison Health--A Role for Professional Nursing.

    Alexander-Rodriguez, Terry

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the history of health care services in prisons and the difficulties in providing prison medical services today. Indicates that prison nurses require more than just traditional nursing skills. (JOW)

  19. Factors Associated With the Perception of Family Nursing Practice Among Mental Health Nurses in Taiwan.

    Hsiao, Chiu-Yueh; Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine factors that influenced the perceptions of mental health nurses about involving families in their nursing practice. A sample of 175 Taiwanese mental health nurses who are employed in both inpatient and community settings completed structured questionnaires designed to measure empathy, attitudes about involving families in care, and perceptions of family nursing practice. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson's product-moment correlation, t test, one-way ANOVA, and a hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Positive perceptions of family nursing practice were correlated with more years of clinical experience in mental health, empathy, supportive attitudes toward the importance of family nursing care, and personal experiences with family members with serious illness in need of professional care. These findings may assist in the development of effective educational programs designed to help nurses integrate family nursing knowledge and skills in the care of patients and families experiencing mental illness. PMID:26410853

  20. Nursing services: an imperative to health care marketing

    Isaac D. Montoya; Olive M. Kimball

    2012-01-01

    Nurses comprise a significant portion of the work force in any health care organization. This work force is one having the maximum exposure to patients. Further, they work hand in hand with the various departments of the organization. Though an unintended consequence of nursing care, nurses form a potential marketing tool for any health care organization. In that marketing tool role, however, there are hindrances that nurses face. These may result in an unhappy work environment and potentiall...

  1. Working hours and health behaviour among nurses at public hospitals

    Juliana da Costa Fernandes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyse the differences between genders in the description in the professional, domestic and total work hours and assess its association with health-related behaviour among nurses. METHODS: this is a transversal study carried out in 18 different public hospitals in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro. The data collection procedure was based on questionnaires. All nurses working with assistance were considered eligible (n=2,279. RESULTS: men and women showed significant differences in relation to working hours. The female group showed longer domestic and total work hours when compared to the group of men. In contrast, the number of hours spent on professional work was higher among men. For the women, both the professional hours and total work hours were often associated with excessive consumption of fried food and also coffee, lack of physical exercise and also the greater occurrence of overweight and obesity. CONCLUSION: both the professional hours and the domestic work hours need to be taken into account in studies about health, self-care and also the care provided within the context of nursing workers, particularly among women. The results add weight to the need for actions for health promotion in this occupational group and the importance of assessing the impact of long working hours on the health of workers.

  2. Nurses' assessment of elderly patients in hospital.

    Reed, J; Bond, S

    1991-01-01

    Nurses' assessment of patients' mobility in hospital provided the focus for an inductive qualitative study which examined how an everyday aspect of nursing practice was carried out. The study described assessment practices in both long-term care and acute care wards for elderly patients as a situated activity. Interviews with nurses, as well as observation of their activities and records, resulted in explanations of their behaviour as deriving from their conceptions of ward functions. These conceptions arose from their adoption of the values of cure and discharge and so, in the different types of ward, assessment held different meanings and was carried out in different ways. The findings have implications for nursing practice in different settings but also for the care of elderly and chronically ill patients, where cure is an inappropriate end goal of care. This example of developing explanatory theory inductively also has implications for the development of mid-range nursing theory and suggestions are made for its extension. PMID:1856034

  3. Sleep and health in shift working nurses

    Flo, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, the prevalence of Shift Work Disorder (SWD) in a sample of nurses, and the association between SWD and work characteristics, health outcome and personality (paper 1) have been investigated. Next, the psychometric properties of the “Bergen Shift Work Sleep Questionnaire” (BSWSQ) were evaluated (paper 2). The BSWSQ evaluates sleep and sleepiness problems in relation to day shifts, evening shifts, night shifts and rest-days. The validated BSWSQ was used to investigate how d...

  4. Establishing a Nursing Student Learning Center for Women's Reproductive Health in Nepal

    Knecht, S.I

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe the establishment of a self-sustaining Student Learning Center (SLC) employing humanistic anatomical models to aid in the teaching of family planning and reproductive health clinical skills to nursing students in Nepal. In response to a local needs assessment a plan was developed to implement more thorough training of nursing students in family planning clinical skills. Nepalese nursing leaders worked together with a U.S. Non-Governmental Organization (NG...

  5. Critical Cases Faced by Mental Health Nurses and Assistant Nurses in Psychiatric Hospitals in Greece

    Evmorfia Koukia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric Nurses and nurses’ assistants working in an inpatient unit experience a significant number of critical cases. A small number of studies have explored which patients’ problems nurses perceive as ‘critical case or incident’ and particularly which interventions they choose. Aim: The aim of the research was 1. To identify the clinical problems that mental health nurses and assistant nurses characterize as critical 2. To report the main nursing interventions 3. To investigate the main person involved in the critical incident. Material-Method: Critical incident technique was used as a method of data collection. Content analysis was carried out in order nurses’ information to be categorized into subcategories. The sample consisted of 35 mental health nurses and nurses’ assistants who work in psychiatric acute inpatient wards.Results: Nurses identified ten types of critical incidents. They noted violence (verbal, physical by patients and psychotic symptoms to be the most critical situations. Nurses were the main person involved in these incidents. The study also described eight nursing interventions used by nurses when faced with critical events. Conclusions: The findings indicated that mental health nurses and assistant nurses working in acute inpatient wards are called to confront a variety of critical incidents in their every day practice. Further research is necessary to identify in-depth nursing interventions and decision-making used in these situations.

  6. Coping focus counselling in mental health nursing.

    Shanley, Eamon; Jubb-Shanley, Maureen

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to describe a newly-developed system of mental health nurse counselling (coping focus counselling (CFC)) for people with serious and complex mental health needs. The system is based on the recovery alliance theory (RAT) of mental health nursing. The paper identifies shortcomings in current practices in psychotherapy and counselling in the exclusive use of techniques from a single approach, for example, cognitive behaviour therapy, client-centred therapy, attachment theory, or Gestalt theory. It also discusses the opposite dangers of the use of many techniques from different approaches, without a clear rationale for their selection. CFC was developed to avoid these practices. It accommodates the selective use of techniques from different approaches. Techniques selected are viewed as deriving their meanings from the theoretical framework into which they are assimilated, namely RAT, and no longer take the same meaning from the theory from which they originated. Central to this integrative process is the use of the concept of coping. Other distinguishing features of CFC are the use of everyday language in using the system and the reaffirmation of the nurse-client relationship within a working alliance as the basis in which the CFC operates. PMID:22640173

  7. Behavioral Health Emergencies Managed by School Nurses Working with Adolescents

    Ramos, Mary M.; Greenberg, Cynthia; Sapien, Robert; Bauer-Creegan, Judith; Hine, Beverly; Geary, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Background: As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses provide behavioral health services. Studies indicate that school nurses may lack sufficient continuing education in adolescent behavioral health and in the management of behavioral health emergencies, specifically. We conducted this study to describe the adolescent behavioral health…

  8. Mentors’ implication in clinical learning and assessment of nursing students

    González Chordá, Víctor; Mena Tudela, Desirée; Cervera Gasch, Águeda; Salas Medina, Pablo; Folch Ayora, Ana; Orts Cortés, María Isabel; Maciá Soler, Loreto

    2014-01-01

    Nursing Education in Europe is regulated by law from 2005. Clinical learning comprises at least 50% of the total degree program in nursing. It is necessary rely on professionals nurses involved in the learning process and skills development assessment. The level of implication in learning processes of these professional nurses is very important to ensure good results.

  9. Health Promoting Behaviors in Nursing Students

    Gulay Yilmazel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This descriptive study was planned to determine the behavior of a healthy lifestyle in nursing students who assume the role of nursing care services and education in their future lives. Material-Method: The research was conducted in Hitit University School of Health in November-December 2011. All of the 262 students who were studying in the Department of Nursing were included in the study. The survey was applied to 234 students whom can be accessed. A questionnaire included descriptive items and health perceptions of students with the 48-item scale consists of healthy lifestyle behaviors (HPLP was used as a tool for collecting the data. Results: The mean age of students who participated in this study was 20.40±1.96. The 72.6% of students were female and 27.4% were male, 67.1% of declared that their levels of economic status was moderate, 14.1% of currently smoked, and 70.1% of general health situation was good. It was seen that the average scale scores of HPLP was 121.57±19, 65. The total mean score is 2.53 ± 0:11 according to four scale of likert. The lowest mean score obtained from the subscales was exercise and the highest scores were interpersonal support and self-realization. Total scores of female students taken from the scale of healthy lifestyle behaviors were lower than the male students, but no significant difference was found between the groups. Exercise and stress management scores were higher in male students and the difference between the groups was statistically significant (p<0.05. Health responsibility subscale was highest in second year students. The average scores of self-realization and nutrition sub-groups were high in students whose perception of general health as "good". Conclusion: We determined that student’ scores taken from healthy lifestyle behaviors scale was moderate level. The issues about health protection and health promotion should be more take place in nursing school curricula. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(3.000: 261-270

  10. Global health and neonatal nursing: a personal journey.

    Kenner, Carole; Boykova, Marina

    2012-09-01

    The need for improvement of neonatal nursing care is a global issue. Neonatal nurses have an important role in optimizing these health outcomes for neonates and their families. This article describes the personal journey of one nurse and her mentee. It describes how a passion for neonates led to global policy work. PMID:22895204

  11. Academy and health services in the consolidation of boarding school of nursing

    Simone Domingues Garcia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to analyze the perception of teachers and nurses on the structure of the nursing internship at a public university of Paraná. We used a qualitative methodology to the collection in the period from March to August 2012. We used the electronic tool Google Docs, which enables the use of open and closed questions as well as data storage. The 27 study participants were nurse teachers and from the services used as training field of nursing internship. Data analysis enabled the establishment of two categories: Partnership between academia and health services: the construction of the completion of the internship and nursing boarding rating: structuring effectiveness. The results showed that the basis of consolidation of the nursing internship is the partnership of academia with health institutions and the strengthening of innovative educational proposals, as the systematic participatory assessments among stakeholders guided by the required reality of the labor market.

  12. Mental Health of Muslim Nursing Students in Thailand

    Paul Ratanasiripong

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore the mental health and well-being of Muslim nursing students in Thailand. Specifically, the study investigated the factors that impact anxiety and depression among Muslim nursing students. This cross-sectional research was conducted with a half sampling method of Muslim undergraduate students who were studying at a public nursing college in Thailand. From the 220 self-identified Muslim nursing students, 110 were sampled for this study, representing 1...

  13. Education, leadership and partnerships: nursing potential for Universal Health Coverage

    Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa; Ventura, Carla Aparecida Arena; Trevizan, Maria Auxiliadora; Marchi-Alves, Leila Maria; de Souza-Junior, Valtuir Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to discuss possibilities of nursing contribution for universal health coverage. Method: a qualitative study, performed by means of document analysis of the World Health Organization publications highlighting Nursing and Midwifery within universal health coverage. Results: documents published by nursing and midwifery leaders point to the need for coordinated and integrated actions in education, leadership and partnership development. Final Considerations: this article represents a call for nurses, in order to foster reflection and understanding of the relevance of their work on the consolidation of the principles of universal health coverage. PMID:26959333

  14. Nurse work engagement impacts job outcome and nurse-assessed quality of care: model testing with nurse practice environment and nurse work characteristics as predictors

    Bogaert, Peter; van Heusden, Danny; Timmermans, Olaf; Franck, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To explore the mechanisms through which nurse practice environment dimensions, such as nurse–physician relationship, nurse management at the unit level and hospital management and organizational support, are associated with job outcomes and nurse-assessed quality of care. Mediating variables included nurse work characteristics of workload, social capital, decision latitude, as well as work engagement dimensions of vigor, dedication and absorption. Background: Understanding how to supp...

  15. Nursing and health care reform: implications for curriculum development.

    Bowen, M; Lyons, K J; Young, B E

    2000-01-01

    The health care system is undergoing profound changes. Cost containment efforts and restructuring have resulted in cutbacks in registered nurse (RN) positions. These changes are often related to the increased market penetration by managed care companies. To determine how RN graduates perceive these changes and their impact on the delivery of patient care, Healthcare Environment Surveys were mailed to graduates of the classes of 1986 and 1991. Using the Survey's 5-point Likert Scale, we measured the graduates' satisfaction with their salary, quality of supervision they received, opportunities for advancement, recognition for their job, working conditions, the overall job and the changes in their careers over the previous five year period. Our study suggests that the changes in the health care system are having an impact on how health care is being delivered and the way nurses view their jobs. Respondents reported that insurance companies are exerting increased control over patient care and perceive that the quality of patient care is declining. Increased workloads and an increase in the amount of paperwork were reported. Participants perceived that there were fewer jobs available and that job security was decreasing. The percentage of nurses who see job satisfaction as remaining the same or increasing are a majority. However, the relatively high percent of nurses who see job satisfaction as declining should provide a note of warning. The major implications of this study are that the professional nursing curriculum must be modified to include content on communication, organization, legislative/policy skills, and leadership. The nation's health care system is undergoing profound changes. There are numerous forces at work that are effecting the delivery of care and, consequently, the work of health professionals. These forces include significant efforts at cost containment, restructuring and downsizing of hospitals, and the movement of health care delivery out of acute care centers and into the community. Even though cutbacks in registered nurse (RN) positions appear to have leveled off in sections of the country that have gone through restructuring and reengineering of the work place, there still remains a heavy emphasis on lowering costs by decreasing employee benefits and increasing productivity through the substitution of part-time RNs for full-time RNs and the substitution of unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) for RNs. These changes are often related to the increased market penetration by managed care companies, which are not expected to abate any time soon. It is important to determine what impact these changes are having on the delivery of patient care since there is some evidence to suggest that reduction in nursing staff below certain levels is related to poor patient outcomes (Fridken et al, 1996). It is also important to assess the effect of system changes on the satisfaction level health professionals have in their jobs. This is particularly important since some researchers suggest that job dissatisfaction, over a period of time, can result in burnout and eventually, turnover (Cameron, Horsburgh, & Armstrong-Stassen, 1994; Cotterman, 1991). Finally, understanding the impact of these health care delivery system changes has significant implications for baccalaureate nursing education and the preparation needed by future nurses to help them adjust to the changed environment. PMID:10647022

  16. Nursing leadership style and mental health outcome of nurse in Taiwan

    Lin, Ping-Yi

    2013-01-01

    The present thesis report research on the role of leadership style related to the quality of nurses' working lives in Taiwanese hospitals. It begins by focusing on the mental health of nursing work forces and questions the applicability of leadership styles employed in different ownership of health care organisations. There is very little literature on this issue and knowledge of how such hospitals function is not clear. The thesis addresses the influences of nursing leadership style at both ...

  17. Primary care nursing role and care coordination: an observational study of nursing work in a community health center.

    Anderson, Daren R; St Hilaire, Daniel; Flinter, Margaret

    2012-05-01

    Care coordination is a core element of the Patient-Centered Medical Home and requires an effective, well educated nursing staff. A greater understanding of roles and tasks currently being carried out by nurses in primary care is needed to help practices determine how best to implement care coordination and transform into PCMHs. We conducted an observational study of primary care nursing in a Community Health Center by creating a classification schema for nursing responsibilities, directly observing and tracking nurses' work, and categorizing their activities. Ten nurses in eight different practice sites were observed for a total of 61 hours. The vast majority of nursing time was spent in vaccine and medication administration; telephone work; and charting and paper work, while only 15% of their time was spent in activity that was classified broadly as care coordination. Care coordination work appeared to be subsumed by other daily tasks, many of which could have been accomplished by other, lesser trained members of the health care team. Practices looking to implement care coordination need a detailed look at work flow, task assignments, and a critical assessment of staffing, adhering to the principal of each team member working to the highest level of his or her education and license. Care coordination represents a distinct responsibility that requires dedicated nursing time, separate from the day to day tasks in a busy practice. To fully support these new functions, reimbursement models are needed that support such non visit-based work and provide incentives to coordinate and manage complex cases, achieve improved clinical outcomes and enhance efficiency of the health system. This article describes our study methods, data collection, and analysis, results, and discussion about reorganizing nursing roles to promote care coordination. PMID:22686111

  18. Nurses' Knowledge and Responsibility toward Nutritional Assessment for Patients in Intensive Care Units

    Mahmoud Al Kalaldeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nutritional assessment is a prerequisite for nutritional delivery. Patients in intensive care suffer from under-nutrition and nutritional failure due to poor assessment. Nursing ability to early detect nutritional failure is the key for minimizing imparities in practice and attaining nutritional goals. Aim of this article is to examine the ability of Jordanian ICU nurses to assess the nutritional status of critically ill patients, considering biophysical and biochemical measures.Methods: This cross sectional study recruited nurses from different health sectors in Jordan. ICU nurses from the governmental sector (two hospitals and private sectors (two hospitals were surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire. Nurses' knowledge and responsibility towards nutritional assessment were examined.Results: A total of 220 nurses from both sectors have completed the questionnaire. Nurses were consistent in regard to knowledge, responsibility, and documentation of nutritional assessment. Nurses in the governmental hospitals inappropriately perceived the application of aspiration reduction measures. However, they scored higher in applying physical examination and anthropometric assessment.  Although both nurses claimed higher use of biochemical measurements, biophysical measurements were less frequently used. Older nurses with longer clinical experience exhibited better adherence to biophysical measurement than younger nurses.Conclusion: Nursing nutritional assessment is still suboptimal to attain nutritional goals. Assessment of body weight, history of nutrition intake, severity of illness, and function of gastrointestinal tract should be considered over measuring albumin and pre-albumin levels.  A well-defined evidence-based protocol as well as a multidisciplinary nutritional team for nutritional assessment is the best to minimize episodes of under-nutrition.

  19. Work and health conditions of nursing staff in palliative care and hospices in Germany

    Schröder, Christina; Bänsch, Alexander; Schröder, Harry

    2004-01-01

    Aims of this representative study were to assess the relevant differences between the work and organisational characteristics as well as the subjective resources and health status of nurses occupied in hospice care, compared to nurses from palliative stations. Further, the assessment of the predictive correlations between the work situation of this nurses as a factor influencing their health and perceived strains was also a leading intention. Method: In a written survey conducted in Germany in 2001, 820 nursing staff of 113 palliative stations and stationary hospices were included. A qualified diagnostic procedure for the assessment of health promoting work was implemented. In order of obtaining a secure comparison, a sample of 320 nurses working in 12 homes for old people in Saxony was also considered. Results: The nurses referred generally to favourable working conditions, still they informed about deficiencies in the perceived participation, organizational benefits and experienced gratification. Hospice nurses experienced overall more favourable work conditions than palliative nurses or than the staff of homes for old people (regarding identification with the institution, organizational benefits, accurate gratification and little time pressure during work). Hospice personnel were psychologically and physically healthier than the staff of palliative stations. Important predictors for health stability that could be assessed by multiple regression analysis were: positively evaluated work contents, the identification with the institution, little time pressure and a positive working atmosphere. Conclusions: The assessed organisational framework is generally more favourable in the institutions of professional terminal care than in common hospitals and homes for old people. Therefore, the conditions in hospices could have a modelling function for the inner-institutional work organisation and for the anchorage of the intrinsic motivation of nurses in the health care system. PMID:19742056

  20. Work and health conditions of nursing staff in palliative care and hospices in Germany

    Schröder, Christina

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims of this representative study were to assess the relevant differences between the work and organisational characteristics as well as the subjective resources and health status of nurses occupied in hospice care, compared to nurses from palliative stations. Further, the assessment of the predictive correlations between the work situation of this nurses as a factor influencing their health and perceived strains was also a leading intention.Method: In a written survey conducted in Germany in 2001, 820 nursing staff of 113 palliative stations and stationary hospices were included. A qualified diagnostic procedure for the assessment of health promoting work was implemented. In order of obtaining a secure comparison, a sample of 320 nurses working in 12 homes for old people in Saxony was also considered.Results: The nurses referred generally to favourable working conditions, still they informed about deficiencies in the perceived participation, organizational benefits and experienced gratification. Hospice nurses experienced overall more favourable work conditions than palliative nurses or than the staff of homes for old people (regarding identification with the institution, organizational benefits, accurate gratification and little time pressure during work. Hospice personnel were psychologically and physically healthier than the staff of palliative stations. Important predictors for health stability that could be assessed by multiple regression analysis were: positively evaluated work contents, the identification with the institution, little time pressure and a positive working atmosphere.Conclusions: The assessed organisational framework is generally more favourable in the institutions of professional terminal care than in common hospitals and homes for old people. Therefore, the conditions in hospices could have a modelling function for the inner-institutional work organisation and for the anchorage of the intrinsic motivation of nurses in the health care system.

  1. Healthy Eating for Healthy Nurses: Nutrition Basics to Promote Health for Nurses and Patients.

    Reed, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Nurses care for people each day in many settings such as hospitals, physician offices, schools, and public health facilities. Such positions often require nurses to work variable and long hours, exposing them to the stressors of caring for people who are ill. These stressors can support poor food choices that adversely affect the health and well-being of the nurse. Nurses are also an integral part of providing nutrition related information to patients. As such, patients may be very cognizant of the health habits of their nurses. Eating for good health is one way that nurses can reduce the impact of stressors on the body and positively influence their health, allowing them to better care for patients and themselves. This article reviews two common nutrition related areas of concern to nurses, stressors, inflammation, and nutrition and sleep and eating patterns, that can lead to obesity. Knowledge and attitudes about nutrition education are also discussed briefly. Finally, the article offers a review of nutrition basics for nurses and suggestions to avoid potential food pitfalls common for nurses. PMID:26824155

  2. Reframing E-Assessment: Building Professional Nursing and Academic Attributes in a First Year Nursing Course

    Lawrence, Jill; Loch, Birgit; Galligan, Linda

    2008-01-01

    This paper documents the relationships between pedagogy and e-assessment in two nursing courses offered at the University of Southern Queensland, Australia. The courses are designed to build the academic, numeracy and technological attributes student nurses need if they are to succeed at the university and in the nursing profession. The paper…

  3. Privileged communication: psychiatric/mental health nurses and the law.

    Smith, J

    1990-01-01

    This article examines the issues of confidentiality and privileged communication as they relate to psychiatric/mental health nursing practice. It includes a discussion of statutory and case law, arguments for and against privileged communication, and several examples of how these issues effect psychiatric/mental health nurses and their practice. PMID:2274409

  4. Electronic Health Records: Describing Technological Stressors of Nurse Educators.

    Burke, Mary S; Ellis, D Michele

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the technological stressors that nurse educators experienced when using electronic health records while teaching clinical courses. Survey results indicated that educators had mild to moderate technological stress when teaching the use of electronic health records to students in clinical nursing courses. PMID:26164324

  5. Assessment of autonomic nervous system function in nursing students using an autonomic reflex orthostatic test by heart rate spectral analysis

    HASEGAWA, MAO; Hayano, Azusa; KAWAGUCHI, ATSUSHI; YAMANAKA, RYUYA

    2015-01-01

    Nursing students experience academic demands, such as tests, theoretical and practical coursework, research activities, various aspects of professional practice, and contact with health professionals and patients. Consequently, nursing students face numerous types of stress, and increased stress levels contribute to physical and psychological distress in nursing students. The aim of the present study was to investigate the autonomic nervous system function of nursing students by assessing act...

  6. Reduction in force perspectives--the occupational health nurse as the employee.

    Tompkins, Olga

    2009-06-01

    The occupational health nurse usually encounters reduction in force issues from a company perspective. This article discusses strategies for the occupational health nurse who is downsized. PMID:19552341

  7. Community nurses' child protection role: views of public health nurses in Ireland.

    Kent, Susan

    2011-11-01

    Public health nurses in Ireland are generalist practitioners with a wide range of roles that address the needs of clients in the community across their lifespan. Child protection is one of many of the roles of Irish public health nurses. However, with increasing caseloads, birth rates and aging populations, their child protection role is becoming more difficult to define and practise safely. This paper presents a key finding of a qualitative study that explored the views of a group of public health nurses (n = 10) regarding their role with pre-school children. A significant theme following analysis of the interviews were the nurses\\' expressed concerns on their role in child protection. There is a need to define the role practised by public health nurses in child protection and to achieve a standard for this nationally.

  8. What is nursing in the 21st century and what does the 21st century health system require of nursing?

    Scott, Anne; Matthews, Anne; Kirwan, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    It is frequently claimed that nursing is vital to the safe, humane provision of health care and health service to our populations. It is also recognized however, that nursing is a costly health care resource that must be used effectively and efficiently. There is a growing recognition, from within the nursing profession, health care policy makers and society, of the need to analyse the contribution of nursing to health care and its costs. This becomes increasingly pertinent and urgent in a si...

  9. Assessment of activities performed by clinical nurse practitioners and implications for staffing and patient care at primary health care level in South Africa

    Jude Igumbor

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The shortage of nurses in public healthcare facilities in South Africa is well documented; finding creative solutions to this problem remains a priority.Objective: This study sought to establish the amount of time that clinical nurse practitioners (CNPs in one district of the Western Cape spend on clinical services and the implications for staffing and skills mix in order to deliver quality patient care.Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted across 15 purposively selected clinics providing primary health services in 5 sub-districts. The frequency of activities and time CNPs spent on each activity in fixed and mobile clinics were recorded. Time spent on activities and health facility staff profiles were correlated and predictors of the total time spent by CNPs with patients were identified.Results: The time spent on clinical activities was associated with the number of CNPs in the facilities. CNPs in fixed clinics spent a median time of about 13 minutes with each patient whereas CNPs in mobile clinics spent 3 minutes. Fixed-clinic CNPs also spent more time on their non-core functions than their core functions, more time with patients, and saw fewer patients compared to mobile-clinic CNPs.Conclusions: The findings give insight into the time CNPs in rural fixed and mobile clinics spend with their patients, and how patient caseload may affect consultation times. Two promising strategies were identified – task shifting and adjustments in health workerd eployment – as ways to address staffing and skills mix, which skills mix creates the potential for using healthcare workers fully whilst enhancing the long-term health of these rural communities.

  10. Problem based learning in mental health nursing : the students experience.

    Cooper, Carol; Carver, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) is well established within the field of health-care education for professionals worldwide, although little has been done to explore the experiences of students undertaking a PBL course in mental health nursing. Without firm evidence of the benefits of PBL, educationalists in mental health might be reluctant to view it as an option in curricula design. This UK study examined the experiences of pre-registration post-graduate mental health student nurses undertaking ...

  11. Promoting health and safety virtually: key recommendations for occupational health nurses.

    Wolf, Debra M; Anton, Bonnie B; Wenskovitch, John

    2014-07-01

    Nurses' use of the Internet and social media has surfaced as a critical concern requiring further exploration and consideration by all health care organizations and nursing associations. In an attempt to support this need, the American Nurses Association (2011) published six principles of social networking that offered guidance and direction for nurses. In addition, the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (2011) published a nurse's guide to using social media. Surfing the Internet and using social media for professional and personal needs is extremely common among nurses. What is concerning is when nurses do not separate their professional and personal presence in the virtual world. This article presents an Institutional Review Board-approved pilot survey that explored nurses' use of social media personally and professionally and offers recommendations specifically directed to the occupational health nurse. PMID:25000549

  12. Forensic nursing. Applications in the occupational health setting.

    Pozzi, C L

    1996-11-01

    1. Nurses are inherent investigators through the use of observation, data gathering, and documentation techniques. 2. Occupational health nurses may be involved in assisting with or evaluating workplace accidents, injuries, and deaths. These investigations may be the only critical information gathered. 3. Accurate and through investigations are critical for clients, physicians, insurance companies, medical investigators, law enforcement, legal proceedings, and the company. Utilizing improper techniques during accident investigations could potentially dismiss a litigation case or lead to hazardous situations. 4. The occupational health nurse can improve practices related to investigations by understanding and learning more about forensic nursing. PMID:9043220

  13. Health for all: a transnational model for nursing.

    Salmon, M; Talashek, M; Tichy, A

    1988-01-01

    If nursing is to realize "Health for All by the Year 2000", culturally diverse primary health care approaches should be easily communicated across borders. So agreed a cultural mix of nursing leaders when they met at an international conference at the University of Illinois at Chicago. At the time the conference participants formed small groups to discuss nursing's leadership role in WHO's global strategy. At one group session, which included this paper's authors, the germ was planted for the recent formation of the following conceptual model--transnational, cultural and lingual in its origin--to provide nursing services through a common understanding. PMID:3417391

  14. Health Instruction Packages: Nursing Care Plans.

    Kowalski, Dorcas S.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are provided in this set of learning modules to teach nurses and nursing students various patient care skills. The first module, "How to Write a Nursing Care Plan" by Dorcas S. Kowalski, discusses three tasks in developing patient care plans: identifying and prioritizing a patient's needs, gathering information…

  15. Health Instruction Packages: Nursing Care Plans.

    Kowalski, Dorcas S.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are provided in this set of learning modules to teach nurses and nursing students various patient care skills. The first module, "How to Write a Nursing Care Plan" by Dorcas S. Kowalski, discusses three tasks in developing patient care plans: identifying and prioritizing a patient's needs, gathering information…

  16. Nursing Assessment and Intervention to Geriatric Patients Discharged from Emergency Departments

    Rosted, Elizabeth Emilie; Poulsen, Ingrid; Hendriksen, Carsten; Wagner, Lis

    2011-01-01

    geriatric patients have complex and often unresolved caring needs. Objective: To investigate a structured nursing intervention’s impact on geriatric patients’ unresolved problems and their use of help from the community health centre. Method: We conducted a prospective descriptive study of selected...... geriatric patients with nursing intervention at discharge and 1 and 6 months follow-up. Included were geriatric patients 70+ years discharged to their home October 2006-June 2008. Intervention: After detecting the geriatric patients planned to be discharged, the geriatric nurse in the ED did a brief...... standardised nursing assessment developed by McCusker et al. comprising a checklist of physical, mental, medical and social problems. Focus was on unresolved problems that required medical intervention, new/different home care services or comprehensive geriatric assessment. After assessment the nurse made...

  17. Evaluation of the Community Health Nursing Course of First Year Proficiency Certificate Level Nursing in Nepal

    Mandira Shahi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Community health is very much important in nursing education. It is essential because it maximizes the health status of individuals, families, groups and the community through direct approach with them. The main purpose of the study was to identify the gap in Community Health Nursing I course in Proficiency Certificate Level first year nursing program in Nepal. METHODS: Mix methods of research having qualitative and quantitative method were used in the study. Data were collected from 12 subject teachers, 35 nursing graduates and 61 Proficiency Certificate Level first year nursing students. The study used structured, five-point rating scale and open ended questions according to Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats analysis for the self-administered questionnaire. FINDINGS: Common view points of the three sector's respondents (student, nursing graduate and teachers regarding the strengths of curriculum are: curriculum is based on Primary Health Care approach and covers preventive and promotive aspects of health. Regarding weaknesses, they said that there is inadequate time for practice, there is lack of innovative methods and materials, the course didn't cover new trends of environmental pollution and changes, global warming, greenhouse effect, climate change and deforestation etc. Similarly, they added that curriculum is not revised regularly and there is insufficient supervision in field. Likewise, regarding opportunities, they said that there is job opportunity in social organization as Community Health Nursing/Public Health Nurse. Moreover, they said that there is lack of employment scope as threats point. CONCLUSION: The paper concludes that new issues and trends of community health nursing should be added, and curriculum should be revised regularly.

  18. Occupational stress among staff nurses: Controlling the risk to health

    Sharma, Parul; Davey, Anuradha; Davey, Sanjeev; Shukla, Arvind; Shrivastava, Kajal; Bansal, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Nursing has been identified as an occupation that has high levels of stress. Job stress brought about hazardous impacts not only on nurses’ health but also on their abilities to cope with job demands. Objectives: This study aimed at finding out the degree of work-related stress among the staff nurses and various determinants, which have a impact on it. Materials and Methods: Institutional-based cross-sectional study conducted on GNM qualified nurses. Predesigned and pre-tested q...

  19. Occupational stress among staff nurses: Controlling the risk to health

    Parul Sharma; Anuradha Davey; Sanjeev Davey; Arvind Shukla; Kajal Shrivastava; Rahul Bansal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Nursing has been identified as an occupation that has high levels of stress. Job stress brought about hazardous impacts not only on nurses′ health but also on their abilities to cope with job demands. Objectives: This study aimed at finding out the degree of work-related stress among the staff nurses and various determinants, which have a impact on it. Materials and Methods: Institutional-based cross-sectional study conducted on GNM qualified nurses. Predesigned and pre-tested q...

  20. Promoting critical perspectives in mental health nursing education.

    McKie, A; Naysmith, S

    2014-03-01

    This paper explores themes relevant to mental health nursing using the example of one educational module of a nursing degree. The authors argue that the educational preparation of mental health nursing students in higher education must address certain contested philosophical, conceptual, social and ethical dimensions of contemporary mental health care practice. These themes are discussed within the context of a third-year mental health nursing module within a Scottish nursing degree programme. By interlinking epistemology and ontology, the notion of student as 'critical practitioner', involving the encouragement of 'critical thinking', is developed. This is shown via engagement with parallel perspectives of the sciences and the humanities in mental health. Narratives of student nurse engagement with selected literary texts demonstrate the extent to which issues of knowledge, self-awareness and personal development are central to a student's professional journey as they progress through an academic course. The paper concludes by suggesting that these 'critical perspectives' have important wider implications for curriculum design in nursing education. Insights from critical theory can equip nurse educators to challenge consumerist tendencies within contemporary higher education by encouraging them to remain knowledgeable, critical and ethically sensitive towards the needs of their students. PMID:23552221

  1. An Investigation into the Reliability and Validity of Assessment Strategies for the Accreditation of Prior Learning of Nurses, Midwives and Health Visitors. SEEC AP(E)L Project. Final Report [and] Annexes to Final Report.

    Skinner, Jo; Nganasurian, Wendy; Pike, Susan; Hilton, Anne

    A survey of 83 nursing and midwifery education institutions in Britain collected information regarding assessment of prior learning (APL), i.e., certificated learning, and assessment of prior experiential learning (APEL), i.e., noncertificated learning. Follow-up interviews took place in 10 institutions. All nursing and midwifery education…

  2. A question of justice: assessing nurse migration from a philosophical perspective.

    Kaelin, Lukas

    2011-04-01

    The intensified nurse migration leads to severe problems for the health care systems in many developing countries. Using the Philippines as an example, this paper will address the question of global nurse migration from a philosophical perspective. John Rawls' liberal and Michael Walzer's communitarian theory of justice will be examined in view of the ethical problem of nurse migration. In line with Rawls' A Theory of Justice, nurse migration undermines the ability of the people in developing countries to make use of their basic rights and liberties. Walzer's communitarian assessment of nurse migration, on the other hand, will stress the shared 'thin' morality, as well as the shared history between the 'donating' and receiving countries. This paper argues that the commonality of a shared history and common values implies the moral obligation to ensure a fairer distribution of nurses. PMID:20807230

  3. Nurses' roles in health promotion practice: an integrative review.

    Kemppainen, Virpi; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Turunen, Hannele

    2013-12-01

    Nurses play an important role in promoting public health. Traditionally, the focus of health promotion by nurses has been on disease prevention and changing the behaviour of individuals with respect to their health. However, their role as promoters of health is more complex, since they have multi-disciplinary knowledge and experience of health promotion in their nursing practice. This paper presents an integrative review aimed at examining the findings of existing research studies (1998-2011) of health promotion practice by nurses. Systematic computer searches were conducted of the Cochrane databases, Cinahl, PubMed, Web of Science, PsycINFO and Scopus databases, covering the period January 1998 to December 2011. Data were analysed and the results are presented using the concept map method of Novak and Gowin. The review found information on the theoretical basis of health promotion practice by nurses, the range of their expertise, health promotion competencies and the organizational culture associated with health promotion practice. Nurses consider health promotion important but a number of obstacles associated with organizational culture prevent effective delivery. PMID:22888155

  4. Creating a brand image for public health nursing.

    Baldwin, Kathleen A; Lyons, Roberta L; Issel, L Michele

    2011-01-01

    Public health nurses (PHNs) have declined as a proportion of both the nursing and the public health workforces in the past 2 decades. This decline comes as 30 states report public health nursing as the sector most affected in the overall public health shortage. Taken together, these data point to a need for renewed recruitment efforts. However, the current public images of nurses are primarily those of professionals employed in hospital settings. Therefore, this paper describes the development of a marketable image aimed at increasing the visibility and public awareness of PHNs and their work. Such a brand image was seen as a precursor to increasing applications for PHN positions. A multimethod qualitative sequential approach guided the branding endeavor. From the thoughts of public health nursing students, faculty, and practitioners came artists' renditions of four award-winning posters. These posters portray public health nursing-incorporating its image, location of practice, and levels of protection afforded the community. Since their initial unveiling, these posters have been distributed by request throughout the United States and Canada. The overwhelming response serves to underline the previous void of current professional images of public health nursing and the need for brand images to aid with recruitment. PMID:21198816

  5. Organizational climate and nurse health outcomes in the United States: a systematic review.

    Gershon, Robyn R M; Stone, Patricia W; Zeltser, Marina; Faucett, Julia; MacDavitt, Kathryn; Chou, Shin-Shang

    2007-10-01

    Increasing interest has been focused on understanding the role working conditions play in terms of the serious issues facing hospitals today, including quality of patient care, nurse shortages, and financial challenges. One particular working condition that has been the subject of recent research, is the impact of organizational climate on nurses' well-being, including occupational health outcomes. To examine evidence-based research on the association between organizational climate and occupational health outcomes among acute-care registered nurses, a systematic review of published studies was conducted. Studies assessing the association between organizational climate variables and three common health outcomes in nurses (blood/body fluid exposures, musculoskeletal disorders, and burnout) were reviewed. Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Although most were cross-sectional in design and variability was noted across studies with respect to operational definitions and assessment measures, all noted significant associations between specific negative aspects of hospital organizational climate and adverse health impacts in registered nurses. While evidence for an association between organizational climate constructs and nurses' health was found, data were limited and some of the relationships were weak. Additional studies are warranted to clarify the nature of these complex relationships. PMID:18057805

  6. Roles of nurses in tele-health services

    Berrin Pazar; Sevinc Tastan; Emine Iyigun

    2015-01-01

    Lately, advances in science and technology showed their impact also in healthcare services, inuencing the formation of new service areas such as tele-health and tele-nursing. Tele-health services help especially care management and improving life qualities of clients with chronic diseases. Furthermore, decreasing the care cost is also aimed, via reducing hospital and emergency referrals and incidence of house care visits. Nurses, who possess an important part in the tele-health system, have r...

  7. Oral Health Measurement in Nursing Research: State of the Science

    Munro, Cindy L.; Grap, Mary Jo; Jablonski, Rita; Boyle, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Oral health can impact general health and systemic disease. Changes in dental plaque, oral microbial flora, and local oral immunity may be important in the development or exacerbation of disease in critically ill patients, trauma patients, adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and frail elderly. Inasmuch as oral health potentially can be influenced by nursing interventions, nursing research in this area can contribute greatly to improved patient outcomes in these diverse populati...

  8. Decision Factors Nurses Use to Assess Pain in Nursing Home Residents With Dementia.

    Monroe, Todd B; Parish, Abby; Mion, Lorraine C

    2015-10-01

    Nurses caring for older people with various psychiatric illnesses face many obstacles when treating pain. One setting with a high percentage of psychiatric conditions is long-term care where more than half of residents have some form of dementia, and behavioral symptoms of dementia (BSDs) may mimic behavioral displays of pain. Furthermore, two-thirds of nursing home residents have pain. Thus, many nursing home residents with dementia have pain that may be confounded by BSDs. Since many people with dementia are at risk for poor pain management, determining current methods in which nurses assess and manage pain in nursing home residents will aid in recognizing potential barriers to using current pain management guidelines and help develop strategies to enhance nurses' assessment and management of pain in this vulnerable population. The aim of this study was to explore nursing home nurses' cues and practices to identify and alleviate pain in nursing home residents with dementia. Nurses use the constructs of 'comfort' and 'quality of life' as key components in their overall pain assessment strategy in people with dementia. Indeed, the extensive process they use involving frequent reassessment and application of interventions is geared towards "appearance of comfort." Nurses reported difficulty in ascertaining whether a person with dementia was in pain, and they expressed further difficulty determining the intensity associated with resident pain. Nurses further reported that residents with dementia who are not well know by the staff were are greater risk of poor pain management. It was not unusual for nurses to discuss the importance of conflict resolution among family members as well as allowing for open expression of family's concerns. Nurses had to focus not only on the resident's comfort, but also the families' level of comfort with pain management, especially at the end-of-life. Findings support further use and development of discomfort behavior scales to help manage pain. PMID:26397435

  9. School Nurses' Perceptions and Practices of Assisting Students in Obtaining Public Health Insurance

    Rickard, Megan L.; Hendershot, Candace; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Price, James H.; Thompson, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Background: From January through June 2009, 6.1 million children were uninsured in the United States. On average, students with health insurance are healthier and as a result are more likely to be academically successful. Some schools help students obtain health insurance with the help of school nurses. Methods: This study assessed public school…

  10. Elementary School Nurse Interventions: Attendance and Health Outcomes

    Weismuller, Penny C.; Grasska, Merry A.; Alexander, Marilyn; White, Catherine G.; Kramer, Pat

    2007-01-01

    Regular school attendance is a necessary part of the learning process; student absenteeism has a direct association with poor academic performance. School nurses can influence student attendance. This study describes the impact of school nurse interventions on student absenteeism and student health. A retrospective review of 240 randomly selected…

  11. School Nurse Case Management: Achieving Health and Educational Outcomes

    Bonaiuto, Maria M.

    2007-01-01

    Educators and health care professionals alike understand that healthy students are likely to be successful learners. The goal of school nurse case management is to support students so that they are ready to learn. This article describes the outcomes of a 4-year process improvement project designed to show the impact of school nurse case management…

  12. The health-related behaviors and attitudes of student nurses

    Vowell, Maribeth

    Nurses are an important component of primary medical care, and patient education is a common and important role of most nurses. Patient education and positive role modeling by nurses have the potential to influence patients' life style choices and the serious diseases that may be affected by those choices. A greater understanding of the ways nurses think about their own health could help facilitate healthier choices for them and in their patients. The purpose of this inquiry was to examine the experiences, attitudes and beliefs of student nurses related to their personal health, and to investigate those experiences, attitudes and beliefs as they relate to their education, relationships, values and career choice. The purpose was achieved through phenomenological interviews with eleven senior nursing students, nine females and two males, encouraging them to provide in as much detail as possible their attitudes and values about their personal health. The interviews were tape recorded, transcribed verbatim, and phenomenologically analyzed. A thematic structure emerged such that the nursing students experiences were represented by the four interrelated themes of caring for myself/caring for others ; I control my health/my world controls my health; I have energy/I'm tired; and feeling good/looking good. The contextual grounds for the themes that emerged during the analysis were the Body and Time. This structure was presented in terms of its relationship to health education, other research and to current theory.

  13. The process of community health nursing clinical clerkship: A grounded theory

    Ildarabadi, Eshagh; Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi; Heydari, Abbas; Taghipour, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: The performance of the community health nurse depends on a combination of scientific and practical competencies acquired by educational experiences during the nursing course. Curriculum planners of nursing education need to understand nursing education to train professional and community-oriented nurses. The aim of this article is to explore the experiences of nursing students during their community health nursing clinical clerkship courses. Materials and Methods: A grounded theor...

  14. Burnout in health-care professionals during reorganizations and downsizing. A cohort study in nurses

    Hall-Lord Marie-Louise; Nordang Kirsten; Farup Per G

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Burnout is a psychological reaction triggered by interaction between personal characteristics and stress factors. Reorganizations and downsizing with increased workload imply stress for health-care professionals. This is a study of burnout in nurses during a period with two comprehensive reorganizations. Methods In this quasi-experimental retrospective cohort study, burnout was assessed in nurses with long work experience in three surveys during a 30 months' period with tw...

  15. Oral health in nursing students at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre teaching hospital in Moshi, Tanzania

    Rwakatema, Deogratias Stanslaus; Ananduni, Kanankira Nnko; Katiti, Victor William; Msuya, Marycelina; Chugulu, Juliet; Kapanda, Gibson

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine the prevalence and severity of dental caries, oral hygiene levels and assessment of the oral health knowledge and practices of nursing students at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre teaching hospital in Moshi, Tanzania. Methods A cross-sectional survey was done on 217 student nurse population at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre Teaching Hospital in Moshi, Tanzania in 2014. Ethical approval was obtained from the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Unive...

  16. Nursing leadership in addressing the social determinants of health.

    Lathrop, Breanna

    2013-02-01

    Social determinants of health have a profound impact on health status and the prevalence of health disparities in the United States. Significant improvements in national health indices are not possible without addressing social determinants of health. Drawing on their historical legacy as patient advocates, patient care expertise, and community focused education, nurses are ideally positioned to lead the nation in strategies to promote health equity. Nurses can embrace this new leadership role through the use of interdisciplinary collaboration, advocacy, political involvement, and community partnerships. PMID:23793135

  17. Do nurses feel stressed? A perspective from primary health care.

    Galdikien, Nijolė; Asikainen, Paula; Balčiūnas, Sigitas; Suominen, Tarja

    2014-09-01

    This study describes nurses' experiences of stress in primary healthcare settings, and examines correlations between stress and personal factors. There were 187 nurses from 18 public primary care centers participating, drawn from one county of Lithuania. The Expanded Nursing Stress Scale was used to evaluate the study data. The study indicates that in primary healthcare centers, nurses working with adult patients experienced less stress than those working with younger patients. The most frequently reported stressors were those related to death and dying, and conflicts with physicians and patients and their families. In particular, older nurses more frequently experienced stress related to death and dying. The intensity of nurses' stress in conflict situations with physicians was related to age, however, the depth of work experience in the healthcare setting was more influential. Findings indicate that more detailed research is needed regarding stress experiences in primary health care, and especially the related impact of the social contexts involved in the setting. PMID:25389543

  18. Legal limitations for nurse prescribers in Primary Health Care

    N. Geyer

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The nurse plays an important role in the delivery of primary health care services in South Africa. The primary purpose is to provide the public with access to safe competent basic health care and to achieve this, the nurse should be empowered to practice within legal and ethical boundaries. This paper explores and describes the limitations imposed by legislation on the nurse’s ability to prescribe treatment in the primary health care field. The focus is mainly on the Nursing Act, the Pharmacy Act and the Medicines and Related Substances Control Act which highlights a number of limitations. It is concluded that empowerment of the nurse should not only include addressing the legal boundaries for practice, but also education and training opportunities to equip them with the expert knowledge and skills that they need to render a quality health care service.

