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Sample records for glucose analogs measured

  1. PET measurement of glucose membrane transport using labeled analogs: Distinction of transport from metabolic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrier mediated glucose transport rates across brain capillary and myocardial cell membranes are many times higher than those expected for simple diffusion, and transport regulation can be an important determinant of tissue metabolic status. The authors have investigated the use of glucose analogs and dynamic positron tomography for the non-invasive measurement of unidirectional membrane transport rates. If analog extraction is sufficiently low, transport rates can be inferred directly from fitted kinetic rate constants. Fitting calculations were seen to be sensitive to the difficult to measure rapid components of the arterial input curves, to contributions from blood-borne label in the early data points, and to interference from other chemical forms in cases of significant phosphorylation. This last uncertainty was studied using serial scans of normal brain after venous injection of the well-transported but poorly phosphorylated analog 3-deoxy-3-fluoroglucose. Transport rate constants derived from 4-parameter fits of three hours of data were compared to those derived from 2-parameter fits of the first 12-20 minutes of data. Errors due to trapped label were absorbed primarily into the apparent distribution volume, allowing accurate estimation of transport rate constants from a brief data acquisition period. The study of the distinction of transport from phosphorylation also bears on the important question of the significance of the individual rate constants in the four-parameter fitting of brief dynamic scan sequences in studies of metabolic rate using 2-deoxy-2-fluoroglucose

  2. Liver kinetics of glucose analogs measured in pigs by PET: importance of dual-input blood sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, O L; Bass, L; Roelsgaard, K; Bender, D; Hansen, S B; Keiding, S

    2001-01-01

    parameters, because of ignorance of the dual blood supply from the hepatic artery and the portal vein to the liver. METHODS: Six pigs underwent PET after [15O]carbon monoxide inhalation, 3-O-[11C]methylglucose (MG) injection, and [18F]FDG injection. For the glucose scans, PET data were acquired for 90 min......Metabolic processes studied by PET are quantified traditionally using compartmental models, which relate the time course of the tracer concentration in tissue to that in arterial blood. For liver studies, the use of arterial input may, however, cause systematic errors to the estimated kinetic....... Hepatic arterial and portal venous blood samples and flows were measured during the scan. The dual-input function was calculated as the flow-weighted input. RESULTS: For both MG and FDG, the compartmental analysis using arterial input led to systematic underestimation of the rate constants for rapid blood...

  3. Measuring brain glucose phosphorylation with labeled glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, H E; Gjedde, A

    This study tested whether glucose labeled at the C-6 position generates metabolites that leave brain so rapidly that C-6-labeled glucose cannot be used to measure brain glucose phosphorylation (CMRGlc). In pentobarbital-anesthetized rats, the parietal cortex uptake of [14C]glucose labeled in the C...

  4. Measuring brain glucose phosphorylation with labeled glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study tested whether glucose labeled at the C-6 position generates metabolites that leave brain so rapidly that C-6-labeled glucose cannot be used to measure brain glucose phosphorylation (CMRGlc). In pentobarbital-anesthetized rats, the parietal cortex uptake of [14C]glucose labeled in the C-6 position was followed for times ranging from 10 s to 60 min. We subtracted the observed radioactivity from the radioactivity expected with no loss of labeled metabolites from brain by extrapolation of glucose uptake in an initial period when loss was negligible. The observed radioactivity was a monoexponentially declining function of the total radioactivity expected in the absence of metabolite loss. The constant of decline was 0.0077.min-1 for parietal cortex. Metabolites were lost from the beginning of the experiment. However, with correction for the loss of labeled metabolites, it was possible to determine an average CMRGlc between 4 and 60 min of circulation of 64 +/- 4 (SE; n = 49) mumol.hg-1.min-1

  5. Analog to Digital Conversion in Physical Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Kapitaniak, T.; Zyczkowski, K.; Feudel, U.; Grebogi, C. (C.)

    1999-01-01

    There exist measuring devices where an analog input is converted into a digital output. Such converters can have a nonlinear internal dynamics. We show how measurements with such converting devices can be understood using concepts from symbolic dynamics. Our approach is based on a nonlinear one-to-one mapping between the analog input and the digital output of the device. We analyze the Bernoulli shift and the tent map which are realized in specific analog/digital converters. Furthermore, we d...

  6. Positron emission tomographic measurements of cerebral glucose utilization using [1-11C]D-glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional CMRglc was measured in seven healthy volunteers with positron emission tomography using [1-11C]D-glucose. Regional CBF was measured using [11C]fluoromethane. The arteriovenous differences of unlabeled glucose and oxygen together with 11C metabolites were also measured. In addition to the loss of [11C]CO2, a loss of acidic 11C metabolites was also detected. A three-compartment model was applied to the tracer data in the time interval 0-24 min. After correction for the loss of 11C metabolites, the tracer method gave an average CMRglc of 26.4 +/- 1.9 (SD) mumol/100 g/min, close to the value obtained with the Fick principle. After correction for the loss of [11C]CO2 only, the tracer method gave 23.6 +/- 2.1 mumol/100 g/min, compatible with (1/6) CMRO2, obtained with the Fick principle. These results and the time course of the loss of acidic 11C metabolites are consistent with the presence of nonoxidative metabolism of glucose that causes an early loss of mainly [11C]lacetate after a bolus injection of the tracer. This implies that [1-11C]D-glucose measures the rate of glucose oxidation rather than the total CMRglc. The experiments using [1-11C]D-glucose were compared to five analogous experiments using [U-11C]D-glucose together with [15O]H2O as a flow tracer. After correction for the loss of [11C]CO2, the two glucose tracers gave similar global values of CMRglc and other parameters associated with glucose utilization, but with labeling in the carbon-1 position, the loss of [11C]CO2 was substantially delayed and the contrast between gray and white matter was improved

  7. A Comparative Study on the Antioxidant and Glucose-lowering Effects of Curcumin and Bisdemethoxycurcumin Analog through in vitro Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sivabalan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes has emerged as an epidemic affecting millions of people all over the world. Several research findings suggest that oxidative stress is the triggering factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Hyperglycemia and oxidative stress go hand in hand to accelerate the disease progression in a vicious cycle. In India, the medicinal herb Curcuma longa is used as a culinary food additive and also as a therapeutic agent for diabetes. Recent research evidenced that the curcuminoids present in Curcuma longa have several medicinal properties including anti-diabetic property. However, the bioavailability of curcumin is very less compared to its derivatives and its synthetic analogs. The synthetic analog of bisdemethoxycurcumin is reported to have increased bioavailability and stability but its effect on controlling oxidative stress, glucose absorption and gluconeogenesis have not yet been explored. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-oxidant and glucose lowering effects of bisdemethoxycurcumin analog (BDMCA in comparison with curcumin. Anti-oxidant activity of BDMCA and curcumin was evaluated by measuring the rate of inhibition of iron-ascorbate induced lipid peroxidation in liver homogenate in vitro. Effect of these drugs on intestinal glucose absorption in Wistar rats and on gluconeogenesis in liver homogenate in vitro was evaluated to know their glucose lowering effects. We found that both the BDMCA and curcumin lower the gluconeogenesis in the hepatocytes and function as antioxidants in vitro in a similar manner. Both BDMCA and curcumin delays the intestinal glucose absorption but BDMCA delays the intestinal glucose absorption more effectively compared to curcumin.

  8. Measurement of glucose and 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose transport and phosphorylation rates in myocardium using dual-tracer kinetic experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the use of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (2-FDG) as a glucose analog for measuring glucose utilization rate in myocardium, dual-tracer kinetic experiments with 2-FDG and 2-[3H]glucose were performed in the perfused, isolated rabbit interventricular septum to measure simultaneously the transport and phosphorylation rates of glucose and 2-FDG. Results of the present study indicated that, in the septum, (i) the transport rate constants of 2-FDG and glucose were similar in magnitude, (ii) the phosphorylation rate constant for 2-FDG was about 60% of that of glucose, (iii) hypoxia caused an increase in phosphorylation rates of glucose and 2-FDG without affecting transport. 9 refs.; 1 figure; 3 tabs

  9. Blood Glucose Measurement Using Bioimpedance Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Kamat, D. K.; Dhanashri Bagul; Patil, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Bioimpedance measurement is gaining importance in wide field of bioresearch and biomedical systems due to its noninvasive nature. Noninvasive measurement method is very important to decrease infection and physical injuries which result due to invasive measurement. This paper presents basic principle of bioimpedance along with its application for blood glucose analysis and effect of frequency on impedance measurement. Input from bioimpedance sensor is given to amplifier and signal conditioner ...

  10. Estimation of glucose utilization in a type 2 diabetes mellitus patient on insulin analogs with tumor hypoglycemia induced by IGF-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chode, Suresh; Albert, Stewart G; Shoemaker, James D; Green, Aileen L

    2016-02-01

    We present a 38-year-old male patient with insulin requiring type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) who had fasting hypoglycemia caused by a non-pancreatic-islet-cell mesenchymal tumor producing IGF-II. The evaluation was confounded in that there was pre-existing DM being treated with insulin analogs. Insulin levels were assessed with an immunoassay with cross reactivity with the insulin analogs. An 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) scan localized the 19.7×18.0×17.8cm retroperitoneal mass. A 3.25kg tumor was resected. Post-operatively insulin treatment was resumed and circulating IGF-II levels returned to normal. The maximum standardized uptake values of FDG (SUVmax) along with a steady state glucose infusion of 17.5g/h were used to determine the components of glucose utilization due to IGF-II induced muscle glucose uptake (utilization, 62%) whereas the tumor itself was responsible for approximately 22% of measurable glucose uptake. Whereas tumor induced hypoglycemia has been ascribed to preferential glucose utilization by the tumor, the predominant hypoglycemic effect was due to hormonal IGF-II induced total body glucose uptake. PMID:26774399

  11. Regulatory aspects of noninvasive glucose measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Steve; Bernhardt, Patricia; Pinkos, Arleen; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Knott, Thomas; Cooper, Jean

    2002-01-01

    The Medical Device Amendments of 1976 to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the Act) established three regulatory classes for medical devices. Section 513 of the Act specifies three classes based upon the degree of control and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversight that is necessary to assure that the various types of devices are safe and effective. High-risk devices are placed into the most regulated device class, Class III. Under Section 515 of the Act, all devices placed in Class III are subject to premarket approval (PMA) requirements. PMA by FDA is the required process of scientific review to ensure the safety and effectiveness of Class III devices. Advisory panel review is required of virtually all original submissions. Manufacturing facilities of devices requiring PMA approval are also subject to preapproval inspection to assure data integrity and compliance with good manufacturing practices. An approved PMA is granted for marketing a particular medical device for a particular intended use. FDA considers noninvasive and minimally invasive glucose devices that are intended to measure, monitor, or predict blood glucose levels in diabetics to be high-risk medical devices. These devices will have a significant potential impact on the medical care of people with diabetes. The technology offers potential improvements in the quality of life, enhanced blood glucose control through increased frequency of testing, or access to testing, in a broader range of patients. However, the technology is not yet well understood, and the information obtained from these devices is often different from the information that has been the traditional base for the management of diabetes. As a result, FDA requires both analytical and clinical studies to support the intended claims for these new devices. PMID:12685801

  12. Activity of P536, a UDP-glucose analog, against Trypanosoma cruzi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P536, a UDP-glucose analog which was previously described as an antiviral agent, has a potent and selective activity against the intracellular and extracellular stages of Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro. It had a 50% inhibitory concentration of less than 5 micrograms/ml for T. cruzi extracellular cultured forms (epimastigote) and of 25 micrograms/ml for T. cruzi intracellular forms (amastigote) growing inside J774G8 macrophage-like cells. In contrast, the 50% inhibitory concentration was 100 micrograms/ml or greater for cultured mammalian cells and 180 micrograms/ml for the proliferation of mouse spleen lymphocytes. Furthermore, the addition of P536 (50 micrograms/ml) to T. cruzi-infected J774G8 cells cured the infected macrophages, making them able to grow and function normally. Studies on the mechanism of action of this drug indicated that it inhibited incorporation of [35S]methionine, [3H]thymidine, [3H]mannose, [14C]-N-acetylglucosamine, and [3H]uridine into macromolecules by T. cruzi epimastigotes, the last being the most sensitive

  13. Importance of correction for intravascular radioactivity in dynamic PCT studies using glucose analogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, there has been considerable controversy concerning the accuracy of single scan approaches for estimating glucose metabolic rate. An alternative is to acquire a dynamic sequence of PCT data to estimate the individual rate constants of the conventional 4-parameters model. A model developed that accounts not only for the arterial blood radioactivity, but also for the venous blood radioactivity which itself depends on the local blood flow value, the individual plasma and RBC components of the blood radioactivity, the hematocrit, and the transport rate constants k/sub 1/ and k/sub 2/. Computer simulations predict overestimation in k/sub 1/, k/sub 2/ and k/sub 3/ of 30%, 40%, and 20%, respectively. The overestimation in the estimated metabolic rate, which is proportional to the term k/sub 1/k/sub 3//(k/sub 2/+k/sub 3/), was less than 16%. Parameter values for PCT studies on human subjects using 2-FDG and 3-FDG were evaluated with and without corrections for blood-horns radioactivity. Percent overestimations were similar for both analogs. Results from human studies are in good agreement with those predicted by computer simulation

  14. Interaction of uridine diphosphate glucose analogs with calf liver uridine diphosphate glucose dehydrogenase. Influence of substituents at C-5 of pyrimidine nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibaev, V N; Eliseeva, G I; Kochetkov, N K

    1975-09-22

    The interaction of alpha-D-glucopyranosyl pyrophosphates of 5-X-uridines (X = CH3, NH2, CH3O, I, Br, Cl, OH) with uridine diphosphate glucose (UDPGlc) dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.22) from calf liver has been studied. All the derivatives investigated were able to serve as substrates for the enzyme. The apparent Michaelis constants for UDPGlc-analogs were dependent both on electronic and steric factors. Increase of substituent negative inductive effect lead to decrease of pKa for ionization of the NH-group in the uracil nucleus and, consequently, to a diminishing of the proportion of the active analog species under the conditions of assay. After correction for the ionization effect, the Km values were found to depend on the van der Waals radius of the substituent. The value of 1.95 A seems to be critical, as the analogs with bulkier substituents at C-5 showed a decreased affinity to the enzyme. The maximal velocity values of the analogs were also dependent on nature of the substituent. Good linear correlation between log V and substituent hydrophobic phi-constant was observed for a number of the analogs, although V values for the nucleotides with X = H, OH or NH2 were higher than would be expected on the basis of the correlation. The significance of the results for understanding of the topography of UDPGlc dehydrogenase active site is discussed. PMID:1174552

  15. Testing and calibration of analog signal measuring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The routes of analog signals for measuring the temperature, amount and pressure of carbon dioxide in the reactor and for measuring the temperature of uranium in fuel elements are described. The manner and results of the measurement of interference voltages on the routes are described and the calculation is shown of the symmetrical RC filter for the suppression of the interference voltages. The measured results and the tests of the MT 100 converter resistance to interference voltages show that when an analog-to-digital converter of this type is used route filtration is unnecessary. (J.B.)

  16. An areal analog of Mahler’s measure

    OpenAIRE

    Pritsker, Igor E.

    2008-01-01

    We consider a version of height on polynomial spaces defined by the integral over the normalized area measure on the unit disk. This natural analog of Mahler's measure arises in connection with extremal problems for Bergman spaces. It inherits many nice properties such as the multiplicative one. However, this height is a lower bound for Mahler's measure, and it can be substantially lower. We discuss some similarities and differences between the two.

  17. Adaptation of a manometric biosensor to measure glucose and lactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Daniel M; Delwiche, Michael J

    2003-01-01

    A manometric sensor previously developed to measure urea was modified to measure glucose and lactose through enzymatic oxidation. Change in pressure in an enclosed cavity was correlated to the depletion of oxygen resulting from the enzymatic oxidation of glucose or lactose. The response of the sensor was linear and could be made adjustable over a large range by adjusting the amount of sample loaded into the fixed volume reactor. Because of the slow mutarotation of glucose, the oxidation of glucose was not allowed to proceed to completion. Therefore, the precision of the sensor (approximately 0.2 mM in a range from 0 to 5 mM) was limited by variations in the oxidation rate of glucose by glucose oxidase. Because the assay for lactose measured glucose subsequent to the hydrolysis of lactose by beta-galactosidase, the same degree of precision was observed in lactose. Milk lactose, typically at concentrations of about 150 mM, was estimated using the lactose assay after first diluting the samples. For many fluids such as milk, the use of manometric sensors for oxidizable substrates may be preferable to optical and electrochemical methods because they are robust and suffer a low degree of optical and chemical interferences. Glucose and lactose are representative of many important oxidizable substrates, which may be determined in this manner, many of which do not suffer from limitations caused by mutarotation. In theory, detection limits less than 1 microM may be achieved using these methods. PMID:12445450

  18. Contribution to a decision making model for analogical measurement validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In limits of studies taken on validity of analogic measures in nuclear power plant's operation, the present thesis takes aim at establishment of a model to reaching a decision on the indice of probability on measures obtained by preliminary validation system. In a first step, it is proposed to retain a system made by redundant measures in which the calcul of measures is based on the coherence between measures themselves and logic vote. In the second step, one equation is proposed to compute the index of probability of measures taken in account, the characteristics of the system

  19. Analogy between gambling and measurement-based work extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinkler, Dror A.; Permuter, Haim H.; Merhav, Neri

    2016-04-01

    In information theory, one area of interest is gambling, where mutual information characterizes the maximal gain in wealth growth rate due to knowledge of side information; the betting strategy that achieves this maximum is named the Kelly strategy. In the field of physics, it was recently shown that mutual information can characterize the maximal amount of work that can be extracted from a single heat bath using measurement-based control protocols, i.e. using ‘information engines’. However, to the best of our knowledge, no relation between gambling and information engines has been presented before. In this paper, we briefly review the two concepts and then demonstrate an analogy between gambling, where bits are converted into wealth, and information engines, where bits representing measurements are converted into energy. From this analogy follows an extension of gambling to the continuous-valued case, which is shown to be useful for investments in currency exchange rates or in the stock market using options. Moreover, the analogy enables us to use well-known methods and results from one field to solve problems in the other. We present three such cases: maximum work extraction when the probability distributions governing the system and measurements are unknown, work extraction when some energy is lost in each cycle, e.g. due to friction, and an analysis of systems with memory. In all three cases, the analogy enables us to use known results in order to obtain new ones.

  20. Blood-brain transport of new glucose analogs and their effect on yeast hexokinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dihalogen derivates of D-glucal were formed by the direct addition of halogen to the unsaturated double-bond between C atoms 1 and 2 in D-glucal. 82Br-glucal and 36Cl-glucal were injected into the carotid artery of rats and brain uptake studied and compared with uptake for D-glucose and 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Investigations with enzymes have shown D-glucal dihalides to be good substrates for hexokinase. (U.K.)

  1. Double-label autoradiographic deoxyglucose method for sequential measurement of regional cerebral glucose utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new double-label autoradiographic glucose analog method for the sequential measurement of altered regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose in the same animal is presented. This method is based on the sequential injection of two boluses of glucose tracer labeled with two different isotopes (short-lived 18F and long-lived 3H, respectively). An operational equation is derived which allows the determination of glucose utilization for the time period before the injection of the second tracer; this equation corrects for accumulation and loss of the first tracer from the metabolic pool occurring after the injection of the second tracer. An error analysis of this operational equation is performed. The double-label deoxyglucose method is validated in the primary somatosensory (''barrel'') cortex of the anesthetized rat. Two different rows of whiskers were stimulated sequentially in each rat; the two periods of stimulation were each preceded by an injection of glucose tracer. After decapitation, dried brain slices were first exposed, in direct contact, to standard X-ray film and then to uncoated, ''tritium-sensitive'' film. Results show that the double-label deoxyglucose method proposed in this paper allows the quantification and complete separation of glucose utilization patterns elicited by two different stimulations sequentially applied in the same animal. (author)

  2. IR spectroscopy vs. Raman scattering by measurement of glucose concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, O.; Hansmann, J.; Bolz, A.; Mertsching, H.

    2010-11-01

    By developing a non-invasive device for glucose concentration measurement, two promising methods were compared for that aim. The Raman scattering using Laser at the wavelength 785 nm and the light scattering in R- and IR-range are demonstrated. An easy accessible and low-cost method for glucose concentration monitoring and management to avoid its complications will be a great help for diabetic patients. Raman Scattering is a promising method for noninvasively measuring of glucose and for the diagnostic of pathological tissue variations. Despite the power and the time of measurement can be reduced using enhanced Raman scattering, it will be difficult to develop a compatible device with low power Laser and low price for a non-invasive method for home monitoring. As using IR-spectroscopy at wavelengths slightly below 10000 nm, the absorption of glucose can be well discriminated from that of water, LED`s or LD's at these wavelengths are very expensive for this purpose. At wavelengths about 6250 and 7700 glucose has a less light absorption than water. Also slightly above 3000 nm glucose has a high absorption. There are also possibilities for the measurement in the NIR at wavelengths between 1400 nm and 1670 nm. Scattering measurements at wavelengths below 900 nm and our measurements with the wavelength about 640 nm give reproducible glucose dependence on the reflected light from a glucose solution at a constant temperature. A multi-sensor with different wavelengths and temperature sensor will be a good choice for in-vivo glucose monitoring.

  3. A new application of electrical impedance spectroscopy for measuring glucose metabolism: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhurjaty, Sreeram; Qiu, Yuchen; Tan, Maxine; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Glucose metabolism relates to biochemical processes in living organisms and plays an important role in diabetes and cancer-metastasis. Although many methods are available for measuring glucose metabolism-activities, from simple blood tests to positron emission tomography, currently there is no robust and affordable device that enables monitoring of glucose levels in real-time. In this study we tested feasibility of applying a unique resonance-frequency based electronic impedance spectroscopy (REIS) device that has been, recently developed to measure and monitor glucose metabolism levels using a phantom study. In this new testing model, a multi-frequency electrical signal sequence is applied and scanned through the subject. When the positive reactance of an inductor inside the device cancels out the negative reactance of the capacitance of the subject, the electrical impedance reaches a minimum value and this frequency is defined as the resonance frequency. The REIS system has a 24-bit analog-to-digital signal convertor and a frequency-resolution of 100Hz. In the experiment, two probes are placed inside a 100cc container initially filled with distilled water. As we gradually added liquid-glucose in increments of 1cc (250mg), we measured resonance frequencies and minimum electrical signal values (where A/D was normalized to a full scale of 1V). The results showed that resonance frequencies monotonously decreased from 243kHz to 178kHz, while the minimum voltages increased from 405mV to 793mV as the added amount of glucose increased from 0 to 5cc. The study demonstrated the feasibility of applying this new REIS technology to measure and/or monitor glucose levels in real-time in future.

  4. A Miniature Graphene-based Biosensor for Intracellular Glucose Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a small and simple graphene-based potentiometric sensor for the measurement of intracellular glucose concentration. A fine borosilicate glass capillary coated with graphene and subsequently immobilized with glucose oxidase (GOD) enzyme is inserted into the intracellular environment of a single human cell. The functional groups on the edge plane of graphene assist the attachment with the free amine terminals of GOD enzyme, resulting in a better immobilization. The sensor exhibits a glucose-dependent electrochemical potential against an Ag/AgCl reference microelectrode which is linear across the whole concentration range of interest (10 – 1000 μM). Glucose concentration in human fat cell measured by our graphene-based sensor is in good agreement with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

  5. Miniatured blood glucose measurement module interfaced with cellular phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Byung-Gu; Park, Kyung-Soon; Kim, Seong-Sik; Park, Mi-Sook; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Lee, Tae-Soo; Cha, Eun-Jung

    2006-01-01

    Chronic diabetes requires systematic disease management that considers the patients' personal characteristics such as age and sex. The bureaucratic complexity of the Korean medical system lowers the efficiency of diabetes management. The present study developed a miniature blood glucose meter interfaced through the serial port of a cellular phone. The measured glucose level is displayed and efficiently managed by the customized GUI program run on the mobile platform. The present results demonstrate a new medical application example of mobile telecommunication technology. PMID:17102428

  6. An Integrated Analog Readout for Multi-Frequency Bioimpedance Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Kassanos, P.; Constantinou, L.; Triantis, I. F.; Demosthenous, A.

    2014-01-01

    Bioimpedance spectroscopy is used in a wide range of biomedical applications. This paper presents an integrated analog readout, which employs synchronous detection to perform galvanostatic multi-channel, multi-frequency bioimpedance measurements. The circuit was fabricated in a 0.35-μm CMOS technology and occupies an area of 1.52 mm2. The effect of random dc offsets is investigated, along with the use of chopping to minimize them. Impedance measurements of a known RC load and skin (using comm...

  7. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of boronate derivatives to determine glucose concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gable, J H

    2000-06-01

    A novel investigation into the fluorescence lifetimes of molecules, both established and newly designed, was performed. These molecules are the basis of a continuous, minimally invasive, glucose sensor based on fluorescence lifetime measurements. This sensor, if coupled with an automated insulin delivery device, would effectively create an artificial pancreas allowing for the constant monitoring and control of glucose levels in a person with diabetes. The proposed sensor includes a fluorescent molecule that changes its' fluorescence properties upon binding selectively and reversibly to glucose. One possible sensor molecule is N-methyl-N-(9-methylene anthryl)-2-methylenephenylboronic acid (AB). The fluorescence intensity of AB was shown to change in response to changing glucose concentrations. (James, 1994) James proposed that when glucose binds to AB the fluorescence intensity increases due to an enhancement of the N{yields}B dative bond which prevents photoinduced electron transfer (PET). PET from the amine (N) to the fluorophore (anthracene) quenches the fluorescence. The dative bond between the boron and the amine can prevent PET by involving the lone pair of electrons on the amine in interactions with the boron rather than allowing them to be transferred to the fluorophore. Results of this research show the average fluorescence lifetime of AB also changes with glucose concentration. It is proposed that fluorescence is due to two components: (1) AB with an enhanced N{yields}B interaction, and no PET, and (2) AB with a weak N{yields}B interaction, resulting in fluorescence quenching by PET. Lifetime measurements of AB as a function of both the pH of the solvent and glucose concentration in the solution were made to characterize this two component system and investigate the nature of the N{yields}B bond. Measurements of molecules similar to AB were also performed in order to isolate behavior of specific AB constituents. These molecules are 9-(Methylaminomethyl)-anthracene (MAMA), and N-benzyl-N-methyl-N-methyl anthracene (AB-B). Fluorescence lifetime measurements confirmed the two species of AB, with and without PET. Fluorescence lifetimes were approximately 11 nsec without PET and 3 nsec with PET. The degree of the interaction between the N and the B atoms was also determined by fluorescence lifetime measurements. Electron transfer rates of AB were measured to be on the order of 10{sup 8} sec{sup -1}. Analysis of AB as a glucose sensor shows it has the potential for measuring glucose concentrations in solution with less than 5% error. Two novel glucose sensing molecules, Chloro-oxazone boronate (COB) and Napthyl-imide boronate (NIB), were synthesized. Both molecules have a N{yields}B dative bond similar to AB, but with longer wavelength fluorophores. COB and NIB were found to be unacceptable for use as glucose sensor molecules due to the small changes in average fluorescence lifetime.

  8. Near-infrared spectral methods for noninvasively measuring blood glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Sun; Kong, Deyi; Mei, Tao; Tao, Yongchun

    2004-05-01

    Determination of blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients is a frequently occurring procedure and an important tool for diabetes management. Use of noninvasive detection techniques can relieve patients from the pain of frequent finger pokes and avoid the infection of disease via blood. This thesis discusses current research and analyzes the advantages and shortages of different measurement methods, including: optical methods (Transmission, Polarimetry and scattering), then, we give emphasis to analyze the technology of near-infrared (NIR) spectra. NIR spectral range 700 nm ~2300 nm was used because of its good transparency for biological tissue and presence of glucose absorption band. In this work, we present an outline of noninvasive blood glucose measurement. A near-infrared light beam is passed through the finger, and the spectral components of the emergent beam are measured using spectroscopic techniques. The device includes light sources having the wavelengths of 600 nm - 1800 nm to illuminate the tissue. Receptors associated with the light sources for receiving light and generating a transmission signal representing the light transmitted are also provided. Once a transmission signal is received by receptors, and the high and low values from each of the signals are stored in the device. The averaged values are then analyzed to determine the glucose concentration, which is displayed on the device.

  9. Noninvasive blood glucose measurement using multiple laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, E. T.; Zhang, X. Q.; Chen, J. H.; Soh, P. H.; Ng, K.; Yeo, J. H.

    2007-02-01

    In the event of diabetes clinicians have advocated that frequent monitoring of a diabetic's blood glucose level is the key to avoid future complications (kidney failure, blindness, amputations, premature death, etc.,) associated with the disease. While the test-strip glucose meters available in current consumer markets allow for frequent monitoring, a more convenient technique that is accurate, painless and sample-free is preferable in a diabetic's daily routine. This paper presents a non-invasive blood glucose measurement technique using diffuse reflectance near infrared (NIR) signals. This technique uses a set of laser diodes, each operating at fixed wavelengths in the first overtone region. The NIR signals from the laser diodes are channeled to the measurement site viz., the nail-bed by means of optical fibers. A series of in vivo experiments have been performed on eight normal human subjects using a standard Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) protocol. The reflected NIR signals are inputs to a Partial Least Squares (PLS) algorithm for calibration and future predictions. The calibration models used are developed using in vivo datasets and are unique to a particular individual. The 1218 paired points collected from the eight test subjects plotted on the Clarke Error Grid, revealed that 87.3% of these points fall within the A zone while the remainder, within the B zone, both of which, are clinically accepted. The standard error of prediction was +/-13.14mg/dL for the best calibration model. A Bland-Altman analysis of the 1218 paired points yields a 76.3% confidence level for a measurement accuracy of +/-20mg/dL. These results demonstrate the initial potential of the technique for non-invasive blood glucose measurements in vivo.

