WorldWideScience

Sample records for health nursing assessment

  1. Learning about health: The pupils' and the school health nurses assessment of the health dialogue

    Borup, Ina K.

    Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiential learning, HBSC, health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children, adolescents, health dialouge, school health nurse......Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiential learning, HBSC, health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children, adolescents, health dialouge, school health nurse...

  2. Learning about health: The pupils' and the school health nurses assessment of the health dialogue

    Borup, Ina K.

    Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiental learning, HBSC, health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children, adolescents, health dialogue, school health nurse......Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiental learning, HBSC, health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children, adolescents, health dialogue, school health nurse...

  3. Nurses' Evaluation of Their Use and Mastery in Health Assessment Skills: Selected Iran's Hospitals

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Safa, Azade

    2013-01-01

    Background: Health assessment skills are of the most important skills which nurses require. The more precise assessment, the better results would be obtained and the quality of patient care would be improved. However, in Iran, few studies have investigated nurses’ assessment skills. Objectives: This study was aimed to assessnurses' evaluation of the learned skills of health assessment and their use. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 200 nurses in Isfahan provi...

  4. Risk assessment and absconding: Perceptions, understandings and responses of mental health nurses

    Grotto, J.; Gerace, A.; O'Kane, D; Simpson, A; Oster, C; Muir-Cochrane, E.

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objectives: This paper reports mental health nurses' perspectives of absconding. The aims of the study were to explore nurses' perceptions of risk assessment and management practices regarding absconding from acute inpatient psychiatric settings, and their affective responses when patients absconded. Background: Nurses are directly involved in managing the risk of patients leaving hospital while acutely unwell, as well as dealing with the implications of an absconding event. How...

  5. Assessing Organizational Readiness for a Participatory Occupational Health/Health Promotion Intervention in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

    Zhang, Yuan; Flum, Marian; West, Cheryl; Punnett, Laura

    2015-09-01

    The long-term care sector is characterized by high morbidity and employee turnover, along with associated costs. Effective health protection and health promotion are important to improve physical and psychosocial well-being of caregivers. Assessment of organizational readiness for change is an essential precursor to the successful implementation of workplace programs addressing work climate, structure of tasks and relationships, and other issues that may be perceived as challenging by some within the institution. This study qualitatively assessed readiness of five skilled nursing facilities for a participatory occupational health/health promotion intervention. Selection criteria were developed to screen for program feasibility and ability to conduct prospective evaluations, and information was collected from managers and employees (interviews and focus groups). Three centers were selected for the program, and the first year of formative evaluation and intervention experience was then reviewed to evaluate and modify our selection criteria after the fact. Lessons learned include adding assessment of communication and the structure of problem solving to our selection criteria, improving methods to assess management support in a concrete (potentially nonverbal) form, and obtaining a stated financial commitment and resources to enable the team to function. Assessment of organizational readiness for change is challenging, although necessary to implement effective and sustainable health promotion programs in specific organizations. PMID:25715335

  6. Assessment of primary care nursing in relation to adolescent health behaviour by means of trigger films.

    Eshed, H; Epstein, L

    1991-01-01

    The patterns of adolescents' behaviour place them at a risk from developing health and social pathology. In order to assess whether primary care nursing meets adolescents' health needs, the reported performance of 306 registered nurses working in different primary health care settings was studied. The research tool developed especially for the study was a video-taped trigger film. Demographic, education and work-related variables were studied by means of a questionnaire. The behaviour patterns studied were smoking, sexual activity, alcohol and drug consumption, and eating habits. The clinical issues were hypertension, obesity and anorexia nervosa. Reported performance was low--35% of the total possible score--with the lowest scores in the areas of preventive care, data gathering and recording, and somewhat higher in the areas of curative care and follow-up. The video-taped trigger films were considered to have face validity; they were found to be reliable, with an ability to assess the nurses' reported performance and to differentiate between the nurses in the three different work settings. This is the first study of its kind in Israel. The results show that primary health nursing of adolescents is insufficient, and that teenagers should get higher priority as a target population from the nursing profession in order to achieve WHO's aims of 'health for all by the year 2000'. PMID:2005286

  7. Making a spectacle of herself: reading community mental health nursing assessments.

    Street, A

    1994-11-01

    The metaphor of mapping is used in this paper to examine the discursive construction of women whose nudity in public places (making a spectacle of herself) provides dilemmas for community mental health nurses required to make assessments of these women's ability to function in the community. Excerpts from stories provided by the nurses are used to demonstrate the complexity of the decision-making processes and the limits to the choices they perceive they can make. PMID:7531608

  8. Shift work disorder in nurses--assessment, prevalence and related health problems

    Flo, Elisabeth; Pallesen, Ståle; Magerøy, Nils; Moen, Bente E; Grønli, Janne; Nordhus, Inger Hilde; Bjorvatn, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    Background: This study investigates the prevalence of symptoms of shift work disorder in a sample of nurses, and its association to individual, health and work variables. Methodology/Principal Findings: We investigated three different shift work disorder assessment procedures all based on current diagnostic criteria and employing symptom based questions. Crude and adjusted logistic regression analyses were performed with symptoms of shift work disorder as the dependent variable. Participants ...

  9. Learning about health: The pupils' and the school health nurses' assessment of the health dialogue

    Borup, Ina K.

    Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiential learning, health behaviour in school-aged children (HBSC), health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children......Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiential learning, health behaviour in school-aged children (HBSC), health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children...

  10. Dental auscultation for nursing personnel as a model of oral health care education: development, baseline, and 6-month follow-up assessments.

    Wårdh, Inger; Berggren, Ulf; Hallberg, Lillemor R M; Andersson, Lars; Sörensen, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Oral health care has been shown to have low priority in nursing and has been only partly successful. To create more positive effects than those achieved through traditional oral health care education, this project tested an educational model for nursing staff personnel. In addition to traditional oral health care education, some of the nursing staff members passed an additional dental auscultation period and served as oral care aides. The aides were responsible for the oral health care of the residents at their nursing facilities (intervention group). The intervention nursing facilities were compared with facilities where nursing personnel only received a traditional oral health care education program. Assessments were made at baseline and at a 6-month follow-up. At follow-up it was shown that the nursing staff in the intervention group gave higher priority to the oral health care work than the nursing staff in the control group. PMID:11905448

  11. NURSES' PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE COMPONENTS SELF-ASSESSMENT IN BUILDING A POSITIVE HEALTH CARE ENVIRONMENT

    Miķelsone, Madara; Renigere, Ruta; Dreimane, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Nurses' professional competence consists of several interrelated components, which during interacting of critical thinking, reflection and experience, characterizes the essence of the profession of nurses. Critical thinking applies not only to the educational process, it is an expression the nurses’ responsible and professional action during the health care process. Critical thinking and reflection make up of various specific competence component interactions of nurses professional healthcare...

  12. Health Literacy Concepts in Nursing Education.

    Kennard, Deborah K

    2016-01-01

    The impact of low health literacy on the health care system is astronomical. The ability to learn, retain, and apply health information is greatly affected by health literacy and thus greatly affects patient outcomes. The responsibility of patient education is mostly shouldered by nurses and yet nursing is the discipline that is most lacking in knowledge and awareness about health literacy. Providing nursing students with the necessary tools to assess patient health literacy and to assess their own patient teaching is a vital component of patient education. Nursing curricula is the place to start. PMID:27209875

  13. Assisted living nursing practice: admission assessment.

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    Admission assessment, generally conducted by a registered nurse, is autonomous, without opportunity for dialogue with colleagues and other health care professionals and bounded by the nurse's knowledge and skills, state regulations, facility practices, and marketing. The fact that some states permit admission and retention of nursing home level-of-care residents and provision of end-of-life care means that the assessment has to be able to predict the resident's likely trajectory of well-being as well as chronic illness exacerbation. The nurse must have a clear perspective on staff competencies and judge whether additional education or training will be necessary. This article reviews assessment standards of practice as put forth by the American Assisted Living Nurses Association as part of its application for recognition of assisted living nursing as specialty nursing practice by the American Nurses Association. The role of the Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurse in resident assessment is also discussed. PMID:17292794

  14. Health and nursing problems of elderly patients related to bio-psycho-social need deficiencies and functional assessment

    Muszalik, Marta; Dijkstra, Ate; Kedziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Zielinska-Wieczkowska, Halina

    2012-01-01

    Elderly population is characterized by larger need for social welfare and medical treatment than other age groups. Along with aging, there is a number of emerging health, nursing, caring, psychological and social problems. Complexity of these problems results from overlapping and advancing involutional changes, multi-illness, decreased functional efficiency and other factors. The aim of the study was the assessment of health problems in geriatric patients as well as bio-psycho-social need def...

  15. Shift work disorder in nurses--assessment, prevalence and related health problems.

    Elisabeth Flo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study investigates the prevalence of symptoms of shift work disorder in a sample of nurses, and its association to individual, health and work variables. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated three different shift work disorder assessment procedures all based on current diagnostic criteria and employing symptom based questions. Crude and adjusted logistic regression analyses were performed with symptoms of shift work disorder as the dependent variable. Participants (n = 1968 reported age, gender, work schedule, commuting time, weekly work hours, children in household, number of nights and number of shifts separated by less than 11 hours worked the last year, use of bright light therapy, melatonin and sleep medication, and completed the Bergen Insomnia Scale, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Global Sleep Assessment Questionnaire, Diurnal Scale, Revised Circadian Type Inventory, Dispositional Resilience (Hardiness Scale--Revised, Fatigue Questionnaire, questions about alcohol and caffeine consumption, as well as the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Prevalence rates of symptoms of shift work disorder varied from 32.4-37.6% depending on the assessment method and from 4.8-44.3% depending on the work schedule. Associations were found between symptoms of shift work disorder and age, gender, circadian type, night work, number of shifts separated by less than 11 hours and number of nights worked the last year, insomnia and anxiety. The different assessment procedures yielded similar results (prevalence and logistic regression analyses. The prevalence of symptoms indicative of shift work disorder was high. We argue that three symptom-based questions used in the present study adequately assess shift work disorder in epidemiological studies.

  16. Emancipatory practices of nurses in primary health care: the home visit as an instrument of health needs assessment

    Celia Maria Sivalli Campos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective Identify nurses’ emancipatory practices in primary care, to contribute to the improvement of health care. Method A case study type social research of qualitative nature, in which nurses of a primary health care service unit in São Paulo were interviewed. Results The home visit was identified as a nursing practice possible to be expanded in order to identify social determinants of health, triggering emancipatory practices in the service. This expansion occurred because the design of health care labour intended by the service team changed its focus from the traditional object of health services, the disease. Conclusion First, it is advocated that social policies lead projects with the purpose of improving health needs. On the other hand, the daily labour needs to provide opportunities for reflection and discussion of healthcare projects, leading workers to propose labour-processes targeted to both the social determinants of health and people’s illness.

  17. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing.

    Reighley, Joan

    A description is provided of a course, "Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing," designed to teach students at Level 3 of a two-year college nursing program about the role of the nurse in a psychiatric setting and about concepts of mental health and psychiatric disorders, using both classroom and clinical instruction. The first section of the course…

  18. Objective structured video examination in psychiatric and mental health nursing: a learning and assessment method.

    Selim, Abeer A; Dawood, Eman

    2015-02-01

    In the current study, the Objective Structured Video Examination (OSVE) was conducted to assess undergraduate nursing students' knowledge, observation, and clinical reasoning related to clinical psychiatric nursing competencies. The OSVE showed acceptable reliability and validity (Cronbach's α = 0.714, r = 0.6, respectively). Students highly appraised the OSVE because it covered a wide area of knowledge and clinical skills; the examination instructions were clear, concrete, and easily understood; the sounds and pictures of the videos were clear; and the videos simulated real patients. The examination was fair, well-administered, well-structured, and well-sequenced. The OSVE reflected learned skills, it provided opportunities for learning, grades were clearly identified, and it eliminated personal bias. Overall, the OSVE provided a practical and useful experience. On the other hand, some students negatively perceived the OSVE as being stressful and requiring more time. PMID:25602587

  19. Crushing oral solid drugs: Assessment of nursing practices in health-care facilities in Auvergne, France.

    Clauson, Hélène; Rull, Françoise; Thibault, Magali; Ordekyan, Audrey; Tavernier, Jérôme

    2016-08-01

    Iatrogenic harm from crushing oral drugs, a common but hazardous practice, can be largely avoided by following recommendations for good practice. The aims of this study were to evaluate the frequency of tablet crushing and opening capsules in hospitals and to compare the nursing practices with national recommendations. From 46 health facilities in Auvergne, 1110 nurses answered an anonymous self-completed questionnaire between September and November 2014 regarding general medication issues, prescription, preparation and administration of crushed medications. Crushing tablets or opening capsules was reported as a daily practice for 28% (increasing to 67% in geriatric units). While most best practice recommendations were followed by most nurses, scope for improvement remained: pharmacists were rarely contacted, rationales for change of medication formulation were seldom recorded in patients' files and medications were often crushed and administered together, risking drug interactions. Study data were used to inform recommendations for practice improvement. As findings bear similarities to those from other countries, this may be a widespread issue and study recommendations may be widely relevant. Practice will be reviewed again once practice improvement has been completed. PMID:27287304

  20. Consulting in occupational health nursing. An overview.

    Roy, D R

    1997-01-01

    1. The term consultant is defined as anyone who provides professional advice or services, which may include internal and external consultants. Consulting is a challenging way to practice occupational health nursing. 2. The consulting process involves problem solving and the creation of change. This process may be illustrated by using the nursing process and the steps of assessment, analysis, planning, implementation, and evaluation. 3. Successful occupational health nursing consultants are excellent communicators, are willing to market themselves, love problem solving, and are self starters. PMID:9043229

  1. [Nurses' practice in health audit].

    Pinto, Karina Araújo; de Melo, Cristina Maria Meira

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this investigation was to identify nurses' practice in heath audit. The hermeneutic-dialectic method was used for the analysis. The study was performed in three loci: the internal audit service of a hospital; the external audit service of a private health service buyer, and the state audit service of the public health system (SUS, acronym in Portuguese for Sistema Unico de Saúde-Unique Health System), in Bahia. Nine audit nurses were interviewed. In the SUS audit, the nurses report being fulfilled with their practice and with the valorization of their professional role. In the private audit--both inside and outside of health organizations--the nurses' activities are focused on meeting the interests of their contractors, and do not get much involved with the care delivered by the nursing team and with the needs of service users. PMID:20964043

  2. Nursing and mHealth

    Catherine Samples

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Innovations in mobile health (mHealth technology offer applications to promote wellness management and health behavior change outside of formal clinical settings. Nurses can help to move mHealth into mainstream health care by understanding its potential to change the landscape of health intervention delivery, incorporating mHealth into patients' day to day preventive care strategies, and supporting the science of mHealth's effectiveness.

  3. Leadership and mental health nursing.

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; Deacon, Maureen; Jackson, Debra

    2011-01-01

    This discussion paper argues for the critical importance of successful leadership for effective mental health nursing, observing that nursing leadership has long been regarded problematically by the profession. Using empirical and theoretical evidence we debate what leadership styles and strategies are most likely to result in effective, recovery-orientated mental health nursing. Models of transformational and distributed leadership are found to be highly congruent with mental health nursing values, yet the literature suggests it is a type of leadership more often desired than experienced. We note how the scholarly literature tends to ignore the "elephant in the room" that is organizational power, and we question whether transformational leadership pursued within a specific clinical context can influence beyond those confines. Nevertheless it is within these contexts that consumers experience nursing, effective or otherwise, thus we should advocate what is known about effective leadership wherever it is required. PMID:21932925

  4. There is more to risk and safety planning than dramatic risks: Mental health nurses' risk assessment and safety-management practice.

    Higgins, Agnes; Doyle, Louise; Downes, Carmel; Morrissey, Jean; Costello, Paul; Brennan, Michael; Nash, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Risk assessment and safety planning are considered a cornerstone of mental health practice, yet limited research exists into how mental health nurses conceptualize 'risk' and how they engage with risk assessment and safety planning. The aim of the present study was to explore mental health nurses' practices and confidence in risk assessment and safety planning. A self-completed survey was administered to 381 mental health nurses in Ireland. The findings indicate that nurses focus on risk to self and risk to others, with the risk of suicide, self-harm, substance abuse, and violence being most frequently assessed. Risk from others and 'iatrogenic' risk were less frequently considered. Overall, there was limited evidence of recovery-oriented practice in relation to risk. The results demonstrate a lack of meaningful engagement with respect to collaborative safety planning, the identification and inclusion of protective factors, and the inclusion of positive risk-taking opportunities. In addition, respondents report a lack of confidence working with positive risk taking and involving family/carers in the risk-assessment and safety-planning process. Gaps in knowledge about risk-assessment and safety-planning practice, which could be addressed through education, are identified, as are the implications of the findings for practice and research. PMID:26632975

  5. PARTNER INVOLVEMENT: NEGOTIATING THE PRESENCE OF PARTNERS IN PSYCHOSOCIAL ASSESSMENT AS CONDUCTED BY MIDWIVES AND CHILD AND FAMILY HEALTH NURSES.

    Rollans, Mellanie; Kohlhoff, Jane; Meade, Tanya; Kemp, Lynn; Schmied, Virginia

    2016-05-01

    Universal screening for maternal depression and assessment of psychosocial risks has been integrated into the routine perinatal care provided in many Australian hospitals, but to date, partners/fathers have been largely excluded from the process. This study explored the ways in which clinicians in health service settings include partners who attend antenatal and postnatal visits with women. Qualitative data were collected using observations (n = 54), interviews (n = 60), and discussion groups (n = 7) with midwives and child and family health nurses who conducted the appointments. Transcripts from observations, interviews, and discussion groups underwent qualitative analysis, and key themes were identified. Results showed partners to have little or no involvement in psychosocial assessment and depression screening. Thematic analysis revealed four key themes: negotiating partner exclusion, partial inclusion, women's business or a couple concern? and they know anyway. Partner involvement appeared to be challenged particularly by mandatory interpersonal violence screening, which, according to health service policy, is to be conducted confidentially. Overall, results highlighted partner involvement in perinatal depression screening and psychosocial assessment processes and identified some of the benefits such as partner disclosure, but also the challenges and complexities of inclusion of partners. Clinical implications and directions for further education and research are discussed. PMID:27111339

  6. Nurse Work Engagement Impacts Job Outcome and Nurse-Assessed Quality of Care: Model Testing with Nurse Practice Environment and Nurse Work Characteristics as Predictors

    Peter Mathieu Van Bogaert; Danny eVan heusden; Olaf eTimmermans; Erik eFranck

    2014-01-01

    Key words: burnout,job satisfaction, nurse retention, nurse practice environment,quality of care, acute health care,structural equation modelling. Aim:To explore the mechanisms through which nurse practice environment dimensions are associated with job outcomes and nurse-assessed quality of care. Mediating variables tested included nurse work characteristics of workload, social capital, decision latitude, as well as work engagement dimensions of vigor, dedication and absorption.Background: Un...

  7. Religion, assessment and the problem of 'normative uncertainty' for mental health student nurses: a critical incident-informed qualitative interview study.

    Bassett, A M; Baker, C; Cross, S

    2015-10-01

    There is limited research around how mental health (MH) student nurses interpret and differentiate between people's religious and cultural beliefs and the existence of psychopathological symptomatology and experiences. Here we focus on one cultural issue that arose from research exploring how MH student nurses approach and interpret religion and culture in their practice - that is, the difficulties in determining the clinical significance of the religious beliefs and experiences expressed by the people they care for. While problems with establishing the cultural boundaries of normality in clinical assessments are an important area of debate in cultural psychiatry, it remains a peripheral issue in MH nurse education. An anthropologically informed qualitative research design underpinned 'critical incident' (CI)-focused ethnographic interviews with 36 second and third-year MH nursing field students and seven undergraduate MH branch lecturers. Follow up focus groups were also carried out. Interview transcripts were subject to thematic analysis. Four subthemes were identified under the broad theme of the clinical significance of religious-type expression and experience: (1) identifying the difference between delusions and religious belief; (2) identifying whether an experience was hallucination or religious experience; (3) the clinical implications of such challenges; and (4) applying religion-specific knowledge. There are clinical implications that may result from the difficulties with assessing the clinical significance of religious beliefs and experiences, identified in both our research and within international cultural psychiatry literature and research. Misinterpretation and therefore wrongly assessing someone's experience as pathological is a significant concern. It is suggested that CI analysis could be adapted to help nurses, nursing students and nurse educators recognize the religious dimensions of mental distress, particularly those that then potentially

  8. Respiratory protection competencies for the occupational health nurse.

    Burns, Candace; Lachat, Ann M; Gordon, Kimberly; Ryan, Mary Gene; Gruden, MaryAnn; Barker, D Paxon; Taormina, Deborah

    2014-03-01

    Approximately 5 million workers employed at 1.3 million work settings are required to wear some form of respiratory protection as part of their jobs. Occupational health nurses can protect the respiratory health of America's workforce. In 2012, the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses Grants Committee Working Group conducted a nationwide survey of occupational health nurses to assess their knowledge, comfort, skills, and abilities relative to respiratory protection. The Working Group used the survey findings as a foundation for the development of respiratory protection competencies for occupational health nurses and a guide for the development of educational modules. PMID:24811695

  9. Mapping the Future of Environmental Health and Nursing: Strategies for Integrating National Competencies into Nursing Practice

    Larsson, Laura S.; Butterfield, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Nurses are increasingly the primary contact for clients concerned about health problems related to their environment. In response to the need for nursing expertise in the field of environmental health, the Institute of Medicine (IOM), Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) have designed core competencies for the nursing profession. The IOM competencies focus on four areas: (1) knowledge and concepts; (2) assessment and referral; advocacy, ethics, and risk communication; and (4) legislation and regulation. The competencies establish a baseline of knowledge and awareness in order for nurses to prevent and minimize health problems associated with exposure to environmental agents. To address the known difficulties of incorporating new priorities into established practice, nurses attending an environmental health short course participated in a nominal group process focusing on the question, “What specific actions can we take to bring environmental health into the mainstream of nursing practice?” This exercise was designed to bring the concepts of the national initiatives (IOM, NINR, ATSDR) to the awareness of individual nurses involved in the direct delivery of care. Results include 38 action items nurses identified as improving awareness and utilization of environmental health principles. The top five ideas were: (1) get environmental health listed as a requirement or competency in undergraduate nursing education; (2) improve working relationships with interdepartmental persons—a team approach; (3) strategically place students in essential organizations such as NIOSH, ATSDR, or CDC; (4) educate nurse educators; and (5) create environmental health awards in nursing. The 38 original ideas were also reorganized into a five-tiered conceptual model. The concepts of this model include: (1) developing partnerships; (2) strengthening publications; (3) enhancing continuing education; (4) updating nursing

  10. Mental health and learning disability nursing students' perceptions of the usefulness of the objective structured clinical examination to assess their competence in medicine administration

    Hemingway, Steve; Stephenson, John; Roberts, Bronwyn; McCann, Terence

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate mental health and learning disability nursing students’ perceptions of the usefulness of the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in assessing their administration of medicine competence. Learning disability (n = 24) and mental health (n = 46) students from a single cohort were invited to evaluate their experience of the OSCE. A 10-item survey questionnaire was used, comprising open- and closed-response questions. Twelve (50%) lear...

  11. Licensed Practical Nurses in Occupational Health. An Initial Survey.

    Lee, Jane A.; And Others

    The study, conducted in 1971, assessed characteristics of licensed practical nurses (LPN's) who worked in occupational health nursing. The survey instrument, a questionnaire, was returned by 591 LPN's in occupational health and provided data related to: personal characteristics, work and setting, administrative and professional functioning,…

  12. Health and nursing problems of elderly patients related to bio-psycho-social need deficiencies and functional assessment

    Muszalik, Marta; Dijkstra, Ate; Kedziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Zielinska-Wieczkowska, Halina

    2012-01-01

    Elderly population is characterized by larger need for social welfare and medical treatment than other age groups. Along with aging, there is a number of emerging health, nursing, caring, psychological and social problems. Complexity of these problems results from overlapping and advancing involutio

  13. The History of College Health Nursing

    Crihfield, Connie; Grace, Ted W.

    2011-01-01

    Almost from the beginning of formal college health programs in the second half of the 19th century, college health nurses were there to care for students in college and university settings. By the end of the 20th century, the role of college health nurses had evolved with the nursing field in general, but with enough unique features for the…

  14. Mental health and learning disability nursing students' perceptions of the usefulness of the objective structured clinical examination to assess their competence in medicine administration.

    Hemingway, Steve; Stephenson, John; Roberts, Bronwyn; McCann, Terence

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate mental health and learning disability nursing students' perceptions of the usefulness of the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in assessing their administration of medicine competence. Learning disability (n = 24) and mental health (n = 46) students from a single cohort were invited to evaluate their experience of the OSCE. A 10-item survey questionnaire was used, comprising open- and closed-response questions. Twelve (50%) learning disability and 32 (69.6%) mental health nursing students participated. The OSCE was rated highly compared to other theoretical assessments; it was also reported as clinically real and as a motivational learning strategy. However, it did not rate as well as clinical practice. Content analysis of written responses identified four themes: (i) benefits of the OSCE; (ii) suggestions to improve the OSCE; (iii) concern about the lack of clinical reality of the OSCE; and (iv) OSCE-induced stress. The themes, although repeating some of the positive statistical findings, showed that participants were critical of the university setting as a place to conduct clinical assessment, highlighted OSCE-related stress, and questioned the validity of the OSCE as a real-world assessment. The OSCE has an important role in the development of student nurses' administration of medicine skills. However, it might hinder their performance as a result of the stress of being assessed in a simulated environment. PMID:25180411

  15. Community Health Nursing through a Global Lens.

    Sarkar, Norma; Dallwig, Amber; Abbott, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Community Health Nursing (N456) is a required senior clinical course in the undergraduate nursing curriculum at the University of Michigan in which students learn to assess and address the health of populations and communities. In 2012, we began our efforts to internationalize the curriculum using a globally engaged nursing education framework. Our goal is for all students to have an intercultural learning experience understanding that all students are unable to travel internationally. Therefore, this intercultural learning was implemented through a range of experiences including actual immersion, virtual activities (videoconferencing) and interventions with local vulnerable populations. Grants were obtained to provide immersion experiences in Quito, Ecuador and New Delhi, India. Several technologies were initiated with partner nursing schools in Leogane, Haiti and New Delhi, India. Weekly videoconferencing utilizing BlueJeans software and exchange of knowledge through the Knowledge Gateway facilitated intercultural exchange of knowledge and culture. Local clinical groups work with a variety of vulnerable populations. A private blog was developed for all sections to share community assessment data from local and international communities. Qualitative evaluation data was collected for local and international students to begin to assess cultural competence and student learning. Analysis of data documented increased awareness of culture and identified the many positive benefits of interaction with a global partner. PMID:25980716

  16. An assessment by nurses and mothers of a ‘road-to-health ’ book in the Western Cape

    D Harrison

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate English, Afrikaans, and Xhosa mother-retained ‘Road-to- Health Book’ (RTH book for children, and an electronic calculator. Design: Researchers D Harrison (DH and H Harker (HH informed clinic staff about the contents and significance of the RTH book. They requested nurses to use this book in conjunction with the Road-to-Health Card and to issue and explain its use to every visiting client. The use of an electronic calculator that plotted horizontal centile and Z-score charts was demonstrated and explained. To determine the relevance of the book and the electronic calculator, nurses involved in the study for 6 months were given three standardised descriptive questionnaires with ‘yes’, ‘no’ and ‘don’t know’ responses. Clients were traced and interviewed by the researchers after 6 -1 2 months to obtain their views on the book. Setting: Clinics that provided children with healthcare in 24 locations in the Western Cape Province participated in the study. The children lived in informal settlements, in low-, middle- and high-income residential areas, and on farms in the Cape Town. Stellenbosch, and Paarl regions. Subjects: One hundred and fourteen nurses were enrolled in the study as well as 581 clients to whom the RTH book was issued. Outcome measures: The use of and comments on the RTH book by nurses and clients were based on analysis of the questionnaires. Results: The majority of nurses (81.6% and clients (96% found the RTH book useful. The horizontal and Z-score growth charts and electronic calculator were less acceptable because their use was time-consuming and less well understood. Conclusion: The RTH book with appropriate modifications should be issued to clients in place of the current Road-to-Health card and educational material.

  17. Public Health Interventions for School Nursing Practice.

    Schaffer, Marjorie A; Anderson, Linda J W; Rising, Shannon

    2016-06-01

    School nurses (SNs) use public health nursing knowledge and skills to provide nursing services to school populations. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a practice framework that can be used to explain and guide public health nursing interventions. SNs who were also members of the National Association of School Nurses completed an electronic survey on their use of public health interventions as defined by the wheel. Although 67% of the participants were not familiar with the Public Health Intervention Wheel, respondents reported conducting activities that were consistent with the Wheel interventions. Screening, referral and follow-up, case management, and health teaching were the most frequently performed interventions. Intervention use varied by educational level, age of nurse, years of practice, and student population. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a relevant and useful framework that provides a language to explain population-based school nursing practice. PMID:26404552

  18. Undergraduate nursing students' attitudes towards mental health nursing: determining the influencing factors.

    Happell, Brenda; Gough Nee Hayman-White, Karla

    2007-01-01

    Available evidence clearly demonstrates that undergraduate nursing students typically hold unfavourable attitudes towards psychiatric / mental health nursing as a career. It has been suggested that students' negative attitudes towards mental illness and consumers of mental health services may be responsible for the unpopularity of this specialty area; however, research exploring the relationship between career choices and students' attitudes is lacking. A sub-set of data from a large Victorian study that examined undergraduate nursing students' attitudes towards mental illness, mental health nursing, and mental health clinical placement experiences was used to clarify the nature of this relationship. In total, complete data was available from 605 students undertaking their first mental health placement who provided responses to a 24-item pre-placement survey. This survey assessed the following three areas: 1. preparedness for the mental health field; 2. attitudes towards mental illness; and 3. attitudes towards mental health nursing. The findings demonstrate significant relationships between students' attitudes, beliefs, and characteristics and desire to pursue a career in psychiatric mental health nursing. The identification of these relationships provides a basis from which interventions to influence nursing students' attitudes towards psychiatric/mental health nursing, can be planned. PMID:17622991

  19. Does occupational health nursing exist in India?

    Rajnarayan R Tiwari; Anjali Sharma; Sanjay P Zodpey; Shobha M Khandare

    2014-01-01

    Background: Occupational health services are important to develop healthy and productive work forces, which should be delivered through occupational health team. Occupational health nurse (OHN) is an important member of this team and is required to apply nursing principles in conserving the health of workers in occupational settings. Purpose: This article attempts to map the occupational health nursing courses in India and design competencies and curriculum for such a course. Materials and Me...

  20. American Association of Occupational Health Nurses

    ... Vision & Mission Board of Directors Fellows What is Occupational Health Nursing Public/Legislative Affairs AAOHN Alliances AAOHN Affiliates AAOHN ... Total Worker Health ® Agenda The American Association of Occupational ... nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission ...

  1. Nursing students' attitudes about psychiatric mental health nursing.

    Hunter, Lauren; Weber, Tayler; Shattell, Mona; Harris, Barbara A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe Masters entry nursing students' attitudes about psychiatric mental health clinical experiences; preparedness to care for persons with mental illness; students' perceived stigmas and stereotypes; and plans to choose mental health nursing as a career. A 31-item survey was administered to pre-licensure graduate nursing students who were recruited from a Masters entry nursing program from a university in a large city in the Midwestern US. Results indicated that clinical experiences provide valuable experiences for nursing practice, however, fewer students think that these experiences prepare them to work as a psychiatric mental health nurse and none plan to pursue careers as psychiatric mental health nurses. The findings support conclusions from other studies that increasing the amount of time in the clinical setting and adding specific content to the curriculum, particularly content related to the importance of psychiatric mental health nursing and the effects of stigma, may assist the profession's efforts to recruit and retain psychiatric mental health nurses. Further research is needed to determine the effectiveness of these strategies and to identify the best ways to implement them. PMID:25397970

  2. Quantifying Community Health Nursing: The Control is with the Nurse

    Miller, Judith L.; Sienkiewicz, Josephine I.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the formation, benefits, and implication to nursing practice of an automated nursing information system in a community health agency based on a service provided framework. The design of the service provided coding system is described. Benefits and future implications to the community health agency are discussed.

  3. Nursing and eHealth: Are We Preparing Our Future Nurses as Automatons or Informaticians?

    Honey, Michelle; Procter, Paula M; Wilson, Marisa L; Moen, Anne; Dal Sasso, Grace T M

    2016-01-01

    The Education Working Group of IMIA NI present this thought provoking panel where the changing and challenging role of nursing will be explored within the information intensive eHealth arena. The session will be of interest to any nurse as the discussion will be driven by the objective of trying to understand how best to prepare nurses to be actively engaged in information and communication technology (ICT) developments that enhance care assessment, delivery, evaluation and audit. As a balance, the discussion will consider the increasing emergence of 'nursing by numbers' where risk assessment tools are used in an automatic way leaving little room for individual evidenced based care. PMID:27332312

  4. Are operating room nurses at higher risk of severe persistent asthma? The Nurses' Health Study.

    Moual, N. le; Varraso, R.; Zock, J.P.; Henneberger, P.; Speizer, F.E.; Kauffmann, F.; Camargo, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the associations between operating room (OR) nursing, a category of health care workers at high risk of exposure to various inhaled agents, and asthma severity/control among women with asthma. Methods: The level of severity/control in nurses with prevalent doctor-diagnosed asthm

  5. Psychiatric mental health nursing in a biopsychosocial era.

    Abbondanza, D M; Puskar, K R; Wilkinson, B; Welch, C; Rudert, S; Gallippi, B

    1994-01-01

    Clients in long-term facilities carry a wide array of psychiatric diagnoses, often with equally diverse medical problems. This "back ward" population requires a specialized area of psychiatric mental health nursing practice. The need for comprehensive assessment and adequate interventions, and the various frustrations of nursing staff, are discussed using a case example. PMID:7862514

  6. Knowledge and Attitude of Medical Nurses toward Oral Health and Oral Health Care of Pregnant Women

    Sharif, Suzana; Saddki, Norkhafizah; Yusoff, Azizah

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed the knowledge and attitudes of medical nurses regarding oral health and oral health care of pregnant women. Methods This cross sectional study of 133 nurses in the district of Tumpat, Kelantan (Malaysia) used self-administered questionnaires. Results Most nurses knew that dental plaque is associated with periodontal disease (97.7%). However, most nurses erroneously believed that tooth decay (86.5%) and excessive sugar consumption (87.2%) led to periodontal disease. About half of the nurses knew about the relationship between periodontal disease of pregnant women and low birth weight (43.6%) and preterm birth (48.9%). Many nurses had the misconception that the developing foetus draws calcium from the mothers’ teeth (78.2%). Most nurses had good attitudes toward improving their oral health knowledge (97.0%) and agreed they should help to deliver oral health education to pregnant women (94.0%). Age, length of service as a nurse, and length of service in antenatal care had no effect on the scores for the nurses’ knowledge and attitude regarding oral health and oral health care of pregnant women. Conclusion Medical nurses had limited knowledge about oral health of pregnant women and had some misunderstandings about oral health, although they had good attitudes. Age, length of service as a nurse, and length service in antenatal care had no effect on the knowledge and attitude scores of the nurses.

  7. Public health nursing, ethics and human rights.

    Ivanov, Luba L; Oden, Tami L

    2013-05-01

    Public health nursing has a code of ethics that guides practice. This includes the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for Nurses, Principles of the Ethical Practice of Public Health, and the Scope and Standards of Public Health Nursing. Human rights and Rights-based care in public health nursing practice are relatively new. They reflect human rights principles as outlined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and applied to public health practice. As our health care system is restructured and there are new advances in technology and genetics, a focus on providing care that is ethical and respects human rights is needed. Public health nurses can be in the forefront of providing care that reflects an ethical base and a rights-based approach to practice with populations. PMID:23586767

  8. Occupational Health Content in Baccalaureate Nursing Education.

    Keller, Marjorie J.; May, W. Theodore

    A 4-year project was conducted at the University of Tennessee College of Nursing to identify occupational health nursing content essential in baccalaureate education for professional nursing. In the process of determining content, a review of relevant literature was made, and a theoretical framework was developed which consisted of an integration…

  9. Occupational Health Hazards in ICU Nursing Staff

    Helena Eri Shimizu; Djalma Ticiani Couto; Edgar Merchán-Hamann; Anadergh Barbosa Branco

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed occupational health hazards for Intensive Care Unit (ICU) nurses and nursing technicians, comparing differences in the number and types of hazards which occur at the beginning and end of their careers. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out with 26 nurses and 96 nursing technicians from a public hospital in the Federal District, Brazil. A Likert-type work-related symptom scale (WRSS) was used to evaluate the presence of physical, psychological, and social risk...

  10. Considering place in community health nursing.

    Bender, Amy; Clune, Laurie; Guruge, Sepali

    2009-03-01

    When a geographic location is assigned meaning, it becomes a place. The authors argue that place matters as both geographical location and lived experience.They extend the current conceptualization of nursing geography to encompass community health nursing and address intricacies of community nursing practice and research that often go unnoticed. They do so by exploring the notion of place in home and community, including the structural/spatial dimensions of the nurse-client relationship. The authors review the health geography literatures, then discuss the implications for practice and research in community health. They invite community health nurses to critically examine their practice and research with reference to such issues as the power of the nurse, marginalized places as determinants of health, and how best to care for clients living in diverse community settings. PMID:19485049

  11. Oral Health Education for Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Students

    Golinveaux, J; Gerbert, B.; Cheng, J.; Duderstadt, K; Alkon, A.; Mullen, S.; Lin, B; Miller, A.; Zhan, L.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether an interdisciplinary, multifaceted oral health education program delivered to pediatric nurse practitioner students at the University of California, San Francisco, would improve their knowledge, confidence, attitudes, and behaviors regarding the provision of oral health assessments, consultations, referrals, and services to young children during well-child visits. Thirty pediatric nurse practitioner students were included in the study. Participant...

  12. Nurse prescribing in mental health: national survey.

    Dobel-Ober, D; Brimblecombe, N; Bradley, E

    2010-08-01

    Mental health nurses can now train to become independent prescribers as well as supplementary prescribers. Independent nurse prescribing can potentially help to reorganize mental health services, increase access to medicines and improve service user information, satisfaction and concordance. However, mental health nursing has been slow to undertake prescribing roles, and there has been little work conducted to look at where nurse prescribing is proving successful, and those areas where it is less so. This survey was designed to collect information from directors of nursing in mental health trusts about the numbers of mental health prescribers in England, gather views about prescribing in practice, and elicit intentions with regards to the development of nurse prescribing. In some Trusts, the number of mental health nurse prescribers has increased to the point where wider impacts on workforce, the configuration of teams and services are inevitable. Currently, the way that prescribing is used within different organizations, services and teams varies and it is unclear which setting is most appropriate for the different modes of prescribing. Future work should focus on the impact of mental health nurse prescribing on service delivery, as well as on service users, colleagues and nurses themselves. PMID:20633075

  13. Emotional intelligence of mental health nurses

    Dusseldorp, Loes van; van Meijel, Berno; Derksen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Aims. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the level of emotional intelligence of mental health nurses in the Netherlands. Background. The focus in research on emotional intelligence to date has been on a variety of professionals. However, little is known about emotional intelligence in mental health nurses. Method. The emotional intelligence of 98 Dutch nurses caring for psychiatric patients is reported. Data were collected with the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory within a cross...

  14. Occupational Health Hazards in ICU Nursing Staff

    Helena Eri Shimizu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed occupational health hazards for Intensive Care Unit (ICU nurses and nursing technicians, comparing differences in the number and types of hazards which occur at the beginning and end of their careers. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out with 26 nurses and 96 nursing technicians from a public hospital in the Federal District, Brazil. A Likert-type work-related symptom scale (WRSS was used to evaluate the presence of physical, psychological, and social risks. Data were analyzed with the use of the SPSS, version 12.0, and the Kruskal-Wallis test for statistical significance and differences in occupational health hazards at the beginning and at the end of the workers' careers. As a workplace, ICUs can cause work health hazards, mostly physical, to nurses and nursing technicians due to the frequent use of physical energy and strength to provide care, while psychological and social hazards occur to a lesser degree.

  15. The Health of the School Nurse Community: A Framework

    Christeson, Elisabeth P.

    2003-01-01

    School nursing is based on a conceptual foundation of community health nursing. Using community health nursing as a reference point, this article describes a viewpoint of school nurses as the population of care. With this perspective, school nurses will better understand how to foster the health of their community. Developed on the basis of…

  16. Nurse Work Engagement Impacts Job Outcome and Nurse-Assessed Quality of Care: Model Testing with Nurse Practice Environment and Nurse Work Characteristics as Predictors

    Peter Mathieu Van Bogaert

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Key words: burnout,job satisfaction, nurse retention, nurse practice environment,quality of care, acute health care,structural equation modelling. Aim:To explore the mechanisms through which nurse practice environment dimensions are associated with job outcomes and nurse-assessed quality of care. Mediating variables tested included nurse work characteristics of workload, social capital, decision latitude, as well as work engagement dimensions of vigor, dedication and absorption.Background: Understanding to support and guide the practice community in their daily effort to answer most accurate complex care demands along with a stable nurse workforce are challenging.Design: Cross-sectional survey.Method:Based on previous empirical findings,a structural equation model designed with valid measurement instruments was tested.The study population was registered acute care hospital nurses(N = 1201 in twoindependent hospitals and one hospital group with six hospitals in Belgium.Results: Nurse practice environment dimensions predicted job outcome variables and nurse ratings of quality of care.Analyses were consistent with features of nurses’ work characteristics including perceived workload,decision latitude,and social capital,as well as three dimension of work engagement playing mediating roles between nurse practice environment and outcomes.A revised model adjusted using various fit measures explained 60 % and 47 % of job outcomes and nurse - assessed quality of care,respectively.Conclusion: Study findings show that aspects of nurse work characteristics such as workload,decision latitude and social capital along with nurse work engagement(e.g.vigor, dedication and absorption play a role between how various stakeholders such as executives,nurse managers and physicians will organize care and how nurses perceive job outcomes and quality of care.

  17. Model documentation of assessment and nursing diagnosis in the practice of nursing care management for nursing students

    A. Aziz Alimul Hidayat; M. Kes

    2015-01-01

    Model documentation of assessment and nursing diagnosis in the practice of nursing care management is an integration model in nursing care records, especially records nursing assessment and diagnosis in one format. This model can reduce the duration of the recording in nursing care, and make it easier for students to understand the nursing diagnosis, so that nursing interventions more effective. The purpose of this paper was to describes the form integration documentation of nursing assessmen...

  18. Service Learning and Community Health Nursing: A Natural Fit.

    Miller, Marilyn P.; Swanson, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Community health nursing students performed community assessments and proposed and implemented service learning projects that addressed adolescent smoking in middle schools, home safety for elderly persons, industrial worker health, and sexual abuse of teenaged girls. Students learned to apply epidemiological research methods, mobilize resources,…

  19. Challenges in mental health nursing: current opinion

    Sabella, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Donna Sabella, Theresa Fay-Hillier College of Nursing and Health Professions, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: The current mental health care system in the US continues to struggle with providing adequate care and services to all that require it due to limited resources, biases from both other professions and the public, and the complexities of treatment of many of those individuals or populations that suffer from mental illness. Mental health nurses, also referred to as ps...

  20. School Nurses' Perceived Prevalence and Competence to Address Student Mental Health Problems

    Stephan, Sharon H.; Connors, Elizabeth H.

    2013-01-01

    Due to under-identification of student mental health problems and limited specialty mental health providers in schools, school nurses are often faced with identifying and addressing student mental health needs. This exploratory study assessed prevalence and types of student mental health problems encountered by school nurses, as well as their…

  1. Working hours and health behaviour among nurses at public hospitals

    Juliana da Costa Fernandes; Luciana Fernandes Portela; Lucia Rotenberg; Rosane Harter Griep

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyse the differences between genders in the description in the professional, domestic and total work hours and assess its association with health-related behaviour among nurses. METHODS: this is a transversal study carried out in 18 different public hospitals in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro. The data collection procedure was based on questionnaires. All nurses working with assistance were considered eligible (n=2,279). RESULTS: men and women showed significant ...

  2. Nursing leadership and health sector reform.

    Borthwick, C; Galbally, R

    2001-06-01

    The political, technological and economic changes that have occurred over the past decade are increasingly difficult to manage within the traditional framework of health-care, and the organisation of health-care is seen to need radical reform to sweep away many of the internal barriers that now divide one form of health-care, and one profession, from another. Nursing must equip itself with skills in advocacy and political action to influence the direction the system will take. Nursing currently suffers from a weakness in self-concept that goes hand in hand with a weakness in political status, and nursing leadership must build the foundations for both advocacy for others and self-advocacy for the nursing movement. The profession faces tensions between different conceptions of its role and status, its relationship to medicine, and its relationship to health. Health indices are tightly linked to status, and to trust, hope, and control of one's own life. Can nurses help empower others when they are not particularly good at empowering themselves? What will the role of the nurse be in creating the information flows that will guide people toward health? Nursing's long history of adaptation to an unsettled and negotiated status may mean that it is better fitted to make this adaptation than other more confident disciplines. PMID:11882205

  3. Nurse Education and the Assessment of Nurse Competence

    Olga Takahashi

    2006-01-01

    The issue in which I am interested is the assessment of nurse knowledge, skills and competence, and ways in which formative assessment can promote more effective learning. In this critical review of the relevant literature I consider some of the changes in nurse education, first in the UK in general, and then in the particular context of the University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil. I will then relate these changes to broader issues of professional education, and in particular developments in a...

  4. Integrating Sexual Minority Health Issues into a Health Assessment Class.

    Bosse, Jordon D; Nesteby, J Aleah; Randall, Carla E

    2015-01-01

    The health needs of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) population are traditionally overlooked by the health care community and are rendered invisible by most nursing school curricula. Initial contact with a nurse during a health history and assessment can have an impact on whether the person will feel comfortable disclosing his or her identity, returning for services, or following plans of care. Because the first interaction with a nurse can be critical, the health assessment course is an appropriate place in the curriculum to discuss the needs of the LGBT community. This article includes a discussion of unique health risks to the LGBT population, benefits, and challenges of incorporating these issues into the classroom and recommendations for including the care of this population into a health assessment nursing course. Specific communication techniques are provided that may be helpful during history taking and physical examination with a patient who is LGBT. Guidance regarding physical examination of the transgender patient is also included. These suggestions will be helpful to nurse faculty who teach health assessment, nursing students, educators who design and implement professional development and continuing education for established nurses, preceptors in the clinical setting, and any nurse who is unfamiliar with the needs and concerns specific to the LGBT population. PMID:26653044

  5. Geriatric nursing assessment and intervention in an emergency department

    Rosted, Elizabeth Emilie; Wagner, Lis; Hendriksen, Carsten;

    2012-01-01

    assessment, the nurse made relevant referrals to the geriatric outpatient clinic, community health centre, general practitioner or made arrangements with next of kin. Results. One hundred and fifty people participated, mean age was 81.7. At discharge, they had a mean of 1.9 unresolved problems, after 1 month......To describe and test a model for structured nursing assessment and intervention to older people discharged from emergency department (ED). Background. Older people recently discharged from hospital are at high risk of readmission. This risk may increase when they are discharged straight home from...... discharge, and at 1 and 6 months follow-up, a brief standardised nursing assessment (ISAR 2) developed by McCusker et al. was carried out. The focus was on unresolved problems that required medical or nursing intervention, new or different home care services or comprehensive geriatric assessment. After...

  6. Occupational Health Teaching for Pre Registration Nursing Students.

    Whitaker, Stuart; Wynn, Philip; Williams, Nerys

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 41 of 66 nursing schools showed that occupational health is taught in 88% of nursing diploma and 80% of nursing degree programs. However, the majority focus on nurses' own occupational safety and health, not how patients' health can be affected by work or can affect the ability to work. (SK)

  7. Mixed methods research in mental health nursing.

    Kettles, A M; Creswell, J W; Zhang, W

    2011-08-01

    Mixed methods research is becoming more widely used in order to answer research questions and to investigate research problems in mental health and psychiatric nursing. However, two separate literature searches, one in Scotland and one in the USA, revealed that few mental health nursing studies identified mixed methods research in their titles. Many studies used the term 'embedded' but few studies identified in the literature were mixed methods embedded studies. The history, philosophical underpinnings, definition, types of mixed methods research and associated pragmatism are discussed, as well as the need for mixed methods research. Examples of mental health nursing mixed methods research are used to illustrate the different types of mixed methods: convergent parallel, embedded, explanatory and exploratory in their sequential and concurrent combinations. Implementing mixed methods research is also discussed briefly and the problem of identifying mixed methods research in mental and psychiatric nursing are discussed with some possible solutions to the problem proposed. PMID:21749560

  8. A study to assess burnout among nurses of maternity department in Gauhati Medical College Hospital, Assam

    Marami Baishya; Bivarani Goswami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Burnout in healthcare workers, especially among nurses, can have an impact on overall healthcare delivery system. For health in general and maternal health in particular, wellbeing of healthcare workers, including nurses, is of paramount importance. Material and methods: This study aimed to assess burnout among nurses working in the maternity department. One hundred nurses of a tertiary care centre, selected by non-purposive convenient sampling, were examined by a standardised...

  9. Development of a respiratory protection survey instrument for occupational health nurses: an educational project.

    Taormina, Deborah; Burgel, Barbara J

    2013-02-01

    The Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training outlined seven recommendations to improve the competency of occupational health nurses in respiratory protection. An advisory group was convened in December 2011, with stakeholder representation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health/National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory, American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., American Board for Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare, American Nurses Association, and Institute of Medicine Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health. The initial work of the advisory group included developing and administering a survey to assess current occupational health nurse roles and responsibilities relevant to respiratory protection. Development of the survey was led by a master's student and advisor who worked with the advisory group. The process of tool development and preliminary findings are presented in this article. PMID:23380641

  10. Professional stress and health among critical care nurses in Serbia.

    Milutinović, Dragana; Golubović, Boris; Brkić, Nina; Prokeš, Bela

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and analyse professional stressors, evaluate the level of stress in nurses in Intensive Care Units (ICU), and assess the correlation between the perception of stress and psychological and somatic symptoms or diseases shown by nurses. The research, designed as a cross-sectional study, was carried out in the Intensive Care Units (ICU), in health centres in Serbia. The sample population encompassed 1000 nurses. Expanded Nursing Stress Scale (ENSS) was used as the research instrument. ENSS revealed a valid metric characteristic within our sample population. Nurses from ICUs rated situations involving physical and psychological working environments as the most stressful ones, whereas situations related to social working environment were described as less stressful; however, the differences in the perception of stressfulness of these environments were minor. Socio-demographic determinants of the participants (age, marital status and education level) significantly affected the perception of stress at work. Significant differences in the perception of stressfulness of particular stress factors were observed among nurses with respect to psychological and somatic symptoms (such as headache, insomnia, fatigue, despair, lower back pain, mood swings etc.) and certain diseases (such as hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes mellitus etc). In view of permanent escalation of professional stressors, creating a supportive working environment is essential for positive health outcomes, prevention of job-related diseases and better protection of already ill nurses. PMID:22728799

  11. Self-assessment of nursing competency among final year nursing students in Thailand: a comparison between public and private nursing institutions

    Sawaengdee, Krisada; Kantamaturapoj, Kanang; Seneerattanaprayul, Parinda; Putthasri, Weerasak; Suphanchaimat, Rapeepong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and objectives Nurses play a major role in Thailand’s health care system. In recent years, the production of nurses, in both the public and private sectors, has been growing rapidly to respond to the shortage of health care staff. Alongside concerns over the number of nurses produced, the quality of nursing graduates is of equal importance. This study therefore aimed to 1) compare the self-assessed competency of final year Thai nursing students between public and private nursing schools, and 2) explore factors that were significantly associated with competency level. Methods A cross-sectional clustered survey was conducted on 40 Thai nursing schools. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires. The questionnaire consisted of questions about respondents’ background, their education profile, and a self-measured competency list. Descriptive statistics, factor analysis, and multivariate regression analysis were applied. Results A total of 3,349 students participated in the survey. Approximately half of the respondents had spent their childhood in rural areas. The majority of respondents reported being “confident” or “very confident” in all competencies. Private nursing students reported a higher level of “public health competency” than public nursing students with statistical significance. However, there was no significant difference in “clinical competency” between the two groups. Conclusion Nursing students from private institutions seemed to report higher levels of competency than those from public institutions, particularly with regard to public health. This phenomenon might have arisen because private nursing students had greater experience of diverse working environments during their training. One of the key limitations of this study was that the results were based on the subjective self-assessment of the respondents, which might risk respondent bias. Further studies that evaluate current nursing curricula in both

  12. Assault experiences: Lessons learned from mental health nurses in Taiwan.

    Yang, Cheng-I; Hsieh, Wen-Po; Lee, Li-Hung; Chen, Shu-Ling

    2016-06-01

    Mental health nurse are frequently subjected to patients' violent and aggressive behaviour. These assault experiences have given rise to mental health nurses' physical and psychological trauma, and negatively impact the quality of patient care. The purpose of the present qualitative study was to understand mental health nurses' experiences of being assaulted, the influences on their patient care, and their perspectives of the effectiveness of in-service, violence-prevention education. Ten mental health nurses from two different inpatient mental health facilities were interviewed using a semistructured interview guide. Thematic analysis of interview data found six themes: (i) violence is unpredictable; (ii) violence is normal; (iii) lasting psychological trauma; (iv) limited support from peers and the administrator; (v) violence prevention requires team cooperation; and (vi) doubting the effectiveness of in-service education on violence prevention. Psychiatric ward administrators should assess nurses' learning and skill needs to determine whether these needs are met by existing in-service training programmes. A culture of safety should also be promoted by building a warm and supportive ward climate for both staff and patients, which would include team cooperation and support for colleagues who suffer a violent incident. PMID:27170463

  13. Primary health care nurse practitioners in Canada.

    DiCenso, Alba; Auffrey, Lucille; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Donald, Faith; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Matthews, Sue; Opsteen, Joanne

    2007-08-01

    Canada, like many countries, is in the midst of primary health care reform. A key priority is to improve access to primary health care, especially in remote communities and areas with physician shortages. As a result, there is an increased emphasis on the integration of primary health care nurse practitioners. As of March 2006, legislation exists in all provinces and two territories in Canada that allows nurse practitioners (NPs) to implement their expanded nursing role. In this paper, we will briefly review the historical development of the NP role in Canada and situate it in the international context; describe the NP role, supply of NPs in the country, and the settings in which they work; propose an NP practice model framework; summarize facilitators and barriers to NP role implementation in primary health care delivery; and outline strategies to address the barriers. PMID:18041990

  14. 77 FR 36549 - Nursing Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit-“Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health...

    2012-06-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Nursing Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit--``Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health Disparities, and Social Determinants of Health...). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: HRSA's Bureau of Health Professions, Division of Nursing, will...

  15. Total Worker Health: Implications for the Occupational Health Nurse.

    Campbell, Karen; Burns, Candace

    2015-07-01

    Total Worker Health™ is defined as a "strategy integrating occupational safety and health protection with health promotion to prevent worker injury and illness and to advance worker health and well-being." This strategy aligns workplace safety with individual behaviors that support healthy lifestyles. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 presumes that incentive-oriented worksite health promotion provides a critical pathway to reduce group health costs. Because of their scientific and clinical backgrounds, professional nurses are well qualified to educate and assist individuals with healthy lifestyle choices. Occupational health nurses and patient advocates can shape wellness initiatives that best serve both employees and their employers. PMID:26187174

  16. Health Information Technology and Nursing Homes

    Liu, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Nursing homes are considered lagging behind in adopting health information technology (HIT). Many studies have highlighted the use of HIT as a means of improving health care quality. However, these studies overwhelmingly do not provide empirical information proving that HIT can actually achieve these improvements. The main research goal of this…

  17. Nursing III. A Course of Study. Health Occupations Education.

    Rogers, Helen V.

    This curriculum guide for instructors provides a course of study (Nursing III) requisite for the third and concluding portion of a 1-year practical nursing curriculum designed to continue opportunities for career mobility in the health occupations. Content is in three sections: (1) Medical Surgical Nursing II, (2) Mental Health Nursing, and (3)…

  18. Chronic Health Conditions Managed by School Nurses. Position Statement. Revised

    Morgitan, Judith; Bushmiaer, Margo; DeSisto, Marie C.; Duff, Carolyn; Lambert, C. Patrice; Murphy, M. Kathleen; Roland, Sharon; Selser, Kendra; Wyckoff, Leah; White, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that students with chronic health conditions have access to a full-time registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse). School districts should include school nurse positions in their full-time instructional support personnel to provide health services…

  19. Nursing students' attitudes to mental health nursing: psychometric properties of a self-report scale.

    Happell, Brenda; Hayman-White, Karla Gough Nee

    2009-10-01

    Negative attitudes toward people experiencing mental illness and mental health nursing as a career option have been recognized as a major barrier to sustaining an adequate psychiatric nursing workforce. This article presents the findings from a prospective observational study that explored the relationship between undergraduate nursing students' (n = 688) attitudes relevant to the mental health field, preparedness, and career preferences after they had completed a mental health placement. A comparison was also made between the self-reported attitudes, beliefs, and preferences of two groups of students, one with and one without relevant clinical experience. Finally, the psychometric properties of the clinical evaluation component of the survey were explored because the structure and composition of this component have not been assessed or reported previously. The findings have direct implications for psychiatric-mental health education. They show a strong association between educational preparation, placement experiences, and students' attitudes toward psychiatric nursing and consumers of mental health services. Findings also indicated that students with clinical experience felt significantly more prepared for employment in the mental health field and significantly less anxiety surrounding mental illness than did students without clinical experience. PMID:19766929

  20. Information-seeking behavior of nursing students and clinical nurses: implications for health sciences librarians*

    Dee, Cheryl; Stanley, Ellen E.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This research was conducted to provide new insights on clinical nurses' and nursing students' current use of health resources and libraries and deterrents to their retrieval of electronic clinical information, exploring implications from these findings for health sciences librarians.

  1. Infusing Oral Health Care into Nursing Curriculum: Addressing Preventive Health in Aging and Disability

    Joan Earle Hahn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Access to oral health care is essential for promoting and maintaining overall health and well-being, yet oral health disparities exist among vulnerable and underserved populations. While nurses make up the largest portion of the health care work force, educational preparation to address oral health needs of elders and persons with disabilities is limited across nursing curricula. This descriptive study reports on the interdisciplinary development, implementation, and testing of an oral health module that was included and infused into a graduate nursing curriculum in a three-phase plan. Phase 1 includes evaluation of a lecture presented to eight gerontological nurse practitioner (GNP students. Phase 2 includes evaluation of GNP students’ perceptions of learning, skills, and confidence following a one-time 8-hour practicum infused into 80 required practicum hours. The evaluation data show promise in preparing nurse practitioner students to assess and address preventive oral health needs of persons aging with disabilities such that further infusion and inclusion in a course for nurse practitioners across five specialties will implemented and tested in Phase 3.

  2. The New Nurse in Industry. A Guide for the Newly Employed Occupational Health Nurse.

    Lee, Jane A.

    These guidelines for professional nurses and employers in industrial settings present basic and fundamental nursing principles, duties, and responsibilities in the practice of occupational health. The content is presented in four chapters. The first briefly introduces occupational health. Chapter 2 on occupational health nursing service covers…

  3. A Nursing Informatics Curriculum Within a Health Systems Environment

    Heermann, Judith A.; Warren, Judith J.

    2001-01-01

    Challenged with the need to provide graduate education in nursing informatics across the state of Nebraska, an innovative curriculum was developed. This curriculum is integrated with other system-focused specialties (community health nursing and nursing administration) to form a Health Systems Nurse Specialist (HSNS) Program. The delivery of this curriculum was designed to be as independent of time and place as possible. Nurses especially in rural areas, have embraced this program as they can...

  4. Realities of mental health nursing practice in rural Australia.

    John Crowther, Andrew; Theresa Ragusa, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Mental health nursing as a distinct speciality has been in decline in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, for two decades. Arguably, this decline has worsened both consumer outcomes and the workplace experiences of mental health nurses. This article reports on a study designed to ascertain the nature of contemporary mental health nursing practice in New South Wales. The study utilised focus group research methodology, with participants recounting the realities of their day-to-day professional practice and perceptions of their professional identity. The findings indicate a contracting, if not moribund, profession; a decrease in the value attached to mental health nursing; and a pattern of persistent underfunding by successive governments of mental health services. An analysis of present and historical trends reveals there is a pressing need for a restructure and re-formation of mental health nursing in rural areas. This article links the shortage of mental health nurses in NSW to the closure of the mental health nursing register, a shift to comprehensive/generalist nurse education models, a perceived lack of nurses' professional standing, and natural attrition without suitably qualified replacements. Mental health nurses in this study perceived that they were not valued by other health professionals or by their own managers. Participants in this study reported mental health nursing in rural areas was an unattractive career choice. These findings are important to the understanding of recruitment and retention issues in rural mental health nursing in Australia. PMID:21767253

  5. Nursing education to improve global health

    Hülya Kaya

    2010-01-01

    In the final decades of the twentieth century world went through a complex process in political, technological, economic, social and health areas. In the process  often referred to as globalization, many  health problems including global spread have seen and  many have still being seen. This situation obliges nurses who are the largest groups of health care providers, to be  aware of health problems that result from globalization  and to explore solutions these health problems requires them t...

  6. Emotional intelligence of mental health nurses

    Dusseldorp, R.L.C. van; Meijel, B.K.G. van; Derksen, J.J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Aims. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the level of emotional intelligence of mental health nurses in the Netherlands. Background. The focus in research on emotional intelligence to date has been on a variety of professionals. However, little is known about emotional intelligence in men

  7. Practical Nursing, Volume III. Health Occupations Education. [Revised].

    Reid, Jamee Noell

    This document is a comprehensive guide for instructors to use in teaching the final phase of the practical nursing program. This revised volume contains information related to medical-surgical nursing, mental health nursing, and career success. The section on medical-surgical nursing is composed of many units, dealing with the following subjects:…

  8. Health behaviour, nursing self-efficacy and egagement among nursing students : A longitudinal cohort study

    Bruce, Malin

    2010-01-01

    Nursing students represent one of the largest groups of students in higher education in Sweden. Their future occupation as registered nurses requires professional competencies including working on health promotion. However, nurses are frequently recognised as an occupational group with a high risk of impaired health due to stress in the working environment. Therefore, the higher educational institutions providing nursing education have an important role to play in the health...

  9. Profile of an excellent nurse manager: identifying and developing health care team leaders.

    Kallas, Kathryn D

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify the profile of an excellent nurse manager who can lead effective health care teams. Leadership attributes and competencies that characterize an excellent nurse manager and tools to identify them are lacking in the literature but are required to efficiently and effectively address the growing shortage of registered nurses (RNs) in health care team leadership roles and the critical linkage of these roles to patient outcomes. A profile of an excellent nurse manager was developed on the basis of the responses of nurse managers across the United States who had been identified as excellent or competent by chief nurse executive assessment or/and the Nurse Manager Ability, Leadership, and Support of Nurses staff survey to the Kouzes and Posner Leadership Practices Inventory: Self Instrument. Statistically significant distinctions exist between nurse managers who are excellent and those who are competent as assessed by the Five Practices of Exemplary Leadership, which together comprise the profile of an excellent nurse manager. The Kouzes and Posner Leadership Practices Inventory: Self Instrument can be used to identify, recruit, and develop RNs in the nurse manager role as excellent leaders of effective health care teams. PMID:24896579

  10. Nurse Practitioners' Use of Communication Techniques: Results of a Maryland Oral Health Literacy Survey

    Koo, Laura W.; Horowitz, Alice M.; Radice, Sarah D.; Wang, Min Q.; Kleinman, Dushanka V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We examined nurse practitioners’ use and opinions of recommended communication techniques for the promotion of oral health as part of a Maryland state-wide oral health literacy assessment. Use of recommended health-literate and patient-centered communication techniques have demonstrated improved health outcomes. Methods A 27-item self-report survey, containing 17 communication technique items, across 5 domains, was mailed to 1,410 licensed nurse practitioners (NPs) in Maryland in 2...

  11. Lifestyle practices and the health promoting environment of hospital nurses.

    Hope, A

    1998-08-01

    Lifestyle practices and the health promoting environment of hospital nurses This paper examined the lifestyle practices of hospital nurses and the impact of specific interventions in the hospital environment. The perception of nurse as health promoter and as carer of AIDS patients was also examined. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data at two different time periods. The sample represented 729 nurses (at pre- and post-time periods), both qualified and student nurses. Qualified nurses reported the highest stress levels while student nurses reported more negative lifestyle practices such as smoking, alcohol consumption and drug use. A greater number of current smokers (29%) consumed alcohol and used drugs than non-smokers. The impact of intervention strategies around compliance with smoking policy and work-site walk routes reduced exposure to passive smoking at work for qualified nurses and increased exercise participation for both groups of nurses. Workplace was identified as the main source of stress which included relationships at work and demands of the job. Hospital nurses experiencing high work stress were more likely to use professional support and personal coping (discuss problems with friends\\/family, have a good cry and eat more) than others. Nurses believed in the importance of health promotion as part of their work; however, qualified nurses felt more confident and gave more health related information than student nurses. Student nurses perceived a lower risk of contacting AIDS through work and a higher concern\\/worry in caring for AIDS patients than qualified nurses.

  12. Forecasting the nursing workforce in a dynamic health care market.

    Dumpe, M L; Herman, J; Young, S W

    1998-01-01

    The ability to discern the interacting factors that affect supply and demand for nurses could help nurse educators and nurse leaders allocate resources to meet these needs. Forecasting models must take into account the interactions of three crucial groups of health care providers--physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician's assistants. Buerhaus has noted that market size, wages, preferences for nursing services, and availability of substitutes influence the demand for nursing services. Changes in nurse supply resulting from Medicare reimbursement for nursing services have not been studied, though it could safely be projected that such reimbursement will increase nurse supply. Nurses with baccalaureate degrees and advanced practice preparation will be in the greatest demand in ambulatory care, managed care, public health, and home care settings, raising concerns again that the educational mix is in need of adjustment upwards. PMID:9748982

  13. Community health nursing vision for 2020: shaping the future.

    Schofield, Ruth; Ganann, Rebecca; Brooks, Sandy; McGugan, Jennifer; Dalla Bona, Kim; Betker, Claire; Dilworth, Katie; Parton, Laurie; Reid-Haughian, Cheryl; Slepkov, Marlene; Watson, Cori

    2011-12-01

    As health care is shifting from hospital to community, community health nurses (CHNs) are directly affected. This descriptive qualitative study sought to understand priority issues currently facing CHNs, explore development of a national vision for community health nursing, and develop recommendations to shape the future of the profession moving toward the year 2020. Focus groups and key informant interviews were conducted across Canada. Five key themes were identified: community health nursing in crisis now, a flawed health care system, responding to the public, vision for the future, and CHNs as solution makers. Key recommendations include developing a common definition and vision of community health nursing, collaborating on an aggressive plan to shift to a primary health care system, developing a comprehensive social marketing strategy, refocusing basic baccalaureate education, enhancing the capacity of community health researchers and knowledge in community health nursing, and establishing a community health nursing center of excellence. PMID:20660926

  14. Assessing and appraising nursing students' professional communication

    Diers, Jane E.

    The purpose of this research was to define professional communication in nursing and to develop a prototype to assess and appraise communication at a selected college. The research focused on verbal and nonverbal communication between the nurse and the client using a simulated environment. The first objective was to identify the major characteristics of professional communication in nursing. In this study, the characteristics of professional communication emerged from the constant comparison method of the results of research studies in the fields of healthcare and communication. These characteristics became the elements, representative properties, and descriptive dimensions to assess and appraise verbal and nonverbal communication at the college of study. The second objective was to develop a template to assess verbal and nonverbal communication at a selected college. Using a two-fold process, the researcher used the results from the first objective to begin template construction. First, specialists in the fields of communication and nursing established the content validity of the elements, representative properties, and descriptive dimensions. Second, the course educators determined the relevancy and importance of the elements, properties, and descriptive dimensions to the objectives of two courses at the college of study. The third objective was to develop a rubric to appraise nursing students' verbal and nonverbal communication in a videotaped communication review. An appraisal rubric was constructed from an extension of the template. This rubric was then tested by faculty at the selected college to appraise the communication of five students each in the junior and senior years of the nursing program.

  15. Health and safety risks in nursing

    Fountouki A.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: professional hazards create insecurity and frustration to nurses during their clinical work. Aim of this review is to present and analyze daily risks and aggravating factors during the clinical work of nurses. Method: a systematic evaluation of the International and Greek literature findings was undertaken, according to Rogers’ model of analysis. Results: the frame of analysis showed five categories of risks which include: Biological/contagious risks, Chemical factors, Environmental/mechanical risks, Physical dangers, Psychosocial risks. Discussion: biological dangers can be dealt with by using suitable equipment for trauma avoidance and careful execution of nursing tasks. Chemical risks, including exposure to chemotherapeutic medicines, can be prevented by using protective measures such as gloves, masks, goggles and special appliances for preparing medication. The mechanical strain of the musculaskeletical system should be limited by ergonomic equipment and education, while the physical factors such as noise requires depends also on the personal sensitivity of workers. Conclusions: many preventative measures are based simply on the modification and adoption of a new behaviour and do not demand financial resources or special equipment. The strong-will for protecting the health status of nursing staff and promoting the profession are the two main drives in improving nursing working like conditions and the administration of safe care.

  16. Inductions Buffer Nurses' Job Stress, Health, and Organizational Commitment.

    Kamau, Caroline; Medisauskaite, Asta; Lopes, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Nurses suffer disproportionate levels of stress and are at risk of sickness-absence and turnover intentions, but there is a lack of research clarifying preventions. This study investigated the impact of inductions (job preparation courses) about mental health for nurses' job stress, general health, and organizational commitment. Data from 6,656 nurses were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM), showing that mental health inductions increase nurses' job satisfaction, which reduces their occupational stress and improves their health. SEM showed that these occupational health benefits increase the nurses' commitment to the organization. Job satisfaction (feeling valued, rewarded) also had a direct effect on nurses' intentions to continue working for the organization. Mental health inductions are therefore beneficial beyond job performance: they increase occupational health in the nursing profession. PMID:24971576

  17. Development of Gerontological Nursing Theory. Applying the Man-Living-Health Theory of Nursing.

    Heine, Christine

    1991-01-01

    Describes Rosemary Rizzo Parse's Man-Living-Health theory that was used to describe how gerontological nursing knowledge could be developed through a nursing conceptual model that includes a defined practice and research methodology. (Author/JOW)

  18. Mapping the literature of public health and community nursing

    Alpi, Kristine M.; Adams, Mary G.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to identify the journals most cited in public health and community nursing and to determine which databases provide the most thorough indexing access to these journals. This study is part of the Medical Library Association Nursing and Allied Health Resource Section's project to map the nursing literature.

  19. The quality of assessment visits in community nursing.

    Kerkstra, A.; Beemster, F.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was the measurement of the quality of assessment visits of community nurses in The Netherlands. Process criteria were derived for the quality of the assessment visits from the quality standards of community nursing care established by Appelman et al. Over a period of 8 weeks, a representative sample of 108 community nurses and 49 community nursing auxiliaries at 47 different locations paid a total number of 433 assessment visits. The nursing activities were recorded for ...

  20. Registered Nurses´ View of Performing Pain Assessment among Persons with Dementia as Consultant Advisors

    Karlsson, Christina; Sidenvall, Birgitta; Bergh, Ingrid; Ernsth-Bravell, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pain assessment in persons with dementia is well known as a challenging issue to professional caregivers, because of these patients´ difficulties in verbalising pain problems. Within municipal dementia care in Sweden, pain assessment has become problematic for registered nurses, as they have entered a new role in their nursing profession, from being clinical practitioners to becoming consultant advisers to other health care staff. Aim: To present municipal registered nurses´ view ...

  1. Nursing and health promotion: An exploration of pre-registration nursing students' perceptions of the concept

    Vernon, Lesley

    2000-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. Considerable conceptual confusion exists regarding the meaning of health promotion, yet nurses are called to be leaders in the movement. Pre-registration nursing curricula have been designed purporting to incorporate health promotion principles. In the United Kingdom this change in nursing education has been called Project 2000. Empirical evidence in the United Kingdom suggests that nurses pe...

  2. Strategies for Improving Nursing Students' Mental Health Clinical Rotation.

    Kroning, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Mental illness is a huge problem many people face in the U.S. and around the world. The American Psychiatric Nurses Association indicates there is a shortage of nurses in every level and role in psychiatric-mental health nursing. Raising up a generation of nurses who want to work with the mentally ill is a challenge for nurse educators. The use of role playing and simulation in the learning lab prior to entering the clinical setting and reflective journaling in the clinical rotation can improve undergraduate nursing students' mental health clinical experience. PMID:27295244

  3. Working hours and health behaviour among nurses at public hospitals

    Juliana da Costa Fernandes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyse the differences between genders in the description in the professional, domestic and total work hours and assess its association with health-related behaviour among nurses. METHODS: this is a transversal study carried out in 18 different public hospitals in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro. The data collection procedure was based on questionnaires. All nurses working with assistance were considered eligible (n=2,279. RESULTS: men and women showed significant differences in relation to working hours. The female group showed longer domestic and total work hours when compared to the group of men. In contrast, the number of hours spent on professional work was higher among men. For the women, both the professional hours and total work hours were often associated with excessive consumption of fried food and also coffee, lack of physical exercise and also the greater occurrence of overweight and obesity. CONCLUSION: both the professional hours and the domestic work hours need to be taken into account in studies about health, self-care and also the care provided within the context of nursing workers, particularly among women. The results add weight to the need for actions for health promotion in this occupational group and the importance of assessing the impact of long working hours on the health of workers.

  4. How is Change in Physical Health Status Reflected by Reports of Nurses and Older People Themselves?

    Puvill, Thomas; Lindenberg, Jolanda; Slaets, Joris P J;

    2016-01-01

    retrospectively appreciated their annual change in health. Functional status was assessed with the Groningen Activity Rating Scale and all were followed for vital status. RESULTS: Functional decline was reflected by all reports of change in health (all p < .001). When incongruent, change in nurse...... appreciation of health by older people is superior to change in self-ratings and nurse-ratings in reflecting change in physical health, possibly because similar norms and values are applied in the assessment. The nurse's norms, like the norms of older people, may shift with the ageing of the researched cohort......BACKGROUND: Self-rated health is assumed to closely reflect actual health status, but older people's shifting norms and values may influence this association. We investigated how older people's change in self-ratings, in comparison to their retrospective appreciation and change in nurse ratings...

  5. Changing images of professionalism: the case of public health nurses.

    Bloom, J R; O'Reilly, C A; Parlette, G N

    1979-01-01

    A survey of 89 public health nurses in a California county explored factors that might account for the growing support of unions and subsequent militancy among nurses. As predicted, changes in the backgrounds of public health nurses have occurred over time: 1) older nurses are more likely to have graduated from a diploma program and to have parents of lower educational and occupational attainment than younger nurses; 2) older nurses are more likely to view nursing as a calling and less likely to desire representation in collective bargaining by the union or to believe striking professional; 3) older nurses and those from lower social class backgrounds were less likely to belong to the union and less likely to participate in a county-wide strike. Because age and parental background factors are independently related to our indicators of militancy--union membership and participation in a strike--the results are interpreted as a change in nurses' images of professionalism. PMID:420355

  6. Health habits of nursing versus non-nursing students: a longitudinal study.

    Shriver, C B; Scott-Stiles, A

    2000-10-01

    As our culture shifts from a sickness repair system to a health promotion and disease prevention system, nurses need to take more responsibility for practicing positive health behaviors. The problem addressed in this study was "Does exposure to nursing theory content and client interactions make any difference in the regular practice of positive health behaviors in nursing students when compared to non-nursing students?" The purpose of this study was to determine if nursing students practice healthy life styles that would help prepare them to be effective advocates for health promotion and disease prevention. The Health Habits Inventory (HHI) was used in this two-year longitudinal study to compare health habits between 71 nursing and 83 non-nursing students. There was a statistically significant difference between nursing and non-nursing students in time 1 (t = 4.91, p reading food labels, wearing seatbelts, and exercising at least three times a week. Implications include the importance of emphasizing self health care in nursing curricula to promote healthy life styles of nursing students who can subsequently become role models in their professional practice. PMID:11052653

  7. Sleep and health in shift working nurses

    Flo, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, the prevalence of Shift Work Disorder (SWD) in a sample of nurses, and the association between SWD and work characteristics, health outcome and personality (paper 1) have been investigated. Next, the psychometric properties of the “Bergen Shift Work Sleep Questionnaire” (BSWSQ) were evaluated (paper 2). The BSWSQ evaluates sleep and sleepiness problems in relation to day shifts, evening shifts, night shifts and rest-days. The validated BSWSQ was used to investig...

  8. Perspectives on health and well-being in nursing

    Jormfeldt, Henrika

    2014-01-01

    As a Guest Editor of the International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being’s special edition on perspectives on health and well-being in nursing, it is my wish to present four original articles embracing some essential core aspects of nursing science irrespective of their specialization. They represent different aspects of qualitative research that focus on; the challenge of integrating core concepts of health into mental health nursing praxis, the experiences in psychiatr...

  9. 77 FR 41986 - Division of Nursing, Public Health Nursing Community Based Model of PHN Case Management Services

    2012-07-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Division of Nursing, Public Health Nursing Community Based Model of...), Community Based Model of Public Health Nursing Case Management Services. This program is authorized under... IHS OCPS Public Health Nursing (PHN) Program serves as the primary source for national...

  10. Perceived Competence and Comfort in Respiratory Protection: Results of a Nationwide Survey of Occupational Health Nurses

    Burgel, Barbara J.; Novak, Debra; Burns, Candace M.; Byrd, Annette; Carpenter, Holly; Gruden, MaryAnn; Lachat, Ann; Taormina, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    In response to the Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training, a nationwide survey was conducted in May 2012 to assess occupational health nurses’ educational preparation, roles, responsibilities, and training needs in respiratory protection. More than 2,000 occupational health nurses responded; 83% perceived themselves as competent, proficient, or expert in respiratory protection, reporting moderate comfort with...

  11. Critical Cases Faced by Mental Health Nurses and Assistant Nurses in Psychiatric Hospitals in Greece

    Evmorfia Koukia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric Nurses and nurses’ assistants working in an inpatient unit experience a significant number of critical cases. A small number of studies have explored which patients’ problems nurses perceive as ‘critical case or incident’ and particularly which interventions they choose. Aim: The aim of the research was 1. To identify the clinical problems that mental health nurses and assistant nurses characterize as critical 2. To report the main nursing interventions 3. To investigate the main person involved in the critical incident. Material-Method: Critical incident technique was used as a method of data collection. Content analysis was carried out in order nurses’ information to be categorized into subcategories. The sample consisted of 35 mental health nurses and nurses’ assistants who work in psychiatric acute inpatient wards.Results: Nurses identified ten types of critical incidents. They noted violence (verbal, physical by patients and psychotic symptoms to be the most critical situations. Nurses were the main person involved in these incidents. The study also described eight nursing interventions used by nurses when faced with critical events. Conclusions: The findings indicated that mental health nurses and assistant nurses working in acute inpatient wards are called to confront a variety of critical incidents in their every day practice. Further research is necessary to identify in-depth nursing interventions and decision-making used in these situations.

  12. A Learning Needs Assessment of Operating Room Nurses.

    Pounds, Elizabeth; Littlefield, John H.

    Operating room nursing is not a formal part of the generic nursing curriculum. A learning needs assessment can serve to identify inservice education needs of operating nurses. In this study, a factor analysis was performed on the responses of 1,201 practicing operating room nurses to a list of 24 behaviorally-stated learning needs. Four factors,…

  13. Mentors’ implication in clinical learning and assessment of nursing students

    González Chordá, Víctor; Mena Tudela, Desirée; Cervera Gasch, Águeda; Salas Medina, Pablo; Folch Ayora, Ana; Orts Cortés, María Isabel; Maciá Soler, Loreto

    2014-01-01

    Nursing Education in Europe is regulated by law from 2005. Clinical learning comprises at least 50% of the total degree program in nursing. It is necessary rely on professionals nurses involved in the learning process and skills development assessment. The level of implication in learning processes of these professional nurses is very important to ensure good results.

  14. Evaluation of the Community Health Nursing Course of First Year Proficiency Certificate Level Nursing in Nepal

    Mandira Shahi; Shiva Ram Dhakal; Yogendra Shakya; Kabita Dahal; Sharmila Ranjitkar; Bikram Dhoj Shahi; Amrita Chaulagain; Suni Pradhan; Jeny Kayastha

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Community health is very much important in nursing education. It is essential because it maximizes the health status of individuals, families, groups and the community through direct approach with them. The main purpose of the study was to identify the gap in Community Health Nursing I course in Proficiency Certificate Level first year nursing program in Nepal. METHODS: Mix methods of research having qualitative and quantitative method were used in the study. Data were coll...

  15. Health Promoting Behaviors in Nursing Students

    Gulay Yilmazel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This descriptive study was planned to determine the behavior of a healthy lifestyle in nursing students who assume the role of nursing care services and education in their future lives. Material-Method: The research was conducted in Hitit University School of Health in November-December 2011. All of the 262 students who were studying in the Department of Nursing were included in the study. The survey was applied to 234 students whom can be accessed. A questionnaire included descriptive items and health perceptions of students with the 48-item scale consists of healthy lifestyle behaviors (HPLP was used as a tool for collecting the data. Results: The mean age of students who participated in this study was 20.40±1.96. The 72.6% of students were female and 27.4% were male, 67.1% of declared that their levels of economic status was moderate, 14.1% of currently smoked, and 70.1% of general health situation was good. It was seen that the average scale scores of HPLP was 121.57±19, 65. The total mean score is 2.53 ± 0:11 according to four scale of likert. The lowest mean score obtained from the subscales was exercise and the highest scores were interpersonal support and self-realization. Total scores of female students taken from the scale of healthy lifestyle behaviors were lower than the male students, but no significant difference was found between the groups. Exercise and stress management scores were higher in male students and the difference between the groups was statistically significant (p<0.05. Health responsibility subscale was highest in second year students. The average scores of self-realization and nutrition sub-groups were high in students whose perception of general health as "good". Conclusion: We determined that student’ scores taken from healthy lifestyle behaviors scale was moderate level. The issues about health protection and health promotion should be more take place in nursing school curricula. [TAF Prev Med

  16. Academy and health services in the consolidation of boarding school of nursing

    Simone Domingues Garcia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to analyze the perception of teachers and nurses on the structure of the nursing internship at a public university of Paraná. We used a qualitative methodology to the collection in the period from March to August 2012. We used the electronic tool Google Docs, which enables the use of open and closed questions as well as data storage. The 27 study participants were nurse teachers and from the services used as training field of nursing internship. Data analysis enabled the establishment of two categories: Partnership between academia and health services: the construction of the completion of the internship and nursing boarding rating: structuring effectiveness. The results showed that the basis of consolidation of the nursing internship is the partnership of academia with health institutions and the strengthening of innovative educational proposals, as the systematic participatory assessments among stakeholders guided by the required reality of the labor market.

  17. Behavioral Health Emergencies Managed by School Nurses Working with Adolescents

    Ramos, Mary M.; Greenberg, Cynthia; Sapien, Robert; Bauer-Creegan, Judith; Hine, Beverly; Geary, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Background: As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses provide behavioral health services. Studies indicate that school nurses may lack sufficient continuing education in adolescent behavioral health and in the management of behavioral health emergencies, specifically. We conducted this study to describe the adolescent behavioral health…

  18. Mental Health of Muslim Nursing Students in Thailand

    Paul Ratanasiripong

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore the mental health and well-being of Muslim nursing students in Thailand. Specifically, the study investigated the factors that impact anxiety and depression among Muslim nursing students. This cross-sectional research was conducted with a half sampling method of Muslim undergraduate students who were studying at a public nursing college in Thailand. From the 220 self-identified Muslim nursing students, 110 were sampled for this study, representing 1...

  19. Nurses' Knowledge and Responsibility toward Nutritional Assessment for Patients in Intensive Care Units

    Mahmoud Al Kalaldeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nutritional assessment is a prerequisite for nutritional delivery. Patients in intensive care suffer from under-nutrition and nutritional failure due to poor assessment. Nursing ability to early detect nutritional failure is the key for minimizing imparities in practice and attaining nutritional goals. Aim of this article is to examine the ability of Jordanian ICU nurses to assess the nutritional status of critically ill patients, considering biophysical and biochemical measures.Methods: This cross sectional study recruited nurses from different health sectors in Jordan. ICU nurses from the governmental sector (two hospitals and private sectors (two hospitals were surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire. Nurses' knowledge and responsibility towards nutritional assessment were examined.Results: A total of 220 nurses from both sectors have completed the questionnaire. Nurses were consistent in regard to knowledge, responsibility, and documentation of nutritional assessment. Nurses in the governmental hospitals inappropriately perceived the application of aspiration reduction measures. However, they scored higher in applying physical examination and anthropometric assessment.  Although both nurses claimed higher use of biochemical measurements, biophysical measurements were less frequently used. Older nurses with longer clinical experience exhibited better adherence to biophysical measurement than younger nurses.Conclusion: Nursing nutritional assessment is still suboptimal to attain nutritional goals. Assessment of body weight, history of nutrition intake, severity of illness, and function of gastrointestinal tract should be considered over measuring albumin and pre-albumin levels.  A well-defined evidence-based protocol as well as a multidisciplinary nutritional team for nutritional assessment is the best to minimize episodes of under-nutrition.

  20. Nursing students' attitudes toward mental health nursing and consumers: psychometric properties of a self-report scale.

    Hayman-White, Karla; Happell, Brenda

    2005-08-01

    There is a paucity of measures suitable for assessing the impact of educational and clinical placement strategies on nursing students' career preferences and attitudes toward mental health nursing and consumers of mental health services. Information derived from such scales could be used to improve existing recruitment strategies to this specialty area and identify misperceptions held by individuals joining the health care workforce. This article details the psychometric properties of a self-report scale designed to assess (1) preparedness for the mental health field, (2) attitudes toward mental illness and consumers of mental health services, and (3) attitudes toward mental health nursing, including career preferences. Results are based on data from a large Victorian study that explored the attitudes of 802 nursing students before their clinical placement in the mental health field. Principal components analysis with oblique rotation was used to identify the number and composition of components composing the newly developed scale. Results indicated seven components composed of relatively homogenous items; most items were good to excellent measures of each component. Cronbach alpha values indicated acceptable internal consistency of items composing four of the suggested components. Overall, findings indicated that the self-report scale is a useful instrument with acceptable psychometric properties. Descriptive and correlational analyses emphasized the importance of educational preparation preplacement and highlighted the potential for educational strategies to improve recruitment via improved attitudes and preparedness. PMID:16088857

  1. Primary care nursing role and care coordination: an observational study of nursing work in a community health center.

    Anderson, Daren R; St Hilaire, Daniel; Flinter, Margaret

    2012-05-01

    Care coordination is a core element of the Patient-Centered Medical Home and requires an effective, well educated nursing staff. A greater understanding of roles and tasks currently being carried out by nurses in primary care is needed to help practices determine how best to implement care coordination and transform into PCMHs. We conducted an observational study of primary care nursing in a Community Health Center by creating a classification schema for nursing responsibilities, directly observing and tracking nurses' work, and categorizing their activities. Ten nurses in eight different practice sites were observed for a total of 61 hours. The vast majority of nursing time was spent in vaccine and medication administration; telephone work; and charting and paper work, while only 15% of their time was spent in activity that was classified broadly as care coordination. Care coordination work appeared to be subsumed by other daily tasks, many of which could have been accomplished by other, lesser trained members of the health care team. Practices looking to implement care coordination need a detailed look at work flow, task assignments, and a critical assessment of staffing, adhering to the principal of each team member working to the highest level of his or her education and license. Care coordination represents a distinct responsibility that requires dedicated nursing time, separate from the day to day tasks in a busy practice. To fully support these new functions, reimbursement models are needed that support such non visit-based work and provide incentives to coordinate and manage complex cases, achieve improved clinical outcomes and enhance efficiency of the health system. This article describes our study methods, data collection, and analysis, results, and discussion about reorganizing nursing roles to promote care coordination. PMID:22686111

  2. Nursing leadership style and mental health outcome of nurse in Taiwan

    LIN, PING-YI

    2013-01-01

    The present thesis report research on the role of leadership style related to the quality of nurses' working lives in Taiwanese hospitals. It begins by focusing on the mental health of nursing work forces and questions the applicability of leadership styles employed in different ownership of health care organisations. There is very little literature on this issue and knowledge of how such hospitals function is not clear. The thesis addresses the influences of nursing leadership style at both ...

  3. Nurses' self-reported attitudes concerning transcultural nursing : LOG-Health Project

    Tolvanen, Suvi; Ritala, Marjo; Siimeslahti, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this final project was to explore the attitudes towards transcultural care and nurses’ self-reported level of cultural competence. The data was collected in the Finnish Helsinki metropolitan area, the participants were nurses, public health nurses and practical nurses. The framework used was the Papadopoulos, Tilki and Taylor model for developing cultural competence. This project is a part of Local and Global Development in Social Services and Health Care (LOG-Sote) –project, w...

  4. Work and health conditions of nursing staff in palliative care and hospices in Germany

    Schröder, Christina

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims of this representative study were to assess the relevant differences between the work and organisational characteristics as well as the subjective resources and health status of nurses occupied in hospice care, compared to nurses from palliative stations. Further, the assessment of the predictive correlations between the work situation of this nurses as a factor influencing their health and perceived strains was also a leading intention.Method: In a written survey conducted in Germany in 2001, 820 nursing staff of 113 palliative stations and stationary hospices were included. A qualified diagnostic procedure for the assessment of health promoting work was implemented. In order of obtaining a secure comparison, a sample of 320 nurses working in 12 homes for old people in Saxony was also considered.Results: The nurses referred generally to favourable working conditions, still they informed about deficiencies in the perceived participation, organizational benefits and experienced gratification. Hospice nurses experienced overall more favourable work conditions than palliative nurses or than the staff of homes for old people (regarding identification with the institution, organizational benefits, accurate gratification and little time pressure during work. Hospice personnel were psychologically and physically healthier than the staff of palliative stations. Important predictors for health stability that could be assessed by multiple regression analysis were: positively evaluated work contents, the identification with the institution, little time pressure and a positive working atmosphere.Conclusions: The assessed organisational framework is generally more favourable in the institutions of professional terminal care than in common hospitals and homes for old people. Therefore, the conditions in hospices could have a modelling function for the inner-institutional work organisation and for the anchorage of the intrinsic motivation of nurses in the

  5. Assessment of activities performed by clinical nurse practitioners and implications for staffing and patient care at primary health care level in South Africa

    Jude Igumbor

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The shortage of nurses in public healthcare facilities in South Africa is well documented; finding creative solutions to this problem remains a priority.Objective: This study sought to establish the amount of time that clinical nurse practitioners (CNPs in one district of the Western Cape spend on clinical services and the implications for staffing and skills mix in order to deliver quality patient care.Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted across 15 purposively selected clinics providing primary health services in 5 sub-districts. The frequency of activities and time CNPs spent on each activity in fixed and mobile clinics were recorded. Time spent on activities and health facility staff profiles were correlated and predictors of the total time spent by CNPs with patients were identified.Results: The time spent on clinical activities was associated with the number of CNPs in the facilities. CNPs in fixed clinics spent a median time of about 13 minutes with each patient whereas CNPs in mobile clinics spent 3 minutes. Fixed-clinic CNPs also spent more time on their non-core functions than their core functions, more time with patients, and saw fewer patients compared to mobile-clinic CNPs.Conclusions: The findings give insight into the time CNPs in rural fixed and mobile clinics spend with their patients, and how patient caseload may affect consultation times. Two promising strategies were identified – task shifting and adjustments in health workerd eployment – as ways to address staffing and skills mix, which skills mix creates the potential for using healthcare workers fully whilst enhancing the long-term health of these rural communities.

  6. Assessment of Acute Pain in Nursing Practice in Latvia

    Iveta Strode

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: International Association for the Study of Pain defines pain as annoying sensations and emotions associated with actual or potential tissue damage or is described as such damage. Pains always are considered to be subjective sensations with multidimensional nature composed from physical, emotional and cognitive components. One of the main tasks in pain syndrome effective therapy is the option to perform objective assessment of pain intensity and quality utilizing principle of continuity. Independent surveys on pain management in postoperative period are performed in different countries of the world. Studies analyze effectiveness of both - medical and non-medical measurements in order to reduce pain syndrome. Very few investigations of chronic and acute pain influence on recovery process, progress and outcome of illness, assessment of pain intensity and quality are performed in Latvia. In the case of acute pain chronification, pain perception and management can be changed; pains become inadequately long lasting and may combine with psychogenic pains. According to the data obtained by the World Health Organization, fifty percent patients after injuries or operations have severe and insufferable pains despite the development of acute pain treatment and care. Insufficiently controlled postoperative pains become a risk factor for development of various abnormalities. Aim of the study: To study the usage of postoperative period pain intensity and quality assessment scales in the clinical practice of nursing, as well as availability of these methodsMaterial and methods: Survey utilizes quantitative research method. As an investigation tool was chosen questionnaire. Survey was carried out in the surgical profile wards in Riga and regional clinics of Latvia. Questionnaire embraced 309 nurses, working in the surgical profile.Results: Assessment of acute pains should be considered as the fifth vital sign providing more successful achievement of

  7. Healthy Eating for Healthy Nurses: Nutrition Basics to Promote Health for Nurses and Patients.

    Reed, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Nurses care for people each day in many settings such as hospitals, physician offices, schools, and public health facilities. Such positions often require nurses to work variable and long hours, exposing them to the stressors of caring for people who are ill. These stressors can support poor food choices that adversely affect the health and well-being of the nurse. Nurses are also an integral part of providing nutrition related information to patients. As such, patients may be very cognizant of the health habits of their nurses. Eating for good health is one way that nurses can reduce the impact of stressors on the body and positively influence their health, allowing them to better care for patients and themselves. This article reviews two common nutrition related areas of concern to nurses, stressors, inflammation, and nutrition and sleep and eating patterns, that can lead to obesity. Knowledge and attitudes about nutrition education are also discussed briefly. Finally, the article offers a review of nutrition basics for nurses and suggestions to avoid potential food pitfalls common for nurses. PMID:26824155

  8. Electronic Health Records: Describing Technological Stressors of Nurse Educators.

    Burke, Mary S; Ellis, D Michele

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the technological stressors that nurse educators experienced when using electronic health records while teaching clinical courses. Survey results indicated that educators had mild to moderate technological stress when teaching the use of electronic health records to students in clinical nursing courses. PMID:26164324

  9. Reframing E-Assessment: Building Professional Nursing and Academic Attributes in a First Year Nursing Course

    Lawrence, Jill; Loch, Birgit; Galligan, Linda

    2008-01-01

    This paper documents the relationships between pedagogy and e-assessment in two nursing courses offered at the University of Southern Queensland, Australia. The courses are designed to build the academic, numeracy and technological attributes student nurses need if they are to succeed at the university and in the nursing profession. The paper…

  10. Reduction in force perspectives--the occupational health nurse as the employee.

    Tompkins, Olga

    2009-06-01

    The occupational health nurse usually encounters reduction in force issues from a company perspective. This article discusses strategies for the occupational health nurse who is downsized. PMID:19552341

  11. Public health nurses' primary health care practice: strategies for fostering citizen participation.

    Aston, Megan; Meagher-Stewart, Donna; Edwards, Nancy; Young, Linda M

    2009-01-01

    Citizen participation is heralded as a critical element of community health programs that emphasize empowerment and health promotion strategies. Although there is a growing body of research on public health nurses' primary health care practice, few studies have described how public health nurses foster citizen participation. This article presents findings from an interpretive qualitative study of public health nurses' perceptions of their role in fostering citizen participation in an eastern Canadian province at a time of significant health care restructuring. The findings from this study clearly profile public health nurses as integral to the practice of fostering citizen participation. PMID:19177270

  12. Collaborative Learning Experiences for Nursing Students in Environmental Health.

    Wright, Dolores J.

    2003-01-01

    An environmental health learning experience involved collaborative activities of graduate public health and undergraduate nursing students. Pre/postcourse measures (n=31) showed increased awareness of issues and competence in interdisciplinary teamwork. (Contains 13 references.) (SK)

  13. [Concepts of health education by public health nurses].

    Coscrato, Gisele; Bueno, Sonia Maria Villela

    2013-06-01

    This qualitative study identifies the ideas regarding health education of 12 nurses who are part of the public health service of a city in the São Paulo countryside, and proposes a corresponding educational action. In this study, we used the methodology of action research. Data collection occurred in the second half of 2009 in the public health units of the mentioned municipality. Participant observation and interviews were implemented. The analysis and interpretation of data were conducted through categorization, based on the theory by Paulo Freire. As a result, the reductionism of health education in the pedagogical approach involving the transmission of knowledge was exposed, envisioning a biologicist tendency of academic training. However, in discussion circles, the awakening of political awareness related to the theme and the promotion of health was assumed. In conclusion, there is a need for changes in such training and for the facilitation of new modes of scientific production in the quest for social transformation. PMID:24601151

  14. Community nurses' child protection role: views of public health nurses in Ireland.

    Kent, Susan

    2011-11-01

    Public health nurses in Ireland are generalist practitioners with a wide range of roles that address the needs of clients in the community across their lifespan. Child protection is one of many of the roles of Irish public health nurses. However, with increasing caseloads, birth rates and aging populations, their child protection role is becoming more difficult to define and practise safely. This paper presents a key finding of a qualitative study that explored the views of a group of public health nurses (n = 10) regarding their role with pre-school children. A significant theme following analysis of the interviews were the nurses\\' expressed concerns on their role in child protection. There is a need to define the role practised by public health nurses in child protection and to achieve a standard for this nationally.

  15. Perceived competence and comfort in respiratory protection: results of a nationwide survey of occupational health nurses.

    Burgel, Barbara J; Novak, Debra; Burns, Candace M; Byrd, Annette; Carpenter, Holly; Gruden, MaryAnn; Lachat, Ann; Taormina, Deborah

    2013-03-01

    In response to the Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training, a nationwide survey was conducted in May 2012 to assess occupational health nurses' educational preparation, roles, responsibilities, and training needs in respiratory protection. More than 2,000 occupational health nurses responded; 83% perceived themselves as competent, proficient, or expert in respiratory protection, reporting moderate comfort with 12 respiratory program elements. If occupational health nurses had primary responsibility for the respiratory protection program, they were more likely to perceive higher competence and more comfort in respiratory protection, after controlling for occupational health nursing experience, highest education, occupational health nursing certification, industry sector, Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare membership, taking a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health spirometry course in the prior 5 years, and perceiving a positive safety culture at work. These survey results document high perceived competence and comfort in respiratory protection. These findings support the development of targeted educational programs and interprofessional competencies for respiratory protection. PMID:23429638

  16. Assessment of practice using the National Health Service Knowledge and Skills Framework

    Mclean, C.; Monger, E.; Lally, I.

    2005-01-01

    Current difficulties in the assessment of practice of qualified nurses undertaking courses in critical care nursing are outlined and discussed. The evaluation and development of previously identified core competencies for intensive care nurses is discussed.The use of the National Health Service Knowledge and Skills Framework as a framework for the assessment of practice of nurses undertaking courses in intensive care nursing within one higher education Institution is presented and examined. T...

  17. Health visitors have much to offer pre-registration child branch student nurses.

    Perrin, Louise; Scott, Sophie

    2016-05-01

    The primary care workforce has recently become the focus of several reports, which highlight the preparation and upskilling of nurses for a move to acute care in the community and plans to widen the community and primary care workforce. This paper explores current health plans in relation to pre-registration nurse education and identifies the health visitor as having key qualities and skills to manage child branch student nurses' community placements. A health visitor's perspective reinforces the discussion and highlights how the current climate offers a valuable opportunity for health visitors to promote a positive learning environment. Numerous learning opportunities are identified in the community placement, which can serve to equip student nurses with key nursing and interprofessional skills, such as leadership, management, assessment, communication and negotiation. A student's perspective is offered to provide an example of how a positive experience in the community can enhance student learning. This discussion concludes that the health visitor can be a valuable mentor to offer pre-registration student nurses a supportive environment in which to identify their strengths and weaknesses, and encourage students to flourish as caring and compassionate nurses. PMID:27276799

  18. Do educational outcomes correspond with the requirements of nursing practice: educators' and managers' assessments of novice nurses' professional competence

    Numminen, Olivia; Laine, Tuija; Isoaho, Hannu; Hupli, Maija; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Meretoja, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated weather educational outcomes of nurse education meet the requirements of nursing practice by exploring the correspondence between nurse educators' and nurse managers' assessments of novice nurses' professional competence. The purpose was to find competence areas contributing to the acknowledged practice–theory gap. Design A cross-sectional, comparative design using the Nurse Competence Scale was applied. Subjects The sample comprised nurse educators (n = 86) and...

  19. Incorporating Environmental Health into Pediatric Medical and Nursing Education

    McCurdy, Leyla Erk; Roberts, James; Rogers, Bonnie; Love, Rebecca; Etzel, Ruth; Paulson, Jerome; Witherspoon, Nsedu Obot; Dearry, Allen

    2004-01-01

    Pediatric medical and nursing education currently lacks the environmental health content necessary to appropriately prepare pediatric health care professionals to prevent, recognize, manage, and treat environmental-exposure–related disease. Leading health institutions have recognized the need for improvements in health professionals’ environmental health education. Parents are seeking answers about the impact of environmental toxicants on their children. Given the biologic, psychological, and...

  20. Assessment of Cancer-Related Fatigue: Role of the Oncology Nurse in Translating NCCN Assessment Guidelines into Practice

    Piper, Barbara F.; Borneman, Tami; Sun, Virginia Chih-Yi; Koczywas, Marianna; Uman, Gwen; Ferrell, Betty; James, Raysenia L.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the availability of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network’s (NCCN) evidence-based practice guidelines for the assessment and management of Cancer-Related Fatigue (CRF), assessment of CRF still is not routinely performed at many institutions and oncology practice settings. Numerous patient-, provider-, and system-related barriers exist that hinder the translation of these guidelines into practice by oncology nurses and other health care providers. Oncology nurses can play vital rol...

  1. Attachment icebergs: Maternal and child health nurses' evaluation of infant-caregiver attachment.

    Bryant, Edith; Ridgway, Lael; Lucas, Sandra

    2016-05-01

    Secure attachment of infants to their caregiver is important when promoting the emotional wellbeing and mental health of infants. Maternal and child health (MCH) nurses are well positioned to observe the quality of interactions between infants and caregivers and to assess and intervene. However, as yet there are no approved methods to assess the emotional and mental health of infants in community settings. A qualitative descriptive study of 12 MCH nurses in Victoria, Australia, using semi-structured interviews, was thematically analysed. The data revealed that nurses used many skills to identify and manage attachment difficulties. Key among these were observations of interactions, collaboration with caregivers and reflective practice. Assessments and interventions are also influenced by nurses' emotions, attitudes and workplace factors. An unexpected finding was that attachment markers can be likened to an 'iceberg': warning indicators at the tip can be easily observed by the nurse, while the less obvious underlying factors need to be explored in order to support attachment and improve infant mental health outcomes. Education for nurses should include concepts of attachment and link behaviours with emotional wellbeing. PMID:27276798

  2. Occupational stress among staff nurses: Controlling the risk to health

    Sharma, Parul; Davey, Anuradha; Davey, Sanjeev; Shukla, Arvind; Shrivastava, Kajal; Bansal, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Nursing has been identified as an occupation that has high levels of stress. Job stress brought about hazardous impacts not only on nurses’ health but also on their abilities to cope with job demands. Objectives: This study aimed at finding out the degree of work-related stress among the staff nurses and various determinants, which have a impact on it. Materials and Methods: Institutional-based cross-sectional study conducted on GNM qualified nurses. Predesigned and pre-tested q...

  3. Occupational stress among staff nurses: Controlling the risk to health

    Parul Sharma; Anuradha Davey; Sanjeev Davey; Arvind Shukla; Kajal Shrivastava; Rahul Bansal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Nursing has been identified as an occupation that has high levels of stress. Job stress brought about hazardous impacts not only on nurses′ health but also on their abilities to cope with job demands. Objectives: This study aimed at finding out the degree of work-related stress among the staff nurses and various determinants, which have a impact on it. Materials and Methods: Institutional-based cross-sectional study conducted on GNM qualified nurses. Predesigned and pre-tested q...

  4. Experience of Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioners in Public Mental Health.

    Phoenix, Bethany J; Hurd, Manton; Chapman, Susan A

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of health insurance coverage under the Accountable Care Act has meant that millions of people are now insured for mental health treatment, but with no significant increase in the mental health workforce. Services of psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners (PMHNPs) may be best utilized to improve access to and quality of public mental health services if the financial, political, scope of practice, and treatment model barriers that limit their ability or willingness to practice in these settings are better understood. This article reports qualitative results from a study that assessed barriers and best practices in the use of PMHNPs in county mental health services in California. Results indicate that PMHNPs are valued for their "whole person" perspective, collaborative approach, and interpersonal communication skills, but that significant knowledge gaps, regulatory constraints, and bureaucratic barriers in public mental health systems inhibit PMHNPs from practicing at the top of their scope. PMID:27259125

  5. Promoting critical perspectives in mental health nursing education.

    McKie, A; Naysmith, S

    2014-03-01

    This paper explores themes relevant to mental health nursing using the example of one educational module of a nursing degree. The authors argue that the educational preparation of mental health nursing students in higher education must address certain contested philosophical, conceptual, social and ethical dimensions of contemporary mental health care practice. These themes are discussed within the context of a third-year mental health nursing module within a Scottish nursing degree programme. By interlinking epistemology and ontology, the notion of student as 'critical practitioner', involving the encouragement of 'critical thinking', is developed. This is shown via engagement with parallel perspectives of the sciences and the humanities in mental health. Narratives of student nurse engagement with selected literary texts demonstrate the extent to which issues of knowledge, self-awareness and personal development are central to a student's professional journey as they progress through an academic course. The paper concludes by suggesting that these 'critical perspectives' have important wider implications for curriculum design in nursing education. Insights from critical theory can equip nurse educators to challenge consumerist tendencies within contemporary higher education by encouraging them to remain knowledgeable, critical and ethically sensitive towards the needs of their students. PMID:23552221

  6. Health Promotion in an Opioid Treatment Program: An Evidence-Based Nursing Quality Improvement Project.

    Gadbois, Christine; Chin, Elizabeth D; Dalphonse, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Community assessment and review of the literature indicate that individuals supported in opioid treatment programs are at a significant disadvantage for access to preventative and primary healthcare. In addition, this population faces increased comorbidities and chronic disease. Finally, access to housing, nutritious food, and other social determinants of health is also a challenge for these individuals. This project, aimed at addressing healthcare disparities and improving health outcomes for the opioid treatment program client, was undertaken at a large, private, not-for-profit, community mental health center in an urban area. An education-practice partnership was created between the center and the local university's College of Nursing, which includes undergraduate and graduate programs. Working with administration, nurses, medical staff, and clinicians, the advanced practice nurse guided nursing practice change within the context of an interdisciplinary team to increase attention to clients' health needs. Outcomes included a more comprehensive nursing health assessment and increased attention to nursing care coordination. The partnership between the university and the facility continues with the goal of addressing clients' unmet healthcare needs and improving wellness via on-site intervention, referral, and education. PMID:27272997

  7. Nurses' roles in health promotion practice: an integrative review.

    Kemppainen, Virpi; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Turunen, Hannele

    2013-12-01

    Nurses play an important role in promoting public health. Traditionally, the focus of health promotion by nurses has been on disease prevention and changing the behaviour of individuals with respect to their health. However, their role as promoters of health is more complex, since they have multi-disciplinary knowledge and experience of health promotion in their nursing practice. This paper presents an integrative review aimed at examining the findings of existing research studies (1998-2011) of health promotion practice by nurses. Systematic computer searches were conducted of the Cochrane databases, Cinahl, PubMed, Web of Science, PsycINFO and Scopus databases, covering the period January 1998 to December 2011. Data were analysed and the results are presented using the concept map method of Novak and Gowin. The review found information on the theoretical basis of health promotion practice by nurses, the range of their expertise, health promotion competencies and the organizational culture associated with health promotion practice. Nurses consider health promotion important but a number of obstacles associated with organizational culture prevent effective delivery. PMID:22888155

  8. Measuring Nursing Value from the Electronic Health Record.

    Welton, John M; Harper, Ellen M

    2016-01-01

    We report the findings of a big data nursing value expert group made up of 14 members of the nursing informatics, leadership, academic and research communities within the United States tasked with 1. Defining nursing value, 2. Developing a common data model and metrics for nursing care value, and 3. Developing nursing business intelligence tools using the nursing value data set. This work is a component of the Big Data and Nursing Knowledge Development conference series sponsored by the University Of Minnesota School Of Nursing. The panel met by conference calls for fourteen 1.5 hour sessions for a total of 21 total hours of interaction from August 2014 through May 2015. Primary deliverables from the bit data expert group were: development and publication of definitions and metrics for nursing value; construction of a common data model to extract key data from electronic health records; and measures of nursing costs and finance to provide a basis for developing nursing business intelligence and analysis systems. PMID:27332163

  9. A question of justice: assessing nurse migration from a philosophical perspective.

    Kaelin, Lukas

    2011-04-01

    The intensified nurse migration leads to severe problems for the health care systems in many developing countries. Using the Philippines as an example, this paper will address the question of global nurse migration from a philosophical perspective. John Rawls' liberal and Michael Walzer's communitarian theory of justice will be examined in view of the ethical problem of nurse migration. In line with Rawls' A Theory of Justice, nurse migration undermines the ability of the people in developing countries to make use of their basic rights and liberties. Walzer's communitarian assessment of nurse migration, on the other hand, will stress the shared 'thin' morality, as well as the shared history between the 'donating' and receiving countries. This paper argues that the commonality of a shared history and common values implies the moral obligation to ensure a fairer distribution of nurses. PMID:20807230

  10. Creating a brand image for public health nursing.

    Baldwin, Kathleen A; Lyons, Roberta L; Issel, L Michele

    2011-01-01

    Public health nurses (PHNs) have declined as a proportion of both the nursing and the public health workforces in the past 2 decades. This decline comes as 30 states report public health nursing as the sector most affected in the overall public health shortage. Taken together, these data point to a need for renewed recruitment efforts. However, the current public images of nurses are primarily those of professionals employed in hospital settings. Therefore, this paper describes the development of a marketable image aimed at increasing the visibility and public awareness of PHNs and their work. Such a brand image was seen as a precursor to increasing applications for PHN positions. A multimethod qualitative sequential approach guided the branding endeavor. From the thoughts of public health nursing students, faculty, and practitioners came artists' renditions of four award-winning posters. These posters portray public health nursing-incorporating its image, location of practice, and levels of protection afforded the community. Since their initial unveiling, these posters have been distributed by request throughout the United States and Canada. The overwhelming response serves to underline the previous void of current professional images of public health nursing and the need for brand images to aid with recruitment. PMID:21198816

  11. School Nurses' Perceptions and Practices of Assisting Students in Obtaining Public Health Insurance

    Rickard, Megan L.; Hendershot, Candace; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Price, James H.; Thompson, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Background: From January through June 2009, 6.1 million children were uninsured in the United States. On average, students with health insurance are healthier and as a result are more likely to be academically successful. Some schools help students obtain health insurance with the help of school nurses. Methods: This study assessed public school…

  12. Evaluation of the Community Health Nursing Course of First Year Proficiency Certificate Level Nursing in Nepal

    Mandira Shahi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Community health is very much important in nursing education. It is essential because it maximizes the health status of individuals, families, groups and the community through direct approach with them. The main purpose of the study was to identify the gap in Community Health Nursing I course in Proficiency Certificate Level first year nursing program in Nepal. METHODS: Mix methods of research having qualitative and quantitative method were used in the study. Data were collected from 12 subject teachers, 35 nursing graduates and 61 Proficiency Certificate Level first year nursing students. The study used structured, five-point rating scale and open ended questions according to Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats analysis for the self-administered questionnaire. FINDINGS: Common view points of the three sector's respondents (student, nursing graduate and teachers regarding the strengths of curriculum are: curriculum is based on Primary Health Care approach and covers preventive and promotive aspects of health. Regarding weaknesses, they said that there is inadequate time for practice, there is lack of innovative methods and materials, the course didn't cover new trends of environmental pollution and changes, global warming, greenhouse effect, climate change and deforestation etc. Similarly, they added that curriculum is not revised regularly and there is insufficient supervision in field. Likewise, regarding opportunities, they said that there is job opportunity in social organization as Community Health Nursing/Public Health Nurse. Moreover, they said that there is lack of employment scope as threats point. CONCLUSION: The paper concludes that new issues and trends of community health nursing should be added, and curriculum should be revised regularly.

  13. Cultural competence in mental health nursing: validity and internal consistency of the Portuguese version of the multicultural mental health awareness scale—MMHAS

    de Almeida Vieira Monteiro, Ana Paula Teixeira; Fernandes, Alexandre Bastos

    2016-01-01

    Background Cultural competence is an essential component in rendering effective and culturally responsive services to culturally and ethnically diverse clients. Still, great difficulty exists in assessing the cultural competence of mental health nurses. There are no Portuguese validated measurement instruments to assess cultural competence in mental health nurses. This paper reports a study testing the reliability and validity of the Portuguese version of the Multicultural Mental Health Aware...

  14. Introducing human rights and health into a nursing curriculum

    Mayers, P

    2007-01-01

    An important component of nursing programmes in South Africa has been teaching of the principles of ethical practice and relevant ethical codes. A number of factors have contributed to the need to include human rights as an integral component of nursing curricula in South Africa. These include the Bill of Rights in the Constitution of South Africa and the implications thereof for health care delivery, the primary health care approach in the delivery of health care in South Africa, the develop...

  15. Development of Detailed Clinical Models for Nursing Assessments and Nursing Interventions

    Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Min, Yul Ha; Kim, Younglan; Lee, Myung Kyung; Lee, Youngji

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to develop and validate Detailed Clinical Models (DCMs) for nursing assessments and interventions. Methods First, we identified the nursing assessment and nursing intervention entities. Second, we identified the attributes and the attribute values in order to describe the entities in more detail. The data type and optionality of the attributes were then defined. Third, the entities, attributes and value sets in the DCMs were mapped to the International Cla...

  16. The contribution of organization theory to nursing health services research.

    Mick, Stephen S; Mark, Barbara A

    2005-01-01

    We review nursing and health services research on health care organizations over the period 1950 through 2004 to reveal the contribution of nursing to this field. Notwithstanding this rich tradition and the unique perspective of nursing researchers grounded in patient care production processes, the following gaps in nursing research remain: (1) the lack of theoretical frameworks about organizational factors relating to internal work processes; (2) the need for sophisticated methodologies to guide empirical investigations; (3) the difficulty in understanding how organizations adapt models for patient care delivery in response to market forces; (4) the paucity of attention to the impact of new technologies on the organization of patient care work processes. Given nurses' deep understanding of the inner workings of health care facilities, we hope to see an increasing number of research programs that tackle these deficiencies. PMID:16360704

  17. Nurse work engagement impacts job outcome and nurse-assessed quality of care: model testing with nurse practice environment and nurse work characteristics as predictors

    Bogaert, Peter; Van heusden, Danny; Timmermans, Olaf; Franck, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To explore the mechanisms through which nurse practice environment dimensions, such as nurse–physician relationship, nurse management at the unit level and hospital management and organizational support, are associated with job outcomes and nurse-assessed quality of care. Mediating variables included nurse work characteristics of workload, social capital, decision latitude, as well as work engagement dimensions of vigor, dedication and absorption. Background: Understanding how to supp...

  18. Legal limitations for nurse prescribers in Primary Health Care

    N. Geyer

    1998-01-01

    The nurse plays an important role in the delivery of primary health care services in South Africa. The primary purpose is to provide the public with access to safe competent basic health care and to achieve this, the nurse should be empowered to practice within legal and ethical boundaries. This paper explores and describes the limitations imposed by legislation on the nurse’s ability to prescribe treatment in the primary health care field. The focus is mainly on the Nursing Act, the Pharmacy...

  19. KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE OF PRIMARY HEALTH CARE DOCTORS AND NURSES IN HYPERTENSION OF PREGNANCY

    Gandeh, Mohammad B.S.; Milaat, Waleed A.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To assess the status of knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of doctors and nurses in Primary Health Care (PHC) centers with regard to hypertension in pregnancy and to identify factors associated with KAP in Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia. Methodology: Using a self-administered comprehensive questionnaire, all available doctors and nurses in PHC centers of the Al-Khobar area were approached to determine their knowledge, attitude and practice in hypertension during pregnancy. Questionnai...

  20. Oral health in nursing students at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre teaching hospital in Moshi, Tanzania

    Rwakatema, Deogratias Stanslaus; Ananduni, Kanankira Nnko; Katiti, Victor William; Msuya, Marycelina; Chugulu, Juliet; Kapanda, Gibson

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine the prevalence and severity of dental caries, oral hygiene levels and assessment of the oral health knowledge and practices of nursing students at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre teaching hospital in Moshi, Tanzania. Methods A cross-sectional survey was done on 217 student nurse population at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre Teaching Hospital in Moshi, Tanzania in 2014. Ethical approval was obtained from the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Unive...

  1. Nurse Faculty Enrichment and Competency Development in Oral-Systemic Health

    Dolce, Maria C.

    2012-01-01

    Nurses are positioned to play a significant role in oral health promotion and disease prevention across the life cycle. Oral health has not been a high priority in nursing practice, and educating nurses about oral health has been inadequate particularly regarding the interrelationship between oral health and overall health. The first step for developing a nursing workforce with core competencies in oral health promotion and disease prevention is to prepare nurse faculty with the requisite kno...

  2. The availability of allied health care in Dutch nursing homes.

    Boer, M.E. de; Leemrijse, C.J.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Ribbe, M.W.; Dekker, J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the availability of allied health care in nursing homes in the Netherlands, and its dependency on characteristics of the nursing home. Methods. Structured surveys by telephone were carried out in a sample of 100 from a country total of 286 somatic (for somatic patients only) an

  3. School Nurse Case Management: Achieving Health and Educational Outcomes

    Bonaiuto, Maria M.

    2007-01-01

    Educators and health care professionals alike understand that healthy students are likely to be successful learners. The goal of school nurse case management is to support students so that they are ready to learn. This article describes the outcomes of a 4-year process improvement project designed to show the impact of school nurse case management…

  4. The health-related behaviors and attitudes of student nurses

    Vowell, Maribeth

    Nurses are an important component of primary medical care, and patient education is a common and important role of most nurses. Patient education and positive role modeling by nurses have the potential to influence patients' life style choices and the serious diseases that may be affected by those choices. A greater understanding of the ways nurses think about their own health could help facilitate healthier choices for them and in their patients. The purpose of this inquiry was to examine the experiences, attitudes and beliefs of student nurses related to their personal health, and to investigate those experiences, attitudes and beliefs as they relate to their education, relationships, values and career choice. The purpose was achieved through phenomenological interviews with eleven senior nursing students, nine females and two males, encouraging them to provide in as much detail as possible their attitudes and values about their personal health. The interviews were tape recorded, transcribed verbatim, and phenomenologically analyzed. A thematic structure emerged such that the nursing students experiences were represented by the four interrelated themes of caring for myself/caring for others ; I control my health/my world controls my health; I have energy/I'm tired; and feeling good/looking good. The contextual grounds for the themes that emerged during the analysis were the Body and Time. This structure was presented in terms of its relationship to health education, other research and to current theory.

  5. The process of community health nursing clinical clerkship: A grounded theory

    Ildarabadi, Eshagh; Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi; Heydari, Abbas; Taghipour, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: The performance of the community health nurse depends on a combination of scientific and practical competencies acquired by educational experiences during the nursing course. Curriculum planners of nursing education need to understand nursing education to train professional and community-oriented nurses. The aim of this article is to explore the experiences of nursing students during their community health nursing clinical clerkship courses. Materials and Methods: A grounded theor...

  6. Nursing leadership in addressing the social determinants of health.

    Lathrop, Breanna

    2013-02-01

    Social determinants of health have a profound impact on health status and the prevalence of health disparities in the United States. Significant improvements in national health indices are not possible without addressing social determinants of health. Drawing on their historical legacy as patient advocates, patient care expertise, and community focused education, nurses are ideally positioned to lead the nation in strategies to promote health equity. Nurses can embrace this new leadership role through the use of interdisciplinary collaboration, advocacy, political involvement, and community partnerships. PMID:23793135

  7. Health promotion overview: evidence-based strategies for occupational health nursing practice.

    Dombrowski, Jill J; Snelling, Anastasia M; Kalicki, Michelle

    2014-08-01

    Health promotion practice has evolved over the past four decades in response to the rising rates of chronic disease. The focus of health promotion is attaining wellness by managing modifiable risk factors, such as smoking, diet, or physical activity. Occupational health nurses are often asked to conduct worksite health promotion programs for individuals or groups, yet may be unfamiliar with evidence-based strategies. Occupational health nurses should lead interprofessional groups in designing and implementing worksite health promotion programs. This article introduces occupational health nurses to health promotion concepts and discusses evidence-based theories and planning models that can be easily introduced into practice. PMID:25101931

  8. Social determinants of health in nursing education, research, and health policy.

    Mahony, Deborah; Jones, Emily J

    2013-07-01

    The adoption of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the recent Institute of Medicine report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, have brought about a resurgence of interest in the social determinants of health as the basis for healthcare decisions in nursing education, research, and health policy. Nurses are positioned to be at the forefront of crucial healthcare reform to affect health outcomes and reduce health disparities profoundly. However, for nurses of the 21st century to improve the health of U.S. citizens and promote health equity effectively, we must first intently address the social determinants of health in our current nursing educational models, research agendas, and public health policies. PMID:23818478

  9. Implementation of a nursing competency assessment system in public hospitals

    Alonso Pérez, Laura; Landeta Rodríguez, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Numerous problems are frequently observed when nursing competency assessment systems (NCAS) are implemented. How to effectively implement a nursing competency assessment system, according to academic and practical contributions, is poorly reported in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to present a set of recommendations for public hospitals and nursing management in order to facilitate the implementation of a NCAS. To achieve this objective we have revised the existing literature an...

  10. The importance of communication for clinical leaders in mental health nursing: the perspective of nurses working in mental health.

    Ennis, Gary; Happell, Brenda; Broadbent, Marc; Reid-Searl, Kerry

    2013-11-01

    Communication has been identified as an important attribute of clinical leadership in nursing. However, there is a paucity of research on its relevance in mental health nursing. This article presents the findings of a grounded theory informed study exploring the attributes and characteristics required for effective clinical leadership in mental health nursing, specifically the views of nurses working in mental health about the importance of effective communication in day to day clinical leadership. In-depth interviews were conducted to gain insight into the participants' experiences and views on clinical leadership in mental health nursing. The data that emerged from these interviews were constantly compared and reviewed, ensuring that any themes that emerged were based on the participants' own experiences and views. Participants recognized that effective communication was one of the attributes of effective clinical leadership and they considered communication as essential for successful working relationships and improved learning experiences for junior staff and students in mental health nursing. Four main themes emerged: choice of language; relationships; nonverbal communication, and listening and relevance. Participants identified that clinical leadership in mental health nursing requires effective communication skills, which enables the development of effective working relationships with others that allows them to contribute to the retention of staff, improved outcomes for clients, and the development of the profession. PMID:24131413

  11. Advancing the Digital Health Discourse for Nurse Leaders.

    Remus, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Limited informatics competency uptake is a recognized nursing leadership challenge impacting digital practice settings. The health system's inability to reap the promised benefits of EHRs is a manifestation of inadequate development of informatics competencies by chief nurse executives (CNEs) and other clinicians. Through the application of Transformational Leadership Theory (TL), this discussion paper explains how informatics competencies enable CNEs to become transformational nursing leaders in digital health allowing them to meet their accountabilities to lead integrated, high-quality care delivery through evidence based practices (EBPs). It is proposed that successful CNE eHealth sponsors will be those armed with informatics competencies who can drive health organizations' investment in technology and innovation. Finally, some considerations are suggested in how nurse informaticists globally play a critical role in preparing our existing and future CNEs to fulfill their transformational leader roles in the digital age. PMID:27332233

  12. Organizational Variables on Nurses Job Performance in Turkey: Nursing Assessments

    Mehmet Top

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to describe the influence of organizational variables on hospital staff nurses’ job performance as reported by staff nurses in two cities in Turkey. Hospital ownership status, employment status were examined for their effect on this influence.Methods: The reported influence of organizational variables on job performance was measured by a questionnaire developed for this study. Nurses were asked to evaluate the influence of 28 organizational variables on their job performance using a five-point Likert-type scale (1- Never effective, 5- Very effective. The study used comparative and descriptive study design. The staff nurses who were included in this study were 831 hospital staff nurses. Descriptive statistics, frequencies, t-test, ANOVA and factor analysis were used for data analysis.Results: The study showed the relative importance of the 28 organizational variables in influencing nurses’ job performance. Nurses in this study reported that workload and technological support are the most influential organizational variables on their job performance. Factor analysis yielded a five-factor model that explained 53.99% of total variance.Conclusion: Administratively controllable influence job organizational variables influence job performance of nurses in different magnitude.

  13. Health effects of sleep deprivation on nurses working shifts

    Stanojević Čedomirka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Atypical work schedules cause reduced sleep, leading to drowsiness, fatigue, decline of cognitive performance and health problems among the members of the nursing staff. The study was aimed at reviewing current knowledge and attitudes concerning the impact of sleep disorders on health and cognitive functions among the members of the nursing staff. Sleep and Interpersonal Relations in Modern Society. The modern 24-hour society involves more and more employees (health services, police departments, public transport in non-standard forms of work. In European Union countries, over 50% of the nursing staff work night shifts, while in the United States of America 55% of nursing staff work more than 40 hours a week, and 30-70% of nurses sleep less than six hours before their shift. Cognitive Effects of Sleep Deprivation. Sleep deprivation impairs the performance of tasks that require intensive and prolonged attention which increases the number of errors in patients care, and nurses are subject to increased risk of traffic accidents. Sleep Deprivation and Health Disorders. Sleep deprived members of the nursing staff are at risk of obesity, diabetes, gastrointestinal disorders and cardio­vascular disease. The risk factors for breast cancer are increased by 1.79 times, and there is a significantly higher risk for colorectal carcinoma. Conclusion. Too long or repeated shifts reduce the opportunity for sleep, shorten recovery time in nurses, thus endangering their safety and health as well as the quality of care and patients’ safety. Bearing in mind the significance of the problem it is necessary to conduct the surveys of sleep quality and health of nurses in the Republic of Serbia as well in order to tackle this issue which is insufficiently recognized.

  14. The role of the nurse on health promotion and health maintenance of adolescents

    Dolgun, Gülümser; İnal, Sevil; Uğurlu, Figen

    2011-01-01

    Nurses have an indispensable role in maintenance and promotion of adolescens rsquo; health Nurses must know the basic principles of appropriate approach to adolescents should be able to guide the adolescent and family in the promotion and maintenance of health In this article general observation principles of adolescent and family the appropriate nursing approach to the major adolescent health issues how to evaluate gathered data about adolescent rsquo;s such as nutrition physical activity me...

  15. Becoming a mental health nurse: a three year longitudinal study

    Harvey Wells; Cathy Bernal; Daniel Bressington

    2015-01-01

    This longitudinal case series study explores how students’ conceptions of ‘mental health nursing’ changed whilst on a three-year pre-registration Mental Health Nursing programme. The study was carried out in two university nursing schools in the South East of England and this paper reports a detailed analysis of 6 individual case studies. The researchers utilised Novak’s approach to concept mapping to elicit students’ personal knowledge structures, which were explored further using semi-struc...

  16. Health effects of sleep deprivation on nurses working shifts

    Stanojević Čedomirka; Simić Svetlana; Milutinović Dragana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Atypical work schedules cause reduced sleep, leading to drowsiness, fatigue, decline of cognitive performance and health problems among the members of the nursing staff. The study was aimed at reviewing current knowledge and attitudes concerning the impact of sleep disorders on health and cognitive functions among the members of the nursing staff. Sleep and Interpersonal Relations in Modern Society. The modern 24-hour society involves more and...

  17. Health literacy training for public health nurses in fukushima: a case-study of program adaptation, implementation and evaluation.

    Goto, Aya; Rudd, Rima E; Lai, Alden Yuanhong; Yoshida-Komiya, Hiromi

    2014-05-01

    Health literacy comprises not only an individual's ability to gain access to, understand and use health information, but also health care providers' ability to make health information accessible and usable. The Fukushima nuclear accident has posed challenges related to the communication of radiation-related health information. Public health nurses are gatekeepers of community health in Japan, and have primary responsibility for communicating this complex information about science and risk to lay members of the community. A health literacy training program was designed to augment communication skills of participating nurses with two primary goals: changing communication practices and norms among public health nurses, and improving access to information for community residents. Training content incorporated an overview of health literacy skills (including numeracy), processes for assessing written materials and visual displays, as well as guidelines for text improvement. The workshop was spread across two days with two-hour sessions each day. A proximal post-training evaluation survey was conducted, followed by a more distal one-month follow-up evaluation to assess the application of learned skills in practice. Twenty-six nurses in Fukushima City attended the first trial. Post-training evaluations were highly positive, with agreement from 85-100% of participants on the appropriateness and usefulness of the workshop. During a one-month follow-up, the nurses reported applying new knowledge and skills to develop written materials. However, they faced difficulties sharing their new skills with colleagues and challenges changing work norms. Participants also encountered difficulties using graphics and explaining risks in practice. This paper highlights the importance of providing health literacy training opportunities for professionals to strengthen health system's ability to accessible information and services. This program also serves as important reference for future

  18. The experience of qualified nurses in assessing student nurses' clinical skills

    Kelly, Mary

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of qualified nurses in assessing student nurses’ clinical skills. The writer’s interest in this area arose from the findings of reports in the UK and Ireland. These reports suggested that nurses do not feel adequately prepared for their roles in clinical assessment. The literature reviewed for this study highlights some of the difficulties surrounding assessment. Two areas identified are: lack of preparation for a role in assessment an...

  19. Suriname: Health Sector Assessment

    Rena Eichler

    1999-01-01

    This study assesses the health sector in Suriname, with the goal of assisting policy makers to develop a better understanding of problems and to propose a range of solutions. This study presents the analytical framework used to assess the health sector, reviews the major findings, and presents key recommendations. The focus is on the complex inter-relationships between the major actors in the health sector: policy leaders, consumers, providers, and payers. This market-oriented framework was c...

  20. Supporting Student Mental Health: The Role of the School Nurse in Coordinated School Mental Health Care

    Bohnenkamp, Jill H.; Stephan, Sharon H.; Bobo, Nichole

    2015-01-01

    School nurses play a critical role in the provision of mental health services in the school environment and are valuable members of the coordinated student mental health team. They possess expertise to navigate in today's complicated educational and health care systems, and it is estimated that school nurses spend 33% of their time addressing…

  1. Assessing Resident Safety Culture in Nursing Homes: Using the Nursing Home Survey on Resident Safety

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Wagner, Laura M.; Perera, Subashan; Ferguson, Jamie C.; Handler, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the overall responses of nursing home staff to a newly developed nursing home specific survey instrument to assess patient safety culture (PSC) and to examine whether nursing home staff (including Administrator / Manager, Licensed Nurse, Nurse Aide, Direct Care Staff, and Support Staff) differ in their PSC ratings. Methods Data were collected in late 2007 through early 2008 using a survey administered to staff in each of 40 nursing homes. In four of these nursing homes the responses of different staff were identified. The Nursing Home Survey on Patient Safety Culture (NHSPSC) was used to assess 12 domains of the PSC and identify differences in PSC perceptions between staff. Results For the 40 nursing homes in the sample, the overall facility response rate was 72%. For the four nursing homes of interest, the overall facility response rate was 68.9%. The aggregate NHSPSC scores, using all staff types for all survey items, show that most respondents report a poor PSC. However, Administrators / Managers had more positive scores than the other staff types (pquality of care and quality of life for residents. PMID:22130345

  2. The quality of assessment visits in community nursing.

    Kerkstra, A.; Beemster, F.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was the measurement of the quality of assessment visits of community nurses in The Netherlands. Process criteria were derived for the quality of the assessment visits from the quality standards of community nursing care established by Appelman et al. Over a period of 8 weeks, a

  3. Nursing challenges for universal health coverage: a systematic review1

    Schveitzer, Mariana Cabral; Zoboli, Elma Lourdes Campos Pavone; Vieira, Margarida Maria da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Objectives to identify nursing challenges for universal health coverage, based on the findings of a systematic review focused on the health workforce' understanding of the role of humanization practices in Primary Health Care. Method systematic review and meta-synthesis, from the following information sources: PubMed, CINAHL, Scielo, Web of Science, PsycInfo, SCOPUS, DEDALUS and Proquest, using the keyword Primary Health Care associated, separately, with the following keywords: humanization of assistance, holistic care/health, patient centred care, user embracement, personal autonomy, holism, attitude of health personnel. Results thirty studies between 1999-2011. Primary Health Care work processes are complex and present difficulties for conducting integrative care, especially for nursing, but humanizing practices have showed an important role towards the development of positive work environments, quality of care and people-centered care by promoting access and universal health coverage. Conclusions nursing challenges for universal health coverage are related to education and training, to better working conditions and clear definition of nursing role in primary health care. It is necessary to overcome difficulties such as fragmented concepts of health and care and invest in multidisciplinary teamwork, community empowerment, professional-patient bond, user embracement, soft technologies, to promote quality of life, holistic care and universal health coverage. PMID:27143536

  4. 42 CFR 413.85 - Cost of approved nursing and allied health education activities.

    2010-10-01

    ... courses relating to the theory and practice of the nursing or allied health profession involved that are... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost of approved nursing and allied health... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.85 Cost of approved nursing and allied...

  5. Development of a trauma care assessment instrument for emergency nurses in West Africa

    Sue Anne Bell, MSN FNP-BC; Victoria Bam, RN PhD; Sarah Rominski, MPH; Nee-Kofi Mould-Millman, MD; Petra Brysiewicz, PhD RN

    2014-01-01

    Background: Strengthening the provision of emergency health services, including the nursing workforce, is progress towards decreasing the burden of injury in sub-Saharan Africa. The WHO Essential Trauma Care Guidelines provide minimum knowledge and skills to ensure quality in-hospital trauma care. Our aim was to develop an emergency nursing trauma care knowledge, attitudes, and skills minimum competency assessment instrument with WHO guidelines for African emergency care settings. Methods:...

  6. Home visits as a strategy for health promotion by nursing

    Jucelia Salgueiro Nascimento

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the domiciliary visit performed by nurses in the Family Health Strategy as an activity to promote health. Methods: Exploratory/descriptive study with qualitative approach. The subjects were nine nurses of the Primary Health Units from Health Districts in Maceió-AL. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews in the months from April to August 2012 and were analyzed using content analysis and in light of the theoretical framework of Health Promotion. Results: The nurses recognize that the domiciliary visit can be a way to promote the health of individuals, families and community, but, in daily life, action maintains focus on disease, with curative actions of individual character, which do not take into account the social context where the user and his family are inserted. Conclusion: It is considered that the use of home visits by nurses in the family health strategy as a health promotion activity is still incipient because, although the nurses recognize the need for change in the model of care, in practice, it is observed that the focus of this action is directed to the biological model. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5020/18061230.2013.p513

  7. Understanding workload in occupational health research on nursing

    Ana Lucia Cardoso Kirchhof

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The concept of workload has been used by nursing with multiple meanings. Among them, we have considered patient dependency and nursing intensity. We propose to add to this understanding that workloads are biopsychic processes with effects on the worker’s body.Development: We discuss this theoretical concept based on the Latin American contribution and the importance of theory in the conceptual field. Final reflection: This discussion provides other theoretical ways to operate this concept in areas of research, focusing on the worker’s health. Also, this concept in nursing research helps to further study the work process and its relationship with health to analyze the contribution of each component of this in the health nursing workers.

  8. The African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives

    McCarthy Carey F

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than thirty-five sub-Saharan African countries have severe health workforce shortages. Many also struggle with a mismatch between the knowledge and competencies of health professionals and the needs of the populations they serve. Addressing these workforce challenges requires collaboration among health and education stakeholders and reform of health worker regulations. Health professional regulatory bodies, such as nursing and midwifery councils, have the mandate to reform regulations yet often do not have the resources or expertise to do so. In 2011, the United States of America Centers for Disease Control and Prevention began a four-year initiative to increase the collaboration among national stakeholders and help strengthen the capacity of health professional regulatory bodies to reform national regulatory frameworks. The initiative is called the African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives. This article describes the African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives and discusses its importance in implementing and sustaining national, regional, and global workforce initiatives. Discussion The African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives convenes leaders responsible for regulation from 14 countries in East, Central and Southern Africa. It provides a high profile, south-to-south collaboration to assist countries in implementing joint approaches to problems affecting the health workforce. Implemented in partnership with Emory University, the Commonwealth Secretariat, and the East, Central and Southern African College of Nursing, this initiative also supports four to five countries per year in implementing locally-designed regulation improvement projects. Over time, the African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives will help to increase the regulatory capacity of health professional organizations and ultimately improve regulation and

  9. International Dimensions of Nursing and Health Care in Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Nursing Programs in the United States.

    Mooneyhan, Esther L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Results of a national survey of undergraduate and graduate nursing programs to determine the extent of curriculum content and faculty training in international health issues are reported. The importance of this aspect of nursing education is discussed. (MSE)

  10. Electronic Personal Health Record Use Among Nurses in the Nursing Informatics Community.

    Gartrell, Kyungsook; Trinkoff, Alison M; Storr, Carla L; Wilson, Marisa L

    2015-07-01

    An electronic personal health record is a patient-centric tool that enables patients to securely access, manage, and share their health information with healthcare providers. It is presumed the nursing informatics community would be early adopters of electronic personal health record, yet no studies have been identified that examine the personal adoption of electronic personal health record's for their own healthcare. For this study, we sampled nurse members of the American Medical Informatics Association and the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society with 183 responding. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify those factors associated with electronic personal health record use. Overall, 72% were electronic personal health record users. Users tended to be older (aged >50 years), be more highly educated (72% master's or doctoral degrees), and hold positions as clinical informatics specialists or chief nursing informatics officers. Those whose healthcare providers used electronic health records were significantly more likely to use electronic personal health records (odds ratio, 5.99; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-25.61). Electronic personal health record users were significantly less concerned about privacy of health information online than nonusers (odds ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.70) adjusted for ethnicity, race, and practice region. Informatics nurses, with their patient-centered view of technology, are in prime position to influence development of electronic personal health records. Our findings can inform policy efforts to encourage informatics and other professional nursing groups to become leaders and users of electronic personal health record; such use could help them endorse and engage patients to use electronic personal health records. Having champions with expertise in and enthusiasm for the new technology can promote the adoptionof electronic personal health records among healthcare providers as well as

  11. Quality of care of nurse-led and allied health personnel-led primary care clinics

    Chin, WY; Lam, CLK; Lo, SV

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To review the literature regarding quality of care of nurse-led and allied health personnel-led primary care clinics with specific attention to the quality indicators for fall prevention, continence care, pulmonary rehabilitation, mental health, pharmaceutical care, and wound care services. Data sources Literature search from 1990 to 2010 including Ovid Medline, Cochrane Database, RAND (Research and Development) Corporation Health Database, the ACOVE (Assessing the Care of Vulnerab...

  12. A Systematic Review of the Literature on Health Literacy in Nursing Education.

    McCleary-Jones, Voncella

    2016-01-01

    Health literacy has an impact on patient health outcomes and should be included in prelicensure nursing curricula to prepare the next generation of nurses to provide care for patients with limited health literacy. Nursing curricula should go beyond inclusion of patient teaching strategies. This article provides a systematic review of the current literature related to health literacy in nursing education and identifies implications for nursing curricula. PMID:26237008

  13. Physical health nurse consultant role to improve physical health in mental health services: A carer's perspective.

    Happell, Brenda; Wilson, Karen; Platania-Phung, Chris; Stanton, Robert

    2016-06-01

    The physical health of people diagnosed with a mental illness is significantly poorer in comparison with the general population. Awareness of this health disparity is increasing; however, strategies to address the problem are limited. Carers play an important role in the physical health care of people with mental illness, particularly in facilitating navigation of and advocating in the health care system. A specialist physical health nurse consultant position has been suggested as a way to address the physical health care disparity and limited research available suggests that positive outcomes are possible. In the present study, a qualitative exploratory research project was undertaken, involving in-depth interviews with people identifying as mental health carers. Two focus groups and one individual interview were conducted involving a total of 13 carers. The resulting data were analyzed thematically. Views and opinions about the proposed physical health nurse consultant (PHNC) position were sought during these interviews and are reported in this paper. Two main sub-themes were evident relating to characteristics of this role: reliability and consistency; and communication and support. Essentially carers expressed a need for support for themselves and consumers in addressing physical health concerns. Successful implementation of this position would require a consistent and reliable approach. Carers are significant stakeholders in the physical health of consumers of mental health services and their active involvement in identifying and tailoring services, including development of the physical health nurse consultant must be seen as a priority. PMID:26876094

  14. "Never in All My Years... ": Nurses' Education About LGBT Health.

    Carabez, Rebecca; Pellegrini, Marion; Mankovitz, Andrea; Eliason, Mickey; Ciano, Mark; Scott, Megan

    2015-01-01

    In spite of recent calls for patient-centered care and greater attention to the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients, nurses still lack basic education about LGBT patient care and, as a result, may have negative attitudes, endorse stereotypes, and/or feel uncomfortable providing care. This study reports on education/training of practicing nurses and explores some of the reasons for nurses reporting feelings of discomfort with LGBT patient care. Transcripts from structured interviews with 268 nurses in the San Francisco Bay Area revealed that 80% had no education or training on LGBT issues. Although most said they were comfortable with LGBT patient care, some of their comments indicated that they might not be providing culturally sensitive care. Implications for nursing education and for policies and procedures of health care institutions are addressed. PMID:26194964

  15. The health and health behaviours of Australian metropolitan nurses: an exploratory study

    Perry, Lin; Gallagher, Robyn; Duffield, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Background Nurses make up the largest component of the health workforce and provide the majority of patient care. Most health education is delivered by nurses, who also serve as healthy living and behavioural role models. Anything that diminishes their health status can impact their credibility as role models, their availability and ability to deliver quality care, and is potentially disadvantageous for the health of the population. Study aims were to investigate nurses’ overall health and th...

  16. Health and safety risks in nursing

    Fountouki A.; Theofanidis D.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: professional hazards create insecurity and frustration to nurses during their clinical work. Aim of this review is to present and analyze daily risks and aggravating factors during the clinical work of nurses. Method: a systematic evaluation of the International and Greek literature findings was undertaken, according to Rogers’ model of analysis. Results: the frame of analysis showed five categories of risks which include: Biological/contagious risks, Chemical factors, Environme...

  17. Nursing: promoting the health of overweight children and adolescents in the school context

    Nathalia Costa Gonzaga

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to analyze the nursing interventions related to the competencies of health promotion of overweight children and adolescents in the school context, in light of the Galway Consensus through an integrative review. Articles published between 1988 and June, 2013 were found in the databases CINAHL, SCOPUS, MEDLINE/PubMed, Cochrane, LILACS and SciELO. A total of 139 publications were obtained from indexed descriptors. Ten articles were selected after reading. The most evident competencies for health promotion were: catalyzing change, needs assessment and impact assessment. The highlights were activities of health education and partnerships with other health professionals and the families of students. It was found that the skills of health promotion developed by nurses can contribute to the adoption of healthy habits by overweight children and adolescents.

  18. Nurses' Contribution to Health Information Technology of Iran's 2025 Health Map: A Review of the Document.

    Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Azadi, Tania; Azadi, Tannaz

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of eHealth strategy in Iran has a history less than 17 years. Iran's eHealth strategy is developed in 2011 and is called "Iran' 2025 Health Map: Health Information Technology". Considering the important role of nurses in providing healthcare services as well as in future long term plans such as sustainable development, it is of high value to pay attention to nurses' contribution in developing eHealth strategies. Thus the purpose of this study was to investigate nurses' contribution to health information technology of Iran's 2025 health map. This study was a qualitative study conducted in 2015 through reviewing the "Iran' 2025 Health Map: Health Information Technology" official report. The strategy published in three volumes and in Persian language was downloaded through the official website of the office of Statistics and Information Technology of Iranian Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MOHME). Two main themes were identified in the report indicating areas which nurses' roles were clearly stated. The findings revealed that nurses' contribution is not clearly stated in the strategy. However, there are a few areas highlighting nurses' involvement such as "determining beneficiary groups" and "information dissemination". It is suggested that more attention needs to be paid in contribution of nurses in further actions to revise the Iran's eHealth strategy. PMID:27332183

  19. [Work-satisfaction and Health of Hospital Nursing and Medical Personnel].

    Trojan, A; Nickel, S; Werner, S

    2002-04-01

    The implementation of new service demands and increasing rationalisation measures exercise stress and pressure on medical and nursing personnel in German hospitals. However, their satisfaction and health are important quality criteria in the ranking of a hospital. Basing on the introduction of a new tool, an inquiry was conducted among the medical and nursing personnel of two hospitals (A and B) in respect of the quality of their working conditions. The scope of the questionnaires covered the nature and kind of the work, opportunities of professional success, management of co-operation and conflicts, physical and structural obstacles to smooth working as well as the management of quality. Finally, a scale of complaints and a burn-out scale served to assess the personnel's subjective health situation. The questionnaire was submitted in hospital A between November 1999 and February 2000 to a total of 39 doctors (58 % compliance) and 84 nursing personnel (47 % compliance) of the specialist departments concerned with internal medicine, rheumatology, urology, general and accident surgery. In hospital B the questionnaire was completed between March and July 2001 by a total of 40 doctors (54 %) and 91 nursing personnel (68 %) of two departments of internal medicine, surgery, neurosurgery and gynaecology. Comparable to other studies, the nursing personnel in both the hospitals rated the working conditions more negatively than the medical personnel. The differences, however, are more of a quantitative (number of frequency of problems) than of a qualitative nature (type or kind of problems). With both groups, problems connected with structural difficulties in working and with quality management were by far most important while the nursing personnel also underlined physical stress. Individual health condition were also classified more negatively by the nursing personnel than by the doctors, and the overall physical complaints of the nursing personnel were generally greater

  20. Collaborative learning and competence development in school health nursing

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Wistoft, Karen

    2012-01-01

    nurses’ qualify a) their learning and ability to reflect on practice b) their communication with colleagues and children c) the development of new and innovative approaches to school health nursing. The introduction of peer collaboration, however, takes time and energy and it can be challenge...... to introduce peer collaboration in a working culture in which school nurses traditionally work alone under a prominent work and time pressure. Research limitations/implications The study is explorative. Further research may explore the connection between collaborative learning among school nurses...

  1. Evidence-Based Health Promotion in Nursing Homes: A Pilot Intervention to Improve Oral Health

    Cadet, Tamara J.; Berrett-Abebe, Julie; Burke, Shanna L.; Bakk, Louanne; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Maramaldi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Nursing home residents over the age of 65 years are at high risk for poor oral health and related complications such as pneumonia and adverse diabetes outcomes. A preliminary study found that Massachusetts' nursing homes generally lack the training and resources needed to provide adequate oral health care to residents. In this study, an…

  2. [The nurse answers for health in social inequalities: the development of the nursing critical paradigm.].

    Rocco, Gennaro; Stievano, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    Until the early Eighties, critical social theory as a philosophical orientation informing nursing science, theory development and practice did not exist. Interest on this topic began to arise only after the mid-Eighties. In fact, nursing scholars questioned the validity of empiricism as the historical foundation for nursing science and the limitations of interpretivism in strengthening nursing knowledge, and thus started to focus on the lack of epistemological perspectives in nursing, giving particular prominence to the peculiar social, political, historical and economic conditions involving those who needed nursing care. The theoretical reflection began to develop, like the empirical paradigm, the post-positivist paradigm and, later, the interpretative paradigm, expanded thanks to the early works by Martha Rogers and Rosemarie Rizzo Parse, were seen as unable to address issues related to power inequities, structural constraints and oppression suffered by vulnerable groups such as the homeless, mental health individuals, people affected by HIV+ and other infectious diseases, unemployed, etc.. Empiricism and interpretative paradigms did not manage to bridge the gap between theory and praxis, and a new theoretical and philosophical approach gradually gained ground. This paradigm, based on critical social theory, was developed by distinguished scholars and intellectuals, such as Max Horkheimer, Theodor Adorno, Herbert Marcuse of the Frankfurt School in the Thirties, and, in recent years, by Giddens, Bourdieu, Foucault, Habermas. On this social field the first works of Allen, Thompson, Stevens, Campbell and Bunting, Kendall, allowed to work out a new paradigmatic nursing approach that would have predicted the employment of the critical theory for particular nursing aspects, as a conceptual framework for nursing education, as a paradigm to carry out participatory action-research and for the development of the discipline. The purpose of this article was to describe this

  3. Examination of cultural knowledge and provider sensitivity in nurse managed health centers.

    Waite, Roberta; Nardi, Deena; Killian, Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    It is important to examine empirical evidence of cultural competence among health care providers and to understand how it is assessed from an organizational context. There is a dearth of information about these concepts. Given its relevance to caring for diverse patient populations, the purpose of this paper is to present findings from a mixed method study which conducted a general cultural assessment survey of Nurse Managed Health Centers (NMHCs) that were affiliates of the National Nursing Centers Consortium. Findings enabled the authors to formulate recommendations that could strengthen the cultural competence of staff Organizational leadership and advanced practice nurses would benefit from more intentional efforts to increase proficiency of NMHC staff members in their cultural knowledge and sensitivity skills when delivering care to the populations they serve. PMID:25011210

  4. A study to assess burnout among nurses of maternity department in Gauhati Medical College Hospital, Assam

    Marami Baishya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burnout in healthcare workers, especially among nurses, can have an impact on overall healthcare delivery system. For health in general and maternal health in particular, wellbeing of healthcare workers, including nurses, is of paramount importance. Material and methods: This study aimed to assess burnout among nurses working in the maternity department. One hundred nurses of a tertiary care centre, selected by non-purposive convenient sampling, were examined by a standardised questionnaire. Data were analysed by descriptive statistics. Results: Burnout in depersonalisation was moderate while that in emotional exhaustion and personal achievement were of low-levels. Conclusion: Understanding the nature of the problem of burnout can guide in better management.

  5. Immunization against Hepatitis B: a matter of occupational health nursing

    Fraguás, Suzana Almeida; Silvino, Zenith Rosa; Flach, Diana Mary Araújo de Melo; Couto, Ingrid Ramos Reis; Andrade, Marilda

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To know the vaccination status for hepatitis B nursing staff who was involved in accidents with biological material. Method: This is an exploratory descriptive research with quantitative approach carried out in 259 sheets workers treated at the referral center for health professionals biological accident victims in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro. Results: We identified 173 (66.8%) professionals with hepatitis B immunization schedule to complete. Being 27.0% nursing auxiliaries,...

  6. Current issues in occupational health nursing. A Canadian perspective.

    Hunter, C

    1991-07-01

    The National Association of Occupational Health Nurses is still in its infancy and is striving to become an interest group under the umbrella of the Canadian Nurses Association. This will bring together the provincial associations in a common goal of promoting worker health and safety. The diversity of the country and the sheer magnitude of the various occupations of Canadians reflect the need for the occupational health nurse to be well educated and kept abreast of new developments. Changes in the worksite echo changes in health and safety legislation that will help to improve conditions in the workplace. Future challenges arise from changes in the work force and the nature of work and include: ergonomic issues, job stress, older workers, EAPs, and increased competition. PMID:2069607

  7. 'Health equity through action on the social determinants of health': taking up the challenge in nursing.

    Reutter, Linda; Kushner, Kaysi Eastlick

    2010-09-01

    Reducing health inequities is a priority issue in Canada and worldwide. In this paper, we argue that nursing has a clear mandate to ensure access to health and health-care by providing sensitive empowering care to those experiencing inequities and working to change underlying social conditions that result in and perpetuate health inequities. We identify key dimensions of the concept of health (in)equities and identify recommendations to reduce inequities advanced in key global and Canadian documents. Using these documents as context, we advocate a 'critical caring approach' that will assist nurses to understand the social, political, economic and historical context of health inequities and to tackle these inequities through policy advocacy. Numerous societal barriers as well as constraints within the nursing profession must be acknowledged and addressed. We offer recommendations related to nursing practice, education and research to move forward the agenda of reducing health inequities through action on the social determinants of health. PMID:20712665

  8. Political Economies of Health: A Consideration for International Nursing Studies

    Peters, Michael A.; Drummond, John S.

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces and explores the concept of political economy. In particular it focuses upon the political economy of health while also considering the implications for international nursing studies in the context of health care more generally. Political economy is not only about budgets, resources and policy. It is also about particular…

  9. Patient aggression in clinical psychiatry: perceptions of mental health nurses.

    Jonker, E.J.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Steenhuis, I.H.; Oud, N.E.

    2008-01-01

    Mental health nurses are faced with an increasing number of aggressive incidents during their daily practice. The coercive intervention of seclusion is often used to manage patient aggression in the Netherlands. However, GGZ Nederland, the Dutch association of service providers for mental health and

  10. Behavior of Man in Health and Illness, Nursing 103A.

    Bakke, Sandra I.

    A description is provided of a course, "Behavior of Man in Health and Illness," designed to introduce first-year undergraduate nursing students to the theories and concepts related to the health-illness continuum, the stress of illness, and coping theory. The description begins with an overview of course content, followed by information on the…

  11. Social responsibility of nursing in policies of health humanization

    Mercedes Trentini

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: new conceptions of the world have focused on restructuring health policies and designing a new healthcare model.Objective: to reflect on the humanization policy as part of health promotion with emphasis on nursing care.Content: The article mentions paradigm changes and refers to the biomedical model and the new condition of diversity in models of care practices for health promotion and co-responsibility of nursing in generating and sustaining the humanization of nursing care. It rethinks strategies and commitment to co-responsibility by nursing staff in promoting population health. Participation of nurses in promoting humanization care has shown signs of development in its acceptance, bonding healthcare service professionals and its users. An interview-conversation as a strategy for collecting information is highlighted, whether to care or to research based on a humanization framework.Conclusions: Sensitive listening, modality of dialogue, and the conversational interview method are relationship techniques and means to acquire skills for policy development in humanizing care in health promotion.

  12. Indoor air quality, ventilation and respiratory health in elderly residents living in nursing homes in Europe

    Bentayeb, Malek; Norback, Dan; Bednarek, Micha;

    2015-01-01

    cough. Elderly subjects aged ≥80 years were at higher risk. Pollutant effects were more pronounced in the case of poor ventilation. Even at low levels, indoor air quality affected respiratory health in elderly people permanently living in nursing homes, with frailty increasing with age. The effects were......Few data exist on respiratory effects of indoor air quality and comfort parameters in the elderly. In the context of the GERIE study, we investigated for the first time the relationships of these factors to respiratory morbidity among elderly people permanently living in nursing homes in seven...... European countries. 600 elderly people from 50 nursing homes underwent a medical examination and completed a standardised questionnaire. Air quality and comfort parameters were objectively assessed in situ in the nursing home. Mean concentrations of air pollutants did not exceed the existing standards...

  13. Assessment of dementia in nursing home residents by nurses and assistants

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Uhrskov; Foldspang, Anders; Gulmann, Nils Christian;

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To describe the criterion validity of nursing home staff's assessment of organic disorder compared with ICD-10 criteria, and to identify determinants of staff assessment of organic disorder. Method Two hundred and eighty-eight residents were diagnosed using the GMS-AGECAT. Nursing staff......- as well as under-labelling of residents, a tendency that will affect communication with medical personnel and may lead to inadequate or wrong medical treatment and to negative performance as well as negative role expectations in everyday life in nursing homes....

  14. A Safe and Healthful Work Environment: Development and Testing of an Undergraduate Occupational Health Nursing Curriculum

    McCullagh, Marjorie C.; Berry, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    Occupational health nursing focuses on promotion and restoration of health, prevention of illness and injury, protection from work-related and environmental hazards, and corporate profitability. Quality education about the relationship between work and health is critical for nurses’ success regardless of work setting, and is consistent with Healthy People 2020 goals, but is lacking or limited in some programs. This report introduces an innovative occupational health nursing curriculum for stu...

  15. The Role of Nurses in Community Awareness and Preventive Health

    Marjaneh M. Fooladi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With access to multimedia through social networks at global level, one wonders why some of the preventive healthcare services such as children and adult immunizations, annual screening for men and women, prenatal and dental care for childbearing women and adolescents are not provided at a 100% rate. Community awareness is a crucial aspect of preventative healthcare and perhaps those responsible for implementing the national health initiatives seek to realize other key factors influencing community health. In a study of 190 community health nurses caring for blacks, Puerto Ricans and Southeast Asians, the confidence scores for cultural self-efficacy was high when nurses cared for blacks and they were low when they cared for Asians and Latinos. The lowest scores belonged to items related to knowledge of health beliefs and practices regarding respect, authority and modesty within each culture. Scores were higher when interpreters were used correctly to convey meaningful messages. Researchers concluded that nurses lacked confidence when caring for culturally diverse patients and found weaknesses across the nursing curriculum preparing nurses to care for various demographic groups.1 In most countries, including Iran, governmental agencies have the budget and the man- power to apply preplanned initiatives and provide community-based preventive healthcare services to address the majority of the preventable health related issues through satellite clinics, health department and outpatient facilities. Meanwhile, private sectors in metropolitan cities offer cure-based services to urban and suburban communities. Remote and rural areas should be the focus of primary care and preventive health services, because access to multimedia is limited, healthcare providers refuse to work in outreach areas, and unpaved roads are barriers to easy access to the locals and outsiders. To implement an effective community-based preventive program, recognition of resiliency

  16. Adherence by Dutch public health nurses to the national guidelines for tuberculosis contact investigation.

    Christiaan Mulder

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess whether public health nurses adhered to Dutch guidelines for tuberculosis contact investigations and to explore which factors influenced the process of identifying contacts, prioritizing contacts for testing and scaling up a contact investigation. METHODS: A multiple-case study (2010-2012 compared the contact investigation guidelines as recommended with their use in practice. We interviewed twice 14 public health nurses of seven Public Health Services while they conducted a contact investigation. RESULTS: We found more individuals to be identified as contacts than recommended, owing to a desire to gain insight into the infectiousness of the index case and prevent anxiety among potential contacts. Because some public health nurses did not believe the recommendations for prioritizing contacts fully encompassed daily practice, they preferred their own regular routine. In scaling up a contact investigation, they hardly applied the stone-in-the-pond principle. They neither regularly compared the infection prevalence in the contact investigation with the background prevalence in the community, especially not in immigrant populations. Nonadherence was related to ambiguity of the recommendations and a tendency to act from an individual health-care position rather than a population health perspective. CONCLUSIONS: The adherence to the contact investigation guidelines was limited, restraining the effectiveness, efficiency and uniformity of tuberculosis control. Adherence could be optimized by specifying guideline recommendations, actively involving the TB workforce, and training public health nurses.

  17. Empathy toward Patients with Mental Illness among Baccalaureate Nursing Students: Impact of a Psychiatric Nursing and Mental Health Educational Experience

    Mousa, Marwa Abd El-Gawad Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Empathy is an ability and skill that can be learned and developed through appropriate education and practice. While the importance of nurses' empathy is widely acknowledged, little is known about the impact of passing through the psychiatric nursing and mental health educational experience at the Faculty of Nursing, Alexandria University on…

  18. Systematic review of interventions to increase the delivery of preventive care by primary care nurses and allied health clinicians

    McElwaine, Kathleen M; Freund, Megan; Campbell, Elizabeth M.; Bartlem, Kate M.; Wye, Paula M.; Wiggers, John H

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary care nurses and allied health clinicians are potential providers of opportunistic preventive care. This systematic review aimed to summarise evidence for the effectiveness of practice change interventions in increasing nurse or allied health professional provision of any of five preventive care elements (ask, assess, advise, assist, and/or arrange) for any of four behavioural risks (smoking, inadequate nutrition, alcohol overconsumption, physical inactivity) within a primar...

  19. 'They think they can talk to nurses': practice nurses' views of their roles in caring for mental health problems.

    Crosland, A; Kai, J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care teams have been encouraged to develop the care they provide to patients with mental health problems, and a greater role for practice nurses has been advocated. However, little is known about practice nurses' current level of involvement or their perceived strengths and limitations in caring for patients' mental health problems. AIM: To describe practice nurses' current experiences of caring for patients with mental health problems and to explore their perceptions abou...

  20. An exploration of student nurses' experiences of formative assessment.

    Duers, Lorraine E; Brown, Norrie

    2009-08-01

    The idea that formative assessment has the potential to prepare students, not only to succeed in summative assessments during the course, but also in the world beyond the classroom [Melland, H., Volden, C., 1998. Classroom assessment: linking teaching and learning. Journal of Nursing Education 37(6), 275-277] fuelled the desire to explore student nurses experiences of being assessed formatively. Focus group discussion, within a UK Higher Education setting, captured the holistic, dynamic and individual experiences student nurses (n=14) have of formative assessment. Ethical approval was obtained. Findings from three separate focus group discussions indicate that lecturers do not use the term "formative assessment" in their communication with the student nurses; student preparation and effort is greater when assessment is for summative purposes; oral feedback is preferable to written feedback which can, at times, be illegible and utilise unfamiliar vocabulary; lecturer comments are regarded as being more valuable than grades; student nurses are not being prepared for the critical feedback associated with peer review and they may, therefore, be vulnerable to the process and outcome of peer review. Thus, the UK centric focus of this small qualitative research study need not detract from its ability to add to the global knowledge base on formative assessment in nursing. PMID:19285761

  1. [Reflections on the development of maternal and child health in public health nursing in Taiwan].

    Chen, Miao-Ching

    2014-06-01

    Continued global economic difficulties and Taiwan's health insurance scheme have focused the domestic healthcare system excessively on medical treatments and made this system overly market-oriented. The NHI (national health insurance) Reimbursement Policy lacks adequate flexibility to adjust to current health needs. The situation constrains the medical service budget and causes nursing shortages in hospitals, which in turn marginalizes the public health nurses working at health centers. It is important for the government and professional associations to establish a public healthcare model that adequately meets the needs of the community. In addition to strengthening the role and function of public health nurses, a service model must be developed and piloted. This paper analyzes the situation and problem of maternal and child healthcare in Taiwan, studies the successful experiences of maternal and child healthcare from other counties, and then provides recommendations for the future development of public health nursing in Taiwan. PMID:24899555

  2. A Proactive Innovation for Health Care Transformation: Health and Wellness Nurse Coaching.

    Erickson, Helen Lorraine; Erickson, Margaret Elizabeth; Southard, Mary Elaine; Brekke, Mary E; Sandor, M Kay; Natschke, Mary

    2016-03-01

    A cohort of holistic nurses, recognizing opportunities inherent in health care transformation, organized and worked together from 2009 to 2012. The goal was to hold space for holistic nursing by developing a health and wellness coaching role and certification program for holistic nurses. The intent was to ensure that holistic nurses could work to the fullest of their ability within the evolving health care system, and others could discover the merit of holistic nursing as they explored the possibilities of nurse coaching. Challenges emerged that required the cohort plan strategies that would hold the space for nursing while also moving toward the intended goal. As they worked, this cohort demonstrated leadership skills, knowledge, values, and attitudes of holistic nursing that provide an example for others who follow in the wake of health care transformation. The American Holistic Credentialing Corporation's perspective of the events that unfolded and of the related decisions made by the coalition provides a record of the evolution of holistic nursing. PMID:25911026

  3. Origin, Methods, and Evolution of the Three Nurses' Health Studies.

    Bao, Ying; Bertoia, Monica L; Lenart, Elizabeth B; Stampfer, Meir J; Willett, Walter C; Speizer, Frank E; Chavarro, Jorge E

    2016-09-01

    We have summarized the evolution of the Nurses' Health Study (NHS), a prospective cohort study of 121 700 married registered nurses launched in 1976; NHS II, which began in 1989 and enrolled 116 430 nurses; and NHS3, which began in 2010 and has ongoing enrollment. Over 40 years, these studies have generated long-term, multidimensional data, including lifestyle- and health-related information across the life course and an extensive repository of various biological specimens. We have described the questionnaire data collection, disease follow-up methods, biorepository resources, and data management and statistical procedures. Through integrative analyses, these studies have sustained a high level of scientific productivity and substantially influenced public health recommendations. We have highlighted recent interdisciplinary research projects and discussed future directions for collaboration and innovation. PMID:27459450

  4. Children's nurses' post-operative pain assessment practices.

    Panjganj, Donya; Bevan, Ann

    2016-06-01

    Pain assessment is crucial to achieving optimal pain management in children. Pain that is insufficiently controlled can have extensive short- and long-term repercussions. Many studies continue to report that children experience unnecessary post-operative pain when they are in hospital. The purpose of this literature review was to explore post-operative pain assessment practices used by children's nurses. A literature search of databases was undertaken and inclusion criteria identified. Four themes emerged: pain assessment tools; behavioural cues; documentation; and communication between child, parent/carer and nurse. The findings showed that pain assessment tools were inadequately used, that children's behavioural cues were misinterpreted, and that there was inconsistency in the documentation of pain scores and in communication about pain scores between children, parent/carer and nurse. Addressing the key issues identified from the articles reviewed can help improve nursing practice and care. PMID:27266751

  5. Nursing entrepreneurship: motivators, strategies and possibilities for professional advancement and health system change.

    Wall, Sarah

    2013-06-01

    In Canada, as well as internationally, efficiency-focused organizational restructuring in healthcare has resulted in stressful job change for nurses, although nurses continue to work in a system that values technology-based, physician-provided services. Employed nurses have had to participate in organizational activities that undermine their professional values and goals. Nursing entrepreneurship presents an opportunity to explore nursing's professional potential in nursing practice that is uniquely independent. In this study, a focused ethnographic approach was used to explore the experiences of self-employed nurses, who see themselves as leaders in advancing the profession of nursing and its contribution to healthcare. Key themes in the findings include the responses of self-employed nurses to health system change, expanded roles for nurses, the consequences of this non-traditional approach to nursing work and the possibilities for change that arise from nursing entrepreneurship. This research has implications for healthcare policy, professional advocacy and nursing education. PMID:23809640

  6. Nursing workloads in family health: implications for universal access1

    de Pires, Denise Elvira Pires; Machado, Rosani Ramos; Soratto, Jacks; Scherer, Magda dos Anjos; Gonçalves, Ana Sofia Resque; Trindade, Letícia Lima

    2016-01-01

    Objective to identify the workloads of nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy, considering its implications for the effectiveness of universal access. Method qualitative study with nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy of the South, Central West and North regions of Brazil, using methodological triangulation. For the analysis, resources of the Atlas.ti software and Thematic Content Analysis were associated; and the data were interpreted based on the labor process and workloads as theorical approaches. Results the way of working in the Family Health Strategy has predominantly resulted in an increase in the workloads of the nursing professionals, with emphasis on the work overload, excess of demand, problems in the physical infrastructure of the units and failures in the care network, which hinders its effectiveness as a preferred strategy to achieve universal access to health. On the other hand, teamwork, affinity for the work performed, bond with the user, and effectiveness of the assistance contributed to reduce their workloads. Conclusions investments on elements that reduce the nursing workloads, such as changes in working conditions and management, can contribute to the effectiveness of the Family Health Strategy and achieving the goal of universal access to health. PMID:27027679

  7. The Nursing Informatician's Role in Mediating Technology Related Health Literacies.

    Nelson, Ramona; Carter-Templeton, Heather D

    2016-01-01

    The advent of computer based technology and the internet have not changed nurses' responsibility for patient education; but they are rapidly changing what we teach and how we teach. The challenge for nursing informaticians is to create innovative patient education models and applications with the goal of achieving literate, engaged, empowered and informed patients as well as preparing health professionals to maximize the advantages offered by digital media and other new technology based tools. This paper explores the interrelationship of basic literacy, health literacy and technology related literacies that provide the foundation for achieving these goals. PMID:27332198

  8. Health Literacy Training for Public Health Nurses in Fukushima: A Multi-site Program Evaluation.

    Goto, Aya; Lai, Alden Yuanhong; Rudd, Rima E

    2015-09-01

    Public health nurses (PHNs) are community residents' access points to health information and services in Japan. After the Fukushima nuclear accident, they were challenged to communicate radiation-related health information to best meet community needs. We previously developed and evaluated the outcome of a single-site health literacy training program to augment PHNs' ability to improve community residents' access to written health information. This paper presents an evaluation of an identical training program using data combined from multiple sites, and further included proximal and distal evaluations to document the impact of health literacy training in a post-disaster setting. A total of 64 participants, primarily experienced PHNs, attended one of three multi-session health literacy workshops conducted in multiple sites across Fukushima. Quantitative and qualitative data on PHNs' training satisfaction, self-evaluation of achievements regarding training goals, and application of learned skills were collected and analyzed. Each workshop consisted of two 2-hour sessions introducing health literacy and assessment tools and developing skills to improve written materials, followed by a one-month follow-up assessment on PHNs' application of the gained skills in the field. Post-training evaluations on the appropriateness and usefulness of the workshop were highly positive. At the end of the one-month follow-up, 45% of participants had gained confidence in assessing and revising written materials and had applied the skills they had gained to develop and communicate health information in various settings and modes. This increase in confidence was associated with further application of the learned skills at the municipal level. However, participants reported difficulties in explaining risks, and the need to learn more about plain language to be able to paraphrase professional terms. This paper highlighs the positive outcomes of health literacy training among PHNs. Practical

  9. Assessment of the efficacy of footbaths as a means of improving the mental health of nurses : a preliminary report <原著論文>

    Inoue, Setsuko; Kaneko, Fumiko; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There are few studies that have subjectively and objectively verified the efficacy of footbaths as a means of relieving stress. The purpose of the present study was to validate the stress-reducing efficacy of footbaths both subjectively and objectively by means of a stress indicator, chromogranin A (CgA). Methods: The subjects were 21 female nurses working at a general hospital. After evaluating their current mental and physical condition, and measuring their salivary CgA level...

  10. Shift work a reality in life and health nurses

    Mª Mercedes Gago López

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The need to provide care 24 hours of the day, 365 days of the year, means for nurses, compulsory work in a system of rotating shifts, including the realization of nights. This system has repercussions on the life, health and well-being of nurses.In order to identify evidence on the relationship between the work to shift and/or night the health and well-being of nurses and develop recommendations to improve the adaptation to the system of rotating shifts and/or night, have carried out a review of the literature.After detailed analysis of the literature, we can conclude that the quality of the care provided is in direct relation to the health and well-being of the nursing professional. Implement measures to reduce the physical, psychic, social and family wear must be priority, being necessary to educate professionals, families, society and business. Among the recommendations highlight, those directed to the company; set realistic goals, to reduce workloads in the night shift adapting them to the actual number of nurses, flexible schedules and recommendations addressed to the professional related: diet, sleep, exercise, family life and social hygiene. The implementation of these measures will mean: increase satisfaction, reduce absenteeism, increase productivity, reduce the number of errors and decrease spending.

  11. Survey of knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in nurses of community-based health services in Hainan province

    CHEN Xiu-zhen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available To assess the knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR among the nurses ( n= 302 of community-based health services in Hainan province of China, a survey was made by randomized stratified cluster sampling using self-designed questionnaires. The passing rate for qualification of the knowledge of CPR was found to be very low in Hainan province (23.18 %. A significant difference of regions and different educational level among the nurses were also noticed (P<0.01. It may be concluded from the study that nurses of community-based health services in Hainan province lack the basic knowledge of CPR, especially in rural region.

  12. Functional capacity and health: guidelines and nursing care of the elderly

    GIRALDO M, CLARA INÉS

    2010-01-01

    Objective: to assess health and functional capacity of older people with a functional dependence, for self care, as the elements to guide nursing care and family care at home. Methodology: transversal descriptive study in 40 people of 65 years of age and older with a functional dependence, looked after by relatives in Envigado Colombia; convenience sampling. Assessment of the functional capacity using the Katz index and Lawton and Brody's scale, adjusted as per the Neurosciences Group, U...

  13. [Public health nurse staffing requirements for health examination of infants and children in municipalities of Japan].

    Hoshi, T; Nakahara, T; Takabayashi, K; Gunji, A

    1996-04-01

    In accordance with the Maternal and Child Health Service Act, public health centers and municipalities offer health education, health counseling, health examinations, and home visits for children and their mothers in their jurisdiction. On the basis of the new Maternal and Child Health Service Act, municipalities will have the responsibility to effectively promote health examination for three-year-old children beginning in 1997. To provide health examinations to infants and children, establishing a health personnel system, especially the public health nurse program, is extremely important. The purpose of this study is to determine fundamental facts concerning health manpower development among public health nurses in the municipalities, by reviewing research on health examinations for both infants and children. To determine personnel staffing requirements necessary for health examinations of infants and children in the municipalities of Japan, pertinent references were systematically reviewed. The main results are as follows; 1) The correlation coefficients between the total working hours of the public health nurse for MCH and the population per area and number of birth per year were significantly positive. 2) Total working hours for health examination of three-year-old children per 100 births per year, by the public health nurse were 143 hours, of which 79% were spent just for performing the examination itself. 3) Due to the lack of health personnel, rural towns and villages with small populations required public health nurses to be assisted by other staff, most often public health nurses from prefectural Health Centers. For example, in those areas with a population of less than 3,000, 43% of the total volume of work performed by public health nurses during the health examinations of three-year-old children required the assistance of prefectural public health nurses. 4) On the other hand, in those areas with populations more than 10,000, 88% of the total volume of

  14. Mental Health promotion of a hospital through the nurse in the liaison psychiatry team

    Natalia Cámara Conde; Julián Carretero Román; Ángela García Pozo; Marta Menéndez Rubiera; Javier Sánchez Alfonso; Nuria Sekade Gutiérrez

    2008-01-01

    We show a proposal to increase the quality of nursing cares, improving mental health care of hospitalized patients by creating the figure of the liaison nurse within the liaison psychiatry team. This nurse would not only be a reference to support the nursing staff at the level of patient care, but also the psycho-emotional self-care professional.Objectives: Justifying the need to include the figure of the specialist mental health team liaison psychiatry nurse. Method: The rotation as resident...

  15. The perceptions and the attitude of health care professionals and students about the nursing profession

    Mari Lavdaniti; Areti Tsaloglidou; Alexandra Dimitriadou; Eleni Ntio; Despoina Sapountzi

    2013-01-01

    The fact that nursing is a difficult profession which lacks of social recognition results in being abandoned by many nurses and not being selected by young people. Αim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the perceptions of nurses, other health care professionals and students about the nursing profession and to determine the factors that influence their attitude towards it. Material and Method: 949 students of nursing and medical schools and health care professionals participated ...

  16. Study on Situational Influences Perceived in Nursing Discipline on Health Promotion: A Qualitative Study

    Meimanat Hosseini; Tahereh Ashk Torab; Mohammad Hossein Taghdisi; Safar Ali Esmaeili Vardanjani

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives. Nurses, as behavioral models, play a key role in health promotion, and their attitudes towards health promotion highly influence their health and performance. The aim of this study is to explore nursing students' perception of studies in nursing discipline as a situational influence on health promotion. Materials and Methods. This study was conducted using directed content analysis, by means of 20 deep semistructured interviews with nursing students. The participa...

  17. What can virtual patient simulation offer mental health nursing education?

    Guise, V; Chambers, M; Välimäki, M

    2012-06-01

    This paper discusses the use of simulation in nursing education and training, including potential benefits and barriers associated with its use. In particular, it addresses the hitherto scant application of diverse simulation devices and dedicated simulation scenarios in psychiatric and mental health nursing. It goes on to describe a low-cost, narrative-based virtual patient simulation technique which has the potential for wide application within health and social care education. An example of the implementation of this technology in a web-based pilot course for acute mental health nurses is given. This particular virtual patient technique is a simulation type ideally suited to promoting essential mental health nursing skills such as critical thinking, communication and decision making. Furthermore, it is argued that it is particularly amenable to e-learning and blended learning environments, as well as being an apt tool where multilingual simulations are required. The continued development, implementation and evaluation of narrative virtual patient simulations across a variety of health and social care programmes would help ascertain their success as an educational tool. PMID:22070549

  18. Reducing health care's carbon footprint--the power of nursing.

    Muñoz, Aliria

    2012-11-01

    Global warming and environmentalism continue to be national and international issues as their complexities and implications become better understood. One ironic contributor to the degradation of the environment is the health care system. Serving as clinical laboratories, hotels, restaurants, and offices that never close, U.S. hospitals produce more than 2 million tons of waste annually. Although the consequences and significance of health care's carbon footprint are undeniable, strategies to reduce this impact are challenging. This article discusses how the role, traits, and knowledge of nurses combined with their positions in the health care system make them key players in creating an environmentally sustainable health care industry. With an analysis of environmental action versus inaction, this article explores how nurses at the forefront of health care are equipped to change practice that will reach far beyond the bedside. PMID:23413481

  19. Marketing strategies nurses can employ to promote health.

    McCormack, D

    1994-01-01

    Marketing strategies are employed to ensure the success of new products, services or programs. Both profit and non-profit organizations have used social marketing strategies to inform, to motivate interest, and to engage the involvement of the consumer. A client-dependent health care system did not find it necessary to market services, but a health care system that encourages clients to choose the most appropriate health promotion service available must market services. Nurses are in the business of promoting the health of clients. Therefore, it is essential that nurses become familiar with, and involved in, the development of marketing plans and strategies. The connection between the four variables of the marketing mix (product, promotion, place, and price) and promoting the health of clients is described. A case example recapitulating the marketing strategies employed to raise public awareness of a self-help group for family caregivers is related, the marketing response is evaluated, and future recommendations are proposed. PMID:7888407

  20. Introducing human rights and health into a nursing curriculum

    P. Mayers

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available An important component of nursing programmes in South Africa has been teaching of the principles of ethical practice and relevant ethical codes. A number of factors have contributed to the need to include human rights as an integral component of nursing curricula in South Africa. These include the Bill of Rights in the Constitution of South Africa and the implications thereof for health care delivery, the primary health care approach in the delivery of health care in South Africa, the development and acceptance o f Patients’ Rights Charters, and the recognition of the role that health professionals played - whether through lack of knowledge and awareness or direct involvement - in the human rights violations in the health sector exposed during the hearings of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

  1. [Continuous nursing education to improve the quality of health care].

    Fumić, Nera; Marinović, Marin; Brajan, Dolores

    2014-10-01

    Health care and today's medical and technical achievements and approved standards of treatment provide comprehensive quality, safety and traceability of medical procedures respecting the principles of health protection. Continuous education improves the quality of nursing health care and increases the effectiveness of patient care, consequently maintaining and enhancing patient safety. Patient health problems impose the need of appropriate, planned and timely nursing care and treatment. In providing quality nursing care, attention is focused on the patient and his/her needs in order to maintain and increase their safety, satisfaction, independence and recovery or peaceful death, so the health and nursing practices must be systematized, planned and based on knowledge and experience. Health and nursing care of patients at risk of developing acute and chronic wounds or already suffering from some form of this imply preventive measures that are provided through patient education, motivation, monitoring, early recognition of risk factors and causes, and reducing or removing them through the prescribed necessary medical treatment which is safe depending on the patient health status. Except for preventive measures, nursing care of patients who already suffer from some form of acute or chronic wounds is focused on the care and treatment of damaged tissue by providing appropriate and timely diagnosis, timely and proper evaluation of the wound and patient general status, knowledge and understanding of the wide range of local, oral and parenteral therapy and treatment, aiming to increase patient safety by preventing progression of the patient general condition and local wound status and reducing the possibility of developing infection or other complications of the underlying disease. In the overall patient management, through nursing process, medical interventions are implemented and aimed to maintain and optimize health status, prevent complications of existing diseases and

  2. The relationship between burnout and mental health among nurses

    Abdi masooleh F

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burnout is one of the most important factors in reduced productivity in organizations and involves physical and mental signs, especially in the human service professions. The role of nurses in the healthcare system is vital and motivation to ensure health security is extremely important. We carried out this research to examine the relationship between burnout and mental health in the nursing staff of educational hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted among 200 nurses selected via probable multistage sampling. We used three instruments in this study: 1 demographic questionnaire 2 General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28 and 3 Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI.Results: On the whole, using the MBI subscale, we found low levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization and high levels of reduced sense of personal accomplishment, both in frequency and intensity. The prevalence of symptomatic samples in the GHQ-28 was 43%, and two variables, burnout and poor mental health, were related (p<0.001. Burnout was to be related to gender, age and years of work. The correlation between poor mental health and years of work as well as hours of work in a week were significant. Conclusions: Our results suggest that there is a strong correlation between poor mental health and burnout. Furthermore, the prevalence of symptomatic samples detected in our study using the GHQ-28 was much higher than that reported in studies of the general population. The high prevalence of symptomatic samples and high prevalence of burnout in the dimension of self accomplishment, especially in younger nurses, combined with the strong correlation between poor mental health and burnout all show that care should be taken to improve the stressful conditions that nurses face.

  3. Adolescent Health Promotion Model and The Impact of Oral Health Behavior of Nursing Intervention Applied to The Information Proccessing Theory

    Üstüner Top, Fadime; Ocakçı, Ayşe Ferda

    2012-01-01

    This research is planned to assess the impact of oral and dental health behavior of nursing intervention applied to Health Promotion Model and the Information Processing Theory of adolescents with low oral and dental health behavior. The method of research is experimental design with pre-test and post test control groups. According to the results of oral health care form, individuals that form %25 of the slice on attitude scale are placed in the experimental (n=40) and control (n=40) groups w...

  4. Qualitative Description of Global Health Nursing Competencies by Nursing Faculty in Africa and the Americas

    Wilson, Lynda; Moran, Laura; Zarate, Rosa; Warren, Nicole; Ventura, Carla Aparecida Arena; Tamí-Maury, Irene; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze qualitative comments from four surveys asking nursing faculty to rate the importance of 30 global health competencies for undergraduate nursing programs. Method: qualitative descriptive study that included 591 individuals who responded to the survey in English (49 from Africa and 542 from the Americas), 163 who responded to the survey in Spanish (all from Latin America), and 222 Brazilian faculty who responded to the survey in Portuguese. Qualitative comments were recorded at the end of the surveys by 175 respondents to the English survey, 75 to the Spanish survey, and 70 to the Portuguese survey. Qualitative description and a committee approach guided data analysis. Results: ten new categories of global health competencies emerged from the analysis. Faculty also demonstrated concern about how and when these competencies could be integrated into nursing curricula. Conclusion: the additional categories should be considered for addition to the previously identified global health competencies. These, in addition to the guidance about integration into existing curricula, can be used to guide refinement of the original list of global health competencies. Further research is needed to seek consensus about these competencies and to develop recommendations and standards to guide nursing curriculum development. PMID:27276020

  5. Nurses' Perceptions of Nursing Care Documentation in the Electronic Health Record

    Jensen, Tracey A.

    2013-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) will soon become the standard for documenting nursing care. The EHR holds the promise of rapid access to complete records of a patient's encounter with the healthcare system. It is the expectation that healthcare providers input essential data that communicates important patient information to support quality…

  6. Comparing the Obvious: Interactional characteristics of staff in acute mental health nursing and forensic psychiatric nursing

    Hounsgaard, Lise; Alkier Gildberg, Frederik; Bradley, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    interviews. Findings show that both acute and forensic mental health nursing practice is characterized by two overriding themes; ‘trust and relationship-enabling care’ and ‘behavior and perception-corrective care.’ The comparison of the two studies shows no major differences in the characteristics of staff...

  7. Solution-focused approach therapy for mental health nursing students.

    Evans, Nicola; Evans, Anne-Marie

    Solution-focused therapy is a model of therapy that builds on the client's strengths, is future-focused and can be generally offered as a brief intervention. It can be used across multiple clinical settings and is not limited to being useful for clients accessing mental health services. Learning the underlying principles and developing a foundation level of skill in the approach was found to be achievable in an undergraduate nursing course, with students reporting an increase in their knowledge of the model and confidence in basic therapeutic skills in just one day of training. In this paper, we introduce the solution-focused approach in relation to nursing practice. We describe the template used for the training day offered to undergraduate mental health nurses. Students reported that this method of learning a therapeutic approach was helpful and increased both their knowledge and skill base. PMID:24280922

  8. Health care technology assessment

    Goodman, Clifford

    1994-12-01

    The role of technology in the cost of health care is a primary issue in current debates concerning national health care reform. The broad scope of studies for understanding technological impacts is known as technology assessment. Technology policy makers can improve their decision making by becoming more aware, and taking greater advantage, of key trends in health care technology assessment (HCTA). HCTA is the systematic evaluation of the properties, impacts, and other attributes of health care technologies, including: technical performance; clinical safety and efficacy/effectiveness; cost-effectiveness and other economic attributes; appropriate circumstances/indications for use; and social, legal, ethical, and political impacts. The main purpose of HCTA is to inform technology-related policy making in health care. Among the important trends in HCTA are: (1) proliferation of HCTA groups in the public and private sectors; (2) higher standards for scientific evidence concerning technologies; (3) methodological development in cost analyses, health-related quality of life measurement, and consolidation of available scientific evidence (e.g., meta-analysis); (4) emphasis on improved data on how well technologies work in routine practice and for traditionally under-represented patient groups; (5) development of priority-setting methods; (6) greater reliance on medical informatics to support and disseminate HCTA findings.

  9. Assessment of breastfeeding knowledge of nurse practitioners and nurse-midwives.

    Hellings, P; Howe, C

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate a national study of physician knowledge, experience, and attitudes about breastfeeding. All family, pediatric, and women's health care nurse practitioners and nurse-midwives in a northwestern state were surveyed using a mail questionnaire; the response rate was 60.4%. Respondents were nearly unanimous in believing that "breast is best" and in recommending breastfeeding to expectant mothers as a part of their role. In general, 70% of respondents considered themselves effective or very effective in meeting the needs of breastfeeding patients. Although respondents were very supportive of breastfeeding, they were less knowledgeable about specific management strategies. There were differences in attitudes among nursing specialties and with years of experience. Overall, this statewide sample of nurse practitioners and nurse-midwives had a better understanding of the benefits of breastfeeding and an increased sense of effectiveness in managing breastfeeding problems than the physician participants in the national study. A national sample of nurse practitioners and nurse-midwives is needed to verify and expand on the results from this single jurisdiction, where 40% of the respondents were graduates of the home institution of the co-investigators. PMID:10907336

  10. Health promotion in nursing and cost-effectiveness.

    Jadelhack, Raja

    2012-01-01

    Close examination of the different healthcare systems and the present economic crisis worldwide suggests that all health organizations should re-evaluate the concept of health promotion and its relationship to cost-effectiveness. When choosing the most efficient and cost-effective system, each nation's healthcare system must seriously start to implement strategies for the change. Health professions, including nursing, must change their vision of education both in academic and practice settings, to focus on health promotion and illness prevention. The key principle underlying this paper is to illustrate the importance of health promotion and cost-effectiveness being adopted by all health organizations worldwide, as well as to observe the experiences of selected counties in developing a health policy related to education in primary healthcare. The paper will include a plan adopted by the General Nursing Directorate (GND) in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (SA), which contains a health promotion policy for the nursing administrations in all governmental primary healthcare centers in Saudi Arabia. PMID:22924205

  11. Promoting Occupational Health Nursing Training: An Educational Outreach With a Blended Model of Distance and Traditional Learning Approaches

    Ward, Julie A.; Beaton, Randal D.; Bruck, Annie M.; de Castro, A. B.

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, occupational health nursing faculty and professionals at the University of Washington developed an innovative continuing nursing education offering, the OHN Institute. The OHN Institute was designed to meet the following objectives: (1) extend basic occupational health nursing training to non-occupational health nurses in Federal Region X, (2) target new occupational health nurses or those who possessed little or no advanced education in occupational health nursing, and (3) offer a h...

  12. Nursing personnel's views on oral health from a health promotion perspective: a grounded theory analysis.

    Paulsson, Gun; Söderfeldt, Björn; Nederfors, Tommy; Fridlund, Bengt

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a model for how nursing personnel view oral health in general and the oral health of the care receivers in particular, applying a health promotion perspective and using grounded theory analysis. Data were collected through interviews with 17 nursing personnel, selected by strategic sampling. Analysis of the transcribed interviews showed that there were four strategies, related to staff education, hospital resources, and leadership motivation. The strategies were grounded in data and emerged from the interaction between the two main categories: 'the valuation of the importance of oral health' and 'the behavior towards oral health maintenance'. They were characterized as the routine, theoretical, practical, and flexible strategies, with the latter considered ideal. As increased knowledge is one important part in enhancing the nursing personnel's ability to perform oral hygiene procedures, there is a need for education among nursing personnel, primarily among those using a routine strategy. PMID:11902612

  13. Introducing Health Impact Assessment

    Mannheimer, L N; Gulis, G; Lehto, J;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intersectoral Action for Health (IAH) and its Health Impact Assessment (HIA) tool are built on collaboration between actors and sectors, requiring multidimensional and horizontal way of working. The study aims to analyse the enablers and barriers when such a new way of working and tool...... used by which the actual problems, the governmental actions (or non-actions) (politics) and the understanding, implementation and evaluation of the initiative (policy) could be analysed. All actors involved, civil servants, politicians, representatives of the local public health institute and...... researchers, were interviewed and made to answer a questionnaire. RESULTS: The results showed that there were a number of factors behind the initiation of HIA, which either delayed or accelerated the process. The problems identified were e.g. the prevailing traditional health care focus and the deteriorating...

  14. The American Nurses of the Special Public Health Service and the Formation of Human Resources in Brazilian Nursing.

    Bonini, Bárbara Barrionuevo; Freitas, Genival Fernandes de; Fairman, Julie; Mecone, Márcia Cristina da Cruz

    2015-12-01

    Objective To historicize the changes in training human resources in nursing in Brazil during the period from 1942 to 1961 based on the presence of 35 American nurses assigned to work in cooperation with Special Public Health Service. Method The sources used for the study were reports written by American nurses who described their impressions, suggestions, and the activities they carried out in the country. These were analyzed based on the discourse analysis of Michel Foucault. Results The period mentioned was marked by an American presence in nursing projects developed by the Special Public Health Service. The discourses indicated that the period was marked by many changes in Brazilian nursing, particularly with respect to attracting and training human resources for the profession. Conclusion The results indicate that the American nurses, through what they said and their influence, were central to the consolidation of a new paradigm in the training of nursing professionals in Brazil. PMID:26959165

  15. A successful occupational health nurse-driven health promotion program to support corporate sustainability.

    Redmond, Michael S; Kalina, Christine M

    2009-12-01

    Health promotion programs offer an opportunity to support the health of employees, their families, and the communities in which they reside. By integrating health promotion programs with a company's sustainability efforts, the occupational health nurse can directly impact the company's bottom line by ensuring the benefits from a healthy, safe, and fully productive employee who is able to remain in the workplace for some time. This article discusses a successful health promotion program developed and implemented by an occupational health nurse in support of a company's sustainability effort. PMID:19928715

  16. Community Health Nursing for Working People. A Guide for Voluntary and Official Health Agencies to Provide Part-Time Occupational Health Nursing Services.

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Cincinnati, OH.

    Developed on the assumption that part-time nursing services will eventually become part of a comprehensive health program for each industry served, this 3-part guide contains guidelines for planning, promoting, and developing a part-time nursing service. Part I provides administrative considerations for planning the service and responsibilities of…

  17. Using service-learning to develop health promotion and research skills in nursing students.

    Reising, Deanna L; Shea, Roberta A; Allen, Patricia N; Laux, Marcia M; Hensel, Desiree; Watts, Patricia A

    2008-01-01

    Health promotion skills are a key component of most nursing education programs. While many curricula center around a singular health promotion project contained in one course, this nursing program saw the opportunity to use service-learning as a vehicle for developing a range of both health promotion and research skills. This report details a service-learning research program involving second and third year nursing students. Students conducted a community needs assessment, and designed, implemented, and evaluated health promotion programs that were developed as a result of the community needs assessment. Students collected data on the effectiveness of their programs through pre- and post-test design. Once in their statistics and research courses, students analyzed the data and prepared the data for presentation, developing their research skills. Results from the community on pre- and post-tests indicated significant gains in knowledge regarding hypertension and diabetes risk factors, prevention strategies, and intent to change behavior. Student outcome data was also collected and showed students perceived they had increases in the following skill sets: health promotion, assessment, civic engagement, and research. PMID:18673297

  18. [Community health as a determinant of the nursing curriculum].

    Espino de Alayo, S

    1979-01-01

    This paper summarizes the experience acquired under the first university-level program for the basic training of nurses in Peru. It describes the gradual refining of the academic curriculum, which was designed not only to train people as competent professionals, but also to acquaint them with the country's basic social problems. Four levels of teaching-learning were defined in wide-ranging discussions in which various academic and professional sectors connected with the health field participated. Establishing a process of steps of increasing complexity has considerably facilitated the integration of community health, the scientific method, and mental health into the structure of the curriculum. The practice of community nursing was heavily emphasized, and it was endeavored to strike a balance between hospital experience and work in communities themselves. The program includes specific studies community groups spanning such aspects as control of the more common disease, epidemiologic surveillance, and accident and disaster prevention. Practical work in community health care earns the same credit as hospital internship. The paper closes with a description of the experience of a specific program conducted in the self-managed city of Villa El Salvador under an agreement between the community and the university. The writer also notes that the intense campaign to publicize the program is having an effect because most nurse-training institutions in Peru are tending to add community nursing to their curricula. PMID:393491

  19. Health Instruction Packages: Nursing--Specific Diseases and Disorders.

    Curran, Fern A.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of learning modules to instruct nurses and other health care professionals in the symptoms and treatment of common medical disorders. The first module, by Fern A. Curran, discusses the causes of decubitus ulcers (i.e., bedsores), the physical damage they can do, and methods of preventing…

  20. Undergraduate Nursing Students' Evaluation of the Debriefing Phase in Mental Health Nursing Simulation.

    Kirkbakk-Fjær, Kari; Hedelin, Birgitta; Moen, Øyfrid Larsen

    2016-05-01

    The debriefing phase in mental health nursing simulation promotes a reflexive learning process with the opportunity to develop metacognitive and nontechnical skills. The aim of this quantitative study was to describe undergraduate nursing students' evaluation of their experience during the debriefing phase following high fidelity human simulation (HFHS). Data was collected using the "Debriefing Experience Scale" and analysed with descriptive and comparative tests. The debriefing phase was evaluated as very good. Background data and group size revealed few significant differences. Students with little clinical praxis evaluated having time to acknowledge feelings as important. Differences between groups revealed that groups should consist of up to eighteen students. PMID:27050663

  1. Nursing Workload and the Changing Health Care Environment: A Review of the Literature

    Neill, Denise

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the health care environment have impacted nursing workload, quality of care, and patient safety. Traditional nursing workload measures do not guarantee efficiency, nor do they adequately capture the complexity of nursing workload. Review of the literature indicates nurses perceive the quality of their work has diminished. Research has…

  2. A Preceptorship Model for Nurses in Rural Health Care Facilities. Rural Education Research Series No. 2.

    Pottinger, M. Enid

    This report describes a preceptorship model that provides student nurses with clinical practice in rural health facilities. The development and implementation of a preceptorship model reflects a partnership between nursing education and nursing service--between the urban nursing school and the rural hospital. A five-stage preceptorship model is…

  3. Musculoskeletal Load Assessment in Hospital Nurses with Patient Transfer Activity

    ROGHAYEH ABEDINI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Manual patient handling is known to be the major source of musculoskeletal load among hospital nurses. The objectives of the present study were determination of frequency of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs and its associated factors together with assessment of musculoskeletal load due to patient transfer by PTAI method in hospital nursing staff of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS, Iran. In this crosssectional study, 400 randomly selected nurses of SUMS hospital participated. Data were collected by anonymous demographic and Nordic Musculoskeletal Disorders Questionnaires together with PTAI index checklist. Statistical analyses were undertaken using SPSS, version 16. Age and job tenure means of participants were 30.76±6.44 and 6.92±5.75 years, respectively. 88.2% of the nursing staff reported some forms of musculoskeletal symptoms during the 12 months prior to the study. The results of PTAI index assessment demonstrated that in 4%, 8.5% and 87.5% of the subjects, musculoskeletal load were at levels 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The results revealed that PTAI index score was significantly associated with musculoskeletal disorders occurrence (p<0.001. Musculoskeletal load was high among nurses with patient transfer activity. Age, nurse to bed ratio, marital status, shift work and PTAI score were associated risk factors for MSDs in the studied nursing staff.

  4. Nurse Practitioners, Physician Assistants, and Certified Nurse-Midwives: A Policy Analysis. Health Technology Case Study 37.

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This case study was conducted to analyze the cost-effectiveness of nurse practitioners (NPs), physicians' assistants (PAs), and certified nurse midwives (CNMs) by examining (1) the contributions of each group in meeting health-care needs; (2) the effect of changing the method of payment for their services on the health-care delivery system; and…

  5. It's the anxiety: facilitators and inhibitors to nursing students' career interests in mental health nursing.

    Happell, Brenda; Platania-Phung, Chris; Harris, Scott; Bradshaw, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Increasing the rate of recruitment of nursing students into mental health nursing (MHN) is vital to long-term sustainability of health care system support for people diagnosed with mental illness. However MHN is not a popular career path; this raises questions about what attitudes and beliefs may divert or attract students to this specialisation. The current research involved a survey of undergraduate nursing students at a regional university in Australia to clarify the nature of relationships between attitudes (e.g., the value of mental health nursing, stereotypes of people with mental illness) and how they may be antecedents to considering MHN as a career path. Through a structural equation model, it was ascertained that anxiety surrounding mental illness leads to less interest in MHN as a future career and suggests that anxiety is (a) partly due to negative stereotypes, and (b) countered by preparedness for a MHN role. Beliefs on how MHN can make a valuable contribution to people's well-being did not affect interest in pursuing MHN. These findings reconfirm the need to reduce anxiety about mental illness by educational approaches that effectively prepare students for MHN, combined with challenging negative stereotypes. PMID:24350751

  6. The study of optimal nursing position in health care delivery system in Iran

    Shahshahani, Maryam Sadat; Salehi, Shayesteh; Rastegari, Mohammad; Rezayi, Abdollah

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the recent decade, due to the overwhelming importance of health and prevention of diseases, nurses, the greatest part of the health care system, are acting in any position of the health care delivery system; because nursing have a key role in promotion of health and health care everywhere. The objective of this research was to study the desired positions of nursing in the health care delivery system in Iran. METHODS: This was a triangulation study done on three steps during 200...

  7. The process of formation of mental health for nurses in primary health care

    Hilton Giovani Neves

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was based on descriptive, exploratory and qualitative approach and aimed at analyzing scientific knowledge that was developed in the formation of Family Health (FH nurses to address Mental Health in Primary Care regarding psychosocial aspects. Research conducted in 2008 with three teams of FH nurses a municipality in the countryside of Mato Grosso, whose data were submitted to content analysis. The results were organized according to two themes "The limitations of official spaces for the training of nurses" and "The Family Health as well as the transformation praxis in Mental Health ". It was concluded that the official spaces mentioned above do not give too much importance to education on mental health, the same occurs in the context of lifelong learning. Despite the limited provision of skills for Mental Health care, we have found significant changes such as the sensitization to emotional and psychological manifestations of the population with higher awareness of health.

  8. Latent or Manifest Observers: Two Dichotomous Approaches of Surveillance in Mental Health Nursing

    Martin Salzmann-Erikson; Henrik Eriksson

    2011-01-01

    Background. Surveillance is a central activity among mental health nursing, but it is also questioned for its therapeutic value and considered to be custodial. Aim. The aim of this study was to describe how mental health nurses use different approaches to observe patients in relation to the practice of surveillance in psychiatric nursing care. Methods. In this study, Spradley's twelve-step ethnographic method was used. Results. Mental health nurses use their cultural knowing to observe patien...

  9. Swedish Child Health Care nurses conceptions of overweight in children: a qualitative study

    Isma Gabriella E; Bramhagen Ann-Cathrine; Ahlstrom Gerd; Östman Margareta; Dykes Anna-Karin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Registered Sick Children’s Nurses and District Nurses employed at Child Health Care centres are in a position to help prevent childhood overweight and obesity. Prevention of this challenging public health threat could be improved through having a better understanding of how this group of nurses perceives childhood obesity. The aim of this study was to elucidate the conceptions of childhood overweight, including obesity, among nurses working in Child Health Care. Method A q...

  10. Psychosocial problems in pre-school children : Recognition and strategy applied by doctors and nurses in child health care objective.

    Reijneveld, SA; Brugman, E; Verhulst, FC; Verloove-Vanhorick, SP

    2005-01-01

    Psychosocial problems in pre-school children: recognition and strategy applied by doctors and nurses in child health care Objective. To assess the degree to which preventive child health professionals (CHPs) identify and manage psychosocial problems among pre-school children in the general populatio

  11. Psychosocial problems in pre-school children: Recognition and strategy applied by doctors and nurses in child health care objective

    Reijneveld, S.A.; Brugman, E.; Verhulst, F.C.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.

    2005-01-01

    Psychosocial problems in pre-school children: recognition and strategy applied by doctors and nurses in child health care Objective. To assess the degree to which preventive child health professionals (CHPs) identify and manage psychosocial problems among pre-school children in the general populatio

  12. Health promotion in Family Health Strategy: the perception of the nursing staff Crato - CE

    Danielle Lopes de Alencar; Anna Laryssa Ribeiro de Oliveira Brito; Kenya Waléria de Siqueira Coelho Lisboa

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the perception of the nursing staff of the Family Health Strategy (FHS) on health promotion. Methods: This was a qualitative and descriptive study, which occurred in nine FHS of the city of Crato-CE in the period October-December 2010. The subjects were nine nurses and eight of the nursing technicians with service time of three to eight years at FHS investigated. Randomly chosen and electing the criterion of saturation data, we used semi-structured interview, which was ...

  13. Self-rated health, work characteristics and health related behaviours among nurses in Greece: a cross sectional study

    Dimoliatis Ioannis DK; Alamanos Yannis; Pappas Noula A

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous studies on self-rated health among nurses have indicated an association of low job satisfaction and stress in relation to poor self-rated health. The relationship between self rated health and the specific work characteristics and health related behaviours of nurses to our knowledge have not been adequately studied. Objective To investigate the health profile of nurses working in hospitals in North West Greece and to examine the associations between self rated hea...

  14. [Assessing the impact of the environment on human health].

    Locatelli, Marine

    2016-05-01

    In public health, nurses are concerned with the global health of populations. A recently qualified nurse, interested in this area of health, enhanced her skills with a master's degree specialising in the links between the environment and health. PMID:27155275

  15. [Current state of competence assessment in nursing].

    Darmann-Finck, Ingrid; Reuschenbach, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Competency measurement is central to the optimisation of outcome oriented educational processes in nursing, similar to the concept of evidence based practice. The classification of measurement tools provides the basis for describing the current state of research and development in relation to competence measurement in nursing science, and any gaps are identified. The article concludes with questioning the importance of outcome oriented quality orientation in order to achieve an increase in quality during training. Further methodological developments and qualitative studies are needed to examine the context specific processes of interaction and learning, beyond competence diagnostics. PMID:23415340

  16. Evidence-based uncertainty in mental health nursing.

    Franks, V

    2004-02-01

    The drive towards evidence-based practice is part of a modern reflective and caring service. However there is a paradox at the heart of the notion of evidence-based care. In order to perform any systemized examination of treatment there has to be a conscious acknowledgement of uncertainty about that treatment. This is uncomfortable and when research does find evidence in favour of a treatment, there is a relief and a return to conviction about what is the best. The paradox is that it seems the most valued research practices are predicated on generalizations about patient treatments and categories. However, nursing care is based on the notion of the uniqueness of the patient and the nurse-patient relationship. Sometimes it is necessary to address the particular and not to rush to generalizations and certainty. The psychoanalytic framework promotes a capacity to tolerate uncertainty and provides a model for understanding conflicting feelings, which can occur within the nurse-patient relationship. The author proposes the psychoanalytic observational method as an adjunct to other research methods. This method places certain kinds of evidence within the rubric of evidence-based nursing practice. The evidence collected in this method is the evidence of the conscious and unconscious experience within the nurse-patient relationship. The author will describe and argue for the place of this research method within the canon of other more widely practised methods within mental health practice. She will propose that for safe practice it is necessary to value and examine the veracity of the feelings and tacit understanding of the nurse. She contends that the current climate of excessive bureaucracy and persecutory risk management is having a damaging effect on both the research process and effective nursing care. PMID:14723645

  17. Occupational stress among staff nurses: Controlling the risk to health

    Parul Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing has been identified as an occupation that has high levels of stress. Job stress brought about hazardous impacts not only on nurses′ health but also on their abilities to cope with job demands. Objectives: This study aimed at finding out the degree of work-related stress among the staff nurses and various determinants, which have a impact on it. Materials and Methods: Institutional-based cross-sectional study conducted on GNM qualified nurses. Predesigned and pre-tested questionnaire covering their sociodemographic variables in part I and professional life stress scale by David Fontana in part II. Analysis used was Chi-square test and logistic regression for various factors. Results: Risk for professional stress due to poor and satisfactory doctor′s attitude was found about 3 and 4 times more than with excellent attitude of doctors toward the staff nurses. A statistically significant association (P < 0.024 between department of posting and level of stress. Nurses reported that they had no time for rest, of whom 42% were suffering from moderate-to-severe stress. The nurses who felt that the job was not tiring were found to be less stressed as those who perceived job as tiring (OR = 0.43. Conclusion: The main nurses′ occupational stressors were poor doctor′s attitude, posting in busy departments (emergency/ICU, inadequate pay, too much work, and so on. Thus, hospital managers should initiate strategies to reduce the amount of occupational stress and should provide more support to the nurses to deal with the stress.

  18. The environmental impact of health care: implications for infusion nursing.

    Lipkin, Noelle Claire

    2012-01-01

    Health care provision is a dangerous business. Health professionals recognize the potential for miscommunication, medication errors, and other possible threats to patient safety. Less evident are the hazards to the environment inherent in the everyday practice of patient care. This article addresses 3 areas of practice in which infusion nurses can make a positive impact on the environment: preferable intravenous (IV) supply purchasing, proper management of electronic equipment (including purchasing, servicing, and disposal), and appropriate medication use and disposal practices. The article aims to inform IV nurses of the alarming environmental effects that the health care industry has on the environment and to suggest a clear, direct course of action to improve our environmental impact. PMID:22498487

  19. Survey of knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in nurses of community-based health services in Hainan province

    Chen, Xiu-Zhen

    2008-01-01

    To assess the knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) among the nurses ( n= 302) of community-based health services in Hainan province of China, a survey was made by randomized stratified cluster sampling using self-designed questionnaires. The passing rate for qualification of the knowledge of CPR was found to be very low in Hainan province (23.18 %). A significant difference of regions and different educational level among the nurses were also noticed (P

  20. A Study to Assess Knowledge and Attitude Regarding Hand Hygiene amongst Residents and Nursing Staff in a Tertiary Health Care Setting of Bhopal City

    Maheshwari, Veena; kaore, Navin Chandra M; Ramnani, Vijay Kumar; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Borle, Amod; Kaushal, Rituja

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infection due to hospital-acquired microbes is an evolving problem worldwide, and horizontal transmission of bacterial organism continues to cause a high nosocomial infection rate in health care settings. Most nosocomial infections are thought to be transmitted by the hands of health care workers.The application of hand hygiene is effective in reducing infection rates.

  1. Community nursing towards primary health care

    Bergman, R.

    1984-01-01

    Community health practice in various forms has been recorded for over 5 000 years (Anderson, 1969). The ancient Egyptians developed a community system for water supply and sewage disposal. The Hebrews focused on the promotion of health through the Mosaic code which regulated personal hygiene, food, sanitation, maternal health, and more. The Greeks (500-100 BC) emphasised values of personal hygiene and exercise. The Romans (100 BC - 500 AD), on the other hand, were concerned with the State rat...

  2. Community nursing towards primary health care

    R. Bergman

    1984-09-01

    Full Text Available Community health practice in various forms has been recorded for over 5 000 years (Anderson, 1969. The ancient Egyptians developed a community system for water supply and sewage disposal. The Hebrews focused on the promotion of health through the Mosaic code which regulated personal hygiene, food, sanitation, maternal health, and more. The Greeks (500-100 BC emphasised values of personal hygiene and exercise. The Romans (100 BC - 500 AD, on the other hand, were concerned with the State rather that the individual and set public health measures in relation to building regulations, water supply and community sanitation.

  3. Factors that act as facilitators and barriers to nurse leaders’ participation in health policy development

    Shariff, Nilufa

    2014-01-01

    Background Health policies impact on nursing profession and health care. Nurses' involvement in health policy development ensures that health care is safe, of a high quality, accessible and affordable. Numerous factors influence nurse leaders' ability to be politically active in influencing health policy development. These factors can be facilitators or barriers to their participation. There is scant research evidence from Eastern African region that draws attention to this topic. This paper ...

  4. School Nurse Communication Effectiveness with Physicians and Satisfaction with School Health Services

    Volkman, Julie E.; Hillemeier, Marianne M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined school nurses' communication with community physicians and its relationship to school nurse satisfaction with school health services. A stratified random sample of school nurses in Pennsylvania (N = 615) were surveyed about communication effectiveness with community physicians, satisfaction with school health services for…

  5. Assessment of nursing care using indicators generated by software

    Ana Paula Souza Lima

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze the efficacy of the Nursing Process in an Intensive Care Unit using indicators generated by software. METHOD: cross-sectional study using data collected for four months. RNs and students daily registered patients, took history (at admission, performed physical assessments, and established nursing diagnoses, nursing plans/prescriptions, and assessed care delivered to 17 patients using software. Indicators concerning the incidence and prevalence of nursing diagnoses, rate of effectiveness, risk diagnoses, and rate of effective prevention of complications were computed. RESULTS: the Risk for imbalanced body temperature was the most frequent diagnosis (23.53%, while the least frequent was Risk for constipation (0%. The Risk for Impaired skin integrity was prevalent in 100% of the patients, while Risk for acute confusion was the least prevalent (11.76%. Risk for constipation and Risk for impaired skin integrity obtained a rate of risk diagnostic effectiveness of 100%. The rate of effective prevention of acute confusion and falls was 100%. CONCLUSION: the efficacy of the Nursing Process using indicators was analyzed because these indicators reveal how nurses have identified patients' risks and conditions, and planned care in a systematized manner.

  6. Usability Assessment of Moodle by Brazilian and Portuguese Nursing Students.

    Seixas, Carlos Alberto; de Godoy, Simone; Martins, JoséÉ Carlos Amado; Mazzo, Alessandra; Baptista, Rui Carlos Negrão; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa

    2016-06-01

    Distance education has turned into an important tool for nursing education. The virtual learning environments contribute toward an interactive and attractive educational process. In this study, we assess the usability of a virtual learning environment that was developed to teach nursing students how to care for patients with urinary retention. A multicenter and descriptive study was undertaken, which involved nursing students from the University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto College of Nursing, Brazil, and the Escola Superior de Enfermagem de Coimbra, Portugal. The participants were 79 students, mostly female, between 20 and 24 years of age. The virtual learning environment revealed good properties in terms of usability on most criteria. Future research will help to confirm the results. PMID:27058673

  7. Teaching health assessment in the virtual classroom.

    Lashley, Mary

    2005-08-01

    Health assessment skills are vital to professional nursing practice. Health assessment has traditionally been taught using lecture, teacher-developed tests, practice and live demonstration, and interactive and computer-based learning materials. Rapid advances in information technology during the past decade have greatly expanded distance learning options in higher education. Although much nursing education now uses the Internet, there has been limited use of the Web to teach psychomotor and clinical skills. This article describes how online instruction can be integrated into a health assessment course to teach physical examination skills. The development of instructional videos that can be digitally streamed onto the Web for ready and repeated access can also enhance online learning of technical and clinical skills. Student evaluation of this Web-enhanced course revealed that online assignments enabled them to pace their learning, thereby promoting greater flexibility and independence. Students were able to master the technical skills of working online with minimal difficulty and reported that working online was no more stressful than attending class. The most helpful aspect of the online course was the instructor-developed video that was digitally streamed online. PMID:16130340

  8. Continuing education for maternal child health nurses: a means to improve the health care of mothers and children.

    Bolte, I M; Presler, E P

    1983-01-01

    The University of Kentucky College of Nursing is in the 7th year of implementing a 7-year federally funded continuing education project. The major goal of MCH (maternal child health) Project 969, which is scheduled to terminate Sept. 30, 1984, is to develop and offer a series of quality continuing education courses for three distinct populations--practicing maternal child health nurses, State nurse consultants, and nurse supervisors at county or district levels. The purpose of these courses i...

  9. Effectiveness of interactive discussion group in suicide risk assessment among general nurses in Taiwan: a randomized controlled trial.

    Wu, Chia-Yi; Lin, Yi-Yin; Yeh, Mei Chang; Huang, Lian-Hua; Chen, Shaw-Ji; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Lee, Ming-Been

    2014-11-01

    The evidence of suicide prevention training for nurses is scarce. Strategies to enhance general nurses' ability in suicide risk assessment are critical to develop effective training programs in general medical settings. This study was aimed to examine the effectiveness of an interactive discussion group in a suicide prevention training program for general nurses. In this randomized study with two groups of pre-post study design, the sample was recruited from the Medical, Surgical, and Emergency/Intensive Care Sectors of a 2000-bed general hospital via stratified randomization. Among the 111 nurses, 57 participants randomly assigned to the control group received a two-hour baseline suicide gatekeeper lecture, and 54 participants assigning to the experimental group received an additional five-hour group discussion about suicide risk assessment skills. Using a case vignette, the nurses discussed and assessed suicide risk factors specified in a 10-item Chinese SAD PERSONS Scale during a group discussion intervention. The findings revealed that the nurses achieved significant and consistent improvements of risk identification and assessment after the intervention without influencing their mental health status for assessing suicide risks. The result suggested an effective approach of interactive group discussion for facilitating critical thinking and learning suicide risk assessment skills among general nurses. PMID:24768204

  10. Validation of a nurses' views on electronic medical record systems (EMR) questionnaire in Turkish health system.

    Top, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Ali; Karabulut, Erdem; Otieno, Ochieng George; Saylam, Melahat; Bakır, Sevgi; Top, Sümbül

    2015-06-01

    Using of EMR in health services and organizations is steadily increasing for quality improvement, cost effectiveness and performance development. However, no validated national and international instruments (scale, questionnaire, index, and inventory) have assessed the effectiveness, satisfaction, health care savings, patient safety and cost minimization of electronic medical and health systems from the viewpoint and perceptions of nurses in Turkish health services. The perceptions of health care professionals especially physicians and nurses can contribute important information that may predict their acceptance of EMR and desired mode of use for EMR, evaluation performance of EMR thus guiding EMR implementation in hospitals. This article is a report of validation of the instrument to measure nurses' views on the use, quality and user satisfaction with EMR in Turkish health system. Items in the questionnaire were designed and obtained following O.G. Otieno, H. Toyama, M. Asonuma, M. Kanai-Pak, K. Naitoh's questionnaire about Use, Quality and User Satisfaction with EMR systems. Reliability and validity were examined and investigated in terms of responses from 487 nurses from one education hospital in Ankara, Turkey. This study was planned and conducted at a university hospital. The validation process was based on construct validity in this study. The response rate was 74.92%. Cronbach's alphas of three factors (use, quality and satisfaction of EMR) ranged from 0.78 to 0.94. Goodness-of-fit indices from the confirmatory factor analysis showed a reasonable model fit. Results of confirmatory factor analysis showed that χ2 statistic indicated significant result (p < 0.001) and model fit was acceptable according to relative χ2 statistic (χ2/df = 2.8 < 5). Further validation of the instrument could yield positive results in health systems in the different countries. Also further validation and reliability studies could be planned on physicians and other

  11. A call for change: perspectives on nurses' role in health care reform.

    Halcón, Linda

    2008-01-01

    A new generation of nurse activists must follow in the footsteps of nursing pioneers such as Florence Nightingale and Lillian Wald to facilitate health care systems that promote healthy populations. PMID:19090093

  12. Workplace Participatory Occupational Health/Health Promotion Program: Facilitators and Barriers Observed in Three Nursing Homes.

    Zhang, Yuan; Flum, Marian; Kotejoshyer, Rajashree; Fleishman, Jane; Henning, Robert; Punnett, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Nursing home employees experience high physical and psychosocial workloads, resulting in poor health outcomes. An occupational health/health promotion program, designed to facilitate employee participation, was initiated in three nursing homes. The aim of the current study was to evaluate facilitators and barriers of the program after 3-year implementation. Focus groups with employees and in-depth interviews with top and middle managers were conducted. The Social Ecological Model was used to organize the evaluation. Facilitators and barriers were reported from both managers' and employees' perspectives, and were categorized as intrapersonal, interpersonal, institutional, and corporate level. Management support, financial resources, and release time for participation were identified as the three most important factors. Supports from multiple levels including both human and environment, and managers and employees, are important for a successful participatory occupational health/health promotion program. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(6), 34-42.]. PMID:26977705

  13. Designing of Electronic Health Record Software in the Nursing and Midwifery Faculty of Tabriz

    Vahid Azizi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: much effort was conducted to support the use of electronic record systems in nursing process. Some of the most important reasons for its application are efficiency, security and the quality of the patients’ data registration. The purpose of this study is to present electronic registration software of patients, health assessment and to determine the attitude of nurses towards it. Methods: this is a R&D leading to construction of the patient’s health assessment software. In the beginning, Gordon Model and the daily charts of the patients were prepared to paper. During the next 8 months these charts were converted into the software programs. The databases were implemented using “the SQL server” and “C#Net” programming language. Results: the software used in this study included 4 parts; the first one contained information of Gordon health assessment model in 11 items, the second contained charts of the study, the third part consisted of Lund-Browder table and dummy data table for 4 age groups, and the fourth one was image infor-mation storage part for burn wounds pictures. Conclusion: despite barriers, electronic systems could lead to confidential information, increase the quality of nursing records, and also reduce the amount of expenses.

  14. Complexity and Health Coaching: Synergies in Nursing

    Gail J. Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Health care professionals are increasingly aware that persons are complex and live in relation with other complex human communities and broader systems. Complex beings and systems are living and evolving in nonlinear ways through a process of mutual influence. Traditional standardized approaches in chronic disease management do not address these non-linear linkages and the meaning and changes that impact day-to-day life and caring for self and family. The RN health coach role described in this paper addresses the complexities and ambiguities for persons living with chronic illness in order to provide person-centered care and support that are unique and responsive to the context of persons’ lives. Informed by complexity thinking and relational inquiry, the RN health coach is an emergent innovation of creative action with community and groups that support persons as they shape their health and patterns of living.

  15. Complexity and Health Coaching: Synergies in Nursing

    Mitchell, Gail J.; Nadine Cross; Michelle Wilson; Shauna Biernacki; Winnie Wong; Behnam Adib; Danica Rush

    2013-01-01

    Health care professionals are increasingly aware that persons are complex and live in relation with other complex human communities and broader systems. Complex beings and systems are living and evolving in nonlinear ways through a process of mutual influence. Traditional standardized approaches in chronic disease management do not address these non-linear linkages and the meaning and changes that impact day-to-day life and caring for self and family. The RN health coach role described in thi...

  16. HEALTH SURVEY AND LIFE HABITS OF NURSES WHO WORK AT THE MEDICAL FACULTY HOSPITAL AT AIBU

    Deniz, Fatih; Alcelik, Aytekin; Nuray YESILDAL; Atilla Senih MAYDA; Berna AYAKTA SERIFI

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Nursing is an occupation needed renunciation, patience and physical endurance. Nurses have to prevent their physical and mental health, because they can be more beneficial to patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted on AIBU Duzce Medical School Nurses to determine health problems and nutritional habits. Materials and Methods: The questionnaires forms filled by 79 nurses(%86) and analysed the data using an statistical package programme. Results: Mean age of the study group w...

  17. Teaching methods in community health nursing clerkships: experiences of healthcare staff in Iran

    Eshagh Ildarabadi; Hossein Karimi-Moonaghi; Abbas Heydari; Ali Taghipour; Abdolghani Abdollahimohammad; Azizollah Arbabisarjou

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Healthcare staff educate nursing students during their clerkships at community health nursing programs. Their teaching methods play an important role in nursing students’ acquisition of competencies; however, these methods have not been studied thoroughly. Thus, this study aims to describe, interpret, and understand the experiences of healthcare staff’s teaching methods in clerkships at a community health nursing program. Methods: This study was conducted using purposeful sampling an...

  18. Investigation of health anxiety and its related factors in nursing students

    Zhang Y

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Yuqun Zhang,1,2 Yueqiu Zhao,3 Shengqin Mao,1 Guohong Li,4 Yonggui Yuan1 1Department of Psychosomatics and Psychiatry, Affiliated Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 2Nursing Faculty of Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 3Nanjing Health School, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 4Nursing Department, Affiliated Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Objective: To explore health anxiety in a sample of nursing students to determine the relationships between health anxiety and life satisfaction, personality, and alexithymia.Methods: Two thousand and eighty-six nursing students in junior college, which were divided into five groups, were evaluated by questionnaires, including the Life Satisfaction Scales Applicable to College Students, the Chinese version of the Short Health Anxiety Inventory, the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20, and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Results: The mean age, whether the individual was an only child, residence (urban or rural, and were significantly different between the groups. The self-assessment scores were also significantly different between the groups. The Short Health Anxiety Inventory total score and the factor of fearing the likelihood of becoming ill were significantly negatively correlated with the Life Satisfaction Scales Applicable to College Students total score and its two factors, but were significantly positively correlated with psychoticism, neuroticism, and TAS-20 total scores and its scores of the three TAS-20 factors. The negative consequence scale of Short Health Anxiety Inventory was not significantly correlated with externally oriented thinking, but was significantly negatively correlated with extraversion. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicted that objective satisfaction, subjective satisfaction, neuroticism, and the three

  19. Psychiatric nursing as 'different' care: experience of Iranian mental health nurses in inpatient psychiatric wards.

    Zarea, K; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, A; Abbaszadeh, A; Mohammadpour, A

    2013-03-01

    Patients with mental illness require unique and specific care. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of nurses, who provide such care for mentally ill people, within the context of Iranian culture. This hermeneutic phenomenological study was carried out in a university-affiliated hospital in an urban area of Iran. We interviewed 10 mental health nurses to capture in detail their experiences in psychiatric units, and the approach developed by Diekelmann et al. was employed to analyse the data. Four themes and five sub-themes were identified: 'being engaged with patients' (sub-themes: 'struggle for monitor/control', 'safety/security concerns', 'supporting physiological and emotional needs'), 'being competent', 'altruistic care' and 'facing difficulties and challenges' (sub-themes: 'socio-cultural' and 'organizational challenges'). The results provide valuable insights and greater understanding of the professional experiences of psychiatric nurses in Iran, and indicate the need for a stable and responsible organizational structure for those nurses who are expected to manage patient care in psychiatric wards. PMID:22384949

  20. Health problems of nursing workers in a public educational institution

    Carolina Luiza Bernardes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the issues occurred with nursing workers through a Health Monitoring System for Nursing Workers (SIMOSTE and to describe the consequences of those problems. Method: This is a quantitative, exploratory and descriptive study realized in a teaching hospital in the west region of the city of São Paulo. Results: From the SIMOSTE, 1.847 occurrences were registered in a six month period. Within the main occurrences, medical licenses, work related accidents with and without removals; psychiatric consultations and psychotherapy were highlighted. Conclusion: The data points out to the need for the development of new health vigilance actions to notify accidents and illness related to work, besides the prevention of issues.

  1. Health promotion in Family Health Strategy: the perception of the nursing staff Crato - CE

    Danielle Lopes de Alencar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the perception of the nursing staff of the Family Health Strategy (FHS on health promotion. Methods: This was a qualitative and descriptive study, which occurred in nine FHS of the city of Crato-CE in the period October-December 2010. The subjects were nine nurses and eight of the nursing technicians with service time of three to eight years at FHS investigated. Randomly chosen and electing the criterion of saturation data, we used semi-structured interview, which was recorded. During data analysis, we opted for collective subject discourse (CSD, which emerged the central ideas that enabled the formation of CSD for each professional category. The subjects were informed about the research objectives by submitting the Term of Consent, which was signed by all. The project was approved by the Ethics Committee at the Rural University of Cariri (RUCA, with approval No. 21/2010. Results: It was observed that the conceptual and practical vision on health promotion approaches the concept of prevention, however, nurses recognize health more broadly, in the context of the social construction of individual, differing from the CSD of the nursing technicians. The actions taken in the field of health promotion are still delimited by lectures. Conclusion: Perceptions of professionals are constituted by a weakness related to CSD and the actions performed by them, constituting an obstacle to the consolidation of a new model of care that has as central to health promotion.

  2. Oral Health and Hygiene Content in Nursing Fundamentals Textbooks

    Jablonski, Rita A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the quantity and quality of oral hygiene content in a representative sample of before-licensure nursing fundamentals textbooks. Seven textbooks were examined. Quantity was operationalized as the actual page count and percentage of content devoted to oral health and hygiene. Quality of content was operationalized as congruency with best mouth care practices. Best mouth care practices included evidence-based and consensus-based practices as published pri...

  3. Understanding and integrating mindfulness into psychiatric mental health nursing practice.

    Tusaie, Kathleen; Edds, Kelly

    2009-10-01

    The practice of mindfulness is increasingly being integrated into Western clinical practice within the context of psychotherapy and stress management. Although it is based in ancient Buddhist philosophy, there remains confusion about the definition, antecedents, processes, and outcomes of mindfulness practice. This article reviews the literature on mindfulness, with a focus upon a clearer definition and understanding of the processes and integration into psychiatric mental health nursing practice. PMID:19766927

  4. Pain assessment and management in surgical nursing: a literature review.

    Bell, Liz; Duffy, Anita

    Although postoperative pain assessment and management is an integral part of surgical nursing practice, it remains ad hoc despite numerous costly empirical research studies. Patients have a right to pain relief; however, the barriers to assessing and managing patient pain in practice have not as yet been overcome. A literature review to establish the main barriers to effective postoperative pain relief in clinical practice was carried out. The findings suggest that time management, and attitudes and beliefs of both patients and nurses are significant factors hampering practice. The authors conclude that future research in this area is futile, and suggest that nurses should focus on auditing their own practice to improve the effectiveness of pain management in practice and enhance standards of care. PMID:19223798

  5. Becoming a mental health nurse; A three year longitudinal study

    Harvey Wells

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This longitudinal case series study explores how students’ conceptions of ‘mental health nursing’ changed whilst on a three-year pre-registration Mental Health Nursing programme. The study was carried out in two university nursing schools in the South East of England and this paper reports a detailed analysis of 6 individual case studies. The researchers utilised Novak’s approach to concept mapping to elicit students’ personal knowledge structures, which were explored further using semi-structured individual qualitative interviews. The maps were analysed by looking at their gross morphology to interpret changes over time into types of learning achieved and the associated interview data were analysed using thematic content analysis. Results from analysis of the map structures suggest that whilst four of the selected students learned deeply, one participant learned superficially and one appeared not to learn at all. The associated interview data provides an interesting insight into the students’ reflective narratives on the process of learning. The findings also demonstrate further evidence of the practicability of using Novakian concept maps to self-prompt qualitative research interviews. Implications for the professional education of Mental Health Nurses are discussed.

  6. Mental health nursing and physical health care: a cross-sectional study of nurses' attitudes, practice, and perceived training needs for the physical health care of people with severe mental illness

    Robson, D.; Haddad, M.; Gray, R.; Gournay, K.

    2013-01-01

    Mental health nurses have a key role in improving the physical health of people with a serious mental illness, however, there have been few studies of their attitudes or the extent of their involvement in this work. The aim of this study was to examine mental health nurses' attitudes to physical health care and explore associations with their practice and training. A postal questionnaire survey including the Physical Health Attitude Scale for mental health nurses (PHASe) was used within a UK ...

  7. International survey of occupational health nurses' roles in multidisciplinary teamwork in occupational health services.

    Rogers, Bonnie; Kono, Keiko; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Peurala, Marjatta; Radford, Jennifer; Staun, Julie

    2014-07-01

    Access to occupational health services for primary prevention and control of work-related injuries and illnesses by the global workforce is limited (World Health Organization [WHO], 2013). From the WHO survey of 121 (61%) participating countries, only one-third of the responding countries provided occupational health services to more than 30% of their workers (2013). How services are provided in these countries is dependent on legal requirements and regulations, population, workforce characteristics, and culture, as well as an understanding of the impact of workplace hazards and worker health needs. Around the world, many occupational health services are provided by occupational health nurses independently or in collaboration with other disciplines' professionals. These services may be health protection, health promotion, or both, and are designed to reduce health risks, support productivity, improve workers' quality of life, and be cost-effective. Rantanen (2004) stated that basic occupational health services must increase rather than decline, especially as work becomes more complex; workforces become more dynamic and mobile, creating new models of work-places; and jobs become more precarious and temporary. To better understand occupational health services provided by occupational health nurses globally and how decisions are made to provide these services, this study examined the scope of services provided by a sample of participating occupational health nurses from various countries. PMID:25000546

  8. Assessment of knowledge and attitude towards pulmonary tuberculosis in undergraduate nursing students of Applied University in Greece.

    Vassilopoulos A.; Roupa Z.; Wozniak G.; Rekliti M.; Tsaras K.; Papathanasiou I.; Gourgoulianis K

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis constitutes a diachronic problem of Public Health that in the past years received bigger epidemic dimensions, stirring interesting many researchers in all levels. Aim: The aim of our study was to assess the knowledge and attitude of students of Nursing departments in Applied University in Greece, towards the transmission and the prevention of pulmonary tuberculosis. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of 275 students (12.1% male και 87,9% female) of Nursing De...

  9. Assessing the Information and Communication Technology (ICT)-Educational Needs of Nursing Students at Millikin University

    Folami, Florence; Adeoye, Blessing F.

    2012-01-01

    While the leading edge between nursing and information provides an opportunity to expand the limitations of nursing knowledge and practice and creates new leadership roles for nurses, it also requires special competencies for safe and effective nursing practice. This study, therefore, assesses informatics competencies and examines the pedagogic…

  10. [Communication within the health care team: doctors and nurses].

    Kollár, János

    2016-04-24

    Proper communication within the health care team is especially important in terms of creating safe emotional and professional conditions for the team members and for quality healing. The aim of the study is to explore the factors that hinder appropriate communication between doctors and nurses and thus to make the effective elimination of the communication disturbances possible. Investigation in main medical databases and general search engines were used for analysing the phenomenon. It was revealed that communication between doctors and nurses is restrained by factors that can be observed on individual, professional and system levels as well. Role confusion, lack of trust, communication barriers arising from hierarchical inequalities, leadership problems, differences in qualifications, burnout and organizational problems can equally be found amongst them. The effectiveness of communication between nurses and doctors in Hungary is especially strongly influenced by the fear of losing jobs, the financial problems arising from different degree of gratuity and the phenomenon of burnout. Changes on individual, professional and system levels are equally important for significant improvement in the communication between doctors and nurses. Joint trainings based on strong organizational development skills and joint conferences could promote significantly better flow of information, mutual appreciation and harmonization. PMID:27084439

  11. Addressing health inequalities in the delivery of the human papillomavirus vaccination programme: examining the role of the school nurse.

    Tammy Boyce

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HPV immunisation of adolescent girls is expected to have a significant impact in the reduction of cervical cancer. UK The HPV immunisation programme is primarily delivered by school nurses. We examine the role of school nurses in delivering the HPV immunisation programme and their impact on minimising health inequalities in vaccine uptake. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A rapid evidence assessment (REA and semi-structured interviews with health professionals were conducted and analysed using thematic analysis. 80 health professionals from across the UK are interviewed, primarily school nurses and HPV immunisation programme coordinators. The REA identified 2,795 articles and after analysis and hand searches, 34 relevant articles were identified and analysed. Interviews revealed that health inequalities in HPV vaccination uptake were mainly related to income and other social factors in contrast to published research which emphasises potential inequalities related to ethnicity and/or religion. Most school nurses interviewed understood local health inequalities and made particular efforts to target girls who did not attend or missed doses. Interviews also revealed maintaining accurate and consistent records influenced both school nurses' understanding and efforts to target inequalities in HPV vaccination uptake. CONCLUSIONS: Despite high uptake in the UK, some girls remain at risk of not being vaccinated with all three doses. School nurses played a key role in reducing health inequalities in the delivery of the HPV programme. Other studies identified religious beliefs and ethnicity as potentially influencing HPV vaccination uptake but interviews for this research found this appeared not to have occurred. Instead school nurses stated girls who were more likely to be missed were those not in education. Improving understanding of the delivery processes of immunisation programmes and this impact on health inequalities can help to inform solutions to

  12. Musculoskeletal Load Assessment in Hospital Nurses with Patient Transfer Activity

    Roghayeh Abedini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Manual patient handling is known to be the major source ofmusculoskeletal load among hospital nurses. The objectives of the present study were determination of frequency ofmusculoskeletal disorders (MSDs and its associatedfactors together with assessment of musculoskeletal loaddue to patient transfer by PTAI method in hospitalnursing staff of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, 400 randomlyselected nurses of SUMS hospital participated. Data were collected by anonymousdemographic and Nordic Musculoskeletal Disorders Questionnaires together with PTAI index checklist. Statistical analyses wereundertaken using SPSS, version 16. Age and job tenure means of participantswere 30.76±6.44 and 6.92±5.75 years, respectively. 88.2% of the nursing staffreported some forms of musculoskeletal symptoms during the 12 months prior tothe study. The results of PTAI index assessment demonstrated that in 4%, 8.5% and87.5% of the subjects, musculoskeletal load were at levels 1, 2 and 3,respectively. The results revealed that PTAI index score was significantlyassociated with musculoskeletal disorders occurrence (p<0.001.Musculoskeletal load was high among nurses with patient transfer activity. Age, nurse to bed ratio, marital status, shiftwork and PTAI score were associated risk factors for MSDs in the studiednursing staff.

  13. Perceptions of student nurses regarding the delivery of quality nursing care in katutura health centre, Windhoek and khomas region

    Hans Justus Amukugo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to explore and describe the perceptions of nursing students regarding the delivery of quality nursing care in Katutuura Health Centre, Windhoek, and Khomas Region. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research designs were used in this study. An individual interview was conducted on ten (10 4th year nursing students at UNAM main campus with regard to the delivery of quality nursing care. The data showed that most students expressed shortage of staff, high number of patient attendance, insufficient equipment and insufficient time as factors that affect the delivery of quality nursing care. Possible interventions regarding resource management should be put into consideration, where extra nursing staffs needed to be trained and distributed among hospitals and clinics in Namibia.

  14. 76 FR 77240 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    2011-12-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel, Pain Assessment for...., Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health,...

  15. Developing more positive attitudes towards mental health nursing in undergraduate students: part 1--does more theory help?

    Happell, B; Robins, A; Gough, K

    2008-08-01

    Negative attitudes towards mental illness and the mental health nursing profession have deterred many undergraduate nursing students from considering this area as an attractive career option. Positive clinical experience has been identified as the most important factor in producing more favourable attitudes. While the quantity of theory is identified as important, its impact on attitudes has not been examined through research. This study compared two groups of students undertaking different numbers of theoretical and clinical hours in mental health nursing to determine if this increase has an impact on nursing students' attitudes. Anonymous questionnaires were distributed to the total population of students following completion of the theoretical component of the programme but prior to clinical experience. The questionnaire was designed to assess: (1) nursing student's preparedness for and attitudes towards the mental health field; (2) consumers of mental health services; and (3) the students' career preferences. This first paper in a two-part series examines the impact of theoretical hours and suggests that while other attitudes are fairly similar between the two groups, the group exposed to more theory exhibited significantly more positive attitudes towards psychiatric nursing as a career. PMID:18638203

  16. Developing a manual for strengthening mental health nurses' clinical supervision

    Buus, Niels; Cassedy, Paul; Gonge, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report findings from a study aimed at developing the content and implementation of a manual for a research-based intervention on clinical supervision of mental health nursing staff. The intervention was designed to strengthen already existing supervision practices through...... educational preparation for supervision and systematic reflection on supervision. The intervention consists of three sessions and was implemented on two groups of mental health hospital staff. We present an outline of the manual and explain how the trial sessions made us adjust the preliminary manual. The...

  17. [The assessment of simulation practice learning in nursing education as feedback].

    dos Santos, Mateus Casanova; Leite, Maria Cecília Lorea

    2010-09-01

    This paper is a theoretical and reflective work that emerged as a cutting from a case study with qualitative, descriptive and participative approach. It refers to a research project entitled "Study of the Evaluation on Simulation Learning Trigger", carried out by the Morphofunctional Laboratory at the Nursing School from Federal University of Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The goal is to demonstrate the importance of the assessment of simulation practice learning as a feedback for the improvement and planning of education. Simulation is an attempt to reproduce the essential features of a real clinical setting. It identifies the assessment of learning as a potential curricular space for the reevaluation of the teaching-learning process and educational planning. The interdisciplinarity inherent in health issues need to be integrated to the processes of thinking feeling and executing nursing teaching practices in order to direct it to completeness, universality in health and to critical, reflective and self-directed training. PMID:21574342

  18. Human rights and health: challenges for training nurses in South Africa

    L London

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The need for health professionals to address their human rights obligations has emerged in the last decade both internationally as well as nationally following the findings of South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Support for human rights norms has become a priority for institutions as well as practitioners within the health sector. Training plays a crucial role in shaping health professional practice. In addition to creating a clear understanding of the linkages between human rights and health, educators can role-model how health professionals should act to support human rights. This article explores human rights derived from the South African Constitution in relation to the obligation on health professionals to respect, protect, promote and fulfill human rights. The implications of this commitment to human rights training of nurses are discussed, drawing on the authors’ nine years of experience in running courses for South African health professional educators. Themes include: developing core competencies for human rights in health professional curricula, identifying appropriate instructional methodologies and assessment tools suited to the content and context of human rights, and engaging the institutional environment for human rights teaching, at both the level of institutional culture and strategic implementation. At a time when there are increasing demands on the nursing profession to assume greater responsibility and develop versatility in its scope of practice, key challenges are posed for teaching and realising human rights.

  19. Comparison of general health status and sleep quality between nurses with fixed working shifts and nurses with rotating working shifts

    Mahnaz Ghaljeh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses are vulnerable to various sleep disorders because of the nature of their job. If nurses do not experience a good general health, they will not be able to do their job (patient care well. Materials and Method: We conducted a descriptive-comparative study in 180 nurses that were selected with the stratified sampling method who have been working in different work shift hours in teaching hospitals. We used PSQI and GHQ-28 questionnaire for collecting data.Results: The study results showed a statistically significant difference in sleep quality and general health of nurses based on two questionnaires (p=0.01; p=0.05 respectively. Conclusion: According to our findings we suggest fixed working shifts versus rotating one for nurses to reduce the side effects

  20. The Use of the Cultural Competence Assessment Tool (Ccatool In Community Nurses: The Pilot Study and Test-Retest Reliability

    Marios Vasiliou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses are responsible and accountable for their nursing practice and there is a need to be culturally and linguistically competent in all of their encounters. To be culturally competent community nurses should have the appropriate transcultural education. It is therefore important to assess the level of cultural competence of the community nurses, within their everyday practice.Aim: The aim of the article was the cultural adaptation of the cultural competence assessment tool based on Papadopoulos,Tilki and Taylor Model in a sample of Cypriot community nurses.Methodology: To explore the psychometric properties of the Cultural Competence Assessment Tool that has been distributed in a sample of 28 community nurses. Also, a pre and post-measurement has been applied as to assess the test-retest reliability of the tool.Results: The analysis has shown that the Cultural Competence Assessment Tool has good psychometric properties and it iseasy to understand by the community healthcare professionals. Results showed that 60.7% disagreed that there is the samelevel of cultural competency with other European countries and 89.3% reported that assessment of their cultural competence is needed. Using the special analysis software for this tool, the pilot study showed that Cypriot community nurses have some degree of cultural awareness.Conclusion: Culturally competent care is both a legal and a moral requirement for health and social care professionals.Valuing diversity in health and social care enhances the delivery and effectiveness of care for all people, whether they are members of a minority or a majority cultural group. Using an appropriate tool for assessing cultural competence is very important and useful for health professionals to be culturally competence.

  1. Investing in Nurses is a Prerequisite for Ensuring Universal Health Coverage.

    Kurth, Ann E; Jacob, Sheena; Squires, Allison P; Sliney, Anne; Davis, Sheila; Stalls, Suzanne; Portillo, Carmen J

    2016-01-01

    Nurses and midwives constitute the majority of the global health workforce and the largest health care expenditure. Efficient production, successful deployment, and ongoing retention based on carefully constructed policies regarding the career opportunities of nurses, midwives, and other providers in health care systems are key to ensuring universal health coverage. Yet nurses are constrained by practice regulations, workplaces, and career ladder barriers from contributing to primary health care delivery. Evidence shows that quality HIV care, comparable to that of physicians, is provided by trained nurses and associate clinicians, but many African countries' health systems remain dependent on limited numbers of physicians and fail to meet the demand for treatment. The World Health Organization endorses task sharing to ensure universal health coverage in HIV and maternal health, which requires an investment in nursing education, retention, and professional growth opportunities. Exemplars from Haiti, Rwanda, Republic of Georgia, and multi-country efforts are described. PMID:27086193

  2. Enabling professional development in mental health nursing: the role of clinical leadership.

    Ennis, G; Happell, B; Reid-Searl, K

    2015-10-01

    Clinical leadership is acknowledged as important to the nursing profession. While studies continue to identify its significance in contributing to positive outcomes for consumers, the role that clinical leadership has in enabling and supporting professional development in mental health nursing is poorly understood. This study utilized a grounded theory methodology to explore the characteristics clinicians consider important for clinical leadership and its significance for mental health nursing in day-to-day clinical practice. Individual face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with nurses working in mental health settings. Participants described the important role that clinical leaders play in enabling professional development of others through role modelling and clinical teaching. They describe how nurses, whom they perceive as clinical leaders, use role modelling and clinical teaching to influence the professional development of nursing staff and undergraduate nursing students. Attributes such as professionalism and honesty were seen, by participants, as enablers for clinical leaders in effectively and positively supporting the professional development of junior staff and undergraduate nurses in mental health nursing. This paper examines clinical leadership from the perspective of mental health nurses delivering care, and highlights the important role of clinical leaders in supporting professional development in mental health nursing. PMID:26010165

  3. Study on situational influences perceived in nursing discipline on health promotion: a qualitative study.

    Hosseini, Meimanat; Ashk Torab, Tahereh; Taghdisi, Mohammad Hossein; Esmaeili Vardanjani, Safar Ali

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives. Nurses, as behavioral models, play a key role in health promotion, and their attitudes towards health promotion highly influence their health and performance. The aim of this study is to explore nursing students' perception of studies in nursing discipline as a situational influence on health promotion. Materials and Methods. This study was conducted using directed content analysis, by means of 20 deep semistructured interviews with nursing students. The participants were selected on purposive sampling. Data was analyzed by the qualitative content analysis method. All interviews were recorded, transcribed, and reviewed, and all codes were extracted and summarized. The codes were subcategorized on the basis of centralization and were categorized after review of subcategories, and finally, a theme was determined. Findings. The theme of nursing discipline's situational influence on nursing students' health promotion was revealed. This theme consisted of "choosing the field," "unfavorable environmental factors," "negative impacts of studies in nursing discipline on health," "positive effects of studies in nursing discipline on health", "needs," "attractiveness (aesthetics)," and "coping with negative situational influences in nursing discipline." Conclusion. The perception of studies in nursing discipline as a health-promoting behavior is under influence of social environment. Considering the importance of the students' positive perception of the existing situation, it is essential to pay attention to their attitudes and perceptions so that they can provide better services to patients. PMID:24078880

  4. Assessing Suicide Risk in Veterans: The Role of the Nurse Practitioner

    Kathy Puskar; Giuliana Mazza

    2012-01-01

    Background: Statistics have shown that veteran men and women are at greater risk for suicide than the general population. In order to decrease the incidence of suicide in veterans, nurse practitioners (NPs) and other health care professionals must not only become more aware of the risk factors for veteran suicides but also develop strong psychiatric interviewing skills. Purpose: To discuss the risk factors associated with veteran suicide, the assessment tools to ensure a comprehensive...

  5. Rising to the challenge of health care reform with entrepreneurial and intrapreneurial nursing initiatives.

    Wilson, Anne; Whitaker, Nancy; Whitford, Deirdre

    2012-05-01

    Health reform worldwide is required due to the largely aging population, increase in chronic diseases, and rising costs. To meet these needs, nurses are being encouraged to practice to the full extent of their skills and take significant leadership roles in health policy, planning, and provision. This can involve entrepreneurial or intrapreneurial roles. Although nurses form the largest group of health professionals, they are frequently restricted in their scope of practice. Nurses can help to improve health services in a cost effective way, but to do so, they must be seen as equal partners in health service provision. This article provides a global perspective on evolving nursing roles for innovation in health care. A historical overview of entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship is offered. Included also is discussion of a social entrepreneurship approach for nursing, settings for nurse entre/intrapreneurship, and implications for research and practice. PMID:22686113

  6. Population-Focused Practice Competency Needs Among Public Health Nursing Leaders in Washington State.

    Espina, Christine R; Bekemeier, Betty; Storey-Kuyl, Marni

    2016-05-01

    practice. Describe the benefit of using practice models to assess staff readiness for adopting evidence-based guidelines or practice competencies. DISCLOSURE STATEMENT Neither the planners nor the authors have any conflicts of interest to disclose. Public health nurses (PHNs) need effective strategies to reduce health disparities, requiring a workforce that can practice with a population-focus across the continuum of care and with an ecological approach to health. A statewide leadership group of county-level PHN leaders in Washington assessed their training needs in population-focused knowledge and skills. Interview findings from 17 members were coded based on the Quad Council PHN Competencies. Recommendations were organized around the Push-Pull Infrastructure (PPI) practice model established to help bridge the practice-research gap. The PHN leaders in Washington State want to strengthen their own leadership skills and provide support to staff in transitioning to population-focused care. This article describes the assessment findings of PHN leaders' training needs using the PPI practice model and explores how the PPI might serve to develop evidence-based training for PHNs and local health department staff. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(5):212-219. PMID:27124075

  7. Knowledge, attitude and use of complementary and integrative health strategies:a preliminary survey of Iranian nurses

    Abbas Balouchi; Mozhgan Rahnama; Marie Hastings-Tolsma; Mohammadali M Shoja; Enayatollah Bolaydehyi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Disagreement exists regarding the need for knowledge about complementary and integrative health (CIH) strategies, as wel as for the need to consider such strategies in clinical nursing practice. OBJECTIVE: This study was conductedto assess the knowledge, attitude and use of CIH strategies among nurses in Iran. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: A cross-sectional study of nurses working in twohospitals of Zabol University ofMedicalSciences, in southeast Iran, was conducted from October 2014 to April 2015. The questionnaire, developed speciifcaly for this research, was used to assess the knowledge, attitude and use of CIH by nurses. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to interpret the survey responses. RESULTS: Most nurses (n=95, 60.5%) have average knowledge about CIH strategies with most holding a positive attitude about use (n=81, 51.6%). The majority (n=90, 57.3%) of nurses, however, never applied CIH methods. Where CIH was used, massage was most often clinicaly applied (n=129, 82.2%) and a large percentage believed it useful for treating ilness (n=136, 87.9%). Other CIH methods commonly used included prayer and herbal medicine. CONCLUSION:Nurses have positive attitudes about CIH though knowledge was typicaly weak. Educational programs should carefuly consider how knowledge about CIH methods could be strengthened within curricula.

  8. 78 FR 54255 - HRSA's Bureau of Health Professions Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship Program

    2013-09-03

    ... Education Nursing Traineeship Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS... Education Nursing Traineeship (AENT) program. Effective fiscal year (FY) 2014, AENT support for part-time... practitioners and nurse midwives. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joan Wasserman, DrPH, RN, Advanced...

  9. Participation in Practice A Review of Service User Involvement in Mental Health Nursing

    Lloyd, Marjorie

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To explore the current literature on service user participation in mental health nursing care and the effectiveness of participation practices. Background: Service user involvement in mental health nursing is a requirement of current practice including research and education. A review of the literature was undertaken as part of a research study on involvement practices in mental health nursing. Method: Original research documents were explored that related to participation in men...

  10. Scientific production on sexuality of elder women journals of nursing, public health and gerontology

    Beatriz de Carvalho Cavalheiro, Silvana Sidney Costa dos Santos

    2009-01-01

    Objective: to verify the scientific production on elder women, gender and sexuality in journals of Nursing, Public Health and Gerontology. Methods: a systematic review of literature, in journals of Nursing, Public Health and Gerontology in Brazil, in the years 2003 to 2007. Results: the 362 articles were pre-selected (111 in nursing, 95 in Public Health and 156 in Gerontology), of these, seven focus on elderly women, gender and sexuality. It was possible to understand that sexuality and gende...

  11. Child health nurses in the Solomon Islands: lessons for the Pacific and other developing countries

    Colquhoun Samantha; Ogaoga Divi; Tamou Mathias; Nasi Titus; Subhi Rami; Duke Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To understand the roles of nurses with advanced training in paediatrics in the Solomon Islands, and the importance of these roles to child health. To understand how adequately equipped child health nurses feel for these roles, to identify the training needs, difficulties and future opportunities. Design Semi-structured interviews. Settings Tertiary hospital, district hospitals and health clinics in the Solomon Islands. Participants Twenty-one paediatric nurses were intervi...

  12. The health system consequences of agency nursing and moonlighting in South Africa

    Rispel, Laetitia C.; Blaauw, Duane

    2015-01-01

    Background: Worldwide, there is an increased reliance on casual staff in the health sector. Recent policy attention in South Africa has focused on the interrelated challenges of agency nursing and moonlighting in the health sector.Objective: This paper examines the potential health system consequences of agency nursing and moonlighting among South African nurses.Methods: During 2010, a cluster random sample of 80 hospitals was selected in four South African provinces. On the survey day, all n...

  13. Primary health-care nurses and Internet health information-seeking: Access, barriers and quality checks.

    Gilmour, Jean; Strong, Alison; Chan, Helen; Hanna, Sue; Huntington, Annette

    2016-02-01

    Online information is a critical resource for evidence-based practice and patient education. This study aimed to establish New Zealand nurses' access and evaluation of online health information in the primary care context using a postal questionnaire survey; there were 630 respondents from a random sample of 931 nurses. The majority of respondents were satisfied with work access to online information (84.5%, n = 501) and searched for online information at least several times a week (57.5%, n = 343). The major barrier to online information seeking was insufficient time, but 68 respondents had no work online information access. The level of nursing qualification was significantly correlated with computer confidence and information quality checking. A range of information evaluation approaches was used. Most nurses in study accessed and evaluated Internet information in contrast to the findings of earlier studies, but there were barriers preventing universal integration into practice. PMID:25355072

  14. Health technology assessment in Finland

    Mäkelä, Marjukka; Roine, Risto P

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1990s, health policy makers in Finland have been supportive of evidence-based medicine and approaches to implement its results. The Finnish Office for Health Technology Assessment (Finohta) has grown from a small start in 1995 to a medium-sized health technology assessment (HTA) agency,...... HTA findings. The Managed Uptake of Medical Methods program links the hospital districts to agree on introduction of technologies. The Ohtanen database provides Finnish-language summaries of major assessments made in other countries....

  15. Differences between Irish and Australian psychiatric nurses' family-focused practice in adult mental health services

    Grant, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric nurses\\' practice with parents who have mental illness, their children and families is an important issue internationally. This study provides a comparison of Irish and Australian psychiatric nurses\\' family-focused practices in adult mental health services. Three hundred and forty three nurses across Ireland and 155 from Australia completed the Family Focused Mental Health Practice Questionnaire. Cross-country comparisons revealed significant differences, in terms of family-focused skill, knowledge, confidence and practice. Australian psychiatric nurses engaged in higher family-focused practice compared to Irish nurses. The comparative differences between countries may be attributable to differences in training, workplace support and policy.

  16. Why do Norwegian nurses leave the public health service to practice CAM?

    Johannessen, Berit

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores a number of issues associated with the recent increase in nurses choosing to leave the Norwegian health care system in order to become independent practitioners of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The paper suggests that in Norway, nurses perceive medical hegemony continues to persist. Nurses perceive restrictions in their ability to develop their professional roles and status. CAM would appear to offer many nurses, the opportunity to develop their clinica...

  17. Extent of East-African Nurse Leaders’ Participation in Health Policy Development

    Shariff, N.; Potgieter, E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports part of a bigger study whose aim was to develop an empowerment model that could be used to enhance nurse leaders' participation in health policy development. A Delphi survey was applied which included the following criteria: expert panelists, iterative rounds, statistical analysis, and consensus building. The expert panelists were purposively selected and included national nurse leaders in leadership positions at the nursing professional associations, nursing regulatory bod...

  18. Training Needs Assessment for Leaders in Nursing Based on Comparison of Competency Models

    Kvas Andreja

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The main purpose behind the formation of leadership competency models must be the improvement of leadership. A competency model should serve as one of the tools for selecting the most suitable leaders, appraising their work, assessing training needs and preparing programmes of functional and formal education. The objective of this research is to assess the training needs of leaders in health care. A comparison of leadership competency models between different professional groups should serve as one of the tools with which to assess the training needs of various levels of leaders. Design/Methodology/Approach: A descriptive study using a survey design was conducted on 141 nurse leaders in Slovenia. Respondents indicated to what extent each of 95 different behaviours was characteristic of a person at their leadership level. Results: The most important competence dimensions (groups of behaviours for leaders in health care are (1 at the first - top leadership level: strategic thinking, openness to change and responsibility; (2 for leaders at the second - middle leadership level: relations with co-workers, animation, resistance to stress; and (3 for leaders at the third leadership level: realisation skills, execution of procedures, communication. Training needs assessments were done for three leadership levels in nursing care. Conclusions: The greatest need for training of nurse leaders can be observed at the third leadership level. Special training programmes should be organised in the competency areas of realisation skills, execution of procedures, communication, education and ethics

  19. A Faculty Peer Network for Integrating Consumer Health Solutions in Nursing Education: Contextual Influences and Perspectives.

    Doyle, Glynda

    2016-01-01

    The Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing and Canada Health Infoway recently launched a national project to facilitate the integration of digital and consumer health solutions into undergraduate nursing programs across Canada. Led by eleven nursing faculty members with expertise in informatics, the Digital Health Nursing Faculty Peer Network provided a forum for mentorship and support to other nursing faculty (72) across Canada and facilitated the development of a number of strategies to advance the incorporation of digital health content into undergraduate nursing curricula (e.g., the creation of a Faculty Toolkit for teaching Consumer Health Solutions). In this panel presentation, contextual and regional influences as well as specific perspectives related to the experience of each of the panelists within the Faculty Peer Network project will be outlined and discussed. PMID:27332275

  20. How much time do nurses have for patients? a longitudinal study quantifying hospital nurses' patterns of task time distribution and interactions with health professionals

    Westbrook Johanna I; Duffield Christine; Li Ling; Creswick Nerida J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Time nurses spend with patients is associated with improved patient outcomes, reduced errors, and patient and nurse satisfaction. Few studies have measured how nurses distribute their time across tasks. We aimed to quantify how nurses distribute their time across tasks, with patients, in individual tasks, and engagement with other health care providers; and how work patterns changed over a two year period. Methods Prospective observational study of 57 nurses for 191.3 hour...

  1. Updating the definition and role of public health nursing to advance and guide the specialty.

    Bekemeier, Betty; Walker Linderman, Tessa; Kneipp, Shawn; Zahner, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    National changes in the context for public health services are influencing the nature of public health nursing practice. Despite this, the document that defines public health nursing as a specialty--The Definition and Role of Public Health Nursing--has remained in wide use since its publication in 1996 without a review or update. With support from the American Public Health Association (APHA) Public Health Nursing Section, a national Task Force, was formed in November 2012 to update the definition of public health nursing, using processes that reflected deliberative democratic principles. A yearlong process was employed that included a modified Delphi technique and various modes of engagement such as online discussion boards, questionnaires, and public comment to review. The resulting 2013 document consisted of a reaffirmation of the one-sentence 1996 definition, while updating supporting documentation to align with the current social, economic, political, and health care context. The 2013 document was strongly endorsed by vote of the APHA Public Health Nursing Section elected leadership. The 2013 definition and document affirm the relevance of a population-focused definition of public health nursing to complex systems addressed in current practice and articulate critical roles of public health nurses (PHN) in these settings. PMID:25284433

  2. The level at which registered nurses utilise the nursing process in local-level primary health care practice in Namibia

    Hermine Iita

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the use of the Nursing Process by registered nurses in local level primary health care practice in Namibia. The findings were used to serve as a basis to develop strategies to support registered nurses in their daily local PHC practice. A quantitative research approach using a survey design with self-report questionnaire was used. The population consisted of two groups. The first group consisted of 239 registered nurses working in Clinics, health Centers and in Outreach Programs. The second group consisted of 39 registered nurses supervisors of the registered nurses in these facilities. Quantitative, descriptive analysis was used to summarize and organize data using tables and figures as well as t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA, where applicable. Five main problem areas were identified. It was concluded that strategies needed to be developed to support registered nurses in their daily local Primary health care practice. The development of strategies will be dealt with in a different paper.

  3. The Effects of Family Nursing and Family Medicine Clinical Rotations on Nursing and Medical Students' Self-Efficacy for Health Promotion Counseling.

    Laschinger, Heather K. Spence; McWilliam, Carol L.; Weston, Wayne

    1999-01-01

    Pretest-posttest results from 66 students in community nursing and 71 medical students in a family practice rotation showed that nursing students had significantly higher self-efficacy for health counseling at the posttest and 3 months later. Nurses' self-efficacy scores were significantly related to use of health promotion principles. (SK)

  4. A study of job satisfaction of nursing and allied health graduates from a Mid-Atlantic university.

    Lyons, Kevin J; Lapin, Jennifer; Young, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    There have been numerous changes in the health care system, including cost-containment efforts, the increased growth of managed care, and shortages of many health professionals. It is important to assess the impact these changes are having on the quality of health care delivery and the way various health professionals view their jobs. To accomplish this assessment, a sample of experienced nursing and allied health professionals were asked to provide their assessment of positive and negative changes in the health system over a 5-year period. They also were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction with their profession, their current job, and various aspects of that job. A Health Care Environment Survey was mailed to six groups of graduates of a mid-Atlantic college of health professions. Three of the groups had been in practice for 5 years, and three of the groups had been in practice for 10 years. The survey asked respondents to assess the magnitude of certain changes in the health system over the previous 5 years and to provide an assessment of their satisfaction with their current job. A total of 1,610 surveys were mailed, and 787 were returned for a rate of 49%. Nursing and allied health professionals who responded to the survey reported that there have been many more negative than positive changes in the health care system, including less job security, efficiency, and time available to spend with individual patients and increases in workload, paperwork, and control of health care by insurance companies. Even with these negative changes, nurses and allied health professionals report a high level of satisfaction with their jobs. In investigating the aspects of their jobs that were most related to satisfaction, having a feeling of worthwhile accomplishment from their job, opportunities for personal and professional growth, recognition and satisfaction with their workload were found to be the best predictors of job satisfaction. PMID:12665288

  5. Clinical reasoning in nursing, a think-aloud study using virtual patients - a base for an innovative assessment.

    Forsberg, Elenita; Ziegert, Kristina; Hult, Håkan; Fors, Uno

    2014-04-01

    In health-care education, it is important to assess the competencies that are essential for the professional role. To develop clinical reasoning skills is crucial for nursing practice and therefore an important learning outcome in nursing education programmes. Virtual patients (VPs) are interactive computer simulations of real-life clinical scenarios and have been suggested for use not only for learning, but also for assessment of clinical reasoning. The aim of this study was to investigate how experienced paediatric nurses reason regarding complex VP cases and how they make clinical decisions. The study was also aimed to give information about possible issues that should be assessed in clinical reasoning exams for post-graduate students in diploma specialist paediatric nursing education. The information from this study is believed to be of high value when developing scoring and grading models for a VP-based examination for the specialist diploma in paediatric nursing education. Using the think-aloud method, data were collected from 30 RNs working in Swedish paediatric departments, and child or school health-care centres. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. The results indicate that experienced nurses try to consolidate their hypotheses by seeing a pattern and judging the value of signs, symptoms, physical examinations, laboratory tests and radiology. They show high specific competence but earlier experience of similar cases was also of importance for the decision making. The nurses thought it was an innovative assessment focusing on clinical reasoning and clinical decision making. They thought it was an enjoyable way to be assessed and that all three main issues could be assessed using VPs. In conclusion, VPs seem to be a possible model for assessing the clinical reasoning process and clinical decision making, but how to score and grade such exams needs further research. PMID:23938093

  6. The Development Process of eHealth Strategy for Nurses in Finland.

    Ahonen, Outi; Kouri, Pirkko; Kinnunen, Ulla-Mari; Junttila, Kristiina; Liljamo, Pia; Arifulla, Dinah; Saranto, Kaija

    2016-01-01

    Growing use of information and communication technology (ICT) demands have caused a need for nursing to strengthen the knowledge, skills and competences related to ICT in health (eHealth) and define its versatile roles. The Finnish Nurses Association (FNA) named a group of eHealth experts from various professional fields that are closely connected to nursing e.g. nursing practice, higher education, nursing research and administration. The main purpose was to describe nurses' contribution to the national strategy concerning eHealth development and implementation in health and social care. The group searched for answers, discussed strategic issues, wrote drafts, and sent texts for open commentary circles. The chosen themes of the eHealth strategies deal with the role of the client, nursing practice, ethical aspects education and eHealth competences, nursing leadership, knowledge management and research and development. The article describes the strategic work and the structure of eHealth strategy of nurses in Finland. PMID:27332191

  7. Effect of Prior Health-Related Employment on the Registered Nurse Workforce Supply.

    Yoo, Byung-kwan; Lin, Tzu-chun; Kim, Minchul; Sasaki, Tomoko; Spetz, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses (RN) who held prior health-related employment in occupations other than licensed practical or vocational nursing (LPN/LVN) are reported to have increased rapidly in the past decades. Researchers examined whether prior health-related employment affects RN workforce supply. A cross-sectional bivariate probit model using the 2008 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses was esti- mated. Prior health-related employment in relatively lower-wage occupations, such as allied health, clerk, or nursing aide, was positively associated with working s an RN. ~>Prior health-related employ- ment in relatively higher-wage categories, such as a health care manager or LPN/LVN, was positively associated with working full-time as an RN. Policy implications are to promote an expanded career ladder program and a nursing school admission policy that targets non-RN health care workers with an interest in becoming RNs. PMID:27055308

  8. A Review of Design and Policy Interventions to Promote Nurses' Restorative Breaks in Health Care Workplaces.

    Nejati, Adeleh; Shepley, Mardelle; Rodiek, Susan

    2016-02-01

    The nursing profession in the United States is on the precipice of a crisis. Nurses are essential to the health care industry, and maintaining quality nursing care is a primary concern of today's health care managers. Health care facilities report high rates of staff burnout and turnover, and interest in the nursing profession among younger students is declining. Health care leaders must improve nurses' job satisfaction, performance, and retention. However, they often overlook the need for nurses' respite and underestimate the value of well-designed staff break areas. An exhaustive and systematic literature search was conducted in the summer of 2014, and all studies found on the topic were reviewed for their relevance and quality of evidence. The existing literature about the main causes of nurses' fatigue, barriers that prevent nurses from taking restorative breaks, and consequences of nurses' fatigue for staff, patient, and facility outcomes demonstrates the pressing need for interventions that improve nurses' working conditions. Additional literature on the restorative effects of breaks and the value of well-designed break areas indicates that efforts to improve breakroom design can play an important role in improving nurses' job satisfaction and performance. PMID:26814229

  9. Burnout in health-care professionals during reorganizations and downsizing. A cohort study in nurses

    Hall-Lord Marie-Louise

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burnout is a psychological reaction triggered by interaction between personal characteristics and stress factors. Reorganizations and downsizing with increased workload imply stress for health-care professionals. This is a study of burnout in nurses during a period with two comprehensive reorganizations. Methods In this quasi-experimental retrospective cohort study, burnout was assessed in nurses with long work experience in three surveys during a 30 months' period with two comprehensive reorganizations and downsizing of a hospital unit with mostly seriously ill patients with cancer. Burnout was measured with Bergen Burnout Indicator (BBI at each survey, and "Sense of Coherence" (SOC with Antonovsky's questionnaire at the last survey. Results One man and 45 women aged 30 to 65 years were invited to the surveys. There was a significant increase in burnout during the study period, the mean increase in BBI-score was 12.5 pr year (p Conclusions There was a significant development of burnout in a group of nurses during a period with two reorganizations and downsizing. Burnout was associated with low SOC. Working with seriously ill patients with cancer has probably made the nurses exceptionally vulnerable to the stress and workload related to the reorganizations.

  10. A critical analysis of Neuman's systems model in relation to public health nursing.

    Haggart, M

    1993-12-01

    The public health movement is an old discipline being given new life and meaning based on a recognition of continuing health problems associated with social inequalities. The 'new public health' movement has goals which are closely aligned to those of the World Health Organization in their Health for All by 2000 initiative which represent a collective approach to health in contrast to the current political emphasis on individual responsibility for health. Public health nursing is a relatively new concept in Britain but posts are beginning to be established in many areas where nurses are working in partnership with communities in a public health capacity. At a time when this area of nursing is in its relative infancy it is appropriate to develop a clear philosophy and framework and to examine potential strategies. This paper sets out to contribute to the development of this discipline by critically analysing the work of Betty Neuman to determine its utility for public health nursing. PMID:8132923

  11. Economic valuation of health care services in public health systems: a study about Willingness to Pay (WTP for nursing consultations.

    Jesús Martín-Fernández

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identifying the economic value assigned by users to a particular health service is of principal interest in planning the service. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perception of economic value of nursing consultation in primary care (PC by its users. METHODS AND RESULTS: Economic study using contingent valuation methodology. A total of 662 users of nursing consultation from 23 health centers were included. Data on demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, health needs, pattern of usage, and satisfaction with provided service were compiled. The validity of the response was evaluated by an explanatory mixed-effects multilevel model in order to assess the factors associated with the response according to the welfare theory. Response reliability was also evaluated. Subjects included in the study indicated an average Willingness to Pay (WTP of €14.4 (CI 95%: €13.2-15.5; median €10 and an average Willingness to Accept [Compensation] (WTA of €20.9 (CI 95%: €19.6-22.2; median €20. Average area income, personal income, consultation duration, home visit, and education level correlated with greater WTP. Women and older subjects showed lower WTP. Fixed parameters explained 8.41% of the residual variability, and response clustering in different health centers explained 4-6% of the total variability. The influence of income on WTP was different in each center. The responses for WTP and WTA in a subgroup of subjects were consistent when reassessed after 2 weeks (intraclass correlation coefficients 0.952 and 0.893, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The economic value of nursing services provided within PC in a public health system is clearly perceived by its user. The perception of this value is influenced by socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of the subjects and their environment, and by the unique characteristics of the evaluated service. The method of contingent valuation is useful for making explicit this perception

  12. Economic Valuation of Health Care Services in Public Health Systems: A Study about Willingness to Pay (WTP) for Nursing Consultations

    Martín-Fernández, Jesús; del Cura-González, Mª Isabel; Rodríguez-Martínez, Gemma; Ariza-Cardiel, Gloria; Zamora, Javier; Gómez-Gascón, Tomás; Polentinos-Castro, Elena; Pérez-Rivas, Francisco Javier; Domínguez-Bidagor, Julia; Beamud-Lagos, Milagros; Tello-Bernabé, Mª Eugenia; Conde-López, Juan Francisco; Aguado-Arroyo, Óscar; Bayona, Mª Teresa Sanz-; Gil-Lacruz, Ana Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Background Identifying the economic value assigned by users to a particular health service is of principal interest in planning the service. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perception of economic value of nursing consultation in primary care (PC) by its users. Methods and Results Economic study using contingent valuation methodology. A total of 662 users of nursing consultation from 23 health centers were included. Data on demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, health needs, pattern of usage, and satisfaction with provided service were compiled. The validity of the response was evaluated by an explanatory mixed-effects multilevel model in order to assess the factors associated with the response according to the welfare theory. Response reliability was also evaluated. Subjects included in the study indicated an average Willingness to Pay (WTP) of €14.4 (CI 95%: €13.2–15.5; median €10) and an average Willingness to Accept [Compensation] (WTA) of €20.9 (CI 95%: €19.6–22.2; median €20). Average area income, personal income, consultation duration, home visit, and education level correlated with greater WTP. Women and older subjects showed lower WTP. Fixed parameters explained 8.41% of the residual variability, and response clustering in different health centers explained 4–6% of the total variability. The influence of income on WTP was different in each center. The responses for WTP and WTA in a subgroup of subjects were consistent when reassessed after 2 weeks (intraclass correlation coefficients 0.952 and 0.893, respectively). Conclusions The economic value of nursing services provided within PC in a public health system is clearly perceived by its user. The perception of this value is influenced by socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of the subjects and their environment, and by the unique characteristics of the evaluated service. The method of contingent valuation is useful for making explicit this perception of value of

  13. Work Related Stress, Burnout, Job Satisfaction and General Health of Nurses

    Natasha Khamisa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate. Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Staff issues are best associated with burnout as well as job satisfaction. Burnout explained the highest amount of variance in mental health of nurses. These are known to compromise productivity and performance, as well as affect the quality of patient care. Issues, such as security risks in the workplace, affect job satisfaction and health of nurses. Although this is more salient to developing contexts it is important in developing strategies and intervention programs towards improving nurse and patient related outcomes.

  14. Work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses.

    Khamisa, Natasha; Oldenburg, Brian; Peltzer, Karl; Ilic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate). Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Staff issues are best associated with burnout as well as job satisfaction. Burnout explained the highest amount of variance in mental health of nurses. These are known to compromise productivity and performance, as well as affect the quality of patient care. Issues, such as security risks in the workplace, affect job satisfaction and health of nurses. Although this is more salient to developing contexts it is important in developing strategies and intervention programs towards improving nurse and patient related outcomes. PMID:25588157

  15. Validating the 'intervention wheel' in the context of Irish public health nursing.

    McDonald, Anne; Frazer, Kate; Duignan, Catriona; Healy, Marianne; Irving, Annette; Marteinsson, Patricia; Molloy, Brenda; McNicholas, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Illuminating the full range of nursing actions is a challenge for nurses globally; the invisibility of nursing and of public health nursing in particular is well documented. Visibility can be enhanced by identifying core functions of nursing and matching corresponding levels of interventions and outcomes. This is a priority for the contemporary Irish public health nursing (PHN) service. In the United States, public health nurses have developed an 'Intervention Wheel' naming public health interventions at community, systems and individual/family levels. This aimed to make visible the core functions of PHN practice. The values and beliefs underpinning the Intervention Wheel have been shown to capture the essence of public health nursing within the European context. In total, US nurses described 17 Wheel interventions by recording stories from practice. Owing to concern that the public health aspect of their role was not only invisible but was at risk of erosion, Irish PHNs decided to replicate this storytelling approach to provide evidence for and authenticate the 17 interventions on the Intervention Wheel from their day-to-day public health practice. PMID:25754782

  16. Conceptualizing health assets in a nursing context : Synthesis of findings from multiple perspectives

    2012-01-01

    Health assets, or peoples’ capacities and strengths, have been recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) as being necessary to strengthen and maintain health and wellness. However, the concept of health assets has not been well defined in recent years and there is little consensus. The purpose of this doctoral dissertation was to synthesize findings about health assets based on conceptualization and knowledge from various perspectives: literature, patients and nurses, and the nursing ...

  17. Determinants of the intention of elementary school nurses to adopt a redefined role in health promotion at school

    Godin Gaston

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quest for greater efficiency in the provision of primary healthcare services and the implementation of a "health-promoting school" approach encourage the optimal redefinition of the role of school nurses. School nurses are viewed as professionals who might be significant actors in the promotion of youth health. The aim of this study was to identify the determinants of the intention of elementary school nurses to adopt a new health-promotion role as a strategic option for the health-promoting school. Methods This study was based on an extended version of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB. A total of 251 respondents (response rate of 70% from 42 school health programs across the Province of Québec completed a mail survey regarding their intention to adopt the proposed health-promotion role. Multiple hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between key independent variables and intention. A discriminant analysis of the beliefs was performed to identify the main targets of action. Results A total of 73% of respondents expressed a positive intention to accept to play the proposed role. The main predictors were perceived behavioural control (β = 0.36, moral norm (β = 0.27, attitude (β = 0.24, and subjective norm (β = 0.21 (ps Conclusions Results suggest that leadership is a skill that should be addressed to increase the ability of school nurses to assume the proposed role. Findings also indicate that public health administrators need to ensure adequate nurse staffing in the schools in order to increase the proportion of nurses willing to play such a role and avoid burnout among these human resources.

  18. Primary health care in Spain and Catalonia: a nursing model perspective.

    López, Carmen Caja

    2011-12-01

    Many years have passed since the Health Care Reform in Spain, nevertheless there are still questions about the achievements in this health care level, as well as the aspects and expectations that are still pending for the medical discipline as well as for nursing. The present article analyzes whether the innovation plans recently put into action in different communities, particularly that taking place in Catalonia. Furthermore, it also addressed the current academic development in nursing in Spain, the development of the different nursing areas and aspects related to nursing prescription, screening and care to acute pathologies in Primary Health Care. PMID:22569662

  19. Emotional Intelligence: A Critical Evaluation of the Literature with Implications for Mental Health Nursing Leadership.

    Powell, Kimberly R; Mabry, Jennifer Lynn; Mixer, Sandra J

    2015-05-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is necessary for the development of interpersonal and professional competence in nurses. We argue that the concept of emotional intelligence has particular relevance for mental health nursing leadership. In this critique, we examine the recent empirical evidence (2010-2014) related to emotional intelligence, in general, and nursing, specifically. Correlations between emotional intelligence and better overall health, increased work satisfaction, higher spiritual well-being, and decreased risk of job burnout are noted. We offer suggestions for mental health nurse leaders in developing successful project management teams and improving retention of current leaders. We also provide suggestions for future research. PMID:26091240

  20. [Social determinants of health: community features and nurse work in family health care].

    Sant'Anna, Cynthia Fontella; Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Cardoso, Leticia Silveira; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Soares, Jorgana Fernanda de Souza

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the Social Determinants of Health Care which emerge in nurses' statements as they characterize the community, analyzing its relation to the work carried out by them. It is an exploratory and descriptive study containing a qualitative analysis in the theoretical categories of the determinants. We used a semi-structured interview, recorded with the permission of the 65 nurses of the Family Health Care, members of the 3rd Regional Health Care Coordination of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. It has been shown the inter- and intra-relation in the health determinant factors, obtaining 104 citations for the anatomo-physiological features of the corresponding individuals/community to the proximal correspondents and in association, mainly, to the work carried out by the nurses. For intermediate determinants there were 27 citations and, for distals, 166, with predominant reference to the territorial localization of communities in rural areas and peripheries. The nurses have stated a narrow relation between the proximal features and the work carried out by them, as well as the connection with other determinants in the relation with the process of getting sick. PMID:20839542

  1. Managing parental groups during early childhood: New challenges faced by Swedish child health-care nurses.

    Lefèvre, Åsa; Pia, Lundqvist; Eva, Drevenhorn; Inger, Hallström

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe child health centre (CHC) nurses' views of managing parental groups during early childhood. All 311 CHC nurses working within the Swedish CHC system in one county were asked to complete a web-based questionnaire. Findings showed that although the CHC nurses were experienced, several found group leadership challenging and difficult. The need for specialized groups for young parents, single parents and parents whose first language was not Swedish was identified by 57% of the nurses. The CHC nurses found the participation of fathers in their parental groups to be low (an estimate of 10-20%), and 30% of the nurses made special efforts to make the fathers participate. Education in group dynamics and group leadership can strengthen CHC nurses in managing parental groups. It is recommended that specialized parental groups are organized by a few family centres so CHC nurses can develop their skill in managing such groups. PMID:24298189

  2. Gamification: An Innovative Teaching-Learning Strategy for the Digital Nursing Students in a Community Health Nursing Course.

    Day-Black, Crystal; Merrill, Earline B; Konzelman, Lois; Williams, Tammie T; Hart, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Serious games have "re-emerged" as innovative teaching-learning strategies that researchers have shown to be effective in improving student learning outcomes. "Serious games" refer to games that are driven by educational goals, not entertainment. The use of serious games as part of the teaching-learning experience in nursing education fits into the philosophy and strategies of active learning. The "digital" nursing student needs engagement, stimulation, realism, and entertainment not more readings and Powerpoint supplements in the classroom to support learning. Nursing faculty at a mid-Atlantic Historical Black College and University introduced "serious gaming" technology into a Community Health Nursing course by using two web-based gamed simulations, Outbreak at WatersEdge: A Public Health Discovery Game, and EnviroRisk. This innovation proved to be effective in reinforcing learning and improving student learning outcomes. PMID:26665503

  3. Conception of undergraduate nursing students on the practice of health education on first aid

    Marília Rosa de Oliveira; Ana Rita Arrigo Leonel; Juliana Helena Montezeli; Andréia Bendine Gastaldi; Eleine Aparecida Penha Martins; Cristiano Caveião

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to present the conception of undergraduate nursing students participating in an integrated project on health education on first aid. Methods: qualitative research conducted at the Universidade Estadual de Londrina with five senior nursing students, participating in the project “Nursing in clinical and surgical urgent and emergency care.” We applied semi-structured interviews with content analysis. Results: the following categories emerged: Health education as a facilitator for acad...

  4. Effects of shadowing and supervised on-the-job inductions on mental health nurses

    Kamau, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Supervised on-the-job inductions or inductions through shadowing can help new nurses gain realistic information about the job role, the organization and procedures within it. This study investigated whether the induction of new mental health nurses is a key predictor of job performance, attitudes towards the organization and work-related stress. Data from 5337 mental health nurses who took part in the NHS Staff Survey of 2011 were analysed. Results showed that the more the work-related stress...

  5. Work Related Stress, Burnout, Job Satisfaction and General Health of Nurses

    Natasha Khamisa; Brian Oldenburg; Karl Peltzer; Dragan Ilic

    2015-01-01

    Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate). Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was us...

  6. A review of research and nursing management of mental health problems in pregnancy and motherhood

    Jarosinski JM

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Judith M Jarosinski,1 Jane A Fox21Nursing Department, Henson School of Science, Salisbury University, Salisbury, MD, 2School of Nursing, College of Health and Human Services, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Wilmington, NC, USAAbstract: In this article, the authors explore the risks pregnant women experience due to mental illness and intimate partner violence (IPV and discuss the nursing role involved in the management of their care. For many women, pregnancy is a time of hopeful anticipation, yet for others, pregnancy reflects a new or an ongoing struggle with mental illness. The sequelae of untreated mental illness can be as severe as infanticide, maternal suicide, lack of maternal attachment, and inability to parent. Newborns whose mothers misuse alcohol and drugs are at risk of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and neonatal addiction syndrome. Women who live with IPV risk their physical and mental well-being as well as the safety of their newborn. Implications for practice include the use of assessment tools early and during the treatment trajectory; otherwise, mental illness and IPV in pregnancy would go undetected/untreated. Identifying postpartum depression early is key toward providing timely care for both the mother and infant; yet, few obstetric practices use a depression assessment tool such as the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. During the initial intake assessment, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale can provide the means of early treatment through targeted assessment. Further implications include specialized services for substance-misusing pregnant women whose issues are different and separate from those of men, integration of services to address their multifaceted needs, and educating nurses to the reality of comorbidity as the norm rather than the rare occurrence, with a truly holistic approach that diminishes stigma. Keywords: intimate partner violence, mental illness, pregnancy, serious mental illness, Women

  7. Assessing the Impact of a Family Planning Nurse Training Program in Egypt.

    Halawa, M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a study of the impact of a nurse training program for family planning that stresses the development of nurses' counseling skills. Found an association between improved family planning training for nurses and positive changes in family planning knowledge, attitudes, and behavior among women attending Egyptian Ministry of Health clinics.…

  8. The impact of caring for persons living with HIV and AIDS on the mental health of nurses in the Limpopo Province

    M. Davhana-Maselesele

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the impact of caring for AIDS sufferers on the mental health of nurses. This assessment was measured against the level of burnout, stress and depression among 174 nurses caring for people living with HIV and AIDS in Limpopo Province, South Africa. A structured questionnaire was used for data collection. The questionnaire incorporated the AIDS Impact Scale (AIS), Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the participants’ demographic and professio...

  9. Influence of health, lifestyle, working conditions and sociodemography on early retirement among nurses. The Danish Nurse Cohort Study

    Friis, Karina; Ekholm, Ola; Hundrup, Yrsa;

    2007-01-01

    . METHODS: The study was based on 5,538 nurses in the age of 51-59 who in 1993 completed a questionnaire on health, lifestyle, working environment, and sociodemographic factors. The survey information was combined with longitudinal data from the Danish Integrated Database for Labor Market Research compiled......AIMS: The aim of the study was to analyze the relationship between health, lifestyle, work-related and sociodemographic factors, and older nurses' exit from the labor market to Post-Employment Wage (PEW). PEW is an early retirement scheme to make it possible for workers to retire at the age of 60...... retired or was unemployed. CONCLUSIONS: The retirement age among nurses is influenced by a number of sociodemographic, work-related, and health-related factors. Poor health, low income, living outside the Copenhagen area, being married, having a spouse who is outside the labor force, and working...

  10. Pinnacle Health / Zynx Health / Siemens Medical Solutions A Study of Integration of Evidence Based Nursing Content

    Matter, Sheri; Brown, Cindy; Button, Patricia S.; Kennedy, Rosemary

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, Pinnacle Health System, Zynx Health, and Siemens Medical Solutions developed a partnership to conduct a study to explore the opportunities and challenges associated with the integration of evidence-based knowledge within the EHR with the goal of creating repeatable methodologies for integrating nursing knowledge within the EHR. The two-phase study involved access to referential evidence-based content, as well as integration of customized evidence-based plans of care within the docume...

  11. Global health diplomacy: an integrative review of the literature and implications for nursing.

    Hunter, Anita; Wilson, Lynda; Stanhope, Marcia; Hatcher, Barbara; Hattar, Marianne; Hilfinger Messias, Deanne K; Powell, Dorothy

    2013-01-01

    The increasing interconnectedness of the world and the factors that affect health lay the foundation for the evolving practice of global health diplomacy. There has been limited discussion in the nursing literature about the concept of global health diplomacy or the role of nurses in such initiatives. A discussion of this concept is presented here by the members of a Task Force on Global Health Diplomacy of the American Academy of Nursing Expert Panel on Global Nursing and Health (AAN EPGNH). The purpose of this article is to present an integrative review of literature on the concept of global health diplomacy and to identify implications of this emerging field for nursing education, practice, and research. The steps proposed by Whittemore and Knafl (2005) were adapted and applied to the integrative review of theoretical and descriptive articles about the concept of global health diplomacy. This review included an analysis of the historical background, definition, and challenges of global health diplomacy and suggestions about the preparation of global health diplomats. The article concludes with a discussion of implications for nursing practice, education, and research. The Task Force endorses the definition of global health diplomacy proposed by Adams, Novotny, and Leslie (2008) but recommends that further dialogue and research is necessary to identify opportunities and educational requirements for nurses to contribute to the emerging field of global health diplomacy. PMID:22999856

  12. Is it time for a public health nursing approach to aging?

    Sullivan-Marx, Eileen M

    2013-09-01

    Following the enactment of Medicare in 1965, access to health care for older adults in the United States improved. At the same time, nurse researchers and policy leaders developed individual and family-centered care interventions and programs that led to improvements in quality of health and life. In the next 20 to 30 years, U.S. and global projections of an expanding aging cohort with potential increases in health care needs, coupled with continued nursing shortage projections, present challenges and opportunities to enhance gerontological nursing's approach to aging care. Invigorating a public health nursing focus on the needs of a population of older adults could enhance nursing's ability to create policy and programs of care that promote quality of life for older adults and their families. Nurses using public health approaches can lead and support social policies regarding the physical environment and daily life circumstances that contribute to health equity. Heightened attention to competencies in community/public health nursing education and promotion of public health nursing careers will be important policy considerations as we face the looming increase in a population of older adults throughout the world. PMID:23937101

  13. The Health-Promoting Lifestyles of Undergraduate Nurses in Hong Kong.

    Hui, Wai-Hing Choi

    2002-01-01

    A profile of 169 Hong Kong nursing students indicated they practice good interpersonal relations but exhibit a lack of physical activity. Seniors had the most difficulty with stress management and spiritual growth. Nursing students' potential to promote patients' health may be inhibited by their own lack of compliance with health behavior.…

  14. 38 CFR 52.130 - Nursing services.

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.130 Nursing services. The program... to meet the total nursing care needs, as determined by participant assessment and individualized... level of nursing staff is determined by the authorized capacity of participants and the nursing...

  15. Implementation and evaluation of an educational programme to support registered nurses during clinical supervision of student nurses in medical and surgical wards in a training health facility, Namibia

    Hanna Neshuku

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide an account of the implementation and evaluation of the educational programme was to support registered nurses in the Oshana region, Namibia educationally, in order to enable them to provide effective clinical supervision of student nurses The researcher selected to conduct a workshop because during a workshop it is possible to have two-way communication that encouraged the exchange of ideas and facts with the aim of sharing valued information among one another. The duration of the workshop was two days. The workshop was attended by registered nurses (registered nurses from a training institution and training health facilities from the Oshana Region. Participants were selected using a criterion sampling method (registered nurses who were supervising second and third year nursing students during clinical practice; those registered nurses were from medical and surgical wards at training heath facilities in the Oshana Region and had been working there for a year or more. There were no limitations on the number / sample size; the researcher allowed all participants who turned up to attend the workshop resulted in seventeen participants attended the workshop. The programme was implemented in three phases which in turn was divided into sessions. The orientation phase provided an introduction to the workshop where aspects related to the purpose, goals, and objectives of the workshop and logistical arrangements of the implementation of the programme were discussed. The working phase consisted of three sessions which is corresponding to the programme objectives. The implementation of each session was based on the specific objective activities of that session and it was expected to produce an outcome that would help the registered nurses during the execution of their clinical supervisory duties of nursing students During the termination phase two qualitative evaluations were done firstly, the evaluation of the

  16. Conception of undergraduate nursing students on the practice of health education on first aid

    Marília Rosa de Oliveira

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to present the conception of undergraduate nursing students participating in an integrated project on health education on first aid. Methods: qualitative research conducted at the Universidade Estadual de Londrina with five senior nursing students, participating in the project “Nursing in clinical and surgical urgent and emergency care.” We applied semi-structured interviews with content analysis. Results: the following categories emerged: Health education as a facilitator for academic learning; Health education on first aid as a facilitator in the construction of teacher competence in future nurses; Feelings experienced by students when performing health education on first aid. Conclusion: participating in health education enables the consolidation of the teacher competence of nurses advocated by the National Curriculum Guidelines.

  17. The impact of Chinese cultural values on Taiwan nursing leadership styles: comparing the self-assessments of staff nurses and head nurses.

    Chang, Yuanmay

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of Chinese culture on nursing leadership behavior in Taiwan nurses. A descriptive study compared staff nurses' assessment of Chinese value in the leadership behavior of their head nurses. Data analysis was made on a convenience sample in Taiwan of 214 head nurses and 2,127 staff nurses who had worked with their head nurse for at least one year. Six medical centers and regional hospitals in northern (Taipei), central (Taichung) and southern (Kaohsiung) Taiwan were recruited for this study. Instruments included the demographic questionnaire, Chinese Value Survey, and Kang's Chinese Leadership Behaviors Module Scale. Results indicated that head nurses scored significantly higher than staff nurses in terms of all cultural values and leadership behaviors. Both staff nurses and head nurses scored the highest mean scores in personal integrity (Yi) and human connectedness (Ren) and the lowest in moral discipline (Li). Staff nurse perceptions of leadership behavior indicated the role of parent to be higher than either the role of director or mentor. Head nurses perceptions of leadership behavior emphasized the role of the director more than either parent or mentor. There were no significant differences between the staff nurses and head nurses in terms of expectative leadership behavior, which gave the role of director higher mean scores than those of either the parent or mentor. Positive and significant associations (r = .266 to r = .334) were found between cultural values and perceptions of leadership behavior. Cultural values predicted 10.6% of leadership behavior variance. The three demographic characteristics of location in northern Taiwan (beta = .09), intention to leave (beta = -.14), and general unit (beta = .10) and the two cultural values of human connectedness (Ren) (beta = .16) and personal integrity (Yi) (beta = .16) together reported a cumulative R2 of 14.6% to explain variance in leadership behavior

  18. What Data Do States Collect Related to School Nurses, School Health, and the Health Care Provided?

    Selekman, Janice; Wolfe, Linda C; Cole, Marjorie

    2016-06-01

    School nurses collect data to report to their school district and state agencies. However, there is no national requirement or standard to collect specific data, and each state determines its own set of questions. This study resulted from a joint resolution between the National Association of State School Nurse Consultants and the National Association of School Nurses. The study sought to determine whether similar data points were collected so that comparisons could be made among states and to develop a framework to incorporate the data. Thirty-two states provided their questionnaires or reports. There were 855 data points that could be divided into data related to staff and to students. No categories were measured by all states. The most common data points were the number of students, health screenings, and the number of students with particular conditions for whom the district provided services. A framework for data collection is proposed. PMID:26416766

  19. An investigation on nursing, midwifery and health care students' learning motivation in Turkey.

    Kosgeroglu, Nedime; Acat, M Bahaddin; Ayranci, Unal; Ozabaci, Nilufer; Erkal, Sibel

    2009-09-01

    The aim was to determine differences between the dimensions of motivational learning and sociodemographic characteristics of nursing, midwifery and health care students. For the purpose of collecting data on learning-oriented motivations, occupational learning motivation scale (OLMS) was used. The OLMS was designed to assess the constructs of extrinsic, intrinsic and negative factors for learning, cognitive and lifelong learning goals. The mean levels of the items "willingness to help people", "fear of making mistakes" and "willingness to work with those likely to motivate them" were all determined to be high. Significant differences were revealed for the sex of the students (p<0.05). PMID:18768371

  20. Health impact assessment in Korea

    Recently, Health Impact Assessment has gained great attention in Korea. First, the Ministry of Environment introduced HIA within existing Environment Impact Assessment. Second, the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs began an HIA program in 2008 in alliance with Healthy Cities. In this short report, these two different efforts are introduced and their opportunities and challenges discussed. We believe these two approaches complement each other and both need to be strengthened. We also believe that both can contribute to the development of health in policy and project development and ultimately to improvements in the Korean population's health.

  1. Enhancing Nurses' Pain Assessment to Improve Patient Satisfaction.

    Schroeder, Diana L; Hoffman, Leslie A; Fioravanti, Marie; Medley, Deborah Poskus; Zullo, Thomas G; Tuite, Patricia K

    2016-01-01

    Patient satisfaction with pain management has increasing importance with Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores tied to reimbursement. Previous studies indicate patient satisfaction is influenced by staff interactions. This single-group pre/post design study aimed to improve satisfaction with pain management in older adults undergoing total joint replacement. This was a single-group pre-/posttest design. Nurse (knowledge assessment) and patient (American Pain Society Patient Outcomes Questionnaire Revised [APS-POQ-R], HCAHPS) responses evaluated pre- and postimplementation of the online educational program. Nurse focus group followed intervention. Nurses' knowledge improved significantly (p satisfaction improved from 70.2 ± 9.5 to 73.9 ± 6.0. APS-POQ-R scores did not change. Focus group comments indicated need for education regarding linkages between pain management and patient satisfaction. Education on linkages between patient satisfaction and pain management can improve outcomes; education on strategies to further improve practice may enhance ability to achieve benchmarks. PMID:27028687

  2. Social class variations in schoolchildren's self-reported outcome of the health dialogue with the school health nurse

    Borup, Ina; Holstein, Bjørn Evald

    2004-01-01

    of the health dialogue and to examine the effect of social class on this response controlled for the effect of other relevant social factors. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study is a survey. The population were all pupils in the fifth, seventh and ninth grade (11, 13 and 15 years old) in a random sample...... of schools in Denmark, response rate 87%, n = 5205. Data were collected by questionnaires. RESULTS: The majority of the pupils had reflected about the content of the last health dialogue with the school health nurse (54%), had discussed the content with their mother (62%) and with friends (54%); 62......% had followed the nurse's advice, 77% had made their own autonomous decisions based on the health dialogue, and 11% had returned to the nurse for further advice. Pupils from the lower social classes had more often followed the nurse's advice (OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 0.99-1.37) and returned to the nurse (OR...

  3. Conceptualising the functional role of mental health consultation-liaison nurse in multi-morbidity, using Peplau's nursing theory.

    Merritt, Michael K; Procter, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the mental health consultation-liaison nursing (MHCLN) role and links this to the interpersonal relations theory of nurse theorist Hildegard Peplau. The paper argues that, as mental health nursing care around the world is increasingly focused upon meaningful therapeutic engagement, the role of the MHCLN is important in helping to reduce distressing symptoms, reduce the stigma for seeking help for mental health problems and enhancing mental health literacy among generalist nurses. The paper presents a small case exemplar to demonstrate interpersonal relations theory as an engagement process, providing patients with methodologies which allow them to work through the internal dissonance that exists in relation to their adjustment to changes in life roles precipitated by physical illness. This dissonance can be seen in the emergence of anxiety, depression and abnormal/psychogenic illness behaviours. This paper concludes arguing for considerable effort being given to the nurse-patient relationship that allows for the patient having freedom to use strategies that may help resolve the dissonance that exists. PMID:20509800

  4. Biofeedback Intervention for Stress, Anxiety, and Depression among Graduate Students in Public Health Nursing

    Paul Ratanasiripong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Globally, graduate students have been found to have high prevalence of mental health problems. With increasing severity of mental health problems on university campuses and limited resources for mental health treatment, alternative interventions are needed. This study investigated the use of biofeedback training to help reduce symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression. A sample of 60 graduate students in public health nursing was randomly assigned to either the biofeedback intervention or the control group. Results indicated that biofeedback intervention was effective in significantly reducing the levels of stress, anxiety, and depression over the 4-week period, while the control group had increases in symptoms of anxiety and depression over the same timeframe. As future leaders in the public health nursing arena, the more psychologically healthy the graduate students in public health nursing are, the better the public health nursing professionals they will be as they go forth to serve the community after graduation.

  5. Biofeedback Intervention for Stress, Anxiety, and Depression among Graduate Students in Public Health Nursing.

    Ratanasiripong, Paul; Kaewboonchoo, Orawan; Ratanasiripong, Nop; Hanklang, Suda; Chumchai, Pornlert

    2015-01-01

    Globally, graduate students have been found to have high prevalence of mental health problems. With increasing severity of mental health problems on university campuses and limited resources for mental health treatment, alternative interventions are needed. This study investigated the use of biofeedback training to help reduce symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression. A sample of 60 graduate students in public health nursing was randomly assigned to either the biofeedback intervention or the control group. Results indicated that biofeedback intervention was effective in significantly reducing the levels of stress, anxiety, and depression over the 4-week period, while the control group had increases in symptoms of anxiety and depression over the same timeframe. As future leaders in the public health nursing arena, the more psychologically healthy the graduate students in public health nursing are, the better the public health nursing professionals they will be as they go forth to serve the community after graduation. PMID:25954515

  6. Self-rated health, work characteristics and health related behaviours among nurses in Greece: a cross sectional study

    Dimoliatis Ioannis DK

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies on self-rated health among nurses have indicated an association of low job satisfaction and stress in relation to poor self-rated health. The relationship between self rated health and the specific work characteristics and health related behaviours of nurses to our knowledge have not been adequately studied. Objective To investigate the health profile of nurses working in hospitals in North West Greece and to examine the associations between self rated health (SRH and health related behaviours and work characteristics in this group of hospital employees. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to a random sample of 443 nurses working in all the hospitals in North West Greece. Regression analysis was used to examine the relationship of health related behaviours and work characteristics with self rated health among the nurses. Results A total of 353 responded to the questionnaire (response rate 80% of which 311 (88% were female and 42 (12% male. The mean age (standard deviation of the respondents was 36 years (5.6 and their mean years of working as nurses were 13.5 years (5.9. Almost half of the nurses' smoked, and about one third were overweight or obese. About 58% (206 of the nurses reported having poor health while 42% (147 reported having good health. Self-rated health was independently associated with gender, effort to avoid fatty foods and physical activity, according to multiple logistic regression analysis. Conclusion The population studied presented a relatively poor health profile, and a high proportion of poor SRH. Though female gender and effort to avoid fatty foods were associated with poor SRH, and exercise and white meat consumption with good SRH, specific work characteristics were not associated with SRH.

  7. Assessment of quality in psychiatric nursing documentation-a clinical audit

    2014-01-01

    Background: Quality in nursing documentation facilitates continuity of care and patient safety. Lack of communication between healthcare providers is associated with errors and adverse events. Shortcomings are identified in nursing documentation in several clinical specialties, but very little is known about the quality of how nurses document in the field of psychiatry. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the quality of the written nursing documentation in a psychiatric...

  8. Precautions used by occupational health nursing students during clinical placements

    T.M.M. Maja

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Protection of health care workers including students from being infected when caring for high risk patients is a major cause for concern to all promoting occupational health. Safety of every employee is mandatory. Furthermore, universal guidelines for precautions must be used by all interacting with high risk patients and clients to protect themselves and prevent the spread of infection. The aim of this paper was to ascertain the availability of universal guidelines for precautions against the spread of infection in clinical settings and determine the precautions used by OHN students during their clinical placements. To realise these objectives, a quantitative and descriptive design was followed. A purposive sampling method was used to select 45 Occupational health nursing students who participated in the study.Data was collected with the use of a structured questionnaire and the results revealed that: most units where OHN students were placed for clinical experience had guidelines for universal precautions although these were not always accessible to them; regarding compliance to universal precautions, OHN students were reportedly aware of the hazards of failure to comply although in some emergencies and where personal protective material was not available, they had to provide care without using protective equipments. Recommendations made include that employers and staff at all occupational settings must ensure that updated guidelines for universal precautions are available and accessible to every body interacting with high risk patients; health care providers and students must be fully informed about and should always adhere to universal precautions.

  9. NANDA-NIC-NOC methodology for the mental health resident nurse

    Natalia Cámara Conde

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available As residents of the mental health specialty, we take great care plan with methodology NANDA-NOC-NIC (NNN in each of our rotations. Because of that there is still no consensus on how to use this methodology; we made this poster with our proposal. To do this, we propose a practical and standardized to carry out the care plans to guide future resident nurse of mental health in their care plans.Taking into account the review of various models of existing ratings of nursing at present, as well as taxonomy NNN, we carried out the development of a poster in which we show a practical example of how our proposed structure of a care plan:Evaluation: through functional patterns of M. Gordon Diagnosis: respecting the PES format: - (P Problem: Using with the NANDA taxonomy - (E Etiology: related factors- (S Signs and symptoms: definitorial characteristics Planning: depending on the diagnosis set forth, the NOCs will agree. Performance indicators are also defined, specifying the current state, as well as the level to maintain /achieve and the time to be assessed. Lastly proposed interventions (NIC and developed activities to be carried out to achieve the expected results. Implementation: implementation of interventions and activities Evaluation: we review the performance indicators, assessing the level reached in light of the current situation of the patient, and proposing corrective measures if necessary. As discussion could conclude that we used in our rotations this structure, so that we standardized "way we do." In turn, we have disseminated this structure in the National Congress of Mental Health Nursing.

  10. Scientific production on sexuality of elder women journals of nursing, public health and gerontology

    Beatriz de Carvalho Cavalheiro, Silvana Sidney Costa dos Santos

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to verify the scientific production on elder women, gender and sexuality in journals of Nursing, Public Health and Gerontology. Methods: a systematic review of literature, in journals of Nursing, Public Health and Gerontology in Brazil, in the years 2003 to 2007. Results: the 362 articles were pre-selected (111 in nursing, 95 in Public Health and 156 in Gerontology, of these, seven focus on elderly women, gender and sexuality. It was possible to understand that sexuality and gender issues of elder women remain invisible, and few significant. From the seven articles three categories were abstracted: feminization of aging, social of women’s aging and asexualized elderly. Conclusion: the nurses and the groups of studies and research on gender began to dawn, showing interest in the issues. Requires that the educational projects of graduate programs in health, especially in nursing, bringing more thoughts on gender and sexuality of older women.

  11. The health effects of climate change: what does a nurse need to know?

    Barna, Stefi; Goodman, Benny; Mortimer, Frances

    2012-10-01

    The scientific evidence for anthropogenic climate change has been established with increasing precision and there are widespread concerns about its potential to undermine the public health gains of the past century. There is also a growing consensus across private and public sector organisations at national and international level that carbon reduction should be a policy aim. Various international nursing organisations have made strong position statements on the issue, arguing that nurses should be actively engaged as part of their roles in both health promotion and clinical practice. We point to education for sustainability initiatives in other health professions and share resources for curriculum development in nursing. The nurses of tomorrow will make a unique and significant contribution to protecting population health in an unstable climate, if today's nursing educators can help prepare them for this role. PMID:22683179

  12. HEALTH EFFECTS ASSESSMENT FOR BENZENE

    The document represents a brief, quantitatively oriented scientific summary of health effects data. It was developed by the Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office to assist the Office of Emergency and Remedial Response in establishing chemical-specific health-related goals ...

  13. Improvements in the quality of co-ordination of nursing care following implementation of the Resident Assessment Instrument in Dutch nursing homes.

    Achterberg, W.P.; Holtkamp, C.C.M.; Kerkstra, A.; Pot, A.M.; Ooms, M.E.; Ribbe, M.W.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of implementation of the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) on the quality of co-ordination of nursing care in Dutch nursing homes. Background: The Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) was designed to improve the quality of care and quality of life in nursing homes. Until

  14. Creating archetypes for patient assessment with nurses to facilitate shared patient centred care in the older person

    Hussey, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    The process of what information is captured in documenting patient care assessment and how it is summarised, communicated and interpreted by nurses across different healthcare services is the main focus of this thesis. Currently in Ireland, systems within the domain of healthcare are undergoing transformation. Existing practices where health information is collected at one local health organisation level and often duplicated across differing services will not support the strategic goals of th...

  15. Child health nurses in the Solomon Islands: lessons for the Pacific and other developing countries

    Colquhoun Samantha

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To understand the roles of nurses with advanced training in paediatrics in the Solomon Islands, and the importance of these roles to child health. To understand how adequately equipped child health nurses feel for these roles, to identify the training needs, difficulties and future opportunities. Design Semi-structured interviews. Settings Tertiary hospital, district hospitals and health clinics in the Solomon Islands. Participants Twenty-one paediatric nurses were interviewed out of a total of 27 in the country. Results All nurses were currently employed in teaching, clinical or management areas. At least one or two nurses were working in each of 7 of the 9 provinces; in the two smaller provinces there were none. Many nurses were sole practitioners in remote locations without back-up from doctors or other experienced nurses; all had additional administrative or public health duties. Different types of courses were identified: a residential diploma through the University of Papua New Guinea or New Zealand and a diploma by correspondence through the University of Sydney. Conclusions Child health nurses in the Solomon Islands fulfill vital clinical, public health, teaching and administrative roles. Currently they are too few in number, and this is a limiting factor for improving the quality of child health services in that country. Current methods of training require overseas travel, or are expensive, or lack relevance, or remove nurses from their work-places and families for prolonged periods of time. A local post-basic child health nursing course is urgently needed, and models exist to achieve this.

  16. Child health nurses in the Solomon Islands: lessons for the Pacific and other developing countries

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To understand the roles of nurses with advanced training in paediatrics in the Solomon Islands, and the importance of these roles to child health. To understand how adequately equipped child health nurses feel for these roles, to identify the training needs, difficulties and future opportunities. Design Semi-structured interviews. Settings Tertiary hospital, district hospitals and health clinics in the Solomon Islands. Participants Twenty-one paediatric nurses were interviewed out of a total of 27 in the country. Results All nurses were currently employed in teaching, clinical or management areas. At least one or two nurses were working in each of 7 of the 9 provinces; in the two smaller provinces there were none. Many nurses were sole practitioners in remote locations without back-up from doctors or other experienced nurses; all had additional administrative or public health duties. Different types of courses were identified: a residential diploma through the University of Papua New Guinea or New Zealand and a diploma by correspondence through the University of Sydney. Conclusions Child health nurses in the Solomon Islands fulfill vital clinical, public health, teaching and administrative roles. Currently they are too few in number, and this is a limiting factor for improving the quality of child health services in that country. Current methods of training require overseas travel, or are expensive, or lack relevance, or remove nurses from their work-places and families for prolonged periods of time. A local post-basic child health nursing course is urgently needed, and models exist to achieve this. PMID:23171144

  17. Evaluating nursing students clinic stress, and coping with stress during the clinic first day of the Woman Health and Diseases Nursing clinical course

    Dilek Coşkuner Potur; Nevin Çitak Bilgin; Nuran Kömürcü

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to explore the clinical stress levels, stress sources and coping strategies of Turkish male and female nursing students attending the Woman’s Health and Disease Nursing clinical course on the first day.Method and material: This cross-sectional study was conducted in March 2010 at a public university located in Istanbul. The study group included 98 nursing students. Data were collected from the nursing students in the study group using a self-report questionnaire, cli...

  18. 77 FR 33752 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    2012-06-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel Assessing and Managing... . Name of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel Centers of...

  19. Boot Camp for Occupational Health Nurses: Understanding Social Media.

    Wolf, Debra M; Olszewski, Kimberly

    2015-08-01

    Social media is a buzzword frequently referred to in marketing materials, general media, and personal conversations. Although many refer to the term social media, some individuals do not understand its meaning or how it affects their daily lives at work and home. Since the expansion of the Internet to web 2.0, multiple platforms of communication occur virtually through various social media. Understanding and learning how to use these platforms are essential to stay connected with friends, family, and colleagues; advance connections to professional organizations; and extend educational opportunities. This article presents basic information for occupational health nurses to improve their understanding of social media and how to communicate virtually using different platforms safely and securely. PMID:26240119

  20. Women's mental health nursing: depression, anxiety and stress during pregnancy.

    Parcells, D A

    2010-11-01

    Depression affects more women than men, with a preponderance of cases occurring during prime childbearing years (15-44 years of age). Research shows newborns and infants exposed to maternal antepartum depression, anxiety and stress exhibit pronounced neurobiobehavioral dysregularities. The present study investigated the relationship between maternal psychosocial and biochemical profiles during the antepartum period. Participants were recruited from prenatal registration at a large metropolitan hospital in the southeastern USA--the sample consisted of 59 pregnant women (mean age = 22 years). Structured clinical interviews and maternal self-report were utilized to assess maternal psychosocial distress at mid- (26-28 weeks) and late- (32-34 weeks) gestation. Salivary cortisol levels served as an objective stress measure. The resultant high incidences of maternal depression, anxiety and stress provide evidence of the need for nurses to closely monitor psychosocial and biochemical profiles of all women to thwart the negative effects on the developing human foetus. Clinical nursing implications of the requisite consideration of antepartum maternal psychosocial conditions are discussed. PMID:21040227

  1. Quality of work life among primary health care nurses in the Jazan region, Saudi Arabia: a cross-sectional study

    Almalki Mohammed J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality of work life (QWL is defined as the extent to which an employee is satisfied with personal and working needs through participating in the workplace while achieving the goals of the organization. QWL has been found to influence the commitment and productivity of employees in health care organizations, as well as in other industries. However, reliable information on the QWL of primary health care (PHC nurses is limited. The purpose of this study was to assess the QWL among PHC nurses in the Jazan region, Saudi Arabia. Methods A descriptive research design, namely a cross-sectional survey, was used in this study. Data were collected using Brooks’ survey of quality of nursing work life and demographic questions. A convenience sample was recruited from 134 PHC centres in Jazan, Saudi Arabia. The Jazan region is located in the southern part of Saudi Arabia. A response rate of 91% (n = 532/585 was achieved (effective response rate = 87%, n = 508. Data analysis consisted of descriptive statistics, t-test and one way-analysis of variance. Total scores and subscores for QWL items and item summary statistics were computed and reported using SPSS version 17 for Windows. Results Findings suggested that the respondents were dissatisfied with their work life. The major influencing factors were unsuitable working hours, lack of facilities for nurses, inability to balance work with family needs, inadequacy of vacations time for nurses and their families, poor staffing, management and supervision practices, lack of professional development opportunities, and an inappropriate working environment in terms of the level of security, patient care supplies and equipment, and recreation facilities (break-area. Other essential factors include the community’s view of nursing and an inadequate salary. More positively, the majority of nurses were satisfied with their co-workers, satisfied to be nurses and had a sense of belonging

  2. Workforce Integration of New Graduate Nurses: Evaluation of a Health Human Resources Employment Policy

    Baumann, Andrea; Hunsberger, Mabel; Crea-Arsenio, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Historically, economic changes have negatively affected the nursing workforce in Ontario. The trend towards part-time and casual employment emerged from healthcare restructuring in the 1990s. The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in 2003 alerted the Ontario government to the issue of part-time and casual nursing. In 2007, the Nursing Graduate Guarantee (NGG), a health human resources employment policy, was developed as a financial incentive for employers to hire and mentor new...

  3. The self-medication in elderly people and the role of health professionals and nursing

    Cecília Nogueira Valença, Raimunda Medeiros Germano, Rejane Maria Paiva de Menezes

    2010-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the complex theme of self-medication in the elderly people and the role of health professionals and nursing. Methodology: this is a theoretical essay based on a literature review of the narrative type. It was selected articles indexed in databases Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO) and the Database of Nursing (BDENF), from 2003 to 2009, using as descriptors: self-medication, nursing and elderly people. It was also used books and manuals of the ministry of heal...

  4. A review of research and nursing management of mental health problems in pregnancy and motherhood

    Jarosinski JM; Fox JA

    2016-01-01

    Judith M Jarosinski,1 Jane A Fox21Nursing Department, Henson School of Science, Salisbury University, Salisbury, MD, 2School of Nursing, College of Health and Human Services, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Wilmington, NC, USAAbstract: In this article, the authors explore the risks pregnant women experience due to mental illness and intimate partner violence (IPV) and discuss the nursing role involved in the management of their care. For many women, pregnancy is a time of hopeful ant...

  5. Measuring compliance of conducting an occupational health risk assessment in the occupational health nurse’s practice

    Nicolene de Jager

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Occupational health nurses (OHNs are qualified registered nurses with a postgraduate qualification in occupational health nursing. An important activity of OHNs is to identify and assess health risks in the workplace. Health risk assessments (HRAs are conducted by OHNs to determine all the occupational health stressors, for example noise, vibration and chemical substances. The authors conducted legal compliance occupational health audits and observed that 85% (n = 23 of OHNs in different settings conduct HRAs only to a limited extent. The following objective was formulated for the study: To explore and describe the extent to which OHNs conduct HRAs as it is a legal requirement for compliance; and the possible reasons for not adhering to the regulation and conduct them only to a limited extent. A quantitative, descriptive design was used in this study. A sampling frame was developed from a list of all the members of the South African Society of Occupational Health Nursing Practitioners (SASOHN in Gauteng. From the target population of OHNs in Gauteng, a systematic cluster sampling method was used. A self-developed questionnaire was distributed by mail and e-mail, and authors sent respondents reminders. The authors ensured that validity, reliability and ethical standards were adhered to. The findings revealed that OHNs are mature, experienced, predominately female practitioners who operate on behalf of a disproportionately large number of workers. Four factors influencing these nurses in conducting an HRA to a limited extent were identified: competence, ignorance about the role of the OHN, workload and attitude.

  6. Integrated approach for managing health risks at work--the role of occupational health nurses.

    Marinescu, Luiza G

    2007-02-01

    Currently, many organizations are using a department-centered approach to manage health risks at work. In such a model, segregated departments are providing employee benefits such as health insurance, workers' compensation, and short- and long-term disability or benefits addressing work-life issues. In recent years, a new model has emerged: health and productivity management (HPM). This is an employee-centered, integrated approach, designed to increase efficiency, reduce competition for scarce resources, and increase employee participation in prevention activities. Evidence suggests that corporations using integrated HPM programs achieve better health outcomes for their employees, with consequent increased productivity and decreased absenteeism. Occupational health nurses are well positioned to assume leadership roles in their organizations by coordinating efforts and programs across departments that offer health, wellness, and safety benefits. To assume their role as change agents to improve employees' health, nurses should start using the language of business more often by improving their communication skills, computer skills, and ability to quantify and articulate results of programs and services to senior management. PMID:17323873

  7. Description of an educational programme developed to support registered nurses during clinical supervision of student nurses in medical and surgical wards in a training health facility: Namibia

    Hanna Neshuku

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an educational programme interventions developed to support registered nurses during the clinical supervision of student nurses in the medical and surgical wards of a training hospital in the Oshana region, Namibia. The programme developed contained the purpose and goals of the programme, programme objectives, programme structure, processes and approaches. The programme catered for the following themes: Managerial challenges, educational challenges and non-conducive environment as was experienced by registered nurses and student nurses in order to support them during clinical supervision. It includes the activities to address managerial challenges as identified to be affecting the clinical supervision of student nurses; this is to address educational challenges identified during clinical supervision of student nurses. Furthermore, the programme contains activities focused on providing registered nurses with knowledge and skills on clinical supervision, in order to increase their understanding and competence about the clinical supervision of student nurses. Another activity included interventions for enhancing positive interpersonal relationships and good communication skills to improve effective interactions between registered nurses and student nurses. This study made it possible for the development of an educational programme that enable the registered nurses to receive the much needed information pertaining to the clinical supervision of student nurses, and served as a guide and support tool when carrying out clinical supervision of student nurses. In conclusion the study was justified as an original contribution to the existing body of knowledge in general health nursing science.

  8. Infection Control Link Nurse Program: An interdisciplinary approach n targeting health care-acquired infection

    Sopirala, Madhuri M.; Yahle-Dunbar, Lisa; Smyer, Justin; Wellington, Linda; Dickman, Jeanne; Zikri, Nancy; Martin, Jennifer; Kulich, Pat; Taylor, David; Mekhjian, Hagop; Nash, Mary; Mansfield, Jerry; Pancholi, Preeti; Howard, Mary; Chase, Linda; Brown, Susan; Kipp, Kristopher; Lefeld, Kristen; Myers, Amber; Pan, Xueliang; Mangino, Julie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background We describe a successful interdisciplinary liaison program that effectively reduced health care-acquired (HCA), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a university hospital setting. Methods Baseline was from January 2006 to March 2008, and intervention period was April 2008 to September 2009. Staff nurses were trained to be liaisons (link nurses) to infection prevention (IP) personnel with clearly defined goals assigned and with ongoing monthly education. HCA-MRSA incidence per 1,000 patient-days (PD) was compared between baseline and intervention period along with total and non-HCA-MRSA, HCA and non-HCA-MRSA bacteremia, and hand soap/sanitizer usage. Hand hygiene compliance was assessed. Results A reduction in MRSA rates was as follows in intervention period compared with baseline: HCA-MRSA decreased by 28% from 0.92 to 0.67 cases per 1,000 PD (incidence rate ratio, 0.72; 95% confidence interval: 0.62–0.83, P reeducation for the nurses by IP personnel helped drive these results. PMID:24548456

  9. Living my narrative: storying dishonesty and deception in mental health nursing.

    Grant, Alec J

    2016-07-01

    This article proceeds from MacIntyre's moral philosophical perspective of individual human lives constituting unified narratives, in the context of co-evolving framing and guiding master narratives. This perspective accords specific episodes in people's lives the status of significant component parts of their developing, storied and enacted individual histories. From this philosophical base, autoethnographic principles will be employed in providing accounts from my own professional life narrative strand as a mental health nurse educator that speak to the issue of institutionalized dishonesty and deception in mental health nursing education and practice. On the basis of my pre-existing experience of publishing in nursing journals and scholarly identity, my argument will proceed from contesting the idea of an imagined stable foundational professional ethos underpinning mental health nursing practice, against which to judge professional dishonesty and deception. Using illustrative, relatively recent short stories, drawn from my lived-experience base as a mental health nurse educator, I will argue throughout at implicit and explicit levels that dishonesty and deception are always an inevitable part of the lives of mental health nurses and their educators. This is because of a constant gap between the nursing rhetoric and ideology that both groups espouse and how they actually behave on a day-to-day, mundane level, in and out of work and classroom practice. This gap shows up the public front of what mental health nursing is supposed to be about as dishonest and deceitful window dressing. I will assert that the many first-person, lived-experience accounts in mental health nursing teaching and publication are important educational resources in reducing this gap at professional practice, academic, and informal levels. Such storied accounts may also be useful in moving nurses and their educators towards more morally and ethically sensitive and reflexively attuned positions

  10. Health Literacy Training for Public Health Nurses in Fukushima: A Case-Study of Program Adaptation, Implementation and Evaluation

    Goto, Aya; RUDD, Rima E.; LAI, Alden Yuanhong; Yoshida-Komiya, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Health literacy comprises not only an individual’s ability to gain access to, understand and use health information, but also health care providers’ ability to make health information accessible and usable. The Fukushima nuclear accident has posed challenges related to the communication of radiation-related health information. Public health nurses are gatekeepers of community health in Japan, and have primary responsibility for communicating this complex information about science and risk to ...

  11. A STUDY TO ASSESS KNOWLEDGE AND AWARENESS ABOUT THE HEPATITIS B AND C AMONG NURSING COLLEGE STUDENTS OF CENTRAL INDIA

    Ramniwas; Surendra Kumar; Neeta; Rupesh

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND: The lives of millions of adolescents worldwide are at risk because they do not have the information; skills, health services and support which they need to go through sexual development during adolescence. The epidemic of Hepatitis B/HCV is now progressin g at a rapid pace among young people. AIMS& OBJECTIVE: To assess knowledge of nursing students towards Hepatitis B/HCV Awareness, Prevention & Control . T o assess knowledge in...

  12. Five reasons for the lack of nursing students' motivation to learn public health.

    Kudo, Yasushi; Hayashi, Sachiko; Yoshimura, Emiko; Tsunoda, Masashi; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Shibuya, Akitaka; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2013-01-01

    Prevention is better than cure. Public health plays an important role in promoting prevent medicine. To obtain the abilities to provide appropriate nursing services, learning public health is necessary for students who want to become registered nurses. When teachers teach public health to nursing students, it is important to motivate them to learn it. Therefore, we investigated the reasons for the lack of motivation to learn public health by conducting a questionnaire survey. The subjects were female nursing students in 29 vocational schools in Kanagawa and Chiba prefectures of Japan that allow graduation after a 3-year study period. We asked the students whether or not they had completed the subject of public health and analyzed those students who answered affirmatively. We analyzed 1,553 respondents whose average age was 22.6 ± 5.2 years (range, 18 to 45). Using factor analysis, we discovered the 5 reasons that lead to the lack of nursing students' motivation to learn public health: "Difficulties acquiring knowledge of public health," "Inappropriate attitudes of public health teachers," "Thinking lightly about the national examination in the field of public health," "Lack of understanding the importance of learning public health," and "Future plans that do not specialize in public health." Using multiple linear regression analysis, these 5 reasons were significant predictors for the lack of students' motivation. Older students also had significantly less motivation to learn public health than did younger students. When teachers instruct their students, they should teach public health better with the present knowledge. PMID:24172685

  13. The mental health of nurses%护士的心理健康状况

    张景霞; 陈岩

    2016-01-01

    The mental health status of nurses influenced the quality of nursing work and the recovery of patients directly.In this paper,the author expounded the nurse's mental health from three aspects including the nurse's psychological quality,the influence factors of nurse's mental health condition,suggestions and measures.%护士心理健康状况直接影响着护理工作的质量和患者的康复。本文从护士应具备的心理素质、影响护理人员心理健康状况的因素、应对措施及建议三个方面阐述护士的心理健康状况。

  14. Are your nurse managers ready for health care reform? Consider the 8 'Es'.

    Kirby, Karen K

    2010-01-01

    The most significant investment a nursing executive can make in an organization and to the delivery of quality patient care is the development of current and future front-line nurse managers. We are on the brink of massive changes in access and the delivery of health care. The front-line manager is in a critical position to make it all work and deliver what the public wants: better access, improved quality, and less cost. If front-line nurse managers are key stakeholders and will undoubtedly play a major role in health care reform, are they ready? Nurse leaders must evaluate, educate, embrace, enable, empower, espouse, engage, and excite frontline nurse managers in order to expand health care services efficiently and effectively. PMID:20672546

  15. Community health nursing: can being self-employed work for you in home care?

    Seri, S F

    1997-09-01

    There is a fine distinction between being an independent contractor and being an employee. The advantages of being self-employed as a community health nurse are many. Self-employment suits new parents, graduate students, people in transition, with more than one profession, and who don't want a fixed schedule. However, this type of nursing is not for everyone. A broker such as CHN can help nurses become successfully self-employed. At a time when hospitals are downsizing and home care is becoming more in demand, brokers such as CHN provide a framework in which busy, experienced, community health nurses can work when and where they want. Good clinical and communication skills and a wish to be autonomous are necessities. A willingness to travel to different agencies and a reliable car are also important. A love for variety, flexibility, and independence make self-employment as a home health nurse a clinician's dream. PMID:9335699

  16. 护士的心理健康状况%The mental health of nurses

    张景霞; 陈岩

    2016-01-01

    护士心理健康状况直接影响着护理工作的质量和患者的康复。本文从护士应具备的心理素质、影响护理人员心理健康状况的因素、应对措施及建议三个方面阐述护士的心理健康状况。%The mental health status of nurses influenced the quality of nursing work and the recovery of patients directly.In this paper,the author expounded the nurse's mental health from three aspects including the nurse's psychological quality,the influence factors of nurse's mental health condition,suggestions and measures.

  17. Ethical Issues in Maternal and Child Health Nursing: Challenges Faced By Maternal and Child Health Nurses and Strategies for Decision Making

    Aderemi R.A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Health care givers, particularly midwives, perinatal and neonatal nurses, face ethical issues possibly because of their interactions with patients and clients in the reproductive age groups. These issues are multiple and quite complex. Aim: To identify the ethical issues related to maternal and child care, the challenges faced by the nurses and to profer strategies for decision making. Methods: This is a literature review on ethical issues in maternal and child heal...

  18. Spiritual Health in Nursing From the Viewpoint of Islam

    Heydari, Abbas; Khorashadizadeh, Fatemeh; Heshmati Nabavi, Fatemeh; Mazlom, Seyed Reza; Ebrahimi, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    a unique perspective on spiritual health as it encompasses all aspects of human beings. Thus, it is necessary to carefully study the difference between the Islamic concept of spiritual health and that of other religions and ideologies to design suitable and useful nursing care for Iranian patients that satisfy their spiritual needs.

  19. The perceptions and the attitude of health care professionals and students about the nursing profession

    Mari Lavdaniti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The fact that nursing is a difficult profession which lacks of social recognition results in being abandoned by many nurses and not being selected by young people. Αim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the perceptions of nurses, other health care professionals and students about the nursing profession and to determine the factors that influence their attitude towards it. Material and Method: 949 students of nursing and medical schools and health care professionals participated in the study. The data was gathered by the means of two structured questionnaires, the composition of which was based on the nursing database. The data's statistical analysis was fulfilled by the SPSS 12. Results: Τhe 89,2% of the sample believes that nursing practice requires knowledge, skills, and critical thinking. The 82,4% also believes that the quality of care provided depends on the quality of the nurses' education and lifelong learning is nurses' duty (94,4%. Moreover, the 82,6% of the participants thinks that the nurses do not lose their interest in the patient's care as much as they become more educated. Factors such as religion and frequency of sick leave do not influence the attitude towards the profession, but the reality shock, the lack of nursing staff and the experience of negative bias adversely influence the attitude towards it. Conclusions: The confrontation of factors that influence negatively the image of the profession combined with a better and continuing education for nurses will lead to increase the social status of the nursing profession.

  20. Occupational Risk Factors and Health Problems Faced by Nurses that Working Dialysis Unit and Nephrology Service

    Mehtap Curcani

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study is carried out descriptively with the aim of determining occupational risks the nurses working in dialysis units and nephrology services. METHOD: 47 nurses working in dialysis and nephrology units of the hospitals in Erzurum were included in the study content. In the collection of the data, questionnaire form prepared in the light of literature and including the preventions taken by nurses themselves or their organizations against the professional risks they faced, or personal problems the nurses experienced, professional risk or professional-personal features was used. RESULTS: In the result of the study, it was detected that 48.9% of the nurses was at 28-32 age group, and that 38.3% of the nurses graduated from nursing higher school, and that 72.3% of the nurses worked in dialysis unit. It was found out that while practicing their professions, the nurses expressed that infection risk (97.9%, stress (83%, verbal abuse (80.9%, psychiatric trauma (66%, allergic substance (63.8%, the noise (36.2%, and physical abuse (23.4% were the risk factors they raced in working medium .In the health problem seen in the nurses, in the first row is lumbago. CONCLUSION: In the result of the study, it was found out that while practicing their professions, the nurses expressed that infection risk was the highest rate among the risk factors they raced in working medium and, in the health problem seen in the nurses, in the first row is lumbago and that the nurses and organizations’ attempts which will reduce the risks were not sufficient. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(4.000: 339-344

  1. Utilisation and costs of nursing agencies in the South African public health sector, 2005–2010

    Laetitia C. Rispel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Globally, insufficient information exists on the costs of nursing agencies, which are temporary employment service providers that supply nurses to health establishments and/or private individuals. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the utilisation and direct costs of nursing agencies in the South African public health sector. Design: A survey of all nine provincial health departments was conducted to determine utilisation and management of nursing agencies. The costs of nursing agencies were assumed to be equivalent to expenditure. Provincial health expenditure was obtained for five financial years (2005/6–2009/10 from the national Basic Accounting System database, and analysed using Microsoft Excel. Each of the 166,466 expenditure line items was coded. The total personnel and nursing agency expenditure was calculated for each financial year and for each province. Nursing agency expenditure as a percentage of the total personnel expenditure was then calculated. The nursing agency expenditure for South Africa is the total of all provincial expenditure. The 2009/10 annual government salary scales for different categories of nurses were used to calculate the number of permanent nurses who could have been employed in lieu of agency expenditure. All expenditure is expressed in South African rands (R; US$1 ∼ R7, 2010 prices. Results: Only five provinces reported utilisation of nursing agencies, but all provinces showed agency expenditure. In the 2009/10 financial year, R1.49 billion (US$212.64 million was spent on nursing agencies in the public health sector. In the same year, agency expenditure ranged from a low of R36.45 million (US$5.20 million in Mpumalanga Province (mixed urban-rural to a high of R356.43 million (US$50.92 million in the Eastern Cape Province (mixed urban-rural. Agency expenditure as a percentage of personnel expenditure ranged from 0.96% in KwaZulu-Natal Province (mixed urban-rural to 11.96% in the

  2. Research brief: using a Wiki to support student nurses learning discipline specific health terminology.

    Honey, Michelle; Doherty, Iain

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to clarify whether a collaborative exercise using a Wiki to teach nursing students health-specific terminology resulted in better learning. In one New Zealand School of Nursing a list of health-related and discipline-specific terms was created, first-year nursing students were expected to learn these before their initial clinical practice. However, students found the terms difficult to learn. The use of a collaborative Wiki exercise to create a glossary of health terms was seen as a way to aid student learning, while also providing a learning environment where students would develop collaborative skills. PMID:24839746

  3. [Visions for the future--nursing as a profession in German-speaking Swiss health care].

    Spirig, R; Petry, H; Kesselring, A; De Geest, S

    2001-06-01

    Social, scholarly, and technical changes and changes in health politics have a lasting influence on the nursing profession. The development of nursing science programs can be seen in this context and institutions, which offer educational programs for nurses, have to orient them toward the new demands of the profession. Up to now in the German-speaking realm, published data, which describe the changes the nursing profession can expect, have not been available, nor have possible future fields of activity of nursing been examined. In order to close this gap, a group of opinion leaders and experts in nursing in German-speaking Switzerland were studied. Eighty-one people were surveyed by means of a questionnaire, and ten people were interviewed in-depth. The results reflect the visions and perspectives of the nursing profession of the future in German-speaking Switzerland. The expectation is that nursing should deal increasingly with sociopolitical changes and that the main issues of nursing with regard to type of client and locations where care is given will change. A re-orientation toward strengthening professional identity is called for in the following areas: involvement in determining and shaping decisions in politics and health politics; taking entrepreneurial initiatives; building clinical practice on caring, patient preferences, and evidence; making professional training and continuing education clinically-oriented as well as the development and the establishment of nursing science. Through a re-orientation, nursing should be better able to meet the challenges, which it faces because of health and social problems in the population. A great discrepancy exists between the expectations for nursing in the future and present reality. The challenge will be to see whether it will be possible to close the gap between visions and reality by means of training, continuing education, and changes in clinical practice. PMID:12385266

  4. Connecting Students to Mental Health Care: Pilot Findings from an Engagement Program for School Nurses

    Kim, Rachel E.; Becker, Kimberly D.; Stephan, Sharon H.; Hakimian, Serop; Apocada, Dee; Escudero, Pia V.; Chorpita, Bruce F.

    2015-01-01

    Schools function as the major provider of mental health services (MHS) for youth, but can struggle with engaging them in services. School nurses are well-positioned to facilitate referrals for MHS. This pilot study examined the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of an engagement protocol (EP) designed to enhance school nurses'…

  5. Environmental Psychology Effects on Mental Health Job Satisfaction and Personal Well Being of Nurses

    Sodeh Tavakkoli

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available  Objective: Environmental psychology as a science could be useful in understanding the dissociation between the man and the environment. The aim of this study was to compare mental health, job satisfaction and well-being of nurses who work in hospital environments with different designs.  Material:This was a quasi-experimental study, in which 250 nurses filled out the mental health, well-being and job satisfaction questionnaires. They were categorized into 3 groups randomly. Group1 included 63 nurses who worked in an environment without any natural elements; group 2 included 100 nurses who worked in an environment with natural elements and group 3 included 87 nurses who worked in an environment without any psychological and ergonomic design. The last group was only stimulated by demonstrating visual stimulus. Data were analyzed using the ANOVA and Tukey’s pursuit statistical method. Results:The nurses who were working in an environment without any natural elements reported significantly lower scores on mental health, well-being and job satisfaction compared to those who were working in other groups, with the exception of social functioning . Moreover, depression and anxiety were more common in nurses who were working in environments without any natural elements compared to those in the other groups (p<0.05.Conclusions:We can increase job satisfaction, and mental health and well-being of the nurses through the use of natural design and environmental psychology indexes in hospital buildings.

  6. Family Support in Nursing Homes Serving Residents with a Mental Health History

    Frahm, Kathryn; Gammonley, Denise; Zhang, Ning Jackie; Paek, Seung Chun

    2010-01-01

    Using 2003 nursing home data from the Minimum Data Set (MDS) database, this study investigated the role of family support among nursing homes serving residents with a mental health history. Exploratory factor analysis was used to create and test a conceptual model of family support using indicators located within the MDS database. Families were…

  7. Some Health Effects of Implementing School Nursing in a Norwegian High School: A Controlled Study

    Svebak, Sven; Jensen, Eva Naper; Gotestam, K. Gunnar

    2008-01-01

    The effects of a school nursing service on health complaints and mood were investigated in a Norwegian high school. The school nursing service was delivered to students in 1 high school, and students in a comparable high school served as the comparison group. There were 41 students in the treatment group and 63 in the comparison group. All…

  8. Undergraduate nurses reflections on Whatsapp use in improving primary health care education

    Juliana J. Willemse

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The global use of mobile devices with their connectivity capacity, and integrated with the affordances of social media networks, provides a resource-rich platform for innovative student-directed learning experiences.Objective: The objective of this study was to review the experiences of undergraduate nurses on the improvement of primary health care education at a School of Nursing at a University in the Western Cape, South Africa, through the incorporation of a social media application, WhatsApp.Method: A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive, and contextual design was used to explore and describe data collected from a purposive sample of 21 undergraduate nursing students. The study population was engaged in a WhatsApp discussion group to enhance their integration of theory and clinical practice of the health assessment competency of the Primary Health Care Module. Participants submitted electronic reflections on their experiences in the WhatsApp discussion group via email on completion of the study. Thematic analysis of the qualitative data collected was done according to Tesch’s (1990 steps of descriptive data analysis in order to identify the major themes in the study. The electronic reflections were analysed to explore their rich, reflective data.Results: Seven themes were identified that included: positive experiences using the WhatsApp group; the usefulness of WhatsApp for integrating theory and clinical practice; the availability of resources for test preparation; opportunity for clarification; anonymity; exclusion of students as a result of the lack of an appropriate device, and the application caused the battery of the device to run flat quickly.Conclusion: The results of the experiences of students in the WhatsApp discussion group could be used to inform the use of social media applications in teaching and learning, with the purpose of enhancing the integration of the theory and clinical practice.

  9. Report from the American Nurses' Association council on psychiatric and mental health nursing.

    Joel, L A; Baldwin, B; Stevens, G

    1989-01-01

    Society has demonstrated a major need for expanded gerontological and geropsychiatric nursing services. Current needs have not yet been met and the call for service will increase throughout the balance of this century and beyond. Social responsiveness demands that nurses: (1) formally establish their clinical authority in care of the aged; (2) lobby for public policy which enables the provider professional to control the practice environment, rather than be controlled by it; (3) improve the educational preparation of nurses to care for the aged; and (4) expand the professions' scientific and research base in this area. The national professional organization of registered nurses, the American Nurses' Association, provides leadership to influence the course of nursing as it continues to provide vital services in a dramatically changing environment. PMID:2744491

  10. Nursing Positions

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Nursing Positions KidsHealth > For Parents > Nursing Positions Print A ... and actually needs to feed. Getting Comfortable With Breastfeeding Nursing can be one of the most challenging ...

  11. Situational analysis of teaching and learning of medicine and nursing students at Makerere University College of Health Sciences

    Kiguli Juliet

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS in Uganda is undergoing a major reform to become a more influential force in society. It is important that its medicine and nursing graduates are equipped to best address the priority health needs of the Ugandan population, as outlined in the government’s Health Sector Strategic Plan (HSSP. The assessment identifies critical gaps in the core competencies of the MakCHS medicine and nursing and ways to overcome them in order to achieve HSSP goals. Methods Documents from the Uganda Ministry of Health were reviewed, and medicine and nursing curricula were analyzed. Nineteen key informant interviews (KII and seven focus group discussions (FGD with stakeholders were conducted. The data were manually analyzed for emerging themes and sub-themes. The study team subsequently used the checklists to create matrices summarizing the findings from the KIIs, FGDs, and curricula analysis. Validation of findings was done by triangulating information from the different data collection methods. Results The core competencies that medicine and nursing students are expected to achieve by the end of their education were outlined for both programs. The curricula are in the process of reform towards competency-based education, and on the surface, are well aligned with the strategic needs of the country. But implementation is inadequate, and can be changed: • Learning objectives need to be more applicable to achieving competencies. • Learning experiences need to be more relevant for competencies and setting in which students will work after graduation (i.e. not just clinical care in a tertiary care facility. • Student evaluation needs to be better designed for assessing these competencies. Conclusion MakCHS has made a significant attempt to produce relevant, competent nursing and medicine graduates to meet the community needs. Ways to make them more effective though deliberate efforts to

  12. Re-envisioning paediatric nurse training in a re-engineered health care system

    Minette Coetzee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: South African’s infant and child mortality rates remain high and at the current rate of decline will not meet the Millennium Development Goals of a two thirds decrease by 2015. At the latest available count, there were fewer than 1500 qualified paediatric nurses on the National South African Nursing Council register, with only about 100 nurses graduating with this qualification from South African nursing schools annually. It is not clear, however, if current paediatric nurse training programmes adequately equip nurses to make a real impact on reducing the under-5 mortality rate. In their 2011 interim report, the Ministerial Committee on Morbidity and Mortality in Children under 5 years recommended strengthening paediatric nurses’ training as a strategy to reduce the under-5 mortality rate.Method: In response to the Committee on Morbidity and Mortality in Children recommendation, a colloquium was convened as a national forum for schools of nursing, departments of health, health care facilities, clinicians and regulatory bodies to advance children’s nursing in South Africa.Objectives: The goals of the colloquium were to thoroughly investigate the situation in South Africa’s paediatric nurse training, plot ways to strengthen and expand postgraduate paediatric programmes to meet priority child health needs, and to build relationships between the various schools and stakeholders.Results: Outcomes included the clarification and strengthening of a ‘stakeholder grid’ in nurse training, recognition of the need for more active teaching and learning strategies in curricula linked to national child health priorities, as well as the need to develop and support clinical nursing practice in facilities.

  13. Does poor school satisfaction inhibit positive outcome of health promotion at school? A cross-sectional study of schoolchildren's response to health dialogues with school health nurses

    Borup, Ina; Holstein, Bjørn E

    2006-01-01

    Students with high school satisfaction were more likely to reflect on and discuss the content of health dialogues with school health nurses, and more likely to follow the nurse's advice. This was demonstrated among 5205 students ages 11-15-years, in a random sample of schools in Denmark....

  14. The Impact of Nursing Students' Prior Chemistry Experience on Academic Performance and Perception of Relevance in a Health Science Course

    Boddey, Kerrie; de Berg, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Nursing students have typically found the study of chemistry to be one of their major challenges in a nursing course. This mixed method study was designed to explore how prior experiences in chemistry might impact chemistry achievement during a health science unit. Nursing students (N = 101) studying chemistry as part of a health science unit were…

  15. 77 FR 22790 - ``Low Income Levels'' Used for Various Health Professions and Nursing Programs Included in Titles...

    2012-04-17

    ... Health Professions and Nursing Programs Included in Titles III, VII and VIII of the Public Health Service... nursing training for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds. These various programs are included in... professions and nursing grant and cooperative agreement programs that use the low-income levels to...

  16. Making Connections: Linking Generalist and Specialist Essentials in Baccalaureate Community/Public Health Nursing Education and Practice.

    Kaiser, Katherine Laux; Carter, Kimberly Ferren; O'Hare, Patricia A.; Callister, Lynn Clark

    2002-01-01

    Describes the work of a task force to revise public health nursing curriculum that combined the expertise of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and specialty organizations. Discusses the current state of community/public health nursing and the model used to identify core professional knowledge and values underpinning the curriculum.…

  17. Standardizing Assessment of Competences and Competencies of Oncology Nurses Working in Ambulatory Care.

    Beaver, Clara; Magnan, Morris A; Henderson, Denise; DeRose, Patricia; Carolin, Kathleen; Bepler, Gerold

    2016-01-01

    A nursing quality consortium standardized nursing practice across 17 independently functioning ambulatory oncology sites. Programs were developed to validate both competences and competencies. One program assessed nine competences needed to develop systems of care to detect and treat treatment-related side effects. A second program was developed to assess competencies needed to prevent harm to oncology patients. This manuscript describes a successful approach to standardizing nursing practice across geographically distant academic and community sites. PMID:26985750

  18. Supporting SIDS Families: The Public Health Nurse SIDS Home Visit.

    Stastny, Penny F; Keens, Thomas G; Alkon, Abbey

    2016-05-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) death has a devastating effect on parents. There is no known cause, so parents experience guilt about what they might have done or not done to contribute to the death. Although some SIDS parents may receive support from family and friends, the public health nurse (PHN) has an important professional role in providing grief support, SIDS education, and offering SIDS resources and referrals. Based on years of clinical practice, we recommend the following: Perform the home visit as soon as possible. Show care and compassion. Personalize the baby by using his or her name and asking to see photographs. Reassure the parents that grief is a process which takes time. Educate about what SIDS is and what it is not. Increasingly, SIDS deaths occur in the presence of risk factors. Explain that risk factors are not causes of death. As an authority in health care, reassuring families that they did not cause their baby's death has a tremendous impact on relieving guilt. Putting newly bereaved SIDS parents in contact with other SIDS parents is one of the most helpful actions a PHN can take to help families. PMID:26822270

  19. The Nurse Consultant: an Innovative Role in the Greek Health Care System?

    Dimitrios Theofanidis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing has gone through phases of being a static profession in many countries withdifficulty in breaking this mold in order to escalate its full potential. In countries where innovative rolesand new posts for nursing flourish i.e. nurse consultant, clinical nurse specialist and others, nursesenjoy advanced professional independence, greater respect from other health care professionals andhold higher prestige within the extended society. The nursing profession in Greece requires innovativeways to raise the expertise and profile of its members.Aim: This paper presents the merits of introducing a consultant nurse training programme and postsinto the Greek National Health Care System in order actively to address the many problems facing theprofession.Discussion and Conclusions: The introduction of the nurse consultant post in Greece would provideaccess for continual professional development of the nursing staff, open specialist career opportunitiesand would raise the morale and standing of nurses. As this requires change, a brief overview of thetheory of change is also presented.

  20. Physiotherapy students’ mental health assessment

    Gesouli-Voltyraki –E.; Charisi E.; Papastergiou D.; Κostopoulou S.; Borou A.; Alverti V.; Avlakiotis K.; Spanos S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Educational environment has a serious impact on students’ mental health. Few data are available on mental health of Physiotherapy students. Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess the mental heath of students in a tertiary Physiotherapy Department during the 3rd years of studies. Material and methods: 80 males and females physiotherapy students of the 5th and 6th semester of a tertiary Physiotherapy Department filled in the GHQ-28 questionnaire. Comparisons between groups w...

  1. Assessing undergraduate nursing students' knowledge, attitudes, and cultural competence in caring for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender patients.

    Strong, Kristy L; Folse, Victoria N

    2015-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients experience barriers to health care that include fear of discrimination, as well as insensitivity and lack of knowledge about LGBT-specific health needs among providers. This study examined the effectiveness of an educational intervention designed to improve knowledge and attitudes of baccalaureate nursing students regarding LGBT patient care. Education focused on key terminology, health disparities, medical needs of transgender patients, and culturally sensitive communication skills for competent LGBT patient care. Knowledge level and attitudes were evaluated before and after the intervention using a survey based on a modified Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men Scale and two assessment tools developed for this study. A statistically significant increase in positive attitudes and knowledge level was found immediately after the intervention. Findings from this study support the inclusion of education related to LGBT patient health care in undergraduate nursing curricula to promote cultural competence and sensitivity. PMID:25535762

  2. Comparing Burnout Across Emergency Physicians, Nurses, Technicians, and Health Information Technicians Working for the Same Organization.

    Schooley, Benjamin; Hikmet, Neset; Tarcan, Menderes; Yorgancioglu, Gamze

    2016-03-01

    Studies on the topic of burnout measure the effects of emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP) (negative or cynical attitudes toward work), and reduced sense of personal accomplishment (PA). While the prevalence of burnout in practicing emergency medicine (EM) professionals has been studied, little is known of the prevalence and factors across physicians, nurses, technicians, and health information technicians working for the same institution. The aim of this study was to assess burnout differences across EM professional types.The total population of 250 EM professionals at 2 public urban hospitals in Turkey were surveyed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and basic social- and work-related demographics. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and additional post hoc tests were computed.Findings show that EE and DP scores were high across all occupational groups, while scores on PA were low. There was a statistically significant difference between nurses and medical technicians (P < 0.05) for EE; and between physicians and both nurses and medical technicians (P < 0.05) for PA; while no group differences were found for DP. Age, gender, economic well-being, and income level were all significant; while patient load and marital status showed no significance.Burnout can be high across occupational groups in the emergency department. Burnout is important for EM administrators to assess across human resources. Statistically significant differences across socio-demographic groups vary across occupational groups. However, differences between occupational groups may not be explained effectively by the demographic factors assessed in this or other prior studies. Rather, the factors associated with burnout are incomplete and require further institutional, cultural, and organizational analyses including differentiating between job tasks carried out by each EM job type. PMID:26962780

  3. Swedish Child Health Care nurses conceptions of overweight in children: a qualitative study

    Isma Gabriella E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Registered Sick Children’s Nurses and District Nurses employed at Child Health Care centres are in a position to help prevent childhood overweight and obesity. Prevention of this challenging public health threat could be improved through having a better understanding of how this group of nurses perceives childhood obesity. The aim of this study was to elucidate the conceptions of childhood overweight, including obesity, among nurses working in Child Health Care. Method A qualitative study using a phenomenographic approach, based on open-ended interviews with 18 Child Health Care nurses (CHC-nurses strategically selected from 17 Child Health Care Centres in the southern part of Sweden. Results Four categories of description emerged from the data: Perception of childhood overweight changes, Overweight in younger children a neglected concern, Overweight a delicate issue and Importance of family lifestyle. The participating CHC-nurses conceived overweight in children, primarily obesity in children to be an extensive and serious problem which affects children, families and the surrounding society. Overweight in children was further perceived as a consequence of their parent’s lifestyle and their awareness of the problem, which was considered by the CHC-nurses as a sensitive and a provoking issue. It was also perceived that overweight in children is not taken seriously during the pre-school period and that concerns regarding overweight in younger children were mainly about the appearance and not the health of the child. The CHC-nurses perceived that the proportion of overweight children has increased, which Swedish society and the CHC-nurses have adapted to. This adaptation makes it difficult for CHC-nurses to define those children who are overweight. Conclusion CHC-nurses provide a comprehensive and complex picture of childhood overweight, which includes several difficulties dealing with this issue. Attention to CHC

  4. Nurse Practitioner Led Health Facility (Role 1 on Exercise Precision Support, 2011: A nurse practitioners observational report

    Danny O'Neill

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Late in 2011, the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF deployed a Role One enhanced health facility in support of Exercise Precision Support. The Role One health facility was deployed to the Shoalwater Bay military training area and tasked with providing 24 hour care during the pre-deployment exercise for Australian forces headed to operations overseas. The Precision Support exercise integrates with air operations, large scale logistic movements and austere base establishment elements, to aid in the preparation, training and sustainment of service personnel for operational roles, both in a conflict environment as well as humanitarian aid roles. The Role One provided this medical support with 2 Emergency Nurse Practitioners (ENPs, Registered Nurses (RNs, Medical Assistants (MAs and Radiographers. The ENPs took on the role of the senior clinicians during this exercise, competently managing all of the health complaints that presented during the exercise period. This article will discuss and review the role of the Nurse Practitioner (NP within a Role One, deployed Defence health facility, build on international evidence whilst supporting the utilisation of NPs in the RAAF Health Service and subsequently more widely in the greater Australian Defence Force (ADF. This article will provide some practical evidence enabling health commanders to recognise, deploy and fully utilise NPs, in order to support current and future ADF operations.

  5. Knowledge and perception of oral health promotion in schools among dental nurses in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Chen, C J; Jallaludin, R L

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, the concept of a Health-Promoting School has received much interest. In Malaysia, dental nurses are ideally placed to play a lead role in promoting Oral Health within the school setting. This study aims to provide information on the knowledge, perception and perceived role of Oral Health Promotion in schools, among dental nurses. A postal questionnaire was used to measure dental nurses' knowledge, perception and perceived role of Oral Health Promotion. The majority (60%) of dental nurses had good knowledge of Oral Health Promotion. Generally, they perceived that they play an important role in promoting Oral Health in schools. However, a sizeable proportion (25%) did not think they had a role to play in working together with school authorities to provide children with healthy food choices in school canteens. The majority (60%) of dental nurses did not perceive Oral Health Promotion to be important as a whole. They had a good perception of the concepts: it supports behaviour change, it has appropriate goals, it integrates oral health and general health and relieves anxiety. However, they had a poorer perception of the concepts; diverse educational approaches, participation, focus on prevention, early intervention, "spread of effect" of dental health education and "make healthier choices the easier choices". Years of service was not significantly associated with knowledge and perception of Oral Health Promotion. Dental nurses should be reoriented towards a more holistic practice of Oral Health Promotion. Workshops that invite active participation from dental nurses should be conducted to equip them with the necessary knowledge and skills. PMID:11200211

  6. Self-assessment of nursing competency among final year nursing students in Thailand: a comparison between public and private nursing institutions

    Sawaengdee, Krisada; Kantamaturapoj, Kanang; Seneerattanaprayul,Parinda; Putthasri, Weerasak; Suphanchaimat, Rapeepong

    2016-01-01

    Krisada Sawaengdee,1,2 Kanang Kantamaturapoj,3 Parinda Seneerattanaprayul,1 Weerasak Putthasri,1 Rapeepong Suphanchaimat,1,4 1International Health Policy Program (IHPP), 2Praboromrajchanok Institute for Health Workforce Development, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, 3Banphai Hospital, Khon Kaen, 4Department of Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Mahidol University, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand Introduction and objectives: Nurses play a major role in Thailand’...

  7. Knowledge in health technology assessment

    Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2011-01-01

    Health systems are placing more and more emphasis on designing and delivering services that are focused on the patient, and there is a growing interest in patient aspects of health policy research and health technology assessment (HTA). Only a few HTA agencies use and invest in scientific methods...... to generate knowledge and evidence about the patient aspects of a given technology. This raises questions about how knowledge is produced in HTA reports and what kind of knowledge is considered relevant. This article uses a Danish HTA on patient education from 2009 as empirical material for a...

  8. A comparative study of the experiences of violence of English and Swedish mental health nurses.

    Nolan, P; Soares, J; Dallender, J; Thomsen, S; Arnetz, B

    2001-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that violence in health care environments, especially mental health care, appears to be increasing. Although there is a lack of cross-cultural studies to prove it, this increase in violence would seem to be an international phenomenon. The present study sought to compare the extent and nature of violence encountered by mental health nurses in Sweden and England. Systematic studies of violence have previously been carried out independently in both countries but this was the first attempt to compare levels of violence. Clearly defined study protocols were put in place, an operational definition of 'violence' adhered to, and random samples recruited. A specially designed questionnaire was sent to every subject (Swedish nurses n=720; English nurses n=296) enquiring about the extent of nurses' exposure to violence, the nature and severity of the violence experienced, and the effect of violence on self-esteem and job satisfaction. Significant differences were found with English nurses experiencing more violence than their Swedish counterparts. Yet support for English nurses appeared to be less good than for Swedish nurses. Reasons for the differences are discussed along with possible measures to minimise the frequency of violence against nurses and the negative effects on their work. PMID:11470100

  9. Integration of end-of-life education into a community health nursing course.

    Pullis, Bridgette Crotwell

    2013-01-01

    Student nurses and novice nurses report that they received little in their nursing education to adequately prepare them for the death of a patient. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing's (AACN) competencies for end-of-life care assert the need for competent nursing care at the time of death. To prepare students to care for dying patients and their families, a hospice clinical experience in a community health nursing course was designed to facilitate the development of competence in caring for adults and children at the end of life. At the end of the semester, the students were able to demonstrate principles of pain and symptom management and to communicate the goals and philosophy of hospice care to dying patients and their families. The students also demonstrated the ability to advocate for individuals at the end of life through the provision of information about hospice care, especially the benefits for timely referral to hospice and palliative care. The incorporation of a clinical experience into a community health nursing course that focuses on end-of-life care is an effective approach to teaching both community health concepts and care of dying patients. Such an approach incorporates essential content without adding to already extensive nursing curricula. PMID:24000920

  10. Health complaints among nurses working near MRI scanners-A descriptive pilot study

    A questionnaire-based descriptive pilot study was conducted among all nurses routinely working with MRI in the Northern part of Sweden to provide an indication of the self-reported prevalence of health complaints related to working with MRI systems. Fifty-nine nurses (88% response rate), with on average 8 (±6) years experience with MRI scanning procedures, returned the questionnaire. In total, 9 nurses (15%) reported regularly experiencing at least one of the health complaints (1-5% for specific health complaints) attributed to arise or be aggravated by their presence in the MRI scanning room. Stratification of the results indicated that reporting of adverse symptoms was not related to the level of occupational workload/stress. However, reporting of health complaints was related to the strength of the magnet(s) the nurses worked with, with 57% of symptoms reported by those nurses working with the strongest systems (both 1.5 and 3 T scanners in this population). Although this descriptive study did not include a control population and was based on self-reporting of health complaints, these data indicate that the prevalence of reported health complaints is not related to perceived work load or occupational stress, but does confirm data from other occupational sectors and indicates that the prevalence of adverse health complaints increases with the strength of the MRI system for nurses as well.

  11. Assessment of Breast Cancer Risk and Belief in Breast Cancer Screening Among the Primary Healthcare Nurses.

    İz, Fatma Başalan; Tümer, Adile

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Early detection of breast cancer is known to increase survival rates significantly after diagnosis. This research was carried out to determine the level of breast cancer risk among primary healthcare nurses and their belief in breast cancer screening. In this descriptive research, the data were collected in face-to-face interviews with the participants. The researchers contacted all primary healthcare nurses currently working in the province. The data collection tools included a questionnaire form on sociodemographic characteristics, breast cancer risk assessment form, and Champion's Health Belief Model Scale (CHBMS) for breast cancer screening. In data analysis, descriptive statistics, t test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used. The mean age of nurses was 35 ± 3.6. The mean score for the breast cancer risk assessment form was calculated as 82.9 ± 18.7. The subscale scores for the CHBMS for breast cancer screening were as follows: susceptibility 7.3 ± 1.8, seriousness 19.5 ± 4.1, benefits of breast self-exam 15.5 ± 2.6, barriers to breast self-exam 15.1 ± 2.8, self-efficacy 40.3 ± 7.0, and motivation 19.5 ± 4.1. The risk of breast cancer was found to be low in the study group. The analysis of the subscale scores for the CHBMS for breast cancer screening revealed that nurses had a below-average susceptibility perception, a somewhat lower perception of seriousness, an above-average mean score for perceived benefits, a moderate barrier perception, a relatively high perceived self-efficacy, and motivation above average. PMID:26758047

  12. Nurse-sensitive health care outcomes in acute care settings: an integrative analysis of the literature.

    Pierce, S F

    1997-04-01

    With the advent of profit maximization in health care came an increased focus on defining quality through outcomes achieved. The article describes an analysis of the nursing literature from 1974 to 1996 using Donabedian's structure-process-outcome framework and the specific indicators identified by the American Nurses Association report card, the Institute of Medicine, and the nursing-sensitive outcomes classification. Although evidence exists documenting nursing's positive impact on patient outcomes, this analysis suggests a real need to integrate our clinical and administrative studies and to employ a more comprehensive, longitudinal, multifacility approach if we are to answer the scientific question regarding which nursing structures and processes truly produce the best health outcomes. PMID:9097521

  13. Enhancing the learning of student nurses in a community "sign off" placement: implications for students, health services and higher education

    Brown, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This action research project explored the implications for student nurses, health services and Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) of placing students for their final “sign off” placement prior to registration with district nursing teams who nurse patients at home. The placing of students with District Nursing teams for the “sign off” period is unusual in the London area. The stated aim of the Department of Health is that students should have more experience outside of the hospital setting (...

  14. The relationship between quality of work life and turnover intention of primary health care nurses in Saudi Arabia

    Almalki Mohammed J; FitzGerald Gerry; Clark Michele

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Quality of work life (QWL) has been found to influence the commitment of health professionals, including nurses. However, reliable information on QWL and turnover intention of primary health care (PHC) nurses is limited. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between QWL and turnover intention of PHC nurses in Saudi Arabia. Methods A cross-sectional survey was used in this study. Data were collected using Brooks’ survey of Quality of Nursing Work Life, the A...

  15. Assessment of oral health promotion services offered as part of maternal and child health services in the Tshwane Health District, Pretoria, South Africa

    Yolanda Kolisa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study aimed to assess the oral health promotion services provided as part of the maternal and child health (MCH services in the Tshwane Health District, Pretoria, South Africa.Methods: The research design was a descriptive cross-sectional study using a modified standard questionnaire. The population was drawn from the parents/caregivers (PCGs and the MCH nurses at seven clinics during June 2012 and June 2013 in Pretoria.Results: The nurses’ response rate was 83%; average age of 37 years. The majority of the nurses (65% were females; 60% were professional nurses. Most (63% of the nurses reported that they provided oral health education (OHE services. A shortage of dental education materials (43%, staff time (48%, and staff training (52% were large constraints to nurses providing OHE. The majority of PCGs (n = 382; mean age 31.5 years had a low education level (76%. About 55% of PCGs received information on children’s oral health from the television and 35% at the MCH clinics. PCGs beliefs were worrying as about 38% believed primary dentition is not important and need not be saved.Conclusion: There is evidence of minimal integration of OHE at MCH sites. Parents’ beliefs are still worrying as a significant number do not regard the primary dentition as important. The MCH site remains an important easily accessible area for integration of oral health services with general health in complementing efforts in prevention of early childhood caries.Keywords: Oral health; Promotion integration

  16. The mental health of nurses in acute teaching hospital settings: a cross-sectional survey

    Perry, Lin; Lamont, Scott; Brunero, Scott; Gallagher, Robyn; Duffield, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Background Nursing is an emotionally demanding profession and deficiencies in nurses’ mental wellbeing, characterised by low vitality and common mental disorders, have been linked to low productivity, absenteeism and presenteeism. Part of a larger study of nurses’ health, the aim of this paper was to describe the mental health status and related characteristics of nurses working in two acute metropolitan teaching hospitals. Methods A cross sectional survey design was used. The Registered and ...

  17. Public health nurses' experiences of training in Marte Meo communication skills.

    O'Donovan, Colette

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this research study was to explore with Public Health Nurses their experiences of training in Marte Meo communication skills. Method: A qualitative design using a phenomenological approach was used. Data analysis was guided by a hermeneutic circle of understanding and drew upon Heideggerian principles of philosophy. Data were gathered by unstructured individual interviews with ten Public Health Nurses who participated in the Marte Meo communication skills training course. ...

  18. Sensor based soil health assessment

    Quantification and assessment of soil health involves determining how well a soil is performing its biological, chemical, and physical functions relative to its inherent potential. Due to high cost, labor requirements, and soil disturbance, traditional laboratory analyses cannot provide high resolut...

  19. Characteristics of racism and the health consequences experienced by black nursing faculty.

    Robinson, Ora V

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined the health consequences of racism experienced by Black nursing professors. A cohort of nine Black nursing professors at various academic ranks responded to a series of questions on racism, coping and intervention strategies to reduce the harmful health consequences. Findings identified behavioral characteristics of racism, resiliency factors of coping, and suggested workshops to minimize the effects of racism within the nursing profession. Implications include workshops on critical self reflection and rules of engagement. A question raised for future research "how to create a racially/ethnic inclusive and psychosocial healthy academic work environment"? PMID:25612397

  20. Engaging primary healthcare nurses in men's health education: A pilot study.

    Rizio, Taletha A; Thomas, Wendy J; O'Brien, Anthony Paul; Collins, Veronica; Holden, Carol A

    2016-03-01

    Many countries have identified a need for targeted men's health promotion within primary health care as part of broader men's health policy. Primary health care nurses are well placed to deliver such services but may lack the requisite skills. The aim of this study was to pilot the delivery phase of an education program and evaluate a train-the-trainer approach for delivering men's health education to primary health care nurses. The 8-h train-the-trainer workshop was designed to equip nurses to deliver men's health education workshops to peers. Surveys of facilitators (n = 18) and peer workshop participants (n = 98) evaluated their level of confidence in men's health and knowledge and skills in men's health promotion. After completing the train-the-trainer workshop, most facilitators expressed confidence (92%), and all indicated sufficient knowledge and access to resources to deliver a peer workshop. All agreed that the module was sufficiently flexible to suit their local setting. Following the peer education workshop, facilitators and workshop participants reported high levels of confidence and knowledge in men's health promotion. This pilot evaluation suggests train-the-trainer is an effective model to deliver men's health education across a range of settings, with a flexible approach to raising awareness and improving the skills of primary health care nurses in men's health promotion. PMID:26803801

  1. BURNOUT SYNDROME IN NURSES OF PRIMARY HEALTH CARE: AN INTEGRATIVE REVIEW

    Magno Conceição das Merces

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Burnout Syndrome (BS also known as burnout is described as a phenomenon composed of feelings of failure and exhaustion, caused by excessive wear and energy resources, mediated by practice and work stress. In this sense, the nurse Primary Health Care (PHC is not exempted in the development of the syndrome in question, since it is a profession that develops their work activities through direct contact with patients and families, making workloads too much which can depreciate the quality of care. This study becomes relevant because it will contribute to the PHC nurses have deeper knowledge of the BS, and few studies at this level of health care. He stood as guiding question: What is the prevalence of BS nurses in the PHC based in Brazilian literature from 2000 to 2014? And as objective to determine the prevalence of BS nurses in the PHC. Content: This is an integrative literature review. To that end, we conducted survey of manuscripts published from 2000 to 2014, using as descriptors, in combination: nurse; burnout and primary care in the Virtual Health Library (VHL. Conclusion: It is not yet possible to know the prevalence of BS nurses in the PHC due to lack of studies in the area. KEYWORDS: Nurse. Burnout, Professional. Primary Health Care.

  2. The health system consequences of agency nursing and moonlighting in South Africa

    Laetitia C. Rispel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Worldwide, there is an increased reliance on casual staff in the health sector. Recent policy attention in South Africa has focused on the interrelated challenges of agency nursing and moonlighting in the health sector. Objective: This paper examines the potential health system consequences of agency nursing and moonlighting among South African nurses. Methods: During 2010, a cluster random sample of 80 hospitals was selected in four South African provinces. On the survey day, all nurses providing clinical care completed a self-administered questionnaire after giving informed consent. The questionnaire obtained information on socio-demographics, involvement in agency nursing and moonlighting, and self-reported indicators of potential health system consequences of agency nursing and moonlighting. A weighted analysis was done using STATA® 13. Results: In the survey, 40.7% of nurses reported moonlighting or working for an agency in the preceding year. Of all participants, 51.5% reported feeling too tired to work, 11.5% paid less attention to nursing work on duty, and 10.9% took sick leave when not actually sick in the preceding year. Among the moonlighters, 11.9% had taken vacation leave to do agency work or moonlighting, and 9.8% reported conflicting schedules between their primary and secondary jobs. In the bivariate analysis, moonlighting nurses were significantly more likely than non-moonlighters to take sick leave when not sick (p=0.011 and to pay less attention to nursing work on duty (p=0.035. However, in a multiple logistic regression analysis, the differences between moonlighters and non-moonlighters did not remain statistically significant after adjusting for other socio-demographic variables. Conclusion: Although moonlighting did not emerge as a statistically significant predictor, the reported health system consequences are serious. A combination of strong nursing leadership, effective management, and consultation with and

  3. Nurses' health, age and the wish to leave the profession--findings from the European NEXT-Study

    Hasselhorn, H M; Tackenberg, P; Kuemmerling, Angelika;

    2006-01-01

    In many industrialised countries the number of workers with low health is expected to increase in the nursing profession. This will have implications for occupational health work in health care. The European NEXT-Study (www. next-study. net, funded by EU) investigates working conditions of nurses...... in ten European countries and provides the opportunity to evaluate the role of health with respect to age and the consideration of leaving nursing....

  4. 76 FR 70076 - Technical Revisions To Update Reference to the Required Assessment Tool for State Nursing Homes...

    2011-11-10

    ... State homes providing nursing home care to eligible veterans. 74 FR 19426-01 (Apr. 29, 2009). This... diem from VA for providing nursing home care to veterans. The proposed rule would require State nursing... update reference to the required resident assessment tool for State homes providing nursing home...

  5. Swimming without the water: a critical perspective on mental health experience for adult nursing students.

    Barrett, Paul; Jackson, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    Adult nurses and adult field nursing students come into contact with a diverse range of other patient groups in their practice but perhaps none more so than those who have co-existing mental health issues. Consequently adult field student nurses must be equipped with the requisite knowledge and skills to competently care for their patients who also experience mental health problems. Given the pressure on placements many education providers have developed alternatives to direct mental health experiences. The authors review their own experience of some of the modalities that higher education institutes (HEI) use to instruct their students in this field. They argue that, ideally, there is no substitute for the practical experience of placements in the mental health sector, particularly if these include contact with mental health nursing. The paper concludes with some recommendations for nursing education and our professional body that could help equip adult field nursing students with the necessary experience and skills of mental health to support them into their future careers. PMID:23830557

  6. Acoustic assessment of speech privacy curtains in two nursing units.

    Pope, Diana S; Miller-Klein, Erik T

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals have complex soundscapes that create challenges to patient care. Extraneous noise and high reverberation rates impair speech intelligibility, which leads to raised voices. In an unintended spiral, the increasing noise may result in diminished speech privacy, as people speak loudly to be heard over the din. The products available to improve hospital soundscapes include construction materials that absorb sound (acoustic ceiling tiles, carpet, wall insulation) and reduce reverberation rates. Enhanced privacy curtains are now available and offer potential for a relatively simple way to improve speech privacy and speech intelligibility by absorbing sound at the hospital patient's bedside. Acoustic assessments were performed over 2 days on two nursing units with a similar design in the same hospital. One unit was built with the 1970s' standard hospital construction and the other was newly refurbished (2013) with sound-absorbing features. In addition, we determined the effect of an enhanced privacy curtain versus standard privacy curtains using acoustic measures of speech privacy and speech intelligibility indexes. Privacy curtains provided auditory protection for the patients. In general, that protection was increased by the use of enhanced privacy curtains. On an average, the enhanced curtain improved sound absorption from 20% to 30%; however, there was considerable variability, depending on the configuration of the rooms tested. Enhanced privacy curtains provide measureable improvement to the acoustics of patient rooms but cannot overcome larger acoustic design issues. To shorten reverberation time, additional absorption, and compact and more fragmented nursing unit floor plate shapes should be considered. PMID:26780959

  7. Acoustic assessment of speech privacy curtains in two nursing units

    Diana S Pope

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hospitals have complex soundscapes that create challenges to patient care. Extraneous noise and high reverberation rates impair speech intelligibility, which leads to raised voices. In an unintended spiral, the increasing noise may result in diminished speech privacy, as people speak loudly to be heard over the din. The products available to improve hospital soundscapes include construction materials that absorb sound (acoustic ceiling tiles, carpet, wall insulation and reduce reverberation rates. Enhanced privacy curtains are now available and offer potential for a relatively simple way to improve speech privacy and speech intelligibility by absorbing sound at the hospital patient′s bedside. Acoustic assessments were performed over 2 days on two nursing units with a similar design in the same hospital. One unit was built with the 1970s′ standard hospital construction and the other was newly refurbished (2013 with sound-absorbing features. In addition, we determined the effect of an enhanced privacy curtain versus standard privacy curtains using acoustic measures of speech privacy and speech intelligibility indexes. Privacy curtains provided auditory protection for the patients. In general, that protection was increased by the use of enhanced privacy curtains. On an average, the enhanced curtain improved sound absorption from 20% to 30%; however, there was considerable variability, depending on the configuration of the rooms tested. Enhanced privacy curtains provide measureable improvement to the acoustics of patient rooms but cannot overcome larger acoustic design issues. To shorten reverberation time, additional absorption, and compact and more fragmented nursing unit floor plate shapes should be considered.

  8. A Model for Risk Assessment in Health Care.

    Prijatelj, Vesna; Rajkovič, Vladislav; Šušteršič, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our research is to reduce risks and hence prevent errors in the health care process. The aim is to design an organizational information model using error prevention methods for risk assessment in a clinical setting. The model is based on selected indicators of quality nursing care, resulting from the world-known theoretical and practical models combined with experience in the Slovenian health care. The proposed organizational information model and software solution has a significant impact on the professional attention, communication and information, critical thinking, experience and knowledge. PMID:27332383

  9. An Investigation into the Public Health Roles of Community Learning Disability Nurses

    Mafuba, Kay; Gates, Bob

    2015-01-01

    International studies have shown poor uptake of public health initiatives by people with learning disabilities. In addition, studies have shown that people with learning disabilities experience poor access to public health services. The contribution of community learning disability nurses in meeting the public health needs of people with learning…

  10. Community Health Nursing in a Former Soviet Union Republic: A Case Study of Change in Armenia.

    Bernal, Henrietta; And Others

    1995-01-01

    To combat extreme health conditions in Armenia, nurses and physicians were given pretraining in community health at home and additional training in the United States on change strategies and community-based practice. Unforeseen barriers to change hindered progress, but participants were committed to preventive community health care. (SK)

  11. Weight Care Project: Health professionals' attitudes and ability to assess body weight status - Study protocol

    Murphy Kathy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health professionals working in primary care and public health have opportunities to address body weight status issues with their patients through face-to-face contact. The objectives of this all-Ireland project are: 1. to assess the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups on body weight status; 2. to assess the health professional groups' ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The health professional groups are: (a community related public health nurses; (b school public health nurses; (c GPs and practice nurses (primary care; and (d occupational health nurses (workplace from both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Methods/Design This all-Ireland multi-disciplinary project follows a mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and consists of four components: 1. Literature review - to explore the role of health professionals in managing obesity through spontaneous intervention in a variety of health promotion settings. 2. Telephone interviews and focus groups - to gain an in-depth insight into the views of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 3. Survey (primarily online but also paper-based - to determine the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 4. Online evaluation study - an online interactive programme will be developed to assess health professionals' ability to identify the body weight status of adults and children. Discussion This project will assess and report the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups within Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on body weight status, and their ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The results of this project will generate recommendations for clinical practice in managing obesity, which may

  12. Weight Care Project: Health professionals' attitudes and ability to assess body weight status - Study protocol

    Moorhead, Anne

    2011-03-31

    Abstract Background Health professionals working in primary care and public health have opportunities to address body weight status issues with their patients through face-to-face contact. The objectives of this all-Ireland project are: 1. to assess the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups on body weight status; 2. to assess the health professional groups\\' ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The health professional groups are: (a) community related public health nurses; (b) school public health nurses; (c) GPs and practice nurses (primary care); and (d) occupational health nurses (workplace) from both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Methods\\/Design This all-Ireland multi-disciplinary project follows a mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and consists of four components: 1. Literature review - to explore the role of health professionals in managing obesity through spontaneous intervention in a variety of health promotion settings. 2. Telephone interviews and focus groups - to gain an in-depth insight into the views of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 3. Survey (primarily online but also paper-based) - to determine the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 4. Online evaluation study - an online interactive programme will be developed to assess health professionals\\' ability to identify the body weight status of adults and children. Discussion This project will assess and report the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups within Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on body weight status, and their ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The results of this project will generate recommendations for clinical practice in managing obesity, which may

  13. The education and contribution of women health care professionals in Saudi Arabia: the case of nursing.

    el-Sanabary, N

    1993-12-01

    "Women constitute the key resource for attaining the goal of health for all by the year 2000," maintains a report by The World Health Organization. Achieving this goal requires massive efforts including (1) the training of women health care professionals; and (2) the nonformal health education of women, the primary health care providers to their families and communities. This paper focuses on the first area, specifically on the education of women nurses in a Third World country, Saudi Arabia, where traditional attitudes persist against intermingling of the genders and the treatment of women by men. It examines the progress and problems encountered in recruiting Saudi women for nursing education and practice; describes the evolution of nursing education programs; and analyzes the obstacles to women's participation in these programs and in the nursing profession. The paper concludes with recommendations to address the problem, increase women's participation, and contribute to that country's health development. The paper is based upon primary and secondary data, including official statistics; personal interviews with Saudi women health professionals and students; the memoirs of a leading Saudi woman nurse and educator, the author's personal observations and experiences with the health care system during four years of residence in Saudi Arabia, and available literature on the subject. PMID:8284700

  14. The Impact of Certificate-of-Need Laws on Nursing Home and Home Health Care Expenditures

    Rahman, Momotazur; Galarraga, Omar; Zinn, Jacqueline S.; Grabowski, David C.; Mor, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades, nursing homes and home health care agencies have been influenced by several Medicare and Medicaid policy changes including the adoption of prospective payment for Medicare-paid postacute care and Medicaid-paid long-term home and community-based care reforms. This article examines how spending growth in these sectors was affected by state certificate-of-need (CON) laws, which were designed to limit the growth of providers and have remained unchanged for several decades. Compared with states without CON laws, Medicare and Medicaid spending in states with CON laws grew faster for nursing home care and more slowly for home health care. In particular, we observed the slowest growth in community-based care in states with CON for both the nursing home and home health industries. Thus, controlling for other factors, public postacute and long-term care expenditures in CON states have become dominated by nursing homes. PMID:26223431

  15. Child care consultations held by nurses within the Family Health Strategy

    Francisco Fagner Sousa Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at identifying initiatives taken by nurses during child care routine visits in Family Health Units. It is an observational, descriptive and quantitative research. Data collection took place from August to October 2011, through the observation of three consultations carried out by eight nurses (24 appointments for the Family Health Strategy Scheme in Picos - Piauí. During consultations, the following issues were more frequently observed: anthropometry, reflexes according to age, encouraging of exclusive breastfeeding and advice on child hygiene. The need for further nurse training through continuous education was verified, seeking to improve care in order to contribute to the improvement of nursing care quality focused on promoting child health thru childcare consultations.

  16. Developing a preceptorship/mentorship model for home health care nurses.

    DeCicco, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Preceptorship and mentorship programs are used in the health care sector to educate nurses, enhance their leadership skills, and improve their quality of work life. Recognizing the importance of these initiatives, Saint Elizabeth Health Care sought funding to create an innovative model of preceptorship/mentorship that meets the unique needs of home health care nurses. The methods utilized included focus groups, key informant interviews, and a workflow analysis. Factors that influence preceptorship such as nursing workload, preceptor training and remuneration were examined to develop a new model that offers career enhancement and leadership opportunities for preceptors and mentors, and promotes a welcoming environment for preceptees. Reward and recognition programs were created for preceptors to acknowledge their leadership contribution at the front line. This study demonstrates how evidence and innovation were used to create a preceptorship/mentorship model to develop community nursing leaders of the future. PMID:18444063

  17. Work process and management competences of the nurses in the family health strategy

    Marcilene de Paula

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to identify the dimension of the process of nursing work in a unit of the Family Health Strategy and correlate the necessary competences for the development of managerial activities. It is a descriptive study using the technique of non-participant observation during 160 hours of activities of four nurses from a unit of the Family Health Strategy, from March to May, 2011. The results showed that the care dimension holds 42% of the time spent by nurses in their activities, followed by management (33%, education (20% and political participation (2.5%. In managerial dimension, managerial competences were classified as follows: communication (55%, leadership (33%, permanent education (8% and decision making (4%. These competences are interrelated and developed together with administrative functions: planning, coordination, direction and control. For the development of their attributions in the Family Health Strategies the nurse professionals uses administrative tools demanding constant mobilization of different competences.

  18. [Prenatal care protocol: actions and the easy and difficult aspects dealt by Family Health Strategy nurses].

    Rodrigues, Edilene Matos; do Nascimento, Rafaella Gontijo; Araújo, Alisson

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to learn the perception that nurses have about the protocol of their attributions in prenatal care, identifying the health actions they develop, as well as the easy and difficult aspects in using the referred protocol. This qualitative study was developed with Family Health Strategy nurses in Divinópolis, Minas Gerais. The data survey was performed through interviews with five nurses. The data was submitted to thematic content analysis. Results showed the need for investments in professional qualification for women's health care in the pregnancy-postpartum cycle, as well as to create and implement protocols that promote a better interaction between the medical and nursing work. PMID:22031361

  19. Nursing students' perceptions of their knowledge of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender issues: effectiveness of a multi-purpose assignment in a public health nursing class.

    Carabez, Rebecca; Pellegrini, Marion; Mankovitz, Andrea; Eliason, Michele J; Dariotis, Wei Ming

    2015-01-01

    Nurses work with diverse populations, but the nursing literature lacks research, theoretical frameworks, or practice guidelines regarding lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health. Through diverse teaching strategies, students explored issues related to LGBT patients, families, and nurses using a cultural humility lens. Diverse teaching strategies included readings, a 2-hour presentation on LGBT health issues, and an assignment to conduct a scripted interview with two nurse key informants, based on the Health Care Equality Index (HEI). Students completed an online LGBT awareness preinterview survey, completed interviews, and completed a postinterview survey. Students showed a significant increase in knowledge about sexual orientation and gender identity and research and interview methods from pretest to posttest. The diverse teaching strategies involved in this assignment can enhance student knowledge, attitudes, and skills related to LGBT health care needs and increase appreciation of nursing research. PMID:25545145

  20. Stress assessment by anaesthesiologists and nurses working in paediatric intensive care units

    Grzeskowiak, Malgorzata; Bartkowska-Sniatkowska, Alicja; Rosada-Kurasinska, Jowita; Kielbasiewicz-Drozdowska, Iwona; Janicki, Piotr K

    2013-01-01

      Abstract. Paediatric intensive care units (PICU) play a special role in the therapy of critically ill children. The physicians (anaesthesiologists) and nurses are at a particular risk of job-related stress because continuous work stress can lead to psychological and physical disturbances. The aim of the study was to assess the stress level among the anaesthesiologists and nurses in the PICU. The anaesthesiologists and nurses (104), recruited from five university hospital centres in Poland, ...

  1. Psychometric Properties of the Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale

    Yoon, Sunmoo; Yen, Po-Yin; Bakken, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the factor structure, internal consistency reliability, and responsiveness of the Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale (SANICS). Combined BS/MS nursing students (N=336) completed the 93-item scale, which was based upon published and locally-developed nursing informatics competency statements. Exploratory principal component analysis with oblique promax rotation extracted five factors comprising 30 items that explained 63.7% of th...

  2. The Silence of Our Science: Nursing Research on LGBT Older Adult Health.

    Cloyes, Kristin G

    2016-03-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) older adults have been largely invisible within health and aging services research, despite being disproportionately burdened by poor health and aging outcomes. The current study examines the prevalence of LGBT aging and older adult health-related studies in the 2010-2014 nursing literature, and how this topic is being addressed. Systematic CINAHL and PubMed searches were conducted and compared to (a) quantify the prevalence of LGBT older adult-related scholarship in nursing research; (b) document the appearance of relevant publications in top nursing journals; (c) identify the focus of articles with a substantive focus on LGBT older adult health or aging; and (d) compare the prevalence of LGBT older adult-related literature in nursing, gerontology, medicine, and social work. Findings indicate that research explicitly including LGBT older adults is lacking across the health sciences, particularly in nursing (where it has been largely absent). Implications for nursing research, practice, and education are discussed. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2016; 9(2):92-104.]. PMID:26716654

  3. Supervision of Community Health Agents in the Family Health Strategy: the perspective of nurses

    Juliana Sterci da Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective Analyzing the conceptions of supervision of nurses in the Family Health Strategy (ESF - Estratégia Saúde da Família in relation to community health workers (ACS – Agente Comunitário de Saúde, taking for reference the work process and the power relations. Method A qualitative study, in which 18 interviews were carried out with nurses from the ESF in the countryside of the state of Goiás. Following transcription, the data were subjected to thematic content analysis and the following categories were identified: Supervision with that sees it all and Supervision is participating and working together. Results Among the findings, it is clear the character of control and monitoring that is carried out primarily through printed instruments and home visits, which constitute vertical and impositive relations, and suffer influence of the local health management. Another finding is the supervision as acting together and with the educational perspective. Conclusion The supervision carried out does not provide the changes intended by the ESF.

  4. Mental Health promotion of a hospital through the nurse in the liaison psychiatry team

    Natalia Cámara Conde

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We show a proposal to increase the quality of nursing cares, improving mental health care of hospitalized patients by creating the figure of the liaison nurse within the liaison psychiatry team. This nurse would not only be a reference to support the nursing staff at the level of patient care, but also the psycho-emotional self-care professional.Objectives: Justifying the need to include the figure of the specialist mental health team liaison psychiatry nurse. Method: The rotation as residents, for a month, with the interconsultation team psychiatric hospital Gregorio Marañón and literature review. Results: There have been partially unmet needs, these could be covered with the existence of a nurse specialist in mental health consultation in this hospital. Discussion: Possibly it poses difficulties in defining the roles of various liaison team professionals, which we expect can be defined at the start implementing the new member.The hospital itself has an own field defined, articulated through the NANDA, NIC, NOC methodology, which covers aspects that so far have not being made, there is not a nurse figure into the psychiatric consultation liaison team.

  5. Changing realities: an analysis of the British Health Care system and the implications for nursing.

    Calvert-Simms, D

    1993-01-01

    The British health care system is undergoing dramatic change as it moves from a management system based on scientific management principles towards a management system based on internal market principles. This restructuring, outlined in the British Government's White Paper, "Working for Patients" (1989), will have a significant impact on the practice of nursing. The changes will seriously affect, not only the nurse at the bedside, but also nursing management roles, practices and responsibilities. Ultimately these changes will require the radical restructuring of nursing education as British nurses know it today. This restructuring is essential if nurses are to meet and surpass the difficulties they face as their present role in the health care system is challenged, and in some areas seriously undermined. Similar problems are already being faced by Canadian nurses as they struggle to redefine the goals of their profession in light of new government strategies and policies on health care. An objective analysis of the problems faced by our British counterparts may offer insight into our own difficulties, and generate some solutions. PMID:8490037

  6. FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE SELECTION OF LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDENT NURSES IN PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    L F Small

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available T he researcher, being a nursing lecturer, questioned the method of selection of learning opportunities for student nurses in two training hospitals in the Northern part of Namibia.

    The study therefore focused on the following objective: To identify the factors that influence the selection of learning opportunities for primary health care in hospital units. A qualitative research design utilising focus group discussions were used. The population consisted of conveniently selected lecturers, student nurses and registered nurses. The same initial question was asked in each focus group to initiate the discussions. The data were analysed according to Tesch's method.

    The results indicated that there is positive commitment from the lecturers and registered nurses to be involved in selecting appropriate learning opportunities. The student nurses also demonstrated a willingness to learn and to be exposed to learning opportunities in primary health care. There were however certain constraints that emerged as themes, namely:
    • Managerial constraints • Educational constraints
    Under the theme "managerial constraints" categories such as workload, nursing staff shortages and communication problems were identified. Under the theme "educational constraints" categories such as a lack of guidance, and the correlation of theory and practice emerged.

    Recommendations based on this research report include improvement of in-service education on managerial and educational aspects to facilitate the primary health care approach in hospitals.

  7. Assessment and evaluation of nurses training programme on radiation

    Many nurses in hospitals and clinics are concerned about the care of patients diagnosed or treated with radiation. Knowledge about radiation effects and radiological protection was in limited supply among nurses. Some nurses are anxious about the effects of occupational radiation, and they have not appropriately coped with their patients' questions about radiation effects of medical exposure. We investigated the level of knowledge about radiation among nurses and required knowledge for nurses in hospitals and clinics. Based on the results of the investigation, we designed an education and training program of lectures and practice for nurses in hospitals. After the education and training by our program was done, we evaluated the effects of the education and training with an interview and a questionnaire for each nurse. (author)

  8. Teaching Job Survival Skills in Nursing: A Look at Occupational Health Nursing.

    Henderson, S. Lee

    1980-01-01

    Most nursing assistant programs place emphasis primarily on the cognitive and psychomotor aspects of the student's education. The school must focus on career exploration to meet fully its responsibility for helping students prepare for work. (JOW)

  9. Assessment and management of pain in children: perception of the nursing team

    Débora Guedelha Blasi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the perception of the nursing team regarding the assessment and management of pain performed in a pediatric unit. This is a qualitative, observational, prospective, and cross-sectional study. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with the nursing team from a pediatric unit of an university hospital in the city of Londrina - Paraná, in the period from June to August 2009, and analyzed according to Mayan. In total, 31 professionals of the nursing team participated in this study, 4 nurses and 27 from other nursing categories. It was verified that less than half of the professionals attended training courses for pain assessment often carried out in this hospital. However, most stated to perform the assessment of pain as the 5th vital sign for all children. The facial scale is the most used by the team, although only 44% had correctly described the technique of use. Other professionals also reported that they did not use any scale to assess pain. The main difficulty pointed by the nursing team was regarding assessment of pain in infants. Regarding the unit's assessment of pain in general, most of the professionals think that they need to improve, reporting that other professionals do not assess pain all the times, or do it incorrectly. Nevertheless, everyone considered pain assessment of major importance in childcare. It is concluded that there is still a lack of knowledge and awareness about child's pain in the nursing team.

  10. Exploring Communities of Practice through Public Health Walks for Nurse Education

    Davies, J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Student nurses must develop skills in observation, communication and reflection as well as public health knowledge from their first year of training. This paper will explain a method developed for students to collect their own findings about public health in urban areas. These areas are both rich in the history of old public health that informs the content of many traditional public health walks, but are also locations where new public health concerns about chronic disease are c...

  11. Oxymoronic or synergistic: deconstructing the psychiatric and/or mental health nurse.

    Cutcliffe, John; Stevenson, Chris; Lakeman, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Examination of the names used to signify a nurse who specializes in working with people with mental health problems indicates the absence of a shared nomenclature and the frequent conflation of the terms 'psychiatric' and 'mental health'. Informed by the work of Derrida (1978) and Saussure (1916-1983), the authors encourage the deconstruction of and problematization of these terms, and this shows that what nurses who work with people with so-called mental illness are called has depended on where they have worked, the vagaries of passing fashion, and public policy. Further, there are irreconcilable philosophical, theoretical, and clinical positions that prevent nurses from practicing simultaneously as 'psychiatric' and 'mental health' nurses. Related service user literature indicates that it is disingenuous to camouflage 'psychiatric' services as 'mental health' services, and as signifiers, signified, and signs, psychiatric and mental health nursing are sustained by political agendas, which do not necessarily prioritize the needs of the person with the illness. Clearly demarked and less disingenuous signs for both mental health and psychiatric care would not only be a more honest approach, but would also be in keeping with the service user literature that highlights the expectation that there are two signs (and thus two services): psychiatric and mental health services. PMID:23066735

  12. The Role of the Community Nurse in Promoting Health and Human Dignity-Narrative Review Article.

    Ana Muntean

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Population health, as defined by WHO in its constitution, is out "a physical, mental and social complete wellbeing". At the basis of human welfare is the human dignity. This dimension requires an integrated vision of health care. The ecosystemical vision of Bronfenbrenner allows highlighting the unexpected connections between social macro system based on values and the micro system consisting of individual and family. Community nurse is aimed to transgression in practice of education and care, the respect for human dignity, the bonds among values and practices of the community and the physical health of individuals. In Romania, the promotion of community nurse began in 2002, through the project promoting the social inclusion by developing human and institutional resources within community nursery of the National School of Public Health, Management and Education in Healthcare Bucharest. The community nurse became apparent in 10 counties included in the project. Considering the respect for human dignity as an axiomatic value for the community nurse interventions, we stress the need for developing a primary care network in Romania. The proof is based on the analysis of the concept of human dignity within health care, as well as the secondary analysis of health indicators, in the year of 2010, of the 10 counties included in the project. Our conclusions will draw attention to the need of community nurse and, will open directions for new researches and developments needed to promote primary health in Romania.

  13. Overweight children's response to an annual health dialogue with the school nurse

    Borup, Ina K; Holstein, Bjørn Evald

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare overweight and normal weight pupils' perceived outcome of the health dialogue with the school nurse. A random sample of schools in Denmark, where pupils age 11.6, 13.6 and 15.6 years old, answered a questionnaire (response rate 88%, n = 5205). The...... independent variable weight group was measured by self-reported height and weight and calculated as body mass index. Perceived outcome of the dialogue was measured as: (i) reflected on the dialogue; (ii) discussed the content with parents; (iii) followed the advice of the nurse; and (iv) visited the nurse...... again. Overweight boys reflected (odds ratio (OR) = 1.73), discussed the dialogue with at least one parent (OR = 1.38), followed the nurse's advice (OR = 1.42) and visited the nurse again (OR = 2.68). There was a significant statistical link between age group and perceived outcome among the boys, but...

  14. Self-assessment of nursing informatics competencies for doctor of nursing practice students.

    Choi, Jeungok; Zucker, Donna M

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the informatics competencies of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) students and whether these competencies differed between DNP students in the post-baccalaureate (BS) and post-master's (MS) tracks. Self-reported informatics competencies were collected from 132 DNP students (68 post-BS and 64 post-MS students) in their first year in the program (2007 to 2010). Students were assessed in 18 areas of 3 competency categories: computer skills, informatics knowledge, and informatics skills. Post-BS students were competent in 4 areas (computer skills in communication, systems, documentation, and informatics knowledge about impact of information management), whereas post-MS students were competent in only 1 area (computer skills in communication). Students in both tracks reported computer skills in decision support as their least competent area. Overall, post-BS students reported slightly higher than or similar competency scores as post-MS students, but scores were statistically significant in only 3 of 18 areas. The assessment indicated that knowledge and skills on informatics competencies need to be improved, especially in computer skills for data access and use of decision support systems. Strategies are suggested to integrate competencies into existing informatics course and DNP curricula. Further studies are recommended using an objective measure of informatics competencies. PMID:24267932

  15. Development of a model home health nurse internship program for new graduates: key lessons learned.

    Shur Coyle, Joanne

    2011-05-01

    A nursing shortage, the aging baby boomer population, an escalating need for home health care, and limited availability of health care dollars are threatening to undermine the quality of health care in the United States. The National Center for Health Workforce Analysis projects a deficit of 275,000 full-time equivalents by 2010 (-12%) and a deficit of 800,000 by 2020 (-29%). This article focuses on one home health agency's strategy to support nurse graduates transitioning from student to professional nurse. Based on Benner's (1984) hallmark theory from novice to expert, the goals of this program are to enhance job satisfaction and social integration, facilitate autonomy, increase critical thinking and psychomotor skills, and develop additional competencies. Eleven key lessons learned are outlined. PMID:20839661

  16. Nurse Mentors to Advance Quality Improvement in Primary Health Centers: Lessons From a Pilot Program in Northern Karnataka, India.

    Fischer, Elizabeth A; Jayana, Krishnamurthy; Cunningham, Troy; Washington, Maryann; Mony, Prem; Bradley, Janet; Moses, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    High-quality care during labor, delivery, and the postpartum period is critically important since maternal and child morbidity and mortality are linked to complications that arise during these stages. A nurse mentoring program was implemented in northern Karnataka, India, to improve quality of services at primary health centers (PHCs), the lowest level in the public health system that offers basic obstetric care. The intervention, conducted between August 2012 and July 2014, employed 53 full-time nurse mentors and was scaled-up in 385 PHCs in 8 poor rural districts. Each mentor was responsible for 6 to 8 PHCs and conducted roughly 6 mentoring visits per PHC in the first year. This paper reports the results of a qualitative inquiry, conducted between September 2012 and April 2014, assessing the program's successes and challenges from the perspective of mentors and PHC teams. Data were gathered through 13 observations, 9 focus group discussions with mentors, and 25 individual and group interviews with PHC nurses, medical officers, and district health officers. Mentors and PHC staff and leaders reported a number of successes, including development of rapport and trust between mentors and PHC staff, introduction of team-based quality improvement processes, correct and consistent use of a new case sheet to ensure adherence to clinical guidelines, and increases in staff nurses' knowledge and skills. Overall, nurses in many PHCs reported an increased ability to provide care according to guidelines and to handle maternal and newborn complications, along with improvements in equipment and supplies and referral management. Challenges included high service delivery volumes and/or understaffing at some PHCs, unsupportive or absent PHC leadership, and cultural practices that impacted quality. Comprehensive mentoring can build competence and improve performance by combining on-the-job clinical and technical support, applying quality improvement principles, and promoting team

  17. Feasibility and Impact of Doctor-Nurse Task Delegation in Preventive Child Health Care in the Netherlands, a Controlled Before-After Study.

    S Janine Benjamins

    experienced an equal level of proficiency but less continuity in person.This experiment shows that task delegation from doctor to nurse in preventive child health care is feasible. It is important to pay attention to the acceptation process of professionals during implementation. More investigation is needed in order to assess effectiveness and efficacy of task delegation.

  18. Development of a self-assessment tool for measuring competences of obstetric nurses in rooming-in wards in China

    Zhang, Ju; Ye, Wenqin; Fan, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To provide high-quality nursing care, a reliable and feasible competency assessment tool is critical. Although several questionnaire-based competency assessment tools have been reported, a tool specific for obstetric nurses in rooming-in wards is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to develop a competency assessment tool for obstetric rooming-in ward nurses. Methods: A literature review was conducted to create an individual intensive interview with 14 nurse manag...

  19. Information management. Computer resources for the occupational and environmental health nurse.

    Amann, M C

    1999-12-01

    Occupational and environmental health nurses are responsible for the management of large amounts of very complex information, ranging from individual employee health records to reports that insure corporate compliance. There are four primary tools available to the occupational health nurse to facilitate efficient management and use of health information--occupational health information systems, office support programs, communication systems, and the Internet and intranets. Selection and implementation of an integrated health information system requires the involvement of any organization that uses data processed by the system. A project management approach to implementation and maintenance of a system insures adherence to time lines and attention to details. The internet provides access to a vast amount of information useful to both the occupational health professional and the employee. Intranets are internal systems that may facilitate distribution of health information to employees, maintenance of current health related policies, and more efficient reporting procedures. PMID:10865545

  20. The impact of caring for persons living with HIV and AIDS on the mental health of nurses in the Limpopo Province

    M Davhana-Maselesele

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the impact of caring for AIDS sufferers on the mental health of nurses. This assessment was measured against the level of burnout, stress and depression among 174 nurses caring for people living with HIV and AIDS in Limpopo Province, South Africa. A structured questionnaire was used for data collection. The questionnaire incorporated the AIDS Impact Scale (AIS, Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the participants’ demographic and professional profiles. Participants were conveniently selected from five selected hospitals in Limpopo Province. The study participants’ valuation using the AIS showed that nurses tended to develop strong bonds and relationships with the patients; felt frustrated by their inability to help the terminally ill AIDS sufferers and were subsequently affected by the death of their patients. Personal accomplishments of the nurses remained high and the levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization levels were low. The BDI showed that over 3 out of 4 nurses were experiencing between mild mood disturbance and extreme depression. Higher average scores were noted for items of the depression scale like sadness, dissatisfaction, fatigue and low level of energy. The findings highlight the need to develop psychological support programmes for nurses caring for AIDS patients and promote the provision of social incentives and recognition of the role of nurses in AIDS care.