  19. Factors influencing nursing students' acceptance of electronic health records for nursing education (EHRNE) software program.

    Kowitlawakul, Yanika; Chan, Sally Wai Chi; Pulcini, Joyce; Wang, Wenru

    2015-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the Health Information Technology Act (2009) in America had recommended that electronic health records (EHRs) should be fully adopted by 2014. This has urged educational institutions to prepare healthcare professionals to be competent in using electronic health records (EHRs) while they are in schools. To equip nursing students with competency in using EHRs, an electronic health record for nursing education (EHRNE) has been developed and integrated it into nursing curricula. The purposes of the study were to investigate the factors influencing nursing students' acceptance of the EHRs in nursing education using the extended Technology Acceptance Model with self-efficacy as a conceptual framework. The study is a descriptive study design using self-reported questionnaires with 212 student participants. The IBM SPSS and AMOS 22.0 were used to analyze the data. The results showed that attitude toward using the EHRNE was the most influential factor on students' acceptance. The preliminary findings suggested that to enhance the students' acceptance of the EHRNE, cultivation of a positive attitude toward using this EHR as well as increasing the perceived usefulness is very important. Also, the study's framework could be used in guiding learning health informatics and be applied to nursing students. PMID:24947068

  20. Social determinants of health in nursing education, research, and health policy.

    Mahony, Deborah; Jones, Emily J

    2013-07-01

    The adoption of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the recent Institute of Medicine report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, have brought about a resurgence of interest in the social determinants of health as the basis for healthcare decisions in nursing education, research, and health policy. Nurses are positioned to be at the forefront of crucial healthcare reform to affect health outcomes and reduce health disparities profoundly. However, for nurses of the 21st century to improve the health of U.S. citizens and promote health equity effectively, we must first intently address the social determinants of health in our current nursing educational models, research agendas, and public health policies. PMID:23818478

  1. PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING IN MISSISSIPPI: CHANGES IN CONTEXT AND PRACTICE

    Kaiser, Betty L.; Zahner, Susan J.; Simani, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Current standards and competencies guiding public health nursing (PHN) practice promote population-focused practice, but few studies have examined the extent to which change toward this type of practice has occurred. A cross-sectional, mail-back survey was conducted among public health nurses in Mississippi to examine recent changes in their practice, contextual factors related to population-focused practice, and recommendations for improving practice and educational preparation for practice....

  2. Competency-based curriculum education in mental health nursing

    Jamileh Mohtashami; Mahvash Salsali; Mehrnoosh Pazargadi; Homan Manoochehri; Hamid Alavi Majd

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The essential problems in providing quality and safety services to patients, rapid changes in health care settings as well as information technology require educational revision. Competency-based curriculum focuses on set of skills that students should achieve. This study reviewed characteristics of competency-based curriculum in psychiatric nursing. Methods: A literature review about a competency-based curriculum in psychiatric mental health nursing was carried out by sear...

  3. Psychiatric-mental health nurses and the sex trafficking pandemic.

    de Chesnay, Mary

    2013-12-01

    Nurses are in a unique position to treat survivors of human trafficking and are most likely to encounter patients who have been involved in the sex trade. In particular, psychiatric-mental health nurses can be effective because they are educated to think of clients holistically and can provide both short-term medical intervention and long-term psychotherapy. Additionally, they can recognize and refer these individuals for medical treatment. The purpose of this article is to present an overview of sex trafficking and what psychiatric-mental health nurses can do to treat survivors. PMID:24274246

  4. Business law. Fundamentals for the occupational health nurse.

    D'Arruda, Kimberley A

    2002-05-01

    1. A basic understanding of the judicial system will enable occupational health nurses to read court opinions and have a better understanding of whether or how they or their companies are affected by the decision. With this knowledge, occupational health nurses can help their organization avoid legal liability by ensuring that the company does not act contrary to the decisions of the controlling courts. 2. As they are often involved in the process of contracting for goods and services, occupational health nurses need to be aware of general contract terminology and negotiating techniques so they will be better able to protect their companies. In addition, occupational health nurses can also assist in the actual contract drafting process with knowledge of a few concepts, such as the description, caption, operative language of the agreement, and definitions, of a contract. 3. Occupational health nurses are often called upon to be expert witnesses and can play an integral part in the litigation process. Because of the importance of expert witnesses, occupational health nurses must have an understanding of how to effectively provide expert witness testimony. PMID:12033091

  5. [The "Zurich Quality Model of Nursing Care", based on the "Quality of Health Outcome Model" (QHOM): a new perspective in measuring quality in nursing care].

    Schmid-Büchi, Silvia; Rettke, Horst; Horvath, Eva; Marfurt-Russenberger, Katrin; Schwendimann, René

    2008-10-01

    Ensuring and maintaining a high level of quality in nursing care becomes more and more important as economic pressure is increasing and personnel is being reduced. The nursing executives of four large Swiss hospitals therefore commissioned a group of nursing scientists and nursing experts with the task of developing a trendsetting model to represent, assess, and interpret the quality of nursing care. The "Quality of Health Outcome Model" (QHOM) served as a basis for development. More than 60 nurses from acute care hospitals and specialized clinics assessed a first draft of the model in hearings and by means of questionnaires. The model integrated earlier attempts at quality screening regarding structures, processes and results, complementing these three elements with a fourth: the patients, whose characteristics influence the results of nursing care remarkably. Thus, the former one-dimensional, linear viewpoint was resolved into a dynamic representation of all four elements, illustrating a specific concept of nursing care. Through the multi-dimensionality of the model the complexity of the nursing process is better represented. The model's core consists of eight exemplary indicators of quality, each of which is relevant to nursing and for each of which criteria and assessment tools have been formulated. The model is seen as a basis and reference for the quality development and first opportunities for clinical application have been succesfully employed. The project can serve as a paradigm of networking amongst hospitals and cooperation between nursing scientists and experts, and of the critical significance of such collaboration to the advancement of nursing quality. PMID:18850535

  6. Supporting Student Mental Health: The Role of the School Nurse in Coordinated School Mental Health Care

    Bohnenkamp, Jill H.; Stephan, Sharon H.; Bobo, Nichole

    2015-01-01

    School nurses play a critical role in the provision of mental health services in the school environment and are valuable members of the coordinated student mental health team. They possess expertise to navigate in today's complicated educational and health care systems, and it is estimated that school nurses spend 33% of their time addressing…

  7. Supporting Student Mental Health: The Role of the School Nurse in Coordinated School Mental Health Care

    Bohnenkamp, Jill H.; Stephan, Sharon H.; Bobo, Nichole

    2015-01-01

    School nurses play a critical role in the provision of mental health services in the school environment and are valuable members of the coordinated student mental health team. They possess expertise to navigate in today's complicated educational and health care systems, and it is estimated that school nurses spend 33% of their time addressing…

  8. Electronic Personal Health Record Use Among Nurses in the Nursing Informatics Community.

    Gartrell, Kyungsook; Trinkoff, Alison M; Storr, Carla L; Wilson, Marisa L

    2015-07-01

    An electronic personal health record is a patient-centric tool that enables patients to securely access, manage, and share their health information with healthcare providers. It is presumed the nursing informatics community would be early adopters of electronic personal health record, yet no studies have been identified that examine the personal adoption of electronic personal health record's for their own healthcare. For this study, we sampled nurse members of the American Medical Informatics Association and the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society with 183 responding. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify those factors associated with electronic personal health record use. Overall, 72% were electronic personal health record users. Users tended to be older (aged >50 years), be more highly educated (72% master's or doctoral degrees), and hold positions as clinical informatics specialists or chief nursing informatics officers. Those whose healthcare providers used electronic health records were significantly more likely to use electronic personal health records (odds ratio, 5.99; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-25.61). Electronic personal health record users were significantly less concerned about privacy of health information online than nonusers (odds ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.70) adjusted for ethnicity, race, and practice region. Informatics nurses, with their patient-centered view of technology, are in prime position to influence development of electronic personal health records. Our findings can inform policy efforts to encourage informatics and other professional nursing groups to become leaders and users of electronic personal health record; such use could help them endorse and engage patients to use electronic personal health records. Having champions with expertise in and enthusiasm for the new technology can promote the adoptionof electronic personal health records among healthcare providers as well as their patients. PMID:26061563

  9. Patterns of Self-Disclosure among Mental Health Nursing Students.

    Banks, David; Ashmore, Russell

    2001-01-01

    Sample of nursing students in mental health (n=173) completed a self-disclosure questionnaire; results were compared with earlier samples (n=50, 25). The mental health group would disclose significantly fewer items to patients than to parents or friends. Results have implications for the care of mental health patients. (Contains 53 references.)…

  10. What is nursing in the 21st century and what does the 21st century health system require of nursing?

    Scott, P Anne; Matthews, Anne; Kirwan, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    It is frequently claimed that nursing is vital to the safe, humane provision of health care and health service to our populations. It is also recognized however, that nursing is a costly health care resource that must be used effectively and efficiently. There is a growing recognition, from within the nursing profession, health care policy makers and society, of the need to analyse the contribution of nursing to health care and its costs. This becomes increasingly pertinent and urgent in a situation, such as that existing in Ireland, where the current financial crisis has lead to public sector employment moratoria, staff cuts and staffing deficits, combined with increased patient expectation, escalating health care costs, and a health care system restructuring and reform agenda. Such factors, increasingly common internationally, make the identification and effective use of the nursing contribution to health care an issue of international importance. This paper seeks to explore the nature of nursing and the function of the nurse within a 21st century health care system, with a focus on the Irish context. However, this analysis fits into and is relevant to the international context and discussion regarding the nursing workforce. This paper uses recent empirical studies exploring the domains of activity and focus of nursing, together with nurses perceptions of their role and work environment, in order to connect those findings with core conceptual questions about the nature and function of nursing. PMID:24320979

  11. Home visits as a strategy for health promotion by nursing

    Jucelia Salgueiro Nascimento

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the domiciliary visit performed by nurses in the Family Health Strategy as an activity to promote health. Methods: Exploratory/descriptive study with qualitative approach. The subjects were nine nurses of the Primary Health Units from Health Districts in Maceió-AL. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews in the months from April to August 2012 and were analyzed using content analysis and in light of the theoretical framework of Health Promotion. Results: The nurses recognize that the domiciliary visit can be a way to promote the health of individuals, families and community, but, in daily life, action maintains focus on disease, with curative actions of individual character, which do not take into account the social context where the user and his family are inserted. Conclusion: It is considered that the use of home visits by nurses in the family health strategy as a health promotion activity is still incipient because, although the nurses recognize the need for change in the model of care, in practice, it is observed that the focus of this action is directed to the biological model. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5020/18061230.2013.p513

  12. The African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives

    McCarthy Carey F

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than thirty-five sub-Saharan African countries have severe health workforce shortages. Many also struggle with a mismatch between the knowledge and competencies of health professionals and the needs of the populations they serve. Addressing these workforce challenges requires collaboration among health and education stakeholders and reform of health worker regulations. Health professional regulatory bodies, such as nursing and midwifery councils, have the mandate to reform regulations yet often do not have the resources or expertise to do so. In 2011, the United States of America Centers for Disease Control and Prevention began a four-year initiative to increase the collaboration among national stakeholders and help strengthen the capacity of health professional regulatory bodies to reform national regulatory frameworks. The initiative is called the African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives. This article describes the African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives and discusses its importance in implementing and sustaining national, regional, and global workforce initiatives. Discussion The African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives convenes leaders responsible for regulation from 14 countries in East, Central and Southern Africa. It provides a high profile, south-to-south collaboration to assist countries in implementing joint approaches to problems affecting the health workforce. Implemented in partnership with Emory University, the Commonwealth Secretariat, and the East, Central and Southern African College of Nursing, this initiative also supports four to five countries per year in implementing locally-designed regulation improvement projects. Over time, the African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives will help to increase the regulatory capacity of health professional organizations and ultimately improve regulation and professional standards in this region of Africa. The African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives will measure the progress of country projects and conduct an annual evaluation of the initiative’s regional impact, thereby contributing to the global evidence base of health workforce interventions. Conclusion The African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives is designed to address priority needs in health workforce development and improve regulation of the health workforce. This model may assist others countries and regions facing similar workforce challenges.

  13. A Systematic Review of the Literature on Health Literacy in Nursing Education.

    McCleary-Jones, Voncella

    2016-01-01

    Health literacy has an impact on patient health outcomes and should be included in prelicensure nursing curricula to prepare the next generation of nurses to provide care for patients with limited health literacy. Nursing curricula should go beyond inclusion of patient teaching strategies. This article provides a systematic review of the current literature related to health literacy in nursing education and identifies implications for nursing curricula. PMID:26237008

  14. Emergency mental health nursing for self-harming refugees and asylum seekers.

    Procter, Nicholas G

    2005-09-01

    This article describes the structure and function of emergency mental health nursing practice for self-harming refugees and asylum seekers on Temporary Protection Visas. Emergency nurses working in accident and emergency departments or as part of crisis intervention teams will see self-harming refugees and asylum seekers at the very point of their distress. This clinical paper is intended to support nurses in their practice should they encounter an adult asylum seeker needing emergency mental health care. Practical strategies are highlighted to help mental health nurses assess, care, and comfort refugees and asylum seekers in this predicament. Mental health nurses should, where possible, work closely with asylum seekers, their support workers, and accredited interpreters and translators to ensure the appropriate use of language when dealing with mental and emotional health issues without further isolating the asylum seeker from appropriate services. To help strengthen continuity and integration of mental health supports for refugees and asylum seekers, well-resourced care must be experienced as coherent and connected. A coherent, interdisciplinary and team-orientated approach will synthesize different viewpoints to shape clinical practice and create workable solutions in local situations. PMID:16181157

  15. Nits, nurses and the war: school nursing before the National Health Service.

    Kelsey, Amanda

    2002-01-01

    A previous paper (published in the last issue of the 'International History of Nursing Journal') traced the origins of the school medical service and the work and employment of school nurses in the first years. The following account outlines the development of school nursing up to the period following the World War II. This takes place against a series of political and organisational changes, including those precipitated by both the World wars. Although there are frequent references to school nursing work in contemporary records, the voice of school nurses themselves is often missing. The sources used in writing this paper include the archives of the Health Visitors' Association and its predecessors (particularly the Women Public Health Officers' Association--the WPHOA) include records of the responses of a professional association for school nurses to proposed changes. Records of the School Medical Group (SMG) of the Society of Medical Officers of Health (Soc MOsH), including correspondence with the BMA, were also consulted. The records of both of these groups are held at the Contemporary Medical Archive of the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine. Material kept at the Public Record Office was used, but papers relating to the years after 1969 remain closed under the 30-year rule. Relevant secondary sources were also used. PMID:12243096

  16. The health care work environment and adverse health and safety consequences for nurses.

    Geiger-Brown, Jeanne; Lipscomb, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Nurses' working conditions are inextricably linked to the quality of care that is provided to patients and patients' safety. These same working conditions are associated with health and safety outcomes for nurses and other health care providers. This chapter describes aspects of the nursing work environment that have been linked to hazards and adverse exposures for nurses, as well as the most common health and safety outcomes of nursing work. We include studies from 2000 to the present by nurse researchers, studies of nurses as subjects, and studies of workers under similar working conditions that could translate to nurses' work environment. We explore a number of work organization factors including shift work and extended work hours, safety climate and culture, teamwork, and communication. We also describe environmental hazards, including chemical hazards (e.g., waste anesthetics, hazardous drugs, cleaning compounds) and airborne and bloodborne pathogen exposure. Nurses' health and safety outcomes include physical (e.g., musculoskeletal disorders, gastrointestinal, slips, trips and falls, physical assault) and psychosocial outcomes (e.g., burnout, work-family conflict). Finally, we present recommendations for future research to further protect nurses and all health care workers from a range of hazardous working conditions. PMID:21639028

  17. The impact of assessment methods on the learning of nursing students.

    Leung, Sau Fong; Mok, Esther; Wong, Daniel

    2008-08-01

    Assessment methods can influence the learning approaches of nursing students. Assessments designed to assess understanding rather than rote learning can contribute to a deep learning approach. Multiple-choice questions can be formulated at high cognitive levels for nursing assessments. This study aimed to examine the effect of high quality multiple-choice tests on the learning approaches of students enrolled in a mental health nursing course as measured by the revised two-factor study process questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F). Data were collected from 136 students in a higher diploma (HD) in nursing programme and 142 baccalaureate (BSN) nursing students. Two-step cluster analysis yielded three clusters represented by students who were predominantly deep, predominantly surface or intermediate in their orientation to learning. There was a general decrease in the deep learning score and an increase in the surface learning score of the students on the course, possibly related to the excessive workload in nursing studies. However, there was no direct association with multiple-choice assessment. The academic achievement of students correlated negatively with their surface learning approach. Students (n=31) in four focus group interviews believed that assessments constructed using scenario-based questions, simulated role-play situations and case studies could direct desired learning in order to facilitate their understanding of knowledge, their use of critical thinking, and their application of knowledge. PMID:18164105

  18. Nursing: promoting the health of overweight children and adolescents in the school context

    Nathalia Costa Gonzaga

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to analyze the nursing interventions related to the competencies of health promotion of overweight children and adolescents in the school context, in light of the Galway Consensus through an integrative review. Articles published between 1988 and June, 2013 were found in the databases CINAHL, SCOPUS, MEDLINE/PubMed, Cochrane, LILACS and SciELO. A total of 139 publications were obtained from indexed descriptors. Ten articles were selected after reading. The most evident competencies for health promotion were: catalyzing change, needs assessment and impact assessment. The highlights were activities of health education and partnerships with other health professionals and the families of students. It was found that the skills of health promotion developed by nurses can contribute to the adoption of healthy habits by overweight children and adolescents.

  19. Kenya’s emergency-hire nursing programme: a pilot evaluation of health service delivery in two districts

    Vindigni, Stephen M; Patricia L. Riley; Kimani, Francis; Willy, Rankesh; Warutere, Patrick; Sabatier, Jennifer F; Kiriinya, Rose; Friedman, Michael; Osumba, Martin; Waudo, Agnes N; Rakuom, Chris; Rogers, Martha

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility of utilizing a small-scale, low-cost, pilot evaluation in assessing the short-term impact of Kenya’s emergency-hire nursing programme (EHP) on the delivery of health services (outpatient visits and maternal-child health indicators) in two underserved health districts with high HIV/AIDS prevalence. Methods Six primary outcomes were assessed through the collection of data from facility-level health management forms—total general outpatient visits, vaginal del...

  20. Evidence-Based Health Promotion in Nursing Homes: A Pilot Intervention to Improve Oral Health

    Cadet, Tamara J.; Berrett-Abebe, Julie; Burke, Shanna L.; Bakk, Louanne; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Maramaldi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Nursing home residents over the age of 65 years are at high risk for poor oral health and related complications such as pneumonia and adverse diabetes outcomes. A preliminary study found that Massachusetts' nursing homes generally lack the training and resources needed to provide adequate oral health care to residents. In this study, an…

  1. Burnout and work environments of public health nurses involved in mental health care

    Imai, H.; Nakao, H.; Tsuchiya, M.; KURODA, Y.; Katoh, T

    2004-01-01

    Aims: (1) To examine whether prevalence of burnout is higher among community psychiatric nurses working under recently introduced job specific work systems than among public health nurses (PHNs) engaged in other public health services. (2) To identify work environment factors potentially contributing to burnout.

  2. Social responsibility of nursing in policies of health humanization

    Mercedes Trentini

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: new conceptions of the world have focused on restructuring health policies and designing a new healthcare model.Objective: to reflect on the humanization policy as part of health promotion with emphasis on nursing care.Content: The article mentions paradigm changes and refers to the biomedical model and the new condition of diversity in models of care practices for health promotion and co-responsibility of nursing in generating and sustaining the humanization of nursing care. It rethinks strategies and commitment to co-responsibility by nursing staff in promoting population health. Participation of nurses in promoting humanization care has shown signs of development in its acceptance, bonding healthcare service professionals and its users. An interview-conversation as a strategy for collecting information is highlighted, whether to care or to research based on a humanization framework.Conclusions: Sensitive listening, modality of dialogue, and the conversational interview method are relationship techniques and means to acquire skills for policy development in humanizing care in health promotion.

  3. Reflecting about the health education in the nursing graduation

    Barbara Soares Avanci, Fernanda Garcia Bezerra Góes, Luciana Rangel Marins, Luciana da Silva Viana, Renata Loureiro Laborne Borges

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify the nursing academic's knowledge about the education in health. Methods: this is about a descriptive and exploratory study from qualitative approach that had as subjects ten nursing students from 3rd to 8th period of the nursing course of a private university in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The choice was random and for the fact of the same ones have already lived the theoretical-practical teaching, where they had the opportunity to develop educational activities in health in the practical field. It was used as instrument for data collection an interview itinerary composed by open questions. The collection of data closed up after the saturation of the speeches and the interpretation of the same ones was accomplished through the Thematic Analysis. Results: after analysis of the data, two categories emerged: The nursing academics and the education in health; The approach of the education in health in the graduation. Conclusion: this study showed us that the education in health needs to be analyzed continually, discussed and understood in the graduation as an important practice in the nurse's assistance performance.

  4. Reframing women's health in nursing education: a feminist approach.

    Morse, G G

    1995-01-01

    To operate from a feminist paradigm is a new way of thinking for nurse educators. Feminist perspectives in nursing provide a new stage of consciousness--one that values women's voices, their way of knowing, and their life experiences, and, most important, one that challenges traditional patriarchal practices. Furthermore, nursing curricula with feminist perspectives provides a biopsychosocial approach that encourages the full recognition of variables that can influence women's health, such as socioeconomic status, racial and ethnic background, and biobehavioral factors. The debate in medicine over a specialty in women's health is not unique. The history of academia abounds with descriptions of struggles to establish new fields and disciplines. Recent specialties, such as pediatrics and gerontology, which are distinguished by age rather than specific organ or system, struggled for establishment and recognition. Historically, nursing curricula has emulated the biomedical model that is reductionistic and contradictory to nursing's holistic mission. Rather than classifying women's health into a separate entity, women's health may be introduced into present curricula by employing feminist ideals and pedagogy throughout the curriculum. This approach would provide a mechanism to explore women's health issues that were previously minimally addressed at best, or not addressed at all. More important, students would be provided with an opportunity to examine the societal effects of racism, sexism, and classism, and this education would potentially lead to a growing awareness of concerns specific to women and minorities. PMID:8668562

  5. Empathy toward Patients with Mental Illness among Baccalaureate Nursing Students: Impact of a Psychiatric Nursing and Mental Health Educational Experience

    Mousa, Marwa Abd El-Gawad Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Empathy is an ability and skill that can be learned and developed through appropriate education and practice. While the importance of nurses' empathy is widely acknowledged, little is known about the impact of passing through the psychiatric nursing and mental health educational experience at the Faculty of Nursing, Alexandria University on…

  6. Globalisation and its implications for health care and nursing practice.

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline

    Globalisation describes the increasing economic and social interdependence between countries. This article examines globalisation in terms of the opportunities and threats it poses to health, in particular increasing rates of non-communicable diseases. Nursing is challenged with responding to the changing health needs of the global population that have arisen as a result of globalisation. PMID:19323125

  7. Behavior of Man in Health and Illness, Nursing 103A.

    Bakke, Sandra I.

    A description is provided of a course, "Behavior of Man in Health and Illness," designed to introduce first-year undergraduate nursing students to the theories and concepts related to the health-illness continuum, the stress of illness, and coping theory. The description begins with an overview of course content, followed by information on the…

  8. The Role of Nurses in Community Awareness and Preventive Health

    Marjaneh M. Fooladi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With access to multimedia through social networks at global level, one wonders why some of the preventive healthcare services such as children and adult immunizations, annual screening for men and women, prenatal and dental care for childbearing women and adolescents are not provided at a 100% rate. Community awareness is a crucial aspect of preventative healthcare and perhaps those responsible for implementing the national health initiatives seek to realize other key factors influencing community health. In a study of 190 community health nurses caring for blacks, Puerto Ricans and Southeast Asians, the confidence scores for cultural self-efficacy was high when nurses cared for blacks and they were low when they cared for Asians and Latinos. The lowest scores belonged to items related to knowledge of health beliefs and practices regarding respect, authority and modesty within each culture. Scores were higher when interpreters were used correctly to convey meaningful messages. Researchers concluded that nurses lacked confidence when caring for culturally diverse patients and found weaknesses across the nursing curriculum preparing nurses to care for various demographic groups.1 In most countries, including Iran, governmental agencies have the budget and the man- power to apply preplanned initiatives and provide community-based preventive healthcare services to address the majority of the preventable health related issues through satellite clinics, health department and outpatient facilities. Meanwhile, private sectors in metropolitan cities offer cure-based services to urban and suburban communities. Remote and rural areas should be the focus of primary care and preventive health services, because access to multimedia is limited, healthcare providers refuse to work in outreach areas, and unpaved roads are barriers to easy access to the locals and outsiders. To implement an effective community-based preventive program, recognition of resiliency as a theoretical framework within that community should be considered to help explain how communities address adversity.2 In a British study, researchers established the importance of the role of nursing in preventive health when nurses added significant improvement to reduce the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease in middle aged patients. Nurses, compared to other healthcare providers, were able to provide health screening and doubled the recorded blood pressure, quadrupled identification of smoking habit, and increased documented weight related issues by fivefold in a primary care setting.3 Community health nursing theory addresses collective concepts of nursing domains in an attempt to rectify environmental, resiliency, and community abilities for healthcare issues among diverse population and avoids simple groupings of aggregates. Conceptual frameworks are introduced to help urban and rural communities implement preventative measures for health and wellbeing of residents through rural-based community health nursing programs.1,4 With this awareness, Iranian nurses in any practice area will find a golden opportunity to encourage, motivate, inform and guide the public to consider health screening, annual check-ups, childhood and adult immunizations and offer health education to patients across the lifespan. The role of nursing does not begin or end in a hospital-based or clinical facility. It is important to remember “Once a nurse, Always a nurse”, which means a nurse can guide and educate the public every minute and in all places, for the mere fact that medicine does NOT. Community health is a major part of nursing profession as Sarah, who graduated from a baccalaureate nursing program 5 years ago, demonstrates her role as a spiritual journey with a firm belief to bring health awareness through motivation. Her usual day begins by telling a 45 year-old male cashier in a supermarket to go for a prostate cancer screening; a 50 year-old woman sitting in the park to have her bone density screening; asking a young mother on the bus if her children are up-to-date with their immunizations; encouraging a 16 year-old adolescent to stop smoking and discuss the adverse effects of nicotine dependency; hold a passionate conversation with a 5 month pregnant woman at a birthday party to consider natural birth versus Cesarean Section and breastfeed; discuss swimming pool safety, poison control, insect bites, falls and motor vehicle accident prevention with a teacher in her neighborhood and so on. Sarah may be unique, but her words are nothing less than the seeds of knowledge planted by a farmer to reap good health. Nurses are the foundation of any successful social healthcare program and instrumental in implementing any private or government funded universal health plan. The role of nurses for improving the health and wellbeing of a society is undeniable and Iranian nurses should take their role more seriously for an everlasting effect on the public wellbeing.

  9. An exploration of student nurses' experiences of formative assessment.

    Duers, Lorraine E; Brown, Norrie

    2009-08-01

    The idea that formative assessment has the potential to prepare students, not only to succeed in summative assessments during the course, but also in the world beyond the classroom [Melland, H., Volden, C., 1998. Classroom assessment: linking teaching and learning. Journal of Nursing Education 37(6), 275-277] fuelled the desire to explore student nurses experiences of being assessed formatively. Focus group discussion, within a UK Higher Education setting, captured the holistic, dynamic and individual experiences student nurses (n=14) have of formative assessment. Ethical approval was obtained. Findings from three separate focus group discussions indicate that lecturers do not use the term "formative assessment" in their communication with the student nurses; student preparation and effort is greater when assessment is for summative purposes; oral feedback is preferable to written feedback which can, at times, be illegible and utilise unfamiliar vocabulary; lecturer comments are regarded as being more valuable than grades; student nurses are not being prepared for the critical feedback associated with peer review and they may, therefore, be vulnerable to the process and outcome of peer review. Thus, the UK centric focus of this small qualitative research study need not detract from its ability to add to the global knowledge base on formative assessment in nursing. PMID:19285761

  10. Needs assessment as a marketing strategy: an experience for baccalaureate nursing students.

    Colangelo, R; Goldrick, B

    1991-04-01

    A marketing needs assessment was undertaken as a community health project for baccalaureate nursing students. The objective of the project were: (1) to conduct a needs assessment utilizing the concepts of marketing in health planning, and (2) to identify health needs of a community based on active participation by members of the community. Through a collaborative effort with a community health agency, students were able to integrate the principles of marketing and participative decision-making into a learning experience. The results of the needs assessment provided the agency with valuable information for strategic planning. PMID:1646309

  11. PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING IN MISSISSIPPI: CHANGES IN CONTEXT AND PRACTICE.

    Kaiser, Betty L; Zahner, Susan J; Simani, Julie

    2010-12-01

    Current standards and competencies guiding public health nursing (PHN) practice promote population-focused practice, but few studies have examined the extent to which change toward this type of practice has occurred. A cross-sectional, mail-back survey was conducted among public health nurses in Mississippi to examine recent changes in their practice, contextual factors related to population-focused practice, and recommendations for improving practice and educational preparation for practice. The survey response rate was 54% (n=150 [of 277]). Participants were predominantly female (95%), White (85%), 46 years or older (62%) and held an associate degree in nursing (69%). Most experienced nurses (n=106, 70%) reported perceived practice changes compared to five years prior, but did not consistently report changes toward greater population-focused practice. Participants reported funding decreases and negative effects on practice stemming from the nursing shortage. Recommendations for improving practice conditions included increasing resources, improving workplace environment and management practices, changing the focus of services, and promoting awareness of public health and PHN. Recommendations for improving education included providing more clinical experiences in public health settings and increasing financial supports and distance learning options. Additional research is needed to determine the nature and characteristics of population-focused PHN as practiced in Mississippi and elsewhere. PMID:21243042

  12. Systematic review of interventions to increase the delivery of preventive care by primary care nurses and allied health clinicians

    McElwaine, Kathleen M; Freund, Megan; Campbell, Elizabeth M.; Bartlem, Kate M.; Wye, Paula M.; Wiggers, John H

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary care nurses and allied health clinicians are potential providers of opportunistic preventive care. This systematic review aimed to summarise evidence for the effectiveness of practice change interventions in increasing nurse or allied health professional provision of any of five preventive care elements (ask, assess, advise, assist, and/or arrange) for any of four behavioural risks (smoking, inadequate nutrition, alcohol overconsumption, physical inactivity) within a primar...

  13. Nursing entrepreneurship: motivators, strategies and possibilities for professional advancement and health system change.

    Wall, Sarah

    2013-06-01

    In Canada, as well as internationally, efficiency-focused organizational restructuring in healthcare has resulted in stressful job change for nurses, although nurses continue to work in a system that values technology-based, physician-provided services. Employed nurses have had to participate in organizational activities that undermine their professional values and goals. Nursing entrepreneurship presents an opportunity to explore nursing's professional potential in nursing practice that is uniquely independent. In this study, a focused ethnographic approach was used to explore the experiences of self-employed nurses, who see themselves as leaders in advancing the profession of nursing and its contribution to healthcare. Key themes in the findings include the responses of self-employed nurses to health system change, expanded roles for nurses, the consequences of this non-traditional approach to nursing work and the possibilities for change that arise from nursing entrepreneurship. This research has implications for healthcare policy, professional advocacy and nursing education. PMID:23809640

  14. [Reflections on the development of maternal and child health in public health nursing in Taiwan].

    Chen, Miao-Ching

    2014-06-01

    Continued global economic difficulties and Taiwan's health insurance scheme have focused the domestic healthcare system excessively on medical treatments and made this system overly market-oriented. The NHI (national health insurance) Reimbursement Policy lacks adequate flexibility to adjust to current health needs. The situation constrains the medical service budget and causes nursing shortages in hospitals, which in turn marginalizes the public health nurses working at health centers. It is important for the government and professional associations to establish a public healthcare model that adequately meets the needs of the community. In addition to strengthening the role and function of public health nurses, a service model must be developed and piloted. This paper analyzes the situation and problem of maternal and child healthcare in Taiwan, studies the successful experiences of maternal and child healthcare from other counties, and then provides recommendations for the future development of public health nursing in Taiwan. PMID:24899555

  15. A Proactive Innovation for Health Care Transformation: Health and Wellness Nurse Coaching.

    Erickson, Helen Lorraine; Erickson, Margaret Elizabeth; Southard, Mary Elaine; Brekke, Mary E; Sandor, M Kay; Natschke, Mary

    2016-03-01

    A cohort of holistic nurses, recognizing opportunities inherent in health care transformation, organized and worked together from 2009 to 2012. The goal was to hold space for holistic nursing by developing a health and wellness coaching role and certification program for holistic nurses. The intent was to ensure that holistic nurses could work to the fullest of their ability within the evolving health care system, and others could discover the merit of holistic nursing as they explored the possibilities of nurse coaching. Challenges emerged that required the cohort plan strategies that would hold the space for nursing while also moving toward the intended goal. As they worked, this cohort demonstrated leadership skills, knowledge, values, and attitudes of holistic nursing that provide an example for others who follow in the wake of health care transformation. The American Holistic Credentialing Corporation's perspective of the events that unfolded and of the related decisions made by the coalition provides a record of the evolution of holistic nursing. PMID:25911026

  16. Nursing workloads in family health: implications for universal access1

    de Pires, Denise Elvira Pires; Machado, Rosani Ramos; Soratto, Jacks; Scherer, Magda dos Anjos; Gonçalves, Ana Sofia Resque; Trindade, Letícia Lima

    2016-01-01

    Objective to identify the workloads of nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy, considering its implications for the effectiveness of universal access. Method qualitative study with nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy of the South, Central West and North regions of Brazil, using methodological triangulation. For the analysis, resources of the Atlas.ti software and Thematic Content Analysis were associated; and the data were interpreted based on the labor process and workloads as theorical approaches. Results the way of working in the Family Health Strategy has predominantly resulted in an increase in the workloads of the nursing professionals, with emphasis on the work overload, excess of demand, problems in the physical infrastructure of the units and failures in the care network, which hinders its effectiveness as a preferred strategy to achieve universal access to health. On the other hand, teamwork, affinity for the work performed, bond with the user, and effectiveness of the assistance contributed to reduce their workloads. Conclusions investments on elements that reduce the nursing workloads, such as changes in working conditions and management, can contribute to the effectiveness of the Family Health Strategy and achieving the goal of universal access to health. PMID:27027679

  17. Nursing workloads in family health: implications for universal access.

    Pires, Denise Elvira Pires de; Machado, Rosani Ramos; Soratto, Jacks; Scherer, Magda Dos Anjos; Gonçalves, Ana Sofia Resque; Trindade, Letícia Lima

    2016-01-01

    Objective to identify the workloads of nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy, considering its implications for the effectiveness of universal access. Method qualitative study with nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy of the South, Central West and North regions of Brazil, using methodological triangulation. For the analysis, resources of the Atlas.ti software and Thematic Content Analysis were associated; and the data were interpreted based on the labor process and workloads as theorical approaches. Results the way of working in the Family Health Strategy has predominantly resulted in an increase in the workloads of the nursing professionals, with emphasis on the work overload, excess of demand, problems in the physical infrastructure of the units and failures in the care network, which hinders its effectiveness as a preferred strategy to achieve universal access to health. On the other hand, teamwork, affinity for the work performed, bond with the user, and effectiveness of the assistance contributed to reduce their workloads. Conclusions investments on elements that reduce the nursing workloads, such as changes in working conditions and management, can contribute to the effectiveness of the Family Health Strategy and achieving the goal of universal access to health. PMID:27027679

  18. Using an academic-community partnership model and blended learning to advance community health nursing pedagogy.

    Ezeonwu, Mabel; Berkowitz, Bobbie; Vlasses, Frances R

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a model of teaching community health nursing that evolved from a long-term partnership with a community with limited existing health programs. The partnership supported RN-BSN students' integration in the community and resulted in reciprocal gains for faculty, students and community members. Community clients accessed public health services as a result of the partnership. A blended learning approach that combines face-to-face interactions, service learning and online activities was utilized to enhance students' learning. Following classroom sessions, students actively participated in community-based educational process through comprehensive health needs assessments, planning and implementation of disease prevention and health promotion activities for community clients. Such active involvement in an underserved community deepened students' awareness of the fundamentals of community health practice. Students were challenged to view public health from a broader perspective while analyzing the impacts of social determinants of health on underserved populations. Through asynchronous online interactions, students synthesized classroom and community activities through critical thinking. This paper describes a model for teaching community health nursing that informs students' learning through blended learning, and meets the demands for community health nursing services delivery. PMID:24720659

  19. Shift work a reality in life and health nurses

    Mª Mercedes Gago López

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The need to provide care 24 hours of the day, 365 days of the year, means for nurses, compulsory work in a system of rotating shifts, including the realization of nights. This system has repercussions on the life, health and well-being of nurses.In order to identify evidence on the relationship between the work to shift and/or night the health and well-being of nurses and develop recommendations to improve the adaptation to the system of rotating shifts and/or night, have carried out a review of the literature.After detailed analysis of the literature, we can conclude that the quality of the care provided is in direct relation to the health and well-being of the nursing professional. Implement measures to reduce the physical, psychic, social and family wear must be priority, being necessary to educate professionals, families, society and business. Among the recommendations highlight, those directed to the company; set realistic goals, to reduce workloads in the night shift adapting them to the actual number of nurses, flexible schedules and recommendations addressed to the professional related: diet, sleep, exercise, family life and social hygiene. The implementation of these measures will mean: increase satisfaction, reduce absenteeism, increase productivity, reduce the number of errors and decrease spending.

  20. The Nurse as a Primary Health Care Provider. And: The Nurse Practitioner: An Annotated Bibliography.

    Perry, Lesley

    Issues and present trends related to the preparation and the expanded role of the nurse and physician's assistant in meeting health needs are the major concerns of part one, representing 100 pages of the document. Issues discussed include: (1) manpower considerations, (2) definition of responsibilities, training needs, and requirements, (3)…

  1. Perspectives of Australian nursing directors regarding educational preparation for mental health nursing practice.

    Happell, Brenda; McAllister, Margaret

    2014-11-01

    There is an ongoing global shortage of mental health nurses. Within Australia, the principal strategy of offering a postgraduate education programme with various incentives to encourage nurses back to study has not been successful. This has led to the consideration of radical alternatives, including the return to pre-registration specialisation in mental health. The successful introduction of this strategy would require the full support of industry partners. To date, the voice of industry has not been heard in relation to this issue. The aim of this paper is to present the views of an Australian sample of mental health nursing directors regarding the resources and other factors required, should undergraduate specialist programmes in mental health be developed, to ensure they are relevant and likely to be successful. A qualitative exploratory research project was undertaken to explore the perspectives and opinions of industry partners. In-depth interviews were conducted with nursing directors (n = 12) in Queensland Australia. Five main themes were identified: relationships with universities; clinical placement preparation and support; workplace culture; facilitators and preceptors; and practical student learning. Genuine collaboration between the two organisations was considered crucial for delivering a quality programme and providing the required support for students. Transformative leadership could inform this collaboration by promoting acknowledgement of and respect for differences. PMID:25353302

  2. Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage: identification of nursing research priorities in Latin America

    Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli; Bassalobre-Garcia, Alessandra; Reveiz, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estabilish a regional list for nursing research priorities in health systems and services in the Region of the Americas based on the concepts of Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage. Method: five-stage consensus process: systematic review of literature; appraisal of resulting questions and topics; ranking of the items by graduate program coordinators; discussion and ranking amongst a forum of researchers and public health leaders; and consultation with the Ministries of Health of the Pan American Health Organization's member states. Results: the resulting list of nursing research priorities consists of 276 study questions/ topics, which are sorted into 14 subcategories distributed into six major categories: 1. Policies and education of nursing human resources; 2. Structure, organization and dynamics of health systems and services; 3. Science, technology, innovation, and information systems in public health; 4. Financing of health systems and services; 5. Health policies, governance, and social control; and 6. Social studies in the health field. Conclusion: the list of nursing research priorities is expected to serve as guidance and support for nursing research on health systems and services across Latin America. Not only researchers, but also Ministries of Health, leaders in public health, and research funding agencies are encouraged to use the results of this list to help inform research-funding decisions. PMID:26487014

  3. Survey of knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in nurses of community-based health services in Hainan province

    CHEN Xiu-zhen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available To assess the knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR among the nurses ( n= 302 of community-based health services in Hainan province of China, a survey was made by randomized stratified cluster sampling using self-designed questionnaires. The passing rate for qualification of the knowledge of CPR was found to be very low in Hainan province (23.18 %. A significant difference of regions and different educational level among the nurses were also noticed (P<0.01. It may be concluded from the study that nurses of community-based health services in Hainan province lack the basic knowledge of CPR, especially in rural region.

  4. [Continuous nursing education to improve the quality of health care].

    Fumić, Nera; Marinović, Marin; Brajan, Dolores

    2014-10-01

    Health care and today's medical and technical achievements and approved standards of treatment provide comprehensive quality, safety and traceability of medical procedures respecting the principles of health protection. Continuous education improves the quality of nursing health care and increases the effectiveness of patient care, consequently maintaining and enhancing patient safety. Patient health problems impose the need of appropriate, planned and timely nursing care and treatment. In providing quality nursing care, attention is focused on the patient and his/her needs in order to maintain and increase their safety, satisfaction, independence and recovery or peaceful death, so the health and nursing practices must be systematized, planned and based on knowledge and experience. Health and nursing care of patients at risk of developing acute and chronic wounds or already suffering from some form of this imply preventive measures that are provided through patient education, motivation, monitoring, early recognition of risk factors and causes, and reducing or removing them through the prescribed necessary medical treatment which is safe depending on the patient health status. Except for preventive measures, nursing care of patients who already suffer from some form of acute or chronic wounds is focused on the care and treatment of damaged tissue by providing appropriate and timely diagnosis, timely and proper evaluation of the wound and patient general status, knowledge and understanding of the wide range of local, oral and parenteral therapy and treatment, aiming to increase patient safety by preventing progression of the patient general condition and local wound status and reducing the possibility of developing infection or other complications of the underlying disease. In the overall patient management, through nursing process, medical interventions are implemented and aimed to maintain and optimize health status, prevent complications of existing diseases and conditions, provide appropriate wound treatment, increase satisfaction, reduce pain, increase mobility, reduce and eliminate aggravating factors, and achieve a satisfactory functional and aesthetic outcome. Many scientific researches and knowledge about the pathophysiological processes of wound formation and healing are currently available. Modern achievements can accelerate independence, reduce pain and encourage faster wound healing, thus it is important to continuously develop awareness, knowledge and experience, along with the treatment to achieve, maintain and enhance the quality of health care and patient safety. PMID:25326985

  5. The Use of Competency Models to Assess Leadership in Nursing

    Andreja Kvas; Janko Seljak; Janez Stare

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The efficiency of the health care system is significantly dependent on the appropriate leadership and guidance of employees. One of the most frequently used new approaches in human resources management is the study of competencies and competency models. The aim of this research is to develop a competency model for leaders in nursing, and to compare it with the leadership competency model for state administration. Methods A survey was conducted among 141 nurse leaders in Sl...

  6. The relationship between burnout and mental health among nurses

    Abdi masooleh F

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burnout is one of the most important factors in reduced productivity in organizations and involves physical and mental signs, especially in the human service professions. The role of nurses in the healthcare system is vital and motivation to ensure health security is extremely important. We carried out this research to examine the relationship between burnout and mental health in the nursing staff of educational hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted among 200 nurses selected via probable multistage sampling. We used three instruments in this study: 1 demographic questionnaire 2 General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28 and 3 Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI.Results: On the whole, using the MBI subscale, we found low levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization and high levels of reduced sense of personal accomplishment, both in frequency and intensity. The prevalence of symptomatic samples in the GHQ-28 was 43%, and two variables, burnout and poor mental health, were related (p<0.001. Burnout was to be related to gender, age and years of work. The correlation between poor mental health and years of work as well as hours of work in a week were significant. Conclusions: Our results suggest that there is a strong correlation between poor mental health and burnout. Furthermore, the prevalence of symptomatic samples detected in our study using the GHQ-28 was much higher than that reported in studies of the general population. The high prevalence of symptomatic samples and high prevalence of burnout in the dimension of self accomplishment, especially in younger nurses, combined with the strong correlation between poor mental health and burnout all show that care should be taken to improve the stressful conditions that nurses face.