  10. Measurement of lactate formation from glucose using [6-3H]- and [6-14C]glucose in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the validity of determining the origin of plasma lactate from the ratio of lactate and glucose specific activities (SA) during infusion of labeled glucose, normal subjects received infusions of [6-3H]- and [6-14C]glucose for 4 h after a 12 h fast, and, on another day, cold glucose labeled with both tracers during 4-6 h of hyperinsulinemia (approximately 650 microU/ml). Basally, less lactate was derived from plasma glucose when measured with [6-3H]glucose (27 +/- 2%) than with [6-14C]glucose (40 +/- 2%, P less than 0.001). Insulin did not increase the percent of lactate derived from plasma glucose when measured with [6-3H]glucose (29 +/- 2%) but did increase when measured with [6-14C]glucose (60 +/- 4%). The arterialized blood (A) [3H]lactate SA was 30-40% higher (P less than 0.01) than deep venous blood (V) [3H]lactate SA, whereas A and V [14C]lactate SA were similar. During conversion of alanine to lactate with glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in vitro, 32 +/- 2% of 3H in [3-3H]alanine was found in water and 68 +/- 2% in lactate. During infusion of [6-3H]- and [6-14C]glucose, the ratio of [14C]alanine to lactate SA (0.88 +/- 0.05) was less than the ratio of [3H]alanine to lactate SA (0.31 +/- 0.03, P less than 0.001). In conclusion (1) loss of 3H relative to 14C from position 6 in glucose occurs during lactate formation in extrahepatic tissues possibly due to the GPT reaction (alanine conversion to pyruvate), and (2) even under supraphysiologic hyperinsulinemic conditions not all of plasma lactate originates from plasma glucose

  11. Glucose Measurement by Affinity Sensor and Pulsed Measurements of Fluidic Resistances: Proof of Principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Uwe; Wyss, Thomas; Robin, Franck; Heinemann, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Affinity sensors for glucose are based on a different measuring principle than the commercially available amperometric needle type sensors: reversible affinity interaction of glucose with specific receptors is the primary recognition mechanism instead of an enzymatic glucose oxidation. A novel pulsed-flow micro-fluidic system was used to characterize first the viscosity of a sensitive liquid containing the glucose receptor Concanavalin A and dextran and in a second approach to characterize the geometry of a fluidic resistance. In the viscometric sensor, glucose of the sensitive liquid is equilibrated, while passing through a dialysis chamber, with the surrounding medium. With the membrane flow sensor, the viscosity of the liquid remains constant but the pores of the flow-resisting membrane contain a swellable hydrogel affecting the width of the pores. Two types of hydrogel were tested with the membrane flow sensor; one is highly sensitive to pH and salt concentration, the other contains receptors of phenyl boronic acids to obtain sensitivity to glucose. The viscometric affinity sensor (first approach) showed a linear response over 0 to 30 mmol/L glucose concentration range. The disturbing effect of air bubbles could be compensated for. The sensing proof of principle of the second approach could be demonstrated by its linear response to different saline concentrations; however, the glucose-sensitive membrane developed showed only a small response to glucose. Glucose monitoring based on this pulsed flow measuring principle offers interesting alternatives for the development of CGM systems with different options for the glucose sensing part. PMID:24876545

  12. Investigation of [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose for the measure of myocardial glucose metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorine-18-labeled 2-deoxyglucose (FDG) was studied as a glucose analog for the measure of myocardial glucose metabolism. Myocardial uptake and retention, blood clearance, species dependence (dog, monkey, man), and effect of diet on uptake were investigated. Normal myocardial uptake of FDG was 3 to 4% of injected dose in dog and monkey, and 1 to 4% in man, compared with brain uptakes of 1.5 to 3% in dog, 5 to 6% in monkey, and 4 to 8% in man. The myocardial metabolic rate (MR) for glucose in the nonfasting (glycolytic) state was 2.8 times that in the fasting (ketogenic) state. Human subjects showed higher myocardial uptake after a normal meal than after a meal containing mostly free fatty acids (FFA). Blood clearance was rapid with initial clearance t/sub 1/2/ of 0.2 to 0.3 min, followed by a t/sub 1/2/ of 8.4 +- 1.2 min in dog and 11.6 +- 1.1 min in man. A small third component had half-times of 59 +- 10 min and 88 +- 4 min in dog and man, respectively. With the ECAT positron tomograph, high image-contrast ratios were found between heart and blood (dog 3.5/1, man 14/1), heart and lung (dog 9/1, man 20/1), and heart and liver (dog 15/1, man 10/1). The FDG was taken up rapidly by the myocardium without any significant tissue clearance over a 4-hr period. The FDG exhibited excellent imaging properties. Average counting rates of 12K, 20K, and 40K c/min-mCi injected are obtained in human subjects with high, medium, and low resolutions of the ECAT tomograph. Determination of glucose and FFA MR in vivo with EACT provides a method for investigation and assessment of changing aerobic and anaerobic metabolic rates in ischemic heart disease in man

  13. Investigation of (/sup 18/F)2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose for the measure of myocardial glucose metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, M.E.; Hoffman, E.J.; Selin, C.; Huang, S.C.; Robinson, G.; MacDonald, N.; Schelbert, H.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1978-12-01

    Fluorine-18-labeled 2-deoxyglucose (FDG) was studied as a glucose analog for the measure of myocardial glucose metabolism. Myocardial uptake and retention, blood clearance, species dependence (dog, monkey, man), and effect of diet on uptake were investigated. Normal myocardial uptake of FDG was 3 to 4% of injected dose in dog and monkey, and 1 to 4% in man, compared with brain uptakes of 1.5 to 3% in dog, 5 to 6% in monkey, and 4 to 8% in man. The myocardial metabolic rate (MR) for glucose in the nonfasting (glycolytic) state was 2.8 times that in the fasting (ketogenic) state. Human subjects showed higher myocardial uptake after a normal meal than after a meal containing mostly free fatty acids (FFA). Blood clearance was rapid with initial clearance t/sub 1/2/ of 0.2 to 0.3 min, followed by a t/sub 1/2/ of 8.4 +- 1.2 min in dog and 11.6 +- 1.1 min in man. A small third component had half-times of 59 +- 10 min and 88 +- 4 min in dog and man, respectively. With the ECAT positron tomograph, high image-contrast ratios were found between heart and blood (dog 3.5/1, man 14/1), heart and lung (dog 9/1, man 20/1), and heart and liver (dog 15/1, man 10/1). The FDG was taken up rapidly by the myocardium without any significant tissue clearance over a 4-hr period. The FDG exhibited excellent imaging properties. Average counting rates of 12K, 20K, and 40K c/min-mCi injected are obtained in human subjects with high, medium, and low resolutions of the ECAT tomograph. Determination of glucose and FFA MR in vivo with EACT provides a method for investigation and assessment of changing aerobic and anaerobic metabolic rates in ischemic heart disease in man.

  14. Modeling and Measurement of Correlation between Blood and Interstitial Glucose Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ting; Li, Dachao; Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Yiming; Xu, Kexin; Lu, Luo

    2016-01-01

    One of the most effective methods for continuous blood glucose monitoring is to continuously measure glucose in the interstitial fluid (ISF). However, multiple physiological factors can modulate glucose concentrations and affect the lag phase between blood and ISF glucose changes. This study aims to develop a compensatory tool for measuring the delay in ISF glucose variations in reference to blood glucose changes. A theoretical model was developed based on biophysics and physiology of glucose transport in the microcirculation system. Blood and interstitial fluid glucose changes were measured in mice and rats by fluorescent and isotope methods, respectively. Computer simulation mimicked curves were fitted with data resulting from fluorescent measurements of mice and isotope measurements of rats, indicating that there were lag times for ISF glucose changes. It also showed that there was a required diffusion distance for glucose to travel from center of capillaries to interstitial space in both mouse and rat models. We conclude that it is feasible with the developed model to continuously monitor dynamic changes of blood glucose concentration through measuring glucose changes in ISF with high accuracy, which requires correct parameters for determining and compensating for the delay time of glucose changes in ISF.

  15. Combined use of basal insulin analog and acarbose reduces postprandial glucose in patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ji-Hyun; Ahn, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Dae-Ho; Kim, Hye-Soon; Shon, Ho-Sang; Jeon, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Tae-Hwa; Cho, Yong-Wook; Kim, Jae-Taek; Han, Sung-Min; Chung, Choon-Hee; Ryu, Ohk-Hyun; Lee, Jae-Min; Lee, Soon-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Early initiation of basal insulin therapy is recommended for normalizing fasting blood glucose in type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, basal insulin treatment might not adequately control postprandial glucose levels. The present study evaluated whether the combination of the α-glucosidase inhibitor, acarbose, and basal insulin improved blood glucose control under daily-life treatment conditions in a large sample of Korean patients. Materials and Methods The present study was a...

  16. Development of a fluorescent method for simultaneous measurement of glucose concentrations in interstitial fluid and blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuous blood glucose monitoring is of great clinical significance to patients with diabetes. One of the effective methods to monitor blood glucose is to measure glucose concentrations of interstitial fluid (ISF). However, a time-delay problem exists between ISF and blood glucose concentrations, which results in difficulty in indicating real-time blood glucose concentrations. Therefore, we developed a fluorescent method to verify the accuracy and reliability of simultaneous ISF and blood glucose measurement, especially incorporating it into research on the delay relationship between blood and ISF glucose changes. This method is based on a competitive reaction among borate polymer, alizarin and glucose. When glucose molecules combine with borate polymers in alizarin–borate polymer competitively, changes in fluorescence intensity demonstrate changes in glucose concentrations. By applying the measured results to the blood and ISF glucose delay relationship, we were able to calculate the time delay as an average of 2.16 ± 2.05 min for ISF glucose changes with reference to blood glucose concentrations. (paper)

  17. Evaluation of the appropriateness of using glucometers for measuring the blood glucose levels in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togashi, Yu; Shirakawa, Jun; Okuyama, Tomoko; Yamazaki, Shunsuke; Kyohara, Mayu; Miyazawa, Ayumi; Suzuki, Takafumi; Hamada, Mari; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Glucometers are also widely used in diabetes research conducted using animal models. However, the appropriateness of measuring blood glucose levels using glucometers in animal models remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the consistency between the blood glucose levels measured by 11 models of glucometers and plasma glucose levels measured by a laboratory biochemical test in blood samples collected by retro-orbital sinus puncture or tail-tip amputation. In both blood samples obtained by retro-orbital sinus puncture and those obtained by tail-tip amputation, 10 of the 11 models of glucometers yielded higher glucose values, while 1 yielded lower glucose values, than the plasma glucose values yielded by the laboratory test, the differences being in direct proportion to the plasma glucose values. Most glucometers recorded higher blood glucose levels after glucose loading and lower blood glucose levels after insulin loading in retro-orbital sinus blood as compared to tail vein blood. Our data suggest that the blood glucose levels measured by glucometers in mice tended to be higher than the plasma glucose levels yielded by the biochemical test under the hyperglycemic state, and that differences in the measured levels were observed according to the blood collection method depending on the glycemia status. PMID:27151424

  18. Synthesis and characterization of 1-deoxy-β-D-glucopyranosyl-methanephosphonyl-5'-uridine monophosphate: a phosphono analog of UDP-glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phosphono analog of UDP-glucose (UDPG) has been synthesized as a first entry into potential dead-end inhibitors of glycosyltransferases using UDP-sugars such as UDP-glucuronyltransferase and possible alternative substrates for UDPG dehydrogenase and epimerase. 1-Deoxy-β-D-glucopyranosylmethanephosphonate (G-1-CH2P) was synthesized by modifications of literature procedures and characterized by 1H, 31P and 13C NMR. Condensation of G-1-CH2P with UMP morpholidate gave the expected phosphono analog of UDPG (UDPCH2G) in low yield. G-1-CH2P was found to be a substrate for UTP: glucose-1-phosphate pyrophosphoyrlase. Thus, UDPCH2G can be prepared enzymatically from G-1-CH2P and UTP by the coupled action of the pyrophosphoyrlase and inorganic pyrophosphatase. Preliminary evidence suggests UDPCH2G is a very poor substrate for UDPG dehydrogenase. Thus, efficient enzymatic synthesis of the phosphono analog (UDPCH2GA) of UDP-glucuronate appears unlikely

  19. Relationship between fluctuations in glucose levels measured by continuous glucose monitoring and vascular endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torimoto Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluctuations in blood glucose level cause endothelial dysfunction and play a critical role in onset and/or progression of atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that fluctuation in blood glucose levels correlate with vascular endothelial dysfunction and that this relationship can be assessed using common bedside medical devices. Methods Fluctuations in blood glucose levels were measured over 24 hours by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM on admission day 2 in 57 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The reactive hyperemia index (RHI, an index of vascular endothelial function, was measured using peripheral arterial tonometry (EndoPAT on admission day 3. Results The natural logarithmic-scaled RHI (L_RHI correlated with SD (r=−0.504; PPP=0.001 and percentage of time ≥200 mg/dl (r=−0.292; P=0.028. In 12 patients with hypoglycemia, L_RHI also correlated with the percentage of time at hypoglycemia (r=−0.589; P=0.044. L_RHI did not correlate with HbA1c or fasting plasma glucose levels. Furthermore, L_RHI did not correlate with LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels or with systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Finally, multivariate analysis identified MAGE as the only significant determinant of L_RHI. Conclusions Fluctuations in blood glucose levels play a significant role in vascular endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. Trial registration UMIN000007581

  20. Rapid post-oral stimulation of intake and flavor conditioning in rats by glucose but not a non-metabolizable glucose analog

    OpenAIRE

    Ackroff, Karen; Sclafani, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Mice adapted to drink a flavored saccharin solution (CS−) paired with intragastric (IG) self-infusions of water rapidly increase their intake of a new flavored solution (CS+) that is paired with IG glucose self-infusions. The present study extends this method to examine post-oral glucose appetition in rats. Food-restricted rats were trained to consume a CS− flavor (e.g., grape saccharin) paired with IG water in 5 daily 1-h tests. In the next 3 tests, they drank a CS+ (e.g., cherry saccharin) ...

  1. Application of novel notched long-period fiber grating for glucose concentration measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuan-Cheng; Wu, Janw-Wei; Chiang, Chia-Chin

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we propose using notched long-period fiber grating (NLPFG) fabricated by inductively coupled plasma etching for glucose concentration measurements. The experimental results show that the wavelengths varied linearly with differing glucose concentrations. The sensitivity of the NLPFG glucose concentration sensor is -0.147 nm/wt % from 0-40 wt % and the linearity (R2) is 0.938. The results demonstrate that the proposed NLPFG has potential for high-sensitivity glucose concentration sensor applications.

  2. Differential half-maximal effects of human insulin and its analogs for in situ glucose transport and protein synthesis in rat soleus muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Randi B.; Eleid, Noura; LeCesne, Catherine; Durando, Bianca; Crawford, Julie T.; Heffner, Michelle; Layton, Christle; O'Keefe, Matthew; Robinson, Jennifer; Rudinsky, Suzy; Henriksen, Erik J.; Tischler, Marc E.

    2002-01-01

    Analogs of human insulin have been used to discriminate between responses of metabolic and mitogenic (growth-related) pathways. This study compared the stimulatory effects of human insulin (HI) and 2 analogs (X2, B-Asp(9), B-Glu(27) and H2, A-His(8),B-His(4),B-Glu(10), B-His(27)) on glucose uptake and protein synthesis in rat soleus muscle in situ. Glucose uptake, estimated by intramuscular (IM) injection of 2-deoxy[1,2-3H]glucose with or without insulin, was maximally increased at 10(-6) mol/L for HI and X2 and 10(-7) mol/L for H2. HI had a larger effect (318%) than either X2 (156%) or H2 (124%). The half-maximal effect (ED(50)) values for HI, X2, and H2 were 3.3 x10(-8) mol/L, 1.7 x 10(-7) mol/L, and 1.6 x 10(-9) mol/L, respectively. Protein synthesis, estimated by protein incorporation of [(3)H]phenylalanine injected into muscles with or without insulin, was maximally increased at 10(-5) mol/L for HI and 10(-6) for X2 and H2. HI had a larger effect in stimulating protein synthesis (34%) than either X2 (25%) or H2 (19.8%). The ED(50) values for HI, X2, and H2 were 3.0 x 10(-7) mol/L, 3.2 x 10(-7) mol/L, and 1.0 x 10(-9) mol/L, respectively. The biological potency of each analog (ED(50)insulin/ED(50)analog) showed X2 to be less potent than HI for both glucose uptake (0.2) and protein synthesis (0.9), whereas H2 is more potent than HI with ratios of 20 and 300, respectively. These data suggest that this approach for studying insulin responsiveness in a single muscle in situ may be a useful tool for investigating insulin signaling in muscle in vivo. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  3. Blood glucose measurement by glucometer in comparison with standard method in diagnosis of neonatal hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayeri, Fatemeh; Shariat, Mamak; Mousavi Behbahani, Hamid Modarres; Dehghan, Padideh; Ebrahim, Bita

    2014-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is considered as a serious risk factor in neonates. In the majority of cases, it occurs with no clinical symptoms. Accordingly, early diagnosis is extremely imperative, which can also lead to less morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the importance of screening blood glucose using glucometer (known as a quick and cost-effective diagnostic test) in comparison with laboratory method. A total of 219 neonates at risk of hypoglycemia were included in this study. Blood glucose was measured by glucometer and laboratory. In addition glucose level of capillary blood was measured by glucometer at the same time. Sensitivity and specificity of capillary blood glucose measurement by glucometer were 83.5%, 97.5% respectively (ppv=80%), (npv=98%). Capillary blood glucose measured by glucometer has an acceptable sensitivity and specificity in measurement of neonatal blood glucose. Therefore measurement by glucometer is recommended as a proper diagnostic test. PMID:25149886

  4. Blood glucose measurement by glucometer in comparison with standard method in diagnosis of neonatal hypoglycemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Nayeri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypoglycemia is considered as a serious risk factor in neonates. In the majority of cases, it occurs with no clinical symptoms. Accordingly, early diagnosis is extremely imperative, which can also lead to less morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the importance of screening blood glucose using glucometer (known as a quick and cost-effective diagnostic test in comparison with laboratory method. A total of 219 neonates at risk of hypoglycemia were included in this study. Blood glucose was measured by glucometer and laboratory. In addition glucose level of capillary blood was measured by glucometer at the same time. Sensitivity and specificity of capillary blood glucose measurement by glucometer were 83.5%, 97.5% respectively (ppv=80%, (npv=98%. Capillary blood glucose measured by glucometer has an acceptable sensitivity and specificity in measurement of neonatal blood glucose. Therefore measurement by glucometer is recommended as a proper diagnostic test.

  5. Insulin analogs

    OpenAIRE

    Emily Chu; Nicole Meinel; Martin Gilmour

    2012-01-01

    The fear of hypoglycemia that people with diabetes experience is a factor in non-adherence to insulin therapy, which can adversely affect glycemic control and increase the risk of diabetes-associated complications. Insulin analogs are modified forms of human insulin designed to mimic endogenous insulin secretion, and may therefore help to reduce the risk and severity of hypoglycemia. While much evidence exists to demonstrate the efficacy of insulin analogs in blood glucose control, the effect...

  6. Combined use of basal insulin analog and acarbose reduces postprandial glucose in patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Hyun; Ahn, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Dae-Ho; Kim, Hye-Soon; Shon, Ho-Sang; Jeon, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Tae-Hwa; Cho, Yong-Wook; Kim, Jae-Taek; Han, Sung-Min; Chung, Choon-Hee; Ryu, Ohk-Hyun; Lee, Jae-Min; Lee, Soon-Hee; Kwon, Min-Jeong; Kim, Tae-kyun; Namgoong, Il-Seong; Kim, Eun-Sook; Jung, In-Kyung; Moon, Sung-Dae; Han, Je-Ho; Kim, Chong-Hwa; Cho, Eun-Hee; Kim, Ki-Young; Park, Hee-Baek; Lee, Ki-Sang; Lee, Sung-Woo; Lee, Sang-Cheol; Kang, Cheol-Min; Jeon, Byung-Sook; Song, Min-Seop; Yun, Seung-Baik; Chung, Hyung-Keun; Seong, Jong-Ho; Jeong, Jin-Yi; Cha, Bong-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Early initiation of basal insulin therapy is recommended for normalizing fasting blood glucose in type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, basal insulin treatment might not adequately control postprandial glucose levels. The present study evaluated whether the combination of the α-glucosidase inhibitor, acarbose, and basal insulin improved blood glucose control under daily-life treatment conditions in a large sample of Korean patients. Materials and Methods The present study was a multicenter, prospective, observational study under daily-life treatment conditions. A total of 539 patients with type 2 diabetes who were treated with basal insulin and additional acarbose were enrolled and followed up for 20 weeks. Changes in hemoglobin A1c, fasting and postprandial blood glucose were evaluated at baseline and at the end of the observation period. The physician and patient satisfaction of the combination treatment and safety were assessed. Results Hemoglobin A1c decreased by 0.55 ± 1.05% from baseline (P < 0.0001). Fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels were reduced by 0.89 ± 3.79 and 2.59 ± 4.77 mmol/L (both P < 0.0001). The most frequently reported adverse drug reactions were flatulence (0.37%) and abnormal gastrointestinal sounds (0.37%), and all were mild in intensity and transient. In the satisfaction evaluation, 79.0% of physicians and 77.3% of patients were ‘very satisfied’ or ‘satisfied’ with the combined basal insulin and acarbose therapy. Conclusions Combination therapy of basal insulin and acarbose in patients with type 2 diabetes improved glucose control, and had no drug-specific safety concerns, suggesting that the treatment might benefit individuals who cannot control blood glucose with basal insulin alone. PMID:25802730

  7. Glycolysis-induced discordance between glucose metabolic rates measured with radiolabeled fluorodeoxyglucose and glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed an autoradiographic method for estimating the oxidative and glycolytic components of local CMRglc (LCMRglc), using sequentially administered [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and [14C]-6-glucose (GLC). FDG-6-phosphate accumulation is proportional to the rate of glucose phosphorylation, which occurs before the divergence of glycolytic (GMg) and oxidative (GMo) glucose metabolism and is therefore related to total cerebral glucose metabolism GMt: GMg + GMo = GMt. With oxidative metabolism, the 14C label of GLC is temporarily retained in Krebs cycle-related substrate pools. We hypothesize that with glycolytic metabolism, however, a significant fraction of the 14C label is lost from the brain via lactate production and efflux from the brain. Thus, cerebral GLC metabolite concentration may be more closely related to GMo than to GMt. If true, the glycolytic metabolic rate will be related to the difference between FDG- and GLC-derived LCMRglc. Thus far, we have studied normal awake rats, rats with limbic activation induced by kainic acid (KA), and rats visually stimulated with 16-Hz flashes. In KA-treated rats, significant discordance between FDG and GLC accumulation, which we attribute to glycolysis, occurred only in activated limbic structures. In visually stimulated rats, significant discordance occurred only in the optic tectum

  8. Glycolysis-induced discordance between glucose metabolic rates measured with radiolabeled fluorodeoxyglucose and glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, R.F.; Lear, J.L. (UCLA School of Medicine (USA))

    1989-12-01

    We have developed an autoradiographic method for estimating the oxidative and glycolytic components of local CMRglc (LCMRglc), using sequentially administered ({sup 18}F)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and ({sup 14}C)-6-glucose (GLC). FDG-6-phosphate accumulation is proportional to the rate of glucose phosphorylation, which occurs before the divergence of glycolytic (GMg) and oxidative (GMo) glucose metabolism and is therefore related to total cerebral glucose metabolism GMt: GMg + GMo = GMt. With oxidative metabolism, the {sup 14}C label of GLC is temporarily retained in Krebs cycle-related substrate pools. We hypothesize that with glycolytic metabolism, however, a significant fraction of the {sup 14}C label is lost from the brain via lactate production and efflux from the brain. Thus, cerebral GLC metabolite concentration may be more closely related to GMo than to GMt. If true, the glycolytic metabolic rate will be related to the difference between FDG- and GLC-derived LCMRglc. Thus far, we have studied normal awake rats, rats with limbic activation induced by kainic acid (KA), and rats visually stimulated with 16-Hz flashes. In KA-treated rats, significant discordance between FDG and GLC accumulation, which we attribute to glycolysis, occurred only in activated limbic structures. In visually stimulated rats, significant discordance occurred only in the optic tectum.

  9. Glycolysis-induced discordance between glucose metabolic rates measured with radiolabeled fluorodeoxyglucose and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, R F; Lear, J L

    1989-12-01

    We have developed an autoradiographic method for estimating the oxidative and glycolytic components of local CMRglc (LCMRglc), using sequentially administered [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and [14C]-6-glucose (GLC). FDG-6-phosphate accumulation is proportional to the rate of glucose phosphorylation, which occurs before the divergence of glycolytic (GMg) and oxidative (GMo) glucose metabolism and is therefore related to total cerebral glucose metabolism GMt: GMg + GMo = GMt. With oxidative metabolism, the 14C label of GLC is temporarily retained in Krebs cycle-related substrate pools. We hypothesize that with glycolytic metabolism, however, a significant fraction of the 14C label is lost from the brain via lactate production and efflux from the brain. Thus, cerebral GLC metabolite concentration may be more closely related to GMo than to GMt. If true, the glycolytic metabolic rate will be related to the difference between FDG- and GLC-derived LCMRglc. Thus far, we have studied normal awake rats, rats with limbic activation induced by kainic acid (KA), and rats visually stimulated with 16-Hz flashes. In KA-treated rats, significant discordance between FDG and GLC accumulation, which we attribute to glycolysis, occurred only in activated limbic structures. In visually stimulated rats, significant discordance occurred only in the optic tectum. PMID:2584274

  10. Insulin analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Chu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The fear of hypoglycemia that people with diabetes experience is a factor in non-adherence to insulin therapy, which can adversely affect glycemic control and increase the risk of diabetes-associated complications. Insulin analogs are modified forms of human insulin designed to mimic endogenous insulin secretion, and may therefore help to reduce the risk and severity of hypoglycemia. While much evidence exists to demonstrate the efficacy of insulin analogs in blood glucose control, the effects on the incidence of severe hypoglycemia are less clear. This treatment review presents recent studies investigating the effects of insulin analogs on the frequency of hypoglycemia.

  11. Measurement of the glucose concentration in human urine with optical refractometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rui-Yang; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Meng, Ching-Tang; Cheng, Chih-Ching; Liao, Yu-Ching

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a new type of human urine glucose measurement system is proposed. We measured the phase variation of human urine with/without glucose-urine mixture (to simulate diabetes mellitus). We were able to achieve high resolution with the proposed method. The relation curve between the phase difference and glucose concentration can be estimated, and the glucose concentration of a urine sample can be determined by using this relation curve. The proposed method showed that theoretical resolution is approximated of 1.47 mg/dl.

  12. Analog voltmeter for measuring oxygen concentration in fast reactor sodium circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analog voltmeter designed for oxygen concentration measurement in the sodium coolant of fast reactors and thus the determination of oxygen corrosion action on the reactor core materials was tested in a sodium loop. The oxygen concentration is determined from the measurements of voltage across a solid electrolyte galvanic cell and of ambient temperature measured by a thermocouple. Thermocouple voltage ranges within 10 and 21 mV while the input from the galvanic cell within 0.2 and 0.45 V. The measured values of both quantities are combined at the analog voltmeter output according to a certain relation shown and give oxygen concentration. (Z.M.)

  13. Picosecond time measurement using ultra fast analog memories

    OpenAIRE

    Breton, D.; Delagnes, E.; Maalmi, J.

    2009-01-01

    The currently existing electronics dedicated to precise time measurement is mainly based on the use of constant fraction discriminators (CFD) associated with Time to Digital Converters (TDC). The constant fraction technique minimizes the time walk effect (dependency of timing on the pulse amplitude). Several attempts have been made to integrate CFD in multi-channel ASICs. But the time resolution measured on the most advanced one is of the order of 30 ps rms. Two main techniques are used for t...

  14. Development of reconfigurable analog and digital circuits for plasma diagnostics measurement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In long pulse discharge tokamak, a large number of diagnostic channels are being used to understand the complex behavior of plasma. Different diagnostics demand different types of analog and digital processing for plasma parameters measurement. This leads to variable requirements of signal processing for diagnostic measurement. For such types of requirements, we have developed hardware with reconfigurable electronic devices, which provide flexible solution for rapid development of measurement system. Here the analog processing is achieved by Field Programmable Analog Array (FPAA) integrated circuit while reconfigurable digital devices (CPLD/FPGA) achieve digital processing. FPAA's provide an ideal integrated platform for implementing low to medium complexity analog signal processing. With dynamic reconfigurability, the functionality of the FPAA can be reconfigured in-system by the designer or on the fly by a microprocessor. This feature is quite useful to manipulate the tuning or the construction of any part of the analog circuit without interrupting operation of the FPAA, thus maintaining system integrity. The hardware operation control logic circuits are configured in the reconfigurable digital devices (CPLD/FPGA) to control proper hardware functioning. These reconfigurable devices provide the design flexibility and save the component space on the board. It also provides the flexibility for various setting through software. The circuit controlling commands are either issued by computer/processor or generated by circuit itself. (author)

  15. Measure and category a survey of the analogies between topological and measure spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Oxtoby, John C

    1980-01-01

    In this edition, a set of Supplementary Notes and Remarks has been added at the end, grouped according to chapter. Some of these call attention to subsequent developments, others add further explanation or additional remarks. Most of the remarks are accompanied by a briefly indicated proof, which is sometimes different from the one given in the reference cited. The list of references has been expanded to include many recent contributions, but it is still not intended to be exhaustive. John C. Oxtoby Bryn Mawr, April 1980 Preface to the First Edition This book has two main themes: the Baire category theorem as a method for proving existence, and the "duality" between measure and category. The category method is illustrated by a variety of typical applications, and the analogy between measure and category is explored in all of its ramifications. To this end, the elements of metric topology are reviewed and the principal properties of Lebesgue measure are derived. It turns out that Lebesgue integration is not es...

  16. Multiple Silicon Nanowires with Enzymatic Modification for Measuring Glucose Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chih Hsu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study fabricated a multiple poly-Si nanowires sensor through a top-down method and immobilized glucose oxidase on the multiple nanowires for determining glucose concentration. The proposed sensor is 340 nm in width and uses five physically identical and parallel nanowires. The sensor contained nanowires of various lengths (3, 5, and 10 μm. Experimental results showed that sensor sensitivity is inversely proportional to nanowire length. The sensor with 3 μm in nanowire length exhibited a theoretical resolution of 0.003 mg/dL and the highest sensitivity of 0.03 μA/(mg/dL. Furthermore, the proposed sensor retains this performance when reused for up to 10 applications.

  17. Measurement of deuterium-labeled glucose flux in newborn infants by the continuous isotope infusion technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although hypoglycemia is a frequent neonatal problem, direct estimates of glucose turnover in newborn infants have not been possible before the advent of practical, stable isotope microtechniques. Using the well-established constant isotopic infusion procedure, glucose flux has been measured in newborn infants for the first time with the metabolically non-recycling tracer, glucose-6,6-d2. Nineteen infants from 650 to 4330 grams (25 to 44 weeks gestation) were studied at various times during the first week of postnatal life. 100 to 200 microliter capillary blood samples, obtained at appropriate intervals during the course of a 150 to 240 minute infusion of dideuterioglucose, were processed by rapid ion exchange purification and the glucose converted to the 6-0-acetyl-1,2 : 3,5-di-O-(n-butane-boronyl)-α-D-glucofuranose derivative for subsequent measurement of isotopic enrichment by combined GC-MS with selected ion recording using an AVA:Voltage Sweeping circuit. Glucose flux rates were calculated by steady-state equations, where appropriate, or by non steady-state approximations when blood glucose concentration and/or glucose isotopic enrichment changed during the course of the investigation. Total glucose flux ranged from 3 to 43 mg/min (3.7 to 11.1 mg/kg.min) and was directly correlated with body weight, estimated brain weight, and average blood sugar concentration during the course of the study. These data agree closely with previous indirect estimates of glucose metabolism in the newborn period and represent the first direct measurements of new glucose production and utilization in the human neonate

  18. Measurements of serum glucose using the luciferin/Luciferase system and a liquid scintillation spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single-step assay for serum glucose measurements is described. The assay is based on the phosphorylation of D-glucose by glucokinase and the measurement of ATP consumption by firefly luciferase. The luminescence is recorded in an ordinary liquid scintillation spectrometer. The use of stable reagents and a stable final signal (light emission) makes it possible to analyze a large number of samples in each assay run. The assay is of particular value when repeated serum glucose determinations are performed on samples from small laboratory animals

  19. The measurement of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic function and glucose metabolism in patients with movement disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nigrostriatal dopaminergic function and glucose metabolism were evaluated in 34 patients with various movement disorders by using positron emission tomography with 18F-Dopa and 18F-FDG respectively. The 18F-Dopa uptake in the striatum (the caudate head and the putamen) decreased in patients with Parkinson's disease but was relatively unaffected in the caudate. The cerebral glucose metabolism was normal in patients with Parkinson's disease. The 18F-Dopa uptake in the striatum also decreased in cases of atypical parkinsonism and in cases of progressive supranuclear palsy, but there was no difference in the uptake between the caudate and the putamen. The glucose metabolism decreased in the cerebral hemisphere including the striatum; this finding was also different from those of Parkinson's disease. A normal 18F-Dopa uptake in the striatum with a markedly decreased striatal glucose metabolism and a mildly decreased cortical glucose metabolism was observed in cases of Huntington's disease and Wilson's disease. The 18F-Dopa uptake in the striatum increased and the glucose metabolism was normal in cases of idiopathic dystonia. Various patterns of 18F-Dopa uptake and glucose metabolism were thus observed in the various movement disorders. These results suggest that the measurements of the 18F-Dopa uptake and the cerebral glucose metabolism would be useful for the evaluation of the striatal function in various movement disorders. (author)

  20. An optofluidic system with volume measurement and surface plasmon resonance sensor for continuous glucose monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dachao; Lu, Bingyu; Zhu, Rui; Yu, Haixia; Xu, Kexin

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technology of glucose monitoring is painful and invasive because of the frequent blood collection. Nowadays, the enzyme electrode sensor is mainly used for continuous glucose monitoring in clinic, but it has inherent disadvantages of significant signal drift of current due to bioelectricity in body and the missing of hypoglycemia resulting from the irreversible consumption of glucose at the process of enzyme catalytic reaction. Interstitial fluid (ISF) transdermal extraction can be nearly unsensible which effectively reduces the pain caused by invasive detection so that it may provide a new way to monitor glucose. MEMS technology has been used to produce devices for transdermal ISF extraction, but there is a lack of on-chip ISF volume measurement capabilities, which are required to compensate skin permeability variations. This paper presents a lab-on-a-chip system for ISF transdermal extraction, ISF volume measurement, and optical glucose sensing towards the application of continuous glucose monitoring. The device significantly incorporates a MEMS volume sensor, which measures extracted ISF volume via conductance monitoring, and integrates a fiber-optic surface plasmon resonance sensor to measure glucose concentration in microchannel. The fiber-based technique provides an excellent approach to overcome the above two drawbacks of the enzyme electrode based glucose sensing. Six different volumes were tested, and the standard deviation of every sample is less than 0.05??l, The resonance wavelength moves from 549.081?nm to 592.914?nm while the concentration ranges from 0 to 200?mg/dl. The feasibility of the single-chip device for accurate and continuous monitoring of subcutaneous ISF glucose concentrations is verified. PMID:26958100

  1. Measurement of tissue optical properties with optical coherence tomography: Implication for noninvasive blood glucose concentration monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larin, Kirill V.

    Approximately 14 million people in the USA and more than 140 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes mellitus. The current glucose sensing technique involves a finger puncture several times a day to obtain a droplet of blood for analysis. There have been enormous efforts by many scientific groups and companies to quantify glucose concentration noninvasively using different optical techniques. However, these techniques face limitations associated with low sensitivity, accuracy, and insufficient specificity of glucose concentrations over a physiological range. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), a new technology, is being applied for noninvasive imaging in tissues with high resolution. OCT utilizes sensitive detection of photons coherently scattered from tissue. The high resolution of this technique allows for exceptionally accurate measurement of tissue scattering from a specific layer of skin compared with other optical techniques and, therefore, may provide noninvasive and continuous monitoring of blood glucose concentration with high accuracy. In this dissertation work I experimentally and theoretically investigate feasibility of noninvasive, real-time, sensitive, and specific monitoring of blood glucose concentration using an OCT-based biosensor. The studies were performed in scattering media with stable optical properties (aqueous suspensions of polystyrene microspheres and milk), animals (New Zealand white rabbits and Yucatan micropigs), and normal subjects (during oral glucose tolerance tests). The results of these studies demonstrated: (1) capability of the OCT technique to detect changes in scattering coefficient with the accuracy of about 1.5%; (2) a sharp and linear decrease of the OCT signal slope in the dermis with the increase of blood glucose concentration; (3) the change in the OCT signal slope measured during bolus glucose injection experiments (characterized by a sharp increase of blood glucose concentration) is higher than that measured in the glucose clamping experiments (characterized by slow, controlled increase of the blood glucose concentration); and (4) the accuracy of glucose concentration monitoring may substantially be improved if optimal dimensions of the probed skin area are used. The results suggest that high-resolution OCT technique has a potential for noninvasive, accurate, and continuous glucose monitoring with high sensitivity.

  2. An Analog-Digital Mixed Measurement Method of Inductive Proximity Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-Xin Guo; Zhi-Biao Shao; Ting Li

    2015-01-01

    Inductive proximity sensors (IPSs) are widely used in position detection given their unique advantages. To address the problem of temperature drift, this paper presents an analog-digital mixed measurement method based on the two-dimensional look-up table. The inductance and resistance components can be separated by processing the measurement data, thus reducing temperature drift and generating quantitative outputs. This study establishes and implements a two-dimensional look-up table that red...

  3. Cerebral glucose transport and metabolism with dynamic PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive model describing the response of the steady-state tissue distribution of glucose to changes in plasma glucose concentration was developed. In the model, the steady-state glucose content can be used to predict the steady-state distribution spaces of both phosphorylatable and non-phosphorylatable glucose analogs, and thus the value of the lumped constant (LC) required to convert measured rates of analog metabolism to the desired rate of glucose metabolism. Models of the sensitivity of the kinetic rate constants for phosphorylatable glucose analogs to tissue glucose content were developed. The use of the measured distribution space of a non-phosphorylatable analog such as methyl glucose as an indicator of the LC, is only useful for hyperglycemia. We determined that a particular aspect of the kinetics of phosphorylatable analogs, the ratio of the phosphorylation rate constant to the membrane transport rate constant, is very sensitive to glucose content over the entire physiological range of values. Considerable effort is being made to optimize the use of venous blood that is ''arterialized'' by limb warming methods. Similarly, final refinements have been made to the non-linear least squares fitting routines, allowing for blood-borne radioactivity and for the loss of phosphorylation product

  4. Chance correlation in non-invasive glucose measurement using near-infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the non-invasive glucose measurement technique based on near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been an active research area for over twenty years, a reliable monitoring method has not been established yet. The key problem is that the spectral variations due to glucose concentration are extremely small compared to that from other biological components. In addition, there are also some ambiguous time-dependent physiological processes, which make the explanation of the model more difficult, especially in the universal calibration. Therefore, in order to produce a model that is related to the actual spectral variation of glucose, reproducible measurements and clinical validation experiments that improve the selectivity and signal to noise ratio of glucose measurement are needed. In this paper, chance correlation in spectroscopy analysis is investigated, which is one of the obstacles to achieving successful NIR spectroscopy analysis, especially in in vivo measurement. The reasons for chance correlation in the in vitro and in vivo experiments are analysed. Methods to avoid it are suggested accordingly and verified with the in vitro experiments. We also investigate the chance correlation for the in vivo NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy monitoring blood. Results show that there is significant signal variation after glucose is taken, and the potential chance correlation factors including the instrument-related and physiology-related variations during the in vivo experiments do not contribute to the multivariate model for glucose concentration

  5. Ex vivo optical measurements of glucose diffusion kinetics in native and diabetic mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchina, Daria K; Shi, Rui; Bashkatov, Alexey N; Genina, Elina A; Zhu, Dan; Luo, Qingming; Tuchin, Valery V

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the glucose diffusion coefficients ex vivo in skin of mice with diabetes induced in vivo by alloxan in comparison to non-diabetic mice. The temporal dependences of collimated transmittance of tissue samples immersed in glucose solutions were measured in the VIS-NIR spectral range to quantify the glucose diffusion/permeability coefficients and optical clearing efficiency of mouse skin. The average thickness of intact healthy and diabetic skin was 0.023 ± 0.006 cm and 0.019 ± 0.005 cm, respectively. Considerable differences in optical and kinetic properties of diabetic and non-diabetic skin were found: clearing efficiency was 1.5-fold better and glucose diffusivity was 2-fold slower for diabetic skin. Experimental Setup for measuring collimated transmittance spectra of mouse skin samples. PMID:25760425

  6. Maximum-likelihood reconstruction of photon returns from simultaneous analog and photon-counting lidar measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Veberic, Darko

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel method for combining the analog and photon-counting measurements of lidar transient recorders into reconstructed photon returns. The method takes into account the statistical properties of the two measurement modes and estimates the most likely number of arriving photons and the most likely values of acquisition parameters describing the two measurement modes. It extends and improves the standard combining ("gluing") methods and does not rely on any ad hoc definitions of the overlap region nor on any ackground subtraction methods.

  7. Comparison of protocols for measuring and calculating postmortem submersion intervals for human analogs in fresh water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Michael K; Panacek, Edward; Green, William; Albers, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Protocols for determining postmortem submersion interval (PMSI) have long been problematic for forensic investigators due to the wide variety of factors affecting the rate of decomposition of submerged carrion. Likewise, it has been equally problematic for researchers to develop standardized experimental protocols to monitor underwater decomposition without artificially affecting the decomposition rate. This study compares two experimental protocols: (i) underwater in situ evaluation with photographic documentation utilizing the Heaton et al. total aquatic decomposition (TAD) score and (ii) weighing the carrion before and after submersion. Complete forensic necropsies were performed as a control. Perinatal piglets were used as human analogs. The results of this study indicate that in order to objectively measure decomposition over time, the human analog should be examined at depth using the TAD scoring system rather than utilizing a carrion weight evaluation. The acquired TAD score can be used to calculate an approximate PMSI. PMID:23278272

  8. Real-time estimation of plasma insulin concentration from continuous glucose monitor measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pereda, Diego; Romero-Vivo, Sergio; Ricarte, Beatriz; Rossetti, Paolo; Ampudia-Blasco, Francisco Javier; Bondia, Jorge

    2016-07-01

    Continuous glucose monitors can measure interstitial glucose concentration in real time for closed-loop glucose control systems, known as artificial pancreas. These control systems use an insulin feedback to maintain plasma glucose concentration within a narrow and safe range, and thus to avoid health complications. As it is not possible to measure plasma insulin concentration in real time, insulin models have been used in literature to estimate them. Nevertheless, the significant inter- and intra-patient variability of insulin absorption jeopardizes the accuracy of these estimations. In order to reduce these limitations, our objective is to perform a real-time estimation of plasma insulin concentration from continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). Hovorka's glucose-insulin model has been incorporated in an extended Kalman filter in which different selected time-variant model parameters have been considered as extended states. The observability of the original Hovorka's model and of several extended models has been evaluated by their Lie derivatives. We have evaluated this methodology with an in-silico study with 100 patients with Type 1 diabetes during 25 h. Furthermore, it has been also validated using clinical data from 12 insulin pump patients with Type 1 diabetes who underwent four mixed meal studies. Real-time insulin estimations have been compared to plasma insulin measurements to assess performance showing the validity of the methodology here used in comparison with that formerly used for insulin models. Hence, real-time estimations for plasma insulin concentration based on subcutaneous glucose monitoring can be beneficial for increasing the efficiency of control algorithms for the artificial pancreas. PMID:26343364

  9. The measurement of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic function and glucose metabolism in patients with movement disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, Makoto; Ichiya, Yuichi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Sasaki, Masayuki; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Masuda, Kouji; Shima, Fumio; Kato, Motohiro (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1992-12-01

    The nigrostriatal dopaminergic function and glucose metabolism were evaluated in 34 patients with various movement disorders by using positron emission tomography with [sup 18]F-Dopa and [sup 18]F-FDG respectively. The [sup 18]F-Dopa uptake in the striatum (the caudate head and the putamen) decreased in patients with Parkinson's disease but was relatively unaffected in the caudate. The cerebral glucose metabolism was normal in patients with Parkinson's disease. The [sup 18]F-Dopa uptake in the striatum also decreased in cases of atypical parkinsonism and in cases of progressive supranuclear palsy, but there was no difference in the uptake between the caudate and the putamen. The glucose metabolism decreased in the cerebral hemisphere including the striatum; this finding was also different from those of Parkinson's disease. A normal [sup 18]F-Dopa uptake in the striatum with a markedly decreased striatal glucose metabolism and a mildly decreased cortical glucose metabolism was observed in cases of Huntington's disease and Wilson's disease. The [sup 18]F-Dopa uptake in the striatum increased and the glucose metabolism was normal in cases of idiopathic dystonia. Various patterns of [sup 18]F-Dopa uptake and glucose metabolism were thus observed in the various movement disorders. These results suggest that the measurements of the [sup 18]F-Dopa uptake and the cerebral glucose metabolism would be useful for the evaluation of the striatal function in various movement disorders. (author).

  10. A dielectric inverse problem applied to human skin measurements during glucose excursions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fringing field capacitive sensor has been used to measure the dielectric properties of human skin and underlying tissue in the MHz frequency range. It has recently been shown in clinical experimental studies that these dielectric properties can be related to the effects of in vivo glucose variations of the test subject. Previously, the relationship between electrical impedance and the glucose level has been established via statistical methods, such as the regression method. In this work, we explored a different approach, namely the resolution of the so-called inverse problem. First we applied the method on an artificial two-layer lossy system in order to test the sensitivity of the solution to forced changes in the layer properties and its stability to a constant setting. After validation of this method on artificial systems, a similar inverse problem was set and solved for dielectric measurements on human skin during an induced glucose excursion, where the skin is also modelled as a double-layer system. The changes of the measured permittivity and conductivity of the second layer versus the glucose changes are calculated for 22 study days. The statistical distribution shows that the median slopes of both dielectric properties are negative. These results can be used to test our hypothesis and to continue building potential explanations for the phenomena induced by the glucose changes on the skin layer dielectric parameters

  11. The Analog Revolution and Its On-Going Role in Modern Analytical Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enke, Christie G

    2015-12-15

    The electronic revolution in analytical instrumentation began when we first exceeded the two-digit resolution of panel meters and chart recorders and then took the first steps into automated control. It started with the first uses of operational amplifiers (op amps) in the analog domain 20 years before the digital computer entered the analytical lab. Their application greatly increased both accuracy and precision in chemical measurement and they provided an elegant means for the electronic control of experimental quantities. Later, laboratory and personal computers provided an unlimited readout resolution and enabled programmable control of instrument parameters as well as storage and computation of acquired data. However, digital computers did not replace the op amp's critical role of converting the analog sensor's output to a robust and accurate voltage. Rather it added a new role: converting that voltage into a number. These analog operations are generally the limiting portions of our computerized instrumentation systems. Operational amplifier performance in gain, input current and resistance, offset voltage, and rise time have improved by a remarkable 3-4 orders of magnitude since their first implementations. Each 10-fold improvement has opened the doors for the development of new techniques in all areas of chemical analysis. Along with some interesting history, the multiple roles op amps play in modern instrumentation are described along with a number of examples of new areas of analysis that have been enabled by their improvements. PMID:26629976

  12. A simple method for measuring glucose utilization of insulin-sensitive tissues by using the brain as a reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple method, without measurement of the plasma input function, to obtain semiquantitative values of glucose utilization in tissues other than the brain with radioactive deoxyglucose is reported. The brain, in which glucose utilization is essentially insensitive to plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, was used as an internal reference. The effects of graded doses of oral glucose loading (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/g body weight) on insulin-sensitive tissues (heart, muscle and fat tissue) were studied in the rat. By using the brain-reference method, dose-dependent increases in glucose utilization were clearly shown in all the insulin-sensitive tissues examined. The method seems to be of value for measurement of glucose utilization using radioactive deoxyglucose and positron emission tomography in the heart or other insulin-sensitive tissues, especially during glucose loading. (orig.)

  13. Precision analog signal processor for beam position measurements in electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam position monitors (BPM) in electron and positron storage rings have evolved from simple systems composed of beam pickups, coaxial cables, multiplexing relays, and a single receiver (usually a analyzer) into very complex and costly systems of multiple receivers and processors. The older may have taken minutes to measure the circulating beam closed orbit. Today instrumentation designers are required to provide high-speed measurements of the beam orbit, often at the ring revolution frequency. In addition the instruments must have very high accuracy and resolution. A BPM has been developed for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley which features high resolution and relatively low cost. The instrument has a single purpose; to measure position of a stable stored beam. Because the pickup signals are multiplexed into a single receiver, and due to its narrow bandwidth, the receiver is not intended for single-turn studies. The receiver delivers normalized measurements of X and Y position entirely by analog means at nominally 1 V/mm. No computers are involved. No software is required. Bergoz, a French company specializing in precision beam instrumentation, integrated the ALS design m their new BPM analog signal processor module. Performance comparisons were made on the ALS. In this paper we report on the architecture and performance of the ALS prototype BPM

  14. Low power analog readout front-end electronics for time and energy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the design and measurements of an analog front-end readout electronics dedicated for silicon microstrip detectors with relatively large capacitance of the order of tens pF for time and energy measurements of incoming pulses. The front-end readout electronics is required to process input pulses with an average rate of 150 kHz/channel with low both power consumption and noise at the same time. In the presented solution the single channel is built of two different parallel processing paths: fast and slow. The fast path includes the fast CR–RC shaper with the peaking time tp=40 ns and is optimized to determine the input charge arrival time. The slow path, which consists of the slow CR–(RC)2 shaper with the peaking time tp=80 ns, is dedicated for low noise accurate energy measurement. The analog front-end electronics was implemented in UMC 180 nm CMOS technology as a prototype ASIC AFE. The AFE chip contains 8 channels with the size of 58 μm×1150 μm each. It has low power dissipation Pdiss=3.1 mW per single channel. The article presents the details of the front-end architecture and the measurement results

  15. Precision analog signal processor for beam position measurements in electron storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkson, J. A.; Unser, K. B.

    1995-05-01

    Beam position monitors (BPM) in electron and positron storage rings have evolved from simple systems composed of beam pickups, coaxial cables, multiplexing relays, and a single receiver (usually a analyzer) into very complex and costly systems of multiple receivers and processors. The older may have taken minutes to measure the circulating beam closed orbit. Today instrumentation designers are required to provide high-speed measurements of the beam orbit, often at the ring revolution frequency. In addition the instruments must have very high accuracy and resolution. A BPM has been developed for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley which features high resolution and relatively low cost. The instrument has a single purpose; to measure position of a stable stored beam. Because the pickup signals are multiplexed into a single receiver, and due to its narrow bandwidth, the receiver is not intended for single-turn studies. The receiver delivers normalized measurements of X and Y position entirely by analog means at nominally 1 V/mm. (No computers are involved; No software is required.) Bergoz, a French company specializing in precision beam instrumentation, integrated the ALS design in their new BPM analog signal processor module. Performance comparisons were made on the ALS. In this paper we report on the architecture and performance of the ALS prototype BPM.

  16. Precision analog signal processor for beam position measurements in electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam position monitors (BPM) in electron and positron storage rings have evolved from simple systems composed of beam pickups, coaxial cables, multiplexing relays, and a single receiver (usually a analyzer) into very complex and costly systems of multiple receivers and processors. The older may have taken minutes to measure the circulating beam closed orbit. Today instrumentation designers are required to provide high-speed measurements of the beam orbit, often at the ring revolution frequency. In addition the instruments must have very high accuracy and resolution. A BPM has been developed for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley which features high resolution and relatively low cost. The instrument has a single purpose; to measure position of a stable stored beam. Because the pickup signals are multiplexed into a single receiver, and due to its narrow bandwidth, the receiver is not intended for single-turn studies. The receiver delivers normalized measurements of X and Y posit ion entirely by analog means at nominally 1 V/mm. No computers are involved. No software is required. Bergoz, a French company specializing in precision beam instrumentation, integrated the ALS design m their new BPM analog signal processor module. Performance comparisons were made on the ALS. In this paper we report on the architecture and performance of the ALS prototype BPM

  17. An Analog-Digital Mixed Measurement Method of Inductive Proximity Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yi-Xin; Shao, Zhi-Biao; Li, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Inductive proximity sensors (IPSs) are widely used in position detection given their unique advantages. To address the problem of temperature drift, this paper presents an analog-digital mixed measurement method based on the two-dimensional look-up table. The inductance and resistance components can be separated by processing the measurement data, thus reducing temperature drift and generating quantitative outputs. This study establishes and implements a two-dimensional look-up table that reduces the online computational complexity through structural modeling and by conducting an IPS operating principle analysis. This table is effectively compressed by considering the distribution characteristics of the sample data, thus simplifying the processing circuit. Moreover, power consumption is reduced. A real-time, built-in self-test (BIST) function is also designed and achieved by analyzing abnormal sample data. Experiment results show that the proposed method obtains the advantages of both analog and digital measurements, which are stable, reliable, and taken in real time, without the use of floating-point arithmetic and process-control-based components. The quantitative output of displacement measurement accelerates and stabilizes the system control and detection process. The method is particularly suitable for meeting the high-performance requirements of the aviation and aerospace fields. PMID:26729118

  18. An Analog-Digital Mixed Measurement Method of Inductive Proximity Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Xin Guo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Inductive proximity sensors (IPSs are widely used in position detection given their unique advantages. To address the problem of temperature drift, this paper presents an analog-digital mixed measurement method based on the two-dimensional look-up table. The inductance and resistance components can be separated by processing the measurement data, thus reducing temperature drift and generating quantitative outputs. This study establishes and implements a two-dimensional look-up table that reduces the online computational complexity through structural modeling and by conducting an IPS operating principle analysis. This table is effectively compressed by considering the distribution characteristics of the sample data, thus simplifying the processing circuit. Moreover, power consumption is reduced. A real-time, built-in self-test (BIST function is also designed and achieved by analyzing abnormal sample data. Experiment results show that the proposed method obtains the advantages of both analog and digital measurements, which are stable, reliable, and taken in real time, without the use of floating-point arithmetic and process-control-based components. The quantitative output of displacement measurement accelerates and stabilizes the system control and detection process. The method is particularly suitable for meeting the high-performance requirements of the aviation and aerospace fields.

  19. Classification of diabetes and measurement of blood glucose concentration noninvasively using near infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Li, Gang; Yan, Wen-Juan; Lin, Ling

    2014-11-01

    Developing noninvasive blood glucose monitoring method is an to immense need to alleviate the pain and suffering of diabetics associated with the frequent pricking of skin for taking blood sample. A hybrid algorithm for multivariate calibration is proposed to improve the prediction performance of classification of diabetes and measurement of blood glucose concentration by near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy noninvasively. The algorithm is based on wavelet prism modified uninformative variable elimination approach (WP-mUVE) combined with least squares support vector machine (LSSVM), named as WP-mUVE-LSSVM. The method is successfully applied to diabetic classification experiment (in vivo) and blood glucose concentration measurement experiment (in vivo) respectively. Human tongue is selected as the measuring site in this study. To evaluate effectiveness of pretreatment method and quality of calibration models, several usually used pretreatment methods and kernel functions of LSSVM are introduced comparing with our method. Higher quality data is obtained by our pretreatment method owing to the elimination of varying background and noise of spectra data simultaneously. Better prediction accuracy and adaptability are obtained by LSSVM model with radial basis kernel function. The results indicate that WP-mUVE-LSSVM holds promise for the classification of diabetes and measurement of blood glucose concentration noninvasively based on human tongue using NIR spectroscopy.

  20. Glucose transport carrier of human erythrocytes. Radiation target size measurement based on flux inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intact human erythrocytes frozen in the presence of cryoprotective reagents and irradiated with an electron beam retained their diffusion barrier to L-glucose. The carrier-mediated flux of D-glucose, on the other hand, was inactivated as a simple exponential function of the radiation dose. Classical target size analysis of this data yielded a molecular size of 185,000 daltons for the carrier. This represents the first measurement of the functional size of a transport protein based directly on flux inactivation

  1. Glucose and glycerol concentrations and their tracer enrichment measurements using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornø, Andreas; Foged, Lene; van Hall, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    The present study describes a new liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for high-throughput quantification of glucose and glycerol in human plasma using stable isotopically labeled internal standards and is suitable for simultaneous measurements of glucose and glycerol enrichments...... coefficients of variation were 2.0% and 9.7%, respectively. After derivatization, plasma samples were stable for at least 14?days. In conclusion, we have developed and validated a novel, accurate, and sensitive high-throughput liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for simultaneous determination...

  2. Glucose transport in human erythrocytes measured using 13C NMR spin transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present the results of a new NMR-based procedure for measuring the fast transmembrane exchange of D-[1-13C]glucose in human erythrocytes. The method relies on different rates of exchange between the α- and β-anomers of glucose inside and outside the cells; the rate outside the cells is greatly increased by the addition of mutarotase to the suspension. Theory is developed to describe nuclear-spin transfer in the present system and is used to analyse the data to yield estimates of transmembrane-exchange rate constants and their statistical uncertainties. For a total glucose concentration of 25.5 mmol/l at 400C the first order efflux rate constants for the α- and β-anomers were 1.20 ± 0.40 s-1 and 0.71 ± 0.30 s-1, respectively. 17 refs.; 4 figs

  3. Double-injection FDG method to measure cerebral glucose metabolism twice in a single procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET) may be used to examine changes in cerebral glucose metabolism in two physiological conditions. We proposed and evaluated a double injection-single session FDG method with biological constraints for this purpose. Simulated brain time-radioactivity curves (TACs) generated by using a plasma TAC from an actual study and physiological combinations of input values in a kinetic model were analyzed to evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method. The reproducibility of the estimated values obtained by this method was tested in five normal volunteers who were studied with a dynamic PET scan and two injections of FDG in a single session while fasting. The simulation study showed that the estimated values obtained by the proposed method agreed well with the input values. In the human study, plasma glucose levels were 5.3±0.2 and 5.0±0.2 mM in the first and second measurements, respectively. The difference between the plasma glucose measurements was small but statistically significant (p*1 or rCMRglc, there were small deviations in K* (less than 10%) and LC (less than 5%) with a statistical significance (p* and LC seemed to relate to the difference in the plasma glucose level. The double-injection FDG method with biological constrains can be used to estimate rCMRglc and LC sequentially in a single PET scanning session. (author)

  4. Measurement of glucose utilization by Pseudomonas fluorescens that are free-living and that are attached to surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assimilation and respiration of glucose by attached and free-living Pseudomonas fluorescens were compared. The attachment surfaces were polyvinylidene fluoride, polyethylene, and glass. Specific uptake of [1C]glucose was determined after bacterial biomass was measured by (1) microscopic counts or (2) prelabelling of cells by providing [3H]leucine as substrate, followed by dual-labelling scintillation counting. The glucose concentration was 1.4, 3.5, 5.5, 7.6, or 9.7 μM. Glucose assimilation by cells which became detached from the surfaces during incubation with glucose was also measured after the detached cells were collected by filtration. The composition of the substratum had no effect on the amount of glucose assimilated by attached cells. Glucose assimilation by attached cells exceeded that by free-living cells by a factor of between 2 and 5 or more, and respiration of glucose by surface-associated cells was greater than that by free-living bacteria. Glucose assimilation by detached cells was greater than that by attached bacteria. Measurements of biomass by microscopic counts gave more consistent results than those obtained with dual-labelling, but in general, results obtained by both methods were corroborative

  5. Noninvasive measurement of regional myocardial glucose metabolism by positron emission computed tomography. [Dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.

    1980-06-01

    While the results of regional myocardial glucose metabolism measurements using positron emission computed tomography (/sup 13/N-ammonia) are promising, their utility and value remains to be determined in man. If this technique can be applied to patients with acute myocardial ischemia or infarction it may permit delineation of regional myocardial segments with altered, yet still active metabolism. Further, it may become possible to evaluate the effects of interventions designed to salvage reversibly injured myocardium by this technique.

  6. Evaluation of the Efficacy and Correlation between Blood Glucose Measured Using Glucometers and Enzymatic Laboratory Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Rasouli

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Diabetes Mellitus (DM is the most common chronic metabolic disease, with many complications including renal failure, blindness and non-traumatic amputation, so it is important to monitor and regulate blood glucose. Considering how easy home blood glucose monitoring is, we decided to evaluate the performance of two available glucometers for detection of blood glucose compared with standard laboratory methods.

     

    Methods: In this analytical study, we compared the capillary blood glucose levels of 60 volunteers with mean age of 32.8±9.6 years in Tabriz Mehr Laboratory as determined by test strips (two different Glucometers with venous blood glucose levels’ measurements by the enzymatic method (the standard laboratory kit. Data were analyzed using one way-ANOVA test, T-test, Pearson correlation and Bland and Altman plot.

     

    Results: The mean differences of No: 1 and No: 2 Glucometers with enzymatic laboratory method were 20.78±11.61 and 4.5±3.76mg/dl respectively. The one way ANOVA test indicated significant differences between three methods (p<0.05. Further Duncan's test revealed significant differences between two devices (p=0.001 and device No.1 and laboratory method (p=0.001; however, the differences between device No.2 and laboratory method were not statistically significant (p=0.83.

     

    Conclusion: According to the results, calibrating the devices with laboratory instruments in order to make major clinical decisions is recommended.

  7. The characteristic time of glucose diffusion measured for muscle tissue at optical clearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of agent diffusion in biological tissues is very important to understand and characterize the optical clearing effects and mechanisms involved: tissue dehydration and refractive index matching. From measurements made to study the optical clearing, it is obvious that light scattering is reduced and that the optical properties of the tissue are controlled in the process. On the other hand, optical measurements do not allow direct determination of the diffusion properties of the agent in the tissue and some calculations are necessary to estimate those properties. This fact is imposed by the occurrence of two fluxes at optical clearing: water typically directed out of and agent directed into the tissue. When the water content in the immersion solution is approximately the same as the free water content of the tissue, a balance is established for water and the agent flux dominates. To prove this concept experimentally, we have measured the collimated transmittance of skeletal muscle samples under treatment with aqueous solutions containing different concentrations of glucose. After estimating the mean diffusion time values for each of the treatments we have represented those values as a function of glucose concentration in solution. Such a representation presents a maximum diffusion time for a water content in solution equal to the tissue free water content. Such a maximum represents the real diffusion time of glucose in the muscle and with this value we could calculate the corresponding diffusion coefficient. (paper)

  8. Continuous glucose monitoring in newborn infants: how do errors in calibration measurements affect detected hypoglycemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Felicity; Signal, Mathew; Harris, Deborah L; Weston, Philip J; Harding, Jane E; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2014-05-01

    Neonatal hypoglycemia is common and can cause serious brain injury. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) could improve hypoglycemia detection, while reducing blood glucose (BG) measurements. Calibration algorithms use BG measurements to convert sensor signals into CGM data. Thus, inaccuracies in calibration BG measurements directly affect CGM values and any metrics calculated from them. The aim was to quantify the effect of timing delays and calibration BG measurement errors on hypoglycemia metrics in newborn infants. Data from 155 babies were used. Two timing and 3 BG meter error models (Abbott Optium Xceed, Roche Accu-Chek Inform II, Nova Statstrip) were created using empirical data. Monte-Carlo methods were employed, and each simulation was run 1000 times. Each set of patient data in each simulation had randomly selected timing and/or measurement error added to BG measurements before CGM data were calibrated. The number of hypoglycemic events, duration of hypoglycemia, and hypoglycemic index were then calculated using the CGM data and compared to baseline values. Timing error alone had little effect on hypoglycemia metrics, but measurement error caused substantial variation. Abbott results underreported the number of hypoglycemic events by up to 8 and Roche overreported by up to 4 where the original number reported was 2. Nova results were closest to baseline. Similar trends were observed in the other hypoglycemia metrics. Errors in blood glucose concentration measurements used for calibration of CGM devices can have a clinically important impact on detection of hypoglycemia. If CGM devices are going to be used for assessing hypoglycemia it is important to understand of the impact of these errors on CGM data. PMID:24876618

  9. Association between DNA Methylation in Whole Blood and Measures of Glucose Metabolism: KORA F4 Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Simone; Kunze, Sonja; Molnos, Sophie; Volkova, Nadezda; Schramm, Katharina; Carstensen-Kirberg, Maren; Waldenberger, Melanie; Gieger, Christian; Peters, Annette; Illig, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; Roden, Michael; Grallert, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation has been postulated to affect glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity and the risk of type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we performed an epigenome-wide association study for measures of glucose metabolism in whole blood samples of the population-based Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg F4 study using the Illumina HumanMethylation 450 BeadChip. We identified a total of 31 CpG sites where methylation level was associated with measures of glucose metabolism after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, and estimated white blood cell proportions and correction for multiple testing using the Benjamini-Hochberg (B-H) method (four for fasting glucose, seven for fasting insulin, 25 for homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]; B-H-adjusted p-values between 9.2x10-5 and 0.047). In addition, DNA methylation at cg06500161 (annotated to ABCG1) was associated with all the aforementioned phenotypes and 2-hour glucose (B-H-adjusted p-values between 9.2x10-5 and 3.0x10-3). Methylation status of additional three CpG sites showed an association with fasting insulin only after additional adjustment for body mass index (BMI) (B-H-adjusted p-values = 0.047). Overall, effect strengths were reduced by around 30% after additional adjustment for BMI, suggesting that this variable has an influence on the investigated phenotypes. Furthermore, we found significant associations between methylation status of 21 of the aforementioned CpG sites and 2-hour insulin in a subset of samples with seven significant associations persisting after additional adjustment for BMI. In a subset of 533 participants, methylation of the CpG site cg06500161 (ABCG1) was inversely associated with ABCG1 gene expression (B-H-adjusted p-value = 1.5x10-9). Additionally, we observed an enrichment of the top 1,000 CpG sites for diabetes-related canonical pathways using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. In conclusion, our study indicates that DNA methylation and diabetes-related traits are associated and that these associations are partially BMI-dependent. Furthermore, the interaction of ABCG1 with glucose metabolism is modulated by epigenetic processes. PMID:27019061

  10. A New System Noise Measurement Method Using a 2-bit Analog-To-Digital Converter

    CERN Document Server

    Nakatake, Aki; Takeda, Koji

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new method to measure the system noise temperature, $T_{\\rm sys}$, using a 2-bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The statistics of the digitized signal in a four-level quantization brings us information about the bias voltage and the variance, which reflects the power of the input signal. Comparison of the variances in {\\it hot} and {\\it sky} circumstances yields $T_{\\rm sys}$ without a power meter. We performed test experiments using the Kagoshima 6-m radio telescope and a 2-bit ADC to verify this method. Linearity in the power-variance relation was better than 99% within the dynamic range of 10 dB. Digitally measured $T_{\\rm sys}$ coincided with that of conventional measurement with a power meter in 1.8-% difference or less for elevations of $10^{\\circ} - 88^{\\circ}$. No significant impact was found by the bias voltages within the range between -3.7 and +12.8% with respect to the threshold voltage. The proposed method is available for existing interferometers that have a multi-level ADC, and...

  11. IN SITU MEASUREMENTS OF THE SIZE AND DENSITY OF TITAN AEROSOL ANALOGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organic haze produced from complex CH4/N2 chemistry in the atmosphere of Titan plays an important role in processes that occur in the atmosphere and on its surface. The haze particles act as condensation nuclei and are therefore involved in Titan's methane hydrological cycle. They also may behave like sediment on Titan's surface and participate in both fluvial and aeolian processes. Models that seek to understand these processes require information about the physical properties of the particles including their size and density. Although measurements obtained by Cassini-Huygens have placed constraints on the size of the haze particles, their densities remain unknown. We have conducted a series of Titan atmosphere simulation experiments and measured the size, number density, and particle density of Titan aerosol analogs, or tholins, for CH4 concentrations from 0.01% to 10% using two different energy sources, spark discharge and UV. We find that the densities currently in use by many Titan models are higher than the measured densities of our tholins.

  12. High Precision Dielectric Permittivity Measurements of Planetary Regolith analogs Using A Split-Cylinder Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C. A.; Boivin, A.; Ghent, R. R.; Daly, M. G.; Bailey, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Complex relative permittivity is essential for quantitative interpretation of radar data in remote sensing of planetary surfaces. The real part determines the speed of the electromagnetic waves, while the imaginary part is related to the penetration depth. This project is part of NASA's OSIRIS-REx asteroid sample return mission. Radar is an important tool for asteroid investigation, particularly for detecting and characterizing regolith; but without robust knowledge of dielectric properties, these data cannot be used to their greatest advantage. Here, we present preliminary measurements of complex relative permittivity using the split-cylinder resonator method at 10 GHz. Resonant cavity methods utilize the difference in resonant frequency between an empty cavity and a cavity containing a sample to calculate relative permittivity and loss tangent of the sample, at higher precision than is possible with other methods. We use these split-cylinder measurements of solid samples at a single frequency in conjunction with companion broadband (300 MHz to 14 GHz) measurements of powders. Our goal is to establish a "parameter space" that characterize the effects of various factors such as water content, frequency, and the relative abundances of mineralogical and elemental constituents such as iron and titanium on complex relative permittivity of geological materials that might represent good analogs for the regolith of Bennu, OSIRIS-REx's target asteroid. Our results will also provide a database for future asteroid exploration with radar.

  13. Working Memory and Dynamic Measures of Analogical Reasoning as Predictors of Children's Math and Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Claire E.; Bergwerff, Catharina E.; Heiser, Willem J.; Resing, Wilma C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Working memory and inductive reasoning ability each appear related to children's achievement in math and reading. Dynamic measures of reasoning, based on an assessment procedure including feedback, may provide additional predictive value. The aim of this study was to investigate whether working memory and dynamic measures of analogical…

  14. Glucose metabolism in chronic diabetic foot ulcers measured in vivo using microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, L; Holstein, P; Larsen, K; Bülow, J

    1998-01-01

    Ten subjects with diabetes mellitus and unilateral chronic foot ulcer were investigated. Local tissue concentrations of glucose and lactate were measured using the microdialysis method at a distance of 0.5-1 cm from the edge of the ulcer and in normal skin in the contralateral foot. Subcutaneous...... blood flow in the area investigated was measured using the 133Xewashout technique. The interstitial glucose concentration in the ulcer was found to be lower than in intact skin (8.0 +/- 1.0 mmol l-1 vs. 8.5 +/- 1.1 mmol l-1) (P <0.02), and the interstitial lactate concentration was higher in the ulcer...... than in intact skin (3.2 +/- 0.2 mmol l-1 vs. 2.1 +/- 0.3 mmol l-1) (P <0.01). The subcutaneous blood flow was on average 40% higher in the ulcer than in the intact skin. The calculated local glucose uptake and lactate outputs were twofold higher in the ulcer than in the intact skin. However, the molar...

  15. A Novel Analog Integrated Circuit Design Course Covering Design, Layout, and Resulting Chip Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Liang; Cheng, Wang-Chuan; Wu, Chen-Hao; Wu, Hai-Ming; Wu, Chang-Yu; Ho, Kuan-Hsuan; Chan, Chueh-An

    2010-01-01

    This work describes a novel, first-year graduate-level analog integrated circuit (IC) design course. The course teaches students analog circuit design; an external manufacturer then produces their designs in three different silicon chips. The students, working in pairs, then test these chips to verify their success. All work is completed within…

  16. Analog earthquakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, R.B. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Analogs are used to understand complex or poorly understood phenomena for which little data may be available at the actual repository site. Earthquakes are complex phenomena, and they can have a large number of effects on the natural system, as well as on engineered structures. Instrumental data close to the source of large earthquakes are rarely obtained. The rare events for which measurements are available may be used, with modfications, as analogs for potential large earthquakes at sites where no earthquake data are available. In the following, several examples of nuclear reactor and liquified natural gas facility siting are discussed. A potential use of analog earthquakes is proposed for a high-level nuclear waste (HLW) repository.

  17. Analog earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analogs are used to understand complex or poorly understood phenomena for which little data may be available at the actual repository site. Earthquakes are complex phenomena, and they can have a large number of effects on the natural system, as well as on engineered structures. Instrumental data close to the source of large earthquakes are rarely obtained. The rare events for which measurements are available may be used, with modfications, as analogs for potential large earthquakes at sites where no earthquake data are available. In the following, several examples of nuclear reactor and liquified natural gas facility siting are discussed. A potential use of analog earthquakes is proposed for a high-level nuclear waste (HLW) repository

  18. Measurement of temporal asymmetries of glucose consumption using linear profiles: reproducibility and comparison with visual analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of our study was to test the reproducibility of this method and to compare its diagnostic performance to that of visual analysis in patients with complex partial seizures (CPS). Regional cerebral glucose consumption (rCMRGLc) was measured interictally in 25 CPS patients and 10 controls using F-18-deoxyglucose and the positron emission tomography (PET) camera ECAT EXACT 47. The PET scans were visually analyzed for the occurrence of unilateral temporal hypometabolism. Furthermore, rCMRGLc was quantified on six contiguous coronal planes by manually tracing maximal values of temporal glucose consumption, thus creating line profiles of temporal glucose consumption for each side. Indices of asymmetry (ASY) were then calculated from these line profiles in four temporal regions and compared to the corresponding 95% confidence intervals of the control data. All analyses were performed by two observers independently from each other and without knowledge of the clinical findings. The agreement between the two observers with regard to focus lateralization was 96% on visual analysis and 100% on quantitative analysis. There was an excellent agreement with regard to focus lateralization between visual and quantitative evaluation. (orig.)

  19. Fabrication and Characterization of Graphene-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Glucose Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Minjeong; Choi, Hyonkwang; Park, Yunjae; Lee, Wookyoung; Lee, Jewon; Jeon, Minhyon

    2015-10-01

    Glucose in the blood is generally measured by electrochemical method using glucose oxidase (GOx) which acts as enzymes and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite. The rGO, which has low dispersibility, reduces the sensing capability of sensors. In order to solve this problem, the rGO electrodes with the addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) have been reported. However, rGO with low electrical conductivity and mobility is not compatible to the electrochemical system. In this study, graphene with excellent electrical properties was added to PVP protected rGO. The rGO was synthesized using a Hummer and Offeman's method. Graphene was synthesized using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with a Cu catalyst. Platinum (Pt) electrodes, Ag/AgCl, and PVP protected rGO were used as working electrode, reference electrode, and counter electrode, respectively. Surface morphology and structural properties of graphene were analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Cyclic voltametry (CV) and I-V probe station were used to analyze the performance of the electrodes. Glucose concentration was systematically varied and the reduction current was monitored using I-V probe station. PMID:26726435

  20. Simultaneous measurement of blood flow and glucose metabolism by autoradiographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A double tracer autoradiographic technique using 131I-iodo-antipyrine and 14C-deoxyglucose is presented for the simultaneous measurement of blood flow and cerebral glucose utilization in the same animal. 131I is a gamma emitting isotope with a half life of 8.06 days and can be detected with adequate resolution on standard autoradiographic films. Autoradiograms are made before and after decay of 131I; the time interval between the 2 exposures and the concentration of the 2 tracers is adjusted to avoid significant cross-contamination. In this way, 2 film exposures are obtained which can be processed quantitatively like single tracer autoradiograms. The validity of the method for the investigation of local coupling of flow and metabolism was tested under various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Coupling was tight in barbiturate-anesthetized healthy animals, but not under halothane anesthesia where uncoupling occurred in various subcortical structures. Focal seizures induced by topical application of penicillin on the cortical surface led to a coupled increase of metabolism and flow in thalamic relay nuclei but not at the site of penicillin administration where increased glucose utilization was not accompanied by similar increase in blood flow. Both coupled and uncoupled increases in local glucose utilization were observed in spreading depression and in circumscribed areas of experimental brain tumors. The results obtained demonstrate that double tracer autoradiography allows allows the very precise local assessment of cerebral blood flow and glucose utilization, and, therefore, is particularly suited to the study of regional coupling processes under various experimental conditions

  1. Hollow optical-fiber based infrared spectroscopy for measurement of blood glucose level by using multi-reflection prism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kino, Saiko; Omori, Suguru; Katagiri, Takashi; Matsuura, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    A mid-infrared attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectroscopy system employing hollow optical fibers and a trapezoidal multi-reflection ATR prism has been developed to measure blood glucose levels. Using a multi-reflection prism brought about higher sensitivity, and the flat and wide contact surface of the prism resulted in higher measurement reproducibility. An analysis of in vivo measurements of human inner lip mucosa revealed clear signatures of glucose in the difference spectra between ones taken during the fasting state and ones taken after ingestion of glucose solutions. A calibration plot based on the absorption peak at 1155 cm(-1) that originates from the pyranose ring structure of glucose gave measurement errors less than 20%. PMID:26977373

  2. Measurements of CO2 Carbon Stable Isotopes at Artificial and Natural Analog Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, S. D.; Clegg, S. M.; Rahn, T.; Fessenden, J. E.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.; McLing, T. L.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon storage in geologic formations is one method to prevent carbon dioxide (CO2), produced by fossil fuel combustion, from entering the Earth's atmosphere. The monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) of geologically sequestered CO2 is critical to the operation of a geologic storage site. Surface MVA techniques need to identify seepage from the sequestration reservoir at or below ambient CO2 concentrations. The CO2 carbon stable isotope ratio of is a sensitive diagnostic signature that can distinguish between anthropogenic and natural sources of CO2. Frequency Modulated spectroscopy (FMS) is an ultra-sensitive version of absorption spectroscopy that is capable of detecting the CO2 carbon stable isotope ratios. The technique involves phase modulation of the laser such that two side bands, spaced wider than the absorption feature of interest (in this case +/-2 GHz) are created. The signal is mixed with the local oscillator yielding a signal proportional to the species concentration. This FMS signature is recorded at multiple wavelengths to obtain the CO2 carbon isotope ratio.Two instruments using the FMS technique have been built and tested at LANL. One instrument draws ambient air into a multi-pass cell for a measurement, point source measurements. The other instrument uses an open-air path, tested up to 160 m (round trip), to measure the CO2 carbon isotopic ratio along the beam path, column average measurements. In this paper, results from multiple field deployments of one or both of the instruments will be presented. The Zero Emissions Research & Technology (ZERT) group at Montana State University established a field test site where controlled amounts of CO2 are released to test the performance of CO2 detection instruments and measurement techniques. The field site allows a controlled flow rate of CO2 to be released into the near surface through a 100 m long horizontal pipe. In July of 2009, a release was conducted, with a uniform flow rate of 0.2 tons per day, as the subsequent seepage was measured. There was a similar release, but at a flow rate of 0.15 tons/day, in July 2010. Stable isotope measurements have also been made at several natural analog sites. Two places of interest are the Valles Caldera National Preserve in NM and Soda Springs, ID. The Valle traps CO2 at night and can have very large swings in concentrations that test the instrument range. Soda Springs, ID has many carbonated natural springs and carbon isotope information from this site can provide information regarding CO2 from the deep subsurface, useful for future MVA work.

  3. Measurement of glucose metabolism in rat spinal cord slices with dynamic positron autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We attempted to measure the regional metabolic rate of glucose (MRglc) in sliced spinal cords in vitro. The thoracic spinal cord of a mature Wister rat was cut into 400-μm slices in oxygenated and cooled (1-4 deg. C) Krebs-Ringer solution. After at least 60 min of preincubation, the spinal cord slices were transferred into double polystyrene chambers and incubated in Krebs-Ringer solution at 36 deg. C, bubbled with 5% O2/5% CO2 gas. To measure MRglc, we used the dynamic positron autoradiography technique (dPAT) with F-18-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]FDG) and the net influx constant of [18F]FDG as an index. Uptake curves of [18F]FDG were well fitted by straight lines for more than 7 h after the slicing of the spinal cord (linear regression coefficient, r=0.99), indicating a constant uptake of glucose by the spinal cord tissue. The slope (K), which denotes MRglc, is affected by tetrodotoxin, and high K+ (50 mM) or Ca2+-free, high Mg2+ solution. After 10 min of hypoxia, the K value following reoxygenation was similar to the unloaded control value, but after 45 min of hypoxia, the K value was markedly lower than the unloaded control value, and after >90 min of reoxygenation it was nearly 0. Our results indicate that the living spinal cord slices used retained an activity-dependent metabolism to some extent. This technique may provide a new approach for measuring MRglc in sliced living spinal cord tissue in vitro and for quantifying the dynamic changes in MRglc in response to various interventions such as hypoxia

  4. PING Gamma Ray and Neutron Measurements of a Meter-Sized Carbonaceous Asteroid Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnarik, J.; Burger, D.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Parsons, A.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2011-01-01

    Determining the elemental composition of carbonaceous (spectral type C) asteroids is still one of the basic problems when studying these objects. The only main source of elemental composition information for asteroids is from their optical, NIR and IR properties, which include their spectral reflectance characteristics, albedo, polarization, and the comparison of optical spectroscopy with meteorite groups corresponding to asteroids of every spectral type. Unfortunately, these sources reflect observations from widely contrasting spatial scales that presently yield a void in the continuum of microscopic and macroscopic evidence, a lack of in situ measurement confirmation, and require deeper sensing techniques to discern the nature of these asteroids. The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument is ideally suited to address this problem because it can be used to determine the bulk elemental composition, H and C content, the average atomic weight and density of the surface and subsurface layers of C-type asteroids, and can provide measurements used to determine the difference between and distinguish between different types of asteroids. We are currently developing the PING instrument that combines gamma ray and neutron detectors with a 14 Me V pulsed neutron generator to determine the in-situ bulk elemental abundances and geochemistry of C-type asteroids with a spatial resolution of 1 m down to depths of tens of cm to 1 m. One aspect of the current work includes experimentally testing and optimizing PING on a known meter-sized Columbia River basalt C-type asteroid analog sample that has a similar composition and the same neutron response as that of a C-type asteroid. An important part of this effort focuses on utilizing timing measurements to isolate gamma rays produced by neutron inelastic scattering, neutron capture and delayed activation processes. Separating the gamma ray spectra by nuclear processes results in higher precision and sensitivity elemental composition measurements. Using gated data acquisition techniques allows for the unambiguous identification of gamma ray lines from different isotopes and nuclear processes, especially in situations when limited detector resolution results in overlapping gamma ray lines that cannot be individually resolved. In this paper, we will present the PING basalt layering experimental data, taken at the test facility at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center using the time tagged event-by-event data analysis technique, compared to our MCNPX computer simulation results for the C-type asteroid and basalt layering simulant models. Comparison of these data will show the advantages, validity, and measurement sensitivity of PING's nuclear interrogation methods to obtain more precise and sensitive in situ bulk elemental composition and density measurements of the subsurface of asteroids.

  5. Measurement of Mass Transfer Coefficients in Airlift Reactors with Internal Loop Using the Glucose Oxidase Method

    OpenAIRE

    Juraščik, M.; Sikula, I.; Rosenberg, M.; J. Markoš

    2007-01-01

    This study deals with the measurement of volumetric mass transfer coefficients (kLa) in the internal loop airlift reactors (ILALRs) of different volumes (12 dm3, 40 dm3 and 200 dm3) using the glucose oxidase method. The experimental results of this work were compared with those kLa obtained for the same ILALRs by applying different other methods. Results of this work showed a good agreement with the published results obtained by applying other methods on the non-coalescent medium. The init...

  6. Myocardial glucose uptake and metabolic rate measurements in mice with microPET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To establish a practical microPET imaging procedure for the measurement of myocardial metabolic rate of glucose (MRGlu) in mice. Methods: Twenty wild-type BKS mice were divided into 4 groups by random number table method.The mice were anesthetized with different concentrations of isoflurane (1.3%, 1.5%, 1.8%, 2.0%) at the temperature between 30 ℃ to 34 ℃. The respiratory rate and the physiologic condition were monitored for adjusting the most appropriate isoflurane concentration. Then, different volumes of saline were injected to the anesthetized mice and blood glucose concentrations were measured to test the optimal injection volume. Under the optimal operating condition, 18F-FDG were injected in a group of six mice and followed by microPET imaging.Left ventricular TAC was obtained by drawing ROI and myocardial glucose SUV was also calculated. Meanwhile, the TAC from venous sampling at different time points after 18F-FDG injection was generated. 'Kinetic Imaging System' was used to estimate the coefficients and calculate the MRGlu (Ki ×Glu/LC; Ki =k1 ×k3/(k2 + k3). One-way analysis of variance and q test were used to analyze the data. Results: No movement was observed in non-fasted mice anesthetized with (1.5-1.8)% isoflurane, and their respiratory rates were all over 80 per minute. The plasma glucose concentration showed no difference at each time point between the experimental group injected with 75 μl saline and the control group (F=1.215, P>0.05). The plasma glucose concentration of mice injected with 150 μl saline exhibited statistically significant difference at 30 min (q=2.485, P=0.024), 45 min (q=2.287, P=0.036) and 60 min (q=2.709, P=0.015). When the injection volume reached 300 μl, the blood glucose concentration increased remarkably at 45 min (q=2.435, P=0.027). Mice were maintained in good condition after injected with 18F-FDG ranging from 7.4 to 11.1 MBq within 75 μl volume, meanwhile clear and stable myocardial microPET images could also be obtained. The median myocardial SUV value was 11.88 (9.71-14.93), Ki value was 0.19 (0.10-0.54) ml · min-1 · g-1 and MRGlu value was 19.64 (5.55-23.28) mg · kg-1 · min-1 at 45-55 min after 18F-FDG injection. Conclusion: The microPET imaging may be a reliable,practical method to evaluate myocardial glucose uptake rate and metabolic rate in mice under the precondition of optimal isoflurane anesthetization (1.5%-1.8%) and small volume of 18F-FDG injection (≤<75 μl). (authors)

  7. Simplified brain slice glucose utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, G C; Hospod, F E; Maghsoudlou, B; Patlak, C S

    1996-09-01

    Brain slice glucose utilization (SGU) can be measured by methods analogous to those used for in vivo cerebral glucose utilization. In order to make this technique more accessible and applicable to a broad range of experimental conditions, we have derived a simplified operational rate equation and generated the table of apparent rate coefficients necessary to apply the equation under different experimental situations. Calculations of the apparent rate coefficients were based upon an eight-parameter kinetic model combined with Michaelis-Menten theory to account for changes in the rate constants as a function of buffer glucose concentration. The theory was tested with a series of experiments using rat brain slices. [14C]-2-deoxyglucose (2DG) and [14C]-3-O-methylglucose (3OMG). The errors involved in the simplified technique were estimated by a variety of techniques and found to be acceptable over a broad range of conditions. A detailed, practical protocol for the simplified method is presented. PMID:8784231

  8. Regional cerebral glucose consumption measured by positron emission tomography in patients with Wilson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using positron emission tomography (PET), the regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose consumption (rCMRGlc) was measured in 14 patients with Wilson's disease (WD) and 23 normal subjects. In WD patients, cerebellar, striatal and - to a lesser extent - cortical and thalamic rCMRGlc were significantly decreased compared with controls. Striatal rCMRGlc was significantly reduced in those 4 patients who had recently started decoppering therapy as compared with striatal rCMRGlc measured in those 10 patients with longer duration of medication. Caudate rCMRGlc correlated significantly with various signs of extrapyramidal dysfunction. Cerebellar, thalamic and cortical rCMRGlc correlated significantly with the severity of pyramidal signs. These data indicate that the PET measurement of rCMRGlc may be a useful tool to evaluate cerebral involvement in WD and to monitor the response to treatment. (orig.)

  9. Detection of glucose variability in saline solutions from transmission and reflection measurements using V-band waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Garcia, Helena; Kosmas, Panagiotis; Sotiriou, Ioannis; Papadopoulos-Kelidis, Ioannis; Parini, Clive; Gouzouasis, Ioannis; Palikaras, George; Kallos, Efthymios

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents experimental results that demonstrate the correlation of glucose concentration in water and saline solutions with transmitted electromagnetic (EM) energy in the frequency range of 50–75 GHz. The system is based on placing the aqueous solutions in acrylic holding tanks sandwiched between two open V-band waveguides. The measured samples have clinically relevant range of glucose concentrations, as low as 0.025 wt%. Our measurements show for the first time that it is possible to establish an approximately linear relationship between the signals transmitted through this simple waveguide-based system and the glucose content in the samples. Accurate full-wave EM simulations confirm this linear correlation. The results suggest the possibility of developing a miniaturized non-invasive glucose sensing device based on the transmission of radio waves in this frequency range.

  10. Real-time quantitative fluorescence measurement of microscale cell culture analog systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Taek-il; Kim, Donghyun; Tatosian, Daniel; Sung, Jong Hwan; Shuler, Michael

    2007-02-01

    A microscale cell culture analog (?CCA) is a cell-based lab-on-a-chip assay that, as an animal surrogate, is applied to pharmacological studies for toxicology tests. A ?CCA typically comprises multiple chambers and microfluidics that connect the chambers, which represent animal organs and blood flow to mimic animal metabolism more realistically. A ?CCA is expected to provide a tool for high-throughput drug discovery. Previously, a portable fluorescence detection system was investigated for a single ?CCA device in real-time. In this study, we present a fluorescence-based imaging system that provides quantitative real-time data of the metabolic interactions in ?CCAs with an emphasis on measuring multiple ?CCA samples simultaneously for high-throughput screening. The detection system is based on discrete optics components, with a high-power LED and a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera as a light source and a detector, for monitoring cellular status on the chambers of each ?CCA sample. Multiple samples are characterized mechanically on a motorized linear stage, which is fully-automated. Each ?CCA sample has four chambers, where cell lines MES-SA/DX- 5, and MES-SA (tumor cells of human uterus) have been cultured. All cell-lines have been transfected to express the fusion protein H2B-GFP, which is a human histone protein fused at the amino terminus to EGFP. As a model cytotoxic drug, 10 ?M doxorubicin (DOX) was used. Real-time quantitative data of the intensity loss of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) during cell death of target cells have been collected over several minutes to 40 hours. Design issues and improvements are also discussed.

  11. Detection accuracy of three glucose meters estimated by capillary blood glucose measurements compared with venous blood evaluated by the diabetes unit of the Hospital Evangélico de Curitiba, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camacho SL

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mirnaluci Paulino Ribeiro Gama, Camile Fiorese Cruzeta, Ana Carolina Ossowski, Marina Rech Bay, Mariella Muller Michaelis, Stênio Lujan CamachoEndocrinology and Diabetes Service, Hospital Universitário Evangélico de Curitiba, BrazilObjective: To compare capillary blood glucose measurements between three different glucose meters and with the serum glucose values of inpatients at the diabetes unit of Hospital Universitário Evangélico de Curitiba, Brazil.Materials and methods: A total of 132 non-intensive care unit patients admitted for medical and surgical pathologies were evaluated. All patients reported a previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, were under 60 years of age, had no hematocrit alterations, remained hemodynamically stable during the time of data collection, and were given no ascorbic acid, acetaminophen, dopamine, or mannitol during follow-up. Capillary and serum blood glucose samples were collected simultaneously by finger-stick and venipuncture 2 hours after lunch, by the same observer, who was blinded to the serum glucose results. First, between July and November 2009, capillary glucose levels were measured using the blood glucose meters OneTouch SureStep® and MediSense Optium®. Between November 2009 and February 2010, capillary blood glucose levels were measured on the glucose meters OneTouch SureStep and Optium Xceed®. The capillary glucose readings were analyzed between meters and also in relation to the serum blood glucose values by the t-test for paired samples and the Mood two-sample test.Results: The patients’ mean age was 50.45 years. The blood glucose means obtained using the meters OneTouch SureStep, MediSense Optium, and Optium Xceed were, respectively, 183.87 mg/dL, 178.49 mg/dL, and 192.73 mg/dL, and the mean for the serum glucose values was 174.58 mg/dL. A significant difference was found between the capillary measurements taken by the glucose meters and the serum glucose measurements (P < 0.05, and no significant interdevice difference was found. After stratification of the serum blood glucose values into two groups, below and above 180 mg/dL, the variance found for the glucose meter OneTouch SureStep was statistically greater (P = 0.03 in relation to the serum glucose levels above 180 mg/dL, which was not the case with the glucose meters MediSense Optium (P = 0.06 and Optium Xceed (P = 0.12. The percentage of capillary blood glucose values showing a variation of less than 20% compared with serum values was 64.94% for OneTouch SureStep, 47.83% for Medisense Optium, and 51.61% for Optium Xceed, when serum glucose was greater than 75 mg/dL.Conclusion: The glucose meters tested showed an adequate interdevice correlation in their capillary glucose readings, in addition to correlating with the serum glucose values (ie, if a blood glucose reading is high or low in one test, it is likely to be respectively high or low in another. The means for the capillary blood glucose readings, however, were significantly different from the mean serum glucose. When serum glucose was above 180 mg/dL, there was a greater variance in the capillary measurements on the glucose meter OneTouch SureStep, with less correlation with the serum blood glucose (P < 0.05, which did not occur significantly with the two other glucose meters. On the other hand, OneTouch SureStep had the highest accuracy in relation to serum glucose when the whole sample of serum glucose values above 75 mg/dL was analyzed, considering a variation of less than 20% in the measurements. The three glucose meters provide readings that correlate with the serum glucose values of hospitalized patients. However, one should bear in mind that capillary measurements quite often show more than a 20% variation in relation to serum glucose values, and caution should be exercised in interpreting the readings when serum glucose levels are elevated.Keywords: capillary blood glucose, serum glucose, glucose meters, hospitalized patients

  12. Preliminary Broadband Measurements of Dielectric Permittivity of Planetary Regolith Analog Materials Using a Coaxial Airline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, A.; Tsai, C. A.; Ghent, R. R.; Daly, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    When considering radar observations of airless bodies containing regolith, the radar backscatter coefficient is dependent upon the complex dielectric permittivity of the regolith materials. In many current applications of imaging radar data, uncertainty in the dielectric permittivity precludes quantitative estimates of such important parameters as regolith thickness and depth to buried features (e.g., lava flows on the Aristarchus Plateau on the Moon and the flows that surround the Quetzalpetlatl Corona on Venus). For asteroids, radar is an important tool for detecting and characterizing regoliths. Many previous measurements of the real and/or complex parts of the dielectric permittivity have been made, particularly for the Moon (on both Apollo samples and regolith analogues). However, no studies to date have systematically explored the relationship between permittivity and the various mineralogical components such as presence of FeO and TiO2. For lunar materials, the presence of the mineral ilmenite (FeTiO3), which contains equal portions FeO and TiO2, is thought to be the dominant factor controlling the loss tangent (tanδ, the ratio of the imaginary and real components of the dielectric permittivity). Ilmenite, however, is not the only mineral to contain iron in the lunar soil and our understanding of the effect of iron on the loss tangent is insufficient. Beyond the Moon, little is known about the effects on permittivity of carbonaceous materials. This is particularly relevant for missions to asteroids, such as the OSIRIS-REx mission to (101955) Bennu, a carbonaceous asteroid whose regolith composition is largely unknown. Here we present preliminary broadband (300 Mhz to 14 GHz) measurements on materials intended as planetary regolith analogs. Our ultimate goal is to establish a database of the effects of a wide range mineralogical components on dielectric permittivity, in support of the OSIRIS REx mission and ongoing Earth-based radar investigation of the Moon. In addition to facilitating quantitative interpretation of lunar radar data, our results will provide context into which samples returned by OSIRIS REx will fit, and will therefore inform future remote exploration of asteroids.

  13. MGS-TES Phase Effects and Thermal Infrared Directional Emissivity Field Measurements of Martian Analog Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, K. M.; Bandfield, J. L.; Wolff, M. J.

    2006-03-01

    We present a set of on- and off-nadir thermal IR field and laboratory emissivity spectra for three undisturbed Mars terrain analog sites and analyze them for presence or absence of directional emissivity effects. Comparisons to moderate and low albedo surface MGS-TES EPF sequences are discussed.

  14. FRET measurements of intracellular cAMP concentrations and cAMP analog permeability in intact cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, Sebastian; Schwede, Frank; Schlipp, Angela; Berisha, Filip; Calebiro, Davide; Lohse, Martin J; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O

    2011-04-01

    Real-time measurements of second messengers in living cells, such as cAMP, are usually performed by ratiometric fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging. However, correct calibration of FRET ratios, accurate calculations of absolute cAMP levels and actual permeabilities of different cAMP analogs have been challenging. Here we present a protocol that allows precise measurements of cAMP concentrations and kinetics by expressing FRET-based cAMP sensors in cells and modulating them with an inhibitor of adenylyl cyclase activity and a cell-permeable cAMP analog that fully inhibits and activates the sensors, respectively. Using this protocol, we observed different basal cAMP levels in primary mouse cardiomyocytes, thyroid cells and in 293A cells. The protocol can be generally applied for calibration of second messenger or metabolite concentrations measured by FRET, and for studying kinetics and pharmacological properties of their membrane-permeable analogs. The complete procedure, including cell preparation and FRET measurements, takes 3-6 d. PMID:21412271

  15. Issues in the in vivo measurement of glucose metabolism of human central nervous system tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Chiro, G; Brooks, R A; Patronas, N J; Bairamian, D; Kornblith, P L; Smith, B H; Mansi, L; Barker, J

    1984-01-01

    Over 150 cases of central nervous system tumors have been studied with positron emission tomography using fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG) as a tracer. From this material 100 consecutive cases of cerebral glioma have been reviewed and analyzed. The results show a strong correlation of tumor grade with glycolytic rate, with visual "hot spots" present in all high-grade neoplasms and in only four low-grade tumors. The quantitative accuracy is limited by three basic factors. First, the measurement of tissue uptake, as compared with the parent technique, autoradiography, is more difficult because detection must be done outside the body. Effects such as scattered radiation and self-attenuation introduce errors unless properly corrected. A more serious problem when measuring small structures, such as a rim-shaped high-grade glioma, is the limited spatial resolution. The most advanced scanner, the Neuro-PET, has a resolution of 6 to 7 mm. Second, corrections are needed for backflow, including free tracer at the time of the scan that will return to the blood and "trapped" tracer that will backflow because of the presence of phosphatase. These corrections are calculated from the blood activity using nominal rate constants for 18FDG. Our study found no significant alteration in rate constants between normal and tumoral tissue. Finally, a lumped constant is needed to correct for kinetic differences between 18FDG and glucose. If there is a change in the mechanism of either membrane transport or the hexokinase reaction, the lumped constant may change. However, measurements of actual glucose utilization in tissue culture lines from six patients support the 18FDG results. PMID:6331282

  16. Estimation of utility values from visual analog scale measures of health in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oddershede L

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lars Oddershede,1,2 Jan Jesper Andreasen,1 Lars Ehlers2 1Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Center for Cardiovascular Research, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; 2Danish Center for Healthcare Improvements, Faculty of Social Sciences and Faculty of Health Sciences, Aalborg University, Aalborg East, Denmark Introduction: In health economic evaluations, mapping can be used to estimate utility values from other health outcomes in order to calculate quality adjusted life-years. Currently, no methods exist to map visual analog scale (VAS scores to utility values. This study aimed to develop and propose a statistical algorithm for mapping five dimensions of health, measured on VASs, to utility scores in patients suffering from cardiovascular disease. Methods: Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting at Aalborg University Hospital in Denmark were asked to score their health using the five VAS items (mobility, self-care, ability to perform usual activities, pain, and presence of anxiety or depression and the EuroQol 5 Dimensions questionnaire. Regression analysis was used to estimate four mapping models from patients' age, sex, and the self-reported VAS scores. Prediction errors were compared between mapping models and on subsets of the observed utility scores. Agreement between predicted and observed values was assessed using Bland–Altman plots. Results: Random effects generalized least squares (GLS regression yielded the best results when quadratic terms of VAS scores were included. Mapping models fitted using the Tobit model and censored least absolute deviation regression did not appear superior to GLS regression. The mapping models were able to explain approximately 63%–65% of the variation in the observed utility scores. The mean absolute error of predictions increased as the observed utility values decreased. Conclusion: We concluded that it was possible to predict utility scores from VAS scores of the five dimensions of health used in the EuroQol questionnaires. However, the use of the mapping model may be inappropriate in more severe conditions. Keywords: coronary artery bypass grafts, mapping, cross-walk, quality of life, outcomes research

  17. Development of a passive air sampler to measure airborne organophosphorus pesticides and oxygen analogs in an agricultural community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Jenna L; Yost, Michael G; Fenske, Richard A

    2014-09-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides are some of the most widely used insecticides in the US, and spray drift may result in human exposures. We investigate sampling methodologies using the polyurethane foam passive air sampling device to measure cumulative monthly airborne concentrations of OP pesticides chlorpyrifos, azinphos-methyl, and oxygen analogs. Passive sampling rates (m(3)d(-1)) were determined using calculations using chemical properties, loss of depuration compounds, and calibration with side-by-side active air sampling in a dynamic laboratory exposure chamber and in the field. The effects of temperature, relative humidity, and wind velocity on outdoor sampling rates were examined at 23 sites in Yakima Valley, Washington. Indoor sampling rates were significantly lower than outdoors. Outdoor rates significantly increased with average wind velocity, with high rates (>4m(3)d(-1)) observed above 8ms(-1). In exposure chamber studies, very little oxygen analog was observed on the PUF-PAS, yet substantial amounts chlorpyrifos-oxon and azinphos methyl oxon were measured in outdoor samples. PUF-PAS is a practical and useful alternative to AAS because it results in little artificial transformation to the oxygen analog during sampling, it provides cumulative exposure estimates, and the measured sampling rates were comparable to rates for other SVOCs. It is ideal for community based participatory research due to low subject burden and simple deployment in remote areas. PMID:24997910

  18. Uncertainty estimation of non-ideal analog switches using programmable Josephson voltage standards for mutual inductance measurement in the joule balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Zhang, Zhonghua; Li, Zhengkun; Xu, Jinxin; You, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Measurement of the mutual inductance is one of the key techniques in the joule balance to determine the Planck constant h, where a standard-square-wave compensation method was proposed to accurately measure the dc value of the mutual inductance. With this method, analog switches are used to compose an analog-switch signal generator to synthesize the excitation and compensation voltages. However, the accuracy of the compensation voltage is influenced by the non-ideal behaviors of analog-switches. In this paper, the effect from these non-ideal switches is analyzed in detail and evaluated with the equivalent circuits. A programmable Josephson voltage standard (PJVS) is used to generate a reference compensation voltage to measure the time integration of the voltage waveform generated by the analog-switch signal generator. Moreover, the effect is also evaluated experimentally by comparing the difference between the mutual inductance measured with the analog-switch signal generator and the value determined by the PJVS-analog-switch generator alternately in the same mutual inductance measurement system. The result shows that the impact of analog switches is 1.97  ×  10‑7 with an uncertainty of 1.83  ×  10‑7 (k  =  1) and confirms that the analog switch method can be used regularly instead of the PJVS in the mutual inductance measurement for the joule balance experiment.

  19. [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose transport kinetics as a function of extracellular glucose concentration in malignant glioma, fibroblast and macrophage cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FDG-PET is used to measure the metabolic rate of glucose. Transport and phosphorylation determine the amount of hexose analog that is phosphorylated and trapped. Competition occurs for both events, such that extracellular glucose concentration affects the FDG image. This study investigated the effect of glucose concentration on the rate of FDG accumulation in three cell lines. The results show that extracellular glucose concentration has a greater impact on the rate of FDG accumulation than the relative abundance of GLUT transporter subtypes

  20. [{sup 18}F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose transport kinetics as a function of extracellular glucose concentration in malignant glioma, fibroblast and macrophage cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, Robert C.; Freeman, Scott D.; Charlop, Aaron W.; Wiseman, Robert W.; Adamsen, Tom C.H.; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Spence, Alexander M. E-mail: aspence@u.washington.edu

    2004-01-01

    FDG-PET is used to measure the metabolic rate of glucose. Transport and phosphorylation determine the amount of hexose analog that is phosphorylated and trapped. Competition occurs for both events, such that extracellular glucose concentration affects the FDG image. This study investigated the effect of glucose concentration on the rate of FDG accumulation in three cell lines. The results show that extracellular glucose concentration has a greater impact on the rate of FDG accumulation than the relative abundance of GLUT transporter subtypes.

  1. Automatic Reading Recognition System for Analog Measuring Instruments Base on Digital Image Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Junguo Zhang; Yi Wang; Fantao Lin

    2013-01-01

    Pointer instrument has been widely used in the electric power, chemical industry and other industrial fields, because of the advantages such as low price, high reliability, easy installation, replacement and so forth. The traditional manual reading method has its drawbacks for example process trival, big workload, lack of accuracy. This article, based on digital image processing techniques, studies the automatic reading recognition method for analog measuri...

  2. A Comparative Study of Blood Glucose Measurements Using Glucometer Readings and the Standard Method in the Diagnosis of Neonatal Hypoglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Torkaman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoglycemia is one of the most common neonatal disorders, associated with severe complications. There has been a great deal of controversy regarding the definition and screening of hypoglycemia. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to determine a cut-off value for blood glucose level in glucometer readings. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 238 newborns at risk of hypoglycemia, admitted to Baqiyatallah Hospital of Tehran, Iran in 2012; the subjects were selected via simple sampling. After obtaining informed consents from the newborns’ parents, 1 cc blood samples were sent to the laboratory for measuring the blood glucose level. Moreover, venous blood samples, as well as heel-stick blood samples, were obtained for glucometer measurements. Blood glucose measurements were used to determine the cut-off value by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve and make comparisons with the diagnostic criteria for hypoglycemia in the literature. Results: A total of 238 infants with the mean weight of 2869±821.9 g were enrolled in this study. The mean (±SD blood glucose levels were 65.1±22.9, 82.9±24.7, and 84.4±24.8 mg/dl, based on the standard laboratory method, glucometer reading of venous blood samples, and glucometer reading of heel-stick capillary blood samples, respectively. The optimal cut-off point for hypoglycemia was determined as 65 mg/dl, using glucometer-based assessment of heel-stick blood samples. Conclusion: The significant difference in blood glucose levels measured by the laboratory method and outpatient glucometer readings highlights the importance of a cut-off value for rapid assessment and control of blood glucose and timely detection of hypoglycemia. In fact, the cut-off value introduced in the present study could facilitate such measurements.

  3. Stability of regional cerebral glucose metabolism in the normal brain measured by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral glucose utilization (LCMRGI) was measured using the [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose method with PET in two groups of ten healthy young volunteers, each scanned in a resting state under different methodological conditions. In addition, five subjects had a second scan within 48 hr. Mean hemispheric values averaged 45.8 +/- 3.3 mumol/100 g/min in the right cerebral hemisphere and 47.0 +/- 3.7 mumol/100 g/min in the left hemisphere. A four-way analysis of variance (group, sex, region, hemisphere) was carried out on the results using three different methods of data manipulation: (a) the raw values of glucose utilization, (b) LCMRGI values normalized by the mean hemispheric gray matter LCMRGI value, and (c) log transformed LCMRGI values. For all analysis techniques, significantly higher LCMRGI values were consistently seen in the left mid and posterior temporal area and caudate nucleus relative to the right, and in the right occipital region relative to the left. The coefficient of variation of intrasubject regional differences (9.9%) was significantly smaller than the coefficient of variation for regions between subjects (16.5%). No differences were noted between the sexes and no effect of repeat procedures was seen in subjects having multiple scans. In addition, inter-regional LCMRGI correlations were examined both in values from the 20 normal subjects, as well as in a set of hypothetical abnormal values. Results were compared with those reported from other PET centers; despite certain methodological differences, the intersubject and inter-regional variation of LCMRGI is fairly constant

  4. Photoacoustic blood glucose and skin measurement based on optical scattering effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zuomin; Myllyla, Risto A.

    2002-07-01

    Non-invasive blood glucose determination has been investigated by more than 100 research groups in the world during the past fifteen years. The commonly optical methods are based on the capacity of near-IR light to penetrate a few hundreds micrometers or a few millimeters into human tissue where it interacts with glucose. A change of glucose concentration may modify the optical parameters in tissue, with the result that its glucose concentration can be extracted by analyzing the received optical signals. This paper demonstrates that glucose affects on the scattering coefficient of human blood, by applying the streak camera and pulsed photoacoustic techniques; and drinking water seems also affecting on PA signal from skin surface.

  5. Experiments of glucose solution measurement based on the tunable pulsed laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhong; Liu, Guodong; Xiong, Zhihua; Huang, Zhen

    2015-07-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a hybrid, well-established and promising detection technique that has widely applied into a lot of fields such as bio-medical, material and environment monitoring etc. PAS has high contrast and resolution because of combining the advantages of the pure-optical and the pure-acoustic. In this paper, a photoacoustic experiment of glucose solution induced by 532nm pumped Nd:YAG tunable pulsed laser with repetition rate of 20Hz and pulse width of 10ns is performed. The time-resolved photoacoustic signals of glucose solution induced by pulsed laser in the average time of 512 are obtained. And the photoacoustic experiments of different concentrations of glucose solutions and different wavelengths of pulsed laser are carried out in this paper. Experimental results demonstrate that the bipolar sine-wave profiles for the time-resolved photoacoustic signal of glucose solution are in good agreement with the past reported literatures. And the different absorbing coefficients of glucose solution can be gotten according to the slope of the first part of the time-resolved photoacoustic signals. In addition, the different acoustic velocities of glucose solution can also be gotten according to the shift change of the time-resolved photoacoustic peak values. Research results illustrate that the characteristic wavelengths, different optical and acoustic properties of glucose solution can be interpreted by the time-resolved and peak-to-peak photoacoustic signals induced by the pulsed laser.

  6. 31P-NMR-spectroscopy measurements of energy metabolism of in vivo growing ascites tumours following addition of glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cellular ATP content and the phosphorylation potential, defined as the ATP, ADP and inorganic phosphate (Pi) ratios, of exponentially growing Ehrlich ascites tumour cells were compared with cells at the plateau phase of growth. These phosphorus compounds were measured using 31P-NMR-spectroscopy immediately after removal of the cell material from the host and in their ascites fluid reflecting in vivo growth conditions. Reaching the plateau phase of growth, the ATP content and the phosphorylation potential decreased. Upon addition of glucose, the phosphorylation potential immediately increased. We concluded that the reduced phosphorylation potential was due to a limited availability of glucose in spite of the nearly normal blood glucose concentration found. An increasing diffusion distance from the host to all parts of the tumour is a possible reason for that. (orig.)

  7. Preferred Presentation of the Visual Analog Scale for Measurement of Postoperative Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Helle Birgitte; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    scores than VAS, especially at low levels of pain. Patients preferred the NRS as compared to the VAS, and when choosing between the four different VAS presentations, they preferred the horizontal VAS with stop lines at the ends. CONCLUSION: For daily clinical practice for guiding postoperative analgesic......BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in pain scores with different visual analog scale (VAS) presentations and to compare those differences with a numeric rating scale. We also asked the patients for preference of the different methods. METHODS: Prior to the trial, we...... performed power calculations to estimate a preferred sample size, and 62 postoperative patients supplied a complete set of data to the study. Inclusion criteria were newly operated patients within the first 5 days after surgery. Every patient included was with 1-minute intervals and presented with one of...

  8. Age and sex differences in cerebral glucose consumption measured by pet using [18-F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resting cerebral glucose metabolic rates (CMRglc) were measured in 23 subjects by PET using FDG. Subjects were divided into several groups (mean age +- S.D.) 5 young males (YM) (27 +- 6); 6 young females (YF)(33 +9); 5 elderly males (EM)(73 +- 5); 7 elderly females (EF)(69 +- 7). Additionally, from these groups 4 YM, 3YF, 5EM and 4EF were studied again within 6 weeks under identical conditions. CMRglc in the YF group again was significantly hider than YM (p 0.05). No obvious relationships of CMRglc to the phase of the menstrual cycle was found in this small group. There was a trend (p=0.06) toward a higher CMRglc in YF than EF. These results support the findings of higher CBF in YF versus YM. The differences between the results of Kuhl et al (J. Cereb. and a reduction of CMRglc with age was found in a mixed group of males and females (58and female), and where no age effect was found the males, are also resolved by these findings. The authors suggest that the apparent age effect, in females in this study, is principally a hormonal one

  9. Measurement of regional cerebral glucose utilization in man by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various methods available for the study of regional cerebral glucose consumption in man by positron emission tomography are described and their applications, limitations and principal physiopathological results are presented

  10. The Glucose Measurement Industry and Hemoglobin A1c: An Opportunity for Creative Destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cembrowski, George

    2016-01-01

    The MyStar Extra self-monitoring blood glucose (SMBG) system provides moving estimates of the patient's hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). There is a treasure trove of highly accurate glucose data available from highly accurate SMBG, CGM and FGM along with highly accurate HPLC HbA1c. If Nathan's criteria are used to select subjects whose glucoses can be correlated to the HbA1c, then algorithms can be developed for robustly transforming glucose into HbA1c. These algorithms can then be implemented in any SMBG or with the CGM and FGM software. This calculated HbA1c would even be accurate with Nathan's excluded population thus reducing the use of fructosamine and glycated protein. Finally, the developer of these new algorithms is advised to use a specific approach for testing her algorithm. PMID:26481643

  11. Analysis of FTO Gene Variants with Measures of Obesity and Glucose Homeostasis in the IRAS Family Study

    OpenAIRE

    Wing, Maria R; Ziegler, Julie; Langefeld, Carl D; Ng, Maggie CY; Haffner, Steven M; Norris, Jill M; Goodarzi, Mark O; Bowden, Donald W

    2009-01-01

    Multiple studies have identified FTO gene variants associated with measures of adiposity in European-derived populations. The study objective was to determine whether FTO variants were associated with adiposity, including visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue (VAT; SAT), and glucose homeostasis measures in the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRASFS). A total of 27 SNPs in FTO intron 1, including SNPs prominent in the literature (rs9939609, rs8050136, rs1121980, rs17817449,...

  12. Measurement of glucose metabolism in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy using positron emission tomography with 18F-FDG: Initial Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Fluorine18 deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) has been used in numerous studies to determine the cardiac rate of glucose metabolism in normal and pathological conditions. It is known that during heart failure the metabolic pattern is altered. Patlack's graphical analysis allows the assessment of heart muscle glucose consumption in patients with non-ischaemic heart failure and normal subjects. Methods: Standardized measurement of glucose metabolism was performed in four patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and three healthy subjects. All subjects received an oral load of carbohydrates (75gr) previous to scanning. Dynamic images of the thorax were acquired. Myocardial uptake was estimated from time-activity curves in the atrium and left ventricle using Patlack's graphical analysis. Results: All subjects studied were male. 18F-FDG uptake rate for the group with dilated cardiomyopathy was 1.31±0.2, versus 1.26±0.37 ml/100gr/min in the control group. Conclusion: Measurement of cardiac glucose metabolism by 18F-FDG PET is feasible in a clinical service, allowing impact evaluation of physiologic and metabolic changes in the myocardium in different pathologic scenarios in addition to therapy assessment

  13. Effects of Zinc Supplementation on the Anthropometric Measurements, Lipid Profiles and Fasting Blood Glucose in the Healthy Obese Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepide Mahluji

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the effects of zinc supplementation on anthropometric measures, improving lipid profile biomarkers, and fasting blood glucose level in obese people. Methods: This randomized, double- blind clinical trial was carried out on 60 obese participants in the 18-45 age range for one month. The participants were randomly divided into the intervention group, who received 30 mg/d zinc gluconate, and the placebo group who received 30mg/d starch. Anthropometric measurements (body mass index (BMI, weight and waist circumference were recorded before and at the end of study. Lipid profile biomarkers and fasting blood glucose were determined using enzymatic procedure. Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA test was run to compare the post-treatment values of the two groups, and t-test was conducted to compare within group changes. Results: Serum zinc concentration was increased significantly in intervention group (p=0.024. BMI and body weight was significantly decreased (p=0.030 and p=0.020, respectively. Lipid profile biomarkers and fating blood glucose did not change significantly but triglyceride level was significantly decreased (p=0.006 in the intervention group. Conclusion: The obtained results indicate that zinc supplementation improves BMI, body weight, and triglyceride concentration without considerable effects on lipid profile and glucose level. Zinc can be suggested as a suitable supplementation therapy for obese people, but more studies are needed to verify the results.

  14. Upconverting phosphors as an amplifier of a colorimetric signal in dry chemistry test strips for enzymatic measurement of glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valta, Timo; Horn, Carina

    2015-09-01

    We describe the use of upconverting phosphors (UCPs) as an amplifier of the colorimetric signal in enzymatic dry chemistry test strips for the determination of glucose. The indicator compound used in the strips attenuated both the emission and excitation wavelengths of the upconverting phosphors, thus taking advantage of the nonlinear relationship between the excitation and emission of these particles. By monitoring the emission of the UCPs under 978 nm excitation, we were able to obtain significantly higher signal response (a steeper calibration curve) from the colorimetric assay compared to a reflectance measurement. The limit of detection of the developed method was 2.1-fold lower than the reflectance-based reference method. The new method was able to determine glucose from a sample of water in the range of 5.7 μM to 22 mM, which covers the typical blood glucose range in newborns and adults. In low analyte concentrations we obtained up to 3-fold improvement in the slope of the assay calibration curve. This difference decreased with increasing analyte concentration and the effect was diminished by the highest glucose concentration. However, the analytical sensitivity (the ratio of slope and standard deviation) was practically identical between the two methods because of the higher deviation in the UCP emission signal.

  15. Brain metabolism in autism. Resting cerebral glucose utilization rates as measured with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumsey, J.M.; Duara, R.; Grady, C.; Rapoport, J.L.; Margolin, R.A.; Rapoport, S.I.; Cutler, N.R.

    1985-05-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in ten men (mean age = 26 years) with well-documented histories of infantile autism and in 15 age-matched normal male controls using positron emission tomography and (F-18) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Positron emission tomography was completed during rest, with reduced visual and auditory stimulation. While the autistic group as a whole showed significantly elevated glucose utilization in widespread regions of the brain, there was considerable overlap between the two groups. No brain region showed a reduced metabolic rate in the autistic group. Significantly more autistic, as compared with control, subjects showed extreme relative metabolic rates (ratios of regional metabolic rates to whole brain rates and asymmetries) in one or more brain regions.

  16. Brain metabolism in autism. Resting cerebral glucose utilization rates as measured with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in ten men (mean age = 26 years) with well-documented histories of infantile autism and in 15 age-matched normal male controls using positron emission tomography and (F-18) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Positron emission tomography was completed during rest, with reduced visual and auditory stimulation. While the autistic group as a whole showed significantly elevated glucose utilization in widespread regions of the brain, there was considerable overlap between the two groups. No brain region showed a reduced metabolic rate in the autistic group. Significantly more autistic, as compared with control, subjects showed extreme relative metabolic rates (ratios of regional metabolic rates to whole brain rates and asymmetries) in one or more brain regions

  17. Self-monitoring of blood glucose measurements and glycaemic control in a managed care paediatric type 1 diabetes practice

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    B, Davey; D G, Segal.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intensive diabetes management requires intensive insulin treatment and self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) measurements to obtain immediate information on the status of the blood glucose level and to obtain data for pattern analysis on which meal planning, insulin and lifestyle adjus [...] tments can be made. The value and optimal frequency of SMBGs are often questioned OBJECTIVES: To document the relationship between SMBG frequency and glycaemic control in a managed care paediatric type 1 diabetes practice METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed on 141 managed care paediatric and adolescent patients over a 1-year period from 1 February 2010 to 30 January 2011. The patients were stratified according to their insulin regimen. The frequency of SMBG was analysed and glycaemic control measured by glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c RESULTS: A highly significant decrease (p

  18. The importance of glucose metabolism in the hypoxic cytotoxicity of Misonidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors are investigating the mechanism of inhibition of glucose metabolism and its role in the hypoxic cytotoxicity of Misonidazole (Miso). Preincubation of hypoxic exponential EMT6/Ro cells with Miso and 5.5 mM glucose containing media caused a time-dependent inhibition of both glucose consumption and lactate formation. This inhibition began after 90 min, 45 min, and 15 min preincubation with 1mM, 2.5mM, and 5mM Miso respectively. The inhibition closely correlated with the kinetics and extent of decreased viability of these cells as measured by dye exclusion and colony forming efficiency. Miso does not inhibit glucose transport in these phloretin-sensitive cells. Transport was measured by the uptake of 3-0-methyl-D-glucose, a non-metabolized glucose analog. The initial rate was determined to be the same (1.66 +- 0.18 nmoles cell/second at 250C)

  19. Measurement of the thermal spectrum of Hawking radiation from analog horizon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unruh, William [British Columbia University (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: In 1974 Hawking predicted that black holes should radiate thermal radiation with a temperature given by the geometry of the horizon. In 1980 I suggested that this was a far more universal phenomenon and applied to horizons in many other situations, In 2010 we at Univ of BC measured the spectrum of the quantum radiation from a horizon to surface waves in water flow, by measuring the amplification of waves which impinged on that horizon. The spectrum of the associated quantum noise was shown that it would be thermal and Temperature determined by the characteristics of the flow as expected from the above arguments. (author)

  20. Measurement of Faraday rotation in twisted optical fiber using rotating polarization and analog phase detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrated phase modulation of rotating linearly polarized light by current-induced Faraday rotation in a single mode optical fiber and used the technique to measure the current in ZT-40M, a Reversed-Field Pinch. We have also demonstrated the practicality of using twisted sensing fiber to overcome the problems associated with linear birefringence

  1. Laser spectroscopic real time measurements of methanogenic activity under simulated Martian subsurface analog conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmack, Janosch; Böhm, Michael; Brauer, Chris; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Möhlmann, Diedrich; Wagner, Dirk

    2014-08-01

    On Earth, chemolithoautothrophic and anaerobic microorganisms such as methanogenic archaea are regarded as model organisms for possible subsurface life on Mars. For this reason, the methanogenic strain Methanosarcina soligelidi (formerly called Methanosarcina spec. SMA-21), isolated from permafrost-affected soil in northeast Siberia, has been tested under Martian thermo-physical conditions. In previous studies under simulated Martian conditions, high survival rates of these microorganisms were observed. In our study we present a method to measure methane production as a first attempt to study metabolic activity of methanogenic archaea during simulated conditions approaching conditions of Mars-like environments. To determine methanogenic activity, a measurement technique which is capable to measure the produced methane concentration with high precision and with high temporal resolution is needed. Although there are several methods to detect methane, only a few fulfill all the needed requirements to work within simulated extraterrestrial environments. We have chosen laser spectroscopy, which is a non-destructive technique that measures the methane concentration without sample taking and also can be run continuously. In our simulation, we detected methane production at temperatures down to -5 °C, which would be found on Mars either temporarily in the shallow subsurface or continually in the deep subsurface. The pressure of 50 kPa which we used in our experiments, corresponds to the expected pressure in the Martian near subsurface. Our new device proved to be fully functional and the results indicate that the possible existence of methanogenic archaea in Martian subsurface habitats cannot be ruled out.

  2. In vivo cardiac glucose metabolism in the high-fat fed mouse: Comparison of euglycemic–hyperinsulinemic clamp derived measures of glucose uptake with a dynamic metabolomic flux profiling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rationale: Cardiac metabolism is thought to be altered in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our understanding of the regulation of cardiac substrate metabolism and insulin sensitivity has largely been derived from ex vivo preparations which are not subject to the same metabolic regulation as in the intact heart in vivo. Studies are therefore required to examine in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism under physiologically relevant conditions. Objective: To determine the temporal pattern of the development of cardiac insulin resistance and to compare with dynamic approaches to interrogate cardiac glucose and intermediary metabolism in vivo. Methods and results: Studies were conducted to determine the evolution of cardiac insulin resistance in C57Bl/6 mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for between 1 and 16 weeks. Dynamic in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism was determined following oral administration of [U-13C] glucose. Hearts were collected after 15 and 60 min and flux profiling was determined by measuring 13C mass isotopomers in glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. Cardiac insulin resistance, determined by euglycemic–hyperinsulinemic clamp, was evident after 3 weeks of HFD. Despite the presence of insulin resistance, in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism following oral glucose administration was not compromised in HFD mice. This contrasts our recent findings in skeletal muscle, where TCA cycle activity was reduced in mice fed a HFD. Similar to our report in muscle, glucose derived pyruvate entry into the TCA cycle in the heart was almost exclusively via pyruvate dehydrogenase, with pyruvate carboxylase mediated anaplerosis being negligible after oral glucose administration. Conclusions: Under experimental conditions which closely mimic the postprandial state, the insulin resistant mouse heart retains the ability to stimulate glucose metabolism. - Highlights: • Insulin clamp was used to determine the evolution of cardiac insulin resistance. • Clamp measures were compared to a dynamic metabolomics approach. • The clamp revealed the presence of cardiac insulin resistance after 3 weeks of HFD. • Cardiac glucose metabolism was not affected by HFD during an oral glucose challenge

  3. In vivo cardiac glucose metabolism in the high-fat fed mouse: Comparison of euglycemic–hyperinsulinemic clamp derived measures of glucose uptake with a dynamic metabolomic flux profiling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, Greg M., E-mail: greg.kowalski@deakin.edu.au [Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia); De Souza, David P. [Metabolomics Australia, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute of Molecular Science and Biotechnology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Risis, Steve [Cellular and Molecular Metabolism Laboratory, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria 3004 (Australia); Burch, Micah L. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Hamley, Steven [Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia); Kloehn, Joachim [Metabolomics Australia, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute of Molecular Science and Biotechnology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Selathurai, Ahrathy [Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia); Lee-Young, Robert S. [Cellular and Molecular Metabolism Laboratory, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria 3004 (Australia); Tull, Dedreia; O' Callaghan, Sean; McConville, Malcolm J. [Metabolomics Australia, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute of Molecular Science and Biotechnology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Bruce, Clinton R. [Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia)

    2015-08-07

    Rationale: Cardiac metabolism is thought to be altered in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our understanding of the regulation of cardiac substrate metabolism and insulin sensitivity has largely been derived from ex vivo preparations which are not subject to the same metabolic regulation as in the intact heart in vivo. Studies are therefore required to examine in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism under physiologically relevant conditions. Objective: To determine the temporal pattern of the development of cardiac insulin resistance and to compare with dynamic approaches to interrogate cardiac glucose and intermediary metabolism in vivo. Methods and results: Studies were conducted to determine the evolution of cardiac insulin resistance in C57Bl/6 mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for between 1 and 16 weeks. Dynamic in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism was determined following oral administration of [U-{sup 13}C] glucose. Hearts were collected after 15 and 60 min and flux profiling was determined by measuring {sup 13}C mass isotopomers in glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. Cardiac insulin resistance, determined by euglycemic–hyperinsulinemic clamp, was evident after 3 weeks of HFD. Despite the presence of insulin resistance, in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism following oral glucose administration was not compromised in HFD mice. This contrasts our recent findings in skeletal muscle, where TCA cycle activity was reduced in mice fed a HFD. Similar to our report in muscle, glucose derived pyruvate entry into the TCA cycle in the heart was almost exclusively via pyruvate dehydrogenase, with pyruvate carboxylase mediated anaplerosis being negligible after oral glucose administration. Conclusions: Under experimental conditions which closely mimic the postprandial state, the insulin resistant mouse heart retains the ability to stimulate glucose metabolism. - Highlights: • Insulin clamp was used to determine the evolution of cardiac insulin resistance. • Clamp measures were compared to a dynamic metabolomics approach. • The clamp revealed the presence of cardiac insulin resistance after 3 weeks of HFD. • Cardiac glucose metabolism was not affected by HFD during an oral glucose challenge.

  4. Photoelectric Emission Measurements on the Analogs of Individual Cosmic Dust Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Nuth, J. a.; Camata, R. P.

    2006-01-01

    The photoelectric emission process is considered to be the dominant mechanism for charging of cosmic dust grains in many astrophysical environments. The grain charge and equilibrium potentials play an important role in the dynamical and physical processes that include heating of the neutral gas in the interstellar medium, coagulation processes in the dust clouds, and levitation and dynamical processes in the interplanetary medium and planetary surfaces and rings. An accurate evaluation of photoelectric emission processes requires knowledge of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of astrophysical composition as opposed to the values obtained from measurements on flat surfaces of bulk materials, as it is generally assumed on theoretical considerations that the yields for the small grains are much different from the bulk values. We present laboratory measurements of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of silica, olivine, and graphite of approx. 0.09-5 micrometer radii levitated in an electrodynamic balance and illuminated with ultraviolet radiation at 120-160 nm wavelengths. The measured yields are found to be substantially higher than the bulk values given in the literature and indicate a size dependence with larger particles having order-of-magnitude higher values than for submicron-size grains.

  5. Error in the measurement of the Telector monitor, model 6112B (analogic)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This monitor is a portable equipment used with radiological protection ends in many areas where use of radioactive material is made, since account with a telescopic bar with two Geiger Mueller tubes (GM) to measure gamma radiation. The maker in his specifications indicates that the equipment is able to measure from 0.1 R/hr up to 1000 R/hr and their response doesn't depend on the energy in the interval of 300 keV to 3 MeV. However, personal of the Electronic Systems department carrying out tests in the Secondary Laboratory of Dosimetric Calibration (LSCD) of the ININ, it found that this monitor really presents an energy dependence for the energies of 60Co, in the scale of 2 R/hr. With base in an analysis of the equipment and the two GM detectors that it uses, was found that the origin of the problem is the point of saturation of the detector that uses for this scale, which coincides with the maximum measurement value that is of 2 R/hr. This flaw it can be solved using the detector that operates with the high scales, for which is required to make a modification to the electronic circuit in the part of the switch that selects the detector type. (Author)

  6. Experimentally Measured Interfacial Area during Gas Injection into Saturated Porous Media: An Air Sparging Analogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H., Bromhal, Grant

    2010-01-01

    The amount of interfacial area (awn) between air and subsurface liquids during air-sparging can limit the rate of site remediation. Lateral movement within porous media could be encountered during air-sparging operations when air moves along the bottom of a low-permeability lens. This study was conducted to directly measure the amount of awn between air and water flowing within a bench-scale porous flow cell during the lateral movement of air along the upper edge of the cell during air injections into an initially water-saturated flow cell. Four different cell orientations were used to evaluate the effect of air injection rates and porous media geometries on the amount of awn between fluids. Air was injected at flow rates that varied by three orders of magnitude, and for each flow cellover this range of injection rates little change in awn was noted. A wider variation in awn was observed when air moved through different regions for the different flow cell orientations. These results are in good agreement with the experimental findings of Waduge et al. (2007), who performed experiments in a larger sand-pack flow cell, and determined that air-sparging efficiency is nearly independent of flow rate but highly dependent on the porous structure. By directly measuring the awn, and showing that awn does not vary greatly with changes in injection rate, we show that the lack of improvement to remediation rates is because there is a weak dependence of the awn on the air injection rate.

  7. Analog multivariate counting analyzers

    CERN Document Server

    Nikitin, A V; Armstrong, T P

    2003-01-01

    Characterizing rates of occurrence of various features of a signal is of great importance in numerous types of physical measurements. Such signal features can be defined as certain discrete coincidence events, e.g. crossings of a signal with a given threshold, or occurrence of extrema of a certain amplitude. We describe measuring rates of such events by means of analog multivariate counting analyzers. Given a continuous scalar or multicomponent (vector) input signal, an analog counting analyzer outputs a continuous signal with the instantaneous magnitude equal to the rate of occurrence of certain coincidence events. The analog nature of the proposed analyzers allows us to reformulate many problems of the traditional counting measurements, and cast them in a form which is readily addressed by methods of differential calculus rather than by algebraic or logical means of digital signal processing. Analog counting analyzers can be easily implemented in discrete or integrated electronic circuits, do not suffer fro...

  8. Implementation of PID control using Arduino microcontrollers for glucose measurements and micro incubator applications

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Hugo; Mattsson, Viktor; Senek, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    The task is to build a low-cost thermostat and design necessary elements to perform a study on water mixed glucose-impedance at different temperatures and cell growth in a temperature-controlled incubator housing a magnetic field of up to 3 mT. The incubator was designed in solidworks and made to fit petri dishes of two relevant sizes and necessary wiring. The coils designed to extend across the large of the incubator with six turns and a 4A current to yield a sixth of the required magnetic f...

  9. Troubleshooting analog circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Pease, Robert A

    1991-01-01

    Troubleshooting Analog Circuits is a guidebook for solving product or process related problems in analog circuits. The book also provides advice in selecting equipment, preventing problems, and general tips. The coverage of the book includes the philosophy of troubleshooting; the modes of failure of various components; and preventive measures. The text also deals with the active components of analog circuits, including diodes and rectifiers, optically coupled devices, solar cells, and batteries. The book will be of great use to both students and practitioners of electronics engineering. Other

  10. Analog circuits cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Hickman, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Analog Circuits Cookbook presents articles about advanced circuit techniques, components and concepts, useful IC for analog signal processing in the audio range, direct digital synthesis, and ingenious video op-amp. The book also includes articles about amplitude measurements on RF signals, linear optical imager, power supplies and devices, and RF circuits and techniques. Professionals and students of electrical engineering will find the book informative and useful.

  11. Spectroscopic imaging of blood vessels only near the skin surface for non-invasive blood glucose measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Masaru; Sato, Shun; Abeygunawardhana, Pradeep K. W.; Suzuki, Satoru; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2015-07-01

    To realize the non-invasive blood glucose measurement, it will be effective to acquire the spectroscopic imaging of blood vessels only near the skin surface for eliminating other biological-component's disturbances. Our proposed imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopic imaging can limit the measuring depth into focal plane with high light detection sensitivity. Thus, the proposed method will be suitable for measuring only near the skin surface with detecting weak reflected light from inner biomembrane. But reflectance of skin surface is more than 1000 times larger than inner skin's reflectance. Paying attention on Fresnel reflection, fingers what were illuminated by p-polarized beam from Brewster's angle were observed with crossed-Nicol dark field optics. We successfully acquired spectroscopic characteristics of hemoglobin at vein area near the skin surface.

  12. Glucose Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Glucose Sensing is the eleventh volume in the popular series Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, edited by Drs. Chris D. Geddes and Joseph R. Lakowicz. This volume incorporates authoritative analytical fluorescence-based glucose sensing reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. Glucose Sensing is an essential reference for any lab working in the analytical fluorescence glucose sensing field. All academics, bench scientists, and industry professionals wishing to take advantage of the latest and greatest in the continuously emerging field of glucose sensing, and diabetes care & management, will find this volume an invaluable resource. Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy Volume 11, Glucose Sensing Chapters include: Implantable Sensors for Interstitial Fluid Smart Tattoo Glucose Sensors Optical Enzyme-based Glucose Biosensors Plasmonic Glucose Sens...

  13. Glucose metabolism of fetal rat brain in utero, measured with labeled deoxyglucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammals have low cerebral metabolic rates immediately after birth and, by inference, also before birth. In this study, we extended the deoxyglucose method to the fetal rat brain in utero. Rate constants for deoxyglucose transfer across the maternal placental and fetal blood-brain barriers, and lumped constant, have not been reported. Therefore, we applied a new method of determining the lumped constant regionally to the fetal rat brain in utero. The lumped constant averaged 0.55 ± 0.15 relative to the maternal circulation. On this basis, we determined the glucose metabolic rate of the fetal rat brain to be one third of the corresponding maternal value, or 19 ± 2 ?mol hg-1 min-1. (author)

  14. Analog multivariate counting analyzers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterizing rates of occurrence of various features of a signal is of great importance in numerous types of physical measurements. Such signal features can be defined as certain discrete coincidence events, e.g. crossings of a signal with a given threshold, or occurrence of extrema of a certain amplitude. We describe measuring rates of such events by means of analog multivariate counting analyzers. Given a continuous scalar or multicomponent (vector) input signal, an analog counting analyzer outputs a continuous signal with the instantaneous magnitude equal to the rate of occurrence of certain coincidence events. The analog nature of the proposed analyzers allows us to reformulate many problems of the traditional counting measurements, and cast them in a form which is readily addressed by methods of differential calculus rather than by algebraic or logical means of digital signal processing. Analog counting analyzers can be easily implemented in discrete or integrated electronic circuits, do not suffer from dead time effects, and allow substantial reduction of pileup effects. Besides extending the scope of counting measurements, analog multivariate counting analyzers allow simple feedback adjustment of the parameters of the acquisition system for optimal performance. In addition, such analyzers can be made simpler, cheaper, lighter, more reliable, more accurate, and less power consuming than digital counting detectors, and thus would be ideally suited for operation in autonomous conditions such as mobile communication, space missions, prosthetic devices, etc. Other obvious immediate applications of the presented analyzers are pulse-height measuring systems used in the acquisition of nuclear radiation spectra

  15. Effect of postprandial hyperglycaemia in non-invasive measurement of cerebral metabolic rate of glucose in non-diabetic subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchida, Tatsuro; Itoh, Harumi [Department of Radiology, Fukui Medical University, Matsuoka (Japan); Sadato, Norihiro; Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Yonekura, Yoshiharu [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Fukui Medical University (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of postprandial hyperglycaemia (HG) on the non-invasive measurement of cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRGlc). Five patients who had a meal within an hour before a fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) examination were recruited in this study. They underwent intermittent arterial blood sampling (measured input function), and, based on this sampling, CMRGlc was calculated using an autoradiographic method (CMRGlc{sub real}). Simulated input functions were generated based on standardised input function, body surface area and net injected dose of FDG, and simulated CMRGlc (CMRGlc{sub sim}) was also calculated. Percent error of the area under the curve (AUC) between measured (AUC{sub real}) and simulated input function (AUC{sub IFsim}) and percent error between CMRGlc{sub real} and CMRGlc{sub sim} were calculated. These values were compared with those obtained from a previous study conducted under fasting conditions (F). The serum glucose level in the HG group was significantly higher than that in the F group (165{+-}69 vs 100{+-}9 mg/dl, P=0.0007). Percent errors of AUC and CMRGlc in grey matter and white matter in HG were significantly higher than those in F (12.9%{+-}1.3% vs 3.5%{+-}2.2% in AUC, P=0.0015; 18.2%{+-}2.2% vs 2.9%{+-}1.9% in CMRGlc in grey matter, P=0.0028; 24.0%{+-}4.6% vs 3.4%{+-}2.2% in CMRGlc in white matter, P=0.0028). It is concluded that a non-invasive method of measuring CMRGlc should be applied only in non-diabetic subjects under fasting conditions. (orig.)

  16. The influence of image resolution on the positron emission tomographic measurement of caudate glucose consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of image resolution on (a) relative and absolute values of caudate glucose consumption (rCMRGlc) determined by positron emission tomography (PET), and (b) the detection of significant differences in these metabolic values between groups of subjects. For this purpose, raw data of cerebral accumulation of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) obtained in 11 normal subjects and in nine patients with unilateral thalamic infarction were reconstructed using filtered backprojection with four different cut-off frequencies (CFs), yielding images with a transaxial resolution of 5.7, 7.1, 8.9 and 11 mm (full-width at half-maximum; FWHM). Absolute values of candate rCMRGls decreased significantly by more than 30% over the range of image resolutions studied. Bilateral ratios of caudate rCMRGls were insensitive to variations in image resolution. Levels if significance assessing the differences in mean metabolic values between patients and controls were all below 0.01. They were, however, slightly better at image resolutions of 7,1 and 8.9 mm than at a resolution of 5.7 mm. These data indicate (a) that relative values of rCMRGls are better suited to compare quantitative results from different PET cameras than are absolute values, and (b) that th CF used for the filtered backprojection exerts a small but not negligible influence on levels of significance assessing differences in metabolic values between groups of subjects. (orig.)

  17. Glucose /Oxygen Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J. W.; Cox, M. E.

    1987-04-01

    Oxygen concentration has been measured using fluorescence quenching in solid polymer hosts. The feasibility of generalizing these oxygen transducers to a wider class of chemical sensors through coupling to other chemistries is proposed. An example of such coupling is given in a glucose/oxygen transducer. The glucose transducer is produced by entrapping an enzyme, glucose oxidase, in' the composite matrix of a hydrophilic oxygen transducer. Glucose oxidase catalyzes a reaction between glucose and oxygen, thereby lowering the local oxygen concentration. This transducer yields a glucose modified optical oxygen signal. The specific focus of this research is the development of a theoretical model that describes the coupling of glucose concentration to relative fluorescence intensity, the experimental measurement of the key parameters in this model, and the evaluation of the sensitivity of the variation in relative fluorescence intensity with changes in glucose concentration. The experimental parameters include the diffusivity of oxygen in PHEMA (1.36 x 10-7 cm2/s), the solubility ofoglucose in PHEMA (0.24 g in PHEMA/g in buffer), and the diffusivity of glucose in PHEMA (8.25 x 10-8 cm2/s). When these experimental parameters are incorporated, the model developed predicts critical design requirements of the transducer.

  18. Optical measurements of rat muscle samples under treatment with ethylene glycol and glucose

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Luís; Carvalho, Maria Inês; Nogueira, Elisabete; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2013-01-01

    With the objective to study the variation of optical properties of rat muscle during optical clearing, we have performed a set of optical measurements from that kind of tissue. The measurements performed were total transmittance, collimated transmittance, specular reflectance and total reflectance. This set of measurements is sufficient to determine diffuse reflectance and absorbance of the sample, also necessary to estimate the optical properties. All the performed measurements and calculate...

  19. Measurement of local glucose transport rate constant and free glucose pool in human brain using PET and CMG: First result in normals and Huntington patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even in images reconstructed with the method of filtered backprojection it is possible to perform parametric images on a pixel by pixel base with use of appropriate stable algorithms. There is no doubt, that these analytical procedures are less efficient than the iterative ones, but they are doing well when relative values between pixels are of interest. The approach using a Lookup-Table was determined to be best and used in normals and Huntington patients. The first results show that in Huntington patients the transport of glucose is not regional affected, but globally reduced. Following studies on a large patient pool will challenge and proceed further this presented technique. (orig.)

  20. Filtration of analog data measured on-line in automated control system of thermal and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two approaches to additional filtration of analog data in automated control systems of thermal and nuclear power plants are considered. The algorithms studied were used for the development of data reliability control subsystem in automated control system of nuclear power plants

  1. Glucose effectiveness in nondiabetic relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egede, M B; Henriksen, J-E; Durck, T T; Levin, K; Rantzau, C; Ward, G; Beck-Nielsen, H; Alford, F P

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Reduced glucose effectiveness is a predictor of future glucose tolerance in individuals with a family history of type 2 diabetes. We examined retrospectively at 10 years in normoglycemic relatives of diabetic subjects (RELs) the pathophysiological role of glucose effectiveness in the...... development of isolated impaired fasting glucose, glucose intolerance, and acute insulin release. METHODS: At 0 years, 19 RELs and 18 matched control subjects had glucose effectiveness (GE), insulin sensitivity, acute insulin release (AIR)IVGTT, and disposition index measured during an iv glucose tolerance...... test (IVGTT), using the minimal model analysis. At 0 and 10 years, oral glucose tolerance (OGTT) and AIROGTT were determined. RESULTS: At 0 years, fasting glucose (FG) and GE were raised in RELs, but insulin sensitivity and AIROGTT were reduced (P ≤ .05) compared with controls. At 10 years, RELs...

  2. Comparison of a human portable glucometer and an automated chemistry analyzer for measurement of blood glucose concentration in pet ferrets (Mustela putorius furo)

    OpenAIRE

    Summa, Noémie M.; Eshar, David; Lee-Chow, Bridget; Larrat, Sylvain; Brown, Dorothy C.

    2014-01-01

    This study compared blood glucose concentrations measured with a portable blood glucometer and a validated laboratory analyzer in venous blood samples of 20 pet ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). Correlation and agreement were evaluated with a Bland-Altman plot method and Lin’s concordance correlation coefficient. Blood glucose concentrations measured with the laboratory analyzer and the glucometer ranged from 1.9 to 8.6 mmol/L and from 0.9 to 9.2 mmol/L, respectively. The glucometer had a poor...

  3. Controlled Measurement and Comparative Analysis of Cellular Components in E. coli Reveals Broad Regulatory Changes in Response to Glucose Starvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, John R.; Barnhart, Craig; Boutz, Daniel R.; Carroll, Sean M.; Dasgupta, Aurko; Michener, Joshua K.; Needham, Brittany D.; Papoulas, Ophelia; Sridhara, Viswanadham; Sydykova, Dariya K.; Marx, Christopher J.; Trent, M. Stephen; Barrick, Jeffrey E.; Marcotte, Edward M.; Wilke, Claus O.

    2015-01-01

    How do bacteria regulate their cellular physiology in response to starvation? Here, we present a detailed characterization of Escherichia coli growth and starvation over a time-course lasting two weeks. We have measured multiple cellular components, including RNA and proteins at deep genomic coverage, as well as lipid modifications and flux through central metabolism. Our study focuses on the physiological response of E. coli in stationary phase as a result of being starved for glucose, not on the genetic adaptation of E. coli to utilize alternative nutrients. In our analysis, we have taken advantage of the temporal correlations within and among RNA and protein abundances to identify systematic trends in gene regulation. Specifically, we have developed a general computational strategy for classifying expression-profile time courses into distinct categories in an unbiased manner. We have also developed, from dynamic models of gene expression, a framework to characterize protein degradation patterns based on the observed temporal relationships between mRNA and protein abundances. By comparing and contrasting our transcriptomic and proteomic data, we have identified several broad physiological trends in the E. coli starvation response. Strikingly, mRNAs are widely down-regulated in response to glucose starvation, presumably as a strategy for reducing new protein synthesis. By contrast, protein abundances display more varied responses. The abundances of many proteins involved in energy-intensive processes mirror the corresponding mRNA profiles while proteins involved in nutrient metabolism remain abundant even though their corresponding mRNAs are down-regulated. PMID:26275208

  4. An Analog Front-End and ADC Integrated Circuit for Implantable Force and Orientation Measurements in Joint Prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Godara, Balwant; Konstantina S. Nikita; Tanner, Steve; Ali, Shafqat; Banjevic, Mirjana; Arami, Arash; Aminian, Kamiar; Hasenkamp, Willyan; Bertsch, Arnaud; Renaud, Philippe; Farine, Pierre-André

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents an analogue front-end and ADC integrated circuit for processing signals of sensors implanted into joint prosthesis. The circuit is designed to be operated with Wheatstone bridge sensors, such as strain gauges, pressure, Hall Effect, magneto-resistive sensors, etc. It performs sensor supply multiplexing, sensor signal amplification with chopper modulation, offset compensation and 14-bit analog to digital conversion in a single chip. It can operate simultaneously up to eight ...

  5. On-line measurements of oscillating mitochondrial membrane potential in glucose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ann Zahle; Poulsen, Allan K; Olsen, Lars Folke; Brasen, Jens Christian

    2007-01-01

    We employed the fluorescent cyanine dye DiOC(2)(3) to measure membrane potential in semi-anaerobic yeast cells under conditions where glycolysis was oscillating. Oscillations in glycolysis were studied by means of the naturally abundant nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). We found that the...

  6. Changes in Glucose Homeostasis after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery for Obesity at Day Three, Two Months, and One Year after Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkén, Y; Hellström, P M; Holst, Jens Juul; Näslund, E

    2011-01-01

    Context: Endocrine effects of gastric bypass (GBP) surgery for obesity on glucose homeostasis are not fully understood. Main Objective: The main objective of the study was to assess the changes in plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), leptin, somatostatin, glucose...... assessed before and for 180 min after the meal. Satiety was measured with visual analog scales. The absorption rate of acetaminophen added to the liquid meal was measured. Insulin resistance was measured by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. Results: All subjects lost weight (body mass...

  7. Glucose allostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stumvoll, Michael; Tataranni, P Antonio; Stefan, Norbert; Vozarova, Barbora; Bogardus, Clifton; de Courten, Barbora

    2003-01-01

    In many organisms, normoglycemia is achieved by a tight coupling of nutrient-stimulated insulin secretion in the pancreatic beta-cell (acute insulin response [AIR]) and the metabolic action of insulin to stimulate glucose disposal (insulin action [M]). It is widely accepted that in healthy...... individuals with normal glucose tolerance, normoglycemia can always be maintained by compensatorily increasing AIR in response to decreasing M (and vice versa). This has been mathematically described by the hyperbolic relationship between AIR and M and referred to as glucose homeostasis, with glucose...... concentration assumed to remain constant along the hyperbola. Conceivably, glucose is one of the signals stimulating AIR in response to decreasing M. Hypothetically, as with any normally functioning feed-forward system, AIR should not fully compensate for worsening M, since this would remove the stimulus for...

  8. In vivo measurements of whole body (WB) and skeletal muscle glucose metabolism under basal and euglycemic insulin clamp (Clamp) by combined PET and stable isotope (SI) tracer studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim/Background: Primed-constant infusion of SI labeled tracers is a classic technique for studying metabolism at the WB level, however, this procedure provides no information about the metabolism of specific tissues. In contrast PET provides primarily tissue specific data. In this study, we combined PET with SI techniques to measure glucose metabolism in WB and lower limb skeletal muscle (LLM) of humans under Basal and Clamp conditions. Methods and Materials: Four healthy volunteers (73.0 ± 6.0 kg, mean ± sem) were studied. After fasting overnight, each subject was injected with 10 mCi of 18FDG and serial 1.0 min. PET images of the mid-thigh region were acquired over 90 min. Arterial blood samples were collected in parallel. Glucose metabolic rate (GM) was calculated with a 3-compartment / 4 rate constant model; LC assumed to be 1.0. A primed constant infusion of [6,6, 2H2]glucose was performed in parallel with the PET measurements. On another day, the PET and SI measurements were repeated under clamp conditions. All results are expressed as mean ± sem. Results: The glucose kinetics in whole body and in low limb skeletal muscles are shown. Under in vivo conditions, Clamp caused: 1) a 10.2 ± 2.3 fold increase in GM by LLM but only a 4.7 ± 0.4 fold increase in GM by MB. 2) Increased contribution of LLM to WB GM, indicating that LLM GM is more sensitive to insulin compared with anterior LLM (extensors). Discussion: The study demonstrated the unique advantages of using PET to study substrate metabolism in specific tissues in human subjects: i) It is less invasive than the conventional A-V difference and muscle biopsy method. ii) It provides a more detailed picture of substrate metabolism in different parts of the muscle in the same limb, as compared to one spot muscle biopsy. Data in demonstrated that GM in posterior LLM is more sensitive to insulin than that in anterior LLM. iii) It can detect substrate metabolism in deep muscles which cannot be reached by biopsy technique. Therefore PET combined with stable isotope tracer can non-invasively provide a more complete in vivo picture of glucose metabolism in WB and in different parts of the skeletal muscles in human subjects. Conclusions: 1. Euglycemic insulin clamp (EGIC) caused a significant suppress of endogenous glucose production, either released from glycogenolysis or gluconeogenesis in the fasting condition. 2. Glucose metabolism in LLM is more sensitively regulated by insulin than other tissues. 3. On the same lower limb, glucose metabolism posterior muscle group is more sensitively regulated by insulin than those in the anterior. (author)

  9. An Implantable RFID Sensor Tag toward Continuous Glucose Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhibin; Tan, Xi; Chen, Xianliang; Chen, Sizheng; Zhang, Zijian; Zhang, Hualei; Wang, Junyu; Huang, Yue; Zhang, Peng; Zheng, Lirong; Min, Hao

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a wirelessly powered implantable electrochemical sensor tag for continuous blood glucose monitoring. The system is remotely powered by a 13.56-MHz inductive link and utilizes an ISO 15693 radio frequency identification (RFID) standard for communication. This paper provides reliable and accurate measurement for changing glucose level. The sensor tag employs a long-term glucose sensor, a winding ferrite antenna, an RFID front-end, a potentiostat, a 10-bit sigma-delta analog to digital converter, an on-chip temperature sensor, and a digital baseband for protocol processing and control. A high-frequency external reader is used to power, command, and configure the sensor tag. The only off-chip support circuitry required is a tuned antenna and a glucose microsensor. The integrated chip fabricated in SMIC 0.13-μm CMOS process occupies an area of 1.2 mm ×2 mm and consumes 50 μW. The power sensitivity of the whole system is -4 dBm. The sensor tag achieves a measured glucose range of 0-30 mM with a sensitivity of 0.75 nA/mM. PMID:25823049

  10. Infrared spectroscopic analysis of human interstitial fluid in vitro and in vivo using FT-IR spectroscopy and pulsed quantum cascade lasers (QCL): Establishing a new approach to non invasive glucose measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleitez, Miguel; von Lilienfeld-Toal, Hermann; Mäntele, Werner

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial fluid, i.e. the liquid present in the outermost layer of living cells of the skin between the Stratum corneum and the Stratum spinosum, was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and by infrared spectroscopy using pulsed quantum cascade infrared lasers with photoacoustic detection. IR spectra of simulated interstitial fluid samples and of real samples from volunteers in the 850-1800 cm -1 range revealed that the major components of interstitial fluid are albumin and glucose within the physiological range, with only traces of sodium lactate if at all. The IR absorbance of glucose in interstitial fluid in vivo was probed in healthy volunteers using a setup with quantum cascade lasers and photoacoustic detection previously described [11]. A variation of blood glucose between approx. 80 mg/dl and 250 mg/dl in the volunteers was obtained using the standard oral glucose tolerance test (OGT). At two IR wavelengths, 1054 cm -1 and 1084 cm -1, a reasonable correlation between the photoacoustic signal from the skin and the blood glucose value as determined by conventional glucose test sticks using blood from the finger tip was obtained. The infrared photoacoustic glucose signal (PAGS) may serve as the key for a non-invasive glucose measurement, since the glucose content in interstitial fluid closely follows blood glucose in the time course and in the level (a delay of some minutes and a level of approx. 80-90% of the glucose level in blood). Interstitial fluid is present in skin layers at a depth of only 15-50 μm and is thus within the reach of mid-IR energy in an absorbance measurement. A non-invasive glucose measurement for diabetes patients based on mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers and photoacoustic detection could replace the conventional measurement using enzymatic test stripes and a drop of blood from the finger tip, thus reducing pain and being a cost-efficient alternative for millions of diabetes patients.

  11. Measurement of regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose in the human subject with (F-18)-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-glucose and emission computed tomography: validation of the method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracer techniques and models of in vitro quantitative autoradiography and tissue counting for the measure of regional metabolic rates (rMR) are combined with emission computed tomography (ECT). This approach, Physiologic Tomography (PT), provides atraumatic and analytical measurements of rMR. PT is exemplified with the regional measurement of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRGlu) in man with (18F)-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) and positron ECT. Our model incorporates a k4* mediated hydrolysis of FDG-6-PO4 to FDG which then competes with phosphorylation (k3*) of FDG back to FDG-6-PO4 and reverse transport (k2*) back to blood. Although small, k4* is found to be significant. The ECAT positron tomograph was used to measure the rate constants (k1*→k4*), lumped constant (LC), stability, and reproducibility of the model in man. Since these parameters have not been measured for FDG in any species, comparisons are made to values for DG in rat and monkey. Compartmental concentrations of FDG and FDG-6-PO4 were determined and show that cerebral FDG-6-PO4 steadily accumulates for about 100 mins, plateaus and then slowly decreases due to hydrolysis. Cerebral blood FDG concentration was determined to be a minor contribution to tissue activity after 10 min. Regional CMRGlu measurements are reproducible to +- 5.5% over 5 hrs. PT allows the in vivo study ofregional biochemistry and physiology in normal and pathophysiologic states in man with a unique and fundamental capability

  12. Measurement of muscle and whole body (WB) glucose metabolism (GM) in vivo by combined stable isotope (SI) and PET techniques - Validation in an animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim/Background: Primed-constant infusion of SI labeled tracers is a classic technique for studying metabolism at the WB level, however, without invasive A-V difference data it provides no information about the metabolism of specific tissues. In contrast PET provides primarily tissue specific data. The aim of this study is to apply PET in combination with SI methods in an animal to simultaneously quantify substrate metabolism in specific tissues and the WB. Methods and materials: Animals: Seven white New Zealand rabbits (Mean ± SE 3.7 ± 0.1 kg;) were studied. After 14 hours of fast, they were surgically prepared by tracheotomy and implantation of catheters into carotid artery (Ca), jugular vein (Jv), and right femoral vein (Fv) under anesthesia. PET Imaging: The animal was placed in supine position in the gantry of a PC-4096 PET camera. Transmission images (5 min.) with a rotating pin source containing fib 68Ge were acquired with the central tomographic slice positioned to include both hind limbs (HLs). Each animal received C15O2 inhalation and was imaged for blood flow (BE) rate in HL muscles. Then, 18FDG (? 8 mCi) was injected into the animal through jugular vein, followed by serial PET images of muscle glucose metabolism (GM) for 90 min. Primed constant infusion of [6,6, 2H]-glucose (0.8?mol/kg/min, priming 64umol/kg) was conducted simultaneously. Plateau level blood samples were taken from the Ca and Fv for WB and HL GM. Stable Isotope Measurements: The whole body glucose metabolic rate and the plasma glucose kinetics are calculated according to the conventional stable isotope steady state kinetics model. Q=i(E,/EP-l) where i is the infusion rate of stable isotope labeled [6,6, 2H2]-glucose, E1 and EP are the isotopic enrichments of [6,6, 2H2]-glucose in infusate and plasma under steady state conditions. The hind limb glucose metabolism was also measured using stable isotope tracer and tracee difference across the hind limb. WB GM determined by SI was 2.54 ± 0.22 mg/kg/min and GM in the right HL measured by A-V difference of ST was 0.77 ± 0.12 mg/leg/min. Based on muscle mass in HL (199 ± 7.8 g), LM GM (?g/g tissue/min) was calculated to be 3.40 ± 0.46 by St and 3.64 ± 0.22 by PET (N.S; paired t-test). BF to HL muscle determined by C15O2 inhalation was 0.059 ± 0.01 ml/g tissue/min. Discussion: The two in vivo methods provided comparable quantitative information on muscle protein metabolism. PET measurements have the advantage of less invasive than A-V difference methods using SI, but it does not provide the information on whole body glucose disposal rate. Therefore combined SI and PET would provide more complete picture of whole body and regional glucose metabolism in vivo. Conclusions: PET-ST is a non-invasive approach to simultaneously quantify WB and muscle GM without biopsy, hence a powerful tool for human studies under various physio-pathophysiological conditions. (author)

  13. A CAMAC unit for charge measuring and pulse shape recording based on a fast, 8-bit parallel analog-to-digital converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device designed mainly for measuring systems for testing parameters of some type of detectors used in the high energy physics is described. The device is one-module CAMAC unit. It is equipped in a fast, 8-bit parallel analog-to-digital converter ''flash''type with a gated integrator at the input and a static RAM (4096 x 8 bit) at the output. The device enables measurements of the charge in pulses from detectors or registration of the shape of these pulses. The construction, operation and parameters of the circuits of the device are described and the way of programming functions using CAMAC dataway is given. 8 refs., 9 figs. (author)

  14. Measurement of SFDR and noise in EDF amplified analog RF links using all-optical down-conversion and balanced receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Charles; Borbath, Michael; Wyatt, Jeff; DeSalvo, Richard

    2008-04-01

    Optical down-conversion techniques have become an increasingly popular architecture to realize Multi-band Enterprise Terminals (MET), Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), Optical Arbitrary Waveform Generation (OAWG), RF Channelizers and other technologies that need rapid frequency agile tunability in the microwave and millimeter RF bands. We describe recent SFDR, NF, Gain, and Noise modeling and measurements of Erbium-doped-fiber amplified analog RF optical links implementing all-optical down-conversion and balanced photodiode receivers. We describe measurements made on our newly designed extensive test-bed utilizing a wide array of high powered single and balanced photodiodes, polarization preserving output LN modulators, EAMs, LIMs, tunable lasers, EDFAs, RF Amplifiers, and other components to fully characterize direct and coherent detection techniques. Additionally, we compare these experimental results to our comprehensive MATLAB system modeling and optimization software tools.

  15. The relationship between HbA(1c) and fasting plasma glucose in patients with increased plasma liver enzyme measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, R; Rasmussen, L Melholt; Nybo, H; Steenstrup, T; Nybo, M

    2012-01-01

    Background:  HbA(1c) is currently being introduced for diagnostic purpose in diabetes. Previous studies have, however, indicated that patients with liver disease have false low HbA(1c) levels. We therefore investigated the correlation between HbA(1c) and plasma glucose in patients with different ...

  16. Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mikkel B; Calanna, Salvatore; Holst, Jens Juul; Vilsbøll, Tina; Knop, Filip K

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have clinically relevant disturbances in the effects of the hormone glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP). OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the importance of the prevailing plasma glucose levels for the effect of GIP on responses of...... glucagon and insulin and glucose disposal in patients with T2DM. DESIGN AND SETTING: We performed a single center, placebo-controlled, cross-over, experimental study. PATIENTS: We studied twelve patients with T2DM (age: 62 ± 1 years [mean ± SEM], body mass index: 29 ± 1 kg/m(2); glycosylated hemoglobin A1c......: 6.5 ± 0.1% [48 ± 2 mmol/mol]). INTERVENTION: We infused physiological amounts of GIP (2 pmol × kg(-1) × min(-1)) or saline. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We measured plasma concentrations of glucagon, glucose, insulin, C-peptide, intact GIP, and amounts of glucose needed to maintain glucose clamps. RESULTS...

  17. Working Memory and Dynamic Measures of Analogical Reasoning as Predictors of Children's Math and Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Claire E.; Bergwerff, Catharina E.; Heiser, Willem J.; Resing, Wilma C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Working memory and inductive reasoning ability each appear related to children's achievement in math and reading. Dynamic measures of reasoning, based on an assessment procedure including feedback, may provide additional predictive value. The aim of this study was to investigate whether working memory and dynamic measures of analogical…

  18. Assessment of skeletal muscle blood flow and glucose metabolism with positron emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potassium analog, Rb-82 was used to measure skeletal muscle blood flow and the glucose analog, 18-F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) was used to examine the kinetics of skeletal muscle transport and phosphorylation. New Zealand white rabbits' blood flow ranged from 1.0-70 ml/min/100g with the lowest flows occurring under baseline conditions and the highest flows were measured immediately after exercise. Elevated plasma glucose had no effect on increasing blood flow, whereas high physiologic to pharmacologic levels of insulin doubled flow as measured by the radiolabeled microspheres, but a proportionate increase was not detected by Rb-82. The data suggest that skeletal muscle blood flow can be measured using the positron emitting K+ analog Rb-82 under low flow and high flow conditions but not when insulin levels in the plasma are elevated. This may be due to the fact that insulin induces an increase in the Na+/K+-ATPase activity of the cell indirectly through a direct increase in the Na+/H+pump activity

  19. Analog and VLSI circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wai-Kai

    2009-01-01

    Featuring hundreds of illustrations and references, this book provides the information on analog and VLSI circuits. It focuses on analog integrated circuits, presenting the knowledge on monolithic device models, analog circuit cells, high performance analog circuits, RF communication circuits, and PLL circuits.

  20. Science Teachers' Analogical Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzer, Nilmara Braga; Justi, Rosária

    2013-08-01

    Analogies can play a relevant role in students' learning. However, for the effective use of analogies, teachers should not only have a well-prepared repertoire of validated analogies, which could serve as bridges between the students' prior knowledge and the scientific knowledge they desire them to understand, but also know how to introduce analogies in their lessons. Both aspects have been discussed in the literature in the last few decades. However, almost nothing is known about how teachers draw their own analogies for instructional purposes or, in other words, about how they reason analogically when planning and conducting teaching. This is the focus of this paper. Six secondary teachers were individually interviewed; the aim was to characterize how they perform each of the analogical reasoning subprocesses, as well as to identify their views on analogies and their use in science teaching. The results were analyzed by considering elements of both theories about analogical reasoning: the structural mapping proposed by Gentner and the analogical mechanism described by Vosniadou. A comprehensive discussion of our results makes it evident that teachers' content knowledge on scientific topics and on analogies as well as their pedagogical content knowledge on the use of analogies influence all their analogical reasoning subprocesses. Our results also point to the need for improving teachers' knowledge about analogies and their ability to perform analogical reasoning.

  1. Michaelis-Menten constraints improved cerebral glucose metabolism and regional lumped constant measurements with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the three-compartment model of transfer of native glucose and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) into brain, both transport across the blood-brain barrier and phosphorylation by hexokinase can be described by the Michaelis-Menten equation. This permits the use of fixed transport (tau = K*1/K1) and phosphorylation (psi = k*3/k3) ratios and a common partition volume (Ve = K1/k2) for tracer and glucose. By substituting transfer constants of FDG for those of glucose, using tau and psi, the lumped constant was determined directly by positron tomography. The same constraints also eliminated k*2 and k*3 from the model, thus limiting the parameters to K* [equivalent to K*1k*3/(k*2 + k*3)], K*1, and the cerebral vascular volume (Vo). In six healthy elderly men (aged 61 +/- 5 years), time-activity records of cerebral cortical regions were analyzed with tau = 1.1 and psi = 0.3. The results were compared with those of the conventional FDG method. At 20 min, the goodness of fit by the new equation was as good as that of the conventional method at 45 min. The estimates obtained by the constrained method had stable coefficients of variation. After 20 min, regional differences between the estimates were independent of time, although we observed steady decreases of K* and (k*3). The decrease strongly suggested dephosphorylation of FDG-6-phosphate, particularly after 20 min. All estimates of variables with the constrained method were more accurate than those of the conventional method, including the cerebral glucose metabolic rate itself, as well as physiologically more meaningful, particularly with respect to k*2 and k*3

  2. Spectral Reflectance Measurements of Sulfides at the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory — Analogs for Hollow-Forming Material on Mercury?

    OpenAIRE

    Helbert, Joern; Maturilli, Alessandro; D'Amore, Mario; Vaughan, W.M.; Head, J.W.; Klima, R.L.; Blewett, D.T.; McCoy, T.

    2012-01-01

    We present spectral reflectance measurements at visible and near-infrared wavelengths of fresh and heated samples of MnS, CaS, and MgS, as well as elemental sulfur. We infer that sulfides display a diagnostic feature at or near 0.6 µm.

  3. Analog filters in nanometer CMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Uhrmann, Heimo; Zimmermann, Horst

    2014-01-01

    Starting from the basics of analog filters and the poor transistor characteristics in nanometer CMOS 10 high-performance analog filters developed by the authors in 120 nm and 65 nm CMOS are described extensively. Among them are gm-C filters, current-mode filters, and active filters for system-on-chip realization for Bluetooth, WCDMA, UWB, DVB-H, and LTE applications. For the active filters several operational amplifier designs are described. The book, furthermore, contains a review of the newest state of research on low-voltage low-power analog filters. To cover the topic of the book comprehensively, linearization issues and measurement methods for the characterization of advanced analog filters are introduced in addition. Numerous elaborate illustrations promote an easy comprehension. This book will be of value to engineers and researchers in industry as well as scientists and Ph.D students at universities. The book is also recommendable to graduate students specializing on nanoelectronics, microelectronics ...

  4. Nocturnal continuous glucose monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Christiane; Kristensen, Peter Lommer; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Tarnow, Lise; Thorsteinsson, Birger

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: A reliable method to detect biochemical nocturnal hypoglycemia is highly needed, especially in patients with recurrent severe hypoglycemia. We evaluated reliability of nocturnal continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in patients with type 1 diabetes at high risk of severe...... from 23:00 to 07:00 h for plasma glucose (PG) measurements (gold standard). Results: Valid data were obtained in 217 nights. The sensitivity of CGM was 65% (95% confidence interval, 53-77%) below 4 mmol/L, 40% (24-56%) below 3 mmol/L, and 17% (0-47%) below 2.2 mmol/L. PG and CGM readings correlated in...

  5. Carbon Dioxide Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (MVA) by Carbon Stable Isotope Measurements at Artificial and Natural Analog Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, S. M.; Humphries, S. D.; McInroy, R. E.; Rahn, T.; Fessenden, J. E.; Dobeck, L.; Barr, J. L.; Spangler, L.

    2011-12-01

    Storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations is one method to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion. Monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) of geologically sequestered CO2 is critical to the operation of a geologic storage site. Surface MVA techniques capable of identifying seepage from the sequestration reservoir at or below ambient CO2 concentrations are desired. The CO2 carbon stable isotope ratio (δ13CO2) is a sensitive diagnostic signature that can distinguish between anthropogenic (δ13CO2yielding a signal proportional to the species concentration. This FMS signature is recorded at multiple wavelengths to obtain the CO2 carbon isotope ratio. Two instruments using the FMS technique have been built and tested at LANL. The first instrument is an in situ instrument that draws ambient air into a multi-pass cell for a point source measurement. The second instrument uses an open-air path, tested up to 160 m round trip, to measure the column average CO2 carbon isotopic ratio. In this paper, results from laboratory tests and field deployments will be presented. The Zero Emissions Research & Technology (ZERT) group at Montana State University established a field test site where 0.15 - 0.20 tons of CO2 per day were released approximately 2 m below the soil surface to test the performance of CO2 detection instruments and measurement techniques. The in situ instrument was also deployed to the Valles Caldera National Preserve in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico where CO2 is trapped at night which results in large concentration swings. Finally, the instruments were deployed to the Juniper-Pinion field site at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  6. Intuitive analog circuit design

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Intuitive Analog Circuit Design outlines ways of thinking about analog circuits and systems that let you develop a feel for what a good, working analog circuit design should be. This book reflects author Marc Thompson's 30 years of experience designing analog and power electronics circuits and teaching graduate-level analog circuit design, and is the ideal reference for anyone who needs a straightforward introduction to the subject. In this book, Dr. Thompson describes intuitive and ""back-of-the-envelope"" techniques for designing and analyzing analog circuits, including transistor amplifi

  7. Enhancing the characterization of bedload transport in rivers using the analogy between the Hertz contact theory and plate hydrophone measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrière, Julien; Oth, Adrien; Schenkluhn, Reimar; Krein, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Vibration measurements performed with plate or pipe geophone/hydrophone systems are of growing interest for bedload transport monitoring since they allow performing high temporal resolution and continuous records. Our set-up is constituted by a piezoelectric hydrophone acting as a "sediment vibration sensor" in contact with a steel plate located on the streambed. With such an apparatus, the signal processing is generally reduced to power spectral analysis or impact counting. However, a large amount of useful information is contained in the waveform of the impact signal, which conveys the force and the contact time that the bedload imposes on the plate. The wave amplitude is not well constrained because it varies a lot with changing impact location and velocity. The wave frequency is a more relevant parameter, less sensitive to these variables. According to the Hertz contact theory the frequency of the first signal arrival (flexural wave) is directly proportional to the bed-material grain size. Then, an appropriate analysis of the frequency attributes (central frequency, modulation) is needed to estimate the size of bedload particles. In this way, we have developed a complete processing algorithm based on a high dimensional decomposition method (chirplet transform) to get an accurate estimation of the first arrival frequency content. Results on summer flood events in a lowland river show that impacts are well separated by their central frequency and that most of transport occurs during larger peak flows. The portion of coarser sediment which is characterized by low frequencies is preferentially transported during the rising limb whereas the finer sand fraction identified by higher frequencies is transported during both rising and falling limb. Such a processing offers the opportunity to better understand the bedload signature of vibration measurements and is promising in view of quantifying processes of bedload transport and deposition. This final objective of quantification is an ongoing research by performing a flume experiment with various impact velocity and granulometry (collaboration with the Hydrology Department of Trier University).

  8. Optical imaging of tumor vascularity associated with proliferation and glucose metabolism in early breast cancer: clinical application of total hemoglobin measurements in the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Near-infrared optical imaging targeting the intrinsic contrast of tissue hemoglobin has emerged as a promising approach for visualization of vascularity in cancer research. We evaluated the usefulness of diffuse optical spectroscopy using time-resolved spectroscopic (TRS) measurements for functional imaging of primary breast cancer. Fifty-five consecutive TNM stageI/II patients with histologically proven invasive ductal carcinoma and operable breast tumors (<5 cm) who underwent TRS measurements were enrolled. Thirty (54.5%) patients underwent 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography with measurement of maximum tumor uptake. TRS was used to obtain oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin (tHb) levels from the lesions, surrounding normal tissue, and contralateral normal tissue. Lesions with tHb levels 20% higher than those present in normal tissue were defined as “hotspots,” while others were considered “uniform.” The findings in either tumor type were compared with clinicopathological factors. “Hotspot” tumors were significantly larger (P = 0.002) and exhibited significantly more advanced TNM stage (P = 0.01), higher mitotic counts (P = 0.01) and higher levels of FDG uptake (P = 0.0004) compared with “uniform” tumors; however, other pathological variables were not significantly different between the two groups. Optical imaging for determination of tHb levels allowed for measurement of tumor vascularity as a function of proliferation and glucose metabolism, which may be useful for prediction of patient prognosis and potential response to treatment

  9. Sketching, analogies and creativity

    OpenAIRE

    Verstijnen, Ilse Marieke; Heylighen, Ann; Wagemans, Johan; Neuckermans, Herman

    2001-01-01

    Paper and pencil sketching, visual analogies, and creativity are intuitively interconnected in design. This paper reports on previous and current research activities of a psychologist (the 1st author) and an architect/designer (the 2nd author) on issues concerning sketching and analogies, and analogies and creativity respectively. In this paper we tried to unite these findings into a combined theory on how sketching, analogies, and creativity interrelate. An appealing theory emerges. It...

  10. Tissue IGF-I Measured by Microdialysis Reflects Body Glucose Utilization After rhIGF-I Injection in Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekström, Klas; Pulkkinen, Mari-Anne; Carlsson-Skwirut, Christine; Brorsson, Anna-Lena; Ma, Zhulin; Frystyk, Jan; Bang, Peter

    2015-01-01

    elevated tissue IGF-I remains unknown. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between whole-body glucose uptake and tissue IGF-I measured by microdialysis. DESIGN: This was a single-blind placebo-controlled crossover study. SETTING: The setting was a tertiary pediatric...... injection of recombinant human (rh) IGF-I (120 μg/kg) or saline was given after 2 hours. In parallel, tissue IGF-I levels were determined by microdialysis (md-IGF-I). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: md-IGF-I levels in muscle and subcutaneous fat, and GIR were determined. RESULTS: md-IGF-I levels were detectable but...... < .0001). In contrast, serum IGF-I was increased already at 30 minutes after rhIGF-I and reached a plateau 2-fold above baseline (P < .0001). CONCLUSION: We demonstrate that md-IGF-I measurements are valid and physiologically relevant by reflecting rhIGF-I-induced glucose uptake. Future studies should be...

  11. Edentulism and dental prostheses in the elderly: impact on quality of life measured with EuroQol - visual analog scale (EQ-VAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Gutiérrez, Carlos; Borda, Miguel G; Arciniegas, Antonio J; Borda, Claudia X

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the impact of edentulism and dental prostheses on quality of life (QOL) in older adults in Bogota, Colombia. Edentulism is a frequent condition in older adults and has great impact on their QOL. No epidemiological data are currently available on edentulism among older adults in Colombia. Data were obtained from the SABE-Bogota study, a cross-sectional study conducted in 2012, and used to analyze the EQ-VAS (Visual Analog Scale) from the EuroQol instrument to measure the perception of quality of life (QOL) in relation to edentulism. The study included 2,000 individuals over 60 years old. The Spearman-Rho correlation was used to analyze the correlation between EQ-VAS and edentulism. Chi-Square, ANOVA and t-test were used to study the differences in EQ-VAS scores between edentulous and healthy subjects. Statistical significance was set at psocial class and lower education were related to edentulism. Individuals with fewer teeth and dental prostheses had lower EQ-VAS scores (paffects QOL in older adults and the use of dental prosthesis does not improve the perception of QOL. PMID:26355885

  12. Radioactive Decay - An Analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeachy, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Presents an analog of radioactive decay that allows the student to grasp the concept of half life and the exponential nature of the decay process. The analog is devised to use small, colored, plastic poker chips or counters. Provides the typical data and a graph which supports the analog. (YP)

  13. Thresholds of whole-blood β-hydroxybutyrate and glucose concentrations measured with an electronic hand-held device to identify ovine hyperketonemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, M; Damberger, A; Schwendenwein, I; Gasteiner, J; Drillich, M; Iwersen, M

    2014-03-01

    Metabolic disorders, especially hyperketonemia, are very common in dairy sheep. The whole-blood concentrations of β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) and glucose can be determined by commercially available electronic hand-held devices, which are used in human medicine and for the detection of ketosis in dairy cows. The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of the hand-held device Precision Xceed (PX; Abbott Diabetes Care Inc., Abbott Park, IL) to detect hyperketonemia in ewes. An additional objective of this study was to evaluate the agreement between samples obtained by minimal invasive venipuncture of an ear vein and measurements of whole-blood samples from the jugular vein (vena jugularis, v. jug.). Blood samples taken from the v. jug. were collected from 358 ewes on 4 different farms. These samples and a blood drop obtained from an ear vein were analyzed simultaneously on farm with the PX. For method comparison, the samples obtained from the v. jug. were also analyzed by standard methods, which served as the gold standard at the Central Laboratory of the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Austria. The correlation coefficients between the serum BHBA concentration and the concentrations measured with the hand-held meter in the whole blood from an ear vein and the v. jug. were 0.94 and 0.96, respectively. The correlation coefficients of plasma and whole-blood glucose concentration were 0.68 for the v. jug. and 0.47 for the ear vein. The mean glucose concentration was significantly lower in animals classified as hyperketonemic (BHBA ≥ 1.6 mmol/L) compared with healthy ewes. Whole-blood concentrations of BHBA and glucose measured with the PX from v. jug. showed a constant negative bias of 0.15 mmol/L and 8.4 mg/dL, respectively. Hence, a receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to determine thresholds for the PX to detect hyperketonemia in ewes. This resulted in thresholds for moderate ketosis of BHBA concentrations of 0.7 mmol/L in blood from an ear vein and the v. jug. Cutoffs of 1.0 mmol/L (ear vein) and 1.1 mmol/L (v. jug.) BHBA were determined to detect animals at greater risk to develop severe hyperketonemia. Applying these thresholds, excellent test characteristics, with sensitivities of 1.00 for both samples and specificities of 0.98 for the ear vein and 0.97 for the v. jug. were determined. These results demonstrate that the PX is a useful tool for detection of hyperketonemia in ewes. PMID:24440266

  14. Glucose Metabolism in Critically Ill Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Møller, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    glucose (BG). This is taken advantage of in the treatment of patients with T2DM, for whom GLP-1 analogs have been introduced during the recent years. Infusion of GLP-1 also lowers the BG level in critically ill patients without causing severe hypoglycemia. The T2DM and critical illness share similar...

  15. Analog and hybrid computing

    CERN Document Server

    Hyndman, D E

    2013-01-01

    Analog and Hybrid Computing focuses on the operations of analog and hybrid computers. The book first outlines the history of computing devices that influenced the creation of analog and digital computers. The types of problems to be solved on computers, computing systems, and digital computers are discussed. The text looks at the theory and operation of electronic analog computers, including linear and non-linear computing units and use of analog computers as operational amplifiers. The monograph examines the preparation of problems to be deciphered on computers. Flow diagrams, methods of ampl

  16. Cerebral glucose utilization measured with high resolution positron emission tomography in epileptic Finnish Spitz dogs and healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitmaa, Ranno; Haaparanta-Solin, Merja; Snellman, Marjatta; Cizinauskas, Sigitas; Orro, Toomas; Kuusela, Erja; Johansson, Jarkko; Viljanen, Tapio; Jokinen, Tarja S; Bergamasco, Luciana; Metsähonkala, Liisa

    2014-01-01

    In human epileptic patients, changes in cerebral glucose utilization can be detected 2-deoxy-2-[(18) F] fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). The purpose of this prospective study was to determine whether epileptic dogs might show similar findings. Eleven Finnish Spitz dogs with focal idiopathic epilepsy and six healthy dogs were included. Dogs were examined using electroencephalography (EEG) and FDG-PET, with epileptic dogs being evaluated during the interictal period. Visual and semi-quantitative assessment methods of FDG-PET were compared and contrasted with EEG findings. Three independent observers, unaware of dog clinical status, detected FDG-PET uptake abnormalities in 9/11 epileptic (82%), and 4/8 healthy dogs (50%). Occipital cortex findings were significantly associated with epileptic status (P = 0.013). Epileptic dogs had significantly lower standardized uptake values (SUVs) in numerous cortical regions, the cerebellum, and the hippocampus compared to the control dogs. The lowest SUVs were found in the occipital lobe. White matter normalized and left-right asymmetry index values for all pairs of homologous regions did not differ between groups. Visual evaluation of the EEGs was less sensitive (36%) than FDG-PET. Both diagnostic tests were consensual and specific (100%) for occipital findings, but EEG had a lower sensitivity for detecting lateralized foci than FDG-PET. Findings supported the use of FDG-PET as a diagnostic test for dogs with suspected idiopathic epilepsy. Visual and semiquantitative analyses of FDG-PET scans provided complementary information. Findings also supported the theory that epileptogenesis may occur in multiple brain regions in Finnish Spitz dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. PMID:24547764

  17. Simultaneous integration of biosensor and EEG measurements in freely moving rodents: Dynamic changes of brain glucose and glutamate concentrations during transitions between different sleep states in the mouse pre-frontal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Johnson

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This work demonstrates a direct correlation between glutamate and glucose levels in the pre-frontal cortex of mice and sleep state. Male C57 mice were simultaneously implanted with an intracerebral guide cannula targeting the prefrontal cortex and electrodes to measure cortical electroencephalographs (EEG. A turn-key Pinnacle 8401 EEG/EMG/Biosensor system was used to record real-time, second by second measurements of glucose or glutamate levels and EEG activity over a 24 hour period. Results showed that glucose levels in mice transitioning from waking to slow-wave sleep rose an average of 116 +/- 27 uM (n=57 episodes. Conversely, glucose levels in mice transitioning from sleep to wakefulness resulted in an average decrease of 121 +/- 27uM glucose. (n=54 episodes. Glutamate levels rose an average of 0.52 +/- 0.21uM upon during REM episodes lasting longer than one minute before returning to baseline levels following the REM episode. Second by second measurement of neurochemicals such as glutamate, glucose and lactate in the brain using electrochemical biosensors is a powerful tool that can be used to profile concentration changes due to pharmacological and behavioral interactions. Funding through NIH SBIR Grant #5T44MH076318-03

  18. High-speed analog commutator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessonova, N.A.; Meleshko, E.A.; Oleinik, S.V.; Palkin, Yu.Yu.

    1988-07-01

    A 16-channel high-speed commutator of analog signals is described that is implemented by KR590KT1 integrated-circuit switches. The commutator is designed for multichannel measuring systems for recording sampled instantaneous values of input signals. The maximum channel-switching frequency is approximately 20 MHz and the integral nonlinearity of the transmission coefficient is 0.2%.

  19. Microwave-Based Biosensor for Glucose Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, N. S. M.; Khalid, K.; Yusof, N. A.

    2010-07-01

    In this project, microwave-based biosensor for glucose detection has been studied. The study is based on the dielectric properties changes at microwave frequency for glucose-enzyme reaction. Glucose interaction with glucose oxidase (GOD) produced gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide. The reaction of the glucose solutions with an enzyme was carried out in 1:3 of glucose and enzyme respectively. The measurements were done using the Open Ended Coaxial Probe (OECP) coupled with computer controlled software automated network analyzer (ANA) with frequency range from 200MHz to 20GHz at room temperature (25 °C). The differences of enzyme and glucose-enzyme reaction were calculated and plotted. In the microwave interaction with the glucose-enzyme reaction, ionic conduction and dipole molecules was detected at 0.99GHz and 16.44GHz respectively based on changes of dielectric loss factor.

  20. Predicting Plasma Glucose From Interstitial Glucose Observations Using Bayesian Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Alexander Hildenbrand; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Juhl, Rune; Schmidt, Signe; Nørgaard, Kirsten; Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Madsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    One way of constructing a control algorithm for an artificial pancreas is to identify a model capable of predicting plasma glucose (PG) from interstitial glucose (IG) observations. Stochastic differential equations (SDEs) make it possible to account both for the unknown influence of the continuous...... glucose monitor (CGM) and for unknown physiological influences. Combined with prior knowledge about the measurement devices, this approach can be used to obtain a robust predictive model. A stochastic-differential-equation-based gray box (SDE-GB) model is formulated on the basis of an identifiable...

  1. Effects of 5 Thio-D-Glucose on cellular adenosine triphosphate levels and deoxyribonucleic acid rejoining in hypoxic and aerobic Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were measured in both hypoxic and aerobic cultures of V79 Chinese hamster cells treated with 5-thio-D-glucose (5-SH-D-Glc). This glucose analog, a known inhibitor of D-glucose transport and metabolism, reduced ATP in cell cultures allowed to become hypoxic by cell metabolism, but not in aerobic cultures treated similarly. Cells depleted of ATP were unable to rejoin x-ray induced deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) strand breaks as measured by the alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation technique. The inference for radiation therapy is that inhibition of glucose metabolism selectively depletes energy reserves in hypoxic cells, rendering these cells more radiosensitive and leading to a more effective tumor treatment

  2. Classical analog of entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that quantum entanglement has a very close classical analog, namely, secret classical correlations. The fundamental analogy stems from the behavior of quantum entanglement under local operations and classical communication and the behavior of secret correlations under local operations and public communication. A large number of derived analogies follow. In particular, teleportation is analogous to the one time pad, the concept of 'pure state' exists in the classical domain, entanglement concentration and dilution are essentially classical secrecy protocols, and single-copy-entanglement manipulations have such a close classical analog that the majorization results are reproduced in the classical setting. This analogy allows one to import questions from the quantum domain into the classical one, and vice versa, helping to get a better understanding of both. Also, by identifying classical aspects of quantum entanglement, it allows one to identify those aspects of entanglement that are uniquely quantum mechanical

  3. Glucose and fructose 6-phosphate cycle in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have determined the rate of glucose cycling by comparing turnovers of [2-3H]- and [6-3H]glucose under basal conditions and during a glucose infusion. Moreover, the activity of the fructose 6-phosphate cycle was assessed by comparing [3-3H]- and [6-3H]glucose. The study included eight lean subjects with normal glucose tolerance. They participated in two randomly performed investigations. In one experiment [2-3H]- and [6-3H]glucose were given simultaneously, while in the other only [3-3H]glucose was given. The basal rate of glucose cycling was 0.32 +/- 0.08 mg X kg-1 X min-1 or 17% of basal glucose production (P less than 0.005). During glucose infusion the activity of endogenous glucose cycling did not change but since glucose production was suppressed it amounted to 130% of glucose production. The basal fructose 6-phosphate cycle could be detected only in three subjects and was suppressed during glucose infusion. In conclusion, the glucose cycle is active in healthy humans both in basal conditions and during moderate hyperglycemia. In some subjects, the fructose 6-phosphate cycle also appears to be active. Thus it is preferable to use [6-3H]glucose rather than [3-3H]glucose when measuring glucose production and particularly when assessing glucose cycle

  4. Analogies in theoretical physics

    OpenAIRE

    Jona-Lasinio, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Analogies have had and continue to have an important role in the development of theoretical physics. They may start from similarities of physical concepts followed by similarities in the mathematical formalization or it may be a purely mathematical aspect to suggest the development of analogous physical concepts. More often a subtle non obvious interplay between these levels is involved. In this paper I will discuss two cases sufficiently intricate to illustrate some ways of how analogies wor...

  5. The Analogical Mind

    OpenAIRE

    Holyoak, Keith J.; Thagard, P.

    1997-01-01

    We examine the use of analogy in human thinking from the perspective of a multiconstraint theory, which postulates three basic types of constraints: similarity, structure and purpose. The operation of these constraints is apparent in both laboratory experiments on analogy and in naturalistic settings, including politics, psychotherapy, and scientific research. We sketch how the multiconstraint theory can be implemented in detailed computational simulations of the analogical human mind.

  6. Analog circuit design

    CERN Document Server

    Dobkin, Bob

    2012-01-01

    Analog circuit and system design today is more essential than ever before. With the growth of digital systems, wireless communications, complex industrial and automotive systems, designers are being challenged to develop sophisticated analog solutions. This comprehensive source book of circuit design solutions aids engineers with elegant and practical design techniques that focus on common analog challenges. The book's in-depth application examples provide insight into circuit design and application solutions that you can apply in today's demanding designs. <

  7. The determination of solubility and diffusion coefficient for solids in liquids by an inverse measurement technique using cylinders of amorphous glucose as a model compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of sugar and sugar-containing materials is well recognized nowadays, owing to their application in industrial processes, particularly in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Because of the large numbers of those compounds involved and the relatively small number of solubility and/or diffusion coefficient data for each compound available, it is highly desirable to measure the solubility and/or diffusion coefficient as efficiently as possible and to be able to improve the accuracy of the methods used. In this work, a new technique was developed for the measurement of the diffusion coefficient of a stationary solid solute in a stagnant solvent which simultaneously measures solubility based on an inverse measurement problem algorithm with the real-time dissolved amount profile as a function of time. This study differs from established techniques in both the experimental method and the data analysis. The experimental method was developed in which the dissolved amount of solid solute in quiescent solvent was investigated using a continuous weighing technique. In the data analysis, the hybrid genetic algorithm is used to minimize an objective function containing a calculated and a measured dissolved amount with time. This is measured on a cylindrical sample of amorphous glucose in methanol or ethanol. The calculated dissolved amount, that is a function of the unknown physical properties of the solid solute in the solvent, is calculated by the solution of the two-dimensional nonlinear inverse natural convection problem. The estimated values of the solubility of amorphous glucose in methanol and ethanol at 293 K were respectively 32.1 g/100 g methanol and 1.48 g/100 g ethanol, in agreement with the literature values, and support the validity of the simultaneously measured diffusion coefficient. These results show the efficiency and the stability of the developed technique to simultaneously estimate the solubility and diffusion coefficient. Also the influence of the solution density change and the initial concentration conditions on the dissolved amount was investigated by the numerical results using the estimated parameters. It is found that the theoretical assumption to simplify the inverse measurement problem algorithm is reasonable for low solubility

  8. The determination of solubility and diffusion coefficient for solids in liquids by an inverse measurement technique using cylinders of amorphous glucose as a model compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chengyao; Huang, Pei

    2011-05-01

    The importance of sugar and sugar-containing materials is well recognized nowadays, owing to their application in industrial processes, particularly in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Because of the large numbers of those compounds involved and the relatively small number of solubility and/or diffusion coefficient data for each compound available, it is highly desirable to measure the solubility and/or diffusion coefficient as efficiently as possible and to be able to improve the accuracy of the methods used. In this work, a new technique was developed for the measurement of the diffusion coefficient of a stationary solid solute in a stagnant solvent which simultaneously measures solubility based on an inverse measurement problem algorithm with the real-time dissolved amount profile as a function of time. This study differs from established techniques in both the experimental method and the data analysis. The experimental method was developed in which the dissolved amount of solid solute in quiescent solvent was investigated using a continuous weighing technique. In the data analysis, the hybrid genetic algorithm is used to minimize an objective function containing a calculated and a measured dissolved amount with time. This is measured on a cylindrical sample of amorphous glucose in methanol or ethanol. The calculated dissolved amount, that is a function of the unknown physical properties of the solid solute in the solvent, is calculated by the solution of the two-dimensional nonlinear inverse natural convection problem. The estimated values of the solubility of amorphous glucose in methanol and ethanol at 293 K were respectively 32.1 g/100 g methanol and 1.48 g/100 g ethanol, in agreement with the literature values, and support the validity of the simultaneously measured diffusion coefficient. These results show the efficiency and the stability of the developed technique to simultaneously estimate the solubility and diffusion coefficient. Also the influence of the solution density change and the initial concentration conditions on the dissolved amount was investigated by the numerical results using the estimated parameters. It is found that the theoretical assumption to simplify the inverse measurement problem algorithm is reasonable for low solubility.

  9. Assessing liver function by magnetic resonance imaging two-dimensional phase-shift flow measurement of portal venous blood flow after oral intake of glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have already reported that the ratio of portal venous flow 30 min after oral intake of glucose 75 g to that before intake (PVFR30), measured using pulsed-Doppler ultrasonography (US), correlated significantly with other indicators of liver function and that it could be used to estimate hepatic function before surgery, including liver resection. In this study, to assess the disadvantages of pulsed-Doppler ultrasonography, PVFR30 was measured using two-dimensional (2D) phase-shift (PS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PVFR30 was measured in 17 patients and 7 volunteers: 13 with liver cirrhosis (LC) and 11 without LC (non-LC). Portal venous flow could be measured in all patients without any disturbance of intestinal gas or patient fat, or the high degree of technical skill that Doppler US requires. PVFR30 was significantly lower in the LC group than in the non-LC group. In addition, it correlated significantly with other indicators of liver function, including the indocyanine green clearance test, prothrombin time, hepaplastin test, and cholinesterase activity. These results suggest that PVFR30 measured by 2D PS MRI can be used to estimate liver function, and that this MRI method can be performed more easily than pulsed-Doppler US. (author)

  10. Assessing liver function by magnetic resonance imaging two-dimensional phase-shift flow measurement of portal venous blood flow after oral intake of glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Hidefumi; Sakamoto, Michio [Tomogikukai Showa Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan); Midorikawa, Takemasa [Showa Univ., Yokohama (Japan). Fujigaoka Hospital] [and others

    2002-05-01

    We have already reported that the ratio of portal venous flow 30 min after oral intake of glucose 75 g to that before intake (PVFR30), measured using pulsed-Doppler ultrasonography (US), correlated significantly with other indicators of liver function and that it could be used to estimate hepatic function before surgery, including liver resection. In this study, to assess the disadvantages of pulsed-Doppler ultrasonography, PVFR30 was measured using two-dimensional (2D) phase-shift (PS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PVFR30 was measured in 17 patients and 7 volunteers: 13 with liver cirrhosis (LC) and 11 without LC (non-LC). Portal venous flow could be measured in all patients without any disturbance of intestinal gas or patient fat, or the high degree of technical skill that Doppler US requires. PVFR30 was significantly lower in the LC group than in the non-LC group. In addition, it correlated significantly with other indicators of liver function, including the indocyanine green clearance test, prothrombin time, hepaplastin test, and cholinesterase activity. These results suggest that PVFR30 measured by 2D PS MRI can be used to estimate liver function, and that this MRI method can be performed more easily than pulsed-Doppler US. (author)

  11. Impact of Glucose Tolerance Status, Sex, and Body Size on Glucose Absorption Patterns During OGTTs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faerch, K.; Pacini, G.; Nolan, J. J.; Hansen, Torben; Tura, A.; Vistisen, D.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVEWe studied whether patterns of glucose absorption during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) were abnormal in individuals with impaired glucose regulation and whether they were related to sex and body size (height and fat-free mass). We also examined how well differences in insulin...... sensitivity and -cell function measured by gold-standard tests were reflected in the corresponding OGTT-derived estimates.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSWith validated methods, various aspects of glucose absorption were estimated from 12-point, 3-h, 75-g OGTTs in 66 individuals with normal glucose tolerance (NGT......), isolated impaired fasting glucose (i-IFG), or isolated impaired glucose tolerance (i-IGT). Insulin sensitivity and -cell function were measured with the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp and intravenous glucose tolerance tests, respectively. Surrogate markers of both conditions were calculated from OGTTs...

  12. Biological evaluation of two iodine-123-labeled D-glucose acetals prepared as glucose transporter radioligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunet-Desruet, Marie-Dominique; Ghezzi, Catherine; Morin, Christophe; Comet, Michel; Fagret, Daniel

    1998-07-01

    Two iodinated acetals of D-glucose, 4,6-(R)-O-(2'-iodoethylidene)-{alpha}, {beta}-D-glucose and 4,6-(R)-O-(4'-iodobenzylidene)-{alpha}, {beta}-D-glucose , were prepared and their potential as suitable SPECT radioligands for imaging of glucose transporters was studied. Both are analogs of acetal D-glucose derivatives, which are known to bind to the exofacial sites of the glucose transport protein (GluT). To assess whether iodinated acetals 1 and 2 interacted with the glucose transporter, they were tested in vitro in human erythrocytes (GluT1) and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (GluT4). The results indicated that 1 and 2 had a very low affinity for the glucose transporter and probably accumulated in cells. Study of their tissue distribution was carried out in the mouse in vivo: Both compounds showed fast tissue clearance with preferential renal elimination. It is concluded that iodinated acetals of D-glucose 1 and 2 are not suitable for GluT targeting in vivo.

  13. Hydraulic Capacitor Analogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baser, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    Students have difficulties in physics because of the abstract nature of concepts and principles. One of the effective methods for overcoming students' difficulties is the use of analogies to visualize abstract concepts to promote conceptual understanding. According to Iding, analogies are consistent with the tenets of constructivist learning…

  14. Measurements of urea and glucose in aqueous solutions with dual-beam near-infrared Fourier-transform spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P.S.; Bak, J.

    2002-01-01

    This study investigates the use of a dual-beam, optical null, FT-IR spectrometer to measure trace organic components in aqueous solutions in the combination band region 5000-4000 cm(-1). The spectrometer may be used for both single- and dual-beam measurements, thereby facilitating comparison of...

  15. CMOS image sensor-based implantable glucose sensor using glucose-responsive fluorescent hydrogel

    OpenAIRE

    Tokuda, Takashi; Takahashi, Masayuki; Uejima, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Keita; Kawamura, Toshikazu; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Okitsu, Teru; Takeuchi, Shoji; Ohta, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A CMOS image sensor-based implantable glucose sensor based on an optical-sensing scheme is proposed and experimentally verified. A glucose-responsive fluorescent hydrogel is used as the mediator in the measurement scheme. The wired implantable glucose sensor was realized by integrating a CMOS image sensor, hydrogel, UV light emitting diodes, and an optical filter on a flexible polyimide substrate. Feasibility of the glucose sensor was verified by both in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  16. Modification of a traditional breakfast leads to increased satiety along with attenuated plasma increments of glucose, C-peptide, insulin, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Bodil; Höglund, Peter; Roth, Bodil; Darwiche, Gassan

    2016-04-01

    Our hypothesis was that carbohydrate, fat, and protein contents of meals affect satiety, glucose homeostasis, and hormone secretion. The objectives of this crossover trial were to examine satiety, glycemic-insulinemic response, and plasma peptide levels in response to 2 different recommended diabetes diets with equivalent energy content. One traditional reference breakfast and one test breakfast, with lower carbohydrate and higher fat and protein content, were randomly administered to healthy volunteers (8 men, 12 women). Blood samples were collected, and satiety was scored on a visual analog scale before and 3 hours after meals. Plasma glucose was measured, and levels of C-peptide, ghrelin, glucagon, glucagon-like peptide-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), insulin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and adipokines were analyzed by Luminex. Greater satiety, visual analog scale, and total and delta area under the curve (P < .001), and lower glucose postprandial peak (max) and change from baseline (dmax; P < .001) were observed after test meal compared with reference meal. Postprandial increments of C-peptide, insulin, and GIP were suppressed after test meal compared with reference meal (total delta area under the curve [P = .03, .006, and .004], delta area under the curve [P = .006, .003, and .02], max [P = .01, .007, and .002], and dmax [P = .004, .008, and .007], respectively). Concentrations of other peptides were similar between meals. A lower carbohydrate and higher fat and protein content provides greater satiety and attenuation of C-peptide, glucose, insulin, and GIP responses compared with the reference breakfast but does not affect adipokines, ghrelin, glucagon, glucagon-like peptide-1, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. PMID:27001281

  17. Glucose challenge testing in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, D R; Bolton, R N; Prins, R P; Mark, C

    1991-06-01

    This study examines results of routine glucose challenge screening in 608 third-trimester patients in a private practice setting. Four patient categories were defined on the basis of the results: normal, abnormal screen with normal glucose tolerance test, borderline glucose tolerance test, and gestational diabetes. When only standard prenatal management practices were used, the fetal outcomes in the four groups were not measurably different. The costs of these procedures resulted in an expenditure of $722.31 per diagnosis of gestational diabetes. This seems excessive in view of the negligible impact of these studies on fetal outcome. Our impression was that routine third-trimester dietary counseling, postprandial glucose monitoring without challenge testing, and evaluation of cases of suspected fetal macrosomia would result in comparable outcome at significantly reduced cost. PMID:1904684

  18. Hyperglycemia-induced stimulation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle measured by PET- [18F]6FDG and [18F]2FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A physiologically based model proposed by our group has been developed to assess glucose transport and phosphorylation in skeletal muscle. In this study, we investigated whether our model has the ability to detect a glucose-induced increase in glucose transport in skeletal muscle. In particular, we used small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) data obtained from [18F]6-fluoro-6-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]6FDG). A 2 h PET scan was acquired following a bolus injection of [18F]6FDG in rats currently under euglycemic or hyperglycemic conditions, while somatostatin was infused during both conditions in order to prevent a rise in the endogenous plasma insulin concentration. We were thus able to assess the effect of hyperglycemia per se. For a comparison of radiopharmaceuticals, additional rats were studied under the same conditions, using [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]2FDG). When [18F]6FDG was used, the time-activity curves (TACs) for skeletal muscle had distinctly different shapes during euglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions. This was not the case with [18F]2FDG. For both [18F]6FDG and [18F]2FDG, the model detects increases in both interstitial and intracellular glucose concentrations, increases in the maximal velocity of glucose transport and increases in the rate of glucose transport, all in response to hyperglycemia. In contrast, there was no increase in the maximum velocity of glucose phosphorylation or in the glucose phosphorylation rate. Our model-based analyses of the PET data, obtained with either [18F]6FDG or [18F]2FDG, detect physiological changes consistent with established behavior. Moreover, based on differences in the TAC shapes, [18F]6FDG appears to be superior to [18F]2FDG for evaluating the effect of hyperglycemia on glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle. (paper)

  19. Meat analog: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malav, O P; Talukder, S; Gokulakrishnan, P; Chand, S

    2015-01-01

    The health-conscious consumers are in search of nutritious and convenient food item which can be best suited in their busy life. The vegetarianism is the key for the search of such food which resembles the meat in respect of nutrition and sensory characters, but not of animal origin and contains vegetable or its modified form, this is the point when meat analog evolved out and gets shape. The consumers gets full satisfaction by consumption of meat analog due to its typical meaty texture, appearance and the flavor which are being imparted during the skilled production of meat analog. The supplement of protein in vegetarian diet through meat alike food can be fulfilled by incorporating protein-rich vegetative food grade materials in meat analog and by adopting proper technological process which can promote the proper fabrication of meat analog with acceptable meat like texture, appearance, flavor, etc. The easily available vegetables, cereals, and pulses in India have great advantages and prospects to be used in food products and it can improve the nutritional and functional characters of the food items. The various form and functional characters of food items are available world over and attracts the meat technologists and the food processors to bring some innovativeness in meat analog and its presentation and marketability so that the acceptability of meat analog can be overgrown by the consumers. PMID:24915320

  20. Acute metabolic effects of exenatide in patients with type 1 diabetes with and without residual insulin to oral and intravenous glucose challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazi, Tara; Rink, Linda; Sherr, Jennifer L; Herold, Kevan C

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that is released from the gastrointestinal tract. Treatment with GLP-1 analogs has proven to be of clinical use for patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients with type 1 diabetes, particularly those with residual β-cell function, may also respond to treatment, but the acute metabolic effects of GLP-1 analogs on these patients in reaction to both oral and intravenous glucose challenges are not well understood. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Seventeen patients with type 1 diabetes, half of whom had residual insulin production, underwent two mixed-meal tolerance tests (MMTTs) and two intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTTs), with and without pretreatment with exenatide. No exogenous bolus insulin was administered for the studies. Glucose excursions, insulin secretion rates (ISRs), and levels of glucagon, endogenous GLP-1, and gastric inhibitory polypeptide were measured after the meal or glucose loads. RESULTS During the MMTT, glucose levels were suppressed with exenatide in patients with or without residual insulin production (P = 0.0003). Exenatide treatment did not change the absolute ISR, but the ISR to glucose levels were increased (P = 0.0078). Gastric emptying was delayed (P = 0.0017), and glucagon was suppressed (P = 0.0015). None of these hormonal or glucose changes were detected during the IVGTT with exenatide administration. CONCLUSIONS Exenatide showed a significant antidiabetogenic effect prior to an oral meal in patients with type 1 diabetes involving glucagon suppression and gastric emptying, while preserving increased insulin secretion. GLP-1 analogs may be useful as an adjunctive treatment in type 1 diabetes. PMID:23939544

  1. Discrete LIBOR Market Model Analogy

    CERN Document Server

    Hula, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a discrete time LIBOR analog, which can be used for arbitrage-free discretization of Levy LIBOR models or discrete approximation of continuous time LIBOR market models. Using the work of Eberlein and Oezkan as an inspiration, we build a discrete forward LIBOR market model by starting with a discrete exponential martingale. We take this pure jump process and calculate the appropriate measure change between the forward measures. Next we prove weak convergence of the discrete analog to the continuous time LIBOR model, provided the driving process converges weakly to the continuous time one and the driving processes are PII's. This especially implies the weak convergence of the model to a Levy LIBOR market model if the driving process variables are infinitely divisible distributions. This also relates our model to an Euler discretization.

  2. Analogies in Theoretical Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jona-Lasinio, G.

    Analogies have had and continue to have an important role in the development of theoretical physics. They may start from similarities of physical concepts followed by similarities in the mathematical formalization or it may be a purely mathematical aspect to suggest the development of analogous physical concepts. More often a subtle nonobvious interplay between these levels is involved. In this paper I will discuss two cases sufficiently intricate to illustrate some ways of how analogies work. The first topic is the introduction of spontaneous symmetry breaking in particle physics. The second one is the use of the renormalization group in the theory of critical phenomena and its statistical interpretation.

  3. Glucose kinetics in infants of diabetic mothers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glucose kinetic studies were performed to define the glucose turnover rate with 78% enriched D-[U-13C] glucose by the prime constant infusion technique at less than or equal to 6 hours of age in nine infants of diabetic mothers (four insulin-dependent and five chemical diabetic patients) at term. Five normal infants were studied as control subjects. All infants received 0.9% saline intravenously during the study with the tracer. Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and glucose13/12C ratios were measured during the steady state, and the glucose turnover rate was derived. The average plasma glucose concentration was similar during the steady state in the infants of the diabetic mothers and in the control infants, and the glucose turnover rate was not significantly different among the groups: 2.3 +/- 0.6 mg . kg-1 min-1 in infants of insulin-dependent diabetic patients; 2.4 +/- 0.4 mg . kg-1 min-1 in infants of chemical diabetic patients; and 3.2 +/- 0.3 mg . kg-1 min-1 in the control subjects. Good control of maternal diabetes evidenced by the normal maternal hemoglobin A1c and plasma glucose concentration at delivery and cord plasma glucose concentration resulted in glucose kinetic values in the infants of diabetic mothers that were indistinguishable from those of control subjects. The data further support the importance of good control of the diabetic state in the pregnant woman to minimize or prevent neonatal hypoglycemia

  4. Glucose kinetics in infants of diabetic mothers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowett, R.M.; Susa, J.B.; Giletti, B.; Oh, W.; Schwartz, R.

    1983-08-01

    Glucose kinetic studies were performed to define the glucose turnover rate with 78% enriched D-(U-13C) glucose by the prime constant infusion technique at less than or equal to 6 hours of age in nine infants of diabetic mothers (four insulin-dependent and five chemical diabetic patients) at term. Five normal infants were studied as control subjects. All infants received 0.9% saline intravenously during the study with the tracer. Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and glucose13/12C ratios were measured during the steady state, and the glucose turnover rate was derived. The average plasma glucose concentration was similar during the steady state in the infants of the diabetic mothers and in the control infants, and the glucose turnover rate was not significantly different among the groups: 2.3 +/- 0.6 mg . kg-1 min-1 in infants of insulin-dependent diabetic patients; 2.4 +/- 0.4 mg . kg-1 min-1 in infants of chemical diabetic patients; and 3.2 +/- 0.3 mg . kg-1 min-1 in the control subjects. Good control of maternal diabetes evidenced by the normal maternal hemoglobin A1c and plasma glucose concentration at delivery and cord plasma glucose concentration resulted in glucose kinetic values in the infants of diabetic mothers that were indistinguishable from those of control subjects. The data further support the importance of good control of the diabetic state in the pregnant woman to minimize or prevent neonatal hypoglycemia.

  5. Glucose effectiveness and insulin sensitivity measurements derived from the non-insulin-assisted minimal model and the clamp techniques are concordant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jan Erik; Alford, Frank; Ward, Glenn; Thye-Rønn, Peter; Levin, Klaus; Hother-Nielsen, Ole; Rantzau, Christian; Boston, Ray; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the concordance between glucose effectiveness (SG) and insulin sensitivity (SI), derived from the unmodified dynamic non-insulin-assisted intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) implemented by SG(MM) and SI(MM); simulation analysis and modelling/conversational interaction (SAAM...

  6. Insulin regulation of renal glucose metabolism in conscious dogs.

    OpenAIRE

    Cersosimo, E; Judd, R L; Miles, J M

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies indicating that postabsorptive renal glucose production is negligible used the net balance technique, which cannot partition simultaneous renal glucose production and glucose uptake. 10 d after surgical placement of sampling catheters in the left renal vein and femoral artery and a nonobstructive infusion catheter in the left renal artery of dogs, systemic and renal glucose and glycerol kinetics were measured with peripheral infusions of [3-3H]glucose and [2-14C]glycerol. Aft...

  7. Development of Analogy Experiment Methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen is expected to help address concerns about global climate change and energy security. The HTGR (High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) drew attention as one of the most competitive heat source for producing hydrogen. The knowledge of detailed heat transfer phenomena in gaseous phase emerges as an important factor for HTGR, where buoyancy effect plays a significant role. Large and expensive test facilities are to be constructed to assess the detailed mixed convection phenomena. However, using analogy concept, heat transfer system can be transformed to mass transfer system(copper electroplating system) and vice versa. If we could devise simple mass transfer system and find experimental solution from that system, then theoretically it is not difficult to find solution for similar heat transfer system. This study explores the applicability of simple mass transfer experiments to heat transfer researches using analogy concept. A copper electroplating system with limiting current technique has a good advantage to simulate heat transfer system as mass transfer coefficient, analogous with heat transfer coefficient, can be directly obtained from the information of the bulk concentration and electric current between electrodes. Therefore, the validity of the analogy experimental method was confirmed through comparison between the test results obtained by measuring limiting current and corresponding well-known heat transfer correlations. Three different forced and natural convection mass transfer systems were constructed to simulate Poiseuille flow at horizontal geometry and laminar and turbulent buoyant flows at vertical geometry. it was shown that the close agreement between results for mass transfer experiment and heat transfer correlation is an encouraging indication of the validity of the analogy theory and the experiment method. It may also be concluded that analogy method using electroplating system make it possible to predict the unknown heat transfer correlations. Thus, Analogy methodology is expected to be a useful tool for heat transfer studies for HTGR development as the electroplating method not only provide with useful information on heat transfer but also has cost-effective advantage than any other experiments

  8. Aqueous glucose measurement using differential absorption-based frequency domain optical coherence tomography at wavelengths of 1310 nm and 1625 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Pauline; Manoj, Murali; Sujatha, N.; Vasa, Nilesh J.; Rao, Suresh R.

    2015-07-01

    This work presents a combination of differential absorption technique and frequency domain optical coherence tomography for detection of glucose, which is an important analyte in medical diagnosis of diabetes. Differential absorption technique is used to detect glucose selectively in the presence of interfering species especially water and frequency domain optical coherence tomography (FDOCT) helps to obtain faster acquisition of depth information. Two broadband super-luminescent diode (SLED) sources with centre wavelengths 1586 nm (wavelength range of 1540 to 1640 nm) and 1312 nm (wavelength range of 1240 to 1380 nm) and a spectral width of ≍ 60 nm (FWHM) are used. Preliminary studies on absorption spectroscopy using various concentrations of aqueous glucose solution gave promising results to distinguish the absorption characteristics of glucose at two wavelengths 1310 nm (outside the absorption band of glucose) and 1625 nm (within the absorption band of glucose). In order to mimic the optical properties of biological skin tissue, 2% and 10% of 20% intralipid with various concentrations of glucose (0 to 4000 mg/dL) was prepared and used as sample. Using OCT technique, interference spectra were obtained using an optical spectrum analyzer with a resolution of 0.5 nm. Further processing of the interference spectra provided information on reflections from the surfaces of the cuvette containing the aqueous glucose sample. Due to the absorption of glucose in the wavelength range of 1540 nm to 1640 nm, a trend of reduction in the intensity of the back reflected light was observed with increase in the concentration of glucose.

  9. TV Analog Station Transmitters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This file is an extract from the Consolidated Database System (CDBS) licensed by the Media Bureau. It consists of Analog Television Stations (see Rule Part47 CFR...

  10. Challenges in Analogical Reasoning

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Shih-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Learning physics requires understanding the applicability of fundamental principles in a variety of contexts that share deep features. One way to help students learn physics is via analogical reasoning. Students can be taught to make an analogy between situations that are more familiar or easier to understand and another situation where the same physics principle is involved but that is more difficult to handle. Here, we examine introductory physics students' ability to use analogies in solving problems involving Newton's second law. Students enrolled in an algebra-based introductory physics course were given a solved problem involving tension in a rope and were then asked to solve another problem for which the physics is very similar but involved a frictional force. They were asked to point out the similarities between the two problems and then use the analogy to solve the friction problem.

  11. FRET-based glucose monitoring for bioprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolome, Amelita; Smalls-Mantey, Lauren; Lin, Debora; Rao, Govind; Tolosa, Leah

    2006-02-01

    The glucose-mediated conformational changes in the glucose binding protein (GBP) have been exploited in the development of fluorescence based glucose sensors. The fluorescence response is generated by a polarity sensitive dye attached to a specific site. Such fluorescent sensors respond to submicromolar glucose at diffusion-controlled rates mimicking the wild type. However, such sensors have been limited to in vitro glucose sensing because of the preliminary dye-labeling step. In the study described here, the dye-labeling step is omitted by genetically encoding the GBP with two green fluorescent mutants namely, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in the N- and C-terminal ends, respectively. These two GFP mutants comprise a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) donor and acceptor pair. Thus, when glucose binds with GBP, the conformational changes affect the FRET efficiency yielding a dose-dependent response. A potential application for this FRET-based glucose biosensor is online glucose sensing in bioprocessing and cell culture. This was demonstrated by the measurement of glucose consumption in yeast fermentation. Further development of this system should yield in vivo measurement of glucose in bioprocesses.

  12. Analog synthetic biology

    OpenAIRE

    Sarpeshkar, R.

    2014-01-01

    We analyse the pros and cons of analog versus digital computation in living cells. Our analysis is based on fundamental laws of noise in gene and protein expression, which set limits on the energy, time, space, molecular count and part-count resources needed to compute at a given level of precision. We conclude that analog computation is significantly more efficient in its use of resources than deterministic digital computation even at relatively high levels of precision in the cell. Based on...

  13. Bloody analogical reasoning

    OpenAIRE

    Provijn, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I will study some of William Harvey's applications of analogies in the Prelectiones Anatomiae Universalis and the Exercitatio anatomica de motu cordis et sanguinis in animalibus. I will show that Harvey applied analogies in many different ways and that some contributed to the discovery of the characteristic 'action' of the heart and pulse and even to the discovery of the blood circulation. The discovery process will be approached as a problem solving process as described in Bate...

  14. FGF growth factor analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua; Takahashi, Kazuyuki

    2012-07-24

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  15. Electrical Circuits and Water Analogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Frederick A.; Wilson, Jerry D.

    1974-01-01

    Briefly describes water analogies for electrical circuits and presents plans for the construction of apparatus to demonstrate these analogies. Demonstrations include series circuits, parallel circuits, and capacitors. (GS)

  16. pH-Insensitive Glucose Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Garrett, Jared R.; Wu, Xinxin; Jin, Sha; Ye, Kaiming

    2008-01-01

    There is an urgent need for developing a biosensor that can real-time and noninvasively determine glucose concentration within living cells. In our previous study, we have engineered a glucose indicator protein (GIP) that can provide continuous glucose monitoring through a conformation change-induced Förster resonance-energy transfer measurement. Because of the pH-sensitivity of the fluorescent proteins used in the GIP construction, the GIP made from these fluorescent proteins is less toleran...

  17. The effect of glucose stimulation on 45calcium uptake of rat pancreatic islets and their total calcium content as measured by a fluorometric micro-method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glucose-stimulated 45calcium uptake and total calcium content of rat pancreatic islets has been studied, using a new fluorometric micro-method to estimate total calcium. Extracellular calcium was separated from incubated tissue by a rapid micro-filtration procedure. Islets incubated up to 60 min with calcium chloride 2.5 mmol/l and glucose 2.5 mmol/l maintained the same calcium content (670 +- 7.5 pmol/?g DNA). When the glucose concentration was raised to 15 mmol/l no change in the total calcium content could be detected. On incubation with glucose 2.5 mmol/l in the absence of calcium, the calcium content decreased to 488 +- 27 pmol/?g DNA. On incubation with 45calcium chloride 2.5 mmol/l for 5 or 30 min at 2.5 mmol/l glucose, islets exchanged 21 +- 2 and 28 +- 1% of their total calcium content and, at 15 mmol/l glucose, 30 +- 3 and 45 +- 2%, respectively. Thus, islet calcium has a high turn-over rate. Glucose stimulation results in an increase of the calcium uptake without enhancing the total calcium content and hence must increase the calcium-exchangeable pool. (orig.)

  18. Neuronal GLP1R mediates liraglutide’s anorectic but not glucose-lowering effect

    OpenAIRE

    Sisley, Stephanie; Gutierrez-Aguilar, Ruth; Scott, Michael; D’alessio, David A.; Darleen A. Sandoval; Seeley, Randy J.

    2014-01-01

    Glucose control and weight loss are cornerstones of type 2 diabetes treatment. Currently, only glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) analogs are able to achieve both weight loss and glucose tolerance. Both glucose and body weight are regulated by the brain, which contains GLP1 receptors (GLP1R). Even though the brain is poised to mediate the effects of GLP1 analogs, it remains unclear whether the glucose- and body weight–lowering effects of long-acting GLP1R agonists are via direct action on CNS GLP...

  19. Detecting early kidney damage in horses with colic by measuring matrix metalloproteinase -9 and -2, other enzymes, urinary glucose and total proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salonen Hanna

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to investigate urine matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and -9 activity, alkaline phosphatase/creatinine (U-AP/Cr and gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase/creatinine (U-GGT/Cr ratios, glucose concentration, and urine protein/creatinine (U-Prot/Cr ratio and to compare data with plasma MMP-2 and -9 activity, cystatin-C and creatinine concentrations in colic horses and healthy controls. Horses with surgical colic (n = 5 were compared to healthy stallions (n = 7 that came for castration. Blood and urine samples were collected. MMP gelatinolytic activity was measured by zymography. Results We found out that horses with colic had significantly higher urinary MMP-9 complex and proMMP-9 activities than horses in the control group. Colic horses also had higher plasma MMP-2 activity than the control horses. Serum creatinine, although within reference range, was significantly higher in the colic horses than in the control group. There was no significant increase in urinary alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase or total proteins in the colic horses compared to the control group. A human cystatin-C test (Dako Cytomation latex immunoassay® based on turbidimetry did not cross react with equine cystatin-C. Conclusion The results indicate that plasma MMP-2 may play a role in the pathogenesis of equine colic and urinary MMP-9 in equine kidney damage.

  20. Somatostatin and its Analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lichun; Coy, David H

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin (SST) is a cyclic hormone-release inhibitory peptide that has high binding affinity to all of its five SST receptors (SSTRs). SST negatively regulates cell proliferation and the release of multiple hormones via activation of its cognate receptors. A variety of SST analogs, some with high affinity and selectivity of receptor subtypes, have been synthesized and developed. Certain longacting SST analogs such as octreotide, lanreotide and pasireotide have been clinically applied to the treatment of human diseases such as those caused by excessive release of growth hormone (acromegaly), or adrenocorticotropic hormone (Cushing's syndrome), and for the treatment of carcinoid syndrome. Investigations into new biological activities of these long-acting SSTs and their possible clinical applications are also still ongoing. Also, novel SST analogs are being designed and developed to target different receptor subtype(s) or mimic natural SST's multiple biological properties. Additionally, since SSTRs, especially SSTR2, are aberrantly expressed in many cancer cells and tumor blood vessels, internalizing SST analogs is currently being used as drug-delivery vehicle for the application of receptor-targeted therapeutics. This review will discuss recent advances in the development and applications of SST and its analogs. PMID:26951062

  1. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day ... DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing ...

  2. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose ... glucose) Dawn Phenomenon Checking for Ketones Tight Diabetes Control donate en -- Your Gift for Research Doubled - 2016- ...

  3. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More Oral Health & Hygiene Women ... Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Blood Glucose Testing Share: Print Page Text Size: A A A ...

  4. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by Mail Close www.diabetes.org > Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Blood Glucose Testing Share: Print Page ... and-how-tos, In this section Living With Diabetes Treatment and Care Blood Glucose Testing Checking Your Blood ...

  5. Automated Generation of Cross-Domain Analogies via Evolutionary Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Baydin, Atilim Gunes; Ontanon, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    Analogy plays an important role in creativity, and is extensively used in science as well as art. In this paper we introduce a technique for the automated generation of cross-domain analogies based on a novel evolutionary algorithm (EA). Unlike existing work in computational analogy-making restricted to creating analogies between two given cases, our approach, for a given case, is capable of creating an analogy along with the novel analogous case itself. Our algorithm is based on the concept of "memes", which are units of culture, or knowledge, undergoing variation and selection under a fitness measure, and represents evolving pieces of knowledge as semantic networks. Using a fitness function based on Gentner's structure mapping theory of analogies, we demonstrate the feasibility of spontaneously generating semantic networks that are analogous to a given base network.

  6. Electrical analogous in viscoelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala, Guido; Di Paola, Mario; Francomano, Elisa; Li, Yan; Pinnola, Francesco P.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, electrical analogous models of fractional hereditary materials are introduced. Based on recent works by the authors, mechanical models of materials viscoelasticity behavior are firstly approached by using fractional mathematical operators. Viscoelastic models have elastic and viscous components which are obtained by combining springs and dashpots. Various arrangements of these elements can be used, and all of these viscoelastic models can be equivalently modeled as electrical circuits, where the spring and dashpot are analogous to the capacitance and resistance, respectively. The proposed models are validated by using modal analysis. Moreover, a comparison with numerical experiments based on finite difference time domain method shows that, for long time simulations, the correct time behavior can be obtained only with modal analysis. The use of electrical analogous in viscoelasticity can better reveal the real behavior of fractional hereditary materials.

  7. Analogical Reasoning in Geometry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdas, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The analogical reasoning isn't used only in mathematics but also in everyday life. In this article we approach the analogical reasoning in Geometry Education. The novelty of this article is a classification of geometrical analogies by reasoning type and their exemplification. Our classification includes: analogies for understanding and setting a…

  8. All about Blood Glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... illness • changes in hormone levels,such as during menstrual periods • stress What can make blood glucose fall? • ... blood glucose: • 3 or 4 glucose tablets • ½ cup (4 ounces)of fruit juice • ½ cup (4 ...

  9. Isolation of a Mutant of Kluyveromyces marxianus Resistant to Glucose Repression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moeini Hassan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we isolated a mutant of Kluyveromyces marxianus resistance to glucose repression. To screen for depression mutants, the strains were treated with UV rays. Fifteen resistant mutant strains were isolated. The mutants were further screened for glucose-repression-resistant mutants in the presence of 2-deoxy-D-glucose, an analog to glucose and lactose as the sole carbon source. In this condition, one glucose-repression-resistant mutant was isolated. The enzyme activity in this mutant strain and the wild type strain was compared using different mediums containing 4% of each lactose and glucose and 2% glucose+2% lactose. The results demonstrated significant decreasing in glucose repression in the mutant strain as compared to the wild type. This mutant was unable to grow anaerobically on glucose in present of antimycin A, the property of rag1 mutants. This mutant is, therefore, capable of constitutive expression of β-galactosidase, which makes it suitable for industrial purposes.

  10. Analog layout synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Graeb, Helmut E

    2010-01-01

    Integrated circuits are fundamental electronic components in biomedical, automotive and many other technical systems. A small, yet crucial part of a chip consists of analog circuitry. This part is still in large part designed by hand and therefore represents not only a bottleneck in the design flow, but also a permanent source of design errors responsible for re-designs, costly in terms of wasted test chips and in terms of lost time-to-market. Layout design is the step of the analog design flow with the least support by commercially available, computer-aided design tools. This book provides a

  11. KETONES SUPPRESS BRAIN GLUCOSE CONSUMPTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaManna, Joseph C.; Salem, Nicolas; Puchowicz, Michelle; Erokwu, Bernadette; Koppaka, Smruta; Flask, Chris; Lee, Zhenghong

    2010-01-01

    The brain is dependent on glucose as a primary energy substrate, but is capable of utilizing ketones such as ?-hydroxybutyrate (?HB) and acetoacetate (AcAc), as occurs with fasting, prolonged starvation or chronic feeding of a high fat/low carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet). In this study, the local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose consumption (CMRglu; ?M/min/100g) was calculated in the cortex and cerebellum of control and ketotic rats using Patlak analysis. Rats were imaged on a rodent PET scanner and MRI was performed on a 7-Tesla Bruker scanner for registration with the PET images. Plasma glucose and ?HB concentrations were measured and 90-minute dynamic PET scans were started simultaneously with bolus injection of 2-Deoxy-2[18F]Fluoro-D-Glucose (FDG). The blood radioactivity concentration was automatically sampled from the tail vein for 3 min following injection and manual periodic blood samples were taken. The calculated local CMRGlu decreased with increasing plasma BHB concentration in the cerebellum (CMRGlu = ?4.07*[BHB] + 61.4, r² = 0.3) and in the frontal cortex (CMRGlu = ?3.93*[BHB] + 42.7, r² = 0.5). These data indicate that, under conditions of ketosis, glucose consumption is decreased in the cortex and cerebellum by about 10% per each mM of plasma ketone bodies. PMID:19227486

  12. Towards analogy in toponyms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpán, Pavel

    Cluj : Mega, 2013 - (Felecan, O.), s. 379-383 ISBN 978-606-543-343-4. [Name and Naming /2./ Onomastics in Contemporary Public Space. Baia Mare (RO), 09.05.2013-11.05.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP406/12/P600 Institutional support: RVO:68378092 Keywords : onomastics * toponyms * analogy Subject RIV: AI - Linguistics

  13. Quantum Analog Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum analog computing is based upon similarity between mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics and phenomena to be computed. It exploits a dynamical convergence of several competing phenomena to an attractor which can represent an externum of a function, an image, a solution to a system of ODE, or a stochastic process.

  14. Analog random coding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate numerically the ''analog random coding'' problem, where a vector x element of RN, encrypted by an N by M random matrix W, is transmitted to a remote receiver, over a noisy channel. We show that for M>>N, it is in fact possible to recover the original signal with very high accuracy, even for an extremely high level of noise

  15. Detecção de trombose venosa em retalhos livