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Sample records for green sulfur bacteria

  1. Mobilization of sulfur by green sulfur bacteria : physiological and molecular studies on Chlorobaculum parvum DSM 263

    Donà, Clelia

    2011-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria are photolithotrophs that use inorganic sulfur compounds as electron donors for photosynthesis. Elemental, solid sulfur is one of the electron donors used. Sulfur is produced by green sulfur bacteria during the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate, and during the oxidation of thiosulfate to sulfur and sulfate. Green sulfur bacteria have been known for long, and the genomes of 12 strains have been sequenced. Yet, it is not clear how green sulfur bacteria can access elemental s...

  2. Mechanisms and evolution of oxidative sulfur metabolism in green sulfur bacteria

    Gregersen, Lea Haarup; Bryant, Donald A.; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria (GSB) constitute a closely related group of photoautotrophic and thiotrophic bacteria with limited phenotypic variation. They typically oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to sulfate with sulfur globules as an intermediate. Based on genome sequence information from 15 strains, the...... distribution and phylogeny of enzymes involved in their oxidative sulfur metabolism was investigated. At least one homolog of sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) is present in all strains. In all sulfur-oxidizing GSB strains except the earliest diverging Chloroherpeton thalassium, the sulfide oxidation...

  3. Sulfur globule oxidation in green sulfur bacteria is dependent on the dissimilatory sulfite reductase system

    Holkenbrink, Carina; Ocón Barbas, Santiago; Mellerup, Anders;

    2011-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to sulfate with extracellular globules of elemental sulfur as intermediate. Here we investigated which genes are involved in the formation and consumption of these sulfur globules in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. We show that...... sulfur globule oxidation is strictly dependent on the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) system. Deletion of dsrM/CT2244 or dsrT/CT2245 or the two dsrCABL clusters (CT0851-CT0854, CT2247-2250) abolished sulfur globule oxidation and prevented formation of sulfate from sulfide, whereas deletion of dsr......:quinone oxidoreductases (sqrB/CT0117 and sqrD/CT1087) were deleted, exhibited a decreased sulfide oxidation rate (~50% of wild type), yet formation and consumption of sulfur globules were not affected. The observation that mutants lacking the DSR system maintain efficient growth, suggests that the DSR system is...

  4. Genomic Insights into the Sulfur Metabolism of Phototrophic Green Sulfur Bacteria

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Bryant, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria (GSB) utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, ferrous iron, and hydrogen for anaerobic photoautotrophic growth. Genome sequence data is currently available for 12 strains of GSB. We present here a genome-based survey of the distribution and...... phylogenies of genes involved in oxidation of sulfur compounds in these strains. Sulfide:quinone reductase, encoded by sqr, is the only known sulfur-oxidizing enzyme found in all strains. All sulfide-utilizing strains contain the dissimilatory sulfite reductase dsrABCEFHLNMKJOPT genes, which appear to be...... involved in elemental sulfur utilization. All thiosulfate-utilizing strains have an identical sox gene cluster (soxJXYZAKBW). The soxCD genes found in certain other thiosulfate-utilizing organisms like Paracoccus pantotrophus are absent from GSB. Genes encoding flavocytochrome c (fccAB), adenosine-5...

  5. Genomic and Evolutionary Perspectives on Sulfur Metabolism in Green Sulfur Bacteria

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Bryant, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria (GSB) are anaerobic photoautotrophs that oxidize sulfide, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, ferrous iron, and hydrogen for growth. We present here an analysis of the distribution and evolution of enzymes involved in oxidation of sulfur compounds in GSB based on genome sequence...... data from 12 strains. Sulfide:quinone reductase (SQR) is found in all strains. Chlorobium ferrooxidans, which cannot grow on sulfide but grows on Fe2+, has apparently lost all genes involved in oxidation of sulfur compounds other than sqr. Instead, this organism possesses genes involved in assimilatory...... sulfate reduction, a trait that is unusual in GSB. The dissimilatory sulfite reductase (Dsr) enzyme system, which appears to be involved in elemental sulfur utilization, is found in all sulfide-utilizing strains except Chloroherpeton thalassium. The absence of Dsr enzymes in this early diverging GSB, in...

  6. Mechanisms and evolution of oxidative sulfur metabolism in green sulfur bacteria

    Niels-UlrikFrigaard

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Green sulfur bacteria (GSB constitute a closely related group of photoautotrophic and thiotrophic bacteria with limited phenotypic variation. They typically oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to sulfate with sulfur globules as an intermediate. Based on genome sequence information from 15 strains, the distribution and phylogeny of enzymes involved in their oxidative sulfur metabolism was investigated. At least one homolog of sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR is present in all strains. In all sulfur-oxidizing GSB strains except the earliest diverging Chloroherpeton thalassium, the sulfide oxidation product is further oxidized to sulfite by the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR system. This system consists of components horizontally acquired partly from sulfide-oxidizing and partly from sulfate-reducing bacteria. Depending on the strain, the sulfite is probably oxidized to sulfate by one of two different mechanisms that have different evolutionary origins: adenosine-5’-phosphosulfate reductase (APR or polysulfide reductase-like complex 3 (PSRLC3. Thiosulfate utilization by the SOX system in GSB has apparently been acquired horizontally from proteobacteria. SoxCD does not occur in GSB, and its function in sulfate formation in other bacteria has been replaced by the DSR system in GSB. Sequence analyses suggested that the conserved soxJXYZAKBW gene cluster was horizontally acquired by Chlorobium phaeovibrioides DSM 265 from the Chlorobaculum lineage and that this acquisition was mediated by a mobile genetic element. Thus, the last common ancestor of currently known GSB was probably photoautotrophic, hydrogenotrophic, and contained SQR but not DSR or SOX. In addition, the predominance of the Chlorobium-Chlorobaculum-Prosthecochloris lineage among cultured GSB could be due to the horizontally acquired DSR and SOX systems. Finally, based upon structural, biochemical, and phylogenetic analyses, a uniform nomenclature is suggested for sqr genes in

  7. Quantification of two forms of green sulfur bacteria in their natural habitat using bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence spectra

    Kharcheva, Anastasia V.; Zhiltsova, Anna A.; Lunina, Olga N.; Savvichev, Alexander S.; Patsaeva, Svetlana V.

    2016-04-01

    Detection of phototropic organisms in their natural habitat using optical instruments operating under water is urgently needed for many tasks of ecological monitoring. While fluorescence methods are widely applied nowadays to detect and characterize phytoplankton communities, the techniques for detection and recognition of anoxygenic phototrophs are considered challenging. Differentiation of the forms of anoxygenic green sulfur bacteria in natural water using spectral techniques remains problematic. Green sulfur bacteria could be found in two forms, green-colored (containing BChl d in pigment compound) and brown-colored (containing BChl e), have the special ecological niche in such reservoirs. Separate determination of these microorganisms by spectral methods is complicated because of similarity of spectral characteristics of their pigments. We describe the novel technique of quantification of two forms of green sulfur bacteria directly in water using bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence without pigment extraction. This technique is noninvasive and could be applied in remote mode in the water bodies with restricted water circulation to determine simultaneously concentrations of two forms of green sulfur bacteria in their natural habitat.

  8. Chromatic acclimation and population dynamics of green sulfur bacteria grown with spectrally tailored light

    Saikin, Semion K; Huh, Joonsuk; Hannout, Moataz; Wang, Yaya; Zare, Farrokh; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Tang, Joseph Kuo-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    Living organisms have to adjust to their surrounding in order to survive in stressful conditions. We study this mechanism in one of most primitive creatures - photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria. These bacteria absorb photons very efficiently using the chlorosome antenna complexes and perform photosynthesis in extreme low-light environments. How the chlorosomes in green sulfur bacteria are acclimated to the stressful light conditions, for instance, if the spectrum of light is not optimal for absorption, is unknown. Studying Chlorobaculum tepidum cultures with far-red to near-infrared light-emitting diodes, we found that these bacteria react to changes in energy flow by regulating the amount of light-absorbing pigments and the size of the chlorosomes. Surprisingly, our results indicate that the bacteria can survive in near-infrared lights capturing low-frequency photons by the intermediate units of the light-harvesting complex. The latter strategy may be used by the species recently found near hydrothermal ve...

  9. Atomistic study of energy funneling in the light-harvesting complex of green sulfur bacteria

    Huh, Joonsuk; Brookes, Jennifer C; Valleau, Stéphanie; Fujita, Takatoshi; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2013-01-01

    Phototrophic organisms such as plants, photosynthetic bacteria and algae use microscopic complexes of pigment molecules to absorb sunlight. Within the light-harvesting complexes, which frequently have multiple functional and structural subunits, the energy is transferred in the form of molecular excitations with very high efficiency. Green sulfur bacteria are considered to be amongst the most efficient light-harvesting organisms. Despite multiple experimental and theoretical studies of these bacteria the physical origin of the efficient and robust energy transfer in their light-harvesting complexes is not well understood. To study excitation dynamics at the systems level we introduce an atomistic model that mimic a complete light-harvesting apparatus of green sulfur bacteria. The model contains about 4000 pigment molecules and comprises a double wall roll for the chlorosome, a baseplate and six Fenna-Matthews-Olson trimer complexes. We show that the fast relaxation within functional subunits combined with the...

  10. A Microsensor Study of the Interaction between Purple Sulfur and Green Sulfur Bacteria in Experimental Benthic Gradients

    Pringault, O.; de Wit, R.; Kühl, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The interaction between the purple sulfur bacterium Thiocapsa roseopersicina and the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii was studied in a gradient chamber under a 16-hours light-8-hours dark regime. The effects of interaction were inferred by comparing the final outcome of a mixed...... culture experiment with those of the respective axenic cultures using the same inoculation densities and experimental conditions. Densities of bacteria were deduced from radiance microprofiles, and the chemical microenvironment was investigated with O2, H2S, and pH microelectrodes. P. aestuarii always...

  11. Sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Dahl, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are characterized by oxidizing various inorganic sulfur compounds for use as electron donors in carbon dioxide fixation during anoxygenic photosynthetic growth. These bacteria are divided into the purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and the green sulfur bacteria (GSB). They...... utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate and sometimes also ferrous iron and hydrogen as electron donors. This review focuses on the dissimilatory and assimilatory metabolism of inorganic sulfur compounds in these bacteria and also briefly discusses these metabolisms in...... other types of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. The biochemistry and genetics of sulfur compound oxidation in PSB and GSB are described in detail. A variety of enzymes catalyzing sulfur oxidation reactions have been isolated from GSB and PSB (especially Allochromatium vinosum, a representative of the...

  12. Gene expression system in green sulfur bacteria by conjugative plasmid transfer.

    Chihiro Azai

    Full Text Available Gene transfer and expression systems in green sulfur bacteria were established by bacterial conjugation with Escherichia coli. Conjugative plasmid transfer from E. coli S17-1 to a thermophilic green sulfur bacterium, Chlorobaculum tepidum (formerly Chlorobium tepidum WT2321, was executed with RSF1010-derivative broad-host-range plasmids, named pDSK5191 and pDSK5192, that confer erythromycin and streptomycin/spectinomycin resistance, respectively. The transconjugants harboring these plasmids were reproducibly obtained at a frequency of approximately 10(-5 by selection with erythromycin and a combination of streptomycin and spectinomycin, respectively. These plasmids were stably maintained in C. tepidum cells in the presence of these antibiotics. The plasmid transfer to another mesophilic green sulfur bacterium, C. limnaeum (formerly Chlorobium phaeobacteroides RK-j-1, was also achieved with pDSK5192. The expression plasmid based on pDSK5191 was constructed by incorporating the upstream and downstream regions of the pscAB gene cluster on the C. tepidum genome, since these regions were considered to include a constitutive promoter and a ρ-independent terminator, respectively. Growth defections of the ∆cycA and ∆soxB mutants were completely rescued after introduction of pDSK5191-cycA and -soxB that were designed to express their complementary genes. On the other hand, pDSK5191-6xhis-pscAB, which incorporated the gene cluster of 6xhis-pscA and pscB, produced approximately four times more of the photosynthetic reaction center complex with His-tagged PscA as compared with that expressed in the genome by the conventional natural transformation method. This expression system, based on conjugative plasmid, would be applicable to general molecular biological studies of green sulfur bacteria.

  13. How can the green sulfur bacteria use quantum computing for light harvesting?

    Drakova, D

    2016-01-01

    Long lasting coherence in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes has been observed even at physiological temperatures. Experiments have demonstrated quantum coherent behaviour in the long-time operation of the D-Wave quantum computer as well. Quantum coherence is the common feature between the two phenomena. An explanations for eight orders of magnitude discrepancy between the single flux qubit coherence time and the long-time quantum behaviour of an array of thousand flux qubits in the quantum computer was suggested within a theory where the flux qubits are coupled to an environment of particles called gravonons of high density of states The coherent evolution is in high dimensional spacetime and can be understood as a solution of Schroedinger's time-dependent equation. Explanations for the quantum beats observed in 2D Fourier transform electronic spectroscopy of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein complex in the green sulfur bacteria are presently sought in constructing transport theories based on quan...

  14. Multiple Types of 8-Vinyl Reductases for (Bacterio)Chlorophyll Biosynthesis Occur in Many Green Sulfur Bacteria

    Liu, Zhenfeng; Bryant, Donald A.

    2011-01-01

    Two 8-vinyl reductases, BciA and BciB, have been identified in chlorophototrophs. The bciA gene of Chlorobaculum tepidum was replaced with genes similar to bciB from other green sulfur bacteria. Pigment analyses of the complemented strains showed that the bciB homologs encode 8-vinyl reductases similar to those of cyanobacteria.

  15. [Photoinduced reduction of NAD(P) in the cells of green sulfur bacteria].

    Ivanovskiĭ, R N

    1975-01-01

    The spectrum of a photoinduced increase in luminescence of the cells of the gree sulphur bacterium Chlorobium limicola f. thiosulfatophilum, within the range of 400 to 520 nm, was found to correspond to the spectrum of luminescence of NADH in the protein-bound form. Photoinduced reduction of NAD(P) in green bacteria, contrary to purple bacteria, is not susceptible to the action of p-chlorocarbonylcyanide phenlhydrazone which uncouples photophosphorylation. Therefore, in Chlorobium limicola f. thiosulfatophilum, NAD(P) is reduced by direct non-cyclic transport of electrons via the photosynthetic chain. NAD(P)H is utilized mainly in the system of CO2 fixation; the process is inhibited by fluoroacetate, and the inhibition is eliminated by substrates of the cycle of carboxylic acids. PMID:2843

  16. Temperature and Carbon Assimilation Regulate the Chlorosome Biogenesis in Green Sulfur Bacteria

    Tang, Joseph Kuo-Hsiang; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Enriquez, Miriam M; Huh, Joonsuk; Frank, Harry A; Urban, Volker S; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Green photosynthetic bacteria adjust the structure and functionality of the chlorosome - the light absorbing antenna complex - in response to environmental stress factors. The chlorosome is a natural self-assembled aggregate of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules. In this study we report the regulation of the biogenesis of the Chlorobaculum tepidum chlorosome by carbon assimilation in conjunction with temperature changes. Our studies indicate that the carbon source and thermal stress culture of Cba. tepidum grows slower and incorporates less BChl c in the chlorosome. Compared with the chlorosome from other cultural conditions we investigated, the chlorosome from the carbon source and thermal stress culture displays: (a) smaller cross-sectional radius and overall size; (b) simplified BChl c homologues with smaller side chains; (c) blue-shifted Qy absorption maxima and (d) a sigmoid-shaped circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Using a theoretical model we analyze how the observed spectral modifications can be assoc...

  17. Theoretical characterization of excitation energy transfer in chlorosome light-harvesting antennae from green sulfur bacteria.

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Huh, Joonsuk; Saikin, Semion K; Brookes, Jennifer C; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-06-01

    We present a theoretical study of excitation dynamics in the chlorosome antenna complex of green photosynthetic bacteria based on a recently proposed model for the molecular assembly. Our model for the excitation energy transfer (EET) throughout the antenna combines a stochastic time propagation of the excitonic wave function with molecular dynamics simulations of the supramolecular structure and electronic structure calculations of the excited states. We characterized the optical properties of the chlorosome with absorption, circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy decay spectra. The simulation results for the excitation dynamics reveal a detailed picture of the EET in the chlorosome. Coherent energy transfer is significant only for the first 50 fs after the initial excitation, and the wavelike motion of the exciton is completely damped at 100 fs. Characteristic time constants of incoherent energy transfer, subsequently, vary from 1 ps to several tens of ps. We assign the time scales of the EET to specific physical processes by comparing our results with the data obtained from time-resolved spectroscopy experiments. PMID:24504540

  18. Seeing green bacteria in a new light: genomics-enabled studies of the photosynthetic apparatus in green sulfur bacteria and filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Bryant, Donald A

    2004-01-01

    and the oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds in two model organisms that represent these taxa, Chlorobium tepidum and Chloroflexus aurantiacus. The genes involved in bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c and carotenoid biosynthesis in these two organisms were identified by sequence homology with known BChl...... a and carotenoid biosynthesis enzymes, gene cluster analysis in Cfx. aurantiacus, and gene inactivation studies in Chl. tepidum. Based on these results, BChl a and BChl c biosynthesis is similar in the two organisms, whereas carotenoid biosynthesis differs significantly. In agreement with its facultative anaerobic...... and carotenoid species also allow the functions of these pigments to be studied in vivo....

  19. Comparison of Optimal Thermodynamic Models of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle from Heterotrophs, Cyanobacteria, and Green Sulfur Bacteria

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Jaramillo Riveri, Sebastian I.; Baxter, Douglas J.; Cannon, William R.

    2014-12-15

    We have applied a new stochastic simulation approach to predict the metabolite levels, energy flow, and material flux in the different oxidative TCA cycles found in E. coli and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, and in the reductive TCA cycle typical of chemolithoautotrophs and phototrophic green sulfur bacteria such as Chlorobaculum tepidum. The simulation approach is based on equations of state and employs an assumption similar to that used in transition state theory. The ability to evaluate the thermodynamics of metabolic pathways allows one to understand the relationship between coupling of energy and material gradients in the environment and the selforganization of stable biological systems, and it is shown that each cycle operates in the direction expected due to its environmental niche. The simulations predict changes in metabolite levels and flux in response to changes in cofactor concentrations that would be hard to predict without an elaborate model based on the law of mass action. In fact, we show that a thermodynamically unfavorable reaction can still have flux in the forward direction when it is part of a reaction network. The ability to predict metabolite levels, energy flow and material flux should be significant for understanding the dynamics of natural systems and for understanding principles for engineering organisms for production of specialty chemicals, such as biofuels.

  20. Self-assembly of natural light-harvesting bacteriochlorophylls of green sulfur photosynthetic bacteria in silicate capsules as stable models of chlorosomes.

    Saga, Yoshitaka; Akai, Sho; Miyatake, Tomohiro; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    Naturally occurring bacteriochlorophyll(BChl)s-c, -d, and -e from green sulfur photosynthetic bacteria were self-assembled in an aqueous solution in the presence of octadecyltriethoxysilane and tetraethoxysilane, followed by polycondensation of the alkoxysilanes by incubation for 50 h at 25 degrees C. The resulting BChl self-assemblies in silicate capsules exhibited visible absorption and circular dichroism spectra similar to the corresponding natural light-harvesting systems (chlorosomes) of green sulfur bacteria. Dynamic light scattering measurements indicated that the silicate capsules had an average hydrodynamic diameter of several hundred nanometers. BChl self-aggregates in silicate capsules were significantly stable to a nonionic surfactant Triton X-100, which was apt to decompose the BChl aggregates to their monomeric form, compared with conventional micelle systems. BChls in silicate capsules were more tolerant to demetalation of the central magnesium under acidic conditions than the natural systems. PMID:16848406

  1. Separation of bacteriochlorophyll homologues from green photosynthetic sulfur bacteria by reversed-phase HPLC.

    Borrego, C M; Garcia-Gil, L J

    1994-07-01

    A reversed-phase High Performance Liquid Cromatography (HPLC) method has been developed to accurately separate bacteriochlorophyllsc, d ande homologues in a reasonably short run time of 60 minutes. By using this method, two well-defined groups of bacteriochlorophyll homologue peaks can be discriminated. The first one consists of 4 peaks (min 24 to 30), which corresponds to the four main farnesyl homologues. The second peak subset is formed by a cluster of up to 10 minor peaks (min 33 to 40). These peaks can be related with series of several alcohol esters of the different chlorosome chlorophylls. The number of homologues was, however, quite variable depending on both, the bacteriochlorophyll and the bacterial species. The method hereby described, also provides a good separation of other photosynthetic pigments, either bacterial (Bacteriochlorophylla, chlorobactene, isorenieratene and okenone) or algal ones (Chlorophylla, Pheophytina and β-carotene). A preliminary screening of the homologue composition of several green photosynthetic bacterial species and isolates, has revealed different relative quantitative patterns. These differences seem to be related to physiological aspects rather than to taxonomic ones. The application of the method to the study of natural populations avoids the typical drawbacks on the pigment identification of overlapping eukaryotic and prokaryotic phototrophic microorganisms, giving further information about their physiological status. PMID:24310022

  2. Experimental Study of Interactions between Purple and Green Sulfur Bacteria in Sandy Sediments Exposed to Illumination Deprived of Near-Infrared Wavelengths

    Massé, Astrid; Pringault, Olivier; de Wit, Rutger

    2002-01-01

    Sedimentary biofilms of the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii strain CE 2404, the purple sulfur bacterium Thiocapsa roseopersicina strain 5811, and a mixed culture of both were cultured in fine sand (100- to 300-μm grain size) within counter gradients of oxygen and sulfide. The artificial sediments were exposed to illumination deprived of near-infrared light (NIR) by filtering out the wavelengths longer than 700 nm to simulate the critical light conditions in submerged aquatic...

  3. Depth profiles of spectral and hydrological characteristics of water and their relation to abundances of green sulfur bacteria in the stratified lakes of the White Sea

    Kharcheva, Anastasia V.; Krasnova, Elena D.; Gorlenko, Vladimir M.; Lunina, Olga N.; Savvichev, Alexander S.; Voronov, Dmitry A.; Zhiltsova, Anna A.; Patsaeva, Svetlana V.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the results received from two expeditions performed in August-September 2013, August-September 2014 and February 2015 in the Kandalaksha Bay of the White Sea. Depth profiles of hydrological characteristics and optical properties of water were recorded for five marine lakes being on different stages of isolation from the White Sea. Those relic lakes demonstrate a tendency to meromixis and are characterized by apparent stratification of the water bodies from the brackish top layer to the bottom salt water. Maximal concentrations of anoxygenic phototrophs (green sulfur bacteria) were found at depths close to the redox interface in all the studied lakes. To discriminate differently pigmented groups of microorganisms the fluorescence emission spectra of bacteriochlorophylls from the living cells were used. We puzzle out the data on light spectrum propagation through the water body in each lake using optical properties of water (attenuation spectra) in the UV, visible and NIR ranges, as well as direct measurements of the total irradiances at various depths. The changes in optical characteristics of water in the stratified reservoirs due to cromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and microbial pigments affect the light intensity and its spectral distribution at each water layer thus influencing the living conditions for differently pigmented phototrophic microorganisms and determining the composition of microbial community.

  4. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in environmental technology.

    Pokorna, Dana; Zabranska, Jana

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is widely known as the most undesirable component of biogas that caused not only serious sensoric and toxic problems, but also corrosion of concrete and steel structures. Many agricultural and industrial waste used in biogas production, may contain a large amount of substances that serve as direct precursors to the formation of sulfide sulfur-sources of hydrogen sulfide in the biogas. Biological desulfurization methods are currently promoted to abiotic methods because they are less expensive and do not produce undesirable materials which must be disposed of. The final products of oxidation of sulfides are no longer hazardous. Biological removal of sulfide from a liquid or gaseous phase is based on the activity of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. They need an oxidizing agent such as an acceptor of electrons released during the oxidation of sulfides-atmospheric oxygen or oxidized forms of nitrogen. Different genera of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and their technological application are discussed. PMID:25701621

  5. Experimental study of interactions between purple and green sulfur bacteria in sandy sediments exposed to illumination deprived of near-infrared wavelengths.

    Massé, Astrid; Pringault, Olivier; De Wit, Rutger

    2002-06-01

    Sedimentary biofilms of the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii strain CE 2404, the purple sulfur bacterium Thiocapsa roseopersicina strain 5811, and a mixed culture of both were cultured in fine sand (100- to 300-microm grain size) within counter gradients of oxygen and sulfide. The artificial sediments were exposed to illumination deprived of near-infrared light (NIR) by filtering out the wavelengths longer than 700 nm to simulate the critical light conditions in submerged aquatic sediments. A 16 h of visible light-8 h of dark regimen was used. We studied the effects of these light conditions on the metabolisms of and interactions between both species by comparing the single species biofilms with the mixed biofilm. The photosynthesis rates of P. aestuarii were shown to be highly limited by the imposed light conditions, because the sulfide photooxidation rates were strongly stimulated when NIR was added. T. roseopersicina performed both aerobic chemosynthesis and photosynthesis, but the photosynthesis rates were low and poorly stimulated by the addition of NIR. This species decreased the penetration depth of oxygen in the sediment by about 1 mm by actively respiring oxygen. This way, the strict anaerobe P. aestuarii was able to grow closer to the surface in the mixed culture. As a result, P. aestuarii benefited from the presence of T. roseopersicina in the mixed culture, which was reflected by an increase in the biomass. In contrast, the density of the latter species was almost completely unaffected by the interaction. Both species coexisted in a layer of the same depth in the mixed culture, and the ecological and evolutionary implications of coexistence are discussed. PMID:12039757

  6. Thioploca spp: filamentous sulfur bacteria with nitrate vacuoles

    Jørgensen, BB; Gallardo, VA

    1999-01-01

    Thioploca spp. are multicellular, filamentous, colorless sulfur bacteria inhabiting freshwater and marine sediments. They have elemental sulfur inclusions similar to the phylogenetically closely related Beggiatoa, but in contrast to these they live in bundles surrounded by a common sheath. Vast...

  7. Dominance of a clonal green sulfur bacterial population in a stratified lake

    Gregersen, Lea H; Habicht, Kirsten S; Peduzzi, Sandro;

    2009-01-01

    For many years, the chemocline of the meromictic Lake Cadagno, Switzerland, was dominated by purple sulfur bacteria. However, following a major community shift in recent years, green sulfur bacteria (GSB) have come to dominate. We investigated this community by performing microbial diversity...... population peaked in the chemocline (c. 8 x 10(6) GSB cells mL(-1)) and constituted about 50% of all cells in the anoxic zones of the water column. At least 99.5% of these GSB cells had SSU rRNA, fmoA, and csmCA sequences essentially identical to that of the previously isolated and genome-sequenced GSB...

  8. Comparative Genomics of Green Sulfur Bacteria

    Ussery, David; Davenport, C; Tümmler, B

    2010-01-01

    -genome gene family and single gene sequence comparisons yielded similar phylogenetic trees of the sequenced chromosomes indicating a concerted vertical evolution of large gene sets. Chromosomal synteny of genes is not preserved in the phylum Chlorobi. The accessory genome is characterized by anomalous...... oligonucleotide usage and endows the strains with individual features for transport, secretion, cell wall, extracellular constituents, and a few elements of the biosynthetic apparatus. Giant genes are a peculiar feature of the genera Chlorobium and Prosthecochloris. The predicted proteins have a huge molecular...

  9. Utilization of 'elemental' sulfur by different phototrophic sulfur bacteria (Chromatiaceae, Ectothiorhodospiraceae): A sulfur K-edge XANES spectroscopy study

    Franz, B; Prange, A [Niederrhein University of Applied Sciences, Competence Center for Microbiology and Biotechnology (CCMB), Rheydter Strasse 277, 41065 Moenchengladbach (Germany); Lichtenberg, H; Hormes, J [Louisiana State University, Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD), 6980 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (United States); Dahl, C, E-mail: A.Prange@gmx.d [University of Bonn, Institute for Microbiology and Biotechnology, Meckenheimer Allee 168, 53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are generally able to use elemental sulfur as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis. Elemental sulfur is mainly a mixture of cyclo-octasulfur and polymeric sulfur. The purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum strongly prefers the polymeric sulfur fraction showing that sulfur speciation has a strong influence on availability of elemental sulfur. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was used to investigate whether polymeric sulfur is also the preferred sulfur species in other purple sulfur bacteria belonging to the families Chromatiaceae and Ecothiorodospiraceae. The cultures were fed with 50 mM of elemental sulfur consisting of 68% polymeric sulfur and 30% cyclo-octasulfur. In all cultures, elemental sulfur was converted into intra- or extracellular sulfur globules, respectively, and further oxidized to sulfate. Sulfate concentrations were determined by HPLC and turbidometric assays, respectively. However, the added elemental sulfur was only partly used by the bacteria, one part of the 'elemental sulfur' remained in the cultures and was not taken up. XANES spectroscopy revealed that only the polymeric sulfur fraction was taken up by all cultures investigated. This strongly indicates that polymeric 'chain-like' sulfur is the form preferably used by phototrophic sulfur bacteria.

  10. Motility patterns of filamentous sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp

    Dunker, Rita; Røy, Hans; Kamp, Anja;

    2011-01-01

    The large sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp., live on the oxidation of sulfide with oxygen or nitrate, but avoid high concentrations of both sulfide and oxygen. As gliding filaments, they rely on reversals in the gliding direction to find their preferred environment, the oxygen–sulfide interface...

  11. Motility patterns of filamentous sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp

    Dunker, Rita; Røy, Hans; Kamp, Anja;

    2011-01-01

    The large sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp., live on the oxidation of sulfide with oxygen or nitrate, but avoid high concentrations of both sulfide and oxygen. As gliding filaments, they rely on reversals in the gliding direction to find their preferred environment, the oxygen–sulfide interface. We...

  12. Study of the "Sulfur-turf" : a Community of Colorless Sulfur Bacteria Growing in Hot Spring Effluent

    MAKI, Yonosuke

    1991-01-01

    Sulfur-turf is one of the so-called "sulfureta" which are massive aggregates of colorless sulfur bacteria. Interest in the ecological and physiological aspects of the sulfuretum has strongly increased not only due to the discovery of massive occurrence of colorless sulfur bacteria in an area of hydrothermal vents but also due to the possibility of its significant contribution to the sulfur cycle in the coastal region. Here, I review the types, habitats, and bacterial constituents of the sulfu...

  13. Phototropic sulfur and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the chemocline of meromictic Lake Cadagno, Switzerland

    Raffaele PEDUZZI

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Lake Cadagno, a crenogenic meromictic lake located in the catchment area of a dolomite vein rich in gypsum in the Piora Valley in the southern Alps of Switzerland, is characterized by a compact chemocline with high concentrations of sulfate, steep gradients of oxygen, sulfide and light and a turbidity maximum that correlates to large numbers of bacteria (up to 107 cells ml-1. The most abundant taxa in the chemocline are large- and small-celled purple sulfur bacteria, which account for up to 35% of all bacteria, and sulfate- reducing bacteria that represent up to 23% of all bacteria. Depending on the season, as much as 45% of all bacteria in the chemocline are associated in aggregates consisting of different populations of small-celled purple sulfur bacteria of the genus Lamprocystis (up to 35% of all bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria of the family Desulfobulbaceae (up to 12% of all bacteria that are almost completely represented by bacteria closely related to Desulfocapsa thiozymogenes. Their association in aggregates is restricted to small-celled purple sulfur bacteria of the genus Lamprocystis, but not obligate since non-associated cells of bacteria related to D. thiozymogenes are frequently found, especially under limited light conditions in winter and early summer. Aggregate formation and concomitant growth enhancement of isolates of both partners of this association suggests synergistic interactions that might resemble a sulfide-based source-sink relationship between the sulfate-reducing bacterium that is able to sustain growth by a disproportionation of inorganic sulfur compounds (sulfur, thiosulfate, sulfite, with the purple sulfur bacteria acting as a biotic scavenger. The availability of these isolates opens up the door for future studies considering other facets of potential interactions in aggregates since both types of organisms are metabolically highly versatile and interactions may not be limited to sulfur compounds only.

  14. [Fe]-hydrogenases in green algae: photo-fermentation and hydrogen evolution under sulfur deprivation

    Winkler, M.; Hemschemeier, A.; Happe, T. [Botanisches Institut der Universitat Bonn (Germany); Gotor, C. [CSIC y Universidad de Sevilla (Spain). Instituto de Bioquimica Vegetal y Fotosintesis; Melis, A. [University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

    2002-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that [Fe]-hydrogenases and H{sub 2} metabolism are widely distributed among green algae. The enzymes are simple structured and catalyze H{sub 2} evolution with similar rates than the more complex [Fe]-hydrogenases from bacteria. Different green algal species developed diverse strategies to survive under sulfur deprivation. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii evolves large quantities of hydrogen gas in the absence of sulfur. In a sealed culture of C. reinhardtii, the photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution rate drops below the rate of respiratory O{sub 2} consumption due to a reversible inhibition of photosystem II, thus leading to an intracellular anaerobiosis. The algal cells survive under these anaerobic conditions by switching their metabolism to a kind of photo-fermentation. Although possessing a functional [Fe]-hydrogenase gene, the cells of Scenedesmus obliquus produce no significant amounts of H{sub 2} under S-depleted conditions. Biochemical analyses indicate that S. obliquus decreases almost the complete metabolic activities while maintaining a low level of respiratory activity. (author)

  15. Roles of Thioredoxins in the Obligate Anaerobic Green Sulfur Photosynthetic Bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum

    Naomi Hosoya-Matsuda; Kazuhito Inoue; Toru Hisabori

    2009-01-01

    Thioredoxin is a small ubiquitous protein that is involved in the dithiol-disulfide exchange reaction, by way of two cysteine residues located on the molecule surface. In order to elucidate the role of thioredoxin in Chlorobaculum tepidum, an anaerobic green sulfur bacterium that uses various inorganic sulfur compounds and H2S as electron donors under strict anaerobic conditions for growth, we applied the thioredoxin affinity chromatography method (Motohashi et al., 2001). In this study, 37 cytoplasmic proteins were captured as thioredoxin target candidates, including proteins involved in sulfur assimilation. Furthermore, six of the candidate proteins were members of the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle (pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase, pyruvate flavodoxin/ferredoxin oxidoreductase, α-oxoglutarate synthase, citrate lyase, citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase). The redox sensitivity of three enzymes was then examined: citrate lyase, citrate synthase, and malate dehydrogenase, using their recombinant proteins. Based on the information relating to the target proteins, the significance of thioredoxin as a reductant for the metabolic pathway in the anaerobic photosyn-thetic bacteria is discussed.

  16. Sulfur Isotope Analysis of Minerals and Fluids in a Natural CO2 Reservoir, Green River, Utah

    Chen, F.; Kampman, N.; Bickle, M. J.; Busch, A.; Turchyn, A. V.

    2013-12-01

    Predicting the security of geological CO2 storage sites requires an understanding of the geochemical behavior of the stored CO2, especially of fluid-rock reactions in reservoirs, caprocks and fault zones. Factors that may influence geochemical behavior include co-injection of sulfur gases along with the CO2, either in acid-gas disposal or as contaminants in CO2 storage sites, and microbial activity, such as bacterial sulfate reduction. The latter may play an important role in buffering the redox chemistry of subsurface fluids, which could affect toxic trace metal mobilization and transport in acidic CO2-rich fluids. These processes involving sulfur are poorly understood. Natural CO2-reservoirs provide natural laboratories, where the flow and reactions of the CO2-charged fluids and the activity of microbial communities are integrated over sufficient time-scales to aid prediction of long-term CO2 storage. This study reports on sulfur isotope analyses of sulfate and sulfide minerals in rock core and in CO2-charged fluids collected from a stacked sequence of natural CO2 reservoirs at Green River, Utah. Scientific drilling adjacent to a CO2-degassing normal fault to a depth of 325m retrieved core and fluid samples from two CO2 reservoirs in the Entrada and Navajo Sandstones and from the intervening Carmel Formation caprock. Fluid samples were collected from CO2-charged springs that discharge through the faults. Sulfur exists as sulfate in the fluids, as sedimentary gypsum beds in the Carmel Formation, as remobilized gypsum veins within a fault damage zone in the Carmel Fm. and in the Entrada Sandstone, and as disseminated pyrite and pyrite-mineralized open fractures throughout the cored interval. We use the stable sulfur (δ34S) and oxygen (δ18OSO4) isotopes of the sulfate, gypsum, and pyrite to understand the source of sulfur in the reservoir as well as the timing of gypsum vein and pyrite formation. The hydration water of the gypsum is also reported to explore the

  17. Oxygen uncouples light absorption by the chlorosome antenna and photosynthetic electron transfer in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum

    Frigaard, N-U; Matsuura, K

    1999-01-01

    In photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria excitation energy is transferred from large bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c chlorosome antennas via small BChl a antennas to the reaction centers which then transfer electrons from cytochrome c to low-potential iron-sulfur proteins. Under oxidizing conditions a...... center as a consequence of the quenching mechanism which is activated by O2. This reversible uncoupling of the chlorosome antenna might prevent formation of toxic reactive oxygen species from photosynthetically produced reductants under aerobic conditions. The green filamentous bacterium Chloroflexus...

  18. Diversity studies and molecular analyses with single cells and filaments of large, colorless sulfur bacteria

    Salman, Verena

    2011-01-01

    Large sulfur bacteria feature conspicuous morphologies that are usually visible with the naked eye. Most representatives were already described in the 19th and early 20th century and it needed nearly another 100 years until a new morphotype of large sulfur bacteria was discovered. This discovery encouraged a search for other yet unknown types in this group of bacteria and indeed led to the finding of a new type in two marine seep settings. This novel morphotype is presented in Chapter 2 and i...

  19. Chemolithotrophic Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria from the Galapagos Rift Hydrothermal Vents †

    Ruby, E. G.; Wirsen, C.O. (C.); Jannasch, H W

    1981-01-01

    Three distinct physiological types of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were enriched and isolated from samples collected at several deep-sea hydrothermal vents (2,550 m) of the Galapagos Rift ocean floor spreading center. Twelve strains of the obligately chemolithotrophic genus Thiomicrospira were obtained from venting water and from microbial mats covering surfaces in the immediate vicinity of the vents. From these and other sources two types of obligately heterotrophic sulfur oxidizers were repeat...

  20. Buoyant densities of phototrophic sulfur bacteria and cyanobacteria

    Guerrero, R.

    1985-01-01

    The buoyant densities of bacterial cells are greatly influenced by the accumulation of intracellular reserve material. The buoyant density of phototrophic bacteria that are planktonic is of particular interest, since these organisms must remain in the photic zone of the water column for optimal growth. Separation of cells by their buoyant density may also be of use in separating and identifying organisms from a natural population. The bacteria used were obtained from pure cultures, enrichments, or samples taken directly from the environment.

  1. Filamentous sulfur bacteria of activated sludge: characterization of Thiothrix, Beggiatoa, and Eikelboom type 021N strains.

    Williams, T. M.; Unz, R F

    1985-01-01

    Seventeen strains of filamentous sulfur bacteria were isolated in axenic culture from activated sludge mixed liquor samples and sulfide-gradient enrichment cultures. Isolation procedures involved plating a concentrated inoculum of washed filaments onto media containing sulfide or thiosulfate. The isolates were identified as Thiothrix spp., Beggiatoa spp., and an organism of uncertain taxonomic status, designated type 021N. All bacteria were gram negative, reduced nitrate, and formed long, mul...

  2. Sub-micrometer-scale mapping of magnetite crystals and sulfur globules in magnetotactic bacteria using confocal Raman micro-spectrometry.

    Eder, Stephan H K; Gigler, Alexander M; Hanzlik, Marianne; Winklhofer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The ferrimagnetic mineral magnetite Fe3O4 is biomineralized by magnetotactic microorganisms and a diverse range of animals. Here we demonstrate that confocal Raman microscopy can be used to visualize chains of magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria, even though magnetite is a poor Raman scatterer and in bacteria occurs in typical grain sizes of only 35-120 nm, well below the diffraction-limited optical resolution. When using long integration times together with low laser power (greigite (cubic Fe3S4; Raman lines of 253 and 351 cm(-1)) is often found in the Deltaproteobacteria class, it is not present in our samples. In intracellular sulfur globules of Candidatus Magnetobacterium bavaricum (Nitrospirae), we identified the sole presence of cyclo-octasulfur (S8: 151, 219, 467 cm(-1)), using green (532 nm), red (638 nm) and near-infrared excitation (785 nm). The Raman-spectra of phosphorous-rich intracellular accumulations point to orthophosphate in magnetic vibrios and to polyphosphate in magnetic cocci. Under green excitation, the cell envelopes are dominated by the resonant Raman lines of the heme cofactor of the b or c-type cytochrome, which can be used as a strong marker for label-free live-cell imaging of bacterial cytoplasmic membranes, as well as an indicator for the redox state. PMID:25233081

  3. Filamentous sulfur bacteria of activated sludge: characterization of Thiothrix, Beggiatoa, and Eikelboom type 021N strains.

    Williams, T M; Unz, R F

    1985-04-01

    Seventeen strains of filamentous sulfur bacteria were isolated in axenic culture from activated sludge mixed liquor samples and sulfide-gradient enrichment cultures. Isolation procedures involved plating a concentrated inoculum of washed filaments onto media containing sulfide or thiosulfate. The isolates were identified as Thiothrix spp., Beggiatoa spp., and an organism of uncertain taxonomic status, designated type 021N. All bacteria were gram negative, reduced nitrate, and formed long, multicellular trichomes with internal reserves of sulfur, volutin, and sudanophilic material. Thiothrix spp. formed rosettes and gonidia, and four of six strains were ensheathed. Type 021N organisms utilized glucose, lacked a sheath, and differed from Thiothrix spp. in several aspects of cellular and cultural morphology. Beggiatoa spp. lacked catalase and oxidase, and filaments were motile. Biochemical and physiological characterization of the isolates revealed important distinguishing features between the three groups of bacteria. Strain differences were most evident among the Thiothrix cultures. A comparison of the filamentous sulfur bacteria with freshwater strains of Leucothrix was made also. PMID:4004221

  4. Phylogenetic Evidence for the Existence of Novel Thermophilic Bacteria in Hot Spring Sulfur-Turf Microbial Mats in Japan

    Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hiraishi, Akira; Kato, Kenji; Chiura, Hiroshi X.; Maki, Yonosuke; Shimizu, Akira

    1998-01-01

    So-called sulfur-turf microbial mats, which are macroscopic white filaments or bundles consisting of large sausage-shaped bacteria and elemental sulfur particles, occur in sulfide-containing hot springs in Japan. However, no thermophiles from sulfur-turf mats have yet been isolated as cultivable strains. This study was undertaken to determine the phylogenetic positions of the sausage-shaped bacteria in sulfur-turf mats by direct cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified from the bulk...

  5. Lamellar organization of pigments in chlorosomes, the light harvesting complexes of green photosynthetic bacteria.

    Psencík, J; Ikonen, T P; Laurinmäki, P; Merckel, M C; Butcher, S J; Serimaa, R E; Tuma, R

    2004-08-01

    Chlorosomes of green photosynthetic bacteria constitute the most efficient light harvesting complexes found in nature. In addition, the chlorosome is the only known photosynthetic system where the majority of pigments (BChl) is not organized in pigment-protein complexes but instead is assembled into aggregates. Because of the unusual organization, the chlorosome structure has not been resolved and only models, in which BChl pigments were organized into large rods, were proposed on the basis of freeze-fracture electron microscopy and spectroscopic constraints. We have obtained the first high-resolution images of chlorosomes from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum by cryoelectron microscopy. Cryoelectron microscopy images revealed dense striations approximately 20 A apart. X-ray scattering from chlorosomes exhibited a feature with the same approximately 20 A spacing. No evidence for the rod models was obtained. The observed spacing and tilt-series cryoelectron microscopy projections are compatible with a lamellar model, in which BChl molecules aggregate into semicrystalline lateral arrays. The diffraction data further indicate that arrays are built from BChl dimers. The arrays form undulating lamellae, which, in turn, are held together by interdigitated esterifying alcohol tails, carotenoids, and lipids. The lamellar model is consistent with earlier spectroscopic data and provides insight into chlorosome self-assembly. PMID:15298919

  6. Semi-continuous detection of toxic hexavalent chromium using a sulfur-oxidizing bacteria biosensor.

    Gurung, Anup; Oh, Sang-Eun; Kim, Ki Duck; Shin, Beom-Soo

    2012-09-15

    Toxicity testing is becoming a useful tool for environmental risk assessment. A biosensor based on the metabolic properties of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) has been applied for the detection of toxic chemicals in water. The methodology exploits the ability of SOB to oxidize elemental sulfur to sulfuric acid under aerobic conditions. The reaction results in an increase in electrical conductivity (EC) and a decrease in pH. Five hours after Cr(6+) was added to the SOB biosensor operated in semi-continuous mode (1 min rapid feeding and 29 min batch reaction), a decrease in effluent EC and an increase in pH (from 2-3 to 6) were detected due to Cr(6+) toxicity to SOB. The SOB biosensor is simple; it can detect toxic levels of Cr(6+) on the order of minutes to hours, a useful time scale for early warning detection systems designed to protect the environment from further degradation. PMID:22647672

  7. Elemental sulfur formation and nitrogen removal from wastewaters by autotrophic denitrifiers and anammox bacteria.

    Liu, Chunshuang; Zhao, Dongfeng; Yan, Laihong; Wang, Aijie; Gu, Yingying; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2015-09-01

    Elemental sulfur (S(0)) formation from and nitrogen removal on sulfide, nitrate and ammonium-laden wastewaters were achieved by denitrifying ammonium oxidation (DEAMOX) reactor with autotrophic denitrifiers and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria. The sulfide to nitrate ratio is a key process parameter for excess accumulation of S(0) and a ratio of 1.31:1 is a proposed optimum. The Alishewanella, Thauera and Candidatus Anammoximicrobium present respectively the autotrophic denitrifiers and anammox bacteria for the reactor. DEAMOX is demonstrated promising biological process for treating organics-deficient (S+N) wastewaters with excess S(0) production. PMID:26022701

  8. Insights into the genome of large sulfur bacteria revealed by analysis of single filaments

    Mussmann, Marc; Hu, Fen Z.; Richter, Michael; de Beer, Dirk; Preisler, André; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Huntemann, Marcel; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Amann, Rudolf; Koopman, Werner J.H.; Lasken, Roger S.; Janto, Benjamin; Hogg, Justin; Stoodley, Paul; Boissy, Robert; Ehrlich, Garth D.

    2007-01-01

    enable Beggiatoa to overcome non-overlapping availabilities of electron donors and acceptors while gliding between oxic and sulfidic zones. The first look into the genome of these filamentous sulfur-oxidizing bacteria substantially deepens the understanding of their evolution and their contribution to......Marine sediments are frequently covered by mats of the filamentous Beggiatoa and other large nitrate-storing bacteria that oxidize hydrogen sulfide using either oxygen or nitrate, which they store in intracellular vacuoles. Despite their conspicuous metabolic properties and their biogeochemical...

  9. Sub-micrometer-scale mapping of magnetite crystals and sulfur globules in magnetotactic bacteria using confocal Raman micro-spectrometry.

    Stephan H K Eder

    Full Text Available The ferrimagnetic mineral magnetite Fe3O4 is biomineralized by magnetotactic microorganisms and a diverse range of animals. Here we demonstrate that confocal Raman microscopy can be used to visualize chains of magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria, even though magnetite is a poor Raman scatterer and in bacteria occurs in typical grain sizes of only 35-120 nm, well below the diffraction-limited optical resolution. When using long integration times together with low laser power (<0.25 mW to prevent laser induced damage of magnetite, we can identify and map magnetite by its characteristic Raman spectrum (303, 535, 665 cm(-1 against a large autofluorescence background in our natural magnetotactic bacteria samples. While greigite (cubic Fe3S4; Raman lines of 253 and 351 cm(-1 is often found in the Deltaproteobacteria class, it is not present in our samples. In intracellular sulfur globules of Candidatus Magnetobacterium bavaricum (Nitrospirae, we identified the sole presence of cyclo-octasulfur (S8: 151, 219, 467 cm(-1, using green (532 nm, red (638 nm and near-infrared excitation (785 nm. The Raman-spectra of phosphorous-rich intracellular accumulations point to orthophosphate in magnetic vibrios and to polyphosphate in magnetic cocci. Under green excitation, the cell envelopes are dominated by the resonant Raman lines of the heme cofactor of the b or c-type cytochrome, which can be used as a strong marker for label-free live-cell imaging of bacterial cytoplasmic membranes, as well as an indicator for the redox state.

  10. Cultivated Beggiatoa spp. define the phylogenetic root of morphologically diverse, noncultured, vacuolate sulfur bacteria.

    Ahmad, Azeem; Kalanetra, Karen M; Nelson, Douglas C

    2006-06-01

    Within the last 10 years, numerous SSU rRNA sequences have been collected from natural populations of conspicuous, vacuolate, colorless sulfur bacteria, which form a phylogenetically cohesive cluster (large-vacuolate sulfur bacteria clade) in the gamma-Proteobacteria. Currently, this clade is composed of four named or de facto genera: all known Thioploca and Thiomargarita strains, all vacuolate Beggiatoa strains, and several strains of vacuolate, attached filaments, which bear a superficial similarity to Thiothrix. Some of these vacuolate bacteria accumulate nitrate for respiratory purposes. This clade encompasses the largest known prokaryotic cells (Thiomargarita namibiensis) and several strains that are important in the global marine sulfur cycle. Here, we report additional sequences from five pure culture strains of Beggiatoa spp., including the only two cultured marine strains (nonvacuolate), which firmly establish the root of this vacuolate clade. Each of several diverse metabolic motifs, including obligate and facultative chemolithoautotrophy, probable mixotrophy, and seemingly strict organoheterotrophy, is represented in at least one of the nonvacuolate strains that root the vacuolate clade. Because the genus designation Beggiatoa is interspersed throughout the vacuolate clade along with other recognized or de facto genera, the need for taxonomic revision is clear. PMID:16788728

  11. Accelerated evolutionary rate in sulfur-oxidizing endosymbiotic bacteria associated with the mode of symbiont transmission.

    Peek, A S; Vrijenhoek, R C; Gaut, B S

    1998-11-01

    The nearly neutral theory of molecular evolution predicts that the rate of nucleotide substitution should accelerate in small populations at sites under low selective constraint. We examined these predictions with respect to the relative population sizes for three bacterial life histories within chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria: (1) free-living bacteria, (2) environmentally captured symbionts, and (3) maternally transmitted symbionts. Both relative rates of nucleotide substitution and relative ratios of loop, stem, and domain substitutions from 1,165 nt of the small-subunit 16S rDNA were consistent with expectations of the nearly neutral theory. Relative to free-living sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic bacteria, the maternally transmitted symbionts have faster substitution rates overall and also in low-constraint domains of 16S rDNA. Nucleotide substitition rates also differ between loop and stem positions. All of these findings are consistent with the predictions that these symbionts have relatively small effective population sizes. In contrast, the rates of nucleotide substitution in environmentally captured symbionts are slower, particularly in high-constraint domains, than in free-living bacteria. PMID:12572615

  12. The complete genome sequence of Chlorobium tepidum TLS, a photosynthetic, anaerobic, green-sulfur bacterium

    EISEN, JONATHAN A.; Karen E Nelson; Ian T Paulsen; Heidelberg, John F.; Wu, Martin; Dodson, Robert J; Deboy, Robert; Gwinn, Michelle L.; Nelson, William C.; Haft, Daniel H; Hickey, Erin K.; Peterson, Jeremy D.; Durkin, A. Scott; Kolonay, James L.; Yang, Fan

    2002-01-01

    The complete genome of the green-sulfur eubacterium Chlorobium tepidum TLS was determined to be a single circular chromosome of 2,154,946 bp. This represents the first genome sequence from the phylum Chlorobia, whose members perform anoxygenic photosynthesis by the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. Genome comparisons have identified genes in C. tepidum that are highly conserved among photosynthetic species. Many of these have no assigned function and may play novel role...

  13. Improved hydrogen photoproduction from photosynthetic bacteria and green algae

    Weaver, P.F.; Lien, S.; Seibert, M.

    1979-01-01

    Photosynthetic bacteria evolve hydrogen at much higher rates than do other classes of photosynthetic microorganisms. In addition, they tolerate harsh environments, grow rapidly, and utilize both visible and near infrared light in photosynthesis. They do not split water, but this does not necessarily eliminate their potential use in future applied systems. They are easily manipulated genetically, and thus might be modified to metabolize common biomass waste materials in place of expensive defined organic substrates. Furthermore, the potential for increasing hydrogen photoproduction via genetic techniques is promising. Strains that partially degrade cellulose, have high photoproduction rates, or contain very large amounts of the enzymes associated with hydrogen metabolism have been isolated. Green algae also produce hydrogen but are capable of using water as a substrate. For example, C. reinhardi can evolve hydrogen and oxygen at a molar ratio approaching 2:1. Based upon effect of dichlorophenyl dimethylurea (a specific inhibitor of photosystem II, PSII) on hydrogen photoproduction in the wild type strain and upon results obtained with PSII mutants, one can demonstrate that water is the major source of electrons for hydrogen production. The potential efficiency of in vivo coupling between hydrogenase and the photosynthetic electron transport system is high. Up to 76% of the reductants generated by the electron transport system can be channeled directly to the enzyme for in vivo hydrogen production. Rates exceeding 170 ..mu..moles of H/sub 2/ mg Chl/sup -1/ hr/sup -1/ have been observed.

  14. Bioleaching of heavy metals from contaminated sediment by indigenous sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in an air-lift bioreactor: effects of sulfur concentration.

    Chen, Shen-Yi; Lin, Jih-Gaw

    2004-01-01

    The effects of sulfur concentration on the bioleaching of heavy metals from the sediment by indigenous sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were investigated in an air-lift reactor. Increasing the sulfur concentration from 0.5 to 5 g/l enhanced the rates of pH reduction, sulfate production and metal solubilization. A Michaelis-Menten type equation was used to explain the relationships between sulfur concentration, sulfate production and metal solubilization in the bioleaching process. After 8 days of bioleaching, 97-99% of Cu, 96-98% of Zn, 62-68% of Mn, 73-87% of Ni and 31-50% of Pb were solubilized from the sediment, respectively. The efficiency of metal solubilization was found to be related to the speciation of metal in the sediment. From economical consideration, the recommended sulfur dosage for the bioleaching of metals from the sediment is 3g/l. PMID:15276736

  15. INFLUENCE OF ELEMENTAL SULFUR AND/OR INOCULATION WITH SULFUR OXIDIZING BACTERIA ON GROWTH, AND NUTRIENT CONTENT OF SORGHUM PLANTS GROWN ON DIFFERENT SOILS

    Hala Kandil; M. H. El-Halfawi; Ibrahim, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effect of elemental sulfur(E.S) rates (300 and 600 ppm) and/or sulfur oxidizing bacteria (S.O.B. ATCC 8158) on growth and nutrients content of sorghum plants grown on different soils (sandy soils(I & II) and clay loam soil).The obtained results could be summarized in the followings:Sorghum plants:Significant increases over the control were observed in fresh and dry weights of sorghum plant as well as its content of SO4=, N, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu b...

  16. Chemolithotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from the galapagos rift hydrothermal vents.

    Ruby, E G; Wirsen, C O; Jannasch, H W

    1981-08-01

    Three distinct physiological types of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were enriched and isolated from samples collected at several deep-sea hydrothermal vents (2,550 m) of the Galapagos Rift ocean floor spreading center. Twelve strains of the obligately chemolithotrophic genus Thiomicrospira were obtained from venting water and from microbial mats covering surfaces in the immediate vicinity of the vents. From these and other sources two types of obligately heterotrophic sulfur oxidizers were repeatedly isolated that presumably oxidized thiosulfate either to sulfate (acid producing; 9 strains) or to polythionates (base producing; 74 strains). The former were thiobacilli-like, exhibiting a thiosulfate-stimulated increase in growth and CO(2) incorporation, whereas the latter were similar to previously encountered pseudomonad-like heterotrophs. The presence of chemolithotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in the sulfide-containing hydrothermal water supports the hypothesis that chemosynthesis provides a substantial primary food source for the rich populations of invertebrates found in the immediate vicinity of the vents. PMID:16345831

  17. Population study of the filamentous sulfur bacteria Thioploca spp. off the Bay of Concepcion, Chile

    Schulz, HN; Strotmann, B.; Gallardo, VA;

    2000-01-01

    A population of filamentous sulfur bacteria Thioploca spp. living in the Bay of Concepcion, Chile, and the adjoining shelf area was sampled for 14 mo at 4 to 6 wk intervals to investigate the influence of seasonal variations in upwelling intensity and oxygen concentrations on the population...... 1996, oxygen concentrations in the bottom water were near zero, nitrate was 10 to 20 mu M and the biomass was high, up to 160 g m(-2) wet weight without sheaths. During winter, the biomass declined due to higher oxygen concentrations under reduced upwelling intensity. The depth distribution of...

  18. Barite encrustation of benthic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria at a marine cold seep.

    Stevens, E W N; Bailey, J V; Flood, B E; Jones, D S; Gilhooly, W P; Joye, S B; Teske, A; Mason, O U

    2015-11-01

    Crusts and chimneys composed of authigenic barite are found at methane seeps and hydrothermal vents that expel fluids rich in barium. Microbial processes have not previously been associated with barite precipitation in marine cold seep settings. Here, we report on the precipitation of barite on filaments of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria at a brine seep in the Gulf of Mexico. Barite-mineralized bacterial filaments in the interiors of authigenic barite crusts resemble filamentous sulfide-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Beggiatoa. Clone library and iTag amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene show that the barite crusts that host these filaments also preserve DNA of Candidatus Maribeggiatoa, as well as sulfate-reducing bacteria. Isotopic analyses show that the sulfur and oxygen isotope compositions of barite have lower δ(34)S and δ(18)O values than many other marine barite crusts, which is consistent with barite precipitation in an environment in which sulfide oxidation was occurring. Laboratory experiments employing isolates of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria from Gulf of Mexico seep sediments showed that under low sulfate conditions, such as those encountered in brine fluids, sulfate generated by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria fosters rapid barite precipitation localized on cell biomass, leading to the encrustation of bacteria in a manner reminiscent of our observations of barite-mineralized Beggiatoa in the Gulf of Mexico. The precipitation of barite directly on filaments of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria, and not on other benthic substrates, suggests that sulfide oxidation plays a role in barite formation at certain marine brine seeps where sulfide is oxidized to sulfate in contact with barium-rich fluids, either prior to, or during, the mixing of those fluids with sulfate-containing seawater in the vicinity of the sediment/water interface. As with many other geochemical interfaces that foster mineral precipitation, both biological and abiological processes likely contribute

  19. Chemical protection of bacteria and cultured mammalian cells by sulfur-containing compounds

    Protection by sulfur-containing compounds was studied using bacteria E. coli Bsub(H) and cultured mouse leukemic cells, L 5178 Y, and the protective mechanisms were discussed. The dose reduction factors of non-sulfhydryl compounds observed in the bacteria were the same as those observed in mammalian cells, and the protective activity of these compounds was proportional to their reaction rates with hydroxyl radicals. On the other hand, sulfhydryl compounds, with the exception of glutathione, offered a much greater protection than was anticipated from their radical scavenging activity. From studies under anoxia, the protection of cysteine was explained by its OH scavenging and competition with oxygen. In addition, for MEA, protection against the direct action of radiation was suggested. This was supported by the significant protection in the frozen state. (author)

  20. Use of anaerobic green fluorescent protein versus green fluorescent protein as reporter in lactic acid bacteria.

    Landete, José M; Langa, Susana; Revilla, Concepción; Margolles, Abelardo; Medina, Margarita; Arqués, Juan L

    2015-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are commonly used in the production of fermented and probiotic foods. Development of molecular tools to discriminate the strains of interest from the endogenous microbiota in complex environments like food or gut is of high interest. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like chromophores strictly requires molecular oxygen for maturation of fluorescence, which restrict the study of microorganisms in low-oxygen environments. In this work, we have developed a noninvasive cyan-green fluorescent based reporter system for real-time tracking of LAB that is functional under anoxic conditions. The evoglow-Pp1 was cloned downstream from the promoters D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase and elongation factor Tu of Lactobacillus reuteri CECT925 using pNZ8048 and downstream of the lactococcal P1 promoter using pT1NX. The classical gfp was also cloned in pT1NX. These recombinant expression vectors were electroporated into Lactococccus, Lactobacillus, and Enterococcus strains with biotechnological and/or probiotic interests to assess and compare their functionality under different conditions of oxygen and pH. The expression was analyzed by imaging and fluorometric methods as well as by flow cytometry. We demonstrate that reporter systems pNZ:TuR-aFP and pT1-aFP are two versatile molecular markers for monitoring LAB in food and fecal environments without the potential problems caused by oxygen and pH limitations, which could be exploited for in vivo studies. Production of the fluorescent protein did not disturb any important physiological properties of the parental strains, such as growth rate, reuterin, or bacteriocin production. PMID:26129953

  1. EFFECT OF LIGNIN ON ENZYMATIC SACCHARIFICATION OF HARDWOOD AFTER GREEN LIQUOR AND SULFURIC ACID PRETREATMENTS

    Douyong Min,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Red maple, sweet gum, trembling aspen, red alder, and Eucalyptus globulus samples were pretreated with dilute sulfuric acid and green liquor before enzymatic saccharification. Substrates showed different levels of delignification and sugar recovery, depending on the applied pretreatments and the syringaldehyde/vanillin ratio (S/V. Three major conclusions were drawn in this research. First, lignin is the greatest contributor to recalcitrance of hardwood to enzymatic saccharification. Second, a high S/V ratio is a useful indicator of high delignification during a pretreatment process. Third, green liquor pretreatment is a promising pretreatment method because of a high delignification degree and sugar recovery. In addition, xylan also contributes to the recalcitrance of hardwoods toward enzymatic saccharification.

  2. Chlorobium Tepidum: Insights into the Structure, Physiology, and Metabolism of a Green Sulfur Bacterium Derived from the Complete Genome Sequence

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Chew, Aline Gomez Maqueo; Li, Hui;

    2003-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria are obligate, anaerobic photolithoautotrophs that synthesize unique bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) and a unique light-harvesting antenna structure, the chlorosome. One organism, Chlorobium tepidum, has emerged as a model for this group of bacteria primarily due to its relative...... within the last 3 years, most of which have been made based on analyses of the genome. This has allowed a nearly complete elucidation of the biosynthetic pathways for the carotenoids and BChls in Chl. tepidum, which include several novel enzymes specific for BChl c biosynthesis. Facilitating these...... analyses, both BChl c and carotenoid biosynthesis can be completely eliminated in Chl. tepidum. Based particularly on analyses of mutants lacking chlorosome proteins and BChl c, progress has also been made in understanding the structure and biogenesis of chlorosomes. In silico analyses of the presence and...

  3. Ecological and phylogenetic studies on purple sulfur bacteria based on their pufLM genes of the photosynthetic reaction center

    Tank, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis pufLM genes were tested for their suitability as phylogenetic markers for purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and applied in environmental community studies as well as in polyphasic taxonomy. pufLM genes encode for the light and medium subunit of the photosynthetic reaction center type II proteins exclusively present in the polyphyletic group of anoxygenic phototrophic purple bacteria and Chloroflexaceae. Congruency between 16S rRNA gene and pufLM phylogeny was obtained in this study ...

  4. Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria in Soap Lake (Washington State), a Meromictic, Haloalkaline Lake with an Unprecedented High Sulfide Content▿

    Dimitry Y Sorokin; Foti, Mirjam; Pinkart, Holly C.; Muyzer, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    Culture-dependent and -independent techniques were used to study the diversity of chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in Soap Lake (Washington State), a meromictic, haloalkaline lake containing an unprecedentedly high sulfide concentration in the anoxic monimolimnion. Both approaches revealed the dominance of bacteria belonging to the genus Thioalkalimicrobium, which are common inhabitants of soda lakes. A dense population of Thioalkalimicrobium (up to 107 cells/ml) was found at t...

  5. Genomic properties of Marine Group A bacteria indicate a role in the marine sulfur cycle.

    Wright, Jody J; Mewis, Keith; Hanson, Niels W; Konwar, Kishori M; Maas, Kendra R; Hallam, Steven J

    2014-02-01

    Marine Group A (MGA) is a deeply branching and uncultivated phylum of bacteria. Although their functional roles remain elusive, MGA subgroups are particularly abundant and diverse in oxygen minimum zones and permanent or seasonally stratified anoxic basins, suggesting metabolic adaptation to oxygen-deficiency. Here, we expand a previous survey of MGA diversity in O2-deficient waters of the Northeast subarctic Pacific Ocean (NESAP) to include Saanich Inlet (SI), an anoxic fjord with seasonal O2 gradients and periodic sulfide accumulation. Phylogenetic analysis of small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene clone libraries recovered five previously described MGA subgroups and defined three novel subgroups (SHBH1141, SHBH391, and SHAN400) in SI. To discern the functional properties of MGA residing along gradients of O2 in the NESAP and SI, we identified and sequenced to completion 14 fosmids harboring MGA-associated 16S RNA genes from a collection of 46 fosmid libraries sourced from NESAP and SI waters. Comparative analysis of these fosmids, in addition to four publicly available MGA-associated large-insert DNA fragments from Hawaii Ocean Time-series and Monterey Bay, revealed widespread genomic differentiation proximal to the ribosomal RNA operon that did not consistently reflect subgroup partitioning patterns observed in 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Predicted protein-coding genes associated with adaptation to O2-deficiency and sulfur-based energy metabolism were detected on multiple fosmids, including polysulfide reductase (psrABC), implicated in dissimilatory polysulfide reduction to hydrogen sulfide and dissimilatory sulfur oxidation. These results posit a potential role for specific MGA subgroups in the marine sulfur cycle. PMID:24030600

  6. Polonium in Florida groundwater and its possible relationship to the sulfur cycle and bacteria

    The last radioactive member of the 238U natural decay-series, 210Po is normally considered a very particle-reactive isotope. Analysis of most natural waters shows that 210Po is present at very low activities, usually even lower than its insoluble precursor, 210Pb. The authors have recently discovered, however, that 210Po exists at very high concentrations in groundwaters of some shallow aquifers in west central Florida. These waters tend to be fairly acidic (pH 222Rn. Detailed study of one well with extraordinary levels of 210Po (∼ 1000 dpm/l) indicates that: (1) 210Po in this water is in great excess of radioactive equilibrium with its predecessors 210Pb and 210Bi; (2) most Po in this water exists in a form which does not coprecipitate with an iron hydroxide scavenge; and (3) the conversion of soluble (0.2 μm filter) to particulate Po occurs over a time scale of a few days during sulfide oxidation. The authors suspect that Po cycling in this environment is related to the sulfur cycle and may, therefore, be influenced by sulfur bacteria

  7. Effect of green tea on volatile sulfur compounds in mouth air.

    Lodhia, Parth; Yaegaki, Ken; Khakbaznejad, Ali; Imai, Toshio; Sato, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Tomoko; Murata, Takatoshi; Kamoda, Takeshi

    2008-02-01

    Many food products are claimed to be effective in controlling halitosis. Halitosis is caused mainly by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) such as H(2)S and CH(3)SH produced in the oral cavity. Oral microorganisms degrade proteinaceous substrates to cysteine and methionine, which are then converted to VSCs. Most treatments for halitosis focus on controlling the number of microorganisms in the oral cavity. Since tea polyphenols have been shown to have antimicrobial and deodorant effects, we have investigated whether green tea powder reduces VSCs in mouth air, and compared its effectiveness with that of other foods which are claimed to control halitosis. Immediately after administering the products, green tea showed the largest reduction in concentration of both H(2)S and CH(3)SH gases, especially CH(3)SH which also demonstrated a better correlation with odor strength than H(2)S; however, no reduction was observed at 1, 2 and 3 h after administration. Chewing gum, mints and parsley-seed oil product did not reduce the concentration of VSCs in mouth air at any time. Toothpaste, mints and green tea strongly inhibited VSCs production in a saliva-putrefaction system, but chewing gum and parsley-seed oil product could not inhibit saliva putrefaction. Toothpaste and green tea also demonstrated strong deodorant activities in vitro, but no significant deodorant activity of mints, chewing gum or parsley-seed oil product were observed. We concluded that green tea was very effective in reducing oral malodor temporarily because of its disinfectant and deodorant activities, whereas other foods were not effective. PMID:18388413

  8. Influence of Gamma Radiation in Combination with Biocides on Sulfur Reducing Bacteria

    The counts of sulfur reducing bacteria (SRB) of the water samples collected from a gas treatment plant of a petroleum field in middle delta-Egypt were determined. The data showed a significant counts of (SRB) in the collected samples and there was a mild increase in the bacterial counts through the system stages which revealed the presence of appropriate conditions required for the growth of (SRB) microflora. Three groups of non-oxidizing biocides were screened for their bactericidal activities. It was found that the biocides IA and IB were slightly superior in respect to the antibacterial efficacy compared to their analogues of aldehydic and cationic forms, respectively. So, these biocides were selected for the study of the combined treatment with gamma radiation to maximize the efficiency on sulfate reducing bacteria treatment using the minimum effective dose of both radiation and biocides, and to eliminate their negative impacts, This treatment demonstrated that it is possible to minimize the amount of chemical biocides that are injected into targeted systems and released to the environment by exposing the waste water to ionizing radiation after biocides addition

  9. Isolation of lactic acid bacteria for its possible use in the fermentation of green algerian olives

    Nour-Eddine, Karam; Halima, Zadi-Karam; Mourad, Kacem

    2004-01-01

    This study was undertaken with the aim of obtaining lactic acid bacteria with the ability to ferment olives for possible use as starter cultures. For this reason, 32 isolates of lactic acid bacteria isolated from the spontaneous fermentation of green olives were characterized and identified on the basis of morphological and biochemical criteria. 14 of them were identified as Lactococcus lactis, 11 isolates as Lactobacillus plantarum and 7 isolates as Enterococcus sp. Of the 18 isolates examin...

  10. Genetic manipulation of carotenoid biosynthesis in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Maresca, Julia A; Yunker, Colleen E;

    2004-01-01

    The green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum is a strict anaerobe and an obligate photoautotroph. On the basis of sequence similarity with known enzymes or sequence motifs, nine open reading frames encoding putative enzymes of carotenoid biosynthesis were identified in the genome sequence of C....... tepidum, and all nine genes were inactivated. Analysis of the carotenoid composition in the resulting mutants allowed the genes encoding the following six enzymes to be identified: phytoene synthase (crtB/CT1386), phytoene desaturase (crtP/CT0807), zeta-carotene desaturase (crtQ/CT1414), gamma......-carotene desaturase (crtU/CT0323), carotenoid 1',2'-hydratase (crtC/CT0301), and carotenoid cis-trans isomerase (crtH/CT0649). Three mutants (CT0180, CT1357, and CT1416 mutants) did not exhibit a discernible phenotype. The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in C. tepidum is similar to that in cyanobacteria and plants...

  11. Sedimentary sulfur geochemistry of the Paleogene Green River Formation, western USA: Implications for interpreting depositional and diagenetic processes in saline alkaline lakes

    Tuttle, Michele L.; Goldhaber, Martin B.

    1993-07-01

    The sulfur geochemistry of the lacustrine Paleogene Green River Formation (Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, USA) is unlike that of most marine and other lacustrine rocks. Distinctive chemical, isotopic, and mineralogical characteristics of the formation are pyrrhotite and marcasite, high contents of iron mineral sulfides strikingly enriched in 34S, cyclical trends in sulfur abundance and δ 34S values, and long-term evolutionary trends in δ 34S values. Analyses that identified and quantified these characteristics include carbonate-free abundance of organic carbon (0.13-47 wt%), total iron (0.31-13 wt%), reactive iron (>70% of total iron), total sulfur (0.02-16 wt%), acid-volatile monosulfide (S Av), disulfide (S Di > 70% of total sulfur), sulfate (S SO4) and organosulfur (S Org); isotopic composition of separated sulfur phases (δ 34S Di,Av up to +49‰); and mineralogy, morphology and paragenesis of sulfide minerals. Mineralogy, morphology, δ 34S Di,Av, and δ 34S Org have a distinctive relation, reflecting variable and unique depositional and early diagenetic conditions in the Green River lakes. When the lakes were brackish, dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacteria in the sediment produced H 2S, which initially reacted with labile iron to form pyrite framboids and more gradually with organic matter to form organosulfur compounds. During a long-lived stage of saline lake water, the amount of sulfate supplied by inflow decreased and alkalinity and pH of lake waters increased substantially. Extensive bacterial sulfate reduction in the water column kept lake waters undersaturated with sulfate minerals. A very high H 2S:SO 4 ratio developed in stagnant bottom water aided by the high pH that kinetically inhibited iron sulfidization. Progressive removal of H 2S by coeval formation of iron sulfides and organosulfur compounds caused the isotopic composition of the entire dissolved sulfur reservoir to evolve to δ 34S values much greater than that of inflow sulfate, which is

  12. Succession of Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria in the Microbial Community on Corroding Concrete in Sewer Systems† ▿

    Okabe, Satoshi; Odagiri, Mitsunori; Ito, Tsukasa; Satoh, Hisashi

    2007-01-01

    Microbially induced concrete corrosion (MICC) in sewer systems has been a serious problem for a long time. A better understanding of the succession of microbial community members responsible for the production of sulfuric acid is essential for the efficient control of MICC. In this study, the succession of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) in the bacterial community on corroding concrete in a sewer system in situ was investigated over 1 year by culture-independent 16S rRNA gene-based molecular ...

  13. Removal of sediment and bacteria from water using green chemistry.

    Buttice, Audrey L; Stroot, Joyce M; Lim, Daniel V; Stroot, Peter G; Alcantar, Norma A

    2010-05-01

    Although nearly all newly derived water purification methods have improved the water quality in developing countries, few have been accepted and maintained for long-term use. Field studies indicate that the most beneficial methods use indigenous resources, as they are both accessible and accepted by communities they help. In an effort to implement a material that will meet community needs, two fractions of mucilage gum were extracted from the Opuntia ficus-indica cactus and tested as flocculation agents against sediment and bacterial contamination. As diatomic ions are known to affect both mucilage and promote cell aggregation, CaCl(2) was studied in conjunction and compared with mucilage as a bacteria removal method. To evaluate performance, ion-rich waters that mimic natural water bodies were prepared. Column tests containing suspensions of the sediment kaolin exhibited particle flocculation and settling rates up to 13.2 cm/min with mucilage versus control settling rates of 0.5 cm/min. Bacillus cereus tests displayed flocculation and improved settling times with mucilage concentrations lower than 5 ppm and removal rates between 97 and 98% were observed for high bacteria concentration tests (>10(8) cells/ml). This natural material not only displays water purification abilities, but it is also affordable, renewable and readily available. PMID:20369814

  14. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF BACTERIA FOR REMOVAL OF SULFUR IN ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    2000-01-01

    1. IntroductionThe presence of sulfur in fossil fuels contributesto corrosion of production and refining equipments,when burning these high-sulfur fuels, it will releasesulfur oxides into the atmosphere, which leading tothe formation of acid rain.Various processes have been developed for theremoval of sulfur compounds from fossil fuel.Inorganic sulfur can be reduced through physicalbeneficiation techniques, but organically boundsulfur is difficult to be removed by these ways 1142].Biological desulfurization...

  15. Effects of stress hormones on the production of volatile sulfur compounds by periodontopathogenic bacteria

    Caroline Morini Calil

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the effects of stress hormones on the etiologic agents of halitosis. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effects of adrenaline (ADR, noradrenaline (NA and cortisol (CORT on bacteria that produce volatile sulfur compounds (VSC, the major gases responsible for bad breath. Cultures of Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn, Porphyromonas endodontalis (Pe, Prevotella intermedia (Pi and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg were exposed to 50 µM ADR, NA and CORT or equivalent volumes of sterile water as controls for 12 and 24 h. Growth was evaluated based on absorbance at 660 nm. Portable gas chromatography was used to measure VSC concentrations. Kruskal-Wallis and the Dunn post-hoc test were used to compare the groups. For Fn, ADR, NA and CORT significantly reduced bacterial growth after 12 h and 24 h (p 0.05. In the Pi cultures, ADR, NA and CORT increased H2S (p < 0.05. Catecholamines and cortisol can interfere with growth and H2S production of sub-gingival species in vitro. This process appears to be complex and supports the association between stress and the production of VSC.

  16. Application of bacteria involved in the biological sulfur cycle for paper mill effluent purification

    In anaerobic wastewater treatment, the occurrence of biological sulfate reduction results in the formation of unwanted hydrogen sulfide, which is odorous, corrosive and toxic. In this paper, the role and application of bacteria in anaerobic and aerobic sulfur transformations are described and exemplified for the treatment of a paper mill wastewater. The sulfate containing wastewater first passes an anaerobic UASB reactor for bulk COD removal which is accompanied by the formation of biogas and hydrogen sulfide. In an aeration pond, the residual CODorganic and the formed dissolved hydrogen sulfide are removed. The biogas, consisting of CH4 (80-90 vol.%), CO2 (10-20 vol.%) and H2S (0.8-1.2 vol.%), is desulfurised prior to its combustion in a power generator thereby using a new biological process for H2S removal. This process will be described in more detail in this paper. Biomass from the anaerobic bioreactor has a compact granular structure and contains a diverse microbial community. Therefore, other anaerobic bioreactors throughout the world are inoculated with biomass from this UASB reactor. The sludge was also successfully used in investigation on sulfate reduction with carbon monoxide as the electron donor and the conversion of methanethiol. This shows the biotechnological potential of this complex reactor biomass

  17. CO2 assimilation in the chemocline of Lake Cadagno is dominated by a few types of phototrophic purple sulfur bacteria

    Storelli, Nicola; Peduzzi, Sandro; Saad, Maged; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Perret, Xavier; Tonolla, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Lake Cadagno is characterized by a compact chemocline that harbors high concentrations of various phototrophic sulfur bacteria. Four strains representing the numerically most abundant populations in the chemocline were tested in dialysis bags in situ for their ability to fix CO₂. The purple sulfur...

  18. Sulfur cycle

    LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Microbes, especially bacteria, play an important role in oxidative and reductive cycle of sulfur. The oxidative part of the cycle is mediated by photosynthetic bacteria in the presence of light energy and chemosynthetic forms in the absence of light...

  19. Sulfur Isotopic Fractionation of Carbonyl Sulfide during Degradation by Soil Bacteria.

    Kamezaki, Kazuki; Hattori, Shohei; Ogawa, Takahiro; Toyoda, Sakae; Kato, Hiromi; Katayama, Yoko; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2016-04-01

    We performed laboratory incubation experiments on the degradation of gaseous phase carbonyl sulfide (OCS) by soil bacteria to determine its sulfur isotopic fractionation constants ((34)ε). Incubation experiments were conducted using strains belonging to the genera Mycobacterium, Williamsia, and Cupriavidus isolated from natural soil environments. The (34)ε values determined were -3.67 ± 0.33‰, -3.99 ± 0.19‰, -3.57 ± 0.22‰, and -3.56 ± 0.23‰ for Mycobacterium spp. strains THI401, THI402, THI404, and THI405; -3.74 ± 0.29‰ for Williamsia sp. strain THI410; and -2.09 ± 0.07‰ and -2.38 ± 0.35‰ for Cupriavidus spp. strains THI414 and THI415. Although OCS degradation rates divided by cell numbers (cell-specific activity) were different among strains of the same genus, the (34)ε values for same genus showed no significant differences. Even though the numbers of bacterial species examined were limited, our results suggest that (34)ε values for OCS bacterial degradation depend not on cell-specific activities, but on genus-level biological differences, suggesting that (34)ε values are dependent on enzymatic and/or membrane properties. Taking our (34)ε values as representative for bacterial OCS degradation, the expected atmospheric changes in δ(34)S values of OCS range from 0.5‰ to 0.9‰, based on previously reported decreases in OCS concentrations at Mt. Fuji, Japan. Consequently, tropospheric observation of δ(34)S values for OCS coupled with (34)ε values for OCS bacterial degradation can potentially be used to investigate soil as an OCS sink. PMID:26967120

  20. Predictive and Interpretive Simulation of Green Fluorescent Protein Expression in Reporter Bacteria

    Leveau, Johan H. J.; Lindow, Steven E.

    2001-01-01

    We have formulated a numerical model that simulates the accumulation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in bacterial cells from a generic promoter-gfp fusion. The model takes into account the activity of the promoter, the time it takes GFP to mature into its fluorescent form, the susceptibility of GFP to proteolytic degradation, and the growth rate of the bacteria. From the model, we derived a simple formula with which promoter activity can be inferred easily and quantitatively from actual me...

  1. Isotopically labeled sulfur compounds and synthetic selenium and tellurium analogues to study sulfur metabolism in marine bacteria

    Nelson L. Brock

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Members of the marine Roseobacter clade can degrade dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP via competing pathways releasing either methanethiol (MeSH or dimethyl sulfide (DMS. Deuterium-labeled [2H6]DMSP and the synthetic DMSP analogue dimethyltelluriopropionate (DMTeP were used in feeding experiments with the Roseobacter clade members Phaeobacter gallaeciensis DSM 17395 and Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3, and their volatile metabolites were analyzed by closed-loop stripping and solid-phase microextraction coupled to GC–MS. Feeding experiments with [2H6]DMSP resulted in the incorporation of a deuterium label into MeSH and DMS. Knockout of relevant genes from the known DMSP demethylation pathway to MeSH showed in both species a residual production of [2H3]MeSH, suggesting that a second demethylation pathway is active. The role of DMSP degradation pathways for MeSH and DMS formation was further investigated by using the synthetic analogue DMTeP as a probe in feeding experiments with the wild-type strain and knockout mutants. Feeding of DMTeP to the R. pomeroyi knockout mutant resulted in a diminished, but not abolished production of demethylation pathway products. These results further corroborated the proposed second demethylation activity in R. pomeroyi. Isotopically labeled [2H3]methionine and 34SO42−, synthesized from elemental 34S8, were tested to identify alternative sulfur sources besides DMSP for the MeSH production in P. gallaeciensis. Methionine proved to be a viable sulfur source for the MeSH volatiles, whereas incorporation of labeling from sulfate was not observed. Moreover, the utilization of selenite and selenate salts by marine alphaproteobacteria for the production of methylated selenium volatiles was explored and resulted in the production of numerous methaneselenol-derived volatiles via reduction and methylation. The pathway of selenate/selenite reduction, however, proved to be strictly separated from sulfate reduction.

  2. Metabolic adaptation and trophic strategies of soil bacteria - C1- metabolism and sulfur chemolithotrophy in Starkeya novella

    UlrikeKappler

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The highly diverse and metabolically versatile microbial communities found in soil environments are major contributors to the global carbon, nitrogen and sulfur cycles. We have used a combination of genome –based pathway analysis with proteomics and gene expression studies to investigate metabolic adaptation in a representative of these bacteria, Starkeya novella, which was originally isolated from agricultural soil. This bacterium was the first facultative sulfur chemolithoautotroph that was isolated and it is also able to grow with methanol and on over 39 substrates as a heterotroph. However, using glucose, fructose, methanol, thiosulfate as well as combinations of the carbon compounds with thiosulfate as growth substrates we have demonstrated here that contrary to the previous classification, S. novella is not a facultative sulfur chemolitho- and methylotroph, as the enzyme systems required for these two growth modes as always expressed at high levels. This is typical for key metabolic pathways. In addition enzymes for various pathways of carbon dioxide fixation were always expressed at high levels, even during heterotrophic growth on glucose or fructose, which suggests a role for these pathways beyond the generation of reduced carbon units for cell growth, possibly in redox balancing of metabolism. Our results then indicate that S. novella, a representative of the Xanthobacteraceae family of methylotrophic soil and freshwater dwelling bacteria, employs a mixotrophic growth strategy under all conditions tested here. As a result the contribution of this bacterium to either carbon sequestration or the release of climate active substances could vary very quickly, which has direct implications for the modelling of such processes if mixotrophy proves to be the main growth strategy for large populations of soil bacteria.

  3. Selection of oleuropein-degrading lactic acid bacteria strains isolated from fermenting Moroccan green olives

    Ghabbour, N.; Lamzira, Z.; Thonart, P.; Cidalia, P.; Markaouid, M.; Asehraoua, A.

    2011-07-01

    A total of 177 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from early-stage Moroccan Picholine green olive fermentation, including Lactobacillus plantarum (44.63%), Lactobacillus pentosus (25.99%), Lactobacillus brevis (9.61%) and Pediococcus pentosaceus (19.77%). All the isolates were screened for their tolerance to olive leaf extract and oleuropein. Most of the isolates (85.3%) were found able to degrade oleuropein, when evaluated by either oleuropein or 5-Bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl {beta}-D-glucuronide (X-Gluc) as substrates. The biodegradation capacity of the selected strains of each species was confirmed by HPLC analysis. (Author).

  4. Selection of oleuropein-degrading lactic acid bacteria strains isolated from fermenting Moroccan green olives

    A total of 177 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from early-stage Moroccan Picholine green olive fermentation, including Lactobacillus plantarum (44.63%), Lactobacillus pentosus (25.99%), Lactobacillus brevis (9.61%) and Pediococcus pentosaceus (19.77%). All the isolates were screened for their tolerance to olive leaf extract and oleuropein. Most of the isolates (85.3%) were found able to degrade oleuropein, when evaluated by either oleuropein or 5-Bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl β-D-glucuronide (X-Gluc) as substrates. The biodegradation capacity of the selected strains of each species was confirmed by HPLC analysis. (Author).

  5. Selection of oleuropein-degrading lactic acid bacteria strains isolated from fermenting Moroccan green olives

    Ghabbour, N.; Lamzira, Z.; Thonart, P.; Cidalia, P.; Markaoui, M.; Asehraou, A.

    2011-01-01

    A total of 177 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from early-stage Moroccan Picholine green olive fermentation, including Lactobacillus plantarum (44.63%), Lactobacillus pentosus (25.99%), Lactobacillus brevis (9.61%) and Pediococcus pentosaceus (19.77%). All the isolates were screened for their tolerance to olive leaf extract and oleuropein. Most of the isolates (85.3%) were found able to degrade ole...

  6. Sulfur Oxygenase Reductase (Sor in the Moderately Thermoacidophilic Leaching Bacteria: Studies in Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans and Acidithiobacillus caldus

    Claudia Janosch

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The sulfur oxygenase reductase (Sor catalyzes the oxygen dependent disproportionation of elemental sulfur, producing sulfite, thiosulfate and sulfide. Being considered an “archaeal like” enzyme, it is also encoded in the genomes of some acidophilic leaching bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus caldus, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans, among others. We measured Sor activity in crude extracts from Sb. thermosulfidooxidans DSM 9293T. The optimum temperature for its oxygenase activity was achieved at 75 °C, confirming the “thermophilic” nature of this enzyme. Additionally, a search for genes probably involved in sulfur metabolism in the genome sequence of Sb. thermosulfidooxidans DSM 9293T was done. Interestingly, no sox genes were found. Two sor genes, a complete heterodisulfidereductase (hdr gene cluster, three tetrathionate hydrolase (tth genes, three sulfide quinonereductase (sqr, as well as the doxD component of a thiosulfate quinonereductase (tqo were found. Seven At. caldus strains were tested for Sor activity, which was not detected in any of them. We provide evidence that an earlier reported Sor activity from At. caldus S1 and S2 strains most likely was due to the presence of a Sulfobacillus contaminant.

  7. Biologically produced sulfur

    Kleinjan, W.E.; Keizer, de A.; Janssen, A.J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Sulfur compound oxidizing bacteria produce sulfur as an intermediate in the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate. Sulfur produced by these microorganisms can be stored in sulfur globules, located either inside or outside the cell. Excreted sulfur globules are colloidal particles which are stabil

  8. Isolation of sulfur reducing and oxidizing bacteria found in contaminated drywall.

    Hooper, Dennis G; Shane, John; Straus, David C; Kilburn, Kaye H; Bolton, Vincent; Sutton, John S; Guilford, Frederick T

    2010-01-01

    Drywall from China has been reported to release sulfur producing products which are corrosive to metals, result in noxious odors, and represent a significant health risk. It has been reported that these emissions produce medical symptoms such as respiratory or asthma type problems, sinusitis, gastrointestinal disorders, and vision problems in home owners and their household pets. We report here a method of identifying a causative agent for these emissions by sampling affected gypsum wallboard and subjecting those samples to Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction [RT-PCR] studies. Specific DNA probes and primers have been designed and patented that detect a specific iron and sulfur reducing bacterium (i.e., Thiobacillus ferrooxidans). One hundred percent of affected drywall samples obtained from homes located in the southeastern United States tested positive for the presence of T. ferrooxidans. All negative controls consisting of unaffected wallboard and internal controls, Geotrichum sp., tested negative within our limits of detection. PMID:20386658

  9. Isolation of Sulfur Reducing and Oxidizing Bacteria Found in Contaminated Drywall

    Frederick T. Guilford

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Drywall from China has been reported to release sulfur producing products which are corrosive to metals, result in noxious odors, and represent a significant health risk. It has been reported that these emissions produce medical symptoms such as respiratory or asthma type problems, sinusitis, gastrointestinal disorders, and vision problems in home owners and their household pets. We report here a method of identifying a causative agent for these emissions by sampling affected gypsum wallboard and subjecting those samples to Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction [RT-PCR] studies. Specific DNA probes and primers have been designed and patented that detect a specific iron and sulfur reducing bacterium (i.e., Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. One hundred percent of affected drywall samples obtained from homes located in the southeastern United States tested positive for the presence of T. ferrooxidans. All negative controls consisting of unaffected wallboard and internal controls, Geotrichum sp., tested negative within our limits of detection.

  10. Isolation of Sulfur Reducing and Oxidizing Bacteria Found in Contaminated Drywall

    Guilford, Frederick T.; John S. Sutton; Kaye H. Kilburn; Vincent Bolton; John Shane; Straus, David C.; Dennis G. Hooper

    2010-01-01

    Drywall from China has been reported to release sulfur producing products which are corrosive to metals, result in noxious odors, and represent a significant health risk. It has been reported that these emissions produce medical symptoms such as respiratory or asthma type problems, sinusitis, gastrointestinal disorders, and vision problems in home owners and their household pets. We report here a method of identifying a causative agent for these emissions by sampling affected gypsum wallboard...

  11. Evidence for hydrogen oxidation and metabolic plasticity in widespread deep-sea sulfur-oxidizing bacteria

    Anantharaman, Karthik; Breier, John A.; Sheik, Cody S.; Dick, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are a well-known source of energy that powers chemosynthesis in the deep sea. Recent work suggests that microbial chemosynthesis is also surprisingly pervasive throughout the dark oceans, serving as a significant CO2 sink even at sites far removed from vents. Ammonia and sulfur have been identified as potential electron donors for this chemosynthesis, but they do not fully account for measured rates of dark primary production in the pelagic water column. Here we use metagen...

  12. Rapid detection of bacteria in green tea using a novel pretreatment method in a bioluminescence assay.

    Shinozaki, Yohei; Harada, Yasuhiro

    2014-06-01

    Tea is one of the most popular beverages consumed in the world, and green tea has become a popular beverage in Western as well as Asian countries. A novel pretreatment method for a commercial bioluminescence assay to detect bacteria in green tea was developed and evaluated in this study. Pretreatment buffers with pH levels ranging from 6.0 to 9.0 were selected from MES (morpholineethanesulfonic acid), HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid), or Tricine buffers. To evaluate the effect of pretreatment and the performance of the assay, serially diluted cultures of Enterobacter cloacae, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus were tested. The improved methods, which consisted of a pretreatment of the sample in alkaline buffer, significantly decreased the background bioluminescence intensity of green tea samples when compared with the conventional method. Pretreatment with alkaline buffers with pH levels ranging from 8.0 to 9.0 increased the bioluminescence intensities of cultures of E. cloacae and S. aureus. Strong log-linear relationships between the bioluminescence intensities and plate counts emerged for the tested strains. Furthermore, the microbial detection limit was 15 CFU in 500 ml of bottled green tea after an 8-h incubation at 35°C and an assay time of 1 h. The results showed that contaminated samples could be detected within 1 h of operation using our improved bioluminescence assay. This method could be used to test for contamination during the manufacturing process as well as for statistical sampling for quality control. PMID:24853516

  13. Memory-assisted exciton diffusion in the chlorosome light-harvesting antenna of green sulfur bacteria

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Saikin, Semion K; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Chlorosomes are likely the largest and most efficient natural light-harvesting photosynthetic antenna systems. They are composed of large numbers of bacteriochlorophylls organized into supramolecular aggregates. We explore the microscopic origin of the fast excitation energy transfer in the chlorosome using the recently-resolved structure and atomistic-detail simulations. Despite the dynamical disorder effects on the electronic transitions of the bacteriochlorophylls, our simulations show that the exciton delocalizes over the entire aggregate in about 200 fs. The memory effects associated to the dynamical disorder assist the exciton diffusion through the aggregates and enhance the diffusion coefficients as a factor of two as compared to the model without memory. Furthermore, exciton diffusion in the chlorosome is found to be highly anisotropic with the preferential transfer towards the baseplate, which is the next functional element in the photosynthetic system.

  14. Theoretical characterization of excitation energy transfer in chlorosome light-harvesting antennae from green sulfur bacteria

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Saikin, Semion K; Brookes, Jennifer C; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Chlorosomes are the largest and most efficient natural light-harvesting antenna systems. They contain thousands of pigment molecules - bacteriochlorophylls (BChls)- that are organized into supramolecular aggregates and form a very efficient network for excitonic energy migration. Here, we present a theoretical study of excitation energy transfer (EET) in the chlorosome based on experimental evidence of the molecular assembly. Our model for the exciton dynamics throughout the antenna combines a stochastic time propagation of the excitonic wave function with molecular dynamics simulations of supramolecular structure, and electronic structure calculations of the excited states. The simulation results reveal a detailed picture of the EET in the chlorosome. Coherent energy transfer is significant only for the first 50 fs after the initial excitation, and the wavelike motion of the exciton is completely damped at 100 fs. Characteristic time constants of incoherent energy transfer, subsequently, vary from 1 ps to se...

  15. Augmentation of potential phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB) stimulate growth of green mustard (Brasica caventis Oed.) in marginal soil

    SULIASIH; SRI WIDAWATI

    2006-01-01

    The potential of phosphate solubilizing bacteria/PSB (Bacillus megaterium, B. pantothenticus, Chromobacterium lividum and Klebsiella aerogenes) were used as biofertilizer to increase the fresh leaf production of green mustard (Brasica caventis Oed.). An experiment was conducted at green house condition. The experiment were used 18 treatments such as single isolate of potential PSB (A,B,C,D), inoculants contain two isolates of potential PSB (E,F,G,H,I,J), inoculants contain three isolates of p...

  16. Menaquinone-7 in the reaction center complex of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme functions as the electron acceptor A1

    Kjaer, B; Frigaard, N-U; Yang, F; Zybailov, B; Miller, M; Golbeck, J H; Scheller, H V

    1998-01-01

    Photosynthetically active reaction center complexes were prepared from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme NCIMB 8327, and the content of quinones was determined by extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography. The analysis showed a stoichiometry of 1.7 molecules of.......7 mT, consistent with its identification as a quinone. This spectrum is highly similar in terms of g values and line widths to photoaccumulated A1- in photosystem I of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. The results indicate that menaquinone-7 in the green sulfur bacterial reaction center is analogous to...

  17. Retreived bacteria from Noctiluca miliaris (green) bloom of the northeastern Arabian Sea

    Basu, Subhajit; Matondkar, S. G. Prabhu; Furtado, Irene

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, seasonal blooms of the dinoflagellate Noctiluca miliaris have appeared in the open-waters of the northern Arabian Sea (NAS). This study provides the first characterization of bacteria from a seasonal bloom of green Noctiluca of NAS (20°N-17°N and 64°E-70°E), during the spring-inter-monsoon cruise of Sagar Sampada 253, in March 2007. Bacterial growth as assessed by most-probable number (MPN) and plate counts, revealed `variable-physiotypes' over a wide range of salinities (0%-25% w/v NaCl), pH levels (5-8.5), and organic nutrient strengths, in comparison to non-bloom waters. MPN indices of bacteria in surface waters of bloom stations *DWK and *PRB, corresponded to (3.08-4.41)×103 cells/mL at 3.5% NaCl (w/v), and (2.82-9.49)×102 cells/mL at 25% (w/v) NaCl in tryptone-yeast extract broth (TYE). Plate counts were (1.12-4)×106 CFU/mL at 0% (w/v) NaCl, (1.28-3.9)×106 CFU/mL at 3.5% (w/v) NaCl, and (0.4-7)×104 CFU/mL at 25% NaCl (w/v) on TYE. One-tenth-strength Zobell's gave (0.6-3.74)×105 CFU/mL at pH 5 to (3.58-7.5)×105 CFU/mL at pH 8.5. These bacteria were identified to the genera Bacillus, Cellulomonas, Staphylococcus, Planococcus, Dietzia, Virgibacillus, Micrococcus, Sporosarcinae, Leucobacter, and Halomonas. The identity of three strains (GUFBSS253N2, GUFBSS253N30, and GUFBSS253N84) was confirmed through 16S rDNA sequence homology as Bacillus cohnii, Bacillus flexus, and Bacillus cereus. The ˜2-3-fold higher plate counts of culturable bacteria from the open-waters of the NAS indicate that these bacteria could critically determine the biogeochemical dynamics of the bloom and its milieu. The role of these bacteria in sustaining/terminating the bloom is under evaluation.

  18. Retreived bacteria from Noctiluca miliaris (green) bloom of the northeastern Arabian Sea

    BASU Subhajit; MATONDKAR SG Prabhu; FURTADO Irene

    2013-01-01

    In recent years,seasonal blooms of the dinoflagellate Noctiluca miliaris have appeared in the open-waters of the northern Arabian Sea (NAS).This study provides the first characterization of bacteria from a seasonal bloom of green Noctiluca ofNAS (20°N-17°N and 64°E-70°E),during the spring-inter-monsoon cruise ofSagar Sampada 253,in March 2007.Bacterial growth as assessed by most-probable number (MPN) and plate counts,revealed ‘variable-physiotypes' over a wide range of salinities (0%-25% w/v NaC1),pH levels (5-8.5),and organic nutrient strengths,in comparison to non-bloom waters.MPN indices of bacteria in surface waters of bloom stations *DWK and *PRB,corresponded to (3.08-4.41)× 103 cells/mL at 3.5%NaC1 (w/v),and (2.82-9.49)× 102 cells/mL at 25% (w/v) NaC1 in tryptone-yeast extract broth (TYE).Plate counts were (1.12-4) × 106 CFU/mL at 0% (w/v) NaCl,(1.28-3.9) × 106 CFU/mL at 3.5% (w/v) NaC1,and (0.4-7)× 104 CFU/mL at 25% NaC1 (w/v) on TYE.One-tenth-strength Zobell's gave (0.6-3.74)× 105 CFU/mL at pH 5 to (3.58-7.5)× 105 CFU/mL at pH 8.5.These bacteria were identified to the genera Bacillus,Cellulomonas,Staphylococcus,Planococcus,Dietzia,Virgibacillus,Micrococcus,Sporosarcinae,Leucobacter,and Halomonas.The identity of three strains (GUFBSS253N2,GUFBSS253N30,and GUFBSS253N84) was confirmed through 16S rDNA sequence homology as Bacillus cohnii,Bacillusflexus,and Bacillus cereus.The ~2-3-fold higher plate counts of culturable bacteria from the open-waters of the NAS indicate that these bacteria could critically determine the biogeochemical dynamics of the bloom and its milieu.The role of these bacteria in sustaining/terminating the bloom is under evaluation.

  19. Sulfide-oxidizing bacteria establishment in an innovative microaerobic reactor with an internal silicone membrane for sulfur recovery from wastewater.

    Valdés, F; Camiloti, P R; Rodriguez, R P; Delforno, T P; Carrillo-Reyes, J; Zaiat, M; Jeison, D

    2016-06-01

    A novel bioreactor, employing a silicone membrane for microaeration, was studied for partial sulfide oxidation to elemental sulfur. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of using an internal silicone membrane reactor (ISMR) to treat dissolved sulfide and to characterize its microbial community. The ISMR is an effective system to eliminate sulfide produced in anaerobic reactors. Sulfide removal efficiencies reached 96 % in a combined anaerobic/microaerobic reactor and significant sulfate production did not occur. The oxygen transfer was strongly influenced by air pressure and flow. Pyrosequencing analysis indicated various sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) affiliated to the species Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Sulfuricurvum kujiense and Pseudomonas stutzeri attached to the membrane and also indicated similarity between the biomass deposited on the membrane wall and the biomass drawn from the material support, supported the establishment of SOB in an anaerobic sludge under microaerobic conditions. Furthermore, these results showed that the reactor configuration can develop SOB under microaerobic conditions and can improve and reestablish the sulfide conversion to elemental sulfur. PMID:27003697

  20. Evidence for hydrogen oxidation and metabolic plasticity in widespread deep-sea sulfur-oxidizing bacteria.

    Anantharaman, Karthik; Breier, John A; Sheik, Cody S; Dick, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are a well-known source of energy that powers chemosynthesis in the deep sea. Recent work suggests that microbial chemosynthesis is also surprisingly pervasive throughout the dark oceans, serving as a significant CO(2) sink even at sites far removed from vents. Ammonia and sulfur have been identified as potential electron donors for this chemosynthesis, but they do not fully account for measured rates of dark primary production in the pelagic water column. Here we use metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses to show that deep-sea populations of the SUP05 group of uncultured sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria, which are abundant in widespread and diverse marine environments, contain and highly express genes encoding group 1 Ni, Fe hydrogenase enzymes for H(2) oxidation. Reconstruction of near-complete genomes of two cooccurring SUP05 populations in hydrothermal plumes and deep waters of the Gulf of California enabled detailed population-specific metatranscriptomic analyses, revealing dynamic patterns of gene content and transcript abundance. SUP05 transcripts for genes involved in H(2) and sulfur oxidation are most abundant in hydrothermal plumes where these electron donors are enriched. In contrast, a second hydrogenase has more abundant transcripts in background deep-sea samples. Coupled with results from a bioenergetic model that suggest that H(2) oxidation can contribute significantly to the SUP05 energy budget, these findings reveal the potential importance of H(2) as a key energy source in the deep ocean. This study also highlights the genomic plasticity of SUP05, which enables this widely distributed group to optimize its energy metabolism (electron donor and acceptor) to local geochemical conditions. PMID:23263870

  1. Close interspecies interactions between prokaryotes from sulfureous environments

    JörgOvermann

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Green sulfur bacteria are obligate photolithoautotrophs that require highly reducing conditions for growth and can utilize only a very limited number of carbon substrates. These bacteria thus inhabit a very narrow ecologic niche. However, several green sulfur bacteria have overcome the limits of immobility by entering into a symbiosis with motile Betaproteobacteria in a type of multicelllular association termed phototrophic consortia. One of these consortia, “Chlorochromatium aggregatum”, has recently been established as the first culturable model system to elucidate the molecular basis of this symbiotic interaction. It consists of 12-20 green sulfur bacteria epibionts surrounding a central, chemoheterotrophic betaproteobacterium in a highly ordered fashion. Recent genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic studies of "C. aggregatum" and its epibiont provide insights into the molecular basis and the origin of the stable association between the two very distantly related bacteria. While numerous genes of central metabolic pathways are upregulated during and hence involved in the specific symbiosis, only a limited number of unique putative symbiosis genes have been detected in the epibiont. Green sulfur bacteria therefore are preadapted to a symbiotic lifestyle. The metabolic coupling between the bacterial partners appears to involve amino acids and highly specific ultrastructures at the contact sites between the cells. Similarly, the interaction in the equally well studied archaeal consortia consisting of Nanoarchaeum equitans and its host Ignicoccus hospitalis is based on the transfer of amino acids while lacking the highly specialized contact sites observed in phototrophic consortia.

  2. Anaerobic sulfide-oxidation in marine colorless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    to the concentration in milligrams per liter of sulfide sulfur. Percentage oxidation was calculated by comparing the experimental values with the respective uninoculated controls at the end of incubation period using the formula (C f 2 E f /C f ) 3 100, where C f... is the final sulfide content in the control, and E f is the final sulfide content in the experiment. Effect of iron (FeCl 3 ) Positive controls at ambient conditions [room temperature (RT) 30 6 28C and atmospheric pressure] were always included to verify normal...

  3. Structure, Function, and Regulation of Antenna Complexes of Green Photosynthetic Bacteria; FINAL

    This project is concerned with the structure and function of the chlorosome antennas found in green photosynthetic bacteria. Chlorosomes are ellipsoidal structures attached to the cytoplasmic side of the inner cell membrane. These antenna complexes provide a very large absorption cross section for light capture. Evidence is overwhelming that the chlorosome represents a very different type of antenna from that found in any other photosynthetic system yet studied. It is now clear that chlorosomes do not contain traditional pigment-proteins, in which the pigments bind to specific sites on proteins. Instead, the chlorosome pigments are organized in vivo into pigment oligomers in which direct pigment-pigment interactions are of dominant importance. Our group has used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate this unique system, including model systems, ultrafast spectroscopy, molecular biology, protein chemistry and X-ray crystallography

  4. Green Synthesis and Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles for Antimicrobial Activity Against Burn Wounds Contaminating Bacteria

    Rout, Anandini; Jena, Padan K.; Sahoo, Debasish; Parida, Umesh K.; Bindhani, Birendra K.

    2014-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were prepared from the plant extract of N. arbor-tristis under atmospheric conditions through green synthesis and characterized by various physicochemical techniques like UV-Visible spectroscopy, IR Spectra, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the results confirmed the synthesis of homogeneous and stable AgNPs by the plant extracts. The antimicrobial activity of AgNPs was investigated against most common bacteria found in burn wound Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In these tests, Mueller Hinton agar plates were used with AgNPs of various concentrations, supplemented in liquid systems. P. aeruginosa was inhibited at the low concentration of AgNPs, whereas the growth-inhibitory effect on S. epidermidis was mild. These results suggest that AgNPs can be used as effective growth inhibitors of various microorganisms, making them applicable to diverse medical devices and antimicrobial control systems.

  5. Existing and emerging technologies that exploit sulfur cycling bacteria in subsurface petroleum reservoir microbial communities (Invited)

    Hubert, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    Fossil fuels remain by far our most important energy resources, providing around 90% of global primary energy supply. In the coming decadal transition between petroleum reliance and a more sustainable energy future we must increasingly view our vital petroleum reserves as microbial ecosystems that can be engineered to responsibly and creatively meet the energy needs of societies worldwide. In this way, the bioenergy agenda must interface with the traditional geoenergy industry and the challenges it faces. Bioengineering and deep biosphere geomicrobiology focus on the ecophysiology and biogeography of microorganisms in subsurface habitats including marine sediments and petroleum reservoirs. Understanding microbial communities in fossil fuel deposits will allow their distribution and catalytic potential to be exploited as geobiotechnologies that target known problem areas including sulfur cycle management related to biodesulfurization of heavy oils and reservoir souring control via nitrate injection, as well as promising emerging directions such as understanding subsurface geofluid dispersal vectors that could enable microbes to be used as bio-indicators in offshore oil and gas exploration. Results related to different research themes within contemporary petroleum geomicrobiology and bioengineering at Newcastle University will be presented with a focus on microorganisms involved in sulfur cycling that are commonly detected in different oil field microbial communities including mesophilic sulfide-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria and thermophilic sulfate-reducers belonging to the genus Desulfotomaculum.

  6. Effect of Nanohexaconazole on Nitrogen Fixing Blue Green Algae and Bacteria.

    Kumar, Rajesh; Gopal, Madhuban; Pabbi, Sunil; Paul, Sangeeta; Alam, Md Imteyaz; Yadav, Saurabh; Nair, Kishore Kumar; Chauhan, Neetu; Srivastava, Chitra; Gogoi, Robin; Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Goswami, Arunava

    2016-01-01

    Nanohexaconazole is a highly efficient fungicide against Rhizoctonia solani. Nanoparticles are alleged to adversely affect the non-target organisms. In order to evaluate such concern, the present study was carried out to investigate the effect of nanohexaconazole and its commercial formulation on sensitive nitrogen fixing blue green algae (BGA) and bacteria. Various activities of algae and bacteria namely growth, N-fixation, N-assimilation, Indole acetic acid (IAA) production and phosphate solubilization were differently affected in the presence of hexaconazole. Although, there was stimulatory to slightly inhibitory effect on the growth measurable parameters of the organisms studied at the recommended dose of nanohexaconazole, but its higher dose was inhibitory to all these microorganisms. On the other hand, the recommended as well as higher dose of commercial hexaconazole showed much severe inhibition of growth and metabolic activity of these organisms as compared to the nano preparation. The uses of nanohexazconazole instead of hexaconazole as a fungicide will not only help to control various fungal pathogens but also sustain the growth and activity of these beneficial microorganisms for sustaining soil fertility and productivity. PMID:27398501

  7. Metal mobilization by iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in a multiple extreme mine tailings in the Atacama Desert, Chile.

    Korehi, H; Blöthe, M; Sitnikova, M A; Dold, B; Schippers, A

    2013-03-01

    The marine shore sulfidic mine tailings dump at the Chañaral Bay in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile, is characterized by extreme acidity, high salinity, and high heavy metals concentrations. Due to pyrite oxidation, metals (especially copper) are mobilized under acidic conditions and transported toward the tailings surface and precipitate as secondary minerals (Dold, Environ. Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 752-758.). Depth profiles of total cell counts in this almost organic-carbon free multiple extreme environment showed variable numbers with up to 10(8) cells g(-1) dry weight for 50 samples at four sites. Real-time PCR quantification and bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversity analysis via clone libraries revealed a dominance of Bacteria over Archaea and the frequent occurrence of the acidophilic iron(II)- and sulfur-oxidizing and iron(III)-reducing genera Acidithiobacillus, Alicyclobacillus, and Sulfobacillus. Acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria were also frequently found via most-probable-number (MPN) cultivation. Halotolerant iron(II)-oxidizers in enrichment cultures were active at NaCl concentrations up to 1 M. Maximal microcalorimetrically determined pyrite oxidation rates coincided with maxima of the pyrite content, total cell counts, and MPN of iron(II)-oxidizers. These findings indicate that microbial pyrite oxidation and metal mobilization preferentially occur in distinct tailings layers at high salinity. Microorganisms for biomining with seawater salt concentrations obviously exist in nature. PMID:23373853

  8. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in Soap Lake (Washington State), a meromictic, haloalkaline lake with an unprecedented high sulfide content.

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Foti, Mirjam; Pinkart, Holly C; Muyzer, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    Culture-dependent and -independent techniques were used to study the diversity of chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in Soap Lake (Washington State), a meromictic, haloalkaline lake containing an unprecedentedly high sulfide concentration in the anoxic monimolimnion. Both approaches revealed the dominance of bacteria belonging to the genus Thioalkalimicrobium, which are common inhabitants of soda lakes. A dense population of Thioalkalimicrobium (up to 10(7) cells/ml) was found at the chemocline, which is characterized by a steep oxygen-sulfide gradient. Twelve Thioalkalimicrobium strains exhibiting three different phenotypes were isolated in pure culture from various locations in Soap Lake. The isolates fell into two groups according to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. One of the groups was closely related to T. cyclicum, which was isolated from Mono Lake (California), a transiently meromictic, haloalkaline lake. The second group, consisting of four isolates, was phylogenetically and phenotypically distinct from known Thioalkalimicrobium species and unique to Soap Lake. It represented a new species, for which we suggest the name Thioalkalimicrobium microaerophilum sp. nov. PMID:17114324

  9. Iron Sulfides and Sulfur Species Produced at (001) Hematite Surfaces in the Presence of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    Neal, Andrew L.; Techkarnjanaruk, Somkiet; Dohnalkova, Alice; McCready, David E.; Peyton, Brent M.; Geesey, Gill G.

    2001-01-01

    In the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans) hematite (a-Fe2O3) dissolution is affected and hydrogen sulfide, the product of sulfate reduction is released. As a consequence, ferrous ions are free to react with excess H2S to form insoluble iron sulfides. X-ray photoelectron spectra indicate binding energies consistent with the iron sulfides having a pyrrhotite structure (Fe2p3/2 708.4 eV; S2p3/2 161.5 eV). Other sulfur species identified at the surface include sulfate, sulfite and polysulfides. X-ray diffraction suggests an unidentifiable crystal structure at the hematite surface develops within 3 months, HRTEM confirms the presence of a hexagonal structure again suggesting the formation of pyrrhotite. The identification of pyrrhotite is inconsistent with previous reports in which mackinawite and greigite were products of biological sulfate reduction (Rickard 1969; Herbert et al 1998). The apparent differences in stoiciometries may be related to the availability of Fe2+(aq.) at the mineral surface through respiratory iron reduction by subsurface bacteria. The significance of pyrrhotite and polysulfide production in relation to the S- and Fe-cycles and to trace metal bioavailability is discussed.

  10. Circular dichroism measured on single chlorosomal light-harvesting complexes of green photosynthetic bacteria

    Furumaki, Shu

    2012-12-06

    We report results on circular dichroism (CD) measured on single immobilized chlorosomes of a triple mutant of green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. The CD signal is measured by monitoring chlorosomal bacteriochlorphyll c fluorescence excited by alternate left and right circularly polarized laser light with a fixed wavelength of 733 nm. The excitation wavelength is close to a maximum of the negative CD signal of a bulk solution of the same chlorosomes. The average CD dissymmetry parameter obtained from an ensemble of individual chlorosomes was gs = -0.025, with an intrinsic standard deviation (due to variations between individual chlorosomes) of 0.006. The dissymmetry value is about 2.5 times larger than that obtained at the same wavelength in the bulk solution. The difference can be satisfactorily explained by taking into account the orientation factor in the single-chlorosome experiments. The observed distribution of the dissymmetry parameter reflects the well-ordered nature of the mutant chlorosomes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  11. Genomic properties of Marine Group A bacteria indicate a role in the marine sulfur cycle

    Wright, Jody J; Mewis, Keith; Hanson, Niels W.; Konwar, Kishori M.; Maas, Kendra R; Hallam, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Marine Group A (MGA) is a deeply branching and uncultivated phylum of bacteria. Although their functional roles remain elusive, MGA subgroups are particularly abundant and diverse in oxygen minimum zones and permanent or seasonally stratified anoxic basins, suggesting metabolic adaptation to oxygen-deficiency. Here, we expand a previous survey of MGA diversity in O2-deficient waters of the Northeast subarctic Pacific Ocean (NESAP) to include Saanich Inlet (SI), an anoxic fjord with seasonal O...

  12. Rhizosphere heterogeneity shapes abundance and activity of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in vegetated salt marsh sediments

    François eThomas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Salt marshes are highly productive ecosystems hosting an intense sulfur (S cycle, yet little is known about S-oxidizing microorganisms in these ecosystems. Here, we studied the diversity and transcriptional activity of S-oxidizers in salt marsh sediments colonized by the plant Spartina alterniflora, and assessed variations with sediment depth and small-scale compartments within the rhizosphere. We combined next-generation amplicon sequencing of 16S rDNA and rRNA libraries with phylogenetic analyses of marker genes for two S-oxidation pathways (soxB and rdsrAB. Gene and transcript numbers of soxB and rdsrAB phylotypes were quantified simultaneously, using newly designed (RT-qPCR assays. We identified a diverse assemblage of S-oxidizers, with Chromatiales and Thiotrichales being dominant. The detection of transcripts from S-oxidizers was mostly confined to the upper 5 cm sediments, following the expected distribution of root biomass. A common pool of species dominated by Gammaproteobacteria transcribed S-oxidation genes across roots, rhizosphere, and surrounding sediment compartments, with rdsrAB transcripts prevailing over soxB. However, the root environment fine-tuned the abundance and transcriptional activity of the S-oxidizing community. In particular, the global transcription of soxB was higher on the roots compared to mix and rhizosphere samples. Furthermore, the contribution of Epsilonproteobacteria-related S-oxidizers tended to increase on Spartina roots compared to surrounding sediments. These data shed light on the under-studied oxidative part of the sulfur cycle in salt marsh sediments and indicate small-scale heterogeneities are important factors shaping abundance and potential activity of S-oxidizers in the rhizosphere.

  13. Hydrogen-producing purple non-sulfur bacteria isolated from the trophic lake Averno (Naples, Italy)

    Bianchi, Lucia; Mannelli, Francesca; Viti, Carlo; Adessi, Alessandra; De Philippis, Roberto [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, University of Florence, Piazzale delle Cascine 24, I 50144 Florence (Italy)

    2010-11-15

    Seventeen purple non-sulfur bacterial strains, isolated from the trophic lake Averno, Naples, Italy, were phylogenetically classified and their H{sub 2}-producing performances were tested utilizing various synthetic substrates and the fermentation broth derived from the spontaneous fermentation of vegetable residues. All the strains showed the capability to produce hydrogen on at least one of the four carbon substrates tested (malic, lactic, acetic and succinic acid). On lactate, Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain AV33 showed the best maximum production rate (50.7 {+-} 2.6 mL (H{sub 2}) L{sup -1} h{sup -1}), with a mean rate, calculated on the whole period of production, of 17.9 mL {+-} 0.7 (H{sub 2}) L{sup -1} h{sup -1}. In the presence of acetate, AV33 produced only few mL of H{sub 2}, but intracellularly accumulated poly-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate up to a concentration of 21.4 {+-} 3.4% (w/w) of cell dry weight. Rp. palustris AV33 also produced H{sub 2} on the fermentation broth supplemented with Fe, with a maximum production rate of 16.4 {+-} 2.3 mL (H{sub 2}) L{sup -1} h{sup -1} and a conversion yield of 44.2%. (author)

  14. Sorption extraction of green ruthenium (4) sulfate from sulfuric acid solutions by complexing type ionite

    The possibility is studied of ruthenium sorption eXtraction on ionites of polyamino- and aminocarboxyle types from equilibrium solutions in the sulfuric acid concentration ranga from 0.05 to 2 g. eq./l at 20 and 85 deg C A temperature increase affects only the sorption kinetics. The AN-31, AV-16G- and ANKB-1 ionites reduce Ru(4) to Ru(3) which is absorbed by ionites, while the ampholyte ANKB-2 possesses no reducing properties. The ruthenium extraction by ionites proceeds following the mechanism of intraspheric substitution

  15. Selection of oleuropein-degrading lactic acid bacteria strains isolated from fermenting Moroccan green olives

    Ghabbour, N.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A total of 177 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB were isolated from early-stage Moroccan Picholine green olive fermentation, including Lactobacillus plantarum (44.63%, Lactobacillus pentosus (25.99%, Lactobacillus brevis (9.61% and Pediococcus pentosaceus (19.77%. All the isolates were screened for their tolerance to olive leaf extract and oleuropein. Most of the isolates (85.3% were found able to degrade oleuropein, when evaluated by either oleuropein or 5-Bromo- 4-chloro-3-indolyl β-D-glucuronide (X-Gluc as substrates. The biodegradation capacity of the selected strains of each species was confirmed by HPLC analysis.

    Un total de 177 cepas de bacterias ácido lácticas (LAB fueron aisladas en las primeras etapas de la fermentación de aceitunas verdes marroquíes Picholine, incluyendo Lactobacillus plantarum (44.63%, Lactobacillus pentosus (25.99%, Lactobacillus brevis (9.61% y Pediococcus pentosaceus (19.77%. Todos los aislados fueron evaluados mediante su tolerancia a extractos de hojas de olivo y oleuropeína. La mayoría de los aislados (85,3% degradaron oleuropeína, cuando fueron evaluados usando oleuropeína o 5-Bromo-4-cloro- 3-indolil β-D-glucuronido (X-Gluc como sustrato. La capacidad de biodegradación de las cepas seleccionadas para cada especie fue confirmada mediante análisis por HPLC.

  16. Biohydrogen production by purple non-sulfur bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides: Effect of low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation.

    Gabrielyan, Lilit; Sargsyan, Harutyun; Trchounian, Armen

    2016-09-01

    The present work was focused on the effects of low-intensity (the flux capacity was of 0.06mWcm(-2)) electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of extremely high frequencies or millimeter waves on the growth and hydrogen (H2) photoproduction by purple non-sulfur bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides MDC6521 (from Armenian mineral springs). After exposure of R. sphaeroides, grown under anaerobic conditions upon illumination, to EMI (51.8GHz and 53.0GHz) for 15min an increase of specific growth rate by ~1.2-fold, in comparison with control (non-irradiated cells), was obtained. However, the effect of EMI depends on the duration of irradiation: the exposure elongation up to 60min caused the delay of the growth lag phase and the decrease specific growth rate by ~1.3-fold, indicating the bactericidal effect of EMI. H2 yield of the culture, irradiated by EMI for 15min, determined during 72h growth, was ~1.2-fold higher than H2 yield of control cells, whereas H2 production by cultures, irradiated by EMI for 60min was not observed during 72h growth. This difference in the effects of extremely high frequency EMI indicates a direct effect of radiation on the membrane transfer and the enzymes of these bacteria. Moreover, EMI increased DCCD-inhibited H(+) fluxes across the bacterial membrane and DCCD-sensitive ATPase activity of membrane vesicles, indicating that the proton FoF1-ATPase is presumably a basic target for extremely high frequency EMI related to H2 production by cultures. PMID:27479839

  17. Predictive and interpretive simulation of green fluorescent protein expression in reporter bacteria.

    Leveau, J H; Lindow, S E

    2001-12-01

    We have formulated a numerical model that simulates the accumulation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in bacterial cells from a generic promoter-gfp fusion. The model takes into account the activity of the promoter, the time it takes GFP to mature into its fluorescent form, the susceptibility of GFP to proteolytic degradation, and the growth rate of the bacteria. From the model, we derived a simple formula with which promoter activity can be inferred easily and quantitatively from actual measurements of GFP fluorescence in growing bacterial cultures. To test the usefulness of the formula, we determined the activity of the LacI-repressible promoter P(A1/O4/O3) in response to increasing concentrations of the inducer IPTG (isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside) and were able to predict cooperativity between the LacI repressors on each of the two operator sites within P(A1/O4/O3). Aided by the model, we also quantified the proteolytic degradation of GFP[AAV], GFP[ASV], and GFP[LVA], which are popular variants of GFP with reduced stability in bacteria. Best described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics, the rate at which these variants were degraded was a function of the activity of the promoter that drives their synthesis: a weak promoter yielded proportionally less GFP fluorescence than a strong one. The degree of disproportionality is species dependent: the effect was more pronounced in Erwinia herbicola than in Escherichia coli. This phenomenon has important implications for the interpretation of fluorescence from bacterial reporters based on these GFP variants. The model furthermore predicted a significant effect of growth rate on the GFP content of individual bacteria, which if not accounted for might lead to misinterpretation of GFP data. In practice, our model will be helpful for prior testing of different combinations of promoter-gfp fusions that best fit the application of a particular bacterial reporter strain, and also for the interpretation of actual GFP

  18. Biofilm formation, communication and interactions of leaching bacteria during colonization of pyrite and sulfur surfaces.

    Bellenberg, Sören; Díaz, Mauricio; Noël, Nanni; Sand, Wolfgang; Poetsch, Ansgar; Guiliani, Nicolas; Vera, Mario

    2014-11-01

    Bioleaching of metal sulfides is an interfacial process where biofilm formation is considered to be important in the initial steps of this process. Among the factors regulating biofilm formation, molecular cell-to-cell communication such as quorum sensing is involved. A functional LuxIR-type I quorum sensing system is present in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. However, cell-to-cell communication among different species of acidophilic mineral-oxidizing bacteria has not been studied in detail. These aspects were the scope of this study with emphasis on the effects exerted by the external addition of mixtures of synthetic N-acyl-homoserine-lactones on pure and binary cultures. Results revealed that some mixtures had inhibitory effects on pyrite leaching. Some of them correlated with changes in biofilm formation patterns on pyrite coupons. We also provide evidence that A. thiooxidans and Acidiferrobacter spp. produce N-acyl-homoserine-lactones. In addition, the observation that A. thiooxidans cells attached more readily to pyrite pre-colonized by living iron-oxidizing acidophiles than to heat-inactivated or biofilm-free pyrite grains suggests that other interactions also occur. Our experiments show that pre-cultivation conditions influence A. ferrooxidans attachment to pre-colonized pyrite surfaces. The understanding of cell-to-cell communication may consequently be used to develop attempts to influence biomining/bioremediation processes. PMID:25172572

  19. Barite Crusts From A Brine Pool In The Gulf Of Mexico Entomb Filamentous Sulfur Bacteria

    Stevens, E. W.; Bailey, J. V.; Flood, B. E.; Jones, D. S.; Joye, S. B.; Teske, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    Hypersaline environments offer the opportunity to study the preservation of cell material and the role of biology in catalyzing mineral precipitation under conditions where authigenic minerals are forming in the presence of microbial biomass. Mineral crusts collected from a brine pool in the Gulf of Mexico contain filamentous mineral structures of grossly similar morphology to extant Beggiatoa mats that can be found on and around the brine pool crusts. Mineralogical and molecular analyses were preformed in order to characterize the microbial and mineral assemblage associated with the crusts. Initial mineralogical analyses show the bulk composition of the crust to be barite (BaSO4). 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to provide insight into the overall microbial community composition. Sequencing results indicate the presence of phylotypes potentially involved in methane oxidation. Sequence-data produced with Beggiatoa specific primers also indicate Beggiatoa-derived DNA within the barite crusts. Barite precipitation has been linked with sulfide oxidation in non-marine settings, and we hypothesize that it may also be important in brine pool settings where low sulfate brine waters interface with sulfide produced via AOM. Ongoing experiments using several types of bacteria are being used to determine if the metabolic oxidation of sulfide to sulfate can induce the precipitation of barite, thus providing insight into the question of whether Beggiatoa can induce the precipitation of barite within a hypersaline setting.

  20. Screening of antagonistic bacteria against the green mold disease (Trichoderma harzianum Rifai of Grey Oyster Mushroom (Pleurotus pulmonarius (Fr. Quel.

    Nualsri, C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 174 strains of bacteria antagonistic against the green mold (Trichoderma harzianum, isolated from cultivating bags and fruiting bodies of the mushrooms, were screened for effects on mushroom mycelia and ability to control the green mold disease. Twenty-eight of them promoted the primodia formation of the Pleurotus pulmonarius mycelia on agar plates. Twenty-two isolates were selected and further tested in a mushroom house. Cell suspension of each isolate was prepared and sprayed onto the spawn surface of P. pulmonarius. Fifteen isolates shortened the times required from watering to 2nd and 3rd flushing and increased yield of the basidiocarps by 1.1-34.3% over 30 days. Six isolates of bacteria which showed an inhibitory effect against T. harzianum, enhanced primordia formation and increased yield of P. pulmonarius were selected and used for control testing in a cultivation house. The suspension of each isolate was sprayed onto the spawn surface immediately after exposure to the air in the mushroom house, followed by spore suspension of T. harzianum two days later. The number of infected bags was counted at 30 days after inoculation and the cumulative yield was compared after 60 days. The results showed that bacteria isolate B012-022 was highly effective in suppressing the green mold disease.Only 6.7% of the cultivating bags were found to be infected by T. harzianum when bacteria isolate B012-022 was applied. Cumulative yield obtained from 900 g of 94% sawdust + 5% rice bran + 1% Ca(OH2 was 300.0 g/bag after 60 days, 71.1% higher than the bags infected by the green mold and without bacterial spraying. Identification of the six bacterial isolates showed all to be Bacillus spp.

  1. Response of cbb gene transcription levels of four typical sulfur-oxidizing bacteria to the CO2 concentration and its effect on their carbon fixation efficiency during sulfur oxidation.

    Wang, Ya-Nan; Wang, Lei; Tsang, Yiu Fai; Fu, Xiaohua; Hu, Jiajun; Li, Huan; Le, Yiquan

    2016-10-01

    The variability in carbon fixation capability of four sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus thioparus DSM 505, Halothiobacillus neapolitanus DSM 15147, Starkeya novella DSM 506, and Thiomonas intermedia DSM 18155) during sulfur oxidation was studied at low and high concentrations of CO2. The mechanism underlying the variability in carbon fixation was clarified by analyzing the transcription of the cbb gene, which encodes the key enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. DSM 15147 and DSM 505 fixed carbon more efficiently during sulfur oxidation than DSM 506 and DSM 18155 at 0.5% and 10% CO2, which was mainly because their cbb gene transcription levels were much higher than those of DSM 506 and DSM 18155. A high CO2 concentration significantly stimulated the carbon fixation efficiency of DSM 505 by greatly increasing the cbb gene transcription efficiency. Moreover, the influence of the CO2 concentration on the carbon fixation efficiency of the four strains differed greatly during sulfur oxidation. PMID:27542742

  2. Determination of antibacterial activity of green coffee bean extract on periodontogenic bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitrostudy

    Nagaraj Bharath; Nagur Karibasappa Sowmya; Dhoom Singh Mehta

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of pure green coffee bean extract on periodonto pathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Prevotella intermedia (Pi), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Materials and Methods: Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were used to assess the antibacterial effect of pure green coffee bean extract against periodonto pathogen...

  3. Characterization of extracellular polymeric substances in the biofilms of typical bacteria by the sulfur K-edge XANES spectroscopy.

    Lin, Huirong; Ye, Chengsong; Lv, Lu; Zheng, Clark Renjun; Zhang, Shenghua; Zheng, Lei; Zhao, Yidong; Yu, Xin

    2014-08-01

    A combined approach of physicochemical extraction and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was applied to characterize the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of typical bacterial biofilms in this study. Physicochemical analysis showed variation of the contents of DNA, polysaccharide and protein in different fractions of EPS in different mediums. The sulfur K-edge XANES analysis yielded a variety of spectra. Spectral fitting of the XANES spectra utilizing a large set of model compounds showed that there was more reduced sulfur in both LB-EPS (loosely bound EPS) and TB-EPS (tightly bound EPS) of all the biofilms in LB medium than in R2A medium. More oxidized sulfur was identified in LB-EPS than that in TB-EPS, suggesting different niches and physiological heterogeneity in the biofilms. Our results suggested that the sulfur K-edge XANES can be a useful tool to analyze the sulfur speciation in EPS of biofilms. PMID:25108733

  4. Biosynthesis of unnatural bacteriochlorophyll c derivatives esterified with α,ω-diols in the green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    Nishimori, Risato; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Kashimura, Shigenori; Saga, Yoshitaka

    2011-09-13

    Unnatural bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c derivatives possessing a hydroxy group at the terminus of a hydrocarbon chain at the 17-propionate were biosynthesized in the green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. Addition of exogenous 1,8-octanediol, 1,12-dodecanediol, and 1,16-hexadecanediol in acetone to liquid cultures resulted in accumulation of BChl c monoesterified with the corresponding diols. The relative ratios of the novel BChl c derivatives esterified with 1,8-, 1,12-, and 1,16-diols to totally producing BChl c were 8.2, 50.2, and 57.6% in the cells grown with additive α,ω-diols at concentrations of 1.5, 0.06, and 0.06 mM, respectively, at the final concentration. The homologue composition of BChl c derivatives esterified with these α,ω-diols was similar to that of original, coexisting BChl c esterified with farnesol (BChl c(F)), suggesting that esterification of α,ω-diols occurred at the last step of the BChl c biosynthetic pathway by BChl c synthase, BchK, in the same manner as in BChl c(F). Chlorosomes, which were isolated from cells grown in the presence of exogenous α,ω-diols, contained a ratio and a composition of BChl c derivatives esterified with the diols similar to those in the whole cells, indicating that these BChl c derivatives were actually present in chlorosomes. Q(y) absorption bands of C. tepidum cells containing the novel BChl c derivatives were shifted to a shorter wavelength, although their bandwidths were analogous to those of cells obtained by normal cultivation. Circular dichroism spectra of cells that had BChl c derivatives esterified with α,ω-diols exhibited S-shaped signals in the Q(y) region, whose polarities were the reverse of those of cells grown in the normal medium and by supplementation with neat acetone as a control experiment. These spectral features of C. tepidum possessing BChl c derivatives esterified with α,ω-diols imply that the novel BChl c derivatives possessing a hydroxy group at the

  5. Gypsum amendment to rice paddy soil stimulated bacteria involved in sulfur cycling but largely preserved the phylogenetic composition of the total bacterial community.

    Wörner, Susanne; Zecchin, Sarah; Dan, Jianguo; Todorova, Nadezhda Hristova; Loy, Alexander; Conrad, Ralf; Pester, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Rice paddies are indispensable for human food supply but emit large amounts of the greenhouse gas methane. Sulfur cycling occurs at high rates in these water-submerged soils and controls methane production, an effect that is increased by sulfate-containing fertilizers or soil amendments. We grew rice plants until their late vegetative phase with and without gypsum (CaSO4 ·2H2 O) amendment and identified responsive bacteria by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Gypsum amendment decreased methane emissions by up to 99% but had no major impact on the general phylogenetic composition of the bacterial community. It rather selectively stimulated or repressed a small number of 129 and 27 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (out of 1883-2287 observed) in the rhizosphere and bulk soil, respectively. Gypsum-stimulated OTUs were affiliated with several potential sulfate-reducing (Syntrophobacter, Desulfovibrio, unclassified Desulfobulbaceae, unclassified Desulfobacteraceae) and sulfur-oxidizing taxa (Thiobacillus, unclassified Rhodocyclaceae), while gypsum-repressed OTUs were dominated by aerobic methanotrophs (Methylococcaceae). Abundance correlation networks suggested that two abundant (>1%) OTUs (Desulfobulbaceae, Rhodocyclaceae) were central to the reductive and oxidative parts of the sulfur cycle. PMID:27085098

  6. New unstable variants of green fluorescent protein for studies of transient gene expression in bacteria

    Andersen, Jens Bo; Sternberg, Claus; Poulsen, Lars K.;

    1998-01-01

    Use of the green fluorescent protein (Gfp) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria ia is a powerful method for nondestructive in situ monitoring, since expression of green fluorescence does not require any substrate addition. To expand the use of Gfp as a reporter protein, new variants have been...... constructed by the addition of short peptide sequences to the C-terminal end of intact Gfp. This rendered the Gfp susceptible to the action of indigenous housekeeping proteases, resulting in protein variants with half-lives ranging from 40 min to a few hours when synthesized in Escherichia coli...

  7. In Situ Analysis of Sulfur Species in Sulfur Globules Produced from Thiosulfate by Thermoanaerobacter sulfurigignens and Thermoanaerobacterium thermosulfurigenes▿ †

    Lee, Yong-Jin; Prange, Alexander; Lichtenberg, Henning; Rohde, Manfred; Dashti, Mona; Wiegel, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    The Firmicutes Thermoanaerobacter sulfurigignens and Thermoanaerobacterium thermosulfurigenes convert thiosulfate, forming sulfur globules inside and outside cells. X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis revealed that the sulfur consisted mainly of sulfur chains with organic end groups similar to sulfur formed in purple sulfur bacteria, suggesting the possibility that the process of sulfur globule formation by bacteria is an ancient feature.

  8. Azoreductase activity in bacteria associated with the greening of instant chocolate puddings.

    Dykes, G A; Timm, R G; von Holy, A

    1994-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain AZR1 and Klebsiella sp. strain AZR2 were isolated from reconstituted instant chocolate puddings that had turned green and were found to have azoreductase activity. This activity was inducible and NADH dependent. Differences in dye reduction rates between the two strains were apparent, and substrate specificity related to dye structure was observed.

  9. Effect of green Spanish‐style Manzanilla packaging conditions on the prevalence of the putative probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus pentosus TOMC‐LAB2

    Rodríguez-Gómez, Francisco; Romero-Gil, Verónica; García-García, Pedro; Arroyo-López, Francisco Noé; Garrido-Fernández, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on the persistence of the putative probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus pentosus TOMC-LAB2 on green Spanish-style Manzanilla olives according to different packaging conditions and storage temperatures. The lactic acid bacteria population decreased with time but the highest survival counts (and lowest yeasts) at the end of storage (8 months) were observed in plastic pouches under nitrogen atmosphere and glass jars with brine stored at 20°C. Molecular techniques...

  10. Antibacterial activity of Green Seaweed Caulerpa racemosa from Takalar Waters against pathogenic bacteria promoting ice-ice diseases in the agar-producing red algae Gracilaria verrucosa.

    Zainuddin, Elmi Nurhaidah; Anshary, Hilal; Huyyirnah; Hiola, Ridha

    2012-01-01

    The Ice-ice disease caused by bacterial pathogens which attack the algae tissue resulted white and brittle of seaweed thallus on red seaweed Gracilaria verrucosa farming. Study of antibacterial activity of green seaweed Caulerpa racemosa against the pathogens has been done using method include isolation of bacteria, pathogenicity test with Koch's postulates method, characterization of ice-ice bacteria, extraction of Caulerpa racemosa, and antibacterial test by agar diffusion method. The res...

  11. [Anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria from microbial communities of Goryachinsk Thermal Spring (Baikal Area, Russia)].

    Kalashnikov, A M; Gaĭsin, V A; Sukhacheva, M V; Namsaraeva, B B; Panteleeva, A N; Nuianzina-Boldareva, E N; Kuznetsov, B B; Gorlenko, V M

    2014-01-01

    Species composition of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in microbial mats of the Goryachinsk thermal spring was investigated along the temperature gradient. The spring belonging to nitrogenous alkaline hydrotherms is located at the shore of Lake Baikal 188 km north-east from Ulan-Ude. The water is of the sulfate-sodium type, contains trace amounts of sulfide, salinity does not exceed 0.64 g/L, pH 9.5. The temperature at the outlet of the spring may reach 54 degrees C. The cultures of filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria, nonsulfur and sulfur purple bacteria, and aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria were identified using the pufLM molecular marker. The fmoA marker was used for identification of green sulfur bacteria. Filamentous cyanobacteria predominated in the mats, with anoxygenic phototrophs comprising a minor component of the phototrophic communities. Thermophilic bacteria Chloroflexus aurantiacus were detected irn the samples from both the thermophilic and mesophilic mats. Cultures ofnonsulfur purple bacteria similar to Blastochloris sulfoviridis and Rhodomicrobium vannielii were isolatd from the mats developing at high (50.6-49.4 degrees C) and low temperatures (45-20 degrees C). Purple sulfur bacteria Allochromatium sp. and Thiocapsa sp., as well as green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium sp., were revealedin low-temperature mats. Truly thermophilic purple and gree sulfur bacteria were not found in the spring. Anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria found in the spring were typical of the sulfuret communities, for which the sulfur cycle is mandatory. The presence of aerobic bacteriochlorophylla-containing bacteria identified as Agrobacterium (Rhizobium) tumifaciens in the mesophilic (20 degrees C) mat is of interest. PMID:25844460

  12. Characterization of purple and green photosynthetic bacteria isolated from the lagoon of Agatti Atoll (Lakshadweep Sea)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Chandramohan, D.

    physiologically but with common anoxygenic photosynthesis using only one photosystem. They are different from cyanobacteria in that the latter group will carry out oxygenic photo- synthesis using two photosystems1. The contribution of photosynthetic bacteria... characters , cell size and ability for photo hyphenminus autotroph y permit the m to be tentatively identified as Chromatium violascens. The possibilit y o f identifying th e presen t strai n a s either Chr. warmingii o r Chr. buderi whic h ar e als o...

  13. Characterization of lactic acid bacteria from naturally-fermented Manzanilla Aloreña green table olives.

    Abriouel, Hikmate; Benomar, Nabil; Cobo, Antonio; Caballero, Natacha; Fernández Fuentes, Miguel Ángel; Pérez-Pulido, Rubén; Gálvez, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    Manzanilla Aloreña (or Aloreña) table olives are naturally fermented traditional green olives with a denomination of protection (DOP). The aim of this study was to search for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with technological properties of interest for possible inclusion in a starter or protective culture preparation or also as probiotics. A collection of 144 LAB obtained from Aloreña green table olives naturally-fermented by four small-medium enterprises (SMEs) from Málaga (Spain), including lactobacilli (81.94%), leuconostocs (10.42%) and pediococci (7.64%) were studied. REP-PCR clustering and further identification of strains by sequencing of phes and rpo genes revealed that all lactobacilli from the different SMEs were Lactobacillus pentosus. Pediococci were identified as Pediococcus parvulus (SME1) and leuconostocs as Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides (SME1 and SME4). Genotyping revealed that strains were not clonally related and exhibited a considerable degree of genomic diversity specially for lactobacilli and also for leuconostocs. Some strains exhibit useful technological properties such as production of antimicrobial substances active against pathogenic bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans and Salmonella enterica, utilization of raffinose and stachyose, production of bile salt hydrolase, phytase and haeme-dependent catalase activities, growth at 10 °C and in the presence of 6.5% NaCl, good acidifying capacity and also resistance to freezing. However, none of the isolates showed protease or amylase activity, and also did not exhibit biogenic amine production from histidine, ornithine, cysteine or tyrosine. On the basis of data obtained, selected strains with potential traits were tested for their survival at low pH and their tolerance to bile salts, and the survival capacity demonstrated by some of the analysed strains are encouraging to further study their potential as probiotics. PMID

  14. Formation of Fe(III)-containing mackinawite from hydroxysulphate green rust by sulphate reducing bacteria

    The interactions between Fe(II-III) hydroxysulphate GR(SO42-) and sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) were studied. The considered SRB, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans subsp. aestuarii ATCC 29578, were added with GR(SO42-) to culture media. Different conditions were envisioned, corresponding to various concentrations of bacteria, various sources of sulphate (dissolved SO42- + GR(SO42-) or GR(SO42-) alone) and various atmospheres (N2:H2 or N2:CO2:H2). In the first part of the study, CO2 was deliberately omitted so as to avoid the formation of carbonated compounds, and GR(SO42-) was the only source of sulphate. Cell concentration increases from ∼4 x 107 to ∼7 x 108 cells/mL in 2 weeks. The evolution with time of the iron compounds, monitored by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, showed the progressive formation of a FeS compound, the Fe(III)-containing mackinawite. This result is consistent with the association GR(SO42-)/SRB/FeS observed in rust layers formed on steel in seawater. In the presence of CO2 and additional dissolved sulphate species, a rapid growth of the bacteria could be observed, leading to the total transformation of GR(SO42-) into mackinawite, found in three physico-chemical states (nanocrystalline, crystalline stoichiometric FeS and Fe(III)-containing), and siderite FeCO3.

  15. Assessing acute toxicity of effluent from a textile industry and nearby river waters using sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in continuous mode.

    Gurung, Anup; Hassan, Sedky H A; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2011-10-01

    Bioassays are becoming an important tool for assessing the toxicity of complex mixtures of substances in aquatic environments in which Daphnia magna is routinely used as a test organism. Bioassays outweigh physicochemical analyses and are valuable in the decision-making process pertaining to the final discharge of effluents from wastewater treatment plants as they measure the total effect of the discharge which is ecologically relevant. In this study, the aquatic toxicity of a textile plant effluent and river water downstream from the plant were evaluated with sulfur-oxidizing bacterial biosensors in continuous mode. Collected samples were analysed for different physicochemical parameters and 1,4-dioxane was detected in the effluent. The effluent contained a relatively high chemical oxygen demand of 60 mg L(-1), which exceeded the limit set by the Korean government for industrial effluent discharges. Results showed that both the effluent and river waters were toxic to sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. These results show the importance of incorporating bioassays to detect toxicity in wastewater effluents for the sustainable management of water resources. PMID:22329151

  16. Determination of antibacterial activity of green coffee bean extract on periodontogenic bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitrostudy

    Nagaraj Bharath

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of pure green coffee bean extract on periodonto pathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg, Prevotella intermedia (Pi, Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa. Materials and Methods: Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC were used to assess the antibacterial effect of pure green coffee bean extract against periodonto pathogenic bacteria by micro dilution method and culture method, respectively. Results: MIC values of Pg, Pi and Aa were 0.2 μg/ml whereas Fn showed sensitive at concentration of 3.125 μg/ml. MBC values mirrors the values same as that of MIC. Conclusion: Antimicrobial activity of pure green coffee bean extract against Pg, Pi, Fn and Aa suggests that it could be recommended as an adjunct to mechanical therapy in the management of periodontal disease.

  17. Bioenergetic studies of coal sulfur oxidation by extremely thermophilic bacteria. Final report, September 15, 1992--August 31, 1997

    Kelly, R.M.; Han, C.J.

    1997-12-31

    Thermoacidophilic microorganisms have been considered for inorganic sulfur removal from coal because of expected improvements in rates of both biotic and abiotic sulfur oxidation reactions with increasing temperature. In this study, the bioenergetic response of the extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon, Metallosphaera sedula, to environmental changes have been examined in relation to its capacity to catalyze pyrite oxidation in coal. Given an appropriate bioenergetic challenge, the metabolic response was to utilize additional amounts of energy sources (i.e., pyrite) to survive. Of particular interest were the consequences of exposing the organism to various forms of stress (chemical, nutritional, thermal, pH) in the presence of coal pyrite. Several approaches to take advantage of stress response to accelerate pyrite oxidation by this organism were examined, including attempts to promote acquired thermal tolerance to extend its functional range, exposure to chemical uncouplers and decouplers, and manipulation of heterotrophic and chemolithotrophic tendencies to optimize biomass concentration and biocatalytic activity. Promising strategies were investigated in a continuous culture system. This study identified environmental conditions that promote better coupling of biotic and abiotic oxidation reactions to improve biosulfurization rates of thermoacidophilic microorganisms.

  18. Colwellia and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria: An unusual dual symbiosis in a Terua mussel (Mytilidae: Bathymodiolinae) from whale falls in the Antilles arc

    Duperron, Sébastien; Gros, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Seven individuals of a single morphotype of mussels (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) were found attached to a naturally sunken whale intervertebral disk collected in Guadeloupe (Caribbean) at 800 m depth. These specimens resemble small Idas mussels which are found worldwide at cold seeps and hydrothermal vents, and typically harbor ectosymbiotic bacteria on their gills upon which they depend for nutrition. Based on multi-locus gene sequencing, these specimens appear to belong to a new species closely related to two species now included within the genus Terua. Unexpectedly, its closest relatives are found in the Pacific, questioning how this species has reached the Antilles arc. Based on marker gene sequence analysis, electron and fluorescence microscopy, Terua n. sp. harbors two distinct and abundant extracellular bacterial symbionts located between microvilli at the apical surface of host gill epithelial cells. One is a sulfur-oxidizing bacterium similar to the symbionts previously identified in several deep-sea mussels, while the other is related to Colwellia species, a group of cold-adapted heterotrophic bacteria able to degrade organic compounds. This study provides the first evidence for the existence of a dual symbiosis in mussels from whale fall ecosystems in the Caribbean. The evolutionary history of Terua n. sp. and potential role of its Colwellia symbionts are discussed.

  19. Isolation and phylogenetic characterization of iron-sulfur-oxidizing heterotrophic bacteria indigenous to nickel laterite ores of Sulawesi, Indonesia: Implications for biohydrometallurgy

    Chaerun, Siti Khodijah; Hung, Sutina; Mubarok, Mohammad Zaki; Sanwani, Edy

    2015-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to isolate and phylogenetically identify the indigenous iron-sulfur-oxidizing heterotrophic bacteria capable of bioleaching nickel from laterite mineral ores. The bacteria were isolated from a nickel laterite mine area in South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia. Seven bacterial strains were successfully isolated from laterite mineral ores (strains SKC/S-1 to SKC/S-7) and they were capable of bioleaching of nickel from saprolite and limonite ores. Using EzTaxon-e database, the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the seven bacterial strains were subjected to phylogenetic analysis, resulting in a complete hierarchical classification system, and they were identified as Pseudomonas taiwanensis BCRC 17751 (98.59% similarity), Bacillus subtilis subsp. inaquosorum BGSC 3A28 (99.14% and 99.32% similarities), Paenibacillus pasadenensis SAFN-007 (98.95% and 99.33% similarities), Bacillus methylotrophicus CBMB 205 (99.37% similarity), and Bacillus altitudinis 41KF2b (99.37% similarity). It is noteworthy that members of the phylum Firmicutes (in particular the genus Bacillus) predominated in this study, therefore making them to have the high potential to be candidates for the bioleaching of nickel from laterite mineral ores. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the predominance of the phylum Firmicutes in the Sulawesi laterite mineral ores.

  20. Gene Inactivation in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and the Green Sulfur Bacterium Chlorobium tepidum Using In Vitro-Made DNA Constructs and Natural Transformation

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Sakuragi, Yumiko; Bryant, Donald A

    2004-01-01

    Inactivation of a chromosomal gene is a useful approach to study the function of the gene in question and can be used to produce a desired phenotype in the organism. This chapter describes how to generate such mutants of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and the green sulfur bacterium...

  1. Antioxidant efficacy of crude methanol extract of ashitaba green tea against radiation induced oxidative stress in E.coli K12 bacteria

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the antioxidant activity of methanol crude extract of ashitaba green tea (G). The DPPH scavenging assay was evaluated for green tea extract to determine its radical scavenging capacity. The bacteria was pretreated with ashitaba green tea extract, quercetin (Q) and (-) epigallocatechin -3-gallate (E) at below MIC level. Oxidative stress was induced at 0.4 Gy using gamma radiation. The antioxidant efficacy of ashitaba green tea was evaluated through enzyme antioxidant studies like SOD (Superoxidedismutase) and CAT (Catalase). The oxidative stress marker Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) was also evaluated. Further the protective efficacy of the(G) was confirmed by colony forming units (CFU) study. Among the tested compounds the crude extract of ashitaba (G) exhibited excellent antioxidant activity in comparison with quercetin and (-) epigallocatechin -3-gallate. (abstract)

  2. green

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The “green” topic follows the “youngsters”, which is quite natural for the Russian language.Traditionally these words put together sound slightly derogatory. However, “green” also means fresh, new and healthy.For Russia, and for Siberia in particular, “green” architecture does sound new and fresh. Forced by the anxious reality, we are addressing this topic intentionally. The ecological crisis, growing energy prices, water, air and food deficits… Alexander Rappaport, our regular author, writes: “ It has been tolerable until a certain time, but under transition to the global civilization, as the nature is destroyed, and swellings of megapolises expand incredibly fast, the size and the significance of all these problems may grow a hundredfold”.However, for this very severe Siberian reality the newness of “green” architecture may turn out to be well-forgotten old. A traditional Siberian house used to be built on principles of saving and environmental friendliness– one could not survive in Siberia otherwise.Probably, in our turbulent times, it is high time to fasten “green belts”. But we should keep from enthusiastic sticking of popular green labels or repainting of signboards into green color. We should avoid being drowned in paper formalities under “green” slogans. And we should prevent the Earth from turning into the planet “Kin-dza-dza”.

  3. Probing fatty acid metabolism in bacteria, cyanobacteria, green microalgae and diatoms with natural and unnatural fatty acids.

    Beld, Joris; Abbriano, Raffaela; Finzel, Kara; Hildebrand, Mark; Burkart, Michael D

    2016-04-22

    In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, fatty acid synthases are responsible for the biosynthesis of fatty acids in an iterative process, extending the fatty acid by two carbon units every cycle. Thus, odd numbered fatty acids are rarely found in nature. We tested whether representatives of diverse microbial phyla have the ability to incorporate odd-chain fatty acids as substrates for their fatty acid synthases and their downstream enzymes. We fed various odd and short chain fatty acids to the bacterium Escherichia coli, cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Major differences were observed, specifically in the ability among species to incorporate and elongate short chain fatty acids. We demonstrate that E. coli, C. reinhardtii, and T. pseudonana can produce longer fatty acid products from short chain precursors (C3 and C5), while Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacks this ability. However, Synechocystis can incorporate and elongate longer chain fatty acids due to acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasS) activity, and knockout of this protein eliminates the ability to incorporate these fatty acids. In addition, expression of a characterized AasS from Vibrio harveyii confers a similar capability to E. coli. The ability to desaturate exogenously added fatty acids was only observed in Synechocystis and C. reinhardtii. We further probed fatty acid metabolism of these organisms by feeding desaturase inhibitors to test the specificity of long-chain fatty acid desaturases. In particular, supplementation with thia fatty acids can alter fatty acid profiles based on the location of the sulfur in the chain. We show that coupling sensitive gas chromatography mass spectrometry to supplementation of unnatural fatty acids can reveal major differences between fatty acid metabolism in various organisms. Often unnatural fatty acids have antibacterial or even therapeutic properties. Feeding of short

  4. Transmission of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) seed and boll rotting bacteria by southern green stink bugs (Nezara viridula L.)

    The aim of this study is to determine the ability of the southern green stink bug (Nezara viridula L.) to transmit an opportunistic Pantoea agglomerans strain into unopened, green cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) bolls. Southern green stink bug (SGSB) colonies were reared on fresh green beans in the labo...

  5. A Green and Highly Efficient Solvent-free Synthesis of Novel Calicx[4]resorcinarene Derivatives Using Tungstate Sulfuric Acid

    A facile and simple procedure for the synthesis of novel and known calix[4]resorcinarene derivatives were developed via a reaction of arylaldehydes with resorcinol in the presence of catalytic amounts of tungstate sulfuric acid (TSA) under solvent-free conditions. This eco-friendly method has many appealing attributes, such as excellent yields, short reactions times, use of safe and recoverable catalyst, and simple work-up procedures. TSA was characterized by powdered X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and FTIR spectroscopy

  6. AKTIVITAS ANTIBAKTERI FRAKSI-FRAKSI EKSTRAK SIRIH HIJAU (Piper betle Linn TERHADAP PATOGEN PANGAN [Antibacterial Activity of Fractionated Green Sirih (Piper betle Linn Extract Against Food Pathogenic Bacteria

    Maggy T. Suhartono

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fractionation of green sirih (Piper betle Linn extract by chromatography colom using the mixture of several solvents i.e. chloroform, ethanol and acetic acid (4:1:1 resulted in 17 fractions. All fractions showed antibacterial activities but only 2 fractions (fraction 3 and fraction 4 showed the highest inhibition towards the six tested bacteria Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus and Listeria monocytogenes. Among the tested bacteria, all fractions of green sirih extracts showed the most effective inhibition against, Salmonella Typhimurium with inhibition zone diameters ranging from 10 mm to 26 mm. Identification using GC-MS found that fraction 3 and fraction 4 contained chavicol; dodecanoic acid, myristic, palmitic and oleic acid.

  7. Synthesis of self-aggregative zinc chlorophylls possessing polymerizable esters as a atable model compound for main light-harvesting antennas of green photosynthetic bacteria

    Reiko Shibata; Kazuya Nishihara; Hitoshi Tamiaki

    2006-01-01

    Zinc bacteriochlorophyll-d derivatives possessing a polymerizable moiety at the 17-propionate were prepared as model compounds of natural occurring chlorophylls in the main peripheral antennas of green photosynthetic bacteria (chlorosomes). The synthetic compounds self-aggregated in nonpolar organic solvents as well as in the solid state to give large oligomers similar to chlorosomal J-aggregates. Such introduction of the polymerizable groups in the ester did not suppress the ability of ...

  8. Functional bacteria and process metabolism of the Denitrifying Sulfur conversion-associated Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (DS-EBPR) system: An investigation by operating the system from deterioration to restoration.

    Guo, Gang; Wu, Di; Hao, Tianwei; Mackey, Hamish Robert; Wei, Li; Wang, Haiguang; Chen, Guanghao

    2016-05-15

    A sulfur conversion-associated Enhanced Biological Phosphorus (P) Removal (EBPR) system is being developed to cater for the increasing needs to treat saline/brackish wastewater resulting from seawater intrusion into groundwater and sewers and frequent use of sulfate coagulants during drinking water treatment, as well as to meet the demand for eutrophication control in warm climate regions. However, the major functional bacteria and metabolism in this emerging biological nutrient removal system are still poorly understood. This study was thus designed to explore the functional microbes and metabolism in this new EBPR system by manipulating the deterioration, failure and restoration of a lab-scale system. This was achieved by changing the mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentration to monitor and evaluate the relationships among sulfur conversion (including sulfate reduction and sulfate production), P removal, variation in microbial community structures, and stoichiometric parameters. The results show that the stable Denitrifying Sulfur conversion-associated EBPR (DS-EBPR) system was enriched by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (SOB). These bacteria synergistically participated in this new EBPR process, thereby inducing an appropriate level of sulfur conversion crucial for achieving a stable DS-EBPR performance, i.e. maintaining sulfur conversion intensity at 15-40 mg S/L, corresponding to an optimal sludge concentration of 6.5 g/L. This range of sulfur conversion favors microbial community competition and various energy flows from internal polymers (i.e. polysulfide or elemental sulfur (poly-S(2-)/S(0)) and poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates (PHA)) for P removal. If this range was exceeded, the system might deteriorate or even fail due to enrichment of glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs). Four methods of restoring the failed system were investigated: increasing the sludge concentration, lowering the salinity or doubling the COD

  9. Sulfur Mustard

    ... Matters What's New A - Z Index Facts About Sulfur Mustard What sulfur mustard is Sulfur mustard is a type of ... it is in liquid or solid form. Where sulfur mustard is found and how it is used ...

  10. Benevolent behavior ofKleinia grandifloraleaf extract as a green corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in sulfuric acid solution

    Muthukrishnan Pitchaipillai; Karthik Raj; Jeyaprabha Balasubramanian; Prakash Periakaruppan

    2014-01-01

    The ethanolic extract ofKleinia grandifloraleaves was characterized and tested for its potential anticorrosion properties on mild steel in 1 M H2SO4 medium using mass-loss analysis, potentiodynamic polarization measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, UV–visible spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The effect of temperature on the corrosion behavior of mild steel was studied in the range of 308 to 328 K. The inhibition efficiency was observed to increase with increasing concentration of the extract. Polarization curves revealed that theKleinia grandiflora leaf extract is a mixed inhibitor. Impedance diagrams revealed that an increase ofKleinia grandiflora leaf extract concentration increased the charge transfer resistance and decreased the double-layer capacitance. The adsorption process obeys Langmuir’s model, with a standard free energy of adsorption (∆Gads) of−18.62 kJ/mol. The obtained results indicate that theKleinia grandiflora leaf extract can serve as an effective inhibitor for the corrosion of mild steel in a sulfuric acid medium.

  11. Benevolent behavior of Kleinia grandiflora leaf extract as a green corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in sulfuric acid solution

    Pitchaipillai, Muthukrishnan; Raj, Karthik; Balasubramanian, Jeyaprabha; Periakaruppan, Prakash

    2014-11-01

    The ethanolic extract of Kleinia grandiflora leaves was characterized and tested for its potential anticorrosion properties on mild steel in 1 M H2SO4 medium using mass-loss analysis, potentiodynamic polarization measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The effect of temperature on the corrosion behavior of mild steel was studied in the range of 308 to 328 K. The inhibition efficiency was observed to increase with increasing concentration of the extract. Polarization curves revealed that the Kleinia grandiflora leaf extract is a mixed inhibitor. Impedance diagrams revealed that an increase of Kleinia grandiflora leaf extract concentration increased the charge transfer resistance and decreased the double-layer capacitance. The adsorption process obeys Langmuir's model, with a standard free energy of adsorption (Δ G ads) of -18.62 kJ/mol. The obtained results indicate that the Kleinia grandiflora leaf extract can serve as an effective inhibitor for the corrosion of mild steel in a sulfuric acid medium.

  12. Comparative proteomics and activity of a green sulfur bacterium across the water column of Lake Cadagno, Switzerland

    Habicht, Kirsten Silvia; Miller, Mette; Cox, Raymond Pickett;

    2011-01-01

    in the dark. Instead we propose that Chl. clathratiforme cells in the dark part of the water column obtain energy for maintenance from the fermentation of polyglucose. Based on the observed protein compositions we have constructed possible pathways for C, N and S metabolism in Chl. clathratiforme....... bacteria survive in the dark. Although metagenomic data are not available for Lake Cadagno, proteome analysis was possible based on the completely sequenced genome of an isolated strain of Chl. clathratiforme. Using LC-MS/MS we identified 1321 Chl. clathratiforme proteins in Lake Cadagno and quantitatively...... compared 621 of these in the four samples. Our results showed that compared with cells obtained from the photic zone, cells collected from the dark part of the water column had the same expression level of key enzymes involved in carbon metabolism and photosynthetic light harvesting. However, most proteins...

  13. Comparative proteomics and activity of a green sulfur bacterium across the water column of Lake Cadagno, Switzerland

    Habicht, Kirsten S.; Miller, Mette; Cox, Raymond P.;

    2011-01-01

    in the dark. Instead we propose that Chl. clathratiforme cells in the dark part of the water column obtain energy for maintenance from the fermentation of polyglucose. Based on the observed protein compositions we have constructed possible pathways for C, N and S metabolism in Chl. clathratiforme...... bacteria survive in the dark. Although metagenomic data are not available for Lake Cadagno, proteome analysis was possible based on the completely sequenced genome of an isolated strain of Chl. clathratiforme. Using LC-MS/MS we identified 1321 Chl. clathratiforme proteins in Lake Cadagno and quantitatively...... compared 621 of these in the four samples. Our results showed that compared with cells obtained from the photic zone, cells collected from the dark part of the water column had the same expression level of key enzymes involved in carbon metabolism and photosynthetic light harvesting. However, most proteins...

  14. Skin Bacteria Diversity and Spatial Distribution in Litoria genimaculata (GREEN- EYED TREE FROG Body Parts and its Bd-Inhibitory Activity -abstract-

    Martha L Silva-Velasco

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Several amphibian skin bacteria have shown inhibitory activity against the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd. However‚ little is known about the spatial distribution of these inhibitory bacteria on amphibian skin‚ or their diversity. We looked at the diversity and distribution of skin bacteria of the green-eyed tree frog Litoria genimaculata. This stream-dwelling species from North Queensland rainforest declined in the early 1990s but has since recovered to pre-decline range population sizes. Swabs were taken from 5 body parts (hands‚ feet‚ legs and dorsal and ventral surfaces and inoculated onto agar plates for isolation of bacterial colonies. Bd- inhibitory activity was tested in challenge essays. Results show that feet had the highest number of bacterial isolates with Bd inhibitory activity followed by hands and legs with similar numbers of bacterial isolates and ventral body parts in that order. The dorsal surface had the lowest number of Bd inhibitory isolates. No sampled frogs were infected with Bd according to PCR assays‚ although Bd is endemic at the site. Information from morphological observations and Gram stains will be used to classify the bacterial isolates. Results will be analyzed for any patterns of distribution across the body of the frogs. Possible associations between body parts and bacterial isolates with and without Bd-inhibitory activity will be examined. This study will contribute to knowledge of the community structure of skin bacteria in frogs. Characterization of skin bacteria diversity is one of the first steps in understanding the role of amphibian skin bacteria in the resistance of the hosts to chytridiomycosis.

  15. One-pot green synthesis of carbon dots by using Saccharum officinarum juice for fluorescent imaging of bacteria (Escherichia coli) and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells

    Mehta, Vaibhavkumar N. [Applied Chemistry Department, S. V. National Institute of Technology, Surat, 395 007 (India); Jha, Sanjay [Gujarat Agricultural Biotechnology Institute, Navsari Agricultural University, Surat, 395007 (India); Kailasa, Suresh Kumar, E-mail: sureshkumarchem@gmail.com [Applied Chemistry Department, S. V. National Institute of Technology, Surat, 395 007 (India)

    2014-05-01

    We are reporting highly economical plant-based hydrothermal method for one-pot green synthesis of water-dispersible fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) by using Saccharum officinarum juice as precursor. The synthesized CDs were characterized by UV-visible, fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopic (HR-TEM), and laser scanning confocal microscopic techniques. The CDs are well dispersed in water with an average size of ∼ 3 nm and showed bright blue fluorescence under UV-light (λ{sub ex} = 365 nm). These CDs acted as excellent fluorescent probes in cellular imaging of bacteria (Escherichia coli) and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). - Highlights: • One-pot green synthesis was used for fluorescent CDs. • FT-IR, DLS, and TEM were used for the characterization of CDs. • The CDs are well dispersed in water with an average size of ∼ 3 nm. • The CDs acted as fluorescent probes for imaging of bacteria and yeast cells.

  16. One-pot green synthesis of carbon dots by using Saccharum officinarum juice for fluorescent imaging of bacteria (Escherichia coli) and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells

    We are reporting highly economical plant-based hydrothermal method for one-pot green synthesis of water-dispersible fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) by using Saccharum officinarum juice as precursor. The synthesized CDs were characterized by UV-visible, fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopic (HR-TEM), and laser scanning confocal microscopic techniques. The CDs are well dispersed in water with an average size of ∼ 3 nm and showed bright blue fluorescence under UV-light (λex = 365 nm). These CDs acted as excellent fluorescent probes in cellular imaging of bacteria (Escherichia coli) and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). - Highlights: • One-pot green synthesis was used for fluorescent CDs. • FT-IR, DLS, and TEM were used for the characterization of CDs. • The CDs are well dispersed in water with an average size of ∼ 3 nm. • The CDs acted as fluorescent probes for imaging of bacteria and yeast cells

  17. Green synthesis of protein capped silver nanoparticles from phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid with antimicrobial properties against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Chowdhury, Supriyo; Basu, Arpita; Kundu, Surekha

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, green synthesis of nanoparticles, i.e., synthesizing nanoparticles using biological sources like bacteria, algae, fungus, or plant extracts have attracted much attention due to its environment-friendly and economic aspects. The present study demonstrates an eco-friendly and low-cost method of biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using cell-free filtrate of phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina. UV-visible spectrum showed a peak at 450 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of silver nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the presence of spherical silver nanoparticles of the size range 5 to 40 nm, most of these being 16 to 20 nm in diameter. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum of the nanoparticles exhibited 2 θ values corresponding to silver nanoparticles. These nanoparticles were found to be naturally protein coated. SDS-PAGE analysis showed the presence of an 85-kDa protein band responsible for capping and stabilization of the silver nanoparticles. Antimicrobial activities of the silver nanoparticles against human as well as plant pathogenic multidrug-resistant bacteria were assayed. The particles showed inhibitory effect on the growth kinetics of human and plant bacteria. Furthermore, the genotoxic potential of the silver nanoparticles with increasing concentrations was evaluated by DNA fragmentation studies using plasmid DNA.

  18. Effect of green Spanish-style Manzanilla packaging conditions on the prevalence of the putative probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus pentosus TOMC-LAB2.

    Rodríguez-Gómez, Francisco; Romero-Gil, Verónica; García-García, Pedro; Arroyo-López, Francisco Noé; Garrido-Fernández, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    This work focuses on the persistence of the putative probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus pentosus TOMC-LAB2 on green Spanish-style Manzanilla olives according to different packaging conditions and storage temperatures. The lactic acid bacteria population decreased with time but the highest survival counts (and lowest yeasts) at the end of storage (8 months) were observed in plastic pouches under nitrogen atmosphere and glass jars with brine stored at 20°C. Molecular techniques showed a 100% presence of the putative probiotic bacteria in biofilms adhered to olive epidermis, while it was absent in PPB (plastic pouches with brine) and in olives stored at 7°C. No changes in NaCl, pH or combined acidity were observed during the storage except for a slight increase in titratable acidity at 20°C. The color of the fruits was stable but degraded at 20°C for olives in plastic pouches with brine. PMID:27004108

  19. Big bacteria

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria......, Thiomargarita namibiensis, with a diameter of 750 mum. All bacteria, including those that swim around in the environment, obtain their food molecules by molecular diffusion. Only the fastest and largest swimmers known, Thiovulum majus, are able to significantly increase their food supply by motility and by...... actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria, the...

  20. Safe use of genetically modified lactic acid bacteria in food. Bridging the gap between consumers, green groups, and industry

    Sybesma, W.; Hugenholtz, J; De Vos; Smid, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Within the European Union (EU), the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food production is not widely applied and accepted. In contrast to the United States of America, the current EU legislation limits the introduction of functional foods derived from GMOs that may bring a clear benefit to the consumer. Genetically modified lactic acid bacteria (GM-LAB) can be considered as a different class of GMOs, and the European Union is preparing regulations for the risk assessment of genet...

  1. A green triple biocide cocktail consisting of a biocide, EDDS and methanol for the mitigation of planktonic and sessile sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    Wen, J; Xu, D; Gu, T; Raad, I

    2012-02-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) cause souring and their biofilms are often the culprit in Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC). The two most common green biocides for SRB treatment are tetrakis-hydroxymethylphosphonium sulfate (THPS) and glutaraldehyde. It is unlikely that there will be another equally effective green biocide in the market any time soon. This means more effective biocide treatment probably will rely on biocide cocktails. In this work a triple biocide cocktail consisting of glutaraldehyde or THPS, ethylenediaminedisuccinate (EDDS) and methanol was used to treat planktonic SRB and to remove established SRB biofilms. Desulfovibrio vulgaris (ATCC 7757), a corrosive SRB was used as an example in the tests. Laboratory results indicated that with the addition of 10-15% (v/v) methanol to the glutaraldehyde and EDDS double combination, mitigation of planktonic SRB growth in ATCC 1249 medium and a diluted medium turned from inhibition to a kill effect while the chelator dosage was cut from 2,000 to 1,000 ppm. Biofilm removal was achieved when 50 ppm glutaraldehyde combined with 15% methanol and 1,000 ppm EDDS was used. THPS showed similar effects when it was used to replace glutaraldehyde in the triple biocide cocktail to treat planktonic SRB. PMID:22806837

  2. Sulfur as a Matrix for the Development of Microbial Biofilm Communities

    Parker, C.; Bell, E.; Johnson, J. E.; Ma, X.; Stamps, B. W.; Rideout, J.; Johnson, H. A.; Vuono, D.; Spear, J. R.; Hanselmann, K.

    2013-12-01

    The high temperature, low oxygen, and high sulfide concentration of many hot springs select for a low diversity of organisms. The stringent requirements for growth and survival limit the types of interactions, which allow the microbial sulfur metabolism to be examined in depth. We combined geochemical, microbial and molecular data to understand mat development in the warm, oxygen-poor sulfidic Stinking Spring, Utah, USA. The upper flow zone of this spring has a variety of observable microbial biofilm structures that are linked to the activities of both sulfide-oxidizing and oxygenic bacteria. The diverse architecture of the microbial assemblages consist of bulbous ridge structures on the bottom of the streambed, floating mats that cover a large portion of the water surface area, and two morphologically different streamers; green long filaments and white shorter filaments, which both contain large amounts of elemental sulfur. We performed structural analysis using phase contrast and epifluorescence microscopy, and SEM coupled with EDS mapping. Amplicon sequenced 16S rRNA genes analyzed by QIIME and ARB indicated that the predominant organisms present were the cyanobacterial genus Leptolyngbya, and an ɛ-Proteobacteria closely related to the sulfur oxidizing genus Sulfurovum. Metagenomic analysis was conducted on six libraries from three locations using MG-RAST to analyze for genes associated with sulfur metabolism, specifically sulfur oxidation (sox) genes. The presence of sox genes and the microbial sulfur deposition strategy changes downstream as the sulfide concentration decreases. When sulfide is low, the streamers themselves become white and shorter with elemental sulfur deposited intracellularly, and diatoms seem to dominate over cyanobacteria, but do not form associations with the streamer structures. We propose that the microbial biofilms and green streamers present in the sulfide-rich section of the stream are formed in a multi-step process. Initial growth

  3. The effect of green tea extract on the removal of sulfur-containing oral malodor volatiles in vitro and its potential application in chewing gum.

    Zeng, Q C; Wu, A Z; Pika, J

    2010-09-01

    Increasing pH solution from 7.5 to 8.0 was found to significantly improve the effectiveness of green tea extract for methanethiol removal in vitro. Green tea extract was also found to remove hydrogen sulfide and its effectiveness was greatly improved under alkaline conditions. It was found that with green tea extract, maximum H₂S removal was achieved when the pH was between 8.1 and 8.4 at 37 °C for 5 min. Further increases in pH resulted in decrease of the extract effectiveness. Vegetable acetone powders which contain polyphenol oxidases or peroxidases were found to further enhance the effectiveness for the removal of thiols when used in combination with green tea extracts at body temperature under alkaline conditions. Adding 5% baking soda to green tea extract-containing chewing gum was found to buffer saliva pHs to 8.0 during 10 min of chewing. However, severe discoloration was observed and undesirable bitterness was perceived, most likely due to the polymerization of unencapsulated green tea polyphenols. Therefore, encapsulation of green tea extract is recommended for applications at elevated pHs. PMID:21383482

  4. Influence of organics and silica on Fe(II) oxidation rates and cell-mineral aggregate formation by the green-sulfur Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium Chlorobium ferrooxidans KoFox - Implications for Fe(II) oxidation in ancient oceans

    Gauger, Tina; Byrne, James M.; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Obst, Martin; Crowe, Sean; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Most studies on microbial phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation (photoferrotrophy) have focused on purple bacteria, but recent evidence points to the importance of green-sulfur bacteria (GSB). Their recovery from modern ferruginous environments suggests that these photoferrotrophs can offer insights into how their ancient counterparts grew in Archean oceans at the time of banded iron formation (BIF) deposition. It is unknown, however, how Fe(II) oxidation rates, cell-mineral aggregate formation, and Fe-mineralogy vary under environmental conditions reminiscent of the geological past. To address this, we studied the Fe(II)-oxidizer Chlorobium ferrooxidans KoFox, a GSB living in co-culture with the heterotrophic Geospirillum strain KoFum. We investigated the mineralogy of Fe(III) metabolic products at low/high light intensity, and in the presence of dissolved silica and/or fumarate. Silica and fumarate influenced the crystallinity and particle size of the produced Fe(III) minerals. The presence of silica also enhanced Fe(II) oxidation rates, especially at high light intensities, potentially by lowering Fe(II)-toxicity to the cells. Electron microscopic imaging showed no encrustation of either KoFox or KoFum cells with Fe(III)-minerals, though weak associations were observed suggesting co-sedimentation of Fe(III) with at least some biomass via these aggregates, which could support diagenetic Fe(III)-reduction. Given that GSB are presumably one of the most ancient photosynthetic organisms, and pre-date cyanobacteria, our findings, on the one hand, strengthen arguments for photoferrotrophic activity as a likely mechanism for BIF deposition on a predominantly anoxic early Earth, but, on the other hand, also suggest that preservation of remnants of Fe(II)-oxidizing GSB as microfossils in the rock record is unlikely.

  5. Magnetite as a precursor for green rust through the hydrogenotrophic activity of the iron-reducing bacteria Shewanella putrefaciens.

    Etique, M; Jorand, F P A; Ruby, C

    2016-05-01

    Magnetite (Fe(II) Fe(III) 2 O4 ) is often considered as a stable end product of the bioreduction of Fe(III) minerals (e.g., ferrihydrite, lepidocrocite, hematite) or of the biological oxidation of Fe(II) compounds (e.g., siderite), with green rust (GR) as a mixed Fe(II) -Fe(III) hydroxide intermediate. Until now, the biotic transformation of magnetite to GR has not been evidenced. In this study, we investigated the capability of an iron-reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens, to reduce magnetite at circumneutral pH in the presence of dihydrogen as sole inorganic electron donor. During incubation, GR and/or siderite (Fe(II) CO3 ) formation occurred as secondary iron minerals, resulting from the precipitation of Fe(II) species produced via the bacterial reduction of Fe(III) species present in magnetite. Taking into account the exact nature of the secondary iron minerals and the electron donor source is necessary to understand the exergonic character of the biotic transformation of magnetite to GR, which had been considered to date as thermodynamically unfavorable at circumneutral pH. This finding reinforces the hypothesis that GR would be the cornerstone of the microbial transformations of iron-bearing minerals in the anoxic biogeochemical cycle of iron and opens up new possibilities for the interpretation of the evolution of Earth's history and for the understanding of biocorrosion processes in the field of applied science. PMID:26715461

  6. The effect of Pediococcus acidilactici bacteria used as probiotic supplement on the growth and non-specific immune responses of green terror, Aequidens rivulatus.

    Neissi, Alireza; Rafiee, Gholamreza; Nematollahi, Mohammadali; Safari, Omid

    2013-12-01

    A 56-day feeding trial was conducted on a species of ornamental fish called green terror (Aequidens rivulatus) (0.388 ± 0.0021 g) to assess the effect of probiotic bacteria, Pediococcus acidilactici on the growth indices and innate immune response. The fish were randomly allocated into 9 oval tanks (120 l) at a density of 60 fish per tank. The experimental diets were comprised of the control (C), C complemented with fish oil (O) and the probiotic and fish oil (PA) and fed ad lib twice a day. The growth indices (specific growth rate (SGR), feed conversion ratio (FCR) and immunological indices of fish fed the diets including lysozyme activity, total immunoglobulin and alternative complement activity were measured. The Fish fed with the diet containing P. acidilactici (PA) displayed significantly (P < 0.05) higher final weight (3.25 ± 0.065 g), weight gain (830.94 ± 9.46%), SGR (3.53 ± 0.02%/day) and lower FCR (1.45 ± 0.011) compared to those of other experimental diets. Total immunoglobulin (10.05 ± 0.12 μg/ml), lysozyme activity (4.08 ± 0.85 μg/ml) and alternative complement activity (2.65 ± 0.12 U/ml) in the serum of PA fed fish showed significant compared to other treatments (P < 0.05). The results showed positive effects of P. acidilactici as a potent probiotic on growth indices and non-specific immune system of green terror. PMID:24161762

  7. Effects of combined action of γ-irradiation and sulfur dioxide or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidin on bacteria and higher plants

    Effect of combined action of of gamma-irradiation and sulfur dioxide or N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidin on baceria (Bacillus subtilis) and higher plants (Hordeum vulgare L., Pinus sylvestris L.) have been studied. The number of barley germ root cells with chromosomal aberrations depends on the order of treatment with the studied agents. The coefficients of SO2 and gamma-irradiation correlation fluctuate from 1,3 to 2,6 in the above experiments. In experiments with pine seedlings, these correlation coefficients were similar to additive ones. The data obtained suggest that the pattern of action of the agents is determined by the radiation sensitivity of objects and the order of action of the agents

  8. Production of glycolic acid by chemolithotrophic iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and its role in delineating and sustaining acidophilic sulfide mineral-oxidizing consortia.

    Nancucheo, Ivan; Johnson, D Barrie

    2010-01-01

    Glycolic acid was detected as an exudate in actively growing cultures of three chemolithotrophic acidophiles that are important in biomining operations, Leptospirillum ferriphilum, Acidithiobacillus (At.) ferrooxidans, and At. caldus. Although similar concentrations of glycolic acid were found in all cases, the concentrations corresponded to ca. 24% of the total dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in cultures of L. ferriphilum but only ca. 5% of the total DOC in cultures of the two Acidithiobacillus spp. Rapid acidification (to pH 1.0) of the culture medium of At. caldus resulted in a large increase in the level of DOC, although the concentration of glycolic acid did not change in proportion. The archaeon Ferroplasma acidiphilum grew in the cell-free spent medium of At. caldus; glycolic acid was not metabolized, although other unidentified compounds in the DOC pool were metabolized. Glycolic acid exhibited levels of toxicity with 21 strains of acidophiles screened similar to those of acetic acid. The most sensitive species were chemolithotrophs (L. ferriphilum and At. ferrivorans), while the most tolerant species were chemoorganotrophs (Acidocella, Acidobacterium, and Ferroplasma species), and the ability to metabolize glycolic acid appeared to be restricted (among acidophiles) to Firmicutes (chiefly Sulfobacillus spp.). Results of this study help explain why Sulfobacillus spp. rather than other acidophiles are the main organic carbon-degrading bacteria in continuously fed stirred tanks used to bioprocess sulfide mineral concentrates and also why temporary cessation of pH control in these systems, resulting in rapid acidification, often results in a plume of the archaeon Ferroplasma. PMID:19933342

  9. Biological and Abiological Sulfur Reduction at High Temperatures †

    Belkin, Shimshon; Wirsen, Carl O.; Jannasch, Holger W.

    1985-01-01

    Reduction of elemental sulfur was studied in the presence and absencè of thermophilic sulfur-reducing bacteria, at temperatures ranging from 65 to 110°C, in anoxic artificial seawater media. Above 80°C, significant amounts of sulfide were produced abiologically at linear rates, presumably by the disproportionation of sulfur. These rates increased with increasing temperature and pH and were enhanced by yeast extract. In the same medium, the sulfur respiration of two recent thermophilic isolate...

  10. Sulfur Earth

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  11. Microbiological study of naturally fermented Algerian green olives: isolation and identification of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts along with the effects of brine solutions obtained at the end of olive fermentation on Lactobacillus plantarum...

    Nour-Eddine, Karam

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The microflora of naturally fermented green olives produced in Western Algeria was studied over 15, 60 and 90 day fermentation periods. Different microorganisms (aerobic bacteria, coliforms, staphylococci, lactic acid bacteria, lactobacilli, enterococci, yeasts, psychrotrophs and lipolytic bacteria were recorded at 15 and 60 days of fermentation. After 90 days (pH 4.40 of fermentation, the lactic acid bacteria population became dominant and persisted together with yeasts throughout the fermentation period. The lactic acid bacteria isolated (343 isolates were identified as L. casei, L. rhamnosus, L. paracasei, L. plantarum, L. lactis subsp. lactis, E. faecalis, E. faecium and E. durans. The dominant species was L. plantarum. Yeasts were isolated from all samples (32 isolates and were identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Candida parapsilosis. Also, in this study we reported that brine solutions obtained at the end of olive fermentation were able to stimulate the growth of several L. plantarum strainsLa microflora de las aceitunas verdes fermentadas naturalmente elaboradas en Argelia Occidental fue estudiada en períodos de fermentación de 15, 60 y 90 días. Diferentes microorganismos (bacterias aeróbicas, coliformes, estafilococos, bacterias del ácido láctico, lactobacilos, enterococos, levaduras, psicotrofos y bacterias lipolíticas fueron detectados a los 15 y 60 días de fermentación. Después de 90 días de fermentación (pH 4.40, la población de bacterias lácticas se hizo dominante y persistió junto con las levaduras a lo largo de todo el proceso. Las bacterias lácticas aisladas (343 fueron identificadas como L. casei, L. rhamnosus, L. paracasei, L. plantarum, L. lactis subsp. lactis, E. faecalis, E. faecium y E. durans. La especie dominante fue L. plantarum. Las levaduras aisladas (32 de todas las muestras fueron identificadas como Saccharomyces cerevisiae o Candida parapsilosis. También se recoge en este estudio que las

  12. Unique communities of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in saline lakes of Salar de Atacama (Chile): evidence for a new phylogenetic lineage of phototrophic Gammaproteobacteria from pufLM gene analyses.

    Thiel, Vera; Tank, Marcus; Neulinger, Sven C; Gehrmann, Linda; Dorador, Cristina; Imhoff, Johannes F

    2010-12-01

    Phototrophic bacteria are important primary producers of salt lakes in the Salar de Atacama and at times form visible mass developments within and on top of the lake sediments. The communities of phototrophic bacteria from two of these lakes were characterized by molecular genetic approaches using key genes for the biosynthesis of the photosynthetic apparatus in phototrophic purple bacteria (pufLM) and in green sulfur bacteria (fmoA). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism of the pufLM genes indicated high variability of the community composition between the two lakes and subsamples thereof. The communities were characterized by the dominance of a novel, so far undescribed lineage of pufLM containing bacteria and the presence of representatives related to known halophilic Chromatiaceae and Ectothiorhodospiraceae. In addition, the presence of BChl b-containing anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria and of aerobic anoxygenic bacteria was indicated. Green sulfur bacteria were not detected in the environmental samples, although a bacterium related to Prosthecochloris indicum was identified in an enrichment culture. This is the first comprehensive description of phototrophic bacterial communities in a salt lake of South America made possible only due to the application of the functional pufLM genes. PMID:20868378

  13. Assessment of the stoichiometry and efficiency of CO2 fixation coupled to reduced sulfur oxidation

    Klatt, Judith M.; Polerecky, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB) couple the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds to the production of biomass. Their role in the cycling of carbon, sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen is, however, difficult to quantify due to the complexity of sulfur oxidation pathways. We describe a

  14. Liquid-nitrogen cryopreservation of three kinds of autotrophicbioleaching bacteria

    WU Xue-ling; XIN Xiao-hong; JIANG Ying; LIANG Ren-xing; YUAN Peng; FANG Cheng-xiang

    2008-01-01

    Three kinds of autotrophic bioleaching bacteria strains,including mesophilic and acidophilic ferrous ion-oxidizing bacteria Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A.ferrooxidans),mesophilic and acidophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans (A.thiooxidans),and moderately thermophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria Acidianus brierleyi,were cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen and their ferrous ion- or sulfur-oxidizing activities were investigated and compared with the original ones.The results revealed that ferrous ion/sulfur oxidation activities of the strains were almost equal before and after cryopreservation.Glycerin was used as cryoprotective agent.In conclusion,liquid-nitrogen cryopreservation is a simple and effective method for autotrophic bioleaching microorganisms.

  15. The Low-temperature Ion Sulfurizing Technology and its Applications

    Ma, G. Z.; Xu, B. S.; Wang, H. D.; Li, G. L.; Zhang, S.

    A solid lubrication film mainly consists of FeS, which has excellent tribology properties, can be formed on the sulfurized iron or steel surface. The sulfurizing technology has aroused intense attention from the day it appeared. However, the widespread industrial application of sulfurizing technology was promoted by the low-temperature ion sulfurizing (LTIS) process. This paper summarized the phylogeny and sorts of sulfurizing technology firstly; then, the process flow of LTIS technology, the forming mechanism, microstructure and tribological properties of ion sulfurized layer were introduced detailedly; and then, the technological, economic and environmental merits of LTIS technology were generalized; finally, the industrial applications of LTIS technology in various typical rolling, sliding and heavy duty parts were reviewed briefly. LTIS technology, with the advantages of high sulfurizing speed, good performance of sulfurized layer and without sideeffect, has played an important role in the tribology modification of ferrous parts, and the LTIS process will become more green, simple and efficient in the future.

  16. Effect of acidic pH on flow cytometric detection of bacteria stained with SYBR Green I and their distinction from background

    Unspecific background caused by biotic or abiotic particles, cellular debris, or autofluorescence is a well-known interfering parameter when applying flow cytometry to the detection of microorganisms in combination with fluorescent dyes. We present here an attempt to suppress the background signal intensity and thus to improve the detection of microorganisms using the nucleic acid stain SYBR® Green I. It has been observed that the fluorescent signals from SYBR Green I are greatly reduced at acidic pH. When lowering the pH of pre-stained samples directly prior to flow cytometric analysis, we hypothesized that the signals from particles and cells with membrane damage might therefore be reduced. Signals from intact cells, temporarily maintaining a neutral cytosolic pH, should not be affected. We show here that this principle holds true for lowering background interference, whereas the signals of membrane-compromised dead cells are only affected weakly. Signals from intact live cells at low pH were mostly comparable to signals without acidification. Although this study was solely performed with SYBR® Green I, the principle of low pH flow cytometry (low pH-FCM) might hold promise when analyzing complex matrices with an abundance of non-cellular matter, especially when expanded to non-DNA binding dyes with a stronger pH dependence of fluorescence than SYBR Green I and a higher pKa value. (paper)

  17. Oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds in acidophilic prokaryotes

    Rohwerder, T.; Sand, W. [Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Biofilm Centre, Aquatic Biotechnology, Duisburg (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    The oxidation of reduced inorganic sulfur compounds to sulfuric acid is of great importance for biohydrometallurgical technologies as well as the formation of acidic (below pH 3) and often heavy metal-contaminated environments. The use of elemental sulfur as an electron donor is the predominant energy-yielding process in acidic natural sulfur-rich biotopes but also at mining sites containing sulfidic ores. Contrary to its significant role in the global sulfur cycle and its biotechnological importance, the microbial fundamentals of acidophilic sulfur oxidation are only incompletely understood. Besides giving an overview of sulfur-oxidizing acidophiles, this review describes the so far known enzymatic reactions related to elemental sulfur oxidation in acidophilic bacteria and archaea. Although generally similar reactions are employed in both prokaryotic groups, the stoichiometry of the key enzymes is different. Bacteria oxidize elemental sulfur by a sulfur dioxygenase to sulfite whereas in archaea, a sulfur oxygenase reductase is used forming equal amounts of sulfide and sulfite. In both cases, the activation mechanism of elemental sulfur is not known but highly reactive linear sulfur forms are assumed to be the actual substrate. Inhibition as well as promotion of these biochemical steps is highly relevant in bioleaching operations. An efficient oxidation can prevent the formation of passivating sulfur layers. In other cases, a specific inhibition of sulfur biooxidation may be beneficial for reducing cooling and neutralization costs. In conclusion, the demand for a better knowledge of the biochemistry of sulfur-oxidizing acidophiles is underlined. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Enhancement of Copper Availability and Microbial Community Changes in Rice Rhizospheres Affected by Sulfur

    Xiao-Feng Yuan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of sulfur on the availability of Cu and the bacterial community in rice rhizospheres was investigated by pot experiments. With sulfur addition, pH in rhizosphere soil decreased and Mg(NO32 extractable Cu increased significantly. The bacterial community composition also changed with sulfur addition. Some specific clones having high similarity to Thiobacillus, which indicated that sulfur oxidation in the rice rhizosphere could increase the availability of Cu. These results suggested that sulfur source which could provide substrate to sulfur oxidizing bacteria and enhance the availability of Cu was not a suitable sulfur fertilizer for Cu polluted soil.

  19. The sulfur metabolism of Cytophaga johnsonae

    Because the cellular sulfur of most bacteria is essentially reduced sulfur form, the energetically expensive process of assimilatory sulfate reduction is prevented by various regulatory mechanisms when reduced sulfur is available. However, members of the Cytophaga-Flexibacter group of gliding bacteria contain 20% or more of their sulfur in the form of the sulfonate moiety of sulfonolipids, which is derived from cysteate; thus a large portion of their cellular sulfur is only one step more reduced than sulfate. Regulation of sulfate assimilation by Cytophaga johnsonae differs from that in other bacteria studied in that, when reduced sulfur sources such as a low concentration of cystine or a peptide-containing medium are available, the initial steps of sulfate assimilation that lead to cysteate, and thus sulfonolipid synthesis are operative, whereas the terminal steps of sulfate assimilation leading to cysteine and methionine (reduced sulfur) synthesis are repressed. The biosynthetic pathway leading to cysteate has not yet been elucidated. Cysteate sulfur can be derived from either sulfate or cystine, but the origin of the carbon is an enigma. It appears that cysteate carbon arises from a glycolytic intermediate. In a series of experiments with cell-free extracts, no evidence was obtained for the participation of phosphoenolpyruvate as a precursor to cysteate. Two lines of evidence support the hypothesis that phosphoserine is the ultimate precursor to cysteate: (a) this pathway does not require the existence of sulfonate intermediates (none have ever been detected), and (b) addition of phosphoserine to a cell extract incubated with [35S]cysteine stimulated the incorporation of 35S into cysteate

  20. The sulfur metabolism of Cytophaga johnsonae

    Gilmore, D.F.

    1989-01-01

    Because the cellular sulfur of most bacteria is essentially reduced sulfur form, the energetically expensive process of assimilatory sulfate reduction is prevented by various regulatory mechanisms when reduced sulfur is available. However, members of the Cytophaga-Flexibacter group of gliding bacteria contain 20% or more of their sulfur in the form of the sulfonate moiety of sulfonolipids, which is derived from cysteate; thus a large portion of their cellular sulfur is only one step more reduced than sulfate. Regulation of sulfate assimilation by Cytophaga johnsonae differs from that in other bacteria studied in that, when reduced sulfur sources such as a low concentration of cystine or a peptide-containing medium are available, the initial steps of sulfate assimilation that lead to cysteate, and thus sulfonolipid synthesis are operative, whereas the terminal steps of sulfate assimilation leading to cysteine and methionine (reduced sulfur) synthesis are repressed. The biosynthetic pathway leading to cysteate has not yet been elucidated. Cysteate sulfur can be derived from either sulfate or cystine, but the origin of the carbon is an enigma. It appears that cysteate carbon arises from a glycolytic intermediate. In a series of experiments with cell-free extracts, no evidence was obtained for the participation of phosphoenolpyruvate as a precursor to cysteate. Two lines of evidence support the hypothesis that phosphoserine is the ultimate precursor to cysteate: (a) this pathway does not require the existence of sulfonate intermediates (none have ever been detected), and (b) addition of phosphoserine to a cell extract incubated with ({sup 35}S)cysteine stimulated the incorporation of {sup 35}S into cysteate.

  1. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Profiling of the Purple Sulfur Bacterium Allochromatium vinosum DSM 180T during Growth on Different Reduced Sulfur Compounds

    Weissgerber, Thomas; Dobler, Nadine; Polen, Tino; Latus, Jeanette; Stockdreher, Yvonne; Dahl, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    The purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum DSM 180T is one of the best-studied sulfur-oxidizing anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria, and it has been developed into a model organism for laboratory-based studies of oxidative sulfur metabolism. Here, we took advantage of the organism's high metabolic versatility and performed whole-genome transcriptional profiling to investigate the response of A. vinosum cells upon exposure to sulfide, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, or sulfite compared to ...

  2. Sulfur Upwelling off the African Coast

    2002-01-01

    Though these aquamarine clouds in the waters off the coast of northern Namibia may look like algae blooms, they are in fact clouds of sulfur produced by anaerobic bacteria on the ocean's floor. This image of the sulfur-filled water was taken on April 24, 2002, by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the Orbview-2 satellite. The anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that can live without oxygen) feed upon algae carcasses that exist in abundance on the ocean's floor off of Namibia. As the bacteria ingest the algae husks, they produce hydrogen sulfide, which slowly builds up in the sea-floor sediments. Eventually, the hydrogen sulfide reaches the point where the sediment can no longer contain it, and it bubbles forth. When this poisonous chemical reaches the surface, it combines with the oxygen in the upper layers of the ocean to create clouds of pure sulfur. The sulfur causes the Namibian coast to smell like rotten eggs, and the hydrogen sulfide will often kill fish and drive lobsters away. For more information, read: A Bloom By Any Other Name A high-resolution (250 meters per pixel) image earlier on the 24th taken from the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) shows additional detail in the plumes. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE. MODIS image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  3. Green Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles using Bark Extract of Salix Alba and Its Antimicrobial Effect Against Bacteria Isolated from Dental Plaque

    Shahnaz Majeed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Now a days oral infections are major concern for the researchers due to chewing large amount of Tabacco, poor hygiene of mouth as well as smoking. These common life styles can enhance the oral infection as well as can play an important role in enhancing the bacterial resistance by the accumulation of antibiotics. Hence my present work was to focused on the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Salix alba bark extract. The color of the plant extract changes in to dark brown upon addition of silver nitrate indicates the formation of silver nanoparticles which completes the reaction after 24 hours.. These nanoparticles were characterized by different microscopic techniques like UV- Vis spectrophotometry which showed the absorption peak at 440 nm specific for silver nanoparticles. HR-TEM showed average size was between 29-35 nm and the tiny particles were seemed to be spherical in morphology. Zeta potential showed silver nanoparticles were stable due to the electrostatic repulsion without adding a different physical or chemical capping agent. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM showed nanoparticles size was 30-50 nm and were stable. . The dental caries forming bacteria were isolated from plaque samples like Lactobacillus sp, Streptococcus sp. and Staphylococcus sp. and compare with different reference strains. Antibacterial activity of these biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles was evaluated by disc diffusion. These synthesized silver nanoparticles showed a good antibacterial activity against the bacteria isolates. . Furthermore these nanoparticles showed quite significant activity along with different antibiotics like Amoxicillin, Tetracycline and Ciprofloxacin during the present study.

  4. Nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur metabolism in natural Thioploca samples

    Otte, S.; Kuenen, JG; Nielsen, LP;

    1999-01-01

    Filamentous sulfur bacteria of the genus Thioploca occur as dense mats on the continental shelf off the coast of Chile and Peru. Since little is known about their nitrogen, sulfur, and carbon metabolism, this study was undertaken to investigate their (eco)physiology. Thioploca is able to store...... internally high concentrations of sulfur globules and nitrate. It has been previously hypothesized that these large vacuolated bacteria can oxidize sulfide by reducing their internally stored nitrate. We examined this nitrate reduction by incubation experiments of washed Thioploca sheaths,vith trichomes in......) mg of protein(-1). The ammonium and sulfate production rates were not influenced by the addition of sulfide, suggesting that sulfide is first oxidized to elemental sulfur, and in a second independent step elemental sulfur is oxidized to sulfate. The average sulfide oxidation rate measured was 5 nmol...

  5. Solubility of Sulfur Dioxide in Sulfuric Acid

    Chang, K. K.; Compton, L. E.; Lawson, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    The solubility of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid was evaluated by regular solution theory, and the results verified by experimental measurements in the temperature range of 25 C to 70 C at pressures of 60 to 200 PSIA. The percent (wt./wt.) of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid is given by the equation %SO2 = 2.2350 + 0.0903P - 0.00026P 10 to the 2nd power with P in PSIA.

  6. Dynamics of the anoxygenic phototrophic community in meromictic Fayetteville Green Lake (NY) and the associated sedimentary pigment record

    Meyer, K. M.; Fulton, J. M.; Hunter, S.; Macalady, J. L.; Kump, L.; Freeman, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    Photosynthetic pigments and their diagenetic products in marine sedimentary rocks hold important clues about recent and ancient variability in the Earth's surface environment. The chemical relicts of carotenoids from anoxygenic sulfur bacteria are of particular interest to geoscientists because of their potential to signal episodes of marine photic-zone euxinia such as those proposed for extended periods in the Proterozoic as well as brief intervals during the Phanerozoic. It is therefore critical to constrain the environmental and physiological factors that influence carotenoid production and preservation in modern environments. Our work in redox stratified, microbially dominated Fayetteville Green Lake (New York) has spanned the past decade and included seasonal (2005-2006) and monthly (2011) pigment monitoring in the water column, as well as a coupled pigment and nucleic acid clone library analyses from planktonic and benthic samples in 2006. Populations of photosynthetic bacteria in the water column are dynamic on monthly and annual scales. In 2011, purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and green sulfur bacteria (GSB) were most abundant in spring and fall, respectively, responding to environmental conditions. PSB are diverse both at the chemocline and in benthic mats below oxygenated shallow waters, with different PSB species inhabiting the two environments. Okenone (from PSB) is an abundant carotenoid in both the chemocline waters and in benthic mats. GSB and their primary pigment Bchl e are also represented in and below the chemocline. However, the water column and sediments contain only trace concentrations of the GSB carotenoid isorenieratene, with concentrations relative to Bchl e being at least two orders of magnitude lower than we have observed in other meromictic lakes. Sediments deposited over the past ~550 years also reveal decadal to centennial scale variability in pigment production in the water column, possibly associated with hypothesized climatic and

  7. Methylotrophic bacteria symbiosis with the higher plants as means of minimization of the lower hydrocarbons concentration during artificial ecosystem gas exchange

    Berkovich, Yuliy; Smolyanina, Svetlana; Moukhamedieva, Lana; Mardanov, Robert; Doronina, Nina; Ivanova, Ekaterina

    Plant growth unit should be included in the LSS for the space vehicles for vitamin greens supply and psychological support of cosmonauts during long-term missions. The lower hydrocarbons such as methane, methanol, methylated sulfuric compounds and methylated amines, ethylene and so on, are the natural products of human and plant metabolism and usually considered as the air pollutions. It is shown, that one way to decrease the lower hydrocarbons concentration in the artificial ecosystems could be colonization of the plants by methylotrophic bacteria. The aerobic methylotrophic bacteria possess unique ability to use methane and its oxidized or replaced derivatives without food damage and human, animals or plants infection. We have found that methylotrophic bacteria are the phyto-symbiotic bacteria: they stimulate growth and development of the colonized plants because of synthesizing cytokinins and auxins, and vitamin B12.Two collection strains of the obligate methylotrophic bacteria - Methylovorus mays C and Methylomonas metanica S - were chosen because of their high activity to assimilate the lower hydrocarbons due to functioning of methanoldehydrogenase, methanmonooxigenase and ribulose monophosphate cycle enzymes system.Colonization of the leaf cabbage Brassica chinensis L. by these strains led to approximately 30 % reduce of methanol and methane concentration in the air inside phytotron. Experimental estimations of the influence of methylotrophic bacteria on leafy greens growth and development are obtained.

  8. Microbiological disproportionation of inorganic sulfur compounds

    Finster, Kai

    2008-01-01

    The disproportionation of inorganic sulfur intermediates at moderate temperatures (0-80 °C) is a microbiologically catalyzed chemolithotrophic process in which compounds like elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, and sulfite serve as both electron donor and acceptor, and generate hydrogen sulfide...... and sulfate. Thus the overall process is comparable to the fermentation of organic compounds such as glucose and is consequently often described as 'inorganic fermentation'. The process is primarily carried out by microorganisms with phylogenetic affiliation to the so called sulfate-reducing bacteria within...

  9. Phylogenetic diversity of bacteria associated with Paleolithic paintings and surrounding rock walls in two Spanish caves (Llonín and La Garma).

    Schabereiter-Gurtner, Claudia; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Piñar, Guadalupe; Lubitz, Werner; Rölleke, Sabine

    2004-02-01

    Bacterial diversity in caves is still rarely investigated using culture-independent techniques. In the present study, bacterial communities on Paleolithic paintings and surrounding rock walls in two Spanish caves (Llonín and La Garma) were analyzed, using 16S rDNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis community fingerprinting and phylogenetic analyses without prior cultivation. Results revealed complex bacterial communities consisting of a high number of novel 16S rDNA sequence types and indicated a high biodiversity of lithotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria. Identified bacteria were related to already cultured bacteria (39 clones) and to environmental 16S rDNA clones (46 clones). The nearest phylogenetic relatives were members of the Proteobacteria (41.1%), of the Acidobacterium division (16.5%), Actinobacteria (20%), Firmicutes (10.6%), of the Cytophaga/Flexibacter/Bacteroides division (5.9%), Nitrospira group (3.5%), green non-sulfur bacteria (1.2%), and candidate WS3 division (1.2%). Thirteen of these clones were most closely related to those obtained from the previous studies on Tito Bustillo Cave. The comparison of the present data with the data obtained previously from Altamira and Tito Bustillo Caves revealed similarities in the bacterial community components, especially in the high abundance of the Acidobacteria and Rhizobiaceae, and in the presence of bacteria related to ammonia and sulfur oxidizers. PMID:19712338

  10. Sulfuric acid on Europa and the radiolytic sulfur cycle

    Carlson, R. W.; Johnson, R. E.; Anderson, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of laboratory spectra with Galileo data indicates that hydrated sulfuric acid is present and is a major component of Europa's surface. In addition, this moon's visually dark surface material, which spatially correlates with the sulfuric acid concentration, is identified as radiolytically altered sulfur polymers. Radiolysis of the surface by magnetospheric plasma bombardment continuously cycles sulfur between three forms: sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and sulfur polymers, with sulfuric acid being about 50 times as abundant as the other forms. Enhanced sulfuric acid concentrations are found in Europa's geologically young terrains, suggesting that low-temperature, liquid sulfuric acid may influence geological processes.

  11. Methanotrophic bacteria.

    Hanson, R S; Hanson, T. E.

    1996-01-01

    Methane-utilizing bacteria (methanotrophs) are a diverse group of gram-negative bacteria that are related to other members of the Proteobacteria. These bacteria are classified into three groups based on the pathways used for assimilation of formaldehyde, the major source of cell carbon, and other physiological and morphological features. The type I and type X methanotrophs are found within the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria and employ the ribulose monophosphate pathway for formaldehy...

  12. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

  13. Chlorosomes: antenna organelles in photosynthetic green bacteria

    Frigaard, N.-U.; Bryant, D. A.

    2006-01-01

    The new series "Microbiology Monographs" begins with two volumes on intracellular components in prokaryotes. In this second volume, "Complex Intracellular Structures in Prokaryotes", the components, labelled complex intracellular structures, encompass a multitude of important cellular functions. ...

  14. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. The influence of metal speciation in combustion waste on the efficiency of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Ni and Cr bioleaching in a mixed culture of sulfur-oxidizing and biosurfactant-producing bacteria.

    Karwowska, Ewa; Wojtkowska, Małgorzata; Andrzejewska, Dorota

    2015-12-15

    Metal leachability from ash and combustion slag is related to the physico-chemical properties, including their speciation in the waste. Metals speciation is an important factor that influences the efficiency of metal bioleaching from combustion wastes in a mixed culture of acidophilic and biosurfactant-producing bacteria. It was observed that individual metals tended to occur in different fractions, which reflects their susceptibility to bioleaching. Cr and Ni were readily removed from wastes when present with a high fraction bound to carbonates. Cd and Pb where not effectively bioleached when present in high amounts in a fraction bound to organic matter. The best bioleaching results were obtained for power plant slag, which had a high metal content in the exchangeable, bound to carbonates and bound to Fe and Mg oxides fractions- the metal recovery percentage for Zn, Cu and Ni from this waste exceeded 90%. PMID:26073519

  16. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain. This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks. Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  17. Anaerobic bacteria

    Brook I, Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 297. Stedman's Online ...

  18. A Sheet-like Carbon Matrix Hosted Sulfur as Cathode for High-performance Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Lu, Songtao; Chen, Yan; Zhou, Jia; Wang, Zhida; Wu, Xiaohong; Gu, Jian; Zhang, Xiaoping; Pang, Aimin; Jiao, Zilong; Jiang, Lixiang

    2016-01-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries are a promising candidate of next generation energy storage systems owing to its high theoretical capacity and energy density. However, to date, its commercial application was hindered by the inherent problems of sulfur cathode. Additionally, with the rapid decline of non-renewable resources and active appeal of green chemistry, the intensive research of new electrode materials was conducted worldwide. We have obtained a sheet-like carbon material (shaddock peel carbon sheets SPCS) from organic waste shaddock peel, which can be used as the conductive carbon matrix for sulfur-based cathodes. Furthermore, the raw materials are low-cost, truly green and recyclable. As a result, the sulfur cathode made with SPCS (SPCS-S), can deliver a high reversible capacity of 722.5 mAh g(-1) at 0.2 C after 100 cycles with capacity recuperability of ~90%, demonstrating that the SPCS-S hybrid is of great potential as the cathode for rechargeable Li-S batteries. The high electrochemical performance of SPCS-S hybrid could be attributed to the sheet-like carbon network with large surface area and high conductivity of the SPCS, in which the carbon sheets enable the uniform distribution of sulfur, better ability to trap the soluble polysulfides and accommodate volume expansion/shrinkage of sulfur during repeated charge/discharge cycles. PMID:26842015

  19. A Sheet-like Carbon Matrix Hosted Sulfur as Cathode for High-performance Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    Lu, Songtao; Chen, Yan; Zhou, Jia; Wang, Zhida; Wu, Xiaohong; Gu, Jian; Zhang, Xiaoping; Pang, Aimin; Jiao, Zilong; Jiang, Lixiang

    2016-02-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries are a promising candidate of next generation energy storage systems owing to its high theoretical capacity and energy density. However, to date, its commercial application was hindered by the inherent problems of sulfur cathode. Additionally, with the rapid decline of non-renewable resources and active appeal of green chemistry, the intensive research of new electrode materials was conducted worldwide. We have obtained a sheet-like carbon material (shaddock peel carbon sheets SPCS) from organic waste shaddock peel, which can be used as the conductive carbon matrix for sulfur-based cathodes. Furthermore, the raw materials are low-cost, truly green and recyclable. As a result, the sulfur cathode made with SPCS (SPCS-S), can deliver a high reversible capacity of 722.5 mAh g-1 at 0.2 C after 100 cycles with capacity recuperability of ~90%, demonstrating that the SPCS-S hybrid is of great potential as the cathode for rechargeable Li-S batteries. The high electrochemical performance of SPCS-S hybrid could be attributed to the sheet-like carbon network with large surface area and high conductivity of the SPCS, in which the carbon sheets enable the uniform distribution of sulfur, better ability to trap the soluble polysulfides and accommodate volume expansion/shrinkage of sulfur during repeated charge/discharge cycles.

  20. Acidophilic, Heterotrophic Bacteria of Acidic Mine Waters

    Wichlacz, Paul L.; Unz, Richard F.

    1981-01-01

    Obligately acidophilic, heterotrophic bacteria were isolated both from enrichment cultures developed with acidic mine water and from natural mine drainage. The bacteria were grouped by the ability to utilize a number of organic acids as sole carbon sources. None of the strains were capable of chemolithotrophic growth on inorganic reduced iron and sulfur compounds. All bacteria were rod shaped, gram negative, nonencapsulated, motile, capable of growth at pH 2.6 but not at pH 6.0, catalase and ...

  1. The Microworld of Marine-Bacteria

    JØRGENSEN, BB

    1995-01-01

    Microsensor studies show that the marine environment in the size scale of bacteria is physically and chemically very different from the macroenvironment. The microbial world of the sediment-water interface is thus dominated by water viscosity and steep diffusion gradients. Because of the diverse...... metabolism types, bacteria in the mostly anoxic sea floor play an important role in the major element cycles of the ocean. The communities of giant, filamentous sulfur bacteria that live in the deep-sea hydrothermal vents or along the Pacific coast of South America are presented here as examples....

  2. Green Chemistry

    Collison, Melanie

    2011-05-15

    Green chemistry is the science of chemistry used in a way that will not use or create hazardous substances. Dr. Rui Resendes is working in this field at GreenCentre Canada, an offshoot of PARTEQ Innovations in Kingston, Ontario. GreenCentre's preliminary findings suggest their licensed product {sup S}witchable Solutions{sup ,} featuring 3 classes of solvents and a surfactant, may be useful in bitumen oil sands extraction.

  3. Separation of sulfur isotopes

    DeWitt, Robert; Jepson, Bernhart E.; Schwind, Roger A.

    1976-06-22

    Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

  4. Bioinspired catalysis metal-sulfur complexes

    Weigand, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The growing interest in green chemistry calls for new, efficient and cheap catalysts. Living organisms contain a wide range of remarkably powerful enzymes, which can be imitated by chemists in the search for new catalysts. In bioinspired catalysis, chemists use the basic principles of biological enzymes when creating new catalyst analogues. In this book, an international group of experts cover the topic from theoretical aspects to applications by including a wide variety of examples of different systems. This valuable overview of bioinspired metal-sulfur catalysis is a must-have for all sci

  5. Quadruple sulfur isotope constraints on the origin and cycling of volatile organic sulfur compounds in a stratified sulfidic lake

    Oduro, Harry; Kamyshny, Alexey; Zerkle, Aubrey L.; Li, Yue; Farquhar, James

    2013-11-01

    We have quantified the major forms of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) distributed in the water column of stratified freshwater Fayetteville Green Lake (FGL), to evaluate the biogeochemical pathways involved in their production. The lake's anoxic deep waters contain high concentrations of sulfate (12-16 mmol L-1) and sulfide (0.12 μmol L-1 to 1.5 mmol L-1) with relatively low VOSC concentrations, ranging from 0.1 nmol L-1 to 2.8 μmol L-1. Sulfur isotope measurements of combined volatile organic sulfur compounds demonstrate that VOSC species are formed primarily from reduced sulfur (H2S/HS-) and zero-valent sulfur (ZVS), with little input from sulfate. Thedata support a role of a combination of biological and abiotic processes in formation of carbon-sulfur bonds between reactive sulfur species and methyl groups of lignin components. These processes are responsible for very fast turnover of VOSC species, maintaining their low levels in FGL. No dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) was detected by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS) in the lake water column or in planktonic extracts. These observations indicate a pathway distinct from oceanic and coastal marine environments, where dimethylsulfide (DMS) and other VOSC species are principally produced via the breakdown of DMSP by plankton species.

  6. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of the purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum DSM 180T during growth on different reduced sulfur compounds.

    Weissgerber, Thomas; Dobler, Nadine; Polen, Tino; Latus, Jeanette; Stockdreher, Yvonne; Dahl, Christiane

    2013-09-01

    The purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum DSM 180(T) is one of the best-studied sulfur-oxidizing anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria, and it has been developed into a model organism for laboratory-based studies of oxidative sulfur metabolism. Here, we took advantage of the organism's high metabolic versatility and performed whole-genome transcriptional profiling to investigate the response of A. vinosum cells upon exposure to sulfide, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, or sulfite compared to photoorganoheterotrophic growth on malate. Differential expression of 1,178 genes was observed, corresponding to 30% of the A. vinosum genome. Relative transcription of 551 genes increased significantly during growth on one of the different sulfur sources, while the relative transcript abundance of 627 genes decreased. A significant number of genes that revealed strongly enhanced relative transcription levels have documented sulfur metabolism-related functions. Among these are the dsr genes, including dsrAB for dissimilatory sulfite reductase, and the sgp genes for the proteins of the sulfur globule envelope, thus confirming former results. In addition, we identified new genes encoding proteins with appropriate subcellular localization and properties to participate in oxidative dissimilatory sulfur metabolism. Those four genes for hypothetical proteins that exhibited the strongest increases of mRNA levels on sulfide and elemental sulfur, respectively, were chosen for inactivation and phenotypic analyses of the respective mutant strains. This approach verified the importance of the encoded proteins for sulfur globule formation during the oxidation of sulfide and thiosulfate and thereby also documented the suitability of comparative transcriptomics for the identification of new sulfur-related genes in anoxygenic phototrophic sulfur bacteria. PMID:23873913

  7. Greene Machine

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article profiles the 37-year-old researcher Jay P. Greene and his controversial research studies on education. Most people learn early to trust the things they see first, but Greene adheres to a different creed. People are deceived by their own eyes. He believed that visual betrayal is as evident as it is in how people think…

  8. Metaphysical green

    Earon, Ofri

    2011-01-01

    “Sensation of Green is about the mental process like touching, seeing, hearing, or smelling, resulting from the immediate stimulation of landscape forms, plants, trees, wind and water. Sensation of Green triggers a feeling of scale, cheerfulness, calmness and peace. The spatial performance...... of Sensation of Green is created by a physical interaction between the language of space and the language of nature” The notion of Sensation of Green was developed through a previous study ‘Learning from the Summer House’ investigating the unique architectural characteristics of the Danish summer houses....... The idea of the concept is a mutual participation of nature in architecture meaning that landscape features become tools to design a built space. The paper develops the concept further focusing on the scale of a single residential unit. The paper argues that the concept of Sensation of Green is flexible...

  9. Green lights

    Fisker, Peter Kielberg

    This study investigates the effect of drought on economic activity globally using remote sensing data. In particular, predicted variation in greenness is correlated with changes in the density of artificial light observed at night on a grid of 0.25 degree latitude-longitude pixels. I define drought...... as greenness estimated by lagged variation in monthly rainfall and temperature. This definition of drought performs well in identifying self-reported drought events since 2000 compared with measures of drought that do not take greenness into account, and the subsequent analysis indicates that predicted...... variation in greenness is positively associated with year-on-year changes in luminosity: If a unit of observation experiences a predicted variation in greenness that lies 1 standard deviation below the global mean, on average 1.5 - 2.5 light pixels out of 900 are extinguished that year. Finally, an attempt...

  10. Green consumerism

    de Groot, Judith I.M.; Schuitema, Geertje; Garson, Carrie Lee

    Our presentation will focus on the influence of product characteristics and values on green consumerism. Although generally a majority of consumers support the idea of purchasing green products, we argue, based on social dilemma theory, that proself product characteristics and egoistic...... and biospheric values influence the importance of such ‘green’ product characteristics on purchasing intentions. In two within-subjects full-factorial experimental studies (N = 100 and N = 107), we found that purchase intentions of products were only steered by green characteristics if prices were low...... and the brand was familiar. Green product characteristics did not influence purchase intentions at all when these proself product characteristics were not fulfilled (i.e., high prices and unfamiliar brands). The importance of proself and green product characteristics on purchasing intentions was also...

  11. Aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions

    Brown, R.C.; Anderson, M.R.; Miake-Lye, R.C.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics; Sorokin, A.A.; Buriko, Y.I. [Scientific Research Center `Ecolen`, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The extent to which fuel sulfur is converted to SO{sub 3} during combustion and the subsequent turbine flow in supersonic and subsonic aircraft engines is estimated numerically. The analysis is based on: a flamelet model with non-equilibrium sulfur chemistry for the combustor, and a one-dimensional, two-stream model with finite rate chemical kinetics for the turbine. The results indicate that between 2% and 10% of the fuel sulfur is emitted as SO{sub 3}. It is also shown that, for a high fuel sulfur mass loading, conversion in the turbine is limited by the level of atomic oxygen at the combustor exit, leading to higher SO{sub 2} oxidation efficiency at lower fuel sulfur loadings. While SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} are the primary oxidation products, the model results further indicate H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} levels on the order of 0.1 ppm for supersonic expansions through a divergent nozzle. This source of fully oxidized S(6) (SO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) exceeds previously calculated S(6) levels due to oxidation of SO{sub 2} by OH in the exhaust plume outside the engine nozzle. (author) 26 refs.

  12. Sulfur activation in Hiroshima

    In 1979, we attempted to establish the validity of source terms for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs using experimental data on sulfur activation. Close agreement was observed between measured and calculated values for test firings of Nagasaki-type bombs. The calculated values were based on source terms developed by W.E. Preeg at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A discrepancy was found, however, when we compared calculated values for the two bombs because a 1956 report by R.R. Wilson stated that sulfur acitvation by fast neutrons in Hiroshima was approximately three times greater than in Nagasaki. Our calculations based on Preeg's source-term data predicted about equal sulfur activation in the two cities

  13. Vertical distribution of bacteria and intensity of microbiological processes in two stratified gypsum Karst Lakes in Lithuania

    Krevs A.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Physical-chemical parameters and the vertical distribution of bacteria and organic matter production-destruction processes were studied during midsummer stratification in two karst lakes (Kirkilai and Ramunelis located in northern Lithuania. The lakes were characterized by high sulfate concentrations (369–1248 mg·L-1. The O2/H2S intersection zone formed at 2–3 m depth. In Lake Kirkilai, the highest bacterial densities (up to 8.7 × 106 cell·mL-1 occurred at the O2/H2S intersection zone, whereas in Lake Ramunelis the highest densities were observed in the anoxic hypolimnion (up to 11 × 106 cell·mL-1. Pigment analysis revealed that green sulfur bacteria dominated in the microaerobic–anaerobic water layers in both lakes. The most intensive development of sulfate-reducing bacteria was observed in the anaerobic layer. Photosynthetic production of organic matter was highest in the upper layer. Rates of sulfate reduction reached 0.23 mg S2−·dm3·d-1 in the microaerobic-anaerobic water layer and 1.97 mg S2−·dm3·d-1 in sediments. Karst lakes are very sensitive to organic pollution, because under such impact in the presence of high sulfate amounts, sulfate reduction may become very intensive and, consequently, the increase in hydrogen sulfide and development of sulfur cycle bacteria may reduce the variety of other hydrobionts.

  14. Green Nail Syndrome

    ... Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Green Nail Syndrome Share | Green nail syndrome (GNS) is an infection of the ... discoloration of nails, also known as chloronychia. The green discoloration varies from blue-green to dark green ...

  15. Behaviorally Green

    Sunstein, Cass; Reisch, Lucia A.

    2015-01-01

    or services and alternatives that are potentially damaging to the environment but less expensive? The answer may well depend on the default rule. Indeed, green default rules may be a more effective tool for altering outcomes than large economic incentives. The underlying reasons include the powers...... of suggestion, inertia, and loss aversion. If well-chosen, green defaults are likely to have large effects in reducing the economic and environmental harms associated with various products and activities. Such defaults may or may not be more expensive to consumers. In deciding whether to establish green...... defaults, choice architects should consider consumer welfare and a wide range of other costs and benefits. Sometimes that assessment will argue strongly in favor of green defaults, particularly when both economic and environmental considerations point in their direction. But when choice architects lack...

  16. Automatically Green

    Sunstein, Cass R.; Reisch, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    environmentally-friendly products or services and alternatives that are potentially damaging to the environment but less expensive? The answer may well depend on the default rule. Indeed, green default rules may well be a more effective tool for altering outcomes than large economic incentives. The underlying...... reasons include the power of suggestion; inertia and procrastination; and loss aversion. If well-chosen, green defaults are likely to have large effects in reducing the economic and environmental harms associated with various products and activities. Such defaults may or may not be more expensive...... to consumers. In deciding whether to establish green defaults, choice architects should consider both consumer welfare and a wide range of other costs and benefits. Sometimes that assessment will argue strongly in favor of green defaults, particularly when both economic and environmental considerations point...

  17. Automatically Green

    Sunstein, Cass R.; Reisch, Lucia

    environmentally-friendly products or services and alternatives that are potentially damaging to the environment but less expensive? The answer may well depend on the default rule. Indeed, green default rules may well be a more effective tool for altering outcomes than large economic incentives. The underlying...... reasons include the power of suggestion; inertia and procrastination; and loss aversion. If well-chosen, green defaults are likely to have large effects in reducing the economic and environmental harms associated with various products and activities. Such defaults may or may not be more expensive...... to consumers. In deciding whether to establish green defaults, choice architects should consider both consumer welfare and a wide range of other costs and benefits. Sometimes that assessment will argue strongly in favor of green defaults, particularly when both economic and environmental considerations point...

  18. Green Roofs

    None

    2004-08-01

    A New Technology Demonstration Publication Green roofs can improve the energy performance of federal buildings, help manage stormwater, reduce airborne emissions, and mitigate the effects of urban heat islands.

  19. Green Coffee

    ... can stimulate the body. Some medications used for depression can also stimulate the body. Taking green coffee and taking some medications for depression might cause too much stimulation and serious side ...

  20. Lunar Sulfur Capture System Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) is an innovative method to capture greater than 90 percent of sulfur gases evolved during thermal treatment of lunar soils....

  1. Lunar Sulfur Capture System Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) is an innovative method to recover sulfur compounds from lunar soil using sorbents derived primarily from in-situ resources....

  2. Green lasers

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2010-01-01

    Well over a dozen papers at this year's Photonics West meeting in San Francisco boasted improvements in harmonic generation to produce visible laser beams, most of them in the green spectral range......Well over a dozen papers at this year's Photonics West meeting in San Francisco boasted improvements in harmonic generation to produce visible laser beams, most of them in the green spectral range...

  3. Green Economics

    David Pearce

    1992-01-01

    Economists assume that people are fundamentally greedy, though not exclusively so. If environmental improvement is to be achieved, it will require policies that use selfishness rather than opposing it. Such policies are to be found in the basics of green economics in which market signals are modified by environmental taxes and tradeable pollution certificates to 'decouple' the economic growth process from its environmental impact. Green economic policies avoid the infringements of human liber...

  4. Accidents with sulfuric acid

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfuric acid is an important industrial and strategic raw material, the production of which is developing on all continents, in many factories in the world and with an annual production of over 160 million tons. On the other hand, the production, transport and usage are very dangerous and demand measures of precaution because the consequences could be catastrophic, and not only at the local level where the accident would happen. Accidents that have been publicly recorded during the last eighteen years (from 1988 till the beginning of 2006 are analyzed in this paper. It is very alarming data that, according to all the recorded accidents, over 1.6 million tons of sulfuric acid were exuded. Although water transport is the safest (only 16.38% of the total amount of accidents in that way 98.88% of the total amount of sulfuric acid was exuded into the environment. Human factor was the common factor in all the accidents, whether there was enough control of the production process, of reservoirs or transportation tanks or the transport was done by inadequate (old tanks, or the accidents arose from human factor (inadequate speed, lock of caution etc. The fact is that huge energy, sacrifice and courage were involved in the recovery from accidents where rescue teams and fire brigades showed great courage to prevent real environmental catastrophes and very often they lost their lives during the events. So, the phrase that sulfuric acid is a real "environmental bomb" has become clearer.

  5. Sulfur Dioxide Pollution Monitor.

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    The sulfur dioxide pollution monitor described in this document is a government-owed invention that is available for licensing. The background of the invention is outlined, and drawings of the monitor together with a detailed description of its function are provided. A sample stream of air, smokestack gas or the like is flowed through a…

  6. Characterization of Sulfur Compounds in MTBE

    Mingqing Wu; Chunyan Chang; Tao Li; Jian Zhou; Liping Zhao

    2015-01-01

    A study is carried out on chemical constitution of sulfur compounds in MTBE and their formation mechanisms. These sulfur compounds are classified into three types: common sulfur compounds, newly formed sulfur compounds, and high boiling sulfur compounds. Common sulfur compounds which include mercaptans, low molecule sulfides and disulfides, are directly from C4, one of the stocks for production of MTBE. The newly formed sulfur compounds, with one sulfur atom and five or more total carbon atom...

  7. SULFUR POLYMER ENCAPSULATION

    Sulfur polymer cement (SPC) is a thermoplastic polymer consisting of 95 wt% elemental sulfur and 5 wt% organic modifiers to enhance long-term durability. SPC was originally developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines as an alternative to hydraulic cement for construction applications. Previous attempts to use elemental sulfur as a construction material in the chemical industry failed due to premature degradation. These failures were caused by the internal stresses that result from changes in crystalline structure upon cooling of the material. By reacting elemental sulfur with organic polymers, the Bureau of Mines developed a product that successfully suppresses the solid phase transition and significantly improves the stability of the product. SPC, originally named modified sulfur cement, is produced from readily available, inexpensive waste sulfur derived from desulfurization of both flue gases and petroleum. The commercial production of SPC is licensed in the United States by Martin Resources (Odessa, Texas) and is marketed under the trade name Chement 2000. It is sold in granular form and is relatively inexpensive ((approx)$0.10 to 0.12/lb). Application of SPC for the treatment of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes was initially developed and patented by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in the mid-1980s (Kalb and Colombo, 1985; Colombo et al., 1997). The process was subsequently investigated by the Commission of the European Communities (Van Dalen and Rijpkema, 1989), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Darnell, 1991), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Mattus and Mattus, 1994). SPC has been used primarily in microencapsulation applications but can also be used for macroencapsulation of waste. SPC microencapsulation has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for a wide variety of wastes, including incinerator hearth and fly ash; aqueous concentrates such as sulfates, borates, and chlorides; blowdown solutions; soils; and sludges. It is not

  8. The Green of Green Functions

    Challis, Lawrie; Sheard, Fred

    2003-12-01

    In 1828, an English miller from Nottingham published a mathematical essay that generated little response. George Green's analysis, however, has since found applications in areas ranging from classical electrostatics to modern quantum field theory.

  9. Biotic and abiotic carbon to sulfur bond cleavage. Final report

    Frost, J.W.

    1994-05-01

    The microbial desulfurization of organosulfur compounds occurs by unprecedented and largely unexplored biochemical processes. A study of such biotic desulfurizations can be expected to give rise to new and useful chemistry and enzymology. The potential value of understanding and harnessing these processes is seen in relation to the need for methods for the removal of organically bound sulfur from coal and the degradation of organic sulfur-containing pollutants. This research effort has been directed towards an examination of desulfurization ability in well characterized microorganisms, the isolation of bacteria with desulfurization ability from natural sources, the characterization and mechanistic evaluation of the observed biocatalytic processes, the development of biomimetic synthetic organic chemistry based on biotic desulfurization mechanisms and the design and preparation of improved coal model compounds for use in microbial selection processes. A systematic approach to studying biodesulfurizations was undertaken in which organosulfur compounds have been broken down into classes based on the oxidation state of the sulfur atom and the structure of the rest of the organic material. Microbes have been evaluated in terms of ability to degrade organosulfur compounds with sulfur in its sulfonic acid oxidation state. These compounds are likely intermediates in coal desulfurization and are present in the environment as persistent pollutants in the form of detergents. It is known that oxygen bonded to sulfur lowers the carbon-sulfur bond energy, providing a thermodynamic basis for starting with this class of compounds.

  10. Microbially Mediated Kinetic Sulfur Isotope Fractionation: Reactive Transport Modeling Benchmark

    Wanner, C.; Druhan, J. L.; Cheng, Y.; Amos, R. T.; Steefel, C. I.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Microbially mediated sulfate reduction is a ubiquitous process in many subsurface systems. Isotopic fractionation is characteristic of this anaerobic process, since sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) favor the reduction of the lighter sulfate isotopologue (S32O42-) over the heavier isotopologue (S34O42-). Detection of isotopic shifts have been utilized as a proxy for the onset of sulfate reduction in subsurface systems such as oil reservoirs and aquifers undergoing uranium bioremediation. Reactive transport modeling (RTM) of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation has been applied to field and laboratory studies. These RTM approaches employ different mathematical formulations in the representation of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation. In order to test the various formulations, we propose a benchmark problem set for the simulation of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation during microbially mediated sulfate reduction. The benchmark problem set is comprised of four problem levels and is based on a recent laboratory column experimental study of sulfur isotope fractionation. Pertinent processes impacting sulfur isotopic composition such as microbial sulfate reduction and dispersion are included in the problem set. To date, participating RTM codes are: CRUNCHTOPE, TOUGHREACT, MIN3P and THE GEOCHEMIST'S WORKBENCH. Preliminary results from various codes show reasonable agreement for the problem levels simulating sulfur isotope fractionation in 1D.

  11. Antimicrobial effect of Malaysian vegetables against enteric bacteria

    Hassanain Al-Talib; Norliana Dalila Mohamad Ali; Mohamed Harreez Suhaimi; Siti Shafika Nabila Rosli; Nurul Huda Othman; Nur Ain Sakinah Mansor; Amira Kartini Sulaiman Shah; Nurul Syuhada Ariffin; Alyaa Al-Khateeb

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the antibacterial activities of green vegetables (pennywort, mint, garlic, parsley and celery) against four common enteric bacteria [Salmonella enterica (ATCC 25957) (S. enterica), Shigella flexneri (ATCC 12022) (S. flexneri), Escherichia coli (ATCC 43889) (E. coli) and Enterobacter cloacae (ATCC 13047) (E. cloacae)] as an alternative medicine for controlling food borne diarrhea disease and the synergistic effect of green vegetables against those bacteria. Methods...

  12. Reduced sulfur in euxinic sediments of the Cariaco Basin : Sulfur isotope contraints on organic sulfur formation

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Werne, J.; Lyons, T.W.; Hollander, D.J.; Formolo, M.

    2003-01-01

    Reduced sulfur accumulation in Holocene and latest Pleistocene euxinic marine sediments from the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela, was investigated to constrain the timing and possible pathways of organic matter (OM) sulfurization. Data were collected for a diverse suite of sulfur species, including concent

  13. Microbial ecology of halo-alkaliphilic sulfur bacteria

    Foti, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    The research of this thesis focussed on the investigation of the microbial diversity in soda lakes, giving a special attention to the micro-organisms involved in the sulphur cycle. The present PhD was part of a bigger project aiming to develop a biological process for the removal of hydrogen sulphid

  14. Genetically engineered acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria by bacteriophage transduction

    Ward, T.E.; Bruhn, D.F.; Bulmer, D.F.

    1989-05-10

    A bacteriophage capable of infecting acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria and processes for genetically engineering acidophilic bacteria for biomining or sulfur removal from coal are disclosed. The bacteriophage is capable of growth in cells existing at pH at or below 3.0. Lytic forms of the phage introduced into areas experiencing acid drainage kill the bacteria causing such drainage. Lysogenic forms of the phage having genes for selective removal of metallic or nonmetallic elements can be introduced into acidophilic bacteria to effect removal of the desired element from ore or coal. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Rumen bacteria

    The rumen is the most extensively studied gut community and is characterized by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interactions. This complex, mixed microbial culture is comprised of prokaryote organisms including methane-producing archaebacteria, eukaryote organisms, such as ciliate and flagellate protozoa, anaerobic phycomycete fungi and bacteriophage. Bacteria are predominant (up to 1011 viable cells per g comprising 200 species) but a variety of ciliate protozoa occur widely (104-106/g distributed over 25 genera). The anaerobic fungi are also widely distributed (zoospore population densities of 102-104/g distributed over 5 genera). The occurrence of bacteriophage is well documented (107-109 particles/g). This section focuses primarily on the widely used methods for the cultivation and the enumeration of rumen microbes, especially bacteria, which grow under anaerobic conditions. Methods that can be used to measure hydrolytic enzymes (cellulases, xylanases, amylases and proteinases) are also described, along with cell harvesting and fractionation procedures. Brief reference is also made to fungi and protozoa, but detailed explanations for culturing and enumerating these microbes is presented in Chapters 2.4 and 2.5

  16. Green banking

    Maja Drobnjaković

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need to march towards “low - carbon economy”. Global challenges of diminishing fossil fuel reserves, climate change, environmental management and finite natural resources serving an expanding world population - these reasons mean that urgent action is required to transition to solutions which minimize environmental impact and are sustainable. We are at the start of the low - carbon revolution and those that have started on their low - carbon journey already are seeing benefits such as new markets and customers, improved economic, social and environmental performance, and reduced bills and risks. Green investment banks offer alternative financial services: green car loans, energy efficiency mortgages, alternative energy venture capital, eco - savings deposits and green credit cards. These items represent innovative financial products.

  17. Metabolic Flexibility of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    Plugge, Caroline M.; Zhang, Weiwen; Scholten, Johannes C. M.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRB) are a very diverse group of anaerobic bacteria that are omnipresent in nature and play an imperative role in the global cycling of carbon and sulfur. In anoxic marine sediments sulfate reduction accounts for up to 50% of the entire organic mineralization in coastal and shelf ecosystems where sulfate diffuses several meters deep into the sediment. As a consequence, SRB would be expected in the sulfate-containing upper sediment layers, whereas me...

  18. Metabolomic study of Chilean biomining bacteria Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain Wenelen and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans strain Licanantay

    Martínez, Patricio; Gálvez, Sebastián; Ohtsuka, Norimasa; Budinich, Marko; Cortés, María Paz; Serpell, Cristián; Nakahigashi, Kenji; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Martínez, Servet; Maass, Alejandro; Parada, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we present the first metabolic profiles for two bioleaching bacteria using capillary electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. The bacteria, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain Wenelen (DSM 16786) and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans strain Licanantay (DSM 17318), were sampled at different growth phases and on different substrates: the former was grown with iron and sulfur, and the latter with sulfur and chalcopyrite. Metabolic profiles were scored from planktonic and sess...

  19. Green networking

    Krief, Francine

    2012-01-01

    This book focuses on green networking, which is an important topic for the scientific community composed of engineers, academics, researchers and industrialists working in the networking field. Reducing the environmental impact of the communications infrastructure has become essential with the ever increasing cost of energy and the need for reducing global CO2 emissions to protect our environment.Recent advances and future directions in green networking are presented in this book, including energy efficient networks (wired networks, wireless networks, mobile networks), adaptive networ

  20. Green times

    The authors, founding members of the ''Green Party'' have in mind to make a very personal contribution to a better understanding of the present political situation which, although it seems to have reached a deadlock, still offers positive chances and prospects. New approaches in policy are mentioned which may help to overcome the present state of resignation of many adolescents and adults. Among other things, they describe themselves setting out for new pathways, the ''Greens'' in Parliament, prospect for the future, opportunities of the ecologically oriented economic policy. Finally, they call upon the reader to think and develop further under the motto ''What we all can do''. (HSCH)

  1. The Metabolome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii following Induction of Anaerobic H2 Production by Sulfur Depletion*

    Timmins, Matthew; Zhou, Wenxu; Rupprecht, Jens; Lim, Lysha; Thomas-Hall, Skye R.; Doebbe, Anja; Kruse, Olaf; Hankamer, Ben; Marx, Ute C.; Smith, Steven M.; Schenk, Peer M.

    2009-01-01

    The metabolome of the model species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been analyzed during 120 h of sulfur depletion to induce anaerobic hydrogen (H2) production, using NMR spectroscopy, gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, and TLC. The results indicate that these unicellular green algae consume freshly supplied acetate in the medium to accumulate energy reserves during the first 24 h of sulfur depletion. In addition to the previously reported accumulation of starch, large amounts of ...

  2. Development of Efficient Flowsheet and Transient Modeling for Nuclear Heat Coupled Sulfur Iodine Cyclefor Hydrogen Production

    Shripad T. Revankar; Nicholas R. Brown; Cheikhou Kane; Seungmin Oh

    2010-05-01

    The realization of the hydrogen as an energy carrier for future power sources relies on a practical method of producing hydrogen in large scale with no emission of green house gases. Hydrogen is an energy carrier which can be produced by a thermochemical water splitting process. The Sulfur-Iodine (SI) process is an example of a water splitting method using iodine and sulfur as recycling agents.

  3. Sulfur oxidation genes in diverse deep-sea viruses.

    Anantharaman, Karthik; Duhaime, Melissa B; Breier, John A; Wendt, Kathleen A; Toner, Brandy M; Dick, Gregory J

    2014-05-16

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities in the oceans and a pervasive cause of mortality of microorganisms that drive biogeochemical cycles. Although the ecological and evolutionary effects of viruses on marine phototrophs are well recognized, little is known about their impact on ubiquitous marine lithotrophs. Here, we report 18 genome sequences of double-stranded DNA viruses that putatively infect widespread sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Fifteen of these viral genomes contain auxiliary metabolic genes for the α and γ subunits of reverse dissimilatory sulfite reductase (rdsr). This enzyme oxidizes elemental sulfur, which is abundant in the hydrothermal plumes studied here. Our findings implicate viruses as a key agent in the sulfur cycle and as a reservoir of genetic diversity for bacterial enzymes that underpin chemosynthesis in the deep oceans. PMID:24789974

  4. Mass-dependent sulfur isotope fractionation during reoxidative sulfur cycling

    Pellerin, André; Bui, Thi Hao; Rough, Mikaella;

    2015-01-01

    The multiple sulfur isotope composition of porewater sulfate from the anoxic marine sapropel of Mangrove Lake, Bermuda was measured in order to establish how multiple sulfur isotopes are fractionated during reoxidative sulfur cycling. The porewater-sulfate d34S and D33S dataset exhibits the...... distinct isotopic signatures of microbial sulfate reduction and sulfur reoxidation. We reproduced the measurements with a simple diagenetic model that yielded fractionation factors for net sulfate removal of between 29.2 0/00 and 32.5 0/00. A new approach to isotopic modeling of the sulfate profiles......, informed by the chemistry of sulfur intermediate compounds in Mangrove Lake, reveals that sulfate reduction produces a relatively small intrinsic fractionation and that an active reoxidative sulfur cycle increases the fractionation of the measured values. Based on the model results, the reoxidative cycle...

  5. Not everything green has green

    Last week (March 2009) Slovak government extended the preferential treatment of renewable energy. Companies that will produce electricity from biomass, water, wind, solar and underground thermal springs, have guaranteed that they will receive a decently paid at least the next 15 years. It promises them a new government bill on the promotion of renewable energy. So far, the State guaranteed the purchase of green power for only one year in advance. And because it is more expensive than electricity from coal or uranium, green investment firms feared. Fifteen guarantees give assurance. The government will guarantee only purchase green electricity, but also biomethane to produce heat. So, who wants an ordinary agrarian biogas from waste and adjust to such a gas. Slovak gas industry will have to buy it into its network. Biomethane is not in domestic terms only on paper.

  6. Lunar Sulfur Capture System

    Berggren, Mark; Zubrin, Robert; Bostwick-White, Emily

    2013-01-01

    The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) protects in situ resource utilization (ISRU) hardware from corrosion, and reduces contaminant levels in water condensed for electrolysis. The LSCS uses a lunar soil sorbent to trap over 98 percent of sulfur gases and about two-thirds of halide gases evolved during hydrogen reduction of lunar soils. LSCS soil sorbent is based on lunar minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that trap sulfur and halide gas contaminants in a fixed-bed reactor held at temperatures between 250 and 400 C, allowing moisture produced during reduction to pass through in vapor phase. Small amounts of Earth-based polishing sorbents consisting of zinc oxide and sodium aluminate are used to reduce contaminant concentrations to one ppm or less. The preferred LSCS configuration employs lunar soil beneficiation to boost concentrations of reactive sorbent minerals. Lunar soils contain sulfur in concentrations of about 0.1 percent, and halogen compounds including chlorine and fluorine in concentrations of about 0.01 percent. These contaminants are released as gases such as H2S, COS, CS2,HCl, and HF during thermal ISRU processing with hydrogen or other reducing gases. Removal of contaminant gases is required during ISRU processing to prevent hardware corrosion, electrolyzer damage, and catalyst poisoning. The use of Earth-supplied, single-use consumables to entirely remove contaminants at the levels existing in lunar soils would make many ISRU processes unattractive due to the large mass of consumables relative to the mass of oxygen produced. The LSCS concept of using a primary sorbent prepared from lunar soil was identified as a method by which the majority of contaminants could be removed from process gas streams, thereby substantially reducing the required mass of Earth-supplied consumables. The LSCS takes advantage of minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that are present in lunar soil to trap sulfur and halide gases in a fixedbed reactor

  7. Green pioneers.

    Trueland, Jennifer

    The government has set tough targets for the NHS in England to reduce its carbon footprint. In this article, nurses and managers at Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust explain how a programme of 'greening' initiatives - including a trial of electric cars for community staff - have slashed the trust's CO2 output. PMID:23763098

  8. Green marketing

    Kymlová, Šárka

    2009-01-01

    The thesis acquaints readers with the basic ideas of a new trend in marketing -- green marketing. It points out its particularities, historical evolution and potential application, including warning about common mistakes. The thesis aspires to bring an overview of the topic.

  9. Going Green

    2008-04-18

    This podcast is for a general audience and provides information on how to recycle, re-use, and restore. It also covers the benefits of “Going Green" on the environment, health, and social interaction.  Created: 4/18/2008 by National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH), ATSDR.   Date Released: 5/8/2008.

  10. Green Olympics

    2008-01-01

    @@ It seems all happened in a moment.White clouds float in blue sky,green trees are decorated by colorful flags with warm smiling images,and the building are taking a brand new appearance...Some magic must has been done to Beijing:it turns to a cleaner,healthier and more beautiful city.