  7. Reducing health care's carbon footprint--the power of nursing.

    Muñoz, Aliria

    2012-11-01

    Global warming and environmentalism continue to be national and international issues as their complexities and implications become better understood. One ironic contributor to the degradation of the environment is the health care system. Serving as clinical laboratories, hotels, restaurants, and offices that never close, U.S. hospitals produce more than 2 million tons of waste annually. Although the consequences and significance of health care's carbon footprint are undeniable, strategies to reduce this impact are challenging. This article discusses how the role, traits, and knowledge of nurses combined with their positions in the health care system make them key players in creating an environmentally sustainable health care industry. With an analysis of environmental action versus inaction, this article explores how nurses at the forefront of health care are equipped to change practice that will reach far beyond the bedside. PMID:23413481

  8. Solution-focused approach therapy for mental health nursing students.

    Evans, Nicola; Evans, Anne-Marie

    Solution-focused therapy is a model of therapy that builds on the client's strengths, is future-focused and can be generally offered as a brief intervention. It can be used across multiple clinical settings and is not limited to being useful for clients accessing mental health services. Learning the underlying principles and developing a foundation level of skill in the approach was found to be achievable in an undergraduate nursing course, with students reporting an increase in their knowledge of the model and confidence in basic therapeutic skills in just one day of training. In this paper, we introduce the solution-focused approach in relation to nursing practice. We describe the template used for the training day offered to undergraduate mental health nurses. Students reported that this method of learning a therapeutic approach was helpful and increased both their knowledge and skill base. PMID:24280922

  9. Health Literacy Training for Public Health Nurses in Fukushima: A Multi-site Program Evaluation.

    Goto, Aya; Lai, Alden Yuanhong; Rudd, Rima E

    2015-09-01

    Public health nurses (PHNs) are community residents' access points to health information and services in Japan. After the Fukushima nuclear accident, they were challenged to communicate radiation-related health information to best meet community needs. We previously developed and evaluated the outcome of a single-site health literacy training program to augment PHNs' ability to improve community residents' access to written health information. This paper presents an evaluation of an identical training program using data combined from multiple sites, and further included proximal and distal evaluations to document the impact of health literacy training in a post-disaster setting. A total of 64 participants, primarily experienced PHNs, attended one of three multi-session health literacy workshops conducted in multiple sites across Fukushima. Quantitative and qualitative data on PHNs' training satisfaction, self-evaluation of achievements regarding training goals, and application of learned skills were collected and analyzed. Each workshop consisted of two 2-hour sessions introducing health literacy and assessment tools and developing skills to improve written materials, followed by a one-month follow-up assessment on PHNs' application of the gained skills in the field. Post-training evaluations on the appropriateness and usefulness of the workshop were highly positive. At the end of the one-month follow-up, 45% of participants had gained confidence in assessing and revising written materials and had applied the skills they had gained to develop and communicate health information in various settings and modes. This increase in confidence was associated with further application of the learned skills at the municipal level. However, participants reported difficulties in explaining risks, and the need to learn more about plain language to be able to paraphrase professional terms. This paper highlighs the positive outcomes of health literacy training among PHNs. Practical strategies to reinforce their skills to use plain language and communicate the epidemiological concept of risk are also recommended. PMID:26870621

  10. Undergraduate Nursing Students' Evaluation of the Debriefing Phase in Mental Health Nursing Simulation.

    Kirkbakk-Fjær, Kari; Hedelin, Birgitta; Moen, Øyfrid Larsen

    2016-05-01

    The debriefing phase in mental health nursing simulation promotes a reflexive learning process with the opportunity to develop metacognitive and nontechnical skills. The aim of this quantitative study was to describe undergraduate nursing students' evaluation of their experience during the debriefing phase following high fidelity human simulation (HFHS). Data was collected using the "Debriefing Experience Scale" and analysed with descriptive and comparative tests. The debriefing phase was evaluated as very good. Background data and group size revealed few significant differences. Students with little clinical praxis evaluated having time to acknowledge feelings as important. Differences between groups revealed that groups should consist of up to eighteen students. PMID:27050663

  11. Assessment of the efficacy of footbaths as a means of improving the mental health of nurses : a preliminary report <原著論文>

    Inoue, Setsuko; Kaneko, Fumiko; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There are few studies that have subjectively and objectively verified the efficacy of footbaths as a means of relieving stress. The purpose of the present study was to validate the stress-reducing efficacy of footbaths both subjectively and objectively by means of a stress indicator, chromogranin A (CgA). Methods: The subjects were 21 female nurses working at a general hospital. After evaluating their current mental and physical condition, and measuring their salivary CgA level...

  12. Health Reform: the health knowledge printed in the annals of Brazilian Nursing (1977-1980

    Érica Toledo de Mendonça

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The study has as object in nursing knowledge built during the Brazilian Sanitary Reform Movement, printed in the Annals of the Brazilian Nursing for the period 1977-1980. Objective: To analyze the content relating to this national health policy in the annals of the Brazilian Congress of Nursing in force from 1977 to 1980. This is a social-historical study, exploratory analysis that used the documentary as a research technique. We analyzed the Annals of the Brazilian Nursing the period 1977-1980, and categorization of selected themes in the corpus. The nurses, as actors engaged in national health system, they made a scientific output that showed signs of incorporation of political and social reality, building a knowledge in public health in line with the ideals sanitarians.

  13. Musculoskeletal Load Assessment in Hospital Nurses with Patient Transfer Activity

    ROGHAYEH ABEDINI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Manual patient handling is known to be the major source of musculoskeletal load among hospital nurses. The objectives of the present study were determination of frequency of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs and its associated factors together with assessment of musculoskeletal load due to patient transfer by PTAI method in hospital nursing staff of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS, Iran. In this crosssectional study, 400 randomly selected nurses of SUMS hospital participated. Data were collected by anonymous demographic and Nordic Musculoskeletal Disorders Questionnaires together with PTAI index checklist. Statistical analyses were undertaken using SPSS, version 16. Age and job tenure means of participants were 30.76±6.44 and 6.92±5.75 years, respectively. 88.2% of the nursing staff reported some forms of musculoskeletal symptoms during the 12 months prior to the study. The results of PTAI index assessment demonstrated that in 4%, 8.5% and 87.5% of the subjects, musculoskeletal load were at levels 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The results revealed that PTAI index score was significantly associated with musculoskeletal disorders occurrence (p<0.001. Musculoskeletal load was high among nurses with patient transfer activity. Age, nurse to bed ratio, marital status, shift work and PTAI score were associated risk factors for MSDs in the studied nursing staff.

  14. Nursing Workload and the Changing Health Care Environment: A Review of the Literature

    Neill, Denise

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the health care environment have impacted nursing workload, quality of care, and patient safety. Traditional nursing workload measures do not guarantee efficiency, nor do they adequately capture the complexity of nursing workload. Review of the literature indicates nurses perceive the quality of their work has diminished. Research has…

  15. [Child health nurse in prison, a unique experience].

    Girou, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    A child health nurse from the mother and infant welfare protection service describes her work in prisons, with women prisoners and their children. A unique experience in which professionalism and emotion go hand in hand. Indeed, while prison is a place of detention, it can also be a place of care and support. PMID:26573402

  16. Health Instruction Packages: Nursing--Specific Diseases and Disorders.

    Curran, Fern A.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of learning modules to instruct nurses and other health care professionals in the symptoms and treatment of common medical disorders. The first module, by Fern A. Curran, discusses the causes of decubitus ulcers (i.e., bedsores), the physical damage they can do, and methods of preventing…

  17. School Nurses and Health Education: The Classroom Experience

    Klein, Julie; Sendall, Marguerite C.; Fleming, Marylou; Lidstone, John; Domocol, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study is to explore school nurses' experience of health education. Design: A qualitative approach, phenomenology was used to answer the question. Method: Sixteen participants were recruited through purposeful and snowball sampling. Participants undertook an audio-recorded interview which was transcribed and analysed.…

  18. International School Children's Health Needs: School Nurses' Views in Europe

    Hansson, Annika; Clausson, Eva; Janlov, Ann-Christin

    2012-01-01

    Rapid globalization and the integration of national economies have contributed to the sharp rise in enrollment in international schools. How does this global nomadism affect international school children and their individual health needs? This study attempts to find an answer by interviewing 10 school nurses, with varying degrees of experience in…

  19. Perceptions of parents of handicapped children concerning nurses and the health care system as it affects them.

    Settle, W

    1992-01-01

    Because of the change in mandate for Home Care Programs across Alberta, new cases of children with handicaps are now being assessed by nurses. Social workers, through the Handicapped Children's Services program, have traditionally been the ones to assess these children. This is a very new area for nurses and there is much to learn. Even less is known about the parents' perspective in working with families in community. As both a nurse working in the community and a parent of a child with special needs I see many of the issues from two sides. This study seeks to find out more about parents' feelings and views regarding nursing and the health care system. This knowledge is helpful to nurses working with these families as they strive to understand, communicate and build a helping relationship. PMID:1387279

  20. Nursing personnel's views on oral health from a health promotion perspective: a grounded theory analysis.

    Paulsson, Gun; Söderfeldt, Björn; Nederfors, Tommy; Fridlund, Bengt

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a model for how nursing personnel view oral health in general and the oral health of the care receivers in particular, applying a health promotion perspective and using grounded theory analysis. Data were collected through interviews with 17 nursing personnel, selected by strategic sampling. Analysis of the transcribed interviews showed that there were four strategies, related to staff education, hospital resources, and leadership motivation. The strategies were grounded in data and emerged from the interaction between the two main categories: 'the valuation of the importance of oral health' and 'the behavior towards oral health maintenance'. They were characterized as the routine, theoretical, practical, and flexible strategies, with the latter considered ideal. As increased knowledge is one important part in enhancing the nursing personnel's ability to perform oral hygiene procedures, there is a need for education among nursing personnel, primarily among those using a routine strategy. PMID:11902612

  1. Using service-learning to develop health promotion and research skills in nursing students.

    Reising, Deanna L; Shea, Roberta A; Allen, Patricia N; Laux, Marcia M; Hensel, Desiree; Watts, Patricia A

    2008-01-01

    Health promotion skills are a key component of most nursing education programs. While many curricula center around a singular health promotion project contained in one course, this nursing program saw the opportunity to use service-learning as a vehicle for developing a range of both health promotion and research skills. This report details a service-learning research program involving second and third year nursing students. Students conducted a community needs assessment, and designed, implemented, and evaluated health promotion programs that were developed as a result of the community needs assessment. Students collected data on the effectiveness of their programs through pre- and post-test design. Once in their statistics and research courses, students analyzed the data and prepared the data for presentation, developing their research skills. Results from the community on pre- and post-tests indicated significant gains in knowledge regarding hypertension and diabetes risk factors, prevention strategies, and intent to change behavior. Student outcome data was also collected and showed students perceived they had increases in the following skill sets: health promotion, assessment, civic engagement, and research. PMID:18673297

  2. Computerized Management Information System in a Community Health Nursing Agency

    Simmons, DeLanne A.

    1981-01-01

    The Visiting Nurse Association of Omaha is a nonprofit, voluntary agency providing home health care, preventive care, clinical services, and school health services in an urban-rural setting. It has developed a computerized system which provides for: (1) centralized dictation by service delivery staff; (2) the printing of a uniform clinical, family problem-oriented record; (3) an integrated data base, statistical system, and financial system; and (4) the communication capability to remote stat...

  3. Registered Nurses' Experiences With Individuals With Low Health Literacy: A Qualitative Descriptive Study.

    Toronto, Coleen E; Weatherford, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The nursing profession is charged to provide effective communication and education to patients. A qualitative descriptive study that explored what nurses experience when interacting with patients thought to possess low health literacy was performed. Findings suggest that nurses are promoting health literacy using several evidence-based strategies. Major barriers encountered by nurses were limited cultural and linguistic resources within their healthcare organizations. This study provides nursing professional development specialists information about the educational gaps of nurses in practice related to health literacy and the identification of systems barriers. PMID:26797300

  4. Latent or Manifest Observers: Two Dichotomous Approaches of Surveillance in Mental Health Nursing

    Henrik Eriksson; Martin Salzmann-Erikson

    2011-01-01

    Background. Surveillance is a central activity among mental health nursing, but it is also questioned for its therapeutic value and considered to be custodial. Aim. The aim of this study was to describe how mental health nurses use different approaches to observe patients in relation to the practice of surveillance in psychiatric nursing care. Methods. In this study, Spradley's twelve-step ethnographic method was used. Results. Mental health nurses use their cultural knowing to observe patien...

  5. Public Health and Nursing: A Natural Partnership

    Joan Kub; Christine Savage

    2009-01-01

    The health of individuals occurs within the context of their environment and the other individuals they interact with in the communities they live in, work in and visit. Promoting the health of the public requires multiple strategies aimed at improving the environment, the health knowledge of groups and individuals, maintaining adequate food and water, and reducing the spread of disease. Many disciplines are needed to meet these goals, but the largest segment of the professional health work f...

  6. Assessment of nurses' work climate at Alexandria Main University Hospital.

    Emam, Sanaa Abdel-aziz; Nabawy, Zeinab Mohamed; Mohamed, Azzaa Hassan; Sbeira, Walaa Hashem

    2005-01-01

    Work climate is indicative of how well the organization is realizing its full potential. An accurate assessment of work climate can identify the unnecessary obstacles to nurses interfering with their best performance. The present study aims to assess nurses' work climate at Alexandria Main University Hospital. The study sample included all nurses (N=400) who were working in inpatient medical and surgical units at the Alexandria Main University Hospital who were available at the time of data collection. A structured questionnaire was developed to assess nurses' perceptions regarding the dimensions of work climate. Data was collected by individual interview using the structured questionnaire. Results indicated that the highest percentages of nurses in medical and surgical units perceived that their work climate is characterized by good way of performance management, feeling of responsibility, warmth and supportive relationships, quality of communication, morale, organizational clarity and feeling of identity and belongness to the hospital. Nurses perceived that they are lacking work climate conducive to conflict resolution, participation in decision making, opportunity for training and development, fair rewards and recognition, calculated risks, sufficient resources, effective leadership and teamwork. There were no significant difference between nurses perceptions in medical and surgical units regarding all dimensions of work climate. The highest percentage of nurses in all units were satisfied only with the feeling of responsibility, way of performance management, and quality of communication. Conflict and identity were perceived as the most important areas that need improvement in the hospital. Based on the results recommendations were given to enhance work climate through designing compensation and recognition systems, and negotiate their requirements and accomplishment based on established standards and outcomes measures. Also, encouragement of and planning for participative decision making, teamwork, in-service training program and open communication are recommended to be present in the work units. PMID:16922154

  7. The role of the nurse on health promotion and health maintenance of adolescents

    Gülümser

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Nurses have an indispensable role in maintenance and promotion of adolescens’ health. Nurses must know the basic principles of appropriate approach to adolescents, should be able to guide the adolescent and family in the promotion and maintenance of health. In this article, general observation principles of adolescent and family, the appropriate nursing approach to the major adolescent health issues, how to evaluate gathered data about adolescent’s such as nutrition, physical activity, mental health and, development and growth, the properties of therapeutic communication with adolescent and family, physical activity to be integrated into the life of the adolescent and family, nursing approach to illness and accident prevention has been handled. (Turk Arch Ped 2011; 46 Suppl: 4-8

  8. Occupational stress among staff nurses: Controlling the risk to health

    Parul Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing has been identified as an occupation that has high levels of stress. Job stress brought about hazardous impacts not only on nurses′ health but also on their abilities to cope with job demands. Objectives: This study aimed at finding out the degree of work-related stress among the staff nurses and various determinants, which have a impact on it. Materials and Methods: Institutional-based cross-sectional study conducted on GNM qualified nurses. Predesigned and pre-tested questionnaire covering their sociodemographic variables in part I and professional life stress scale by David Fontana in part II. Analysis used was Chi-square test and logistic regression for various factors. Results: Risk for professional stress due to poor and satisfactory doctor′s attitude was found about 3 and 4 times more than with excellent attitude of doctors toward the staff nurses. A statistically significant association (P < 0.024 between department of posting and level of stress. Nurses reported that they had no time for rest, of whom 42% were suffering from moderate-to-severe stress. The nurses who felt that the job was not tiring were found to be less stressed as those who perceived job as tiring (OR = 0.43. Conclusion: The main nurses′ occupational stressors were poor doctor′s attitude, posting in busy departments (emergency/ICU, inadequate pay, too much work, and so on. Thus, hospital managers should initiate strategies to reduce the amount of occupational stress and should provide more support to the nurses to deal with the stress.

  9. The process of formation of mental health for nurses in primary health care

    Hilton Giovani Neves

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was based on descriptive, exploratory and qualitative approach and aimed at analyzing scientific knowledge that was developed in the formation of Family Health (FH nurses to address Mental Health in Primary Care regarding psychosocial aspects. Research conducted in 2008 with three teams of FH nurses a municipality in the countryside of Mato Grosso, whose data were submitted to content analysis. The results were organized according to two themes "The limitations of official spaces for the training of nurses" and "The Family Health as well as the transformation praxis in Mental Health ". It was concluded that the official spaces mentioned above do not give too much importance to education on mental health, the same occurs in the context of lifelong learning. Despite the limited provision of skills for Mental Health care, we have found significant changes such as the sensitization to emotional and psychological manifestations of the population with higher awareness of health.

  10. Identifying the Gaps: An Assessment of Nurses' Training, Competency, and Practice in HIV Care and Treatment in Kenya.

    Smith, Janel; Odera, Doris N; Chege, Duncan; Muigai, Esther N; Patnaik, Padmaja; Michaels-Strasser, Susan; Howard, Andrea A; Yu-Shears, Janette; Dohrn, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Given the burden of HIV and the critical shortage of health workers in Kenya, in 2011 the National AIDS and STI Control Program recommended shifting HIV care and treatment tasks to nurses in settings without physicians and clinical officers in order to decentralize and scale-up HIV services. In September 2013, ICAP at Columbia University conducted a survey with nurses in four health facilities in eastern Kenya to assess preparedness for task shifting. Findings indicated gaps in nurses' training, perceived competency, and practice in HIV care and treatment. Further investment in nurse capacity building is needed to bridge the gaps and prepare more nurses to provide high-quality, comprehensive HIV care and treatment services to curb the epidemic in Kenya. PMID:27086191

  11. Collaborative learning and competence development in school health nursing

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Wistoft, Karen

    2012-01-01

    nurses’ qualify a) their learning and ability to reflect on practice b) their communication with colleagues and children c) the development of new and innovative approaches to school health nursing. The introduction of peer collaboration, however, takes time and energy and it can be challenge to...... activities for SNs and possible learning outcomes for practice. Specifically the paper looks into different ways SNs collaborate and the findings contribute to new understandings of how SNs practice can be organised in order to stimulate the nurses’ participation and collaborative learning and increase the......Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the process and learning outcomes of peer collaboration in a Danish health developmental project in school health nursing. The paper explores how peer collaboration influences the school nurses’ collaborative learning and competence development...

  12. Assessment of nursing care using indicators generated by software

    Ana Paula Souza Lima

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze the efficacy of the Nursing Process in an Intensive Care Unit using indicators generated by software. METHOD: cross-sectional study using data collected for four months. RNs and students daily registered patients, took history (at admission, performed physical assessments, and established nursing diagnoses, nursing plans/prescriptions, and assessed care delivered to 17 patients using software. Indicators concerning the incidence and prevalence of nursing diagnoses, rate of effectiveness, risk diagnoses, and rate of effective prevention of complications were computed. RESULTS: the Risk for imbalanced body temperature was the most frequent diagnosis (23.53%, while the least frequent was Risk for constipation (0%. The Risk for Impaired skin integrity was prevalent in 100% of the patients, while Risk for acute confusion was the least prevalent (11.76%. Risk for constipation and Risk for impaired skin integrity obtained a rate of risk diagnostic effectiveness of 100%. The rate of effective prevention of acute confusion and falls was 100%. CONCLUSION: the efficacy of the Nursing Process using indicators was analyzed because these indicators reveal how nurses have identified patients' risks and conditions, and planned care in a systematized manner.

  13. Mentorship part 2: assessing pre-registration student nurses.

    Vinales, James Jude

    The role of the mentor has been evolving since it was introduced following Project 2000 in 1986. The role that mentors of pre-registration nursing students are tasked with on a daily basis is crucial to the overall assessment of the student nurse. Assessment and the importance of the mentor's role when assessing the students in practice will be discussed in this article. The reliability and validity of assessment and the mentor's responsibility in assessing the competencies in the learning environment is explored, together with the roles of formative and summative assessment. The introduction of the sign-off mentor and the ongoing achievement record as part of the assessment process will also be explored. It can be argued that mentoring is not a simple task, and that there are a number of barriers to successful assessment. PMID:25679249

  14. From iron gaze to nursing care: mental health nursing in the era of panopticism.

    Holmes, D

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to question the utilization of mechanical devices (cameras and microphones) to ensure the surveillance of hospitalized patients on psychiatric wards. The works of French philosopher, Michel Foucault, and those of nursing theorist, Jean Watson, are used to support this analysis. A growing number of Canadian psychiatric health care institutions are using mechanical devices for surveillance. The security of staff and patients as well as therapeutic purposes are stated as rationale for these practices. However, a Foucauldian perspective leads us to think otherwise. The metaphor of the panopticon is then used to uncover another reality: a disciplinary one. Within the scope of this paper, the question of surveillance, disciplinary power, caring philosophy, and mental health nursing will be examined. PMID:11879489

  15. Community nursing towards primary health care

    R. Bergman

    1984-09-01

    Full Text Available Community health practice in various forms has been recorded for over 5 000 years (Anderson, 1969. The ancient Egyptians developed a community system for water supply and sewage disposal. The Hebrews focused on the promotion of health through the Mosaic code which regulated personal hygiene, food, sanitation, maternal health, and more. The Greeks (500-100 BC emphasised values of personal hygiene and exercise. The Romans (100 BC - 500 AD, on the other hand, were concerned with the State rather that the individual and set public health measures in relation to building regulations, water supply and community sanitation.

  16. Is there scope for community health nurses to address lifestyle risk factors? the community nursing SNAP trial

    Chan Bibiana C; Laws Rachel A; Williams Anna M; Davies Gawaine; Fanaian Mahnaz; Harris Mark F

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background This paper examines the opportunity and need for lifestyle interventions for patients attending generalist community nursing services in Australia. This will help determine the scope for risk factor management within community health care by generalist community nurses (GCNs). Methods This was a quasi-experimental study conducted in four generalist community nursing services in NSW, Australia. Prior to service contacts, clients were offered a computer-assisted telephone in...

  17. Nurse Educators' Knowledge of Primary Health Care: Implications for Community-Based Education, Practice, and Research.

    Shoultz, Jan; Amundson, Mary Jane

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 177 nurse educators indicates they have more knowledge of primary health care than hypothesized; those with work experience beyond acute care have more knowledge. Nurse educators must be prepared to revise nursing curricula and teaching strategies in terms of community-based primary-health-care knowledge and skills. (JOW)

  18. The role of the registered nurse in an acute mental health inpatient setting in New Zealand: perceptions versus reality.

    Fourie, Willem J; McDonald, Stuart; Connor, John; Bartlett, Steve

    2005-06-01

    Following the closure of the large psychiatric institutions in New Zealand, there is an increasing demand for limited beds in acute inpatient facilities for acutely mentally ill patients. This change in location and downsizing of acute inpatient beds has challenged traditional roles of mental health nursing, resulting in confusion over what roles mental health nurses should now perform in the new context of care. This study compared the perceptions that registered psychiatric nurses have of their roles with their actual practice. This qualitative descriptive exploratory study observed nursing practice on three selected wards and used focus group interviews to establish from registered nurses what they perceived their roles to be. A key finding of this study was that many of the nursing roles related to delivering care from a crisis management perspective, which covers aspects such as assessment, stabilization of symptoms and discharge planning. Participants also believed that the therapeutic relationship was a fundamental role in inpatient care. Nurses used any opportunity to make it a reality such as kitchen organization, medications, or dealing with a challenging patient. This study highlighted the complexity of the roles that nurses performed and went some way to give voice to what at times seems an invisible practice. PMID:15896261

  19. The Use of Competency Models to Assess Leadership in Nursing

    Andreja Kvas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The efficiency of the health care system is significantly dependent on the appropriate leadership and guidance of employees. One of the most frequently used new approaches in human resources management is the study of competencies and competency models. The aim of this research is to develop a competency model for leaders in nursing, and to compare it with the leadership competency model for state administration.Methods: A survey was conducted among 141 nurse leaders in Slovenia. The respondents were asked to complete questionnaire with 95 leadership behaviours that form the leadership competency model for leaders in nursing. The data were analysed by ANOVA and Tukey's honestly significant differences test.Results: The levels of competencies set for themselves by leaders at the third leadership level in nursing (leaders of small units and teams are significantly lower than those set by all other leaders, both in nursing and in state administration. Statistically significant differences were apparent in the majority of areas.Conclusion: Within the context of the comparison of competency models, the greatest need for training can be observed at the third level of leadership in nursing. A comparison of models formulated in this way enables the exchange of good practices among leaders from various professional groups and easier identification of the training needs of individual groups of leaders in public administration. The proposed concept is designed to significantly simplify and unify the building of competency-based leadership models in public sector.

  20. Effectiveness of interactive discussion group in suicide risk assessment among general nurses in Taiwan: a randomized controlled trial.

    Wu, Chia-Yi; Lin, Yi-Yin; Yeh, Mei Chang; Huang, Lian-Hua; Chen, Shaw-Ji; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Lee, Ming-Been

    2014-11-01

    The evidence of suicide prevention training for nurses is scarce. Strategies to enhance general nurses' ability in suicide risk assessment are critical to develop effective training programs in general medical settings. This study was aimed to examine the effectiveness of an interactive discussion group in a suicide prevention training program for general nurses. In this randomized study with two groups of pre-post study design, the sample was recruited from the Medical, Surgical, and Emergency/Intensive Care Sectors of a 2000-bed general hospital via stratified randomization. Among the 111 nurses, 57 participants randomly assigned to the control group received a two-hour baseline suicide gatekeeper lecture, and 54 participants assigning to the experimental group received an additional five-hour group discussion about suicide risk assessment skills. Using a case vignette, the nurses discussed and assessed suicide risk factors specified in a 10-item Chinese SAD PERSONS Scale during a group discussion intervention. The findings revealed that the nurses achieved significant and consistent improvements of risk identification and assessment after the intervention without influencing their mental health status for assessing suicide risks. The result suggested an effective approach of interactive group discussion for facilitating critical thinking and learning suicide risk assessment skills among general nurses. PMID:24768204

  1. Psychiatric nursing as 'different' care: experience of Iranian mental health nurses in inpatient psychiatric wards.

    Zarea, K; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, A; Abbaszadeh, A; Mohammadpour, A

    2013-03-01

    Patients with mental illness require unique and specific care. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of nurses, who provide such care for mentally ill people, within the context of Iranian culture. This hermeneutic phenomenological study was carried out in a university-affiliated hospital in an urban area of Iran. We interviewed 10 mental health nurses to capture in detail their experiences in psychiatric units, and the approach developed by Diekelmann et al. was employed to analyse the data. Four themes and five sub-themes were identified: 'being engaged with patients' (sub-themes: 'struggle for monitor/control', 'safety/security concerns', 'supporting physiological and emotional needs'), 'being competent', 'altruistic care' and 'facing difficulties and challenges' (sub-themes: 'socio-cultural' and 'organizational challenges'). The results provide valuable insights and greater understanding of the professional experiences of psychiatric nurses in Iran, and indicate the need for a stable and responsible organizational structure for those nurses who are expected to manage patient care in psychiatric wards. PMID:22384949

  2. A call for change: perspectives on nurses' role in health care reform.

    Halcón, Linda

    2008-01-01

    A new generation of nurse activists must follow in the footsteps of nursing pioneers such as Florence Nightingale and Lillian Wald to facilitate health care systems that promote healthy populations. PMID:19090093

  3. A Study to Assess Knowledge and Attitude Regarding Hand Hygiene amongst Residents and Nursing Staff in a Tertiary Health Care Setting of Bhopal City

    Maheshwari, Veena; kaore, Navin Chandra M; Ramnani, Vijay Kumar; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Borle, Amod; Kaushal, Rituja

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infection due to hospital-acquired microbes is an evolving problem worldwide, and horizontal transmission of bacterial organism continues to cause a high nosocomial infection rate in health care settings. Most nosocomial infections are thought to be transmitted by the hands of health care workers.The application of hand hygiene is effective in reducing infection rates.

  4. Relationship between nursing care quality, nurse staffing, nurse job satisfaction, nurse practice environment, and burnout: literature review

    Virya Koy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this literature review is to explore the relationship between nurse staffing, nurse job satisfaction, nurse practice environment, burnout, and nursing care quality through a consideration of what is meant by perceptions of nursing care quality. Different people define nursing care quality in many ways. It is complex, multi-faceted and multi-dimensional, and attempts to assess, monitor, evaluate and improve nursing care quality have evolved over a number of years. Of particular interest is the way in which changes in nurse staffing, nurse job satisfaction, nurse practice environment, and burnout may affect the quality of nursing care delivery. A search was conducted using the CINAHL, Medline and Embase databases, HINARI, Science Direct, Google, and PubMed. The terms searched included quality of health care; nursing care quality; nurse job satisfaction; nurse practice environment; burnout; and nurse staffing. Papers were included for their relevance to the field of enquiry. The original search was conducted in 2003 and updated in 2004. Quality of care is a complex, multi-dimensional concept, which presents researchers with a challenge when attempting to evaluate it. Many different tools have assessed nursing care quality. In addition, the review found that there were relationships between nurse staffing, nurse job satisfaction, nurse practice environment, burnout, and nursing care quality. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(8.000: 1825-1831

  5. Health problems of nursing workers in a public educational institution

    Carolina Luiza Bernardes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the issues occurred with nursing workers through a Health Monitoring System for Nursing Workers (SIMOSTE and to describe the consequences of those problems. Method: This is a quantitative, exploratory and descriptive study realized in a teaching hospital in the west region of the city of São Paulo. Results: From the SIMOSTE, 1.847 occurrences were registered in a six month period. Within the main occurrences, medical licenses, work related accidents with and without removals; psychiatric consultations and psychotherapy were highlighted. Conclusion: The data points out to the need for the development of new health vigilance actions to notify accidents and illness related to work, besides the prevention of issues.

  6. Assessment of knowledge about childhood autism among paediatric and psychiatric nurses in Ebonyi state, Nigeria

    Achor Justin U

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing public and professional awareness of autism spectrum disorders with early recognition, diagnosis and interventions that are known to improve prognosis. Poor knowledge about childhood autism among paediatric and psychiatric nurses who are members of multidisciplinary teams that care for such children may be a major barrier to early interventions that could improve quality of life and prognosis in childhood autism. Factors that influence knowledge about childhood autism among these nurses are not known. This study assessed knowledge about childhood autism among paediatric and psychiatric nurses in Ebonyi state, Nigeria and determined the factors that could be influencing such knowledge. Methods Forty specialist paediatric and forty psychiatric nurses, making a total sample of eighty, were randomly selected from all the health care facilities in Ebonyi state, Nigeria. A socio-demographic questionnaire and knowledge about childhood autism among health workers (KCAHW questionnaire were administered to them and the study was a point survey. Results The total mean score on the KCAHW questionnaire among the nurses that participated in the study was 12.56 ± 3.23 out of a total of 19 possible. The mean score for the paediatric nurses was 11.78 ± 3.64 while psychiatric nurses had mean score of 13.35 ± 2.58. The mean scores in Domain 1 were 6.17 ± 1.75 for the paediatric nurses and 6.52 ± 1.43 for the psychiatric nurses. The mean scores in Domain 2 were 0.65 ± 0.48 for the paediatric nurses and 0.80 ± 0.41 for the psychiatric nurses. Domain 3 showed mean scores of 1.97 ± 1.25 for the paediatric nurses while psychiatric nurses scored 2.62 ± 1.23. Domain 4 yielded the mean scores of 2.97 ± 1.54 and 3.42 ± 0.98 for the paediatric and psychiatric nurses respectively. There was significant relationship between the total mean score on the KCAHW questionnaire for the two groups and the area of specialisation of the nurses (t = -2.23, df = 78, p = 0.03 and there was also significant relationship between previous involvement in managing children with childhood autism as a specialist paediatric or psychiatric nurse and the total mean score on the KCAHW questionnaire (t = 6.90, df = 78, p = 0.00. Conclusion The scores reflect deficits in knowledge about childhood autism among the study cohorts. Paediatric and psychiatric nurses as members of multidisciplinary teams that care for children with childhood autism are expected to provide holistic care and adequate counselling to the families of these children. Unfortunately in this environment, they are not fully equipped with enough knowledge about childhood autism. Education on childhood autism is therefore needed and can be provided through continuing medical education and emphasizing childhood autism in their training curriculum. This will enhance early identification and diagnosis of childhood autism with early interventions that are known to improve prognosis.

  7. Designing of Electronic Health Record Software in the Nursing and Midwifery Faculty of Tabriz

    Vahid Azizi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: much effort was conducted to support the use of electronic record systems in nursing process. Some of the most important reasons for its application are efficiency, security and the quality of the patients’ data registration. The purpose of this study is to present electronic registration software of patients, health assessment and to determine the attitude of nurses towards it. Methods: this is a R&D leading to construction of the patient’s health assessment software. In the beginning, Gordon Model and the daily charts of the patients were prepared to paper. During the next 8 months these charts were converted into the software programs. The databases were implemented using “the SQL server” and “C#Net” programming language. Results: the software used in this study included 4 parts; the first one contained information of Gordon health assessment model in 11 items, the second contained charts of the study, the third part consisted of Lund-Browder table and dummy data table for 4 age groups, and the fourth one was image infor-mation storage part for burn wounds pictures. Conclusion: despite barriers, electronic systems could lead to confidential information, increase the quality of nursing records, and also reduce the amount of expenses.

  8. Enhancing Nurses' Pain Assessment to Improve Patient Satisfaction.

    Schroeder, Diana L; Hoffman, Leslie A; Fioravanti, Marie; Medley, Deborah Poskus; Zullo, Thomas G; Tuite, Patricia K

    2016-01-01

    Patient satisfaction with pain management has increasing importance with Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores tied to reimbursement. Previous studies indicate patient satisfaction is influenced by staff interactions. This single-group pre/post design study aimed to improve satisfaction with pain management in older adults undergoing total joint replacement. This was a single-group pre-/posttest design. Nurse (knowledge assessment) and patient (American Pain Society Patient Outcomes Questionnaire Revised [APS-POQ-R], HCAHPS) responses evaluated pre- and postimplementation of the online educational program. Nurse focus group followed intervention. Nurses' knowledge improved significantly (p change. Focus group comments indicated need for education regarding linkages between pain management and patient satisfaction. Education on linkages between patient satisfaction and pain management can improve outcomes; education on strategies to further improve practice may enhance ability to achieve benchmarks. PMID:27028687

  9. Investigation of health anxiety and its related factors in nursing students

    Zhang Y

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Yuqun Zhang,1,2 Yueqiu Zhao,3 Shengqin Mao,1 Guohong Li,4 Yonggui Yuan1 1Department of Psychosomatics and Psychiatry, Affiliated Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 2Nursing Faculty of Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 3Nanjing Health School, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 4Nursing Department, Affiliated Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Objective: To explore health anxiety in a sample of nursing students to determine the relationships between health anxiety and life satisfaction, personality, and alexithymia.Methods: Two thousand and eighty-six nursing students in junior college, which were divided into five groups, were evaluated by questionnaires, including the Life Satisfaction Scales Applicable to College Students, the Chinese version of the Short Health Anxiety Inventory, the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20, and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Results: The mean age, whether the individual was an only child, residence (urban or rural, and were significantly different between the groups. The self-assessment scores were also significantly different between the groups. The Short Health Anxiety Inventory total score and the factor of fearing the likelihood of becoming ill were significantly negatively correlated with the Life Satisfaction Scales Applicable to College Students total score and its two factors, but were significantly positively correlated with psychoticism, neuroticism, and TAS-20 total scores and its scores of the three TAS-20 factors. The negative consequence scale of Short Health Anxiety Inventory was not significantly correlated with externally oriented thinking, but was significantly negatively correlated with extraversion. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicted that objective satisfaction, subjective satisfaction, neuroticism, and the three factors of TAS-20 were predictors of health anxiety.Conclusion: Health anxiety was correlated with life satisfaction, personality, and alexithymia in junior college nursing students. Subjective and objective satisfaction, neuroticism, and the identification and expression of emotions may be predictors of health anxiety in nursing students. Keywords: life satisfaction, personality, alexithymia

  10. Oral Health and Hygiene Content in Nursing Fundamentals Textbooks

    Jablonski, Rita A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the quantity and quality of oral hygiene content in a representative sample of before-licensure nursing fundamentals textbooks. Seven textbooks were examined. Quantity was operationalized as the actual page count and percentage of content devoted to oral health and hygiene. Quality of content was operationalized as congruency with best mouth care practices. Best mouth care practices included evidence-based and consensus-based practices as published pri...

  11. Can student mental health nurses be prepared for medicines management?

    Hemingway, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Aim This paper reports on an evaluation of the Medicines with Respect project, which implemented a stepped approach to education and training in medicines management (MM) for mental health nurses (MHNs). Method In the retrospective qualitative study, nine MHNs were interviewed to gain their perceptions of the MM training they received at university and to find out if it still had relevance. Results Content analysis of the interview data revealed that overall the participants ...

  12. The leadership exercise by a nurse in a context of labor organization in health and nursing: some considerations

    José Luís Guedes dos Santos, Rosângela Marion da Silva, Adelina Giacomelli Prochnow, Carmem Lúcia Colomé Beck, Maria de Lourdes Rodrigues Pedroso, Joséte Luzia Leite

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to reflect on nurse leadership in a health and nursing work organizational context, as well as to provide material for nurses and nursing students that aim to study and/or improve the exercise of leadership. Methods: a theoretical essay based on a bibliographical narrative review of books, papers, and dissertations; from which three axes of analysis and reflection have been built: searching for a leadership concept, potential development for the exercise of leadership and nurse leadership in the past, present, and future. Results: leadership is an important competence for the nurse in managing the work process and coordinating the activities involving health and nurse care. Thus, the exercise of leadership requires nurses to develop entrepreneurial postures based on the setting of teams, negotiation, power relations share, and exploring human motivation at work. Conclusion: the nurse must be sure of his/her leadership role and try to develop coherently and with a critical view on the reality before different contexts, valuing the multidimensionality of the human being that provides and receives care.

  13. Perceptions of student nurses regarding the delivery of quality nursing care in katutura health centre, Windhoek and khomas region

    Hans Justus Amukugo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to explore and describe the perceptions of nursing students regarding the delivery of quality nursing care in Katutuura Health Centre, Windhoek, and Khomas Region. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research designs were used in this study. An individual interview was conducted on ten (10 4th year nursing students at UNAM main campus with regard to the delivery of quality nursing care. The data showed that most students expressed shortage of staff, high number of patient attendance, insufficient equipment and insufficient time as factors that affect the delivery of quality nursing care. Possible interventions regarding resource management should be put into consideration, where extra nursing staffs needed to be trained and distributed among hospitals and clinics in Namibia.

  14. Becoming a mental health nurse; A three year longitudinal study

    Harvey Wells

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This longitudinal case series study explores how students’ conceptions of ‘mental health nursing’ changed whilst on a three-year pre-registration Mental Health Nursing programme. The study was carried out in two university nursing schools in the South East of England and this paper reports a detailed analysis of 6 individual case studies. The researchers utilised Novak’s approach to concept mapping to elicit students’ personal knowledge structures, which were explored further using semi-structured individual qualitative interviews. The maps were analysed by looking at their gross morphology to interpret changes over time into types of learning achieved and the associated interview data were analysed using thematic content analysis. Results from analysis of the map structures suggest that whilst four of the selected students learned deeply, one participant learned superficially and one appeared not to learn at all. The associated interview data provides an interesting insight into the students’ reflective narratives on the process of learning. The findings also demonstrate further evidence of the practicability of using Novakian concept maps to self-prompt qualitative research interviews. Implications for the professional education of Mental Health Nurses are discussed.

  15. Musculoskeletal Load Assessment in Hospital Nurses with Patient Transfer Activity

    Roghayeh Abedini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Manual patient handling is known to be the major source ofmusculoskeletal load among hospital nurses. The objectives of the present study were determination of frequency ofmusculoskeletal disorders (MSDs and its associatedfactors together with assessment of musculoskeletal loaddue to patient transfer by PTAI method in hospitalnursing staff of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, 400 randomlyselected nurses of SUMS hospital participated. Data were collected by anonymousdemographic and Nordic Musculoskeletal Disorders Questionnaires together with PTAI index checklist. Statistical analyses wereundertaken using SPSS, version 16. Age and job tenure means of participantswere 30.76±6.44 and 6.92±5.75 years, respectively. 88.2% of the nursing staffreported some forms of musculoskeletal symptoms during the 12 months prior tothe study. The results of PTAI index assessment demonstrated that in 4%, 8.5% and87.5% of the subjects, musculoskeletal load were at levels 1, 2 and 3,respectively. The results revealed that PTAI index score was significantlyassociated with musculoskeletal disorders occurrence (p<0.001.Musculoskeletal load was high among nurses with patient transfer activity. Age, nurse to bed ratio, marital status, shiftwork and PTAI score were associated risk factors for MSDs in the studiednursing staff.

  16. [Communication within the health care team: doctors and nurses].

    Kollár, János

    2016-04-01

    Proper communication within the health care team is especially important in terms of creating safe emotional and professional conditions for the team members and for quality healing. The aim of the study is to explore the factors that hinder appropriate communication between doctors and nurses and thus to make the effective elimination of the communication disturbances possible. Investigation in main medical databases and general search engines were used for analysing the phenomenon. It was revealed that communication between doctors and nurses is restrained by factors that can be observed on individual, professional and system levels as well. Role confusion, lack of trust, communication barriers arising from hierarchical inequalities, leadership problems, differences in qualifications, burnout and organizational problems can equally be found amongst them. The effectiveness of communication between nurses and doctors in Hungary is especially strongly influenced by the fear of losing jobs, the financial problems arising from different degree of gratuity and the phenomenon of burnout. Changes on individual, professional and system levels are equally important for significant improvement in the communication between doctors and nurses. Joint trainings based on strong organizational development skills and joint conferences could promote significantly better flow of information, mutual appreciation and harmonization. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(17), 659-663. PMID:27084439

  17. Health care technology assessment

    Goodman, Clifford

    1994-12-01

    The role of technology in the cost of health care is a primary issue in current debates concerning national health care reform. The broad scope of studies for understanding technological impacts is known as technology assessment. Technology policy makers can improve their decision making by becoming more aware, and taking greater advantage, of key trends in health care technology assessment (HCTA). HCTA is the systematic evaluation of the properties, impacts, and other attributes of health care technologies, including: technical performance; clinical safety and efficacy/effectiveness; cost-effectiveness and other economic attributes; appropriate circumstances/indications for use; and social, legal, ethical, and political impacts. The main purpose of HCTA is to inform technology-related policy making in health care. Among the important trends in HCTA are: (1) proliferation of HCTA groups in the public and private sectors; (2) higher standards for scientific evidence concerning technologies; (3) methodological development in cost analyses, health-related quality of life measurement, and consolidation of available scientific evidence (e.g., meta-analysis); (4) emphasis on improved data on how well technologies work in routine practice and for traditionally under-represented patient groups; (5) development of priority-setting methods; (6) greater reliance on medical informatics to support and disseminate HCTA findings.

  18. Social Media and Nurses: Insights for Promoting Health for Individual and Professional Use.

    Jackson, Jennifer; Fraser, Robert; Ash, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Social media use can have a significant impact on the health of nurses, both at the individual level and in the workplace. There are positive and negative consequences of social media use for nurses, including potential health consequences. This article provides a brief overview of social media and then explores nursing health and social media and risks for nurses. Social media use also extends to healthcare organizations; with implications for consumers of healthcare delivery. A variety of emerging best practices can guide social media use for nurses. The authors also discuss suggestions for using social media carefully, and future directions for research. PMID:26824150

  19. [Assessing the impact of the environment on human health].

    Locatelli, Marine

    2016-05-01

    In public health, nurses are concerned with the global health of populations. A recently qualified nurse, interested in this area of health, enhanced her skills with a master's degree specialising in the links between the environment and health. PMID:27155275

  20. Being-with, doing-with: a model of the nurse-client relationship in mental health nursing.

    Hanson, B; Taylor, M F

    2000-10-01

    The authors describe a model of the nurse-client relationship within mental health nursing. This is preceded by a consideration of the literature in reference to the efficacy of nursing models in terms of their use within mental health nursing. A statement of philosophical beliefs is the starting point from which the model is described. The terms 'Doing-With' and 'Being-With' form the nucleus of the nurse-client relationship model that is founded upon the philosophy of Martin Buber. Buber explicated a philosophy of human relationships founded on his concepts of the 'I-Thou' and 'I-It' relationships. Two examples of the model illustrate its principles in clinical practice. The authors draw upon the work of Fawcett to argue the limitations and potential for the future development of the model described. PMID:11933468

  1. Comparison of general health status and sleep quality between nurses with fixed working shifts and nurses with rotating working shifts

    Mahnaz Ghaljeh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses are vulnerable to various sleep disorders because of the nature of their job. If nurses do not experience a good general health, they will not be able to do their job (patient care well. Materials and Method: We conducted a descriptive-comparative study in 180 nurses that were selected with the stratified sampling method who have been working in different work shift hours in teaching hospitals. We used PSQI and GHQ-28 questionnaire for collecting data.Results: The study results showed a statistically significant difference in sleep quality and general health of nurses based on two questionnaires (p=0.01; p=0.05 respectively. Conclusion: According to our findings we suggest fixed working shifts versus rotating one for nurses to reduce the side effects

  2. Developing a manual for strengthening mental health nurses' clinical supervision

    Buus, Niels; Cassedy, Paul; Gonge, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report findings from a study aimed at developing the content and implementation of a manual for a research-based intervention on clinical supervision of mental health nursing staff. The intervention was designed to strengthen already existing supervision practices through...... educational preparation for supervision and systematic reflection on supervision. The intervention consists of three sessions and was implemented on two groups of mental health hospital staff. We present an outline of the manual and explain how the trial sessions made us adjust the preliminary manual. The...

  3. International survey of occupational health nurses' roles in multidisciplinary teamwork in occupational health services.

    Rogers, Bonnie; Kono, Keiko; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Peurala, Marjatta; Radford, Jennifer; Staun, Julie

    2014-07-01

    Access to occupational health services for primary prevention and control of work-related injuries and illnesses by the global workforce is limited (World Health Organization [WHO], 2013). From the WHO survey of 121 (61%) participating countries, only one-third of the responding countries provided occupational health services to more than 30% of their workers (2013). How services are provided in these countries is dependent on legal requirements and regulations, population, workforce characteristics, and culture, as well as an understanding of the impact of workplace hazards and worker health needs. Around the world, many occupational health services are provided by occupational health nurses independently or in collaboration with other disciplines' professionals. These services may be health protection, health promotion, or both, and are designed to reduce health risks, support productivity, improve workers' quality of life, and be cost-effective. Rantanen (2004) stated that basic occupational health services must increase rather than decline, especially as work becomes more complex; workforces become more dynamic and mobile, creating new models of work-places; and jobs become more precarious and temporary. To better understand occupational health services provided by occupational health nurses globally and how decisions are made to provide these services, this study examined the scope of services provided by a sample of participating occupational health nurses from various countries. PMID:25000546

  4. An empirical evaluation of the adequacy of self- assessed knowledge competency in a certified population of women's health care nurse practitioners

    Fran H. Byrd; Betty Burns; Barbara L. Grossklags

    2012-01-01

    Background: From a multitude of recognized sources which include the PEW Commission, the Institute of Medicine, and the Citizen Advocacy Center as well as from healthcare consumers in general, there has been a persistent call for change in the processes used to demonstrate ongoing competency of health care professionals after initial licensure or certification in their specialty. In response to such long-standing demands for accountability, the Board of Directors of the National Certification...

  5. Health care for the homeless: a partnership between a city and a school of nursing.

    Pennington, Karen; Coast, Mary Jo; Kroh, Maura

    2010-12-01

    Although there is extant research on the homeless, less is available suggesting an innovative community partnership such as Project HOPE. This partnership provided baccalaureate nursing students with greater understanding of underserved populations and health care delivery systems, and encouraged their future work with marginalized populations upon graduation. Students collected descriptive information on the homeless population. Correlations were found among site placement: age, clothing and supplies given, wound care, referrals given, assessments, and season of the year. Student evaluations revealed paradigm shifts in attitudes and inspired advocacy toward this population. Through the descriptive information and qualitative comments, we gained insight on demographics, conditions observed, and interventions offered, which provided direction for quality improvement in curriculum design for the Community Health Nursing course, direction for future student groups working in shelters and with street outreach workers, and information useful to strengthening partnerships with local organizations working with the homeless population. PMID:20954573

  6. Enabling professional development in mental health nursing: the role of clinical leadership.

    Ennis, G; Happell, B; Reid-Searl, K

    2015-10-01

    Clinical leadership is acknowledged as important to the nursing profession. While studies continue to identify its significance in contributing to positive outcomes for consumers, the role that clinical leadership has in enabling and supporting professional development in mental health nursing is poorly understood. This study utilized a grounded theory methodology to explore the characteristics clinicians consider important for clinical leadership and its significance for mental health nursing in day-to-day clinical practice. Individual face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with nurses working in mental health settings. Participants described the important role that clinical leaders play in enabling professional development of others through role modelling and clinical teaching. They describe how nurses, whom they perceive as clinical leaders, use role modelling and clinical teaching to influence the professional development of nursing staff and undergraduate nursing students. Attributes such as professionalism and honesty were seen, by participants, as enablers for clinical leaders in effectively and positively supporting the professional development of junior staff and undergraduate nurses in mental health nursing. This paper examines clinical leadership from the perspective of mental health nurses delivering care, and highlights the important role of clinical leaders in supporting professional development in mental health nursing. PMID:26010165

  7. Investing in Nurses is a Prerequisite for Ensuring Universal Health Coverage.

    Kurth, Ann E; Jacob, Sheena; Squires, Allison P; Sliney, Anne; Davis, Sheila; Stalls, Suzanne; Portillo, Carmen J

    2016-01-01

    Nurses and midwives constitute the majority of the global health workforce and the largest health care expenditure. Efficient production, successful deployment, and ongoing retention based on carefully constructed policies regarding the career opportunities of nurses, midwives, and other providers in health care systems are key to ensuring universal health coverage. Yet nurses are constrained by practice regulations, workplaces, and career ladder barriers from contributing to primary health care delivery. Evidence shows that quality HIV care, comparable to that of physicians, is provided by trained nurses and associate clinicians, but many African countries' health systems remain dependent on limited numbers of physicians and fail to meet the demand for treatment. The World Health Organization endorses task sharing to ensure universal health coverage in HIV and maternal health, which requires an investment in nursing education, retention, and professional growth opportunities. Exemplars from Haiti, Rwanda, Republic of Georgia, and multi-country efforts are described. PMID:27086193

  8. Rising to the challenge of health care reform with entrepreneurial and intrapreneurial nursing initiatives.

    Wilson, Anne; Whitaker, Nancy; Whitford, Deirdre

    2012-05-01

    Health reform worldwide is required due to the largely aging population, increase in chronic diseases, and rising costs. To meet these needs, nurses are being encouraged to practice to the full extent of their skills and take significant leadership roles in health policy, planning, and provision. This can involve entrepreneurial or intrapreneurial roles. Although nurses form the largest group of health professionals, they are frequently restricted in their scope of practice. Nurses can help to improve health services in a cost effective way, but to do so, they must be seen as equal partners in health service provision. This article provides a global perspective on evolving nursing roles for innovation in health care. A historical overview of entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship is offered. Included also is discussion of a social entrepreneurship approach for nursing, settings for nurse entre/intrapreneurship, and implications for research and practice. PMID:22686113

  9. Health Related Quality of Life in Elderly of Nursing Homes, Medellin-Colombia, 2012

    Jaiberth Antonio Cardona Arias

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elderly in Medellin present conditions of economic, social, environmental and gen-eral health vulnerability; in nursing homes shows further deterioration of health related quality of life (HRQOL. Objective: To compare the profile of HRQOL of adults over public and private nursing homes in Medellin. Materials and methods: Across-sectional correlational study in 220 elderly selected using probability sampling. WHOQOL-BREF was used and the clinical data of each individual. We assessed scale reliability using Cronbach’s alpha, internal consistency and discriminant validity using Pearson correlations, analyzes of HRQOL were based on summaries measures and frequencies, non-parametric and parametric tests and lineal regression. Results: We found 50 % hypertension, 23.6 % diabetes mellitus, dislipidemia 22.3 % and 15 % osteoporosis. The WHOQOL-BREF showed excellent reliability, internal consistency and discriminant validity, the best score was the psychological health and worst in social relationships. We found no differ¬ences in HRQOL by type of nursing home. The main factors related to HRQL were satisfaction with family support and participation in social groups. Conclusion: We identified some determinants of HRQOL, this demonstrated its multidimensionality; relevant information for further research and for the implementation of public health policies and clinical actions.

  10. Addressing Sexuality-Related Needs in Practice: Perspectives of Maternal/Child and Women's Health Nurses.

    Propst, Maureen G.; Phillips, Billie Rhea; Andrew, Michael E.

    2001-01-01

    A survey of sexuality-related nursing practices was completed by 130 maternal/child and women's health nurses. A disparity was found between their agreement on nurses' role in sexuality-related practices and their actual practice; 46.5% felt only somewhat knowledgeable about sexuality. (SK)

  11. Towards a Philosophy of Continuing Professional Education in Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting.

    Maggs, Christopher

    1996-01-01

    A belief system for continuing professional education in nursing, midwifery, and health visiting makes statements about nursing, its mission, and individual nurses. It provides principles to guide practitioners, the profession, and employers in meeting the commitment to society through education. (SK)

  12. "We inform the experience of health": perspectives on professionalism in nursing self-employment.

    Wall, Sarah

    2013-07-01

    Nursing work has evolved tremendously over the last century, raising ongoing questions about nursing's professional status. Through various strategies, professionalization in nursing has to some extent been accomplished, although autonomy over nursing practice has been elusive. This is especially so in the contemporary health care system, in which managerial control is emphasized and physician dominance continues. In response to professional constraints in traditional work settings, nursing self-employment is growing. In this study I used focused ethnography to explore the professional experiences of Canadian self-employed nurses and to reconsider nursing knowledge, ethics, and professionalism in this unique context. Despite the barriers they faced, these nurses offered a perspective on nursing professionalism that transcends classic professional traits, showing how the concept of professionalism can be invoked not as a way to "prove" status but as a way to describe a sense of commitment and the contribution to societal well-being. PMID:23653332

  13. Population-Focused Practice Competency Needs Among Public Health Nursing Leaders in Washington State.

    Espina, Christine R; Bekemeier, Betty; Storey-Kuyl, Marni

    2016-05-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Population-Focused Practice Competency Needs Among Public Health Nursing Leaders in Washington State," found on pages 212-219, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until April 30, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. OBJECTIVES Describe supports and barriers to adopting population-focused care in public health nursing practice. Describe the benefit of using practice models to assess staff readiness for adopting evidence-based guidelines or practice competencies. DISCLOSURE STATEMENT Neither the planners nor the authors have any conflicts of interest to disclose. Public health nurses (PHNs) need effective strategies to reduce health disparities, requiring a workforce that can practice with a population-focus across the continuum of care and with an ecological approach to health. A statewide leadership group of county-level PHN leaders in Washington assessed their training needs in population-focused knowledge and skills. Interview findings from 17 members were coded based on the Quad Council PHN Competencies. Recommendations were organized around the Push-Pull Infrastructure (PPI) practice model established to help bridge the practice-research gap. The PHN leaders in Washington State want to strengthen their own leadership skills and provide support to staff in transitioning to population-focused care. This article describes the assessment findings of PHN leaders' training needs using the PPI practice model and explores how the PPI might serve to develop evidence-based training for PHNs and local health department staff. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(5):212-219. PMID:27124075

  14. [Quality of nursing care and assessment: preliminary results of a study performed at the IRCCS "Giovanni Paolo II" Cancer Institute, Bari].

    Longo, Maria; Rinaldi, Michele; Pacifico, Caterina; Roppo, Nicola; Dodaro, Silvia; Lisco, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study performed was to test the quality and the appropriateness of nursing assessment in the light of the standards established by the American Nurses Association (ANA). For this purpose, we retrospectively reviewed our nursing documentation on a randomized sample of 300 patients (165 from the Clinical Oncology Division and 125 from the Women's Division of Cancer Institute , Bari). Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS vs 9. Data were analysed and compared with ANA standards. The results suggest that the collection of data regarding patients' health and demands is not systematic. A proposal to improve nursing data collection and assessment is therefore put forward. PMID:18462568

  15. Introducing Health Impact Assessment

    Mannheimer, L N; Gulis, G; Lehto, J; Ostlin, P

    2007-01-01

    health status of the population. There was a lack of multi-intersectoral knowledge, co-operation and function between sectors and actors. Enablers on the other hand were the membership of international organizations which called for new solutions, and the strong political commitment and belief that......BACKGROUND: Intersectoral Action for Health (IAH) and its Health Impact Assessment (HIA) tool are built on collaboration between actors and sectors, requiring multidimensional and horizontal way of working. The study aims to analyse the enablers and barriers when such a new way of working and tool...... have been initiated to replace a traditional, vertical operation at the local level in Slovakia-a country in transition-in 2004. METHODS: Up to date, there are few studies that have analysed intersectoral initiatives in relation to politics. In this study the conceptual framework of Kingdon has been...

  16. Scientific production on sexuality of elder women journals of nursing, public health and gerontology

    Beatriz de Carvalho Cavalheiro, Silvana Sidney Costa dos Santos

    2009-01-01

    Objective: to verify the scientific production on elder women, gender and sexuality in journals of Nursing, Public Health and Gerontology. Methods: a systematic review of literature, in journals of Nursing, Public Health and Gerontology in Brazil, in the years 2003 to 2007. Results: the 362 articles were pre-selected (111 in nursing, 95 in Public Health and 156 in Gerontology), of these, seven focus on elderly women, gender and sexuality. It was possible to understand that sexuality and gende...

  17. Role of Health Beliefs, Somatization Tendency and Mental Health on Low Back Pain among Nurses

    Farideh Sadeghian

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Low back pain is one of the widespread problems among nurses which can cause disability, absenteeism, work restriction, and negative economic impacts. This study aimed at determining the role of health beliefs, somatization tendency and mental health on back pain among nurses. Methods: The present research was a cross sectional study among 246 nursing personnel (all nurses and nurse aids working in Shahrood hospitals in 2008. CPUID questionnaire was used to collect data. Chi-square test, multiple logistic regressions and Mann Whitney test for analysis were performed. Results: The mean age of participants was 33.7 ± 0.2 yrs, and the mean work hours per day were 47.5 ± 8 hours. 69% of them had more than 5 years work experience. 59% (n=145 of the study population reported back pain in previous 12 months. Significant relationships were found between work experience, working with hands above shoulder height, Familiarity with people suffering from back pain outside of work environment, somatisation tendency, health beliefs P>0.05.Conclusion: Results indicated that in addition to physical work related risk factors, health beliefs and somatisation tendency can be risk factors for back pain which confirms results of similar studies in other countries.

  18. Navajo nation public health nurses inspire thoughts on health care reform.

    Douglas, Kathy S

    2012-01-01

    The wisdom and experience of pubic health nurses serving on a Navajo Reservation, who work far from the typical hospital setting, may well hold some of the keys to how we can successfully plan for and navigate the future of our shifting health care system. As more of the nursing workforce moves outside the walls of the hospital, competencies in autonomy, clinical judgment, decision making, and communication will increase in importance. long with safety and quality implications, this may also influence changes in nursing education, job requirements, hiring, and measuring performance. In addition, there may be implications around how new nurses are oriented and how they get the experience needed to function in more independent roles. Within their routine days, the conditions they work in, the situations they face, and the many ways public health nurses find to meet the needs of the people they serve, is a wealth of knowledge that may well translate into solutions for some of the challenges our nation's health care system is facing. PMID:22970554

  19. Work and health conditions of nursing staff in palliative care and hospices in Germany [Arbeitsbedingungen und Gesundheit von Pflegekräften auf Palliativstationen und stationären Hospizen in Deutschland

    Schröder, Christina; Bänsch, Alexander; Schröder, Harry

    2004-01-01

    [english] Aims of this representative study were to assess the relevant differences between the work and organisational characteristics as well as the subjective resources and health status of nurses occupied in hospice care, compared to nurses from palliative stations. Further, the assessment of the predictive correlations between the work situation of this nurses as a factor influencing their health and perceived strains was also a leading intention. Method: In a written survey conducted in...

  20. Multisite Assessment of Nursing Continuing Education Learning Needs Using an Electronic Tool.

    Winslow, Susan; Jackson, Stephanie; Cook, Lesley; Reed, Joanne Williams; Blakeney, Keshia; Zimbro, Kathie; Parker, Cindy

    2016-02-01

    A continued education needs assessment and associated education plan are required for organizations on the journey for American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet(®) designation. Leveraging technology to support the assessment and analysis of continuing education needs was a new venture for a 12-hospital regional health system. The purpose of this performance improvement project was to design and conduct an enhanced process to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of gathering data on nurses' preferences and increase nurse satisfaction with the learner assessment portion of the process. Educators trialed the use of a standardized approach via an electronic survey tool to replace the highly variable processes previously used. Educators were able to view graphical summary of responses by category and setting, which substantially decreased analysis and action planning time for education implementation plans at the system, site, or setting level. Based on these findings, specific continuing education action plans were drafted for each category and classification of nurses. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(2):75-81. PMID:26840239

  1. Master's Degree Nursing Education and Health Care Reform: Preparing for the Future.

    Long, Kathleen Ann

    1994-01-01

    Current and anticipated changes in health care require changes in master's-level nursing education, especially in preparation for health promotion, primary health care, and case management. Questions must be resolved about core knowledge, research preparation, and an appropriate title for advanced practice nurses. (SK)

  2. Knowledge of School Nurses in the U.K. regarding Sexual Health Education

    Westwood, Jo; Mullan, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    In the U.K., a current government health strategy indicates that school nurses should be key contributors to sexual health education because they have access to the school-age population. However, there appears to be little research that investigates whether school nurses are the most appropriate health care professionals or indeed have sufficient…

  3. Primary health-care nurses and Internet health information-seeking: Access, barriers and quality checks.

    Gilmour, Jean; Strong, Alison; Chan, Helen; Hanna, Sue; Huntington, Annette

    2016-02-01

    Online information is a critical resource for evidence-based practice and patient education. This study aimed to establish New Zealand nurses' access and evaluation of online health information in the primary care context using a postal questionnaire survey; there were 630 respondents from a random sample of 931 nurses. The majority of respondents were satisfied with work access to online information (84.5%, n = 501) and searched for online information at least several times a week (57.5%, n = 343). The major barrier to online information seeking was insufficient time, but 68 respondents had no work online information access. The level of nursing qualification was significantly correlated with computer confidence and information quality checking. A range of information evaluation approaches was used. Most nurses in study accessed and evaluated Internet information in contrast to the findings of earlier studies, but there were barriers preventing universal integration into practice. PMID:25355072

  4. The need to include obstetric nurses in prenatal care visits in the public health system

    Selma Aparecida Lagrosa Garcia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate, with a qualitative approach, the role of Obstetric Nurses at the primary level of care given to women’s health as a vital component of the multidisciplinary team, which today is fundamental for providing care, prevention as well as health education and promotion, especially in programs whose activities are geared towards primary care of pregnant, parturient, and puerpera women. Methods: Brazilian laws and the determinations of Nursing Councils in reference to the activities of the obstetric nurse were researched, including the nurse’s responsibilities and limits. The bibliographic search was conducted in health-related journals, lay publications, and the Internet. Results: The conflicts between professional physicians and nurses were discussed. Conclusions: It was concluded that the activities of the nurse, conducting low-risk prenatal clinical visits in the basic healthcare network, has legal and ethical support and provides true benefit to the clients.

  5. Training Needs Assessment for Leaders in Nursing Based on Comparison of Competency Models

    Kvas Andreja

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The main purpose behind the formation of leadership competency models must be the improvement of leadership. A competency model should serve as one of the tools for selecting the most suitable leaders, appraising their work, assessing training needs and preparing programmes of functional and formal education. The objective of this research is to assess the training needs of leaders in health care. A comparison of leadership competency models between different professional groups should serve as one of the tools with which to assess the training needs of various levels of leaders. Design/Methodology/Approach: A descriptive study using a survey design was conducted on 141 nurse leaders in Slovenia. Respondents indicated to what extent each of 95 different behaviours was characteristic of a person at their leadership level. Results: The most important competence dimensions (groups of behaviours for leaders in health care are (1 at the first - top leadership level: strategic thinking, openness to change and responsibility; (2 for leaders at the second - middle leadership level: relations with co-workers, animation, resistance to stress; and (3 for leaders at the third leadership level: realisation skills, execution of procedures, communication. Training needs assessments were done for three leadership levels in nursing care. Conclusions: The greatest need for training of nurse leaders can be observed at the third leadership level. Special training programmes should be organised in the competency areas of realisation skills, execution of procedures, communication, education and ethics

  6. ADHERENCIA DE LAS ENFERMERAS/OS A UTILIZAR UN MODELO TEÓRICO COMO BASE DE LA VALORACIÓN DE ENFERMERÍA ADHERENCE OF NURSES TOWARD USING A NURSING MODEL AS A GUIDELINE FOR NURSING ASSESSMENT

    JUAN REYES LUNA

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudio cuasiexperimental que describe la adherencia de enfermeras hospitalarias a utilizar un modelo teórico como base de la valoración de enfermería, medida por la actitud y conducta hacia: valoración de enfermería, planificación del cuidado, conocimiento de modelos teóricos e importancia a realizar la valoración de enfermería en base aun modelo teórico. Una vez que el grupo experimental se capacitó en relación a modelos y teorías de enfemería y participó activamente en la elaboración de un instrumento de valoración, la adherencia se midió a través de las escalas de Actitud y de Conducta en Salud de Miller, adaptadas por los autores, y por la evidencia escrita en los registros. Para el análisis de los datos se usó la diferencia en diferencia mediante t de Student. Los resultados muestran que la adherencia medida por la actitud fue aceptada con una asociación estadística significativa; en cambio la adherencia medida por la conducta, no mostró diferencias significativas, resultados que fueron respaldados por la evidencia en los registros de enfermería de sólo un 11% de adherencia. Se concluye que los profesionales de enfermería, en términos de conductas adherentes, no evidenciaron cambios significativos antes y después del tratamiento experimental, pero se obtuvieron resultados positivos en términos cognitivos, ya que manifestó una actitud adherente a trabajar con un modelo teórico lo que es muy positivo para la profesión y es, por tanto, la motivación necesaria para lograr los cambios en el nuevo marco de la gestión del cuidado en enfermeríaThis quasi-experimental research study describes the adherence of hospital nurses toward using a nursing model as a guideline for nursing assessment. Adherence was measured according to nurses' attitude and behavior toward nursing assessment, nursing care plan, nurses' knowledge of nursing models, and the significance of performing their nursing assessment based on a theoretical model. Once the experimental group received training about nursing theories and models and actively participated in constructing an assessment tool, adherence was measured according to the Miller's Health Attitude Scale and Miller's Behaviour Scale both revised and adapted by the authors. Evidence of adherence was also sought in nursing notes from patients'charts. For data analysis the t test difference in difference was used. Results showed that adherence measured by attitude was statistically significant. On the other hand, no significant differences were observed when adherence was measured according to the behaviour scale. These findings were supported by nurses' notes where little adherence was found. We conclude that in terms of adherence behaviour, nurses did not show significant changes after the initial training. Significant findings were found in terms of nurses' attitude toward working with a nursing model as they showed a tendency to adhere to a model in the attitude scale. The latter is very significant for the nursing profession and it motivates us to continue to enact the current nursing reform focused on nursing care management

  7. [Advanced nursing practice: a must for the quality of care and mental health services].

    Ricard, Nicole; Page, Claire; Laflamme, France

    2014-01-01

    New professional legislation and reorganization of mental health services have had a significant influence on mental health nursing practice. Many nurses have demonstrated clinical leadership and have been able to adapt their services to the needs of the population specially in the primary health care setting. However, many believe that the role of nurses is not sufficiently known and optimally utilized in mental health services. In this article we take a critical look at the mental health nursing practice in Quebec and at the essential requirements for its development. This review aims to: 1) describe current trends in the changing roles and the modernization of mental health nursing practice in Quebec, 2) provide an overview of the development of advanced nursing practice and its impact on the quality of mental health services; 3) clarify the concept of advanced nursing practice and position its development in Quebec and 4) propose various strategies for optimizing the role of nurses and their complementarity with other professionals providing mental health services. This review presents innovative practices developed by nurses in the context of the restructuring of mental health services. For example, new nursing roles have been developed to improve the collaboration with general practitioners groups in primary care settings and facilitate the evaluation and monitoring of patient presenting medical and psychological problems. Another interesting innovation was set up by nurses in developing a new service to allow timely access to integrated care for patients with substance abuse and mental health problems. The various testimonies reported in this article illustrate the potential contribution of these nursing innovations in improving the mental health services in Quebec. Also, in few countries, the reform of mental health services has been a good time to recognize this potential. Thus, some countries have repositioned the role of mental health nurses and supported the development of new models of advanced practice in mental health. These developments have been particularly significant in the United States and Australia. In United States, during the 1990s, at least four models of advanced practice in mental health nursing have been developed leading to wide variations in the roles, education, job titles, scope of practice and legal authorizations. Consequently, a consensus model of uniform standards of practice, accreditation and education has been proposed. This LACE model (Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, Education) will be in effect in 2015. Australia has adopted a more systematic approach, unified and progressive to facilitate the development of advanced mental health nursing practice. Australia who, through their many publications, retains more attention since a clear definition of the role of the nurse practitioner in mental health and a legal framework has been adopted at the national level. The Australian experience and the finding from studies suggest that mental health nurse practitioners and nurses who are specialized in mental health have the potential to make a significant contribution to enhancing access to and quality of mental health care through flexible an innovative approaches. So there are more and more evidence and indications that Quebec should invest in enhancing the skills of mental health nurses through the development of advanced nursing practice and integration of this new model in primary care. In addition, researches, funded by the Canadian Services Research Foundation (CHSRF, 2010), shows that the contribution of advanced nursing practice has never been stronger and there is a broad consensus to its value for the Canadian health care system (Dicenso.et Lukosius-Briant, 2010). The implementation of advanced practice nursing role in mental health is part of best practices required to improve care and mental health services and should be taken into account in future Action Plan 2014-2020. PMID:25120119

  8. Updating the definition and role of public health nursing to advance and guide the specialty.

    Bekemeier, Betty; Walker Linderman, Tessa; Kneipp, Shawn; Zahner, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    National changes in the context for public health services are influencing the nature of public health nursing practice. Despite this, the document that defines public health nursing as a specialty--The Definition and Role of Public Health Nursing--has remained in wide use since its publication in 1996 without a review or update. With support from the American Public Health Association (APHA) Public Health Nursing Section, a national Task Force, was formed in November 2012 to update the definition of public health nursing, using processes that reflected deliberative democratic principles. A yearlong process was employed that included a modified Delphi technique and various modes of engagement such as online discussion boards, questionnaires, and public comment to review. The resulting 2013 document consisted of a reaffirmation of the one-sentence 1996 definition, while updating supporting documentation to align with the current social, economic, political, and health care context. The 2013 document was strongly endorsed by vote of the APHA Public Health Nursing Section elected leadership. The 2013 definition and document affirm the relevance of a population-focused definition of public health nursing to complex systems addressed in current practice and articulate critical roles of public health nurses (PHN) in these settings. PMID:25284433

  9. Clinical reasoning in nursing, a think-aloud study using virtual patients - a base for an innovative assessment.

    Forsberg, Elenita; Ziegert, Kristina; Hult, HÃ¥kan; Fors, Uno

    2014-04-01

    In health-care education, it is important to assess the competencies that are essential for the professional role. To develop clinical reasoning skills is crucial for nursing practice and therefore an important learning outcome in nursing education programmes. Virtual patients (VPs) are interactive computer simulations of real-life clinical scenarios and have been suggested for use not only for learning, but also for assessment of clinical reasoning. The aim of this study was to investigate how experienced paediatric nurses reason regarding complex VP cases and how they make clinical decisions. The study was also aimed to give information about possible issues that should be assessed in clinical reasoning exams for post-graduate students in diploma specialist paediatric nursing education. The information from this study is believed to be of high value when developing scoring and grading models for a VP-based examination for the specialist diploma in paediatric nursing education. Using the think-aloud method, data were collected from 30 RNs working in Swedish paediatric departments, and child or school health-care centres. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. The results indicate that experienced nurses try to consolidate their hypotheses by seeing a pattern and judging the value of signs, symptoms, physical examinations, laboratory tests and radiology. They show high specific competence but earlier experience of similar cases was also of importance for the decision making. The nurses thought it was an innovative assessment focusing on clinical reasoning and clinical decision making. They thought it was an enjoyable way to be assessed and that all three main issues could be assessed using VPs. In conclusion, VPs seem to be a possible model for assessing the clinical reasoning process and clinical decision making, but how to score and grade such exams needs further research. PMID:23938093

  10. The journey of positioning self as both mental health nurse and qualitative researcher: a critical reflection.

    Brunero, S J; Jeon, Y H; Foster, K

    2015-09-01

    This paper discusses the development of a mental health nurse clinician to a mental health nurse researcher. Understanding the theoretical and professional drives that shape mental health nurses clinical practice and how that links to becoming a researcher is discussed. Mental health nurses who conduct research have to often move between their clinical roles and that of the researcher, doing this safely using a reflective supervision approach enables the nurse to conduct the research from a stronger professional and ethical standpoint. The intention of the paper is to encourage mental health nurses to engage in research and development. Shifting between the positions of a mental health nurse clinician and a qualitative researcher has some parallels to the processes in the nurse-service user relationship. This paper addresses this development from practitioner to researcher in one mental health nurse's journey through a PhD study using constructivist grounded theory. The paper examines theoretical and professional drives that have shaped my clinical practice and the role of the researcher in constructivist grounded theory, the notion of the researcher shifting between insider and outsider status, and the importance of reflexivity in conducting research. These influences will be discussed in the context of the development of a constructivist grounded theory study of the delivery of health care to service users with a mental illness in general hospital wards. PMID:26234189

  11. A Review of Design and Policy Interventions to Promote Nurses' Restorative Breaks in Health Care Workplaces.

    Nejati, Adeleh; Shepley, Mardelle; Rodiek, Susan

    2016-02-01

    The nursing profession in the United States is on the precipice of a crisis. Nurses are essential to the health care industry, and maintaining quality nursing care is a primary concern of today's health care managers. Health care facilities report high rates of staff burnout and turnover, and interest in the nursing profession among younger students is declining. Health care leaders must improve nurses' job satisfaction, performance, and retention. However, they often overlook the need for nurses' respite and underestimate the value of well-designed staff break areas. An exhaustive and systematic literature search was conducted in the summer of 2014, and all studies found on the topic were reviewed for their relevance and quality of evidence. The existing literature about the main causes of nurses' fatigue, barriers that prevent nurses from taking restorative breaks, and consequences of nurses' fatigue for staff, patient, and facility outcomes demonstrates the pressing need for interventions that improve nurses' working conditions. Additional literature on the restorative effects of breaks and the value of well-designed break areas indicates that efforts to improve breakroom design can play an important role in improving nurses' job satisfaction and performance. PMID:26814229

  12. An initiative to teach family systems nursing using online health-promoting conversations: A multi-methods evaluation

    Lindh R. Viveca; Persson V. Chatrin; Saveman Britt Inger; Englund Claire J; Idberger Karl; Östlund E.A. Ulrika

    2012-01-01

    Background: Family systems nursing embraces the view that one family member’s illness affects other family members and vice versa. Family nursing developed as a way for nurses to work with families to promote health. Previously, teachers performed most of the education on health-promoting conversations with families on campus. Because online education is increasingly requested in nursing, this article evaluates teaching family systems nursing by using synchronous online health-promoting conv...

  13. Enfermería como profesión Nursing assessed as a profession

    Mónica Burgos Moreno

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo pretende presentar a enfermería desde el concepto de profesión, con el propósito de argumentar si cumple con los criterios para ser considerada en propiedad como tal. Para ello es necesario considerar la evolución histórica del concepto profesión en enfermería, asociado a los cuidados de salud y la instrucción formal impartida a partir de Florence Nightingale. El análisis de enfermería como profesión es realizado según las características señaladas por Ellis y Hartley, las que consideran aspectos tales como; conocimientos, metodología, nivel educacional, autonomía, ética, contribución social y compensación. Se puede concluir que enfermería es una profesión joven, y que existen fundamentados elementos para argumentar, que se dispone de las herramientas necesarias para seguir desarrollándose.This article aims to introduce the concept of nursing as a profession in order to argue whether it meets the criteria to be considered as such. It is therefore necessary to take into account the historical evolution of the professional concept in nursing, which is associated with health care and the formal instruction that has been taught since the time of Florence Nightingale. Nursing as a profession is analyzed according to the characteristics identified by Ellis and Hartley, including issues such as: knowledge, methodology, education level, autonomy, ethics, social contribution, and compensation. It can be concluded that nursing is a young profession and there are grounds to argue that there are tools available to further develop this occupation.

  14. [Humanization in health care: knowledge disseminated in Brazilian nursing literature].

    Casate, Juliana Cristina; Corrêa, Adriana Katia

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative research aims to analyze the scientific production about "humane health care/nursing", understanding what views on humanization have been developing. A bibliographic survey was carried out, covering the period from the end of the 1950's until today, in the periodicals Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem, Revista Paulista de Hospitais and Texto e Contexto, examining 42 articles, which were then subject to analysis and integrative synthesis. The issue has been developing from a charitable perspective to the current preoccupation with the valuation of health as a civil right, inserted in a political health project. Articles from all decades reveal the need to invest in workers, valuing the subjective dimension. Nevertheless, humanization receives little attention in education. Care humanization supposes the meeting of subjects who share knowledge, power and experiences, implying political, administrative and subjective transformations. PMID:15761588

  15. Burnout in health-care professionals during reorganizations and downsizing. A cohort study in nurses

    Hall-Lord Marie-Louise

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burnout is a psychological reaction triggered by interaction between personal characteristics and stress factors. Reorganizations and downsizing with increased workload imply stress for health-care professionals. This is a study of burnout in nurses during a period with two comprehensive reorganizations. Methods In this quasi-experimental retrospective cohort study, burnout was assessed in nurses with long work experience in three surveys during a 30 months' period with two comprehensive reorganizations and downsizing of a hospital unit with mostly seriously ill patients with cancer. Burnout was measured with Bergen Burnout Indicator (BBI at each survey, and "Sense of Coherence" (SOC with Antonovsky's questionnaire at the last survey. Results One man and 45 women aged 30 to 65 years were invited to the surveys. There was a significant increase in burnout during the study period, the mean increase in BBI-score was 12.5 pr year (p Conclusions There was a significant development of burnout in a group of nurses during a period with two reorganizations and downsizing. Burnout was associated with low SOC. Working with seriously ill patients with cancer has probably made the nurses exceptionally vulnerable to the stress and workload related to the reorganizations.

  16. Gamification: An Innovative Teaching-Learning Strategy for the Digital Nursing Students in a Community Health Nursing Course.

    Day-Black, Crystal; Merrill, Earline B; Konzelman, Lois; Williams, Tammie T; Hart, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Serious games have "re-emerged" as innovative teaching-learning strategies that researchers have shown to be effective in improving student learning outcomes. "Serious games" refer to games that are driven by educational goals, not entertainment. The use of serious games as part of the teaching-learning experience in nursing education fits into the philosophy and strategies of active learning. The "digital" nursing student needs engagement, stimulation, realism, and entertainment not more readings and Powerpoint supplements in the classroom to support learning. Nursing faculty at a mid-Atlantic Historical Black College and University introduced "serious gaming" technology into a Community Health Nursing course by using two web-based gamed simulations, Outbreak at WatersEdge: A Public Health Discovery Game, and EnviroRisk. This innovation proved to be effective in reinforcing learning and improving student learning outcomes. PMID:26665503

  17. Use of Electronic Health-Related Datasets in Nursing and Health-Related Research.

    Al-Rawajfah, Omar M; Aloush, Sami; Hewitt, Jeanne Beauchamp

    2015-07-01

    Datasets of gigabyte size are common in medical sciences. There is increasing consensus that significant untapped knowledge lies hidden in these large datasets. This review article aims to discuss Electronic Health-Related Datasets (EHRDs) in terms of types, features, advantages, limitations, and possible use in nursing and health-related research. Major scientific databases, MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, and Scopus, were searched for studies or review articles regarding using EHRDs in research. A total number of 442 articles were located. After application of study inclusion criteria, 113 articles were included in the final review. EHRDs were categorized into Electronic Administrative Health-Related Datasets and Electronic Clinical Health-Related Datasets. Subcategories of each major category were identified. EHRDs are invaluable assets for nursing the health-related research. Advanced research skills such as using analytical softwares, advanced statistical procedures, dealing with missing data and missing variables will maximize the efficient utilization of EHRDs in research. PMID:25421544

  18. Work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses.

    Khamisa, Natasha; Oldenburg, Brian; Peltzer, Karl; Ilic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate). Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Staff issues are best associated with burnout as well as job satisfaction. Burnout explained the highest amount of variance in mental health of nurses. These are known to compromise productivity and performance, as well as affect the quality of patient care. Issues, such as security risks in the workplace, affect job satisfaction and health of nurses. Although this is more salient to developing contexts it is important in developing strategies and intervention programs towards improving nurse and patient related outcomes. PMID:25588157

  19. Work Related Stress, Burnout, Job Satisfaction and General Health of Nurses

    Khamisa, Natasha; Oldenburg, Brian; Peltzer, Karl; Ilic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate). Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Staff issues are best associated with burnout as well as job satisfaction. Burnout explained the highest amount of variance in mental health of nurses. These are known to compromise productivity and performance, as well as affect the quality of patient care. Issues, such as security risks in the workplace, affect job satisfaction and health of nurses. Although this is more salient to developing contexts it is important in developing strategies and intervention programs towards improving nurse and patient related outcomes. PMID:25588157

  20. Work Related Stress, Burnout, Job Satisfaction and General Health of Nurses

    Natasha Khamisa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate. Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Staff issues are best associated with burnout as well as job satisfaction. Burnout explained the highest amount of variance in mental health of nurses. These are known to compromise productivity and performance, as well as affect the quality of patient care. Issues, such as security risks in the workplace, affect job satisfaction and health of nurses. Although this is more salient to developing contexts it is important in developing strategies and intervention programs towards improving nurse and patient related outcomes.

  1. Physical therapy assessment and treatment protocol for nursing home residents.

    O'Neil, M B; Woodard, M; Sosa, V; Hunter, L; Mulrow, C D; Gerety, M B; Tuley, M

    1992-08-01

    This article describes a standard protocol for assessing physical function in elderly nursing home residents. Major physical dimensions that are measured with the protocol include range of motion, muscle force, muscle reflex activity, sensation, soft tissue status, balance/coordination, and posture. A practical, functionally prioritized treatment model based on the assessment is also presented. The standardized assessment and treatment plan may be useful to the physical therapist in (1) planning and prioritizing treatment, (2) identifying when goals have been met, (3) recognizing when there is a need for treatment plan modification, and (4) educating physical therapy students in applying problem-solving skills in their treatment sessions. PMID:1635944

  2. Validating the 'intervention wheel' in the context of Irish public health nursing.

    McDonald, Anne; Frazer, Kate; Duignan, Catriona; Healy, Marianne; Irving, Annette; Marteinsson, Patricia; Molloy, Brenda; McNicholas, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Illuminating the full range of nursing actions is a challenge for nurses globally; the invisibility of nursing and of public health nursing in particular is well documented. Visibility can be enhanced by identifying core functions of nursing and matching corresponding levels of interventions and outcomes. This is a priority for the contemporary Irish public health nursing (PHN) service. In the United States, public health nurses have developed an 'Intervention Wheel' naming public health interventions at community, systems and individual/family levels. This aimed to make visible the core functions of PHN practice. The values and beliefs underpinning the Intervention Wheel have been shown to capture the essence of public health nursing within the European context. In total, US nurses described 17 Wheel interventions by recording stories from practice. Owing to concern that the public health aspect of their role was not only invisible but was at risk of erosion, Irish PHNs decided to replicate this storytelling approach to provide evidence for and authenticate the 17 interventions on the Intervention Wheel from their day-to-day public health practice. PMID:25754782

  3. An explorative Delphi study to uncover knowledge, attitudes and skills for nurses using eHealth.

    Moerman, A.H.

    2014-01-01

    An explorative Delphi study to uncover knowledge, attitudes and skills for nurses using eHealth. Background: eHealth, the use of information and communication technologies for health is seen as an innovative solution. eHealth training has only been scarcely integrated into nursing education; students lack insight into the practice of eHealth. Objective: The aim of this study is to uncover what knowledge, attitudes and skills nurses need for the use of eHealth to community-dwelling pat...

  4. Nursing: the lost commodity in managed care or marketing health care agencies and the professional nursing shortage.

    Kosiba, MaryAnn; Tooker, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    It is essential for Hospital organizations today to have an in depth appreciation for Marketing strategies and practices when dealing with their patients. The most effective first line of defense and action to ensure the highest level of health care service and value for consumers are nurses. This article will explore the essential sophisticated business and marketing role that nurses can play to achieve patient satisfaction. PMID:12569993

  5. Emotional Intelligence: A Critical Evaluation of the Literature with Implications for Mental Health Nursing Leadership.

    Powell, Kimberly R; Mabry, Jennifer Lynn; Mixer, Sandra J

    2015-05-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is necessary for the development of interpersonal and professional competence in nurses. We argue that the concept of emotional intelligence has particular relevance for mental health nursing leadership. In this critique, we examine the recent empirical evidence (2010-2014) related to emotional intelligence, in general, and nursing, specifically. Correlations between emotional intelligence and better overall health, increased work satisfaction, higher spiritual well-being, and decreased risk of job burnout are noted. We offer suggestions for mental health nurse leaders in developing successful project management teams and improving retention of current leaders. We also provide suggestions for future research. PMID:26091240

  6. Work Related Stress, Burnout, Job Satisfaction and General Health of Nurses

    Natasha Khamisa; Brian Oldenburg; Karl Peltzer; Dragan Ilic

    2015-01-01

    Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate). Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was us...

  7. Decision-making competency, self-determination, and health lifestyle in nursing students

    BongSuk Lee; Ji-Su Kim

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study identifies and analyzes the levels of relations between decision-making competency, self-determination, and health lifestyle in nursing students. Methods: This study was designed as a descriptive research to identify the relations of nursing students’ decision-making competency, self-determination, and health lifestyle. The subjects were 187 nursing students. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and were analyzed by the IBM SPSS Statistics 19 program....

  8. Oncology nursing: Finding the balance in a changing health care system.

    Bakker, Debra; Fitch, Margaret I; Green, Esther; Butler, Lorna; Olson, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Health care restructuring has resulted in significant changes in the workload and work environment for oncology nurses. While recent studies describe the impact of these changes on the general nursing workforce in several countries, there have been no published studies that have focused on worklife issues of Canadian oncology nurses. Therefore, a qualitative study was conducted to gain insight about how oncology nursing has changed over the past decade and how Canadian oncology nurses are managing these changes. Analysis of telephone interviews with 51 practising oncology nurses employed across Canada revealed three major themes. The first theme, "health care milieu", portrayed a picture of the cancer care environment and patient and professional changes that occurred over the past decade. The second theme, "conflicting demands", reflects how the elements of change and social forces have challenged professional oncology nursing practice. The third theme, "finding the way", describes the patterns of behaviour that nurses used to manage the changing health care environment and make meaning out of nurses' work in cancer care. Overall, the findings portray a picture of Canadian oncology nurses in "survival mode". They face many workplace challenges, but are able to keep going "for now" because they find ways to balance their responsibilities on a daily basis and because they know and believe that their specialized nursing knowledge and skills make a difference in patient care. PMID:17036592

  9. Scaling up the global nursing health workforce: contributions of an international organization.

    Rukholm, Ellen E; Stamler, Lynnette Leeseberg; Talbot, Lise R; Bednash, Geraldine; Raines, Fay; Potempa, Kathleen; Nugent, Pauline; Clark, Dame Jill Macleod; Bernhauser, Sue; Parfitt, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    In this paper key highlights of the scholarly work presented at the Toronto 2008 Global Alliance for Nursing Education & Scholarship (GANES) conference are summarized, challenges opportunities and issues facing nursing education globally arising from the conference discourse are outlined and initial steps are suggested as a way forward to a shared global view of baccalaureate and graduate nursing education and scholarship. This shared view arises from beginning understandings of the issues and opportunities we face globally starting with and building upon the lessons learned from the literature and from the experiences of nursing educators and nursing education organization locally, regionally, nationally and internationally. The theme of the groundbreaking GANES Toronto conference was "Educating the future nursing and health workforce: A global challenge". One hundred seventy delegates from 17 countries attended the event, with over 80 papers presented. A primary focus of GANES is the contribution of a strategic alliance of national nursing education organizations to contribute to nursing education leading practices and policy that address the scaling up of global nursing and health workforce. The founding members of GANES see a clear link between a strong educational infrastructure and strong scholarship activities in nursing and the ability of a society to be healthy and prosperous. Evidence presented at the recent GANES conference supports that belief. Through the strength of partnerships and other capacity-building efforts, member countries can support each other to address the global nursing education and health challenges while respecting the local issues. PMID:19388426

  10. Determinants of the intention of elementary school nurses to adopt a redefined role in health promotion at school

    Godin Gaston

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quest for greater efficiency in the provision of primary healthcare services and the implementation of a "health-promoting school" approach encourage the optimal redefinition of the role of school nurses. School nurses are viewed as professionals who might be significant actors in the promotion of youth health. The aim of this study was to identify the determinants of the intention of elementary school nurses to adopt a new health-promotion role as a strategic option for the health-promoting school. Methods This study was based on an extended version of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB. A total of 251 respondents (response rate of 70% from 42 school health programs across the Province of Québec completed a mail survey regarding their intention to adopt the proposed health-promotion role. Multiple hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between key independent variables and intention. A discriminant analysis of the beliefs was performed to identify the main targets of action. Results A total of 73% of respondents expressed a positive intention to accept to play the proposed role. The main predictors were perceived behavioural control (β = 0.36, moral norm (β = 0.27, attitude (β = 0.24, and subjective norm (β = 0.21 (ps Conclusions Results suggest that leadership is a skill that should be addressed to increase the ability of school nurses to assume the proposed role. Findings also indicate that public health administrators need to ensure adequate nurse staffing in the schools in order to increase the proportion of nurses willing to play such a role and avoid burnout among these human resources.

  11. Economic Valuation of Health Care Services in Public Health Systems: A Study about Willingness to Pay (WTP) for Nursing Consultations

    Martín-Fernández, Jesús; del Cura-González, Mª Isabel; Rodríguez-Martínez, Gemma; Ariza-Cardiel, Gloria; Zamora, Javier; Gómez-Gascón, Tomás; Polentinos-Castro, Elena; Pérez-Rivas, Francisco Javier; Domínguez-Bidagor, Julia; Beamud-Lagos, Milagros; Tello-Bernabé, Mª Eugenia; Conde-López, Juan Francisco; Aguado-Arroyo, Óscar; Bayona, Mª Teresa Sanz-; Gil-Lacruz, Ana Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Background Identifying the economic value assigned by users to a particular health service is of principal interest in planning the service. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perception of economic value of nursing consultation in primary care (PC) by its users. Methods and Results Economic study using contingent valuation methodology. A total of 662 users of nursing consultation from 23 health centers were included. Data on demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, health needs, pattern of usage, and satisfaction with provided service were compiled. The validity of the response was evaluated by an explanatory mixed-effects multilevel model in order to assess the factors associated with the response according to the welfare theory. Response reliability was also evaluated. Subjects included in the study indicated an average Willingness to Pay (WTP) of €14.4 (CI 95%: €13.2–15.5; median €10) and an average Willingness to Accept [Compensation] (WTA) of €20.9 (CI 95%: €19.6–22.2; median €20). Average area income, personal income, consultation duration, home visit, and education level correlated with greater WTP. Women and older subjects showed lower WTP. Fixed parameters explained 8.41% of the residual variability, and response clustering in different health centers explained 4–6% of the total variability. The influence of income on WTP was different in each center. The responses for WTP and WTA in a subgroup of subjects were consistent when reassessed after 2 weeks (intraclass correlation coefficients 0.952 and 0.893, respectively). Conclusions The economic value of nursing services provided within PC in a public health system is clearly perceived by its user. The perception of this value is influenced by socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of the subjects and their environment, and by the unique characteristics of the evaluated service. The method of contingent valuation is useful for making explicit this perception of value of health services. PMID:23626858

  12. A review of research and nursing management of mental health problems in pregnancy and motherhood

    Jarosinski JM

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Judith M Jarosinski,1 Jane A Fox21Nursing Department, Henson School of Science, Salisbury University, Salisbury, MD, 2School of Nursing, College of Health and Human Services, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Wilmington, NC, USAAbstract: In this article, the authors explore the risks pregnant women experience due to mental illness and intimate partner violence (IPV and discuss the nursing role involved in the management of their care. For many women, pregnancy is a time of hopeful anticipation, yet for others, pregnancy reflects a new or an ongoing struggle with mental illness. The sequelae of untreated mental illness can be as severe as infanticide, maternal suicide, lack of maternal attachment, and inability to parent. Newborns whose mothers misuse alcohol and drugs are at risk of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and neonatal addiction syndrome. Women who live with IPV risk their physical and mental well-being as well as the safety of their newborn. Implications for practice include the use of assessment tools early and during the treatment trajectory; otherwise, mental illness and IPV in pregnancy would go undetected/untreated. Identifying postpartum depression early is key toward providing timely care for both the mother and infant; yet, few obstetric practices use a depression assessment tool such as the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. During the initial intake assessment, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale can provide the means of early treatment through targeted assessment. Further implications include specialized services for substance-misusing pregnant women whose issues are different and separate from those of men, integration of services to address their multifaceted needs, and educating nurses to the reality of comorbidity as the norm rather than the rare occurrence, with a truly holistic approach that diminishes stigma. Keywords: intimate partner violence, mental illness, pregnancy, serious mental illness, Women Abuse Screening Tool, depression, domestic violence, family violence, HITS

  13. The impact of Chinese cultural values on Taiwan nursing leadership styles: comparing the self-assessments of staff nurses and head nurses.

    Chang, Yuanmay

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of Chinese culture on nursing leadership behavior in Taiwan nurses. A descriptive study compared staff nurses' assessment of Chinese value in the leadership behavior of their head nurses. Data analysis was made on a convenience sample in Taiwan of 214 head nurses and 2,127 staff nurses who had worked with their head nurse for at least one year. Six medical centers and regional hospitals in northern (Taipei), central (Taichung) and southern (Kaohsiung) Taiwan were recruited for this study. Instruments included the demographic questionnaire, Chinese Value Survey, and Kang's Chinese Leadership Behaviors Module Scale. Results indicated that head nurses scored significantly higher than staff nurses in terms of all cultural values and leadership behaviors. Both staff nurses and head nurses scored the highest mean scores in personal integrity (Yi) and human connectedness (Ren) and the lowest in moral discipline (Li). Staff nurse perceptions of leadership behavior indicated the role of parent to be higher than either the role of director or mentor. Head nurses perceptions of leadership behavior emphasized the role of the director more than either parent or mentor. There were no significant differences between the staff nurses and head nurses in terms of expectative leadership behavior, which gave the role of director higher mean scores than those of either the parent or mentor. Positive and significant associations (r = .266 to r = .334) were found between cultural values and perceptions of leadership behavior. Cultural values predicted 10.6% of leadership behavior variance. The three demographic characteristics of location in northern Taiwan (beta = .09), intention to leave (beta = -.14), and general unit (beta = .10) and the two cultural values of human connectedness (Ren) (beta = .16) and personal integrity (Yi) (beta = .16) together reported a cumulative R2 of 14.6% to explain variance in leadership behavior perceptions. Results of this study identified the important cultural values "Ren" and "Yi". Managers and administrators could add the consideration of such cultural values into nursing leadership to enhance the organization in which Taiwan nurses work. PMID:18528817

  14. Health promotion and partnerships: collaboration of a community health management center, county health bureau, and university nursing program.

    Huang, Chih-Ling

    2002-06-01

    Effective partnerships were established between a community health management center, a county health bureau and a university nursing program. A health fair was undertaken to heighten public health awareness through the collaboration of these various agencies. In this research, formative, process, and summative evaluations were conducted to determine the benefits of partnerships. Elements evaluated included the planning process, health fair relevancy, integration of community resources, participants satisfaction and knowledge acquisition, and partnership satisfaction. The samples of this study included (1) 529 adult participants who completed the on-site evaluation questionnaires; (2) 1,090 child participants who returned gift-reward cards; (3) 114 partners who gave written feedback on their satisfaction; and (4) 57 third-year and 16 fourth-year undergraduate nursing student participants. Data was collected from the evidence report of the Department of Health, the project proposal, activity protocols, meeting records, the project final report, students term papers, and questionnaires. The chief administrator of the County Health Bureau was very impressed with the creative exhibits in the fair and, therefore, invited a coalition to continue further workshops. Seventeen educational exhibits, two dance programs and two drama programs related to health issues were demonstrated in the fair. Resources from community organizations were successfully integrated and allocated. Community participants expressed satisfaction with the fair and anticipated similar activities in the future. Participants revealed more than 80% accuracy in health knowledge quizzes. The senior nursing students highlighted their interaction with the community, community health nurses, and health volunteers. Community-based health promotion and nursing education can be successfully connected when various disciplines and sectors form effective partnerships. PMID:12119594

  15. Assessing Suicide Risk in Veterans: The Role of the Nurse Practitioner

    Kathy Puskar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Statistics have shown that veteran men and women are at greater risk for suicide than the general population. In order to decrease the incidence of suicide in veterans, nurse practitioners (NPs and other health care professionals must not only become more aware of the risk factors for veteran suicides but also develop strong psychiatric interviewing skills. Purpose: To discuss the risk factors associated with veteran suicide, the assessment tools to ensure a comprehensive suicide assessment and the application of these tools by an NP or other health care professional to a case study. Methods: Review of published literature on the topic. Conclusion: This paper will provide valuable information for NPs and other health care professionals when assessing for suicide risk in veterans.

  16. Global health diplomacy: an integrative review of the literature and implications for nursing.

    Hunter, Anita; Wilson, Lynda; Stanhope, Marcia; Hatcher, Barbara; Hattar, Marianne; Hilfinger Messias, Deanne K; Powell, Dorothy

    2013-01-01

    The increasing interconnectedness of the world and the factors that affect health lay the foundation for the evolving practice of global health diplomacy. There has been limited discussion in the nursing literature about the concept of global health diplomacy or the role of nurses in such initiatives. A discussion of this concept is presented here by the members of a Task Force on Global Health Diplomacy of the American Academy of Nursing Expert Panel on Global Nursing and Health (AAN EPGNH). The purpose of this article is to present an integrative review of literature on the concept of global health diplomacy and to identify implications of this emerging field for nursing education, practice, and research. The steps proposed by Whittemore and Knafl (2005) were adapted and applied to the integrative review of theoretical and descriptive articles about the concept of global health diplomacy. This review included an analysis of the historical background, definition, and challenges of global health diplomacy and suggestions about the preparation of global health diplomats. The article concludes with a discussion of implications for nursing practice, education, and research. The Task Force endorses the definition of global health diplomacy proposed by Adams, Novotny, and Leslie (2008) but recommends that further dialogue and research is necessary to identify opportunities and educational requirements for nurses to contribute to the emerging field of global health diplomacy. PMID:22999856

  17. Developing a comprehensive electronic health record to enhance nursing care coordination, use of technology, and research.

    Rantz, Marilyn J; Skubic, Marjorie; Alexander, Greg; Popescu, Mihail; Aud, Myra A; Wakefield, Bonnie J; Koopman, Richelle J; Miller, Steven J

    2010-01-01

    As in acute care, use of health information technology in long-term care holds promise for increased efficiency, better accuracy, reduced costs, and improved outcomes. A comprehensive electronic health record (EHR), which encompasses all health care measures that clinicians want to use-both standard health care assessments and those acquired through emerging technology-is the key to improved, efficient clinical decision making. New technologies using sensors to passively monitor older adults at home are being developed and are commercially available. However, integrating the clinical information systems with passive monitoring data so that clinical decision making is enhanced and patient records are complete is challenging. Researchers at the University of Missouri (MU) are developing a comprehensive EHR to: (a) enhance nursing care coordination at TigerPlace, independent senior housing that helps residents age in place; (b) integrate clinical data and data from new technology; and (c) advance technology and clinical research. PMID:20047248

  18. Virginia Nursing Faculty Salaries. Report to the Joint Commission on Health Care.

    Virginia State Council of Higher Education, Richmond.

    The Joint Committee on Health Care requested the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV) to compare nursing faculty salaries with clinical practice salaries, review the workload issues related to changes in nursing practice in health care facilities, and make recommendations to address any inappropriate disparities. In response to…

  19. Influence of health, lifestyle, working conditions, and sociodemography on early retirement among nurses

    Friis, Karina; Ekholm, Ola; Hundrup, Yrsa A; Obel, Erik B; Grønbaek, Morten

    2007-01-01

    by Statistics Denmark. The follow-up period was from 1993 to 2002. RESULTS: Nurses who had poor self-rated health were more likely to join PEW compared with nurses who considered their health as good (HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.16-1.41). Low job influence, high workload, and physical job demands only...

  20. Is it time for a public health nursing approach to aging?

    Sullivan-Marx, Eileen M

    2013-09-01

    Following the enactment of Medicare in 1965, access to health care for older adults in the United States improved. At the same time, nurse researchers and policy leaders developed individual and family-centered care interventions and programs that led to improvements in quality of health and life. In the next 20 to 30 years, U.S. and global projections of an expanding aging cohort with potential increases in health care needs, coupled with continued nursing shortage projections, present challenges and opportunities to enhance gerontological nursing's approach to aging care. Invigorating a public health nursing focus on the needs of a population of older adults could enhance nursing's ability to create policy and programs of care that promote quality of life for older adults and their families. Nurses using public health approaches can lead and support social policies regarding the physical environment and daily life circumstances that contribute to health equity. Heightened attention to competencies in community/public health nursing education and promotion of public health nursing careers will be important policy considerations as we face the looming increase in a population of older adults throughout the world. PMID:23937101

  1. The Health-Promoting Lifestyles of Undergraduate Nurses in Hong Kong.

    Hui, Wai-Hing Choi

    2002-01-01

    A profile of 169 Hong Kong nursing students indicated they practice good interpersonal relations but exhibit a lack of physical activity. Seniors had the most difficulty with stress management and spiritual growth. Nursing students' potential to promote patients' health may be inhibited by their own lack of compliance with health behavior.…

  2. Quality of work life among primary health care nurses in the Jazan region, Saudi Arabia: a cross-sectional study

    Almalki Mohammed J; FitzGerald Gerry; Clark Michele

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Quality of work life (QWL) is defined as the extent to which an employee is satisfied with personal and working needs through participating in the workplace while achieving the goals of the organization. QWL has been found to influence the commitment and productivity of employees in health care organizations, as well as in other industries. However, reliable information on the QWL of primary health care (PHC) nurses is limited. The purpose of this study was to assess the Q...

  3. Integration of the primary health care approach into a community nursing science curriculum.

    Vilakazi, S S; Chabeli, M M; Roos, S D

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore and describe guidelines for integration of the primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum in a Nursing College in Gauteng. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was utilized. The focus group interviews were conducted with community nurses and nurse educators as respondents. Data were analysed by a qualitative descriptive method of analysis as described in Creswell (1994: 155). Respondents in both groups held similar perceptions regarding integration of primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum. Five categories, which are in line with the curriculum cycle, were identified as follows: situation analysis, selection and organisation of objectives/goals, content, teaching methods and evaluation. Guidelines and recommendations for the integration of the primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum were described. PMID:11949291

  4. Integration of the primary health care approach into a community nursing science curriculum

    SS Vilakazi

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to explore and describe guidelines for integration of the primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum in a Nursing College in Gauteng. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was utilized. The focus group interviews were conducted with community nurses and nurse educators as respondents. Data were analysed by a qualitative descriptive method of analysis as described in Creswell (1994:155. Respondents in both groups held similar perceptions regarding integration of primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum. Five categories, which are in line with the curriculum cycle, were identified as follows: situation analysis, selection and organisation of objectives/ goals, content, teaching methods and evaluation. Guidelines and recommendations for the integration of the primary health care approach into a Community Nursing Science Curriculum were described.

  5. Learning styles of nursing and allied health students in Semnan university of medical sciences

    Fatemeh Ahadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several factors as learning styles can influence the learning process. The aim of thisstudy was to determine learning styles, which are used by nursing and allied health students in SemnanUniversity of Medical Sciences.Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 199 nursing and allied healthstudents of Semnan university of medical sciences (2007, Iran. Students were selected using a simplesampling method. The assessment instrument was the last version of Kolb learning style inventory (KLSIV.3.1.Results: Generally, the learning styles of students were divergent (% 27.1, accommodations (% 26.6,convergent (%23.6, and assimilation (%22.6. The preferred learning style in nursing students wasconvergent (%31.9, and in allied health students was divergent (%36.1. There was a significantrelationship between the type of learning styles with academic courses (P=0.006 married status(P=0.004 and average score (P=0.031, but there was no correlation between the type of learning stylesand gender.Conclusion: Considering the predominance of convergent and divergent learning styles in thesestudents, the usage of some educational methods such as problem -based learning, group discussions,brain storming, role playing, computerized simulation and demonstration are recommended in theoretical,clinical and skill laboratory fields, so that; the students in the new and objective situations can apply theirvisualization for more earning knowledge and professional skills.

  6. Nurses’ and patients’ communication in smoking cessation at nurse-led COPD clinics in primary health care

    Efraimsson, Eva Österlund; Klang, Birgitta; Ehrenberg, Anna; Larsson, Kjell; Fossum, Bjöörn; Olai, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Background Smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have high nicotine dependence making it difficult to quit smoking. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a method that is used in stimulating motivation and behavioral changes. Objective To describe smoking cessation communication between patients and registered nurses trained in MI in COPD nurse-led clinics in Swedish primary health care. Methods A prospective observational study with structured quantitative content analyses of the communication between six nurses with basic education in MI and 13 patients in non-smoking consultations. Results Only to a small extent did nurses’ evoke patients’ reasons for change, stimulate collaboration, and support patients’ autonomy. Nurses provided information, asked closed questions, and made simple reflections. Patients’ communication was mainly neutral and focusing on reasons for and against smoking. It was uncommon for patients to be committed and take steps toward smoking cessation. Conclusion The nurses did not adhere to the principles of MI in smoking cessation, and the patients focused to a limited extent on how to quit smoking. Practice implications To make patients more active, the nurses need more education and continuous training in motivational communication. PMID:26672958

  7. Quality assessment in nursing home facilities: measuring customer satisfaction.

    Mostyn, M M; Race, K E; Seibert, J H; Johnson, M

    2000-01-01

    A national study designed to assess the reliability and validity of a nursing home customer satisfaction survey is summarized. One hundred fifty-nine facilities participated, each responsible for the distribution and collection of 200 questionnaires randomly sent to the home of the resident's responsible party. A total of 9053 completed questionnaires were returned, for an average adjusted response rate of 53%. The factor analysis identified 4 scales: Comfort and Cleanliness, Nursing, Food Services, and Facility Care and Services, each with high reliability. Based on a multiple regression analysis, the scales were shown to have good criterion-related validity, accounting for 64% of the variance in overall quality ratings. Comparisons based on select characteristics indicated significantly different satisfaction ratings among facilities. The results are interpreted as providing evidence for the construct validity of a multidimensional customer satisfaction scale with measured reliability and criterion-related validity. Moreover, the scale can be used to differentiate satisfaction levels among facilities. PMID:10763218

  8. Computerized Clinical Simulation Testing: Its Use for Competence Assessment in Nursing.

    Bersky, Anna K.; Yocom, Carolyn J.

    1994-01-01

    Computerized Clinical Simulation Testing is an uncued, dynamic, interactive test that permits examinees to simulate the clinical decision-making skills used in the nursing management of client needs. It has the potential for helping boards of nursing to make more valid assessments about who is competent to practice nursing. (JOW)

  9. An Evaluation of the Clinical Performance of Newly Qualified Nurses: A Competency Based Assessment.

    O'Connor, S. E.; Pearce, J.; Smith, R. L.; Voegeli, D.; Walton, P.

    2001-01-01

    Senior nurses' (n=139) expectations of 36 beginning nurses were compared with the beginners' competence ratings by their clinical preceptors. Senior nurses' expectations were lower than the actual competence demonstrated by the graduates, suggesting that assessment instruments should not be derived solely from supervisor expectations. (SK)

  10. School nurses' perspectives on managing mental health problems in children and young people

    Pryjmachuk, S.; Graham, T.; Haddad, M; Tylee, A.

    2012-01-01

    Aims and objectives: To explore the views of school nurses regarding mental health problems in young people and their potential for engaging in mental health work with this client group. Background: Mental health problems in children and young people are an important public health issue. Universal children’s services play a key role in identifying and managing these problems and, while school nurses have an important function in this work, little is known about their views on this aspect ...

  11. What Data Do States Collect Related to School Nurses, School Health, and the Health Care Provided?

    Selekman, Janice; Wolfe, Linda C; Cole, Marjorie

    2016-06-01

    School nurses collect data to report to their school district and state agencies. However, there is no national requirement or standard to collect specific data, and each state determines its own set of questions. This study resulted from a joint resolution between the National Association of State School Nurse Consultants and the National Association of School Nurses. The study sought to determine whether similar data points were collected so that comparisons could be made among states and to develop a framework to incorporate the data. Thirty-two states provided their questionnaires or reports. There were 855 data points that could be divided into data related to staff and to students. No categories were measured by all states. The most common data points were the number of students, health screenings, and the number of students with particular conditions for whom the district provided services. A framework for data collection is proposed. PMID:26416766

  12. Mixed-methods study to develop a patient complexity assessment instrument for district nurses.

    Thomas, Susan J; Wallace, Carolyn; Jarvis, Paul; Davis, Ruth Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    Background There is increasing reference to complex patient needs in health care. However, little is known about how to measure patient complexity or the relationship between it and district nursing activity. Aim To illustrate the use of group concept mapping (GCM) to conceptualise and develop items for a patient complexity assessment instrument to be used by district nurses. Discussion The first phase of this research used GCM conceptualisation and consensus methodology to identify items for a community-based patient complexity instrument. GCM helped to provide a conceptual understanding of community-based patient complexity through focused exploration of the term. Results indicated that a number of environmental, sociological, psychological, behavioural, physical and organisational factors needed to be included. This, in turn, showed that an existing taxonomy did not contain the relevant items. Consequently, amendments were made and a new instrument developed. Conclusion GCM is a suitable consensus method for use in nursing theory and developing instruments. It proved successful in achieving consensus with no loss of participants' views. Implications for practice GCM is a suitable method for nurses to use in research or practice development activities as it is based on a facilitative and engagement-led approach. PMID:26997229

  13. Nursing attrition and the work environment in South African health facilities.

    Hall, E J

    2004-11-01

    A number of media reports appeared on the shortages of professional health workers in the public health sector. Unsatisfactory working conditions in health facilities were mentioned as one of the key aspects responsible for the shortages. Literature indicates that stress caused by unsatisfactory work environments may play a major role in employees' decision to resign their jobs, in spite of enjoying the nature of their work. The aim of this article is to explore the current human resource situation in nursing i.e. to determine if a shortage of nursing skills exists, to establish the challenges that nurses have to face in performing their duties and to establish the potential effect of the work environment on attrition. Currently 155 484 nurses are practicing in South Africa at a rate of 343 nurses per 100 000 of the population, which compares favourably with the World Health Organisation minimum of 200:100 000. The lack of reliable data on the supply of and demand for nurses makes it difficult to determine whether real shortages exist. However the supply of nursing services is influenced by the uneven distribution of skills across regions and the outflow of professional skills. It seems that the existing situation will deteriorate because fewer people are interested in taking up or pursuing nursing as a career in South Africa. At the same time a need for more nurses was identified because of the growth in the population as well as a change in health care needs. Workplace conditions for health workers employed at hospitals and clinics in South Africa were explored as part of a recent national study on the impact of HIV/AIDS on the health sector. Health workers' opinions on aspects such as workload, staff morale and working hours were obtained during personal interviews, which were conducted at 222 health facilities. Nine hundred and twenty four professional nurses, enrolled nurses and nursing assistants, who were mostly employed in the public health sector, participated. A stressful work environment was identified in public hospitals and clinics. An increase in the number of patients visiting these facilities, accompanied by a lack of equipment, unsatisfactory work environment and a shortage of nurses were pointed out. Many patients cannot be accommodated elsewhere because of a lack of finance and alternative health care options. Nurses also indicated that they do not get much support from their employers. The effect of all these factors culminates in a stressed workforce who may be forced to consider alternative career options. This will be to the detriment of health care in the country. PMID:15712823

  14. Standardized patients: a creative teaching strategy for psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioner students.

    Shawler, Celeste

    2008-11-01

    In this article, a learning strategy for psychiatric nurse practitioner students in a research-intensive university is described. The strategy actively involved students in experiences with standardized patients. The course content included review of the causes, manifestations, assessment, and diagnoses of psychopathology across the lifespan. The goal was for students to build diagnostic reasoning skills so they could conceptualize case formulations and examine differential diagnoses related to mental disorders. Faculty simulated complex mental health disorders in a controlled environment where students practiced assessment and diagnostic skills with feedback from faculty, peers, and the standardized patients. On completion of the course with six different standardized patient situations and a final standardized patient scenario that involved assessment, diagnosis, and creation of a formal paper about the case, the students demonstrated excellent interviewing skills, confident assessment abilities, appropriate use of screening and diagnostic tools, and accurate diagnosis of the standardized patients. PMID:19010054

  15. Social class variations in schoolchildren's self-reported outcome of the health dialogue with the school health nurse

    Borup, Ina; Holstein, Bjørn Evald

    2004-01-01

    of the health dialogue and to examine the effect of social class on this response controlled for the effect of other relevant social factors. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study is a survey. The population were all pupils in the fifth, seventh and ninth grade (11, 13 and 15 years old) in a random sample...... of schools in Denmark, response rate 87%, n = 5205. Data were collected by questionnaires. RESULTS: The majority of the pupils had reflected about the content of the last health dialogue with the school health nurse (54%), had discussed the content with their mother (62%) and with friends (54%); 62......% had followed the nurse's advice, 77% had made their own autonomous decisions based on the health dialogue, and 11% had returned to the nurse for further advice. Pupils from the lower social classes had more often followed the nurse's advice (OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 0.99-1.37) and returned to the nurse (OR...

  16. Nursing

    Godden, Judith

    2008-01-01

    The history of nursing in Sydney is central to understanding a range of issues including healthcare and gendered employment. This article is an introduction to nursing’s complex, fascinating and much neglected history in Sydney, Australia. Its focus is on hospitals as these have been, and remain, a central site for nursing practice and education. It explores the very different experiences of nursing students and matrons, the difficult working conditions which led to the ‘battleaxe’ stereotype...

  17. Precautions used by occupational health nursing students during clinical placements

    T.M.M. Maja

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Protection of health care workers including students from being infected when caring for high risk patients is a major cause for concern to all promoting occupational health. Safety of every employee is mandatory. Furthermore, universal guidelines for precautions must be used by all interacting with high risk patients and clients to protect themselves and prevent the spread of infection. The aim of this paper was to ascertain the availability of universal guidelines for precautions against the spread of infection in clinical settings and determine the precautions used by OHN students during their clinical placements. To realise these objectives, a quantitative and descriptive design was followed. A purposive sampling method was used to select 45 Occupational health nursing students who participated in the study.Data was collected with the use of a structured questionnaire and the results revealed that: most units where OHN students were placed for clinical experience had guidelines for universal precautions although these were not always accessible to them; regarding compliance to universal precautions, OHN students were reportedly aware of the hazards of failure to comply although in some emergencies and where personal protective material was not available, they had to provide care without using protective equipments. Recommendations made include that employers and staff at all occupational settings must ensure that updated guidelines for universal precautions are available and accessible to every body interacting with high risk patients; health care providers and students must be fully informed about and should always adhere to universal precautions.

  18. Perceptions from the front line: professional identity in mental health nursing.

    Hercelinskyj, Gylo; Cruickshank, Mary; Brown, Peter; Phillips, Brian

    2014-02-01

    In the context of a growing population of people experiencing mental illness worldwide, mental health nurses are a crucial workforce. Their recruitment and retention, however, is in decline. Drawing on qualitative data obtained from interviews with mental health nurses (MHN) in Victoria, Australia, the paper employs a range of concepts from role theory to explore professional identity within mental health nursing. The data highlight three key issues in relation to the future recruitment and retention of MHN: (i) the ambiguity of the MHN role; (ii) the weak definition and lack of understanding of the scope of the MHN role by nursing students; and (iii) a lack of communication about MHN as a profession to a wider audience. These findings indicate three avenues through which recruitment and retention in mental health nursing could be improved: (i) public communication; (ii) training and educating of the next generation of MHN; and (iii) more accurately defining the role of the MHN. PMID:23279301

  19. Solid waste management in health services: overview of nurses and technicians

    Adriana Gonçalves de Barros, Adriana Maria Pereira da Silva, Luiz Carlos Gomes Costa Júnior, Viviane Euzébia Pereira Santos, Caroline Araújo Fonseca

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze how the team describes the Nursing Management of Solid Waste in Health. Methodology: consisted of an exploratory, descriptive, from quantitative approach. The study was conducted with 20 members of Nursing group, 10 nurses and 10 technicians Nursing hospitalization units of a public hospital in Petrolina / PE. The data was collected through a questionnaire with open and closed in november 2009 and data analysis took place with the help of EPI INFO 3.5.1 (august/2008. Results: most health professionals have a distorted view of what is the waste of health services and how to classify them. Conclusion: after data analysis, it is necessary to conduct training with a view to raising awareness among professionals about the proper handling of solid waste, and thus prevent accidents and improve the quality of life of the team and its clients. Descriptors: waste of health services; nursing team; solid residues

  20. The health effects of climate change: what does a nurse need to know?

    Barna, Stefi; Goodman, Benny; Mortimer, Frances

    2012-10-01

    The scientific evidence for anthropogenic climate change has been established with increasing precision and there are widespread concerns about its potential to undermine the public health gains of the past century. There is also a growing consensus across private and public sector organisations at national and international level that carbon reduction should be a policy aim. Various international nursing organisations have made strong position statements on the issue, arguing that nurses should be actively engaged as part of their roles in both health promotion and clinical practice. We point to education for sustainability initiatives in other health professions and share resources for curriculum development in nursing. The nurses of tomorrow will make a unique and significant contribution to protecting population health in an unstable climate, if today's nursing educators can help prepare them for this role. PMID:22683179

  1. Scientific production on sexuality of elder women journals of nursing, public health and gerontology

    Beatriz de Carvalho Cavalheiro, Silvana Sidney Costa dos Santos

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to verify the scientific production on elder women, gender and sexuality in journals of Nursing, Public Health and Gerontology. Methods: a systematic review of literature, in journals of Nursing, Public Health and Gerontology in Brazil, in the years 2003 to 2007. Results: the 362 articles were pre-selected (111 in nursing, 95 in Public Health and 156 in Gerontology, of these, seven focus on elderly women, gender and sexuality. It was possible to understand that sexuality and gender issues of elder women remain invisible, and few significant. From the seven articles three categories were abstracted: feminization of aging, social of women’s aging and asexualized elderly. Conclusion: the nurses and the groups of studies and research on gender began to dawn, showing interest in the issues. Requires that the educational projects of graduate programs in health, especially in nursing, bringing more thoughts on gender and sexuality of older women.

  2. School Nurses' Experiences of Managing Young People With Mental Health Problems: A Scoping Review.

    Ravenna, Jean; Cleaver, Karen

    2016-02-01

    Prevalence of mental health disorder is increasing among young people. It is recognized that early intervention is essential in supporting young people, and care provided within schools to support emotional well-being is recommended as part of this process. A scoping review was undertaken examining school nurses' experiences of supporting the mental health of schoolchildren. Findings suggest that school nurses have a central role in supporting young peoples' mental health, although a number of barriers exist which impact on school nurses' preparedness for this aspect of their role. While there are inconsistencies in the provision of mental health training available to support school nurses, when training is implemented it has positive outcomes for service provision and quality of care. A number of challenges for school nurses were also identified, and recommendations for practice are suggested in the article. PMID:26656230

  3. A Valid and Reliable Tool to Assess Nursing Students` Clinical Performance

    Mehrnoosh Pazargadi; Tahereh Ashktorab; Sharareh Khosravi; Hamid Alavi majd

    2013-01-01

    Background: The necessity of a valid and reliable assessment tool is one of the most repeated issues in nursing students` clinical evaluation. But it is believed that present tools are not mostly valid and can not assess students` performance properly.Objectives: This study was conducted to design a valid and reliable assessment tool for evaluating nursing students` performance in clinical education.Methods: In this methodological study considering nursing students` performance definition; th...

  4. Preparing the emerging nursing and health care workforce: a case study.

    Pipe, Teri Britt

    2014-01-01

    How do we prepare the nursing and health workforce of the future to meet the challenges of the US health system and equip graduates with problem-solving strategies that are scientific, compassionate, and agile? This article provides examples of several approaches for nursing health professions education, including innovation, interprofessionalism, and multiple, simultaneous community collaboratives. Specific examples highlight ways academic nursing programs and practice organizations are working together to provide stimulating, realistic, safe, and effective education while exposing students to the challenges inherent in the health system. PMID:24569757

  5. Self-rated health, work characteristics and health related behaviours among nurses in Greece: a cross sectional study

    Dimoliatis Ioannis DK

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies on self-rated health among nurses have indicated an association of low job satisfaction and stress in relation to poor self-rated health. The relationship between self rated health and the specific work characteristics and health related behaviours of nurses to our knowledge have not been adequately studied. Objective To investigate the health profile of nurses working in hospitals in North West Greece and to examine the associations between self rated health (SRH and health related behaviours and work characteristics in this group of hospital employees. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to a random sample of 443 nurses working in all the hospitals in North West Greece. Regression analysis was used to examine the relationship of health related behaviours and work characteristics with self rated health among the nurses. Results A total of 353 responded to the questionnaire (response rate 80% of which 311 (88% were female and 42 (12% male. The mean age (standard deviation of the respondents was 36 years (5.6 and their mean years of working as nurses were 13.5 years (5.9. Almost half of the nurses' smoked, and about one third were overweight or obese. About 58% (206 of the nurses reported having poor health while 42% (147 reported having good health. Self-rated health was independently associated with gender, effort to avoid fatty foods and physical activity, according to multiple logistic regression analysis. Conclusion The population studied presented a relatively poor health profile, and a high proportion of poor SRH. Though female gender and effort to avoid fatty foods were associated with poor SRH, and exercise and white meat consumption with good SRH, specific work characteristics were not associated with SRH.

  6. Transforming psychiatric mental health nursing education with team based learning.

    Harmon, Rebecca Bouterie; Hills, Robin L

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the team-based learning (TBL) instructional approach on learning outcomes in an undergraduate psychiatric mental health (PMH) nursing course. An uncontrolled, before and after design was employed. Data were collected over eight consecutive semesters (N=347) before and after implementation of TBL. Two variables were selected for comparison before and after implementation: scores on PMH portion of the Evolve® practice exit examination and time (in hours) students reported preparing for class. After implementation, students scored higher on the PMH practice exit examination and reported increased study time. Qualitatively, students reported enjoying working in teams despite the increased study time required with the TBL method. PMID:26577556

  7. Boot Camp for Occupational Health Nurses: Understanding Social Media.

    Wolf, Debra M; Olszewski, Kimberly

    2015-08-01

    Social media is a buzzword frequently referred to in marketing materials, general media, and personal conversations. Although many refer to the term social media, some individuals do not understand its meaning or how it affects their daily lives at work and home. Since the expansion of the Internet to web 2.0, multiple platforms of communication occur virtually through various social media. Understanding and learning how to use these platforms are essential to stay connected with friends, family, and colleagues; advance connections to professional organizations; and extend educational opportunities. This article presents basic information for occupational health nurses to improve their understanding of social media and how to communicate virtually using different platforms safely and securely. PMID:26240119

  8. Nurse Practitioners' Use of Communication Techniques: Results of a Maryland Oral Health Literacy Survey

    Koo, Laura W.; Horowitz, Alice M.; Radice, Sarah D.; Wang, Min Q.; Kleinman, Dushanka V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We examined nurse practitioners’ use and opinions of recommended communication techniques for the promotion of oral health as part of a Maryland state-wide oral health literacy assessment. Use of recommended health-literate and patient-centered communication techniques have demonstrated improved health outcomes. Methods A 27-item self-report survey, containing 17 communication technique items, across 5 domains, was mailed to 1,410 licensed nurse practitioners (NPs) in Maryland in 2010. Use of communication techniques and opinions about their effectiveness were analyzed using descriptive statistics. General linear models explored provider and practice characteristics to predict differences in the total number and the mean number of communication techniques routinely used in a week. Results More than 80% of NPs (N = 194) routinely used 3 of the 7 basic communication techniques: simple language, limiting teaching to 2–3 concepts, and speaking slowly. More than 75% of respondents believed that 6 of the 7 basic communication techniques are effective. Sociodemographic provider characteristics and practice characteristics were not significant predictors of the mean number or the total number of communication techniques routinely used by NPs in a week. Potential predictors for using more of the 7 basic communication techniques, demonstrating significance in one general linear model each, were: assessing the office for user-friendliness and ever taking a communication course in addition to nursing school. Conclusions NPs in Maryland self-reported routinely using some recommended health-literate communication techniques, with belief in their effectiveness. Our findings suggest that NPs who had assessed the office for patient-friendliness or who had taken a communication course beyond their initial education may be predictors for using more of the 7 basic communication techniques. These self-reported findings should be validated with observational studies. Graduate and continuing education for NPs should increase emphasis on health-literate and patient-centered communication techniques to increase patient understanding of dental caries prevention. Non-dental healthcare providers, such as NPs, are uniquely positioned to contribute to preventing early childhood dental caries through health-literate and patient-centered communication. PMID:26766557

  9. Duly Authorized Officers' practices under mental health law in New Zealand: Are nurses meeting the requirements of the law?

    McKenna, Brian; Thom, Katey; O'Brien, Anthony; Crene, Sally; Simpson, Alexander

    2009-08-01

    The Mental Health (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act (1992) introduced a number of statutory roles that are undertaken by mental health nurses. One of these roles is that of Duly Authorized Officer (DAO). The DAO is responsible for the procedural requirements necessary to facilitate compulsory assessment. Under Section 9(2)(d), the DAO is required to ensure that the purpose of the assessment and the requirements of the notice of assessment are explained to the person in the presence of a member of their family, a caregiver, or other person concerned with the welfare of the person. Three recent High Court decisions under the Habeas Corpus Act 2001 have challenged existing DAO practices in arranging the presence of a third party. This paper presents research, which focuses on unravelling some of the complexities associated with meeting this procedural requirement. It illustrates these complexities through a discussion of the results of an audit of files and three focus groups with mental health nurses who practise as DAO. The paper concludes that national guidelines for practice need to be developed for DAO to assist mental health nurses in meeting this statutory requirement. PMID:19594643

  10. Description of an educational programme developed to support registered nurses during clinical supervision of student nurses in medical and surgical wards in a training health facility: Namibia

    Hanna Neshuku

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an educational programme interventions developed to support registered nurses during the clinical supervision of student nurses in the medical and surgical wards of a training hospital in the Oshana region, Namibia. The programme developed contained the purpose and goals of the programme, programme objectives, programme structure, processes and approaches. The programme catered for the following themes: Managerial challenges, educational challenges and non-conducive environment as was experienced by registered nurses and student nurses in order to support them during clinical supervision. It includes the activities to address managerial challenges as identified to be affecting the clinical supervision of student nurses; this is to address educational challenges identified during clinical supervision of student nurses. Furthermore, the programme contains activities focused on providing registered nurses with knowledge and skills on clinical supervision, in order to increase their understanding and competence about the clinical supervision of student nurses. Another activity included interventions for enhancing positive interpersonal relationships and good communication skills to improve effective interactions between registered nurses and student nurses. This study made it possible for the development of an educational programme that enable the registered nurses to receive the much needed information pertaining to the clinical supervision of student nurses, and served as a guide and support tool when carrying out clinical supervision of student nurses. In conclusion the study was justified as an original contribution to the existing body of knowledge in general health nursing science.

  11. Observation evaluation to assess race and educational bias in state-mandated standard testing of nurse aides in nursing homes.

    Baker, S L; Stoskopf, C H; Ciesla, J R; Glik, D C; Cover, C M

    1996-01-01

    This article presents an assessment of whether race, education, gender, or other testing bias was present in a state-mandated nurse aide competency test. This assessment was carried out with data from two sources: (a) a statewide standardized test for all nurse aides that was given by a nationally known testing company, (b) an independent observational evaluation with a Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale (BARS) for nurse aides' performance that was carried out by the investigators. The results show that race and education level were predictors of performance on written and manual portions of the standardized test. Gender, age, and years of experience were also shown to predict test success. Comparing data from the two sources suggests that a possible bias in the standardized nurse aid test. The independent observation of performance on the job with the BARS is shown to be less biased. PMID:9128536

  12. Quality of work life among primary health care nurses in the Jazan region, Saudi Arabia: a cross-sectional study

    Almalki Mohammed J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality of work life (QWL is defined as the extent to which an employee is satisfied with personal and working needs through participating in the workplace while achieving the goals of the organization. QWL has been found to influence the commitment and productivity of employees in health care organizations, as well as in other industries. However, reliable information on the QWL of primary health care (PHC nurses is limited. The purpose of this study was to assess the QWL among PHC nurses in the Jazan region, Saudi Arabia. Methods A descriptive research design, namely a cross-sectional survey, was used in this study. Data were collected using Brooks’ survey of quality of nursing work life and demographic questions. A convenience sample was recruited from 134 PHC centres in Jazan, Saudi Arabia. The Jazan region is located in the southern part of Saudi Arabia. A response rate of 91% (n = 532/585 was achieved (effective response rate = 87%, n = 508. Data analysis consisted of descriptive statistics, t-test and one way-analysis of variance. Total scores and subscores for QWL items and item summary statistics were computed and reported using SPSS version 17 for Windows. Results Findings suggested that the respondents were dissatisfied with their work life. The major influencing factors were unsuitable working hours, lack of facilities for nurses, inability to balance work with family needs, inadequacy of vacations time for nurses and their families, poor staffing, management and supervision practices, lack of professional development opportunities, and an inappropriate working environment in terms of the level of security, patient care supplies and equipment, and recreation facilities (break-area. Other essential factors include the community’s view of nursing and an inadequate salary. More positively, the majority of nurses were satisfied with their co-workers, satisfied to be nurses and had a sense of belonging in their workplaces. Significant differences were found according to gender, age, marital status, dependent children, dependent adults, nationality, nursing tenure, organizational tenure, positional tenure, and payment per month. No significant differences were found according to education level of PHC nurses and location of PHC. Conclusions These findings can be used by PHC managers and policy makers for developing and appropriately implementing successful plans to improve the QWL. This will help to enhance the home and work environments, improve individual and organization performance and increase the commitment of nurses.

  13. A review of research and nursing management of mental health problems in pregnancy and motherhood

    Jarosinski JM; Fox JA

    2016-01-01

    Judith M Jarosinski,1 Jane A Fox21Nursing Department, Henson School of Science, Salisbury University, Salisbury, MD, 2School of Nursing, College of Health and Human Services, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Wilmington, NC, USAAbstract: In this article, the authors explore the risks pregnant women experience due to mental illness and intimate partner violence (IPV) and discuss the nursing role involved in the management of their care. For many women, pregnancy is a time of hopeful ant...

  14. Re-envisioning paediatric nurse training in a re-engineered health care system

    Minette Coetzee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: South African’s infant and child mortality rates remain high and at the current rate of decline will not meet the Millennium Development Goals of a two thirds decrease by 2015. At the latest available count, there were fewer than 1500 qualified paediatric nurses on the National South African Nursing Council register, with only about 100 nurses graduating with this qualification from South African nursing schools annually. It is not clear, however, if current paediatric nurse training programmes adequately equip nurses to make a real impact on reducing the under-5 mortality rate. In their 2011 interim report, the Ministerial Committee on Morbidity and Mortality in Children under 5 years recommended strengthening paediatric nurses’ training as a strategy to reduce the under-5 mortality rate.Method: In response to the Committee on Morbidity and Mortality in Children recommendation, a colloquium was convened as a national forum for schools of nursing, departments of health, health care facilities, clinicians and regulatory bodies to advance children’s nursing in South Africa.Objectives: The goals of the colloquium were to thoroughly investigate the situation in South Africa’s paediatric nurse training, plot ways to strengthen and expand postgraduate paediatric programmes to meet priority child health needs, and to build relationships between the various schools and stakeholders.Results: Outcomes included the clarification and strengthening of a ‘stakeholder grid’ in nurse training, recognition of the need for more active teaching and learning strategies in curricula linked to national child health priorities, as well as the need to develop and support clinical nursing practice in facilities.

  15. The self-medication in elderly people and the role of health professionals and nursing

    Cecília Nogueira Valença, Raimunda Medeiros Germano, Rejane Maria Paiva de Menezes

    2010-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the complex theme of self-medication in the elderly people and the role of health professionals and nursing. Methodology: this is a theoretical essay based on a literature review of the narrative type. It was selected articles indexed in databases Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO) and the Database of Nursing (BDENF), from 2003 to 2009, using as descriptors: self-medication, nursing and elderly people. It was also used books and manuals of the ministry of heal...

  16. Assessment of the characteristics of the medical care teachers who train the Maternal and Child Health Nursing specialists Determinación de las características del docente asistencial que forma al especialista de Enfermería Materno Infantil

    María José Aguilar Cordero

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: The features of the Mother and Child Health Nursing specialist’s teaching care training are paramount to form appropriate teaching behaviors. Aim: To determine the features of the medical care teacher who trains the Mother and Child Health Nursing specialist. Methods: An exploratory research was carried out during the years 2008-2009 in the “Gustavo Aldereguía Lima” General University Hospital of Cienfuegos, Decision Theory was applied to select the criteria taken into account in the Multicriterial model, by means of a variation of the Delphi Method. The universe was made up by the coordinators and methodologists who run the Mother and Child Health Nursing specialty on a national level, and a non-probabilistic sampling was conducted to obtain the Sample (Experts Sampling. Results: 23 criteria exceeding the PC4 cutoff point corresponding to the “much” category are needed, which links the professional model to the social demands to know, relate and apply the contents of nursing using the material resources that connect the concrete to the abstract to promote the continuity of medical care and the use of the potential of assistance in the training the specialists in which the professional’s behavior was demonstrated. Conclusions: By means of the stated criteria, it is evidenced that medical care is the basis for the kind of teaching training our professional needs to organize the teaching process, starting from medical care issues. That training allows them to accomplish their social task as health trainers.Fundamento: Los rasgos que deben poseer los docentes asistenciales que forman al especialista en Enfermería Materno Infantil son esenciales para trasmitir y formar modos de actuación en la docencia. Objetivo: Determinar las características del docente asistencial que forma al especialista de Enfermería Materno Infantil. Métodos: Se realizó un estudio exploratorio que abarca los años 2007-2008 en el Hospital General Universitario “Gustavo Aldereguía Lima” de Cienfuegos, se aplicó la teoría de la decisión, para la selección de los criterios que fueron tomados en el modelo multicriterial, mediante la aplicación de una variante del método Delphi. El universo estuvo constituido por los coordinadores y metodólogos que atienden la especialidad Enfermería Materno infantil a nivel nacional, para la obtención de la muestra se realizó un muestreo no probabilístico (muestreo de expertos. Resultados: Se precisan 23 criterios que son superiores al punto de corte PC4 correspondiente a la categoría de mucho que vincula el modelo del profesional con las exigencias sociales para conocer, relacionar y aplicar el contenido de la enfermería utilizando los recursos materiales que relacionan lo concreto con lo abstracto para promover la continuidad asistencial del cuidado y la utilización de las potencialidades de la asistencia en la formación del especialista donde quedó demostrado el comportamiento del profesional. Conclusiones: Se evidencia a través de los criterios identificados que la asistencia es el sustento de la formación docente que necesita el profesional para organizar los procesos docentes a partir de los problemas asistenciales que le permita cumplir con el encargo social de formador en salud.

  17. Theories and trends in occupational health nursing: prevention and social change.

    Parrish, R S; Allred, R H

    1995-10-01

    1. Occupational health nursing has evolved against a background of changes in the workplace, health care delivery, and society. 2. One major change is the growing interest among employers for health promotion and wellness programs to manage health care costs. 3. The health Belief Model and levels of prevention provide a framework for health promotion and disease prevention programs at the worksite. 4. Occupational health nurses, using a marketing strategy that incorporates the principles of product, price, placement, and promotion, will enhance their ability to provide successful programs. PMID:7575785

  18. Managing the Security of Nursing Data in the Electronic Health Record

    Samadbeik, Mahnaz; Gorzin, Zahra; Khoshkam, Masomeh; Roudbari, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Electronic Health Record (EHR) is a patient care information resource for clinicians and nursing documentation is an essential part of comprehensive patient care. Ensuring privacy and the security of health information is a key component to building the trust required to realize the potential benefits of electronic health information exchange. This study was aimed to manage nursing data security in the EHR and also discover the viewpoints of hospital information system vendors...

  19. Public health nursing in Indonesia: difference in roles and functions in rural and urban centers

    Raditya Kurniawan Djoar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Public health nurses in Indonesia hold important roles and functions in the effort of achieving goals of health development in Indonesia. In general, there are twof actors related to roles and functions, personal and contextual factors include setting. Therefore, to identify factors related to difference in roles and function of public health nurses in different location is an important step to build up the specific scope of practice. The purpose of this study is to identify facto...

  20. The effect of laughter Yoga on general health among nursing students

    Yazdani, Mohsen; Esmaeilzadeh, Mojtaba; Pahlavanzadeh, Saeid; Khaledi, Firouz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Promotion and provision of individuals’ health is one of the bases for development in societies. Students’ mental health is very important in each society. Students of medical sciences universities, especially nursing students, are under various stresses in clinical environment, in addition to the stress they experience in theoretical education environment. With regard to the importance of nursing students’ general health and considering the various existing strategies to promote ...

  1. Achieving the standard of the school health nursing process in elementary schools of Kerman, Iran

    Salehi, Shayesteh; Abedi, Heidarali; Ghasemi, Tayebeh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Considering the school nursing standards, which is the most important and vital element of the school health team, can be a fundamental step toward solving the current and future problems of the school and society health. The present research was done with the goal of determining the current situation of the standard of the school health nursing process in elementary schools of Kerman, Iran. Materials and Methods: The present research is a quantitative, descriptive study and was d...

  2. Five reasons for the lack of nursing students' motivation to learn public health.

    Kudo, Yasushi; Hayashi, Sachiko; Yoshimura, Emiko; Tsunoda, Masashi; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Shibuya, Akitaka; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2013-01-01

    Prevention is better than cure. Public health plays an important role in promoting prevent medicine. To obtain the abilities to provide appropriate nursing services, learning public health is necessary for students who want to become registered nurses. When teachers teach public health to nursing students, it is important to motivate them to learn it. Therefore, we investigated the reasons for the lack of motivation to learn public health by conducting a questionnaire survey. The subjects were female nursing students in 29 vocational schools in Kanagawa and Chiba prefectures of Japan that allow graduation after a 3-year study period. We asked the students whether or not they had completed the subject of public health and analyzed those students who answered affirmatively. We analyzed 1,553 respondents whose average age was 22.6 ± 5.2 years (range, 18 to 45). Using factor analysis, we discovered the 5 reasons that lead to the lack of nursing students' motivation to learn public health: "Difficulties acquiring knowledge of public health," "Inappropriate attitudes of public health teachers," "Thinking lightly about the national examination in the field of public health," "Lack of understanding the importance of learning public health," and "Future plans that do not specialize in public health." Using multiple linear regression analysis, these 5 reasons were significant predictors for the lack of students' motivation. Older students also had significantly less motivation to learn public health than did younger students. When teachers instruct their students, they should teach public health better with the present knowledge. PMID:24172685

  3. Community health nursing: can being self-employed work for you in home care?

    Seri, S F

    1997-09-01

    There is a fine distinction between being an independent contractor and being an employee. The advantages of being self-employed as a community health nurse are many. Self-employment suits new parents, graduate students, people in transition, with more than one profession, and who don't want a fixed schedule. However, this type of nursing is not for everyone. A broker such as CHN can help nurses become successfully self-employed. At a time when hospitals are downsizing and home care is becoming more in demand, brokers such as CHN provide a framework in which busy, experienced, community health nurses can work when and where they want. Good clinical and communication skills and a wish to be autonomous are necessities. A willingness to travel to different agencies and a reliable car are also important. A love for variety, flexibility, and independence make self-employment as a home health nurse a clinician's dream. PMID:9335699

  4. Are your nurse managers ready for health care reform? Consider the 8 'Es'.

    Kirby, Karen K

    2010-01-01

    The most significant investment a nursing executive can make in an organization and to the delivery of quality patient care is the development of current and future front-line nurse managers. We are on the brink of massive changes in access and the delivery of health care. The front-line manager is in a critical position to make it all work and deliver what the public wants: better access, improved quality, and less cost. If front-line nurse managers are key stakeholders and will undoubtedly play a major role in health care reform, are they ready? Nurse leaders must evaluate, educate, embrace, enable, empower, espouse, engage, and excite frontline nurse managers in order to expand health care services efficiently and effectively. PMID:20672546

  5. The perceptions and the attitude of health care professionals and students about the nursing profession

    Mari Lavdaniti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The fact that nursing is a difficult profession which lacks of social recognition results in being abandoned by many nurses and not being selected by young people. Αim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the perceptions of nurses, other health care professionals and students about the nursing profession and to determine the factors that influence their attitude towards it. Material and Method: 949 students of nursing and medical schools and health care professionals participated in the study. The data was gathered by the means of two structured questionnaires, the composition of which was based on the nursing database. The data's statistical analysis was fulfilled by the SPSS 12. Results: Τhe 89,2% of the sample believes that nursing practice requires knowledge, skills, and critical thinking. The 82,4% also believes that the quality of care provided depends on the quality of the nurses' education and lifelong learning is nurses' duty (94,4%. Moreover, the 82,6% of the participants thinks that the nurses do not lose their interest in the patient's care as much as they become more educated. Factors such as religion and frequency of sick leave do not influence the attitude towards the profession, but the reality shock, the lack of nursing staff and the experience of negative bias adversely influence the attitude towards it. Conclusions: The confrontation of factors that influence negatively the image of the profession combined with a better and continuing education for nurses will lead to increase the social status of the nursing profession.

  6. Occupational Risk Factors and Health Problems Faced by Nurses that Working Dialysis Unit and Nephrology Service

    Mehtap Curcani

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study is carried out descriptively with the aim of determining occupational risks the nurses working in dialysis units and nephrology services. METHOD: 47 nurses working in dialysis and nephrology units of the hospitals in Erzurum were included in the study content. In the collection of the data, questionnaire form prepared in the light of literature and including the preventions taken by nurses themselves or their organizations against the professional risks they faced, or personal problems the nurses experienced, professional risk or professional-personal features was used. RESULTS: In the result of the study, it was detected that 48.9% of the nurses was at 28-32 age group, and that 38.3% of the nurses graduated from nursing higher school, and that 72.3% of the nurses worked in dialysis unit. It was found out that while practicing their professions, the nurses expressed that infection risk (97.9%, stress (83%, verbal abuse (80.9%, psychiatric trauma (66%, allergic substance (63.8%, the noise (36.2%, and physical abuse (23.4% were the risk factors they raced in working medium .In the health problem seen in the nurses, in the first row is lumbago. CONCLUSION: In the result of the study, it was found out that while practicing their professions, the nurses expressed that infection risk was the highest rate among the risk factors they raced in working medium and, in the health problem seen in the nurses, in the first row is lumbago and that the nurses and organizations’ attempts which will reduce the risks were not sufficient. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(4.000: 339-344

  7. An integrated system's nursing shared governance model: a system chief nursing officer's synergistic vehicle for leading a complex health care system.

    Burkman, Karen; Sellers, Diana; Rowder, Cheryl; Batcheller, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    Seton Nursing reengineered previous models of care and leadership to accommodate rapid growth of its health care system from individual acute care sites to a health care system with consistent quality and standardization of like units across the system. Shared governance promotes collaboration with shared decision making and accountability; however, the role and methods of a system chief nursing officer to connect shared governance across a new system has not been previously described. A system chief nursing officer can significantly influence and guide the nursing strategic direction at all the health care system-related facilities by utilizing a single, systemwide nursing shared governance structure. Using this structure provides a venue to maximize the influence of a transformational leader and creates efficiencies in workforce development, resource management, best practice identification, and spread of initiatives and improvements to adapt to an ever-changing health care landscape. This is the story of one such system chief nursing officer. PMID:22955224

  8. Using a computer simulation program to assess the decision-making process in child health care.

    Lauri, S

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to describe the development and testing of a computer simulation program designed to assess the decision-making process in the public health nurses' work in child health care. The work was based primarily on theories of problem-solving and decision making; on knowledge of child development, health care, and education; and on the soft systems methodology. An authoring program and two simulations were designed and produced at the University of Turku by a team of two nurse researchers, a computer specialist, and three public health nurses. The simulations presented two typical situations encountered by the public health nurses' work in child health care. A total of 61 public health nurses from 11 health centers in the southwestern part of Finland completed the simulations. The public health nurses responded positively to the simulations and the program worked very well. The results revealed some inconsistencies in the decision-making process of the public health nurses with respect to the needs of the child and the family. The public health nurses' decisions were more closely related to the developmental stage of the child than to the unique needs of each family. The simulation is acting to test the public health nurses' ability to make decisions "here and now" but not about caring it forward. These shortcomings can be corrected by asking them to explain their decisions and thoughts after each stage and by tape recording their answers. The findings gave many answers to the question of how the computer simulation program can be developed. PMID:1643578

  9. Utilisation and costs of nursing agencies in the South African public health sector, 2005–2010

    Laetitia C. Rispel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Globally, insufficient information exists on the costs of nursing agencies, which are temporary employment service providers that supply nurses to health establishments and/or private individuals. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the utilisation and direct costs of nursing agencies in the South African public health sector. Design: A survey of all nine provincial health departments was conducted to determine utilisation and management of nursing agencies. The costs of nursing agencies were assumed to be equivalent to expenditure. Provincial health expenditure was obtained for five financial years (2005/6–2009/10 from the national Basic Accounting System database, and analysed using Microsoft Excel. Each of the 166,466 expenditure line items was coded. The total personnel and nursing agency expenditure was calculated for each financial year and for each province. Nursing agency expenditure as a percentage of the total personnel expenditure was then calculated. The nursing agency expenditure for South Africa is the total of all provincial expenditure. The 2009/10 annual government salary scales for different categories of nurses were used to calculate the number of permanent nurses who could have been employed in lieu of agency expenditure. All expenditure is expressed in South African rands (R; US$1 ∼ R7, 2010 prices. Results: Only five provinces reported utilisation of nursing agencies, but all provinces showed agency expenditure. In the 2009/10 financial year, R1.49 billion (US$212.64 million was spent on nursing agencies in the public health sector. In the same year, agency expenditure ranged from a low of R36.45 million (US$5.20 million in Mpumalanga Province (mixed urban-rural to a high of R356.43 million (US$50.92 million in the Eastern Cape Province (mixed urban-rural. Agency expenditure as a percentage of personnel expenditure ranged from 0.96% in KwaZulu-Natal Province (mixed urban-rural to 11.96% in the Northern Cape Province (rural. In that financial year, a total of 5369 registered nurses could have been employed in lieu of nursing agency expenditure. Conclusions: The study findings should inform workforce planning in South Africa. There is a need for uniform policies and improved management of commercial nursing agencies in the public health sector.

  10. Research brief: using a Wiki to support student nurses learning discipline specific health terminology.

    Honey, Michelle; Doherty, Iain

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to clarify whether a collaborative exercise using a Wiki to teach nursing students health-specific terminology resulted in better learning. In one New Zealand School of Nursing a list of health-related and discipline-specific terms was created, first-year nursing students were expected to learn these before their initial clinical practice. However, students found the terms difficult to learn. The use of a collaborative Wiki exercise to create a glossary of health terms was seen as a way to aid student learning, while also providing a learning environment where students would develop collaborative skills. PMID:24839746

  11. Preserving the Art and Science of Psychotherapy for Advance Practice Psychiatric Mental Health Nurses.

    Caughill, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric Mental Health (PMH) Nurses are challenged to maintain the viability of their roles in today's healthcare climate as advances in research and complexity of mental healthcare needs of society continue to unfold. Today's mental health practice environment includes disciplines with marketable credentials. Roles for PMH nurses in recent decades are less clearly defined than for other disciplines, much of this related to changes in educational and practice settings. This article reviews literature on the topic of psychotherapy and a call for a renewed emphasis on this mode of treatment for psychiatric mental health advance practice nurses. PMID:27077508

  12. Environmental Psychology Effects on Mental Health Job Satisfaction and Personal Well Being of Nurses

    Sodeh Tavakkoli

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available  Objective: Environmental psychology as a science could be useful in understanding the dissociation between the man and the environment. The aim of this study was to compare mental health, job satisfaction and well-being of nurses who work in hospital environments with different designs.  Material:This was a quasi-experimental study, in which 250 nurses filled out the mental health, well-being and job satisfaction questionnaires. They were categorized into 3 groups randomly. Group1 included 63 nurses who worked in an environment without any natural elements; group 2 included 100 nurses who worked in an environment with natural elements and group 3 included 87 nurses who worked in an environment without any psychological and ergonomic design. The last group was only stimulated by demonstrating visual stimulus. Data were analyzed using the ANOVA and Tukey’s pursuit statistical method. Results:The nurses who were working in an environment without any natural elements reported significantly lower scores on mental health, well-being and job satisfaction compared to those who were working in other groups, with the exception of social functioning . Moreover, depression and anxiety were more common in nurses who were working in environments without any natural elements compared to those in the other groups (p<0.05.Conclusions:We can increase job satisfaction, and mental health and well-being of the nurses through the use of natural design and environmental psychology indexes in hospital buildings.

  13. Learning Motivational Interviewing: Exploring Primary Health Care Nurses' Training and Counselling Experiences

    Soderlund, Lena Lindhe; Nilsen, Per; Kristensson, Margareta

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article explores the training and counselling experiences of 20 nurses, aiming to identify key elements in the process of learning and applying motivational interviewing (MI) counselling skills with adherence to protocols. Setting/method: The nurses were recruited from 10 primary health care units in Ostergotland, Sweden. The study…

  14. Environmental Psychology Effects on Mental Health Job Satisfaction and Personal Well Being of Nurses

    Tavakkoli, Sodeh; Asaadi, Mohammad Mahdy; Pakpour, Amir H; Hajiaghababaei, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Environmental psychology as a science could be useful in understanding the dissociation between the man and the environment. The aim of this study was to compare mental health, job satisfaction and well-being of nurses who work in hospital environments with different designs. Material: This was a quasi-experimental study, in which 250 nurses filled out the mental health, well-being and job satisfaction questionnaires. They were categorized into 3 groups randomly. Group1 included 63 nurses who worked in an environment without any natural elements; group 2 included 100 nurses who worked in an environment with natural elements and group 3 included 87 nurses who worked in an environment without any psychological and ergonomic design. The last group was only stimulated by demonstrating visual stimulus. Data were analyzed using the ANOVA and Tukey’s pursuit statistical method. Results: The nurses who were working in an environment without any natural elements reported significantly lower scores on mental health, well-being and job satisfaction compared to those who were working in other groups, with the exception of social functioning. Moreover, depression and anxiety were more common in nurses who were working in environments without any natural elements compared to those in the other groups (p<0.05). Conclusions: We can increase job satisfaction, and mental health and well-being of the nurses through the use of natural design and environmental psychology indexes in hospital buildings. PMID:26877749

  15. 42 CFR 413.85 - Cost of approved nursing and allied health education activities.

    2010-10-01

    ... health profession or trade in the actual environment in which these skills will be used by the student... registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) education programs that are determined on a reasonable cost basis are... continuously supervises the services of a single student nurse anesthetist, or where the medical...

  16. Health technology assessment in Finland

    Mäkelä, Marjukka; Roine, Risto P

    Since the 1990s, health policy makers in Finland have been supportive of evidence-based medicine and approaches to implement its results. The Finnish Office for Health Technology Assessment (Finohta) has grown from a small start in 1995 to a medium-sized health technology assessment (HTA) agency......, with special responsibility in providing assessments to underpin national policies in screening. External evaluations enhanced the rapid growth. In the Finnish environment, decision making on health technologies is extremely decentralized, so Finohta has developed some practical tools for implementing...

  17. The Impact of the Health Care System Reform on the Romanian Nurses Professionalization Process

    Silvia POPOVICI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Romanian health sector went through a process of reform began in 2000 which entered into a final adjustment phase in 2010 when the economic crisis, the health professionals accelerated trend of labour migration, the precarious health of the population brought new challenges to the unsolved existing problems. Nurses are numerically the most important category of health professionals. Since 1994 they experienced a convergent movement of professionalization in the interior of the nurse profession. The aim of the study is to explore the nurses’ perceptions of the impact of the health care system reform on their own profession and on the internal process of professionalization. As a result a quantitative research was conducted on a sample including 411 nurses of different specialties working in Iasi county. The results of the research point out the significant impact of factors related to the reform of the health care system on the quality of the care process, on the nurses’ work conditions and professional satisfaction. The external disruptive factors produce negative effects on nurses’ group cohesion, despite the centripetal efforts of the professional organization and induce a slowdown movement of the nurses professionalization process.

  18. Nursing and public health in Europe -- a new continuous education programme.

    Danielson, E; Krogerus-Therman, I; Sivertsen, B; Sourtzi, P

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the development of a new education programme in public health for nurses in the European Union (EU). The project, 'Development of a Continuous Professional Education Programme for Nurses in Public Health', is described together with its background and aim, which is to contribute to the development of new competencies of nurses in nursing and public health. For the development of these competencies, the framework for the programme's guidelines is organized around core modules common for all EU countries and elective modules, based on national health needs and policies proposed by each country. An example of the implementation of the programme from Sweden, where the programme has already been offered, is also presented. In addition to the educational programme itself, the opportunities for networking for nurses and teachers from different countries resulting from this effort are discussed. Finally, the evolving nature of public health in nursing is presented in relation to the roles that nurses/midwives already perform in various countries and situations, in order to point out the potential of this programme's contribution to the promotion of health of all European citizens. PMID:15725274

  19. Knowledge in health technology assessment

    Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2011-01-01

    Health systems are placing more and more emphasis on designing and delivering services that are focused on the patient, and there is a growing interest in patient aspects of health policy research and health technology assessment (HTA). Only a few HTA agencies use and invest in scientific methods...

  20. Assisted living nursing practice: health literacy and chronic illness management.

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2008-01-01

    Functional illiteracy is an inability to read sufficient to function in society. In the high-tech, information-dependent environment of postindustrial society, being illiterate is being at risk. Health literacy is the ability to access, understand, and use basic information about health conditions and services that is necessary to make informed decisions. Older adults (>/=65 years of age) have lower health literacy than all other age groups. Limited health literacy is associated with greater use of emergency department visits, increased rates of hospitalization, and failure to take important diagnostic tests. To maintain independence and self-determination, assisted living (AL) residents need to be able to understand a new or changed diagnosis, as well as oral and written instructions, especially with regard to their medication management. This article discusses health literacy, "plain language," and assessment and interventions to maintain health literacy. PMID:18694698

  1. Re-envisioning paediatric nurse training in a re-engineered health care system

    Minette Coetzee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: South African’s infant and child mortality rates remain high and at the current rate of decline will not meet the Millennium Development Goals of a two thirds decrease by 2015. At the latest available count, there were fewer than 1500 qualified paediatric nurses on the National South African Nursing Council register, with only about 100 nurses graduating with this qualification from South African nursing schools annually. It is not clear, however, if current paediatric nurse training programmes adequately equip nurses to make a real impact on reducing the under-5 mortality rate. In their 2011 interim report, the Ministerial Committee on Morbidity and Mortality in Children under 5 years recommended strengthening paediatric nurses’ training as a strategy to reduce the under-5 mortality rate.Method: In response to the Committee on Morbidity and Mortality in Children recommendation, a colloquium was convened as a national forum for schools of nursing, departments of health, health care facilities, clinicians and regulatory bodies to advance children’s nursing in South Africa.Objectives: The goals of the colloquium were to thoroughly investigate the situation in South Africa’s paediatric nurse training, plot ways to strengthen and expand postgraduate paediatric programmes to meet priority child health needs, and to build relationships between the various schools and stakeholders.Results: Outcomes included the clarification and strengthening of a ‘stakeholder grid’ in nurse training, recognition of the need for more active teaching and learning strategies in curricula linked to national child health priorities, as well as the need to develop and support clinical nursing practice in facilities.

  2. Undergraduate nurses reflections on Whatsapp use in improving primary health care education

    Juliana J. Willemse

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The global use of mobile devices with their connectivity capacity, and integrated with the affordances of social media networks, provides a resource-rich platform for innovative student-directed learning experiences.Objective: The objective of this study was to review the experiences of undergraduate nurses on the improvement of primary health care education at a School of Nursing at a University in the Western Cape, South Africa, through the incorporation of a social media application, WhatsApp.Method: A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive, and contextual design was used to explore and describe data collected from a purposive sample of 21 undergraduate nursing students. The study population was engaged in a WhatsApp discussion group to enhance their integration of theory and clinical practice of the health assessment competency of the Primary Health Care Module. Participants submitted electronic reflections on their experiences in the WhatsApp discussion group via email on completion of the study. Thematic analysis of the qualitative data collected was done according to Tesch’s (1990 steps of descriptive data analysis in order to identify the major themes in the study. The electronic reflections were analysed to explore their rich, reflective data.Results: Seven themes were identified that included: positive experiences using the WhatsApp group; the usefulness of WhatsApp for integrating theory and clinical practice; the availability of resources for test preparation; opportunity for clarification; anonymity; exclusion of students as a result of the lack of an appropriate device, and the application caused the battery of the device to run flat quickly.Conclusion: The results of the experiences of students in the WhatsApp discussion group could be used to inform the use of social media applications in teaching and learning, with the purpose of enhancing the integration of the theory and clinical practice.

  3. Health-related quality of life and nursing-sensitive outcomes in mechanically ventilated patients in an Intensive Care Unit: a study protocol

    Riera, Alba; Gallart, Elisabet; Vicálvaro, Araceli; Lolo, Montserrat; Solsona, Anabel; Mont, Anna; Gómez, Jordi; Téllez, David; Fuentelsaz-Gallego, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation (MV) is one of the most utilised techniques in the intensive care unit (ICU), but it can cause sequelae that can negatively influence the patient’s health-related quality of life (HRQL). Nursing-sensitive outcomes (NSOs) can also influence the HRQL. Assessing the HRQL of mechanically ventilated patients admitted to an ICU and its relation to nurse-sensitive outcomes will give healthcare professionals with valuable information to improve patient care. Methods ...

  4. A LITERATURE REVIEW: MENTAL HEALTH EFFECTS AND ASSESSMENT TOOLS OF ALCOHOLISM AMONG THE ELDERLY

    Muraguri, Marytriza; Mahat, Nirupa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of alcoholism on the mental health among the elderly. Different assessment tools were used in this study in order to assess alcoholism in the older adults. The goal of the study was to create awareness among nurses and health professionals about possible mental health effects of alcoholism among the elderly. In addition, the study provided knowledge regarding the assessment tools used in assessing alcoholism among the older adults. Studies ...

  5. The Impact of Nursing Students' Prior Chemistry Experience on Academic Performance and Perception of Relevance in a Health Science Course

    Boddey, Kerrie; de Berg, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Nursing students have typically found the study of chemistry to be one of their major challenges in a nursing course. This mixed method study was designed to explore how prior experiences in chemistry might impact chemistry achievement during a health science unit. Nursing students (N = 101) studying chemistry as part of a health science unit were…

  6. Situational analysis of teaching and learning of medicine and nursing students at Makerere University College of Health Sciences

    Kiguli Juliet

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS in Uganda is undergoing a major reform to become a more influential force in society. It is important that its medicine and nursing graduates are equipped to best address the priority health needs of the Ugandan population, as outlined in the government’s Health Sector Strategic Plan (HSSP. The assessment identifies critical gaps in the core competencies of the MakCHS medicine and nursing and ways to overcome them in order to achieve HSSP goals. Methods Documents from the Uganda Ministry of Health were reviewed, and medicine and nursing curricula were analyzed. Nineteen key informant interviews (KII and seven focus group discussions (FGD with stakeholders were conducted. The data were manually analyzed for emerging themes and sub-themes. The study team subsequently used the checklists to create matrices summarizing the findings from the KIIs, FGDs, and curricula analysis. Validation of findings was done by triangulating information from the different data collection methods. Results The core competencies that medicine and nursing students are expected to achieve by the end of their education were outlined for both programs. The curricula are in the process of reform towards competency-based education, and on the surface, are well aligned with the strategic needs of the country. But implementation is inadequate, and can be changed: • Learning objectives need to be more applicable to achieving competencies. • Learning experiences need to be more relevant for competencies and setting in which students will work after graduation (i.e. not just clinical care in a tertiary care facility. • Student evaluation needs to be better designed for assessing these competencies. Conclusion MakCHS has made a significant attempt to produce relevant, competent nursing and medicine graduates to meet the community needs. Ways to make them more effective though deliberate efforts to apply a competency-based education are possible.

  7. Care around birth, infant and mother health and maternal health investments - Evidence from a nurse strike.

    Kronborg, Hanne; Sievertsen, Hans Henrik; Wüst, Miriam

    2016-02-01

    Care around birth may impact child and mother health and parental health investments. We exploit the 2008 national strike among Danish nurses to identify the effects of care around birth on infant and mother health (proxied by health care usage) and maternal investments in the health of their newborns. We use administrative data from the population register on 39,810 Danish births in the years 2007-2010 and complementary survey and municipal administrative data on 8288 births in the years 2007-2009 in a differences-in-differences framework. We show that the strike reduced the number of mothers' prenatal midwife consultations, their length of hospital stay at birth, and the number of home visits by trained nurses after hospital discharge. We find that this reduction in care around birth increased the number of child and mother general practitioner (GP) contacts in the first month. As we do not find strong effects of strike exposure on infant and mother GP contacts in the longer run, this result suggests that parents substitute one type of care for another. While we lack power to identify the effects of care around birth on hospital readmissions and diagnoses, our results for maternal health investments indicate that strike-exposed mothers-especially those who lacked postnatal early home visits-are less likely to exclusively breastfeed their child at four months. Thus reduced care around birth may have persistent effects on treated children through its impact on parental investments. PMID:26771337

  8. The Nurse Consultant: an Innovative Role in the Greek Health Care System?

    Dimitrios Theofanidis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing has gone through phases of being a static profession in many countries withdifficulty in breaking this mold in order to escalate its full potential. In countries where innovative rolesand new posts for nursing flourish i.e. nurse consultant, clinical nurse specialist and others, nursesenjoy advanced professional independence, greater respect from other health care professionals andhold higher prestige within the extended society. The nursing profession in Greece requires innovativeways to raise the expertise and profile of its members.Aim: This paper presents the merits of introducing a consultant nurse training programme and postsinto the Greek National Health Care System in order actively to address the many problems facing theprofession.Discussion and Conclusions: The introduction of the nurse consultant post in Greece would provideaccess for continual professional development of the nursing staff, open specialist career opportunitiesand would raise the morale and standing of nurses. As this requires change, a brief overview of thetheory of change is also presented.

  9. Collaboration between public health nurses and the private sector.

    Marutani, Miki; Okada, Yumiko; Hasegawa, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We clarified collaborations between public health nurses (PHNs) and the private sector, such as nonprofit organizations.Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 private sector organizations and 13 PHNs who collaborate with them between December 2012 to October 2013. Interview guides were: overall suicide preventive measurements, details of collaboration between private sector organizations and PHNs, and suicide prevention outcomes/issues. Data from private sector organizations and PHNs were separately analyzed and categories created using qualitative and inductive design. Private sector organizations' and PHNs' categories were compared and separated into core categories by similarities.Results Six categories were created: 1. establishing a base of mutual understanding; 2. raising public awareness of each aim/characteristic; 3. competently helping high suicidal risk persons detected during each activity; 4. guarding lives and rehabilitating livelihoods after intervention; 5. restoring suicide attempters/bereaved met in each activity; and 6. continuing/expanding activities with reciprocal cohesion/evaluation.Conclusion PHNs are required to have the following suicide prevention tasks when collaborating with private sector organizations: understanding the private sector civilization, sharing PHN experiences, improving social determinants of health, meeting basic needs, supporting foundation/difficulties each other (Dear editor. Thank you for kind comments. I was going to explain that PHNs and NPOs support each other their foundation of activity and difficulties in their activities. The foundations include knowledge, information, budgets, manpower etc. The difficulties mean like suffering faced with suicide during activities.), and enhancing local governments' flexibilities/ promptness. PMID:26821750

  10. Supporting SIDS Families: The Public Health Nurse SIDS Home Visit.

    Stastny, Penny F; Keens, Thomas G; Alkon, Abbey

    2016-05-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) death has a devastating effect on parents. There is no known cause, so parents experience guilt about what they might have done or not done to contribute to the death. Although some SIDS parents may receive support from family and friends, the public health nurse (PHN) has an important professional role in providing grief support, SIDS education, and offering SIDS resources and referrals. Based on years of clinical practice, we recommend the following: Perform the home visit as soon as possible. Show care and compassion. Personalize the baby by using his or her name and asking to see photographs. Reassure the parents that grief is a process which takes time. Educate about what SIDS is and what it is not. Increasingly, SIDS deaths occur in the presence of risk factors. Explain that risk factors are not causes of death. As an authority in health care, reassuring families that they did not cause their baby's death has a tremendous impact on relieving guilt. Putting newly bereaved SIDS parents in contact with other SIDS parents is one of the most helpful actions a PHN can take to help families. PMID:26822270

  11. Nurse Practitioner Led Health Facility (Role 1 on Exercise Precision Support, 2011: A nurse practitioners observational report

    Danny O'Neill

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Late in 2011, the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF deployed a Role One enhanced health facility in support of Exercise Precision Support. The Role One health facility was deployed to the Shoalwater Bay military training area and tasked with providing 24 hour care during the pre-deployment exercise for Australian forces headed to operations overseas. The Precision Support exercise integrates with air operations, large scale logistic movements and austere base establishment elements, to aid in the preparation, training and sustainment of service personnel for operational roles, both in a conflict environment as well as humanitarian aid roles. The Role One provided this medical support with 2 Emergency Nurse Practitioners (ENPs, Registered Nurses (RNs, Medical Assistants (MAs and Radiographers. The ENPs took on the role of the senior clinicians during this exercise, competently managing all of the health complaints that presented during the exercise period. This article will discuss and review the role of the Nurse Practitioner (NP within a Role One, deployed Defence health facility, build on international evidence whilst supporting the utilisation of NPs in the RAAF Health Service and subsequently more widely in the greater Australian Defence Force (ADF. This article will provide some practical evidence enabling health commanders to recognise, deploy and fully utilise NPs, in order to support current and future ADF operations.

  12. Comparing Burnout Across Emergency Physicians, Nurses, Technicians, and Health Information Technicians Working for the Same Organization.

    Schooley, Benjamin; Hikmet, Neset; Tarcan, Menderes; Yorgancioglu, Gamze

    2016-03-01

    Studies on the topic of burnout measure the effects of emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP) (negative or cynical attitudes toward work), and reduced sense of personal accomplishment (PA). While the prevalence of burnout in practicing emergency medicine (EM) professionals has been studied, little is known of the prevalence and factors across physicians, nurses, technicians, and health information technicians working for the same institution. The aim of this study was to assess burnout differences across EM professional types.The total population of 250 EM professionals at 2 public urban hospitals in Turkey were surveyed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and basic social- and work-related demographics. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and additional post hoc tests were computed.Findings show that EE and DP scores were high across all occupational groups, while scores on PA were low. There was a statistically significant difference between nurses and medical technicians (P load and marital status showed no significance.Burnout can be high across occupational groups in the emergency department. Burnout is important for EM administrators to assess across human resources. Statistically significant differences across socio-demographic groups vary across occupational groups. However, differences between occupational groups may not be explained effectively by the demographic factors assessed in this or other prior studies. Rather, the factors associated with burnout are incomplete and require further institutional, cultural, and organizational analyses including differentiating between job tasks carried out by each EM job type. PMID:26962780

  13. Swedish Child Health Care nurses conceptions of overweight in children: a qualitative study

    Isma Gabriella E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Registered Sick Children’s Nurses and District Nurses employed at Child Health Care centres are in a position to help prevent childhood overweight and obesity. Prevention of this challenging public health threat could be improved through having a better understanding of how this group of nurses perceives childhood obesity. The aim of this study was to elucidate the conceptions of childhood overweight, including obesity, among nurses working in Child Health Care. Method A qualitative study using a phenomenographic approach, based on open-ended interviews with 18 Child Health Care nurses (CHC-nurses strategically selected from 17 Child Health Care Centres in the southern part of Sweden. Results Four categories of description emerged from the data: Perception of childhood overweight changes, Overweight in younger children a neglected concern, Overweight a delicate issue and Importance of family lifestyle. The participating CHC-nurses conceived overweight in children, primarily obesity in children to be an extensive and serious problem which affects children, families and the surrounding society. Overweight in children was further perceived as a consequence of their parent’s lifestyle and their awareness of the problem, which was considered by the CHC-nurses as a sensitive and a provoking issue. It was also perceived that overweight in children is not taken seriously during the pre-school period and that concerns regarding overweight in younger children were mainly about the appearance and not the health of the child. The CHC-nurses perceived that the proportion of overweight children has increased, which Swedish society and the CHC-nurses have adapted to. This adaptation makes it difficult for CHC-nurses to define those children who are overweight. Conclusion CHC-nurses provide a comprehensive and complex picture of childhood overweight, which includes several difficulties dealing with this issue. Attention to CHC-nurse’s conceptions of overweight in children is important since it can affect the parent-nurse relationship and thereby the nurse’s, as well as the parent’s efforts to influence the children’s weight. It is suggested that CHC- nurses should work with person centered counseling and empowerment concerning parent to child relations in cases involving overweight.

  14. ASSESSING SATISFACTION WITH THE NURSING CARE OF OLDER PATIENTS

    Pediaditaki O.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Assessing patients’ views indicates to patients that we are concerned about continuous assessment and improvingservices in general. It also indicates that we are a conscientious professional within a genuine humanistic line of work. Thepaper discusses the many theoretical and methodological problems that have arisen from attempts to measure andquantify patient satisfaction. Numerical data are thought to be ‘sterile’ without any insight into personal meanings. On theother hand purely qualitative methods have not been widely used. This discussion paper ends with the formulation of twosimple questions which can help us to explore and negotiate patients’ needs and satisfaction. Two non-offensivestraightforward questions are proposed as examples which could be used on a regular basis by nurses caring for olderpatients.

  15. Assessing undergraduate nursing students' knowledge, attitudes, and cultural competence in caring for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender patients.

    Strong, Kristy L; Folse, Victoria N

    2015-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients experience barriers to health care that include fear of discrimination, as well as insensitivity and lack of knowledge about LGBT-specific health needs among providers. This study examined the effectiveness of an educational intervention designed to improve knowledge and attitudes of baccalaureate nursing students regarding LGBT patient care. Education focused on key terminology, health disparities, medical needs of transgender patients, and culturally sensitive communication skills for competent LGBT patient care. Knowledge level and attitudes were evaluated before and after the intervention using a survey based on a modified Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men Scale and two assessment tools developed for this study. A statistically significant increase in positive attitudes and knowledge level was found immediately after the intervention. Findings from this study support the inclusion of education related to LGBT patient health care in undergraduate nursing curricula to promote cultural competence and sensitivity. PMID:25535762

  16. A comparative study of the experiences of violence of English and Swedish mental health nurses.

    Nolan, P; Soares, J; Dallender, J; Thomsen, S; Arnetz, B

    2001-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that violence in health care environments, especially mental health care, appears to be increasing. Although there is a lack of cross-cultural studies to prove it, this increase in violence would seem to be an international phenomenon. The present study sought to compare the extent and nature of violence encountered by mental health nurses in Sweden and England. Systematic studies of violence have previously been carried out independently in both countries but this was the first attempt to compare levels of violence. Clearly defined study protocols were put in place, an operational definition of 'violence' adhered to, and random samples recruited. A specially designed questionnaire was sent to every subject (Swedish nurses n=720; English nurses n=296) enquiring about the extent of nurses' exposure to violence, the nature and severity of the violence experienced, and the effect of violence on self-esteem and job satisfaction. Significant differences were found with English nurses experiencing more violence than their Swedish counterparts. Yet support for English nurses appeared to be less good than for Swedish nurses. Reasons for the differences are discussed along with possible measures to minimise the frequency of violence against nurses and the negative effects on their work. PMID:11470100

  17. Does poor school satisfaction inhibit positive outcome of health promotion at school? A cross-sectional study of schoolchildren's response to health dialogues with school health nurses

    Borup, Ina; Holstein, Bjørn E

    2006-01-01

    Students with high school satisfaction were more likely to reflect on and discuss the content of health dialogues with school health nurses, and more likely to follow the nurse's advice. This was demonstrated among 5205 students ages 11-15-years, in a random sample of schools in Denmark....

  18. Development of an Electronic Role-Play Assessment Initiative in Bioscience for Nursing Students

    Craft, Judy; Ainscough, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Devising authentic assessments for subjects with large enrolments is a challenge. This study describes an electronic role-play assessment for approximately 600 first-year nursing students to learn and apply pathophysiology (bioscience) concepts to nursing practice. Students used Microsoft Office PowerPoint[R] to prepare electronic role-plays both…

  19. Knowledge and perception of oral health promotion in schools among dental nurses in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Chen, C J; Jallaludin, R L

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, the concept of a Health-Promoting School has received much interest. In Malaysia, dental nurses are ideally placed to play a lead role in promoting Oral Health within the school setting. This study aims to provide information on the knowledge, perception and perceived role of Oral Health Promotion in schools, among dental nurses. A postal questionnaire was used to measure dental nurses' knowledge, perception and perceived role of Oral Health Promotion. The majority (60%) of dental nurses had good knowledge of Oral Health Promotion. Generally, they perceived that they play an important role in promoting Oral Health in schools. However, a sizeable proportion (25%) did not think they had a role to play in working together with school authorities to provide children with healthy food choices in school canteens. The majority (60%) of dental nurses did not perceive Oral Health Promotion to be important as a whole. They had a good perception of the concepts: it supports behaviour change, it has appropriate goals, it integrates oral health and general health and relieves anxiety. However, they had a poorer perception of the concepts; diverse educational approaches, participation, focus on prevention, early intervention, "spread of effect" of dental health education and "make healthier choices the easier choices". Years of service was not significantly associated with knowledge and perception of Oral Health Promotion. Dental nurses should be reoriented towards a more holistic practice of Oral Health Promotion. Workshops that invite active participation from dental nurses should be conducted to equip them with the necessary knowledge and skills. PMID:11200211

  20. Decision making and work loads as predictors of student nurses' health status.

    McManus, E M

    1990-01-01

    This study was conceived as a means of exploring the factors that could contribute to student nurses' burnout with their educational programs. Current literature mainly addresses this process in terms of the experience of registered nurses. This descriptive study sought to determine the relationships between nursing students' latitude in academic decision making and school work load demands and their effects on the students' health status. Thirty-four female, second-quarter senior nursing students completed a written tool, adapted from one developed by Karasek. Data analysis revealed that for this study, alterations in the nursing students' health status could be predicted from the independent variables, latitude in academic decision making, and school work load demand. PMID:2342620

  1. Health complaints among nurses working near MRI scanners-A descriptive pilot study

    A questionnaire-based descriptive pilot study was conducted among all nurses routinely working with MRI in the Northern part of Sweden to provide an indication of the self-reported prevalence of health complaints related to working with MRI systems. Fifty-nine nurses (88% response rate), with on average 8 (±6) years experience with MRI scanning procedures, returned the questionnaire. In total, 9 nurses (15%) reported regularly experiencing at least one of the health complaints (1-5% for specific health complaints) attributed to arise or be aggravated by their presence in the MRI scanning room. Stratification of the results indicated that reporting of adverse symptoms was not related to the level of occupational workload/stress. However, reporting of health complaints was related to the strength of the magnet(s) the nurses worked with, with 57% of symptoms reported by those nurses working with the strongest systems (both 1.5 and 3 T scanners in this population). Although this descriptive study did not include a control population and was based on self-reporting of health complaints, these data indicate that the prevalence of reported health complaints is not related to perceived work load or occupational stress, but does confirm data from other occupational sectors and indicates that the prevalence of adverse health complaints increases with the strength of the MRI system for nurses as well.

  2. Anglo-American nursing theory, individualism and mental health care: a social conflict perspective.

    Leighton, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    This paper uses social conflict theory to reconsider the relationship of American nursing theory and individualised mental health care in the UK. It is argued that nursing theory has developed within a context of 'American dream' individualism, and that this ideology may be problematic for some UK mental health nurses and service users whose values and beliefs are those of different socio-political traditions. The paper explores the historical background of Anglo-American nursing theory, and then uses conflict theory to generate challenging propositions about the culture bias and political instrumentality of individualised care in mental health settings. In so doing, it critiques the 'scientific' and 'liberal' preconceptions of individualised care which have dominated mental health care policy for over a decade. PMID:14670391

  3. Psychology as a Theoretical Foundation for Health Education in Nursing: Empowerment or Social Control?

    Piper, Stewart M.; Brown, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    Psychology offers nurses engaging in health education insight into the motivation behind behavior. It can aid the process of developing patient knowledge, understanding, and empowerment, but not if used to reinforce social control. (SK)

  4. Influence of health, lifestyle, working conditions, and sociodemography on early retirement among nurses

    Friis, Karina; Ekholm, Ola; Hundrup, Yrsa A; Obel, Erik B; Grønbaek, Morten

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of the study was to analyze the relationship between health, lifestyle, work-related and sociodemographic factors, and older nurses' exit from the labor market to Post-Employment Wage (PEW). PEW is an early retirement scheme to make it possible for workers to retire at the age of 60....... METHODS: The study was based on 5,538 nurses in the age of 51-59 who in 1993 completed a questionnaire on health, lifestyle, working environment, and sociodemographic factors. The survey information was combined with longitudinal data from the Danish Integrated Database for Labor Market Research compiled...... by Statistics Denmark. The follow-up period was from 1993 to 2002. RESULTS: Nurses who had poor self-rated health were more likely to join PEW compared with nurses who considered their health as good (HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.16-1.41). Low job influence, high workload, and physical job demands only...

  5. Enhancing the learning of student nurses in a community "sign off" placement: implications for students, health services and higher education

    Brown, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This action research project explored the implications for student nurses, health services and Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) of placing students for their final “sign off” placement prior to registration with district nursing teams who nurse patients at home. The placing of students with District Nursing teams for the “sign off” period is unusual in the London area. The stated aim of the Department of Health is that students should have more experience outside of the hospital setting (...

  6. Demonstrating the cost effectiveness of an expert occupational and environmental health nurse: application of AAOHN's success tools. American Association of Occupational Health Nurses.

    Morris, J A; Smith, P S

    2001-12-01

    According to DiBenedetto, "Occupational health nurses enhance and maximize the health, safety, and productivity of the domestic and global work force" (1999b). This project clearly defined the multiple roles and activities provided by an occupational and environmental health nurse and assistant, supported by a part time contract occupational health nurse. A well defined estimate of the personnel costs for each of these roles is helpful both in demonstrating current value and in future strategic planning for this department. The model highlighted both successes and a business cost savings opportunity for integrated disability management. The AAOHN's Success Tools (1998) were invaluable in launching the development of this cost effectiveness model. The three methods were selected from several tools of varying complexities offered. Collecting available data to develop these metrics required internal consultation with finance, human resources, and risk management, as well as communication with external health, safety, and environmental providers in the community. Benchmarks, surveys, and performance indicators can be found readily in the literature and online. The primary motivation for occupational and environmental health nurses to develop cost effectiveness analyses is to demonstrate the value and worth of their programs and services. However, it can be equally important to identify which services are not cost effective so knowledge and skills may be used in ways that continue to provide value to employers (AAOHN, 1996). As evidence based health care challenges the occupational health community to demonstrate business rationale and financial return on investment, occupational and environmental health nurses must meet that challenge if they are to define their preferred future (DiBenedetto, 2000). PMID:11806494

  7. Health impact assessment in Korea

    Recently, Health Impact Assessment has gained great attention in Korea. First, the Ministry of Environment introduced HIA within existing Environment Impact Assessment. Second, the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs began an HIA program in 2008 in alliance with Healthy Cities. In this short report, these two different efforts are introduced and their opportunities and challenges discussed. We believe these two approaches complement each other and both need to be strengthened. We also believe that both can contribute to the development of health in policy and project development and ultimately to improvements in the Korean population's health.

  8. Analysis about production of nursing knowledge on health education and aging: review article

    Isis Marques Severo; Maria Cristina Sant’Anna da Silva; Maria Isabel Pinto Coelho Gorini

    2008-01-01

    This study is exploratory, of qualitative nature and has the objective to identify the bibliographical production of nursing related to the aging, to the education in health and the methodological strategies, in Brazilian publications, from 2000 to 2006. Online database BDENF was used to search the articles and the keywords were: health education, aged, aging, behavior and nursing. Eight articles had been identified and five were chosen which are in the following publications: Revista Brasile...

  9. Public health nurses' experiences of training in Marte Meo communication skills.

    O'Donovan, Colette

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this research study was to explore with Public Health Nurses their experiences of training in Marte Meo communication skills. Method: A qualitative design using a phenomenological approach was used. Data analysis was guided by a hermeneutic circle of understanding and drew upon Heideggerian principles of philosophy. Data were gathered by unstructured individual interviews with ten Public Health Nurses who participated in the Marte Meo communication skills training course. ...

  10. Supporting Gang Violence Prevention Efforts: A Public Health Approach for Nurses

    McDaniel, Dawn D.; Logan, J.E.; Schneiderman, Janet U.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of gang violence on a youth’s risk for death or injury is tremendous. Prevention of complex societal problems, such as gang violence, requires a substantial effort and commitment from many sectors and disciplines. Nurses are uniquely positioned to help lead such efforts. Understanding the public health perspective to gang violence may be an important tool for nurses attempting to prevent this problem. The public health approach has four key components: defining and monitoring the p...

  11. Burnout in Relation to Specific Contributing Factors and Health Outcomes among Nurses: A Systematic Review

    Natasha Khamisa; Brian Oldenburg; Karl Peltzer

    2013-01-01

    Nurses have been found to experience higher levels of stress-related burnout compared to other health care professionals. Despite studies showing that both job satisfaction and burnout are effects of exposure to stressful working environments, leading to poor health among nurses, little is known about the causal nature and direction of these relationships. The aim of this systematic review is to identify published research that has formally investigated relationships between these variables. ...

  12. The management of the health system and the formation of the nurse: exploratory research of field

    Claudia Aarestrup; Claudia Mara de Melo Tavares

    2007-01-01

    This study it analyzes the ways of performance of the nurse in the different fields of the management of the health system, identifying intervening factors in the management process; aspects related to its formation that favor or harm the practical one of the management, as also, the necessary preceding experiences to the performance of the paper of manager in the present time. A exploratory research of field with nurses of 11 pertaining cities to the Regional Management of Health of Manhumir...

  13. Environmental Psychology Effects on Mental Health Job Satisfaction and Personal Well Being of Nurses

    Tavakkoli, Sodeh; Asaadi, Mohammad Mahdy; Amir H Pakpour; Hajiaghababaei, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Environmental psychology as a science could be useful in understanding the dissociation between the man and the environment. The aim of this study was to compare mental health, job satisfaction and well-being of nurses who work in hospital environments with different designs. Material: This was a quasi-experimental study, in which 250 nurses filled out the mental health, well-being and job satisfaction questionnaires. They were categorized into 3 groups randomly. Group1 included 63...

  14. Mothers' Experiences of Facilitated Peer Support Groups and Individual Child Health Nursing Support: A Comparative Evaluation

    Kruske, Sue; Schmied, Virginia; Sutton, Ivy; O'Hare, Joan

    2004-01-01

    The “Early Bird Program” is a support group facilitated by child and family health nurses and offered to families of infants aged 0–8 weeks in South East Sydney, Australia. This paper describes the experiences of 20 women who participated in the Early Bird groups and 20 women who chose to use individual consultations with the child and family health nurse. The qualitative evaluation used focus groups and interviews with the 40 women, and data were analysed using content analysis. Key findings...

  15. Acoustic assessment of speech privacy curtains in two nursing units.

    Pope, Diana S; Miller-Klein, Erik T

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals have complex soundscapes that create challenges to patient care. Extraneous noise and high reverberation rates impair speech intelligibility, which leads to raised voices. In an unintended spiral, the increasing noise may result in diminished speech privacy, as people speak loudly to be heard over the din. The products available to improve hospital soundscapes include construction materials that absorb sound (acoustic ceiling tiles, carpet, wall insulation) and reduce reverberation rates. Enhanced privacy curtains are now available and offer potential for a relatively simple way to improve speech privacy and speech intelligibility by absorbing sound at the hospital patient's bedside. Acoustic assessments were performed over 2 days on two nursing units with a similar design in the same hospital. One unit was built with the 1970s' standard hospital construction and the other was newly refurbished (2013) with sound-absorbing features. In addition, we determined the effect of an enhanced privacy curtain versus standard privacy curtains using acoustic measures of speech privacy and speech intelligibility indexes. Privacy curtains provided auditory protection for the patients. In general, that protection was increased by the use of enhanced privacy curtains. On an average, the enhanced curtain improved sound absorption from 20% to 30%; however, there was considerable variability, depending on the configuration of the rooms tested. Enhanced privacy curtains provide measureable improvement to the acoustics of patient rooms but cannot overcome larger acoustic design issues. To shorten reverberation time, additional absorption, and compact and more fragmented nursing unit floor plate shapes should be considered. PMID:26780959

  16. Acoustic assessment of speech privacy curtains in two nursing units

    Diana S Pope

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hospitals have complex soundscapes that create challenges to patient care. Extraneous noise and high reverberation rates impair speech intelligibility, which leads to raised voices. In an unintended spiral, the increasing noise may result in diminished speech privacy, as people speak loudly to be heard over the din. The products available to improve hospital soundscapes include construction materials that absorb sound (acoustic ceiling tiles, carpet, wall insulation and reduce reverberation rates. Enhanced privacy curtains are now available and offer potential for a relatively simple way to improve speech privacy and speech intelligibility by absorbing sound at the hospital patient′s bedside. Acoustic assessments were performed over 2 days on two nursing units with a similar design in the same hospital. One unit was built with the 1970s′ standard hospital construction and the other was newly refurbished (2013 with sound-absorbing features. In addition, we determined the effect of an enhanced privacy curtain versus standard privacy curtains using acoustic measures of speech privacy and speech intelligibility indexes. Privacy curtains provided auditory protection for the patients. In general, that protection was increased by the use of enhanced privacy curtains. On an average, the enhanced curtain improved sound absorption from 20% to 30%; however, there was considerable variability, depending on the configuration of the rooms tested. Enhanced privacy curtains provide measureable improvement to the acoustics of patient rooms but cannot overcome larger acoustic design issues. To shorten reverberation time, additional absorption, and compact and more fragmented nursing unit floor plate shapes should be considered.

  17. Measuring compliance of conducting an occupational health risk assessment in the occupational health nurse’s practice

    Nicolene de Jager

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Occupational health nurses (OHNs are qualified registered nurses with a postgraduate qualification in occupational health nursing. An important activity of OHNs is to identify and assess health risks in the workplace. Health risk assessments (HRAs are conducted by OHNs to determine all the occupational health stressors, for example noise, vibration and chemical substances. The authors conducted legal compliance occupational health audits and observed that 85% (n = 23 of OHNs in different settings conduct HRAs only to a limited extent. The following objective was formulated for the study: To explore and describe the extent to which OHNs conduct HRAs as it is a legal requirement for compliance; and the possible reasons for not adhering to the regulation and conduct them only to a limited extent. A quantitative, descriptive design was used in this study. A sampling frame was developed from a list of all the members of the South African Society of Occupational Health Nursing Practitioners (SASOHN in Gauteng. From the target population of OHNs in Gauteng, a systematic cluster sampling method was used. A self-developed questionnaire was distributed by mail and e-mail, and authors sent respondents reminders. The authors ensured that validity, reliability and ethical standards were adhered to. The findings revealed that OHNs are mature, experienced, predominately female practitioners who operate on behalf of a disproportionately large number of workers. Four factors influencing these nurses in conducting an HRA to a limited extent were identified: competence, ignorance about the role of the OHN, workload and attitude.

  18. Engaging primary healthcare nurses in men's health education: A pilot study.

    Rizio, Taletha A; Thomas, Wendy J; O'Brien, Anthony Paul; Collins, Veronica; Holden, Carol A

    2016-03-01

    Many countries have identified a need for targeted men's health promotion within primary health care as part of broader men's health policy. Primary health care nurses are well placed to deliver such services but may lack the requisite skills. The aim of this study was to pilot the delivery phase of an education program and evaluate a train-the-trainer approach for delivering men's health education to primary health care nurses. The 8-h train-the-trainer workshop was designed to equip nurses to deliver men's health education workshops to peers. Surveys of facilitators (n = 18) and peer workshop participants (n = 98) evaluated their level of confidence in men's health and knowledge and skills in men's health promotion. After completing the train-the-trainer workshop, most facilitators expressed confidence (92%), and all indicated sufficient knowledge and access to resources to deliver a peer workshop. All agreed that the module was sufficiently flexible to suit their local setting. Following the peer education workshop, facilitators and workshop participants reported high levels of confidence and knowledge in men's health promotion. This pilot evaluation suggests train-the-trainer is an effective model to deliver men's health education across a range of settings, with a flexible approach to raising awareness and improving the skills of primary health care nurses in men's health promotion. PMID:26803801

  19. Swimming without the water: a critical perspective on mental health experience for adult nursing students.

    Barrett, Paul; Jackson, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    Adult nurses and adult field nursing students come into contact with a diverse range of other patient groups in their practice but perhaps none more so than those who have co-existing mental health issues. Consequently adult field student nurses must be equipped with the requisite knowledge and skills to competently care for their patients who also experience mental health problems. Given the pressure on placements many education providers have developed alternatives to direct mental health experiences. The authors review their own experience of some of the modalities that higher education institutes (HEI) use to instruct their students in this field. They argue that, ideally, there is no substitute for the practical experience of placements in the mental health sector, particularly if these include contact with mental health nursing. The paper concludes with some recommendations for nursing education and our professional body that could help equip adult field nursing students with the necessary experience and skills of mental health to support them into their future careers. PMID:23830557

  20. School-Based Youth Health Nurses and Adolescent Decision-Making Concerning Reproductive and Sexual Health Advice: How Can the Law Guide Healthcare Practitioners in this Context?

    Smith, Malcolm K; Stepanov, Nikola

    2014-03-11

    Abstract School-Based Youth Health Nurses (SBYHNs) work in Queensland high schools, providing sexual and reproductive health care/advice (amongst other things) to adolescents. SBYHNs are often responsible for referring high school students to other health care practitioners or external health services/community agencies. One of the difficulties faced in this context is how to assess the issue of capacity in terms of the adolescent's ability to provide consent to his or her own health care without parental involvement. This is important because it enables SBYHNs to maintain confidentiality with adolescents, which encourages adolescents to obtain sexual health advice. In this paper we outline the key legal principles relevant to nurses working in this field. We provide some practical examples of issues faced by SBYHNs and consider how the issue of Gillick competency is relevant to these examples. We demonstrate that the law seeks to prioritise the concept of confidentiality and aims to avoid exposing adolescents to harm that may result from unsafe sexual practices. Importantly, the issues discussed in this paper are relevant to nurses working within this field in all Australian jurisdictions. PMID:24611680

  1. Health Effects Assessment for Ammonia

    The report summarizes and evaluates information relevant to a preliminary interim assessment of adverse health effects associated with specific chemicals or compounds. The Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (Superfund) uses these documents in preparing cost-benefit analyse...

  2. Nursing students' perceptions of their knowledge of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender issues: effectiveness of a multi-purpose assignment in a public health nursing class.

    Carabez, Rebecca; Pellegrini, Marion; Mankovitz, Andrea; Eliason, Michele J; Dariotis, Wei Ming

    2015-01-01

    Nurses work with diverse populations, but the nursing literature lacks research, theoretical frameworks, or practice guidelines regarding lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health. Through diverse teaching strategies, students explored issues related to LGBT patients, families, and nurses using a cultural humility lens. Diverse teaching strategies included readings, a 2-hour presentation on LGBT health issues, and an assignment to conduct a scripted interview with two nurse key informants, based on the Health Care Equality Index (HEI). Students completed an online LGBT awareness preinterview survey, completed interviews, and completed a postinterview survey. Students showed a significant increase in knowledge about sexual orientation and gender identity and research and interview methods from pretest to posttest. The diverse teaching strategies involved in this assignment can enhance student knowledge, attitudes, and skills related to LGBT health care needs and increase appreciation of nursing research. PMID:25545145

  3. UK and USA Clinical Mental Health Nurse Specialists' perceptions of their work.

    Nolan, P; BourKe, P; Doran, M

    2002-06-01

    There is little scholarship to compare the work of mental health nurses in different countries, although this is perhaps understandable given that mental health nursing as a discrete discipline exists only in a few countries worldwide. The small-scale study reported here sought to compare the perceptions of UK and American Clinical Nurse Specialists of various aspects of their work, including latest professional developments, current therapies and interventions, and the major problems confronting nurses today. Prior to the main study being undertaken, a short questionnaire was piloted in both countries. The main questionnaire was distributed to 34 American nurses and completed by 25 (75.5% response rate), and to 28 UK nurses and completed by 24 (86% response rate). Descriptive statistics and content analyses were used to analyse the data which suggested that where UK nurses were concerned with the range and availability of services for clients and their families, American nurses were primarily preoccupied with the quality of those services. The American sample placed greater emphasis on the provision of care that enabled clients to take responsibility for themselves than did their UK counterparts. While acknowledging the limitations of the study, the results would appear to suggest that American nurses tend to favour humanistic care, have a belief in the efficacy of chemotherapy and aim to get people functioning independently. They fear the threat to their relationship with clients that managed care might entail. Concurrently, UK nurses appear to be preoccupied with finding appropriate services for their clients and they appear to believe that the changing nature of their work is designed to accommodate structural changes in the health service, rather than to meet the needs of clients. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:12060373

  4. Stress assessment by anaesthesiologists and nurses working in paediatric intensive care units

    Grzeskowiak, Malgorzata; Bartkowska-Sniatkowska, Alicja; Rosada-Kurasinska, Jowita; Kielbasiewicz-Drozdowska, Iwona; Janicki, Piotr K.

    2013-01-01

      Abstract. Paediatric intensive care units (PICU) play a special role in the therapy of critically ill children. The physicians (anaesthesiologists) and nurses are at a particular risk of job-related stress because continuous work stress can lead to psychological and physical disturbances. The aim of the study was to assess the stress level among the anaesthesiologists and nurses in the PICU. The anaesthesiologists and nurses (104), recruited from five university hospital centres in Poland, ...

  5. Psychometric Properties of the Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale

    Yoon, Sunmoo; Yen, Po-Yin; Bakken, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the factor structure, internal consistency reliability, and responsiveness of the Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale (SANICS). Combined BS/MS nursing students (N=336) completed the 93-item scale, which was based upon published and locally-developed nursing informatics competency statements. Exploratory principal component analysis with oblique promax rotation extracted five factors comprising 30 items that explained 63.7% of th...

  6. Assessment and evaluation of nurses training programme on radiation

    Many nurses in hospitals and clinics are concerned about the care of patients diagnosed or treated with radiation. Knowledge about radiation effects and radiological protection was in limited supply among nurses. Some nurses are anxious about the effects of occupational radiation, and they have not appropriately coped with their patients' questions about radiation effects of medical exposure. We investigated the level of knowledge about radiation among nurses and required knowledge for nurses in hospitals and clinics. Based on the results of the investigation, we designed an education and training program of lectures and practice for nurses in hospitals. After the education and training by our program was done, we evaluated the effects of the education and training with an interview and a questionnaire for each nurse. (author)

  7. HEALTH EFFECTS ASSESSMENT FOR BENZENE

    The document represents a brief, quantitatively oriented scientific summary of health effects data. It was developed by the Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office to assist the Office of Emergency and Remedial Response in establishing chemical-specific health-related goals ...

  8. Child care consultations held by nurses within the Family Health Strategy

    Francisco Fagner Sousa Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at identifying initiatives taken by nurses during child care routine visits in Family Health Units. It is an observational, descriptive and quantitative research. Data collection took place from August to October 2011, through the observation of three consultations carried out by eight nurses (24 appointments for the Family Health Strategy Scheme in Picos - Piauí. During consultations, the following issues were more frequently observed: anthropometry, reflexes according to age, encouraging of exclusive breastfeeding and advice on child hygiene. The need for further nurse training through continuous education was verified, seeking to improve care in order to contribute to the improvement of nursing care quality focused on promoting child health thru childcare consultations.

  9. Empowerment in the interpersonal field: discourses of acute mental health nurses.

    Lloyd, M

    2007-08-01

    Social policy greatly influences the working environment of mental health nurses but in practice can be difficult to translate. Empowerment of service users is one area that is constantly significant in policy, locally and nationally, yet quite difficult to define in practice. This ethnomethodological study explored the practice of 10 mental health nurses working in an acute admissions unit. Through semi-structured interviews, the nurses were asked to discuss the taken-for-granted methods of empowerment with individual service users, their families and with work colleagues. The results were thematically analysed and compared with international findings, which reflected an awareness among mental health nurses of empowering practice in four areas. These were: Working with mental illness, Making connections, Responsibility and Teamworking. PMID:17635257

  10. Developing a preceptorship/mentorship model for home health care nurses.

    DeCicco, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Preceptorship and mentorship programs are used in the health care sector to educate nurses, enhance their leadership skills, and improve their quality of work life. Recognizing the importance of these initiatives, Saint Elizabeth Health Care sought funding to create an innovative model of preceptorship/mentorship that meets the unique needs of home health care nurses. The methods utilized included focus groups, key informant interviews, and a workflow analysis. Factors that influence preceptorship such as nursing workload, preceptor training and remuneration were examined to develop a new model that offers career enhancement and leadership opportunities for preceptors and mentors, and promotes a welcoming environment for preceptees. Reward and recognition programs were created for preceptors to acknowledge their leadership contribution at the front line. This study demonstrates how evidence and innovation were used to create a preceptorship/mentorship model to develop community nursing leaders of the future. PMID:18444063

  11. The Impact of Certificate-of-Need Laws on Nursing Home and Home Health Care Expenditures.

    Rahman, Momotazur; Galarraga, Omar; Zinn, Jacqueline S; Grabowski, David C; Mor, Vincent

    2016-02-01

    Over the past two decades, nursing homes and home health care agencies have been influenced by several Medicare and Medicaid policy changes including the adoption of prospective payment for Medicare-paid postacute care and Medicaid-paid long-term home and community-based care reforms. This article examines how spending growth in these sectors was affected by state certificate-of-need (CON) laws, which were designed to limit the growth of providers and have remained unchanged for several decades. Compared with states without CON laws, Medicare and Medicaid spending in states with CON laws grew faster for nursing home care and more slowly for home health care. In particular, we observed the slowest growth in community-based care in states with CON for both the nursing home and home health industries. Thus, controlling for other factors, public postacute and long-term care expenditures in CON states have become dominated by nursing homes. PMID:26223431

  12. Self-assessment of nursing informatics competencies for doctor of nursing practice students.

    Choi, Jeungok; Zucker, Donna M

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the informatics competencies of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) students and whether these competencies differed between DNP students in the post-baccalaureate (BS) and post-master's (MS) tracks. Self-reported informatics competencies were collected from 132 DNP students (68 post-BS and 64 post-MS students) in their first year in the program (2007 to 2010). Students were assessed in 18 areas of 3 competency categories: computer skills, informatics knowledge, and informatics skills. Post-BS students were competent in 4 areas (computer skills in communication, systems, documentation, and informatics knowledge about impact of information management), whereas post-MS students were competent in only 1 area (computer skills in communication). Students in both tracks reported computer skills in decision support as their least competent area. Overall, post-BS students reported slightly higher than or similar competency scores as post-MS students, but scores were statistically significant in only 3 of 18 areas. The assessment indicated that knowledge and skills on informatics competencies need to be improved, especially in computer skills for data access and use of decision support systems. Strategies are suggested to integrate competencies into existing informatics course and DNP curricula. Further studies are recommended using an objective measure of informatics competencies. PMID:24267932

  13. The education and contribution of women health care professionals in Saudi Arabia: the case of nursing.

    el-Sanabary, N

    1993-12-01

    "Women constitute the key resource for attaining the goal of health for all by the year 2000," maintains a report by The World Health Organization. Achieving this goal requires massive efforts including (1) the training of women health care professionals; and (2) the nonformal health education of women, the primary health care providers to their families and communities. This paper focuses on the first area, specifically on the education of women nurses in a Third World country, Saudi Arabia, where traditional attitudes persist against intermingling of the genders and the treatment of women by men. It examines the progress and problems encountered in recruiting Saudi women for nursing education and practice; describes the evolution of nursing education programs; and analyzes the obstacles to women's participation in these programs and in the nursing profession. The paper concludes with recommendations to address the problem, increase women's participation, and contribute to that country's health development. The paper is based upon primary and secondary data, including official statistics; personal interviews with Saudi women health professionals and students; the memoirs of a leading Saudi woman nurse and educator, the author's personal observations and experiences with the health care system during four years of residence in Saudi Arabia, and available literature on the subject. PMID:8284700

  14. FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE SELECTION OF LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDENT NURSES IN PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    L F Small

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available T he researcher, being a nursing lecturer, questioned the method of selection of learning opportunities for student nurses in two training hospitals in the Northern part of Namibia.

    The study therefore focused on the following objective: To identify the factors that influence the selection of learning opportunities for primary health care in hospital units. A qualitative research design utilising focus group discussions were used. The population consisted of conveniently selected lecturers, student nurses and registered nurses. The same initial question was asked in each focus group to initiate the discussions. The data were analysed according to Tesch's method.

    The results indicated that there is positive commitment from the lecturers and registered nurses to be involved in selecting appropriate learning opportunities. The student nurses also demonstrated a willingness to learn and to be exposed to learning opportunities in primary health care. There were however certain constraints that emerged as themes, namely:
    • Managerial constraints • Educational constraints
    Under the theme "managerial constraints" categories such as workload, nursing staff shortages and communication problems were identified. Under the theme "educational constraints" categories such as a lack of guidance, and the correlation of theory and practice emerged.

    Recommendations based on this research report include improvement of in-service education on managerial and educational aspects to facilitate the primary health care approach in hospitals.

  15. Mental Health promotion of a hospital through the nurse in the liaison psychiatry team

    Natalia Cámara Conde

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We show a proposal to increase the quality of nursing cares, improving mental health care of hospitalized patients by creating the figure of the liaison nurse within the liaison psychiatry team. This nurse would not only be a reference to support the nursing staff at the level of patient care, but also the psycho-emotional self-care professional.Objectives: Justifying the need to include the figure of the specialist mental health team liaison psychiatry nurse. Method: The rotation as residents, for a month, with the interconsultation team psychiatric hospital Gregorio Marañón and literature review. Results: There have been partially unmet needs, these could be covered with the existence of a nurse specialist in mental health consultation in this hospital. Discussion: Possibly it poses difficulties in defining the roles of various liaison team professionals, which we expect can be defined at the start implementing the new member.The hospital itself has an own field defined, articulated through the NANDA, NIC, NOC methodology, which covers aspects that so far have not being made, there is not a nurse figure into the psychiatric consultation liaison team.

  16. The Silence of Our Science: Nursing Research on LGBT Older Adult Health.

    Cloyes, Kristin G

    2016-03-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) older adults have been largely invisible within health and aging services research, despite being disproportionately burdened by poor health and aging outcomes. The current study examines the prevalence of LGBT aging and older adult health-related studies in the 2010-2014 nursing literature, and how this topic is being addressed. Systematic CINAHL and PubMed searches were conducted and compared to (a) quantify the prevalence of LGBT older adult-related scholarship in nursing research; (b) document the appearance of relevant publications in top nursing journals; (c) identify the focus of articles with a substantive focus on LGBT older adult health or aging; and (d) compare the prevalence of LGBT older adult-related literature in nursing, gerontology, medicine, and social work. Findings indicate that research explicitly including LGBT older adults is lacking across the health sciences, particularly in nursing (where it has been largely absent). Implications for nursing research, practice, and education are discussed. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2016; 9(2):92-104.]. PMID:26716654

  17. Perceived Ability to Practice in Disaster Management among Public Health Nurses in Aceh, Indonesia

    Ardia Putra

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The increasing number of disaster events around the world has challenged every country to develop better disaster-management strategies. As a part of healthcare system, public health nurses (PHNs should be involved in caring for people in disasters. Currently, there is no known study whether PHNs of Aceh, Indonesia, working with community people who are at high risk of confronting natural disasters, are able to perform their roles and functions regarding disaster management. Methods: 252 PHNs from twenty-seven public health centers in Aceh were studied during November to December 2010 to evaluate their perceived ability to practice regarding disaster management at each disaster phase: preparedness, response, and recovery phase. The perceived ability to practice was assessed by using the 30-statement, five-point Likert-scale (0-4 of Public Health Nurses’ Perceived Ability to Practice Regarding Disaster Management Questionnaire (PHNPP-DMQ. The composite scores of each phase and the total score were calculated and transformed to percentage for ease of presentation across disaster phases.Results: Overall, the PHNs’ perceived ability to practice regarding disaster management in Aceh was at a moderate level (M=74.57%, SD=13.27. The highest mean score was for the recovery phase (M=78%, and the lowest mean score was in the preparedness phase (66.15%.Conclusion: The finding of this study evokes challenges to the local government of Aceh province to further prepare PHNs to increase their ability in disaster management.Keywords: Disaster management, practice, public health nurses

  18. Social media for school nurses: promoting school health in the 21st century.

    Wysocki, Regina

    2015-05-01

    People across the globe use social media to connect with one another, stay in touch with friends and family, and exchange information. Health care has embraced social media, and nursing organizations such as the American Nurses Association (ANA) and NASN have a presence in the social media landscape. The students in our schools today are digital natives who grew up with and are at home in the world of technology. With so many options in the digital world, the question is how can school nurses harness this technology to connect with their students and families? More importantly, how can school nurses use social media in a professional and responsible manner and help to enhance the profession of school nursing overall? This article will outline the planning and implementation of an ongoing social media campaign on wellness and healthy behaviors by one Texas suburban school district. PMID:25816429

  19. Overweight children's response to an annual health dialogue with the school nurse

    Borup, Ina K; Holstein, Bjørn Evald

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare overweight and normal weight pupils' perceived outcome of the health dialogue with the school nurse. A random sample of schools in Denmark, where pupils age 11.6, 13.6 and 15.6 years old, answered a questionnaire (response rate 88%, n = 5205). The...... independent variable weight group was measured by self-reported height and weight and calculated as body mass index. Perceived outcome of the dialogue was measured as: (i) reflected on the dialogue; (ii) discussed the content with parents; (iii) followed the advice of the nurse; and (iv) visited the nurse...... again. Overweight boys reflected (odds ratio (OR) = 1.73), discussed the dialogue with at least one parent (OR = 1.38), followed the nurse's advice (OR = 1.42) and visited the nurse again (OR = 2.68). There was a significant statistical link between age group and perceived outcome among the boys, but...

  20. Assessment on nursing serviceat hospital external consulting rooms

    Mª Dolores Poyatos Ruiz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The social needs and requests change constantly, so that health care is evolving to a more focused on the users, in order to meet users´ needs and expectations of those who are going to get our assistance. Aim: We have developed a research to evaluate the quality of the assistance received by the patientst in their first encounter in the hospital external consulting rooms of traumathology at Santa Bárbara Hospital, letting us know about the patient´s satisfaction after the consulting has finished. Material and method: A transverse descriptive study on the traumathology consulting room of Santa Bárbara Hospital in Puertollano was developed for two months. The research is formed by the patients who attend this consulting room for their first time. A self made multiple choice questionnaire, which was designe by experts, and patients were asked to answer it once their first consulting at traumathology service had finished. Results: 95.6% of the patients considered as good or very good the nursing kindness (confidence/reliabitity when seeing them; 93.5% of them considered as good or very good the information given to them and 90.6% of them considered as good or very good the medical explanations they got. We also noticed a significant statistical difference among nursing kindness (confidence/reliabitity, enough consultation time and explanations received, with regard to the variant high resolution. Conclusions: The study reveals that more than 90% of the interviewed people considered as good or very good the clinical assistance and service given. The research has allowed us to know the areas that we can work on and improve.

  1. Development of a self-assessment tool for measuring competences of obstetric nurses in rooming-in wards in China

    Zhang, Ju; Ye, Wenqin; Fan, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To provide high-quality nursing care, a reliable and feasible competency assessment tool is critical. Although several questionnaire-based competency assessment tools have been reported, a tool specific for obstetric nurses in rooming-in wards is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to develop a competency assessment tool for obstetric rooming-in ward nurses. Methods: A literature review was conducted to create an individual intensive interview with 14 nurse manag...

  2. The Role of the Community Nurse in Promoting Health and Human Dignity-Narrative Review Article.

    Ana Muntean

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Population health, as defined by WHO in its constitution, is out "a physical, mental and social complete wellbeing". At the basis of human welfare is the human dignity. This dimension requires an integrated vision of health care. The ecosystemical vision of Bronfenbrenner allows highlighting the unexpected connections between social macro system based on values and the micro system consisting of individual and family. Community nurse is aimed to transgression in practice of education and care, the respect for human dignity, the bonds among values and practices of the community and the physical health of individuals. In Romania, the promotion of community nurse began in 2002, through the project promoting the social inclusion by developing human and institutional resources within community nursery of the National School of Public Health, Management and Education in Healthcare Bucharest. The community nurse became apparent in 10 counties included in the project. Considering the respect for human dignity as an axiomatic value for the community nurse interventions, we stress the need for developing a primary care network in Romania. The proof is based on the analysis of the concept of human dignity within health care, as well as the secondary analysis of health indicators, in the year of 2010, of the 10 counties included in the project. Our conclusions will draw attention to the need of community nurse and, will open directions for new researches and developments needed to promote primary health in Romania.

  3. A qualitative study exploring the relationship between nursing and health promotion language, theory and practice.

    Piper, Stewart

    2008-02-01

    The definitions and meaning qualified nurses employed in an acute NHS hospital setting in the UK gave to health education and health promotion practice and how these fitted established language and theory were investigated qualitatively. These concepts, and the concomitant frameworks and models of practice, have been the subject of considerable debate in the literature. While unresolved both in general and in nursing, a degree of theoretical convergence was established in the 1990s [Bunton, R., Macdonald, G., 1992. Health promotion: disciplines and diversity. Routledge, London; Maben, J.M., Macleod Clark, J. 1995. Health promotion: a concept analysis. Journal of Advanced Nursing 22, 1158-165] helped by The Ottawa Charter [WHO, 1986. Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. http://www.who.int/hpr/archive/docs/ottawa.html]. For many of the participants in this study however, the meanings given to these concepts and the predominant use of health education were inconsistent with much of the language of the wider debate and this has potential implications for nurse education. For, if the findings are considered transferable then there is a need to develop education strategies and curricula that articulate the ideological foundations of policy and practice and to use mainstream terminology to assist nurses both to understand and contribute to the contemporary health promotion debate. PMID:17512097

  4. Oxymoronic or synergistic: deconstructing the psychiatric and/or mental health nurse.

    Cutcliffe, John; Stevenson, Chris; Lakeman, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Examination of the names used to signify a nurse who specializes in working with people with mental health problems indicates the absence of a shared nomenclature and the frequent conflation of the terms 'psychiatric' and 'mental health'. Informed by the work of Derrida (1978) and Saussure (1916-1983), the authors encourage the deconstruction of and problematization of these terms, and this shows that what nurses who work with people with so-called mental illness are called has depended on where they have worked, the vagaries of passing fashion, and public policy. Further, there are irreconcilable philosophical, theoretical, and clinical positions that prevent nurses from practicing simultaneously as 'psychiatric' and 'mental health' nurses. Related service user literature indicates that it is disingenuous to camouflage 'psychiatric' services as 'mental health' services, and as signifiers, signified, and signs, psychiatric and mental health nursing are sustained by political agendas, which do not necessarily prioritize the needs of the person with the illness. Clearly demarked and less disingenuous signs for both mental health and psychiatric care would not only be a more honest approach, but would also be in keeping with the service user literature that highlights the expectation that there are two signs (and thus two services): psychiatric and mental health services. PMID:23066735

  5. Using scenarios to assess the future supply of NHS nursing staff in England

    Buchan James

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper examines issues related to the future supply of registered nursing staff, midwives and health visitors in the National Health Service (NHS in England at a time when there are major public sector funding constraints and as more of these staff are reaching retirement age. Based on available workforce data, the paper reviews different possible scenarios for the supply of NHS nurses over a ten year period, assessing the impact of different numbers of new staff being trained and of varying retirement patterns from the ageing profession. The government in England has more policy levers available than is the case in many other countries. It determines the number of pre-registration training places that are commissioned and funded, it is the major employer, and it also controls the inflow of nurses from other countries through migration policies. Scenario models provide a picture of what the future might look like under various assumptions. These outcomes can be quantified and the results used to assess the risks and opportunities of alternate policy decisions. The approach used in this paper is that of the aggregate deterministic supply model. As part of this exercise, eight scenarios were selected and modelled. These were: A. “No change”- current inflows and outflows B. “Redundancies” - current inflow with higher outflow C. “Improved retention” - current inflow with lower outflow D. “Reduced training intakes A” - lower inflows with lower outflow E. “Reduced training intakes B” - lower inflow with higher outflows F. “Pension time-bomb”- current inflow with a higher rate of retirement G. “Pension delayed”- current inflow with a lower rate of retirement H. “Worst case” - lower inflow and higher outflow including higher retirement Most of the scenarios indicate that a reduction in the supply of nursing staff to NHS England is possible over the next ten years. Small changes in assumptions can make a substantial difference to outcomes and therefore emphasize the point that it is unwise to base policy decisions on a single projection. It is important that different scenarios are considered that may be regarded as possible futures, based on a realistic assessment of the available workforce data, policies and broader labour market and funding outlook.

  6. Development of a model home health nurse internship program for new graduates: key lessons learned.

    Shur Coyle, Joanne

    2011-05-01

    A nursing shortage, the aging baby boomer population, an escalating need for home health care, and limited availability of health care dollars are threatening to undermine the quality of health care in the United States. The National Center for Health Workforce Analysis projects a deficit of 275,000 full-time equivalents by 2010 (-12%) and a deficit of 800,000 by 2020 (-29%). This article focuses on one home health agency's strategy to support nurse graduates transitioning from student to professional nurse. Based on Benner's (1984) hallmark theory from novice to expert, the goals of this program are to enhance job satisfaction and social integration, facilitate autonomy, increase critical thinking and psychomotor skills, and develop additional competencies. Eleven key lessons learned are outlined. PMID:20839661

  7. An exploration of deaf women's access to mental health nurse education in the United Kingdom.

    Sharples, Naomi

    2013-09-01

    Historically deaf people have been denied access to professional nurse education due to a range of language, communication and ideological barriers. The following study was set in the North of England and draws upon the Western experience and knowledge base of deaf people's experience of access to professional education. The aim of this study was to understand the experiences of the first British Sign Language using deaf qualified nurses before they entered the Pre-registration Diploma in Nursing Programme, during the programme and after the programme as they progressed into professional nursing roles. The purpose of the study was to gather the nurses' thoughts and feelings about their experiences and to analyse these using thematic analysis within a narrative interpretive tradition against a backdrop of Jurgen Habermas' critical theory and Paulo Freire's critical pedagogy. By drawing out significant themes to structure a deeper understanding of the nurses' unique positions, they offer a model for inclusive education practice that would support deaf people and people from minority groups into nursing and other health care professions. The signed narratives were video recorded and interpreted into written English transcripts which were then analysed to discover the underlying themes using Boyatzis' (1998) thematic analysis. The findings are set against an historical and contemporary setting of deaf people in Western society, their experiences of education, health and employment. These unique findings illustrate the significance of an accessible language environment for the nurses, the role of the organisation in ensuring access for the nurses and the impact of barriers to education and the clinical environment. The implications for education and practice supports the need to analyse the workforce required in deaf services, to scrutinize the access provided, to develop cultural competence skills, enhance the use of additional support mechanisms, generate accessible communities of practice and to draw upon the deaf nurses' own ideas and perspectives to develop accessible provision. PMID:23159007

  8. Transforming prelicensure nursing education: preparing the new nurse to meet emerging health care needs.

    Tanner, Christine A

    2010-01-01

    The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching joins a chorus of calls for transformation of prelicensure nursing education (Benner, Sutphen, Leonard, & Day, 2009). Citing the shift of significant responsibility to nurses for managing complex medical regimens, as well as the increasing complexity of community-based practices, Benner and colleagues concluded that nurses entering the field are not equipped with the essential knowledge and skills for today's practice nor prepared to continue learning for tomorrow's nursing (p. 31). They found: a) weak curricula in natural sciences, technology, social sciences, and humanities, and in developing cultural competency; b) weak classroom instruction and limited integration between classroom and clinical experiences; c) limited strategies in helping students develop habits of inquiry, raising clinical questions, seeking evidence for practices; d) faculty and student perception that students are ill prepared for their first job and dissatisfaction with the teaching preparation of current nursing faculty; and e) multiple pathways to eligibility for the licensure examination, with tremendous variability in prerequisites, curricular requirements, and the quality of offerings. PMID:21280438

  9. [Perceptions of nursing service managers in the South African Military Health Service on their level of motivation].

    Fischer, A; Muller, M

    2000-12-01

    The process of transformation in the South African Military Health Services, has influenced the nursing service managers' level of motivation and the following research question is applicable: what are the perceptions of the nursing service managers within the South African Military Health Services on their level of motivation? The purpose with this study was to explore and describe the perceptions of nursing service managers on their level of motivation within these health services. A qualitative research design was utilized and four focus group interviews were conducted with 33 nursing service managers country wide. The transcribed interviews were exposed to a content analysis. The results confirm that the level of motivation amongst these nursing service managers is low. The demotivators relate mainly to the following: inadequate acknowledgement, job insecurity in relation to the future, problems with the process of integration, transformation and rationalization, problems with management, many labour related issues, poor/inadequate communication, inadequate support, increased work load, poor physical environment, negative publicity and poor self motivation. Although there were a few motivators identified, they were of less importance. These results were interpreted within Herzberg's motivation theory to identify the hygiene/maintenance factors and to assess whether the important motivators were in place. During any process of change, and/or when the level of motivation amongst employees is low, it is important to adequately manage the environment (hygiene/maintenance factors within the Herzberg theory). But it is even more important to ensure that the motivators are in place or to intensify them. It is therefore recommended that a motivation strategy, based on the Herzberg theory as well as the Hackman-Oldham job enrichment model, be developed, implemented and evaluated. PMID:11949294

  10. Nurse Mentors to Advance Quality Improvement in Primary Health Centers: Lessons From a Pilot Program in Northern Karnataka, India.

    Fischer, Elizabeth A; Jayana, Krishnamurthy; Cunningham, Troy; Washington, Maryann; Mony, Prem; Bradley, Janet; Moses, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    High-quality care during labor, delivery, and the postpartum period is critically important since maternal and child morbidity and mortality are linked to complications that arise during these stages. A nurse mentoring program was implemented in northern Karnataka, India, to improve quality of services at primary health centers (PHCs), the lowest level in the public health system that offers basic obstetric care. The intervention, conducted between August 2012 and July 2014, employed 53 full-time nurse mentors and was scaled-up in 385 PHCs in 8 poor rural districts. Each mentor was responsible for 6 to 8 PHCs and conducted roughly 6 mentoring visits per PHC in the first year. This paper reports the results of a qualitative inquiry, conducted between September 2012 and April 2014, assessing the program's successes and challenges from the perspective of mentors and PHC teams. Data were gathered through 13 observations, 9 focus group discussions with mentors, and 25 individual and group interviews with PHC nurses, medical officers, and district health officers. Mentors and PHC staff and leaders reported a number of successes, including development of rapport and trust between mentors and PHC staff, introduction of team-based quality improvement processes, correct and consistent use of a new case sheet to ensure adherence to clinical guidelines, and increases in staff nurses' knowledge and skills. Overall, nurses in many PHCs reported an increased ability to provide care according to guidelines and to handle maternal and newborn complications, along with improvements in equipment and supplies and referral management. Challenges included high service delivery volumes and/or understaffing at some PHCs, unsupportive or absent PHC leadership, and cultural practices that impacted quality. Comprehensive mentoring can build competence and improve performance by combining on-the-job clinical and technical support, applying quality improvement principles, and promoting team-based problem solving. PMID:26681711

  11. Feasibility and Impact of Doctor-Nurse Task Delegation in Preventive Child Health Care in the Netherlands, a Controlled Before-After Study

    Benjamins, S. Janine; Damen, Maurice L. W.; van Stel, Henk F.

    2015-01-01

    Background In the Netherlands a need is felt for more flexible Child Health Care services, both efficient and tailored to needs. We set up a study on impact and feasibility of task delegation to child health care nurses performing all regular checkups on children aged 2 months to 4 years. Abnormal findings were discussed with the attending child health care doctor. This article describes impact and feasibility of this task delegation from four viewpoints: competences of nurses; percentage of children assigned to the nurse; change in abnormal findings and referrals; experiences of professionals and parents. Methods Two experiment teams and two control teams were compared before and after starting task delegation. Nurses in the experiment teams were trained to carry out regular checkups on healthy children. Assignment to the experiment schedule was a joint decision by doctor and nurse. Nursing competences were measured by means of questionnaires. Percentage of children assigned to the nurse and screening results of eyes, heart, hips, growth and development were extracted from the electronic health record. Difference in change was compared between experiment and control teams. Mann-Whitney tests and logistic generalized estimating equations were used to test for significance. Experiences of professionals and parents were evaluated through focus group interviews, which were subjected to a qualitative analysis. Results Nurses in the experiment regions showed improvement in medical screening skills. No difference in change was perceived in general nursing competences. In the experiment group, 69% of all children were assigned to the nurse. There were no significant differences in change in the percentages of abnormal findings or referrals in the experiment teams compared to the control teams, except for hips. Interviews showed that both doctors and nurses thought positively of the new working method, yet made some recommendations for improvements. Parents felt well-informed and experienced an equal level of proficiency but less continuity in person. Conclusion This experiment shows that task delegation from doctor to nurse in preventive child health care is feasible. It is important to pay attention to the acceptation process of professionals during implementation. More investigation is needed in order to assess effectiveness and efficacy of task delegation. PMID:26466343

  12. Opportunities for Nurses to Increase Parental Health Literacy: A Discussion Paper.

    Johnston, Robyn; Fowler, Cathrine; Wilson, Valerie; Kelly, Michelle

    2015-12-01

    Most families can access a range of health information and advice. Information and advice sources often include nurses, the Internet, social media, books, as well as family and friends. While the immediate aim may be to find information, it can also be to assist with parenting skills, solve parenting problems or as part of decision-making processes about their child's health. These processes are strongly influenced by the parent's level of health literacy. Health literacy describes a person's capacity to obtain and utilize health related information. Although there are numerous health literacy definitions all have clearly defined steps. These steps are: obtaining relevant information; then understanding this information; and finally being able to use the information to achieve the expected outcome. Previous research has linked low levels of parental health literacy with poorer child health outcomes. Given this link, increasing health literacy levels would be advantageous for both families and health services. Nurses working with families are in a position to support the family to increase their health literacy through the use of a variety of strategies. This article outlines how health literacy can influence the way parents seek help when they are concerned about child health issues, the relevance of parental health literacy for nurses and suggests some tools that could be used to support the increase of health literacy. PMID:26368012

  13. The impact of caring for persons living with HIV and AIDS on the mental health of nurses in the Limpopo Province

    M Davhana-Maselesele

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the impact of caring for AIDS sufferers on the mental health of nurses. This assessment was measured against the level of burnout, stress and depression among 174 nurses caring for people living with HIV and AIDS in Limpopo Province, South Africa. A structured questionnaire was used for data collection. The questionnaire incorporated the AIDS Impact Scale (AIS, Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the participants’ demographic and professional profiles. Participants were conveniently selected from five selected hospitals in Limpopo Province. The study participants’ valuation using the AIS showed that nurses tended to develop strong bonds and relationships with the patients; felt frustrated by their inability to help the terminally ill AIDS sufferers and were subsequently affected by the death of their patients. Personal accomplishments of the nurses remained high and the levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization levels were low. The BDI showed that over 3 out of 4 nurses were experiencing between mild mood disturbance and extreme depression. Higher average scores were noted for items of the depression scale like sadness, dissatisfaction, fatigue and low level of energy. The findings highlight the need to develop psychological support programmes for nurses caring for AIDS patients and promote the provision of social incentives and recognition of the role of nurses in AIDS care.

  14. Multicultural Nursing: Providing Better Employee Care.

    Rittle, Chad

    2015-12-01

    Living in an increasingly multicultural society, nurses are regularly required to care for employees from a variety of cultural backgrounds. An awareness of cultural differences focuses occupational health nurses on those differences and results in better employee care. This article explores the concept of culturally competent employee care, some of the non-verbal communication cues among cultural groups, models associated with completing a cultural assessment, and how health disparities in the workplace can affect delivery of employee care. Self-evaluation of the occupational health nurse for personal preferences and biases is also discussed. Development of cultural competency is a process, and occupational health nurses must develop these skills. By developing cultural competence, occupational health nurses can conduct complete cultural assessments, facilitate better communication with employees from a variety of cultural backgrounds, and improve employee health and compliance with care regimens. Tips and guidelines for facilitating communication between occupational health nurses and employees are also provided. PMID:26199294

  15. Mental health nursing practicum: Student and mentor perspectives on stress and satisfaction

    Sandra Gelabert Vilella

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nursing students begin to complete practicum experiences during their first year, increasing the number of applied credits as they progress toward degree completion. This contributes to integrating knowledge and skills from all of their courses and to obtaining the basic competencies of the nursing profession. It is also essential to identify the student’s sources of stress in order to provide strategies to confront them and diminish the potential consequences. Therefore, it is a priority to ascertain the perception of stress and the stressors. This study applied both quantitative and quality methods to achieve its objectives: to analyze the perception of stress and the stress-generating factors faced by third- and fourth-year nursing students during the mental health practicum, and to determine satisfaction with the new mental health practicum in a student survey and in a focus group of mentor nurses. Study results identified four major stress factors before students began the practicum: the difficulty of providing nursing care for the patient with a mental disorder, knowing how to react in an unfamiliar situation, lack of knowledge about mental health services, and the possibility of patient aggression. Only the latter remained as a stressor after the practicum was completed. Student satisfaction with the mental health practicum was highly positive. Mentor nurses were particularly satisfied with the changes in student follow-up and evaluation, emphasizing the importance of reflective practice and students’ self-management of their learning experience as set out by the European Higher Education Area.

  16. Information management. Computer resources for the occupational and environmental health nurse.

    Amann, M C

    1999-12-01

    Occupational and environmental health nurses are responsible for the management of large amounts of very complex information, ranging from individual employee health records to reports that insure corporate compliance. There are four primary tools available to the occupational health nurse to facilitate efficient management and use of health information--occupational health information systems, office support programs, communication systems, and the Internet and intranets. Selection and implementation of an integrated health information system requires the involvement of any organization that uses data processed by the system. A project management approach to implementation and maintenance of a system insures adherence to time lines and attention to details. The internet provides access to a vast amount of information useful to both the occupational health professional and the employee. Intranets are internal systems that may facilitate distribution of health information to employees, maintenance of current health related policies, and more efficient reporting procedures. PMID:10865545

  17. Pain Assessment and Management in Nursing Education Using Computer-based Simulations.

    Romero-Hall, Enilda

    2015-08-01

    It is very important for nurses to have a clear understanding of the patient's pain experience and of management strategies. However, a review of the nursing literature shows that one of the main barriers to proper pain management practice is lack of knowledge. Nursing schools are in a unique position to address the gap in pain management knowledge by facilitating the acquisition and use of knowledge by the next generation of nurses. The purpose of this article is to discuss the role of computer-based simulations as a reliable educational technology strategy that can enhance the learning experience of nursing students acquiring pain management knowledge and practice. Computer-based simulations provide a significant number of learning affordances that can help change nursing students' attitudes and behaviors toward and practice of pain assessment and management. PMID:26256223

  18. Time standards of nursing in Primary Health Care: an observational study

    Daiana Bonfim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To determine time standards for interventions and activities conducted by nursing professionals in Family Health Units (FHU in Brazil to substantiate the calculation of work force. METHOD This was an observational study carried out in 27 FHU, in 12 municipalities in 10 states, in 2013. In each unit, nursing professionals were observed every 10 minutes, for eight work hours, on five consecutive days via the work sampling technique. RESULTS A total of 32,613 observations were made, involving 47 nurses and 93 nursing technicians/assistants. Appointments were the main intervention carried out by nurses, with a mean time of 25.3 minutes, followed by record-keeping, which corresponded to 9.7%. On average, nursing technicians/assistants spent 6.3% of their time keeping records and 30.6 intervention minutes on immunization/vaccination control. CONCLUSION The study resulted in standard times of interventions carried out by the FHU nursing team, which can underpin the determination of nursing staff size and human resource policies. Furthermore, the study showed the panorama of interventions currently employed, allowing for the work process to be reviewed and optimized.

  19. Time standards of nursing in Primary Health Care: an observational study.

    Bonfim, Daiana; Fugulin, Fernanda Maria Togeiro; Laus, Ana Maria; Peduzzi, Marina; Gaidzinski, Raquel Rapone

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine time standards for interventions and activities conducted by nursing professionals in Family Health Units (FHU) in Brazil to substantiate the calculation of work force. METHOD This was an observational study carried out in 27 FHU, in 12 municipalities in 10 states, in 2013. In each unit, nursing professionals were observed every 10 minutes, for eight work hours, on five consecutive days via the work sampling technique. RESULTS A total of 32,613 observations were made, involving 47 nurses and 93 nursing technicians/assistants. Appointments were the main intervention carried out by nurses, with a mean time of 25.3 minutes, followed by record-keeping, which corresponded to 9.7%. On average, nursing technicians/assistants spent 6.3% of their time keeping records and 30.6 intervention minutes on immunization/vaccination control. CONCLUSION The study resulted in standard times of interventions carried out by the FHU nursing team, which can underpin the determination of nursing staff size and human resource policies. Furthermore, the study showed the panorama of interventions currently employed, allowing for the work process to be reviewed and optimized. PMID:27007429

  20. The RWJF's investment in nursing to strengthen the health of individuals, families, and communities.

    Hassmiller, Susan B

    2013-11-01

    Throughout its history the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) has made a deep commitment to nursing, investing more than $592 million in programs to sustain, grow, and reshape the nurse workforce. In recent years the foundation has adopted strategies to expand the impact and reach of its nursing grants. The RWJF supported the 2010 Institute of Medicine (IOM) study on the future of nursing, which envisioned expanded roles for nurses in the US health care system. Since then, the RWJF has invested heavily in implementing the IOM report's recommendations through the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, a partnership with AARP. In the past three years, that report has been the most-read IOM publication. Also, "action coalitions" are working in fifty states and the District of Columbia to implement its recommendations; philanthropic partners are also supporting implementation; and leaders in academic and clinical nursing settings continue their work to advance nurse education, changes in scope of practice, and other IOM recommendations. PMID:24191098

  1. Stuck between a rock and a hard place: the work situation for nurses as leaders in municipal health care

    Nilsen ER; Olafsen AH; Steinsvåg AG; Halvari H; Grov EK

    2016-01-01

    Etty R Nilsen,1 Anja H Olafsen,1 Anne Grethe Steinsvåg,2 Hallgeir Halvari,1 Ellen K Grov31Department of Strategy and Finance, School of Business, University College of Southeast-Norway, 2Department of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, University College of Southeast-Norway, Kongsberg, 3Department of Nursing and Health Promotion, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo and Akershus University College, Oslo, NorwayBackground: The paper aims to present how nursing leaders in the munici...

  2. Determinants of the intention of elementary school nurses to adopt a redefined role in health promotion at school

    Godin Gaston; Chabot Guylaine; Gagnon Marie-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The quest for greater efficiency in the provision of primary healthcare services and the implementation of a "health-promoting school" approach encourage the optimal redefinition of the role of school nurses. School nurses are viewed as professionals who might be significant actors in the promotion of youth health. The aim of this study was to identify the determinants of the intention of elementary school nurses to adopt a new health-promotion role as a strategic option f...

  3. Child development surveillance: intervention study with nurses of the Family Health Strategy1

    Reichert, Altamira Pereira da Silva; Collet, Neusa; Eickmann, Sophie Helena; Lima, Marília de Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational action in child development surveillance performed by nurses working in primary health care. Methods: interventional study with a before-and-after type of design, carried out with 45 nurses and 450 mothers of children under 2 years of age. Initially, it was evaluated the practices and knowledge of nurses on child development surveillance and the mothers were interviewed about these practices. Subsequently, workshops were carried out with nurses and four months later, the knowledge of nurses and the maternal information were reevaluated. Results: after intervention there was significant increase in the frequency of the following aspects: from 73% to 100%, in relation to the practice of nurses of asking the opinion of mothers about their children's development; from 42% to 91%, regarding the use of the systematized instrument of evaluation; from 91% to 100% with respect to guidance to mothers on how to stimulate child development. Conclusions: the intervention contributed to the increase of knowledge of nurses and implementation of child development surveillance, showing the importance of this initiative to improve the quality of child health care. PMID:26487147

  4. Determining the Level of Satisfaction of Patients in Nursing Care and Health Services

    Sevban Arslan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine patients’ satisfaction with nursing care and health services. This descriptive study was performed with 320 inpatients at University Hospital’s internal diseases and surgical units in July and November 2011. The data were collected by a questionnaire and the Visual Analog Patient Satisfaction Scale and the Scale of Patient Perception of Hospital Experience With Nursing. For statistical evalution , SPSS(Statistical Package for Social Science 15 percent by using the program, the Student t-test, ANOVA and Kruskal- Wallis analysis was done with. The mean total score was 8.65±1.52 on the Visual Analog Patient Satisfaction Scale. The Scale of Patient Perception of Hospital Experience With Nursing, the mean total score was 65.90±11.00. Consequently, Patients were satisfied with the nursing care and health services. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(6.000: 717-724

  5. Evaluation of undergraduate nursing students' clinical confidence following a mental health recovery camp.

    Cowley, Thomas; Sumskis, Sue; Moxham, Lorna; Taylor, Ellie; Brighton, Renee; Patterson, Chris; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, we evaluate the impact of participation in a mental health recovery camp on the clinical confidence of undergraduate nursing students in dealing with individuals with mental illness. Twenty undergraduate nursing students who participated in the recovery camp completed the Mental Health Nursing Clinical Confidence Scale both before and directly after attending the camp. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Participation in the recovery camp was associated with a statistically-significant increase in students' level of overall confidence between the pretest and post-test data (P level of confidence in both the pre- and post-results. The clinical confidence of undergraduate nursing students improved through participation in an immersive clinical experience within the recovery camp. PMID:26767715

  6. Oral health knowledge, attitudes and behaviour among nursing staff in Lesotho.

    Walid, E I; Nasir, F; Naidoo, S

    2004-08-01

    The decreasing prevalence of oral diseases in industrialised countries is attributed to a paradigm shift of oral health services from being mainly curative to preventative care. In under-resourced countries, the use of non-oral health care workers in the promotion of oral health, can contribute substantially to improving oral health and the adoption of a multidisciplinary team approach in oral health is highly recommended. Owing to the inadequate number of oral health personnel in Lesotho, the use of health care workers other than oral health care workers has been investigated. Nurses are one of the most suitable cadres of health care workers to take on this role. The aim of this study was to determine oral health knowledge, attitudes and behaviour among nurses in Lesotho. A descriptive cross-sectional study, using a random sampling method was used. A self-administered questionnaire with open and closed-ended questions was used to collect the data. The response rate was 87%. Knowledge of aetiology and prevention of dental caries, periodontal disease and the oral manifestations of HIV-infection was found to be adequate, while knowledge of oral cancer was found to be satisfactory. Nurses in Lesotho reported positive attitudes towards the provision of oral health education and oral hygiene practices. Most nurses themselves were found to be symptom-orientated in their utilisation of the oral health services. It is recommended that oral health be given greater attention in the nursing curriculum, with more clinical hands-on training in oral examination and diagnosis of oral diseases. PMID:15537032

  7. A comparative analysis of the changes in nursing practice related to health sector reform in five countries of the Americas

    Guevara Edilma B.; Mendias Elnora P.

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To identify changes in nursing practice and the nursing-practice environment that have occurred with implementation of health sector reform in five countries in the Americas. Methods. An exploratory study of selected settings in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, and the United States of America was conducted between 1997 and 1999 to collect narrative data from 125 professional nurses about their perceptions of nursing practice and changes in work environments. Descriptions of ch...

  8. An overview of swearing and its impact on mental health nursing practice.

    Stone, Teresa E; Hazelton, Mike

    2008-06-01

    Swearing is a subject largely ignored in academic circles but impossible to ignore in the workplace. Nurses encounter swearing from patients and their carers, staff and managers and use swearwords in communication with each other. Language is the major tool of the mental health nurse and swearing an aspect of language frequently used in situations of intense emotion. This paper provides an overview of the historical, legal and cultural aspects of swearing in an Australian context in order to assist nurses in their practice. PMID:18460082

  9. A job analysis of selected health workers in a district health system in KwaZulu Natal - Part two: Job analysis of nurses in primary health care settings

    S Mbambo

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this descriptive survey was to do a job analysis of different categories of nurses in a District Health System in order to clarify job expectations, describe current practice of nurses in hospitals and clinics and to make recommendations about skills mix in district services. This article deals with the clinics only.

  10. New nurses' perceptions of nursing practice and quality patient care.

    Boswell, Suzanne; Lowry, Lois W; Wilhoit, Kathryn

    2004-01-01

    During this time of nursing shortages, hospitals that want to maintain the competitive edge must seek ways to recruit and retain a competent nursing staff. This study was conducted in a large hospital that strives to be the primary health care provider and employer of choice in its geographic region. The purpose of the study was to assess new nurses' perceptions of nursing practice and their expectations for meeting professional goals. Sixty-seven new nurses from 13 hospital departments were interviewed. Comprehensive orientation, continuing education, and mentoring were important values identified by this group of nurses. Communication with physicians and fear of causing accidental harm to patients were expressed concerns. Data from this survey will be used by the organization to change orientation policies to better meet the needs of the nursing staff and improve recruitment and retention of nurses. PMID:14717152

  11. Nurses' health, age and the wish to leave the profession--findings from the European NEXT-Study

    Hasselhorn, H M; Tackenberg, P; Kuemmerling, Angelika; Wittenberg, J; Simon, M; Conway, Paul Maurice; Bertazzi, P A; Beermann, Beate; Büscher, A; Camerino, Donatella; Caillard, J F; D'Hoore, W; Estryn-Behar, Madeleine; Fontenla, Marina; Gould, Dinah; van der Heijden, Beate; Josephson, Malin; Kiss, P; Kovarova, Maria; Kuhn, Klaus; Laine, Marjukka; Le Nezet, O; Lindberg, P; Oginska, Halszka; Pokorski, J; Pokorska, Joanna; Radkiewicz, P; Rimarcik, M; van der Schoot, Esther; Stelzig, Stephanie; Stordeur, Sabine; Wickstroem, G; Widerszal-Bazyl, Maria; Mueller, Beate

    2006-01-01

    In many industrialised countries the number of workers with low health is expected to increase in the nursing profession. This will have implications for occupational health work in health care. The European NEXT-Study (www. next-study. net, funded by EU) investigates working conditions of nurses...

  12. Nurses' Role in Cardiovascular Risk Assessment and Management in People with Inflammatory Arthritis

    Primdahl, Jette; Ferreira, Ricardo J O; Garcia-Diaz, Silvia; Ndosi, Mwidimi; Palmer, Deborah; van Eijk-Hustings, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    assessment and management in different settings and groups of patients. The assessments include blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, glucose and lipid-profile, adherence to medication and behavioural risk factors (unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, alcohol and smoking). Different tools......, communication and management in different types of patients. This is considered to be a highly relevant task for rheumatology nursing, especially in patients with IA. Further studies are needed to assess patients' perspective, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of nurse-led CVR. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley......INTRODUCTION: Cardiovascular risk (CVR) assessment and management in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA) is recommended but European nurses' involvement in this role has not been well studied. AIM: The aim of the present study was to explore European nurses' role in assessing and managing CVR...

  13. Undergraduate nurses reflections on Whatsapp use in improving primary health care education

    Juliana J. Willemse

    2015-01-01

    Background: The global use of mobile devices with their connectivity capacity, and integrated with the affordances of social media networks, provides a resource-rich platform for innovative student-directed learning experiences.Objective: The objective of this study was to review the experiences of undergraduate nurses on the improvement of primary health care education at a School of Nursing at a University in the Western Cape, South Africa, through the incorporation of a social media applic...

  14. Investigation of health anxiety and its related factors in nursing students

    Zhang Y; Zhao Y.; Mao S.; Li G; Yuan Y

    2014-01-01

    Yuqun Zhang,1,2 Yueqiu Zhao,3 Shengqin Mao,1 Guohong Li,4 Yonggui Yuan1 1Department of Psychosomatics and Psychiatry, Affiliated Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 2Nursing Faculty of Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 3Nanjing Health School, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 4Nursing Department, Affiliated Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s ...

  15. [The process of demedicalization of women's health care in nursing education].

    Vargens, Octávio Muniz da Costa; Progianti, Jane Márcia

    2004-03-01

    This objective of this study is to present the pedagogic strategies adopted by the Rio de Janeiro State University Nursing School (UERJ--Brazil) for the demedicalization of care in nursing education in women's health. It presents the context of teaching in this area of knowledge. It also presents, from the perspective of concepts by Pierre Bourdieu, three spheres of students' and teachers' performance in this process. PMID:15151057

  16. Evaluating the named nurse understanding of recovery in forensic mental health

    Souter, Gary

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a service evaluation carried out on a personality disorder admission ward in a high-secure hospital to evaluate nurses understanding of recovery approaches in mental health. The study used semi-structured questionnaires to determine the participant’s understanding of recovery. The findings highlight that further development is required in staff training and education on recovery. Theories underpinning recovery principles also need to be disseminated to help nurses un...

  17. Identifying paediatric nursing-sensitive outcomes in linked administrative health data

    Wilson Sally; Bremner Alexandra P; Hauck Yvonne; Finn Judith

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background There is increasing interest in the contribution of the quality of nursing care to patient outcomes. Due to different casemix and risk profiles, algorithms for administrative health data that identify nursing-sensitive outcomes in adult hospitalised patients may not be applicable to paediatric patients. The study purpose was to test adult algorithms in a paediatric hospital population and make amendments to increase the accuracy of identification of hospital acquired event...

  18. Bioethical implications in the act of nursing who provides assistance at mental health

    Nadja Cristiane Lappann Botti, Vanessa Carvalho de Araújo

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the understanding of nurses on care in the area of Mental Health and identify the association between bioethics and care in mental health. Methodology: qualitative research in the Psychosocial Care Center (CAPS III, located in the countryside of Minas Gerais state. Data were collected through interviews with four nurses from the CAPS III. The results were analyzed through the technique of the Discourse of the Collective Subject. The research project was approved of the Research Ethics Committee of the Catholic University of Minas Gerais (CAAE 0047.0.213.000-08. Results: the nurses’ role in mental health as it is hybrid and that requires different skills. Conclusion: there is the paradigm shift from the practice of nurses in mental health to still find itself in duality models of care to the sufferers of mental disorders.

  19. Strengthening the nursing curriculum: an interdisciplinary course addressing agricultural health and safety.

    Jones, Susan; Dunn, David; Coffey, David

    2004-09-01

    1.) Agricultural work is a dangerous occupation and incorporating content on agricultural health and safety issues into the nursing curriculum presents a challenge. 2.) The traditional strategy for dealing with these issues has been a single discipline approach. 3.) An interdisciplinary course bringing together faculty and students from the disciplines of agriculture, nursing, and public health proved successful in addressing this content in the curricula of the disciplines involved. 4.) When teaching agricultural health and safety content, it is essential to emphasize an interdisciplinary approach and frame the course in the context of rurality. PMID:15469138

  20. Simulation: a shared learning experience for child and mental health pre-registration nursing students.

    Felton, Anne; Holliday, Laura; Ritchie, Dawn; Langmack, Gill; Conquer, Alistair

    2013-11-01

    Learning through the use of simulation is perceived as an innovative means to help manage some of the contemporary challenges for pre-registration nurse education. Mental health and child nurses need to have the knowledge and skills to effectively address the holistic needs of service users. This article reports on a pilot simulated learning experience that was designed with key stakeholders for pre-registration child and mental health nursing students. This involved young actors playing the role of someone who had self-harmed to help students develop their skills for working with young people who experience emotional distress. Focus groups and a questionnaire were used to evaluate the pilot. Students valued the practical approach that simulation entailed and identified the benefits of the shared learning experience across the different fields of practice of nursing. However, some students reported anxiety performing in front of peers and indicated they would perform differently in practice. The pilot identified simulation as a potentially useful approach to help child and mental health student nurses develop skills for caring for young people. However, there is a need for caution in the claims to be made regarding the impact of simulation to address gaps in nursing skills. PMID:23660414

  1. ABC for Nursing Care to Terminal Patients in Primary Health Care

    Angelina Basilia Estela Díaz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Terminal patients suffer from an acute or chronic process that immerses them in a critical situation leading to death. When providing a cure is no longer possible, the focus is on providing comfort and relief for the dying. Therefore, it is very important to provide an appropriate orientation to the staff nurses taking care of these patients. Objective: To develop an ABC for nursing care to terminally ill patients in Primary Health Care. Methods: A research was conducted in Area VI Polyclinic, in the municipality of Cienfuegos, from January to June 2012, in order to conform the ABC for nursing care to terminally ill patients in Primary Health Care. Theoretical methods of analysis and synthesis and induction-deduction as well as empirical methods were used: document analysis and brainstorming. Results: The ABC for nursing care to terminal patients was conformed for the following stages: initial or stability, symptomatic or state, and decline and final agony. In each of them possible diagnoses, objectives and actions were included. The document was created in such a way that it can be used by all nurses who attend these patients, regardless of their occupational category. Conclusions: This ABC could be useful to facilitate nursing care to terminally ill patients in primary health care.

  2. Constructed space and legitimacy for health work in the educational system: Perspectives of school nurses

    Morberg, Siv; Dellve, Lotta; Karlsson, Birgitta; Lagerström, Monica

    2006-01-01

    Increasing health problems among children place demands on school health care. It is unclear how contextual issues, e.g. reduced resources and low priority, impact the practising of health care work within the educational system. The aim was to gain a deeper understanding of school nurses' perceptions of their opportunities for practising and handling health support work within the educational system. A qualitative study in line with constructivist grounded theory based on data from six focus...

  3. Teaching of Health Care-Related Infections within an Integrated Nursing Curriculum

    Suellen Karina de Oliveira Giroti; Mara Lúcia Garanhani; Maria Helena Dantas de Menezes Guariente; Elaine Drehmer de Almeida Cruz

    2013-01-01

    Health care-related infections have become an issue of paramount importance in the health care field. Their rates are high in many parts of the world and the adherence of health care professionals to prevention and control measures still involves a minority of them. This study aims to analyze how the teaching on the theme health care-related infections takes place within an integrated Nursing curriculum. This is a qualitative research carried out through documentary analysis of the teaching p...

  4. Biofeedback Intervention for Stress, Anxiety, and Depression among Graduate Students in Public Health Nursing

    Paul Ratanasiripong; Orawan Kaewboonchoo; Nop Ratanasiripong; Suda Hanklang; Pornlert Chumchai

    2015-01-01

    Globally, graduate students have been found to have high prevalence of mental health problems. With increasing severity of mental health problems on university campuses and limited resources for mental health treatment, alternative interventions are needed. This study investigated the use of biofeedback training to help reduce symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression. A sample of 60 graduate students in public health nursing was randomly assigned to either the biofeedback intervention or t...

  5. Sexual Health for Older Women: Implications for nurses and other healthcare providers

    Muliira, Joshua K.; Muliira, Rhoda S.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents findings from a review of the evidence regarding sexual health for older women from MEDLINE, SCOPUS and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINHAL) databases. A total of 10 articles based on primary studies, reporting about the sexuality or sexual health of older women (and older people), and published between 2002–2012, were deemed suitable. The major themes that emerged from the available literature suggest that the sexual health of older people is affec...

  6. Nurse Practitioners' Knowledge, Experience, and Intention to Use Health Literacy Strategies in Clinical Practice

    Cafiero, Madeline

    2013-01-01

    Nurse practitioners' (NPs) knowledge, experience, and intention to use health literacy strategies in practice were investigated using the Theory of Planned Behavior as the theoretical framework. NPs who work in outpatient settings were recruited at a national NP conference. Participants were administered 3 self-report instruments: Health Literacy Knowledge and Experience Survey, Parts I and II; and the Health Literacy Strategies Behavioral Intention Questionnaire. Overall knowledge of health ...

  7. Obstetric Knowledge of Nurse-Educators in Nigeria: Levels, Regional Differentials and Their Implications for Maternal Health Delivery

    Mohammed, Salisu Ishaku; Ahonsi, Babatunde; Oginni, Ayodeji Babatunde; Tukur, Jamilu; Adoyi, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the knowledge of nurse-midwife educators on the major causes of maternal mortality in Nigeria. Setting: Schools of nursing and midwifery in Nigeria. Method: A total of 292 educators from 171 schools of nursing and midwifery in Nigeria were surveyed for their knowledge of the major causes of maternal mortality as a prelude to…

  8. Validation of the self-assessment of nursing informatics competencies scale among undergraduate and graduate nursing students.

    Choi, Jeungok; Bakken, Suzanne

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated the psychometrics of the Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale for nursing students in undergraduate (n = 131) and graduate (n = 171) programs. The scale had a valid five-factor structure, accounting for 69.38% of the variance, high internal consistency reliabilities (0.96 for the total scale and 0.84 to 0.94 for subscales), and good responsiveness (standardized response mean = 0.99), as well as significantly improved scores in nursing students with diverse demographic and educational backgrounds after taking an informatics course. Our factor structure was similar to the original scale, differing slightly in four items' loadings. This difference may reflect current informatics practice or the greater diversity of our sample. Further research is needed on the factor, data/information management skills, and related item loadings. This scale could be used to assess informatics competencies and develop educational strategies that prepare nursing students as informatics-competent graduates in information technology-rich environments. PMID:23586352

  9. The self-medication in elderly people and the role of health professionals and nursing

    Cecília Nogueira Valença, Raimunda Medeiros Germano, Rejane Maria Paiva de Menezes

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the complex theme of self-medication in the elderly people and the role of health professionals and nursing. Methodology: this is a theoretical essay based on a literature review of the narrative type. It was selected articles indexed in databases Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO and the Database of Nursing (BDENF, from 2003 to 2009, using as descriptors: self-medication, nursing and elderly people. It was also used books and manuals of the ministry of health. From the reading and qualitative synthesis of abstracts, were set up two axes of analysis and reflection: Aging and self: views on the issue and Medication in the elderly people: the role of health professionals and nursing. Results: the elderly people are the age group that uses more drugs. Self-medication is a practice that can generate serious health risks such as intoxication. The qualified professional should guide the public about the medicine to lessen the risk and effectively as possible. Conclusion: it was conclude that the use of knowledge of health professionals and nurses to help to reduce the risks associated with self-medication and problems related to use of medicines, contributing to the improvement of quality of life of older people.

  10. Teachers' and Pupils' Perceptions of the School Nurse in Relation to Sexual Health Education

    Westwood, Jo; Mullan, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The current government in the United Kingdom has made a commitment to reducing the high rates of teenage conceptions and sexually transmitted infections by implementing various sexual health strategies. It emphasises an increased public health role for school nurses by identifying that they have access to the school-age population and the…

  11. Health Promotion Practices and Attitudes among Nurses in Special Education Schools in Greece

    Alexandropoulou, Marianthi; Sourtzi, Panayota; Kalokerinou, Athena

    2010-01-01

    Published research concerning health promotion in Greek schools is limited. The aim of the study was to evaluate special education school nurses' involvement in health promotion activities, examine their attitudes toward it, and to explore the factors influencing their practices. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 2005 by mailed…

  12. [Guinea: the army nurses caring for health workers infected with Ebola].

    Marcon, Sandra; Filhos, Nadia

    2015-11-01

    In the first half of 2015, army nurses from the French Army, worked with the Conakry health worker treatment centre in Guinea. Their aim was to save the lives of health workers risking their lives in the fight against the Ebola epidemic. This article describes a mission which proved memorable both on a human and professional level. PMID:26548391

  13. Teachers' and Pupils' Perceptions of the School Nurse in Relation to Sexual Health Education

    Westwood, Jo; Mullan, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The current government in the United Kingdom has made a commitment to reducing the high rates of teenage conceptions and sexually transmitted infections by implementing various sexual health strategies. It emphasises an increased public health role for school nurses by identifying that they have access to the school-age population and the…

  14. Health Promotion Practices and Attitudes among Nurses in Special Education Schools in Greece

    Alexandropoulou, Marianthi; Sourtzi, Panayota; Kalokerinou, Athena

    2010-01-01

    Published research concerning health promotion in Greek schools is limited. The aim of the study was to evaluate special education school nurses' involvement in health promotion activities, examine their attitudes toward it, and to explore the factors influencing their practices. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 2005 by mailed…

  15. Assessment of oral health promotion services offered as part of maternal and child health services in the Tshwane Health District, Pretoria, South Africa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The study aimed to assess the oral health promotion services provided as part of the maternal and child health (MCH) services in the Tshwane Health District, Pretoria, South Africa. Methods The research design was a descriptive cross-sectional study using a modified standard questionnaire. The population was drawn from the parents/caregivers (PCGs) and the MCH nurses at seven clinics during June 2012 and June 2013 in Pretoria. Results The nurses’ response rate was 83%; average age of 37 years. The majority of the nurses (65%) were females; 60% were professional nurses. Most (63%) of the nurses reported that they provided oral health education (OHE) services. A shortage of dental education materials (43%), staff time (48%), and staff training (52%) were large constraints to nurses providing OHE. The majority of PCGs (n = 382; mean age 31.5 years) had a low education level (76%). About 55% of PCGs received information on children’s oral health from the television and 35% at the MCH clinics. PCGs beliefs were worrying as about 38% believed primary dentition is not important and need not be saved. Conclusion There is evidence of minimal integration of OHE at MCH sites. Parents’ beliefs are still worrying as a significant number do not regard the primary dentition as important. The MCH site remains an important easily accessible area for integration of oral health services with general health in complementing efforts in prevention of early childhood caries.

  16. Weight Care Project: Health professionals' attitudes and ability to assess body weight status - Study protocol

    Moorhead, Anne

    2011-03-31

    Abstract Background Health professionals working in primary care and public health have opportunities to address body weight status issues with their patients through face-to-face contact. The objectives of this all-Ireland project are: 1. to assess the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups on body weight status; 2. to assess the health professional groups\\' ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The health professional groups are: (a) community related public health nurses; (b) school public health nurses; (c) GPs and practice nurses (primary care); and (d) occupational health nurses (workplace) from both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Methods\\/Design This all-Ireland multi-disciplinary project follows a mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and consists of four components: 1. Literature review - to explore the role of health professionals in managing obesity through spontaneous intervention in a variety of health promotion settings. 2. Telephone interviews and focus groups - to gain an in-depth insight into the views of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 3. Survey (primarily online but also paper-based) - to determine the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 4. Online evaluation study - an online interactive programme will be developed to assess health professionals\\' ability to identify the body weight status of adults and children. Discussion This project will assess and report the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups within Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on body weight status, and their ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The results of this project will generate recommendations for clinical practice in managing obesity, which may inform policy guidelines.

  17. Weight Care Project: Health professionals' attitudes and ability to assess body weight status - Study protocol

    Murphy Kathy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health professionals working in primary care and public health have opportunities to address body weight status issues with their patients through face-to-face contact. The objectives of this all-Ireland project are: 1. to assess the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups on body weight status; 2. to assess the health professional groups' ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The health professional groups are: (a community related public health nurses; (b school public health nurses; (c GPs and practice nurses (primary care; and (d occupational health nurses (workplace from both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Methods/Design This all-Ireland multi-disciplinary project follows a mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and consists of four components: 1. Literature review - to explore the role of health professionals in managing obesity through spontaneous intervention in a variety of health promotion settings. 2. Telephone interviews and focus groups - to gain an in-depth insight into the views of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 3. Survey (primarily online but also paper-based - to determine the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 4. Online evaluation study - an online interactive programme will be developed to assess health professionals' ability to identify the body weight status of adults and children. Discussion This project will assess and report the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups within Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on body weight status, and their ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The results of this project will generate recommendations for clinical practice in managing obesity, which may inform policy guidelines.

  18. A STUDY TO ASSESS KNOWLEDGE AND AWARENESS ABOUT THE HEPATITIS B AND C AMONG NURSING COLLEGE STUDENTS OF CENTRAL INDIA

    Ramniwas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND: The lives of millions of adolescents worldwide are at risk because they do not have the information; skills, health services and support which they need to go through sexual development during adolescence. The epidemic of Hepatitis B/HCV is now progressin g at a rapid pace among young people. AIMS& OBJECTIVE: To assess knowledge of nursing students towards Hepatitis B/HCV Awareness, Prevention & Control . T o assess knowledge increase after educational intervention by means of lectures and discussions among n ursing students. MATERIAL& METHOD: An educational interventional study was conducted in Kushabhau Thakre Nursing College, Kolar Road, Bhopal. Study population included all Nursing students. Sample size was 200 students. Inclusion Criteria included all Nursing students present at the time of pre intervention interview and who gave informed consent. The data was analyzed using appropriate statistical software (MS excel and SPSS version 20. Mc Nemar test was applied for statistical significance of knowledge improvement by intervention. RESULT: Most of the Nursing students (95% were correctly known that Hepatitis B/HCV is a viral disease and an effective vaccine against Hepatitis B is available in the market but they are not able to differentiate between Hepatitis B and C, in fact they have a m is - conception that both are the same entity. After intervention 87% of the students were aware about preventive measures against Hepatitis B/HCV. Health care providers (55%, Teaching (25 and Mass media (22% were main source of knowledge for them. More t han two thirds of students had positive attitude towards Hepatitis B/HCV infected patients. CONCLUSION: The study revealed that although a significant proportion of students were aware of Hepatitis B/HCV, their knowledge on prevention modalities was low as majority of them are unable to differentiate Hepatitis B from Hepatitis C. Students also harbored misconceptions on the modes of Hepatitis B/HCV transmission. Television, newspapers and internet were quoted as the most common source of information.

  19. Evidence-based nursing: effects of a structured nursing program for the health promotion of Korean women with Hwa-Byung.

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Lee, Kwang-Ja

    2007-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a culturally tailored nursing program for patients with Hwa-Byung (HB) and to test the effects of the nursing intervention. The structured nursing intervention program was based on a transcultural theoretical framework in which patients with HB received therapies consisting of music therapy, drama, and group therapy. Hwa-Byung is a culture-bound syndrome, literally translated as anger syndrome, attributed to the suppression of anger. Individuals experience a decrease in quality of life as a result of insufficient treatment. Current health care programs do not meet the needs of these individuals, who still need nursing interventions. A culturally tailored therapy is effective and appropriate for patients with illnesses related to their cultural background. Evidence-based nursing is a crucial approach in verifying the effects of nursing care and in enhancing the body of knowledge on nursing science. A nonequivalent, nonsynchronized, and controlled study design was applied to experimental and control groups of an even number of women. The nursing program was generally effective in the mental health condition test; the mental health condition of the experimental group was significantly more improved as compared with that of the control group. The program was particularly effective in the categories of somatization, depression, psychoticism, and hostility. The data indicate that the mental health of patients with HB could be improved with the use of nursing intervention programs. Nurses need to understand the cultural background of patients and provide culture-sensitive interventions for effective patient-oriented care. PMID:17258104

  20. Levels of empathy in undergraduate emergency health, nursing, and midwifery students: a longitudinal study

    Williams B

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Brett Williams,1 Ted Brown,2 Malcolm Boyle,1 Lisa McKenna,3 Claire Palermo,4 Jamie Etherington1 1Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice, 2Department of Occupational Therapy, 3School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University–Peninsula Campus, Frankston, 4Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University–Berwick Campus, Berwick, Vic, Australia Purpose: This research examines the extent and nature of empathy among emergency health (paramedic, nursing, and midwifery students at one Australian university and investigates the longitudinal changes in empathy levels across the course of study. Methods: First-, second-, and third-year students at Monash University completed the Jefferson Scale of Empathy–Health Professional (JSE-HP in 2008, 2009, and 2010, and the resulting mean empathy scores were analyzed by course, year of course, year of study, age, and sex. Results: Midwifery students were found to have higher empathy levels than nursing and emergency health students. Second- and third-year students scored higher than their counterparts in the first year. Empathy levels dipped in 2009 and rose in 2010. Students aged 26–30 years and 31–35 years recorded higher scores than their younger colleagues, and female students were found to be more empathic than their male counterparts. Conclusion: The finding that empathy levels are relatively stable over the term of study contributes to the understanding of how empathy evolves over the course of study and offers insights into the importance of incorporating and promoting empathy in health care curricula. Keywords: empathy, nursing, paramedics, midwifery, undergraduates

  1. PICU Nurses' Pain Assessments and Intervention Choices for Virtual Human and Written Vignettes.

    LaFond, Cynthia M; Van Hulle Vincent, Catherine; Corte, Colleen; Hershberger, Patricia E; Johnson, Andrew; Park, Chang G; Wilkie, Diana J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this concurrent mixed-methods study was to 1) examine the factors pediatric intensive care unit nurses consider when assessing and intervening for children who report severe pain and to 2) determine the effect of child behavior and diagnosis on the nurses' pain ratings and intervention choices for written and virtual human vignettes. Quantitative and qualitative results substantiated that despite recommendations to use self-report, many PICU nurses use behavior as the primary indicator to assess and treat pain, even when a child is old enough to articulate pain intensity and there is sufficient cause for pain to be present. PMID:25682019

  2. Putting the world as classroom: an application of the inequalities imagination model in nursing and health education.

    Racine, Louise; Proctor, Peggy; Jewell, Lisa M

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the description of an educational initiative, the Interdisciplinary Population Health Project (IPHP) conducted in the academic year of 2006-2007 with a group of nursing and health care students. Inspired by population health, community development, critical pedagogy, and the inequalities imagination model, students participated in diverse educational activities to become immersed in the everyday life of an underserved urban neighborhood. A sample of convenience composed of 158 students was recruited from 4 health disciplines in a Western Canadian university. Data were collected using a modified version of the Parsell and Bligh's Readiness of Health Care Students for Interprofessional Learning Scale. A one group pretest-posttest design was used to assess the outcomes of the IPHP. Paired t tests and one-way analyses of variance were used to compare the responses of students from different academic programs to determine if there were differences across disciplines. Findings suggest that students' readiness to work in interprofessional teams did not significantly change over the course of their participation in the IPHP. However, the inequalities imagination model may be useful to enhance the quality and the effectiveness of fieldwork learning activities as a means of educating culturally and socially conscious nurses and other health care professionals of the future. PMID:22228781

  3. Nurses' assessment of postoperative pain: can it be an alternative to patients' self-reports?

    Chung, I. S.; Sim, W. S.; Kim, G S; Park, S. H.; Cha, K. J.; Park, Y. S.; Lim, Y.J.; Lee, S C; Kim, Y.C.

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate whether the nurses' assessment of postoperative pain can be an alternative to patients' self-reporting. We examined 187 patients receiving postoperative intravenous patient-controlled analgesia. The nurses assessed the patients' pain with three pain indices (therapeutic efficacy, pain intensity, and facial pain expression) 8 hr after operation. The patients recorded their resting and movement pain using 100-mm visual analog scales immediately following the ...

  4. Imbalances in the health labour force: an assessment using data from three national health facility surveys.

    Barden-O'Fallon, Janine; Angeles, Gustavo; Tsui, Amy

    2006-03-01

    Accurate knowledge of the characteristics of the health labour force that can affect health care production is of critical importance to health planners and policymakers. This study uses health facility survey data to examine characteristics of the primary health care labour force in Nicaragua, Tanzania and Bangladesh. The characteristics examined are those that are likely to affect service provision, including urban/rural distribution, demographic characteristics, and experience and in-service training, for three types of providers (physicians, nurses and auxiliary nurses). The profiles suggest a pattern of urban/rural imbalances in Nicaragua and Tanzania. The Bangladesh facility survey did not include hospitals, thereby making concrete conclusions on the supply and distribution of providers difficult to make. Multivariate logistic regressions are used to assess the relationship between the urban/rural placement of providers by health need, population demand and facility characteristics. Health need, as measured by child mortality rates, does not have a significant association with the placement of providers in either country, unlike population size and annual growth rates. The mean number of years providers have worked at a facility is significantly associated with a decreased likelihood of rural placement for the three types of providers in Nicaragua. The mean age and percentage of female providers at each facility has a negative association with the placement of rural providers in Tanzania. The use of health facility data to profile the health care labour force is also discussed. PMID:16434424

  5. Communal child-rearing: The role of nurses in school health

    Fhumulani M. Mulaudzi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Child-rearing remains a concern within our communities, especially because families of today lack primary parents due to multifaceted challenges such as working mothers, diseases and violence. Health-promoting school initiatives are necessary because they allow a multifaceted approach to child-rearing. They further provide a conducive environment for continued schoolchild-rearing moving from home to school. Objectives: This study promotes an integrated approach to school care using the African concept of Ubuntu – solidarity and sense of community – as a point of departure. The socio-ecological model was used, which includes the work of the school healthcare nurse in contributing to holistic health services. Method: An integrative review was conducted in January 2013, which included methodology studies, a theory review and a variety of studies related to school health. The studies were categorised according to school health, Ubuntu and the socio-ecological model. Findings: The role of school healthcare nurses entails acting as a liaison officer between a variety of stakeholders who work together to shape the future of children. Conclusion: Ubuntu, together with the socio-ecological model, can assist us to involve an entire community to raise children. This knowledge serves as a background to the planning of a school health programme. The role of the nurse in school health can also assist in collaborative efforts to formulate the programme and develop the competencies that will inform school health nurse training curricula.

  6. Nurses and Teachers: Partnerships for Green Health Promotion

    Sendall, Marguerite C.; Lidstone, John; Fleming, MaryLou; Domocol, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Background: The term "green health promotion" is given to health promotion underpinned by the principles of ecological health and sustainability. Green health promotion is supported philosophically by global health promotion documents such as the 1986 Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion and the ecological public health movement. Green…

  7. Nurses and Teachers: Partnerships for Green Health Promotion

    Sendall, Marguerite C.; Lidstone, John; Fleming, MaryLou; Domocol, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Background: The term "green health promotion" is given to health promotion underpinned by the principles of ecological health and sustainability. Green health promotion is supported philosophically by global health promotion documents such as the 1986 Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion and the ecological public health movement. Green…

  8. Developing nurse educators' computer skills towards proficiency in nursing informatics.

    Rajalahti, Elina; Heinonen, Jarmo; Saranto, Kaija

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess nurse educators' competence development in nursing informatics (NI) and to compare their competence to the NI competence of other healthcare professionals. Electronic health records (EHR) have been in use for many years. However, the adoption of the nursing care plan finally made it possible for nurses in Finland to develop a model for structured documentation with nursing terminology. A total of n?=?124 (n?=?85 pre-test and n?=?39 post-test) participants from Universities of Applied Sciences (UAS), hospitals, hospitals' information management and health centres were surveyed with a e-questionnaire designed to assess the development of their NI competences during the nursing documentation development project. The questionnaire included 145 structured questions and 6 open questions. Data analysis focused on classification and comparison of NI competences through data description and statistical parameters using figures and tables. The basic NI competences of the nurse educators were good at the end of project and the nurse educators had better information literacy and information management competences than other participants. The information retrieval skills varied greatly, but they improved evenly towards the end. The nurse educators mastered better evidence-based nursing and use of nursing process models in their work. PMID:24152130

  9. [Survey on the satisfaction regarding their studies and the health habits of nursing students in France].

    Lamaurt, Florence; Estryn-Behar, Madeleine; Le Moël, Romain; Chrétien, Thomas; Mathieu, Béatrice

    2011-06-01

    The French Federation of Nursing Student (FNESI) conducted a study in nursing studies institutions from 6 administrative Regions in order to understand risk factors linked with stress or satisfaction of students. Conducted from september 2008 to june 2009, the response rate was 71.2%. Bivariate analysis were conducted on a sample selected by random of 1450 students, to determine potentials risk factors linked with poorer estimated general health and stress. Students declare more and more frequently stress or poor general health in second and third year of nursing studies. Their life habits are inadequate and do not improve when their knowledge increases: lack of sport practice, tobacco smoke, alcohol consumption, other addictive substances ... Among students who declare a too much supported rhythm of training or a poor quality of training, the majority qualify their health of bad. Practical training is considered by a quarter of first year student and 44% of second and third year students. Existence of "speech groups" and free discussion groups have a major influence on satisfaction or stress and poor general health declaration. This study demonstrated the major influence of good mentorship quality by trained nurses and that this nurse in a tutorial position has to be the same all along the training in each department. These aspects have to be improved in order to attract and retain motivated students. PMID:21800641

  10. HEALTH SURVEY AND LIFE HABITS OF NURSES WHO WORK AT THE MEDICAL FACULTY HOSPITAL AT AIBU

    Fatih DENIZ

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Nursing is an occupation needed renunciation, patience and physical endurance. Nurses have to prevent their physical and mental health, because they can be more beneficial to patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted on AIBU Duzce Medical School Nurses to determine health problems and nutritional habits. Materials and Methods: The questionnaires forms filled by 79 nurses(%86 and analysed the data using an statistical package programme. Results: Mean age of the study group was 23.5 ± 0.2(Standard Erroryears. The answer to ‘Do you satisfied in your life?’question was reported ‘fair’ in 39.7% of the group. 65.7% reported no physical activity. Skipped meals were 80.9%. The most frequent health problems were reported as low back pain (52.9%, back pain (48.5%, stomach pain (48.5%, shoulder pain (38.2% and neck pain (38.2%. Twenty-six and half percent of the group were not immunized against to Hepatitis B. Conclusion: Occupational health and safety unit must be established in workplace. Training about occupational risks and stress management must be given to nurses. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2005; 4(2.000: 55-65

  11. Nursing attrition and the work environment in South African health facilities

    E.J. Hall

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available A number of media reports appeared on the shortages of professional health workers in the public health sector. Unsatisfactory working conditions in health facilities were mentioned as one of the key aspects responsible for the shortages. Literature indicates that stress caused by unsatisfactory work environments may play a major role in employees’ decision to resign their jobs, in spite of enjoying the nature of their work. The aim of this article is to explore the current human resource situation in nursing i.e. to determine if a shortage of nursing skills exists, to establish the challenges that nurses have to face in performing their duties and to establish the potential effect of the work environment on attrition.

  12. Occupational health nursing interventions to reduce third-party liability in workplace injuries.

    Delk, Kayla L

    2012-03-01

    This article explores general principles of workers' compensation law and the ability to sue third parties for employee injuries by using case law and the treatise Larson's Workers' Compensation Law. This overview provides occupational health nurses with a background on workers' compensation law, who is liable for employee injuries, and how recovery from third parties is distributed between the employer or insurer and the employee. The author then explores interventions that occupational health nurses can implement to reduce employee injury and employer costs for providing workers' compensation. The goal of this article is to stimulate occupational health nurses' critical-thinking and problem-solving skills so they may identify risks and implement cost-effective solutions that will prevent injuries to employees. PMID:22387245

  13. From Toyota to the bedside: nurses can lead the lean way in health care reform.

    Johnson, Joyce E; Smith, Amy L; Mastro, Kari A

    2012-01-01

    The advent of health care reform means new pressures on American hospitals, which will be forced to do more with less. In the next decade, increased use of "Lean" principles and practices in hospitals can create real value by reducing waste and improving productivity, costs, quality, and the timely delivery of patient care services. In 2010, the Institute of Medicine recommended that nurses lead collaborative quality improvement efforts and assume a major role in redesigning health care in the United States. In this article, we provide an overview of the use of Lean techniques in health care and 2 case studies of successful, nurse-directed Lean initiatives at the Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital. The article concludes with some lessons we have learned and implications for nursing education in the future that must include the concepts, tools, and skills required for adapting Lean to the patient care environment. PMID:22677964

  14. Perceptions and health beliefs of Greek nursing students about breast self-examination: A descriptive study.

    Lavdaniti, Maria

    2015-12-01

    Breast self-examination is a screening option for young women. Among students, knowledge about breast self-examination ranges from insufficient to average. This descriptive study was planned in order to determine the health beliefs and perceptions of nursing students regarding breast self-examinations. We recruited 538 nursing students in a single Higher Technological Educational Institute in Greece. Data were collected using the Champion's Health Belief Model Scale. Parametric tests were used in the data analysis. We found significant differences in the results of the subscales of Champion's Health Belief Model Scale on comparing people with respect to nationality, previous education about breast self-examination, smoking status and semester in which they were studying. The 'confidence' subscale was positively associated with the frequency of breast self-examination. The results of the present study demonstrated that nursing students have knowledge about breast-self examination but inadequate practice. PMID:24724812

  15. Unit managers' role in improving nursing teamwork in a mental health care facility / Mariska Elizabeth Oosthuizen–Van Tonder

    Oosthuizen–Van Tonder, Mariska Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The nursing team in a mental health care facility is a known dynamic at every hospital, rehabilitation centre and out-patient unit which enables these units to be functional. Currently nursing teams function in a challenged environment in mental health care facilities. The National Department of Health in South Africa states that one of the priority areas in the core standards of health care is to improve values and attitudes of health care professionals. One of the ways to accomplish this is...

  16. Preceptorship: A Model to Empower Nurses in Rural Health Settings.

    Dusmohamed, Haroon; Guscott, Anthony

    1998-01-01

    A preceptorship program provided professional development for rural nurses in South Australia, with colleagues acting as mentor-preceptors. The program overcame their geographic and professional isolation and equipped them with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to make changes. (SK)

  17. Becoming a psychiatric/mental health nurse in the UK: a qualitative study exploring processes of identity formation.

    Hurley, John; Lakeman, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Identity studies are well established across the social science literature with mental health nursing beginning to offer evidenced insights into what may, or may not, constitute key identity performances. For mental health nursing these performances remain contested, both from within the profession and from international contexts that favour generic constructions of mental health. This paper offers findings from a qualitative study that focused upon the process of how mental health nursing identity development is influenced, rather than what that identity may or may not be. These findings highlight that mental health nurses (MHNs) not only form their identity around service user centred education and training, but that many also use the education as a means to leave the profession. Through highlighting the impact of informal education (i.e., through work), formal education, and training upon the formation of mental health nursing identity, nurses are potentially alerted to the importance of clinically focussed mental health being prominent within curricula, rewarding mental health nursing skills specialisation, and the importance of the role of the service user in mental health nurse education and, hence, identity formation. PMID:22077747

  18. Obesity prevention in early life: an opportunity to better support the role of Maternal and Child Health Nurses in Australia

    Laws, R.; Campbell, K. J.; van der Pligt, P.; Ball, K.; Lynch, J; Russell, G.; Taylor, R.; Denney-Wilson, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Because parents with young children access primary health care services frequently, a key opportunity arises for Maternal and Child Health (MCH) nurses to actively work with families to support healthy infant feeding practices and lifestyle behaviours. However, little is known regarding the extent to which MCH nurses promote obesity prevention practices and how such practices could be better supported. Methods This mixed methods study involved a survey of 56 MCH nurses (response ra...

  19. Tactile massage and hypnosis as a health promotion for nurses in emergency care-a qualitative study

    Nordby-Hörnell Elisabeth; Forsberg Christina; Falkenberg Torkel; Andersson Susanne K; Airosa Fanny; Öhlén Gunnar; Sundberg Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background This study explores nursing personnel's experiences and perceptions of receiving tactile massage and hypnosis during a personnel health promotion project. Nursing in a short term emergency ward environment can be emotionally and physically exhausting due to the stressful work environment and the high dependency patient care. A health promotion project integrating tactile massage and hypnosis with conventional physical activities was therefore introduced for nursing personn...

  20. Development of an Applied Framework for Understanding Health Information Technology in Nursing Homes.

    Degenholtz, Howard B; Resnick, Abby; Lin, Michael; Handler, Steven

    2016-05-01

    There is growing evidence that Health Information Technology (HIT) can play a role in improving quality of care and increasing efficiency in the nursing home setting. Most research in this area, however, has examined whether nursing homes have or use any of a list of available technologies. We sought to develop an empirical framework for understanding the intersection between specific uses of HIT and clinical care processes. Using the nominal group technique, we conducted a series of focus groups with different types of personnel who work in nursing homes (administrators, directors of nursing, physicians, mid-level practitioners, consultant pharmacists, and aides). The resulting framework identified key domain areas that can benefit from HIT: transfer of data, regulatory compliance, quality improvement, structured clinical documentation, medication use process, and communication. The framework can be used to guide both descriptive and normative research. PMID:26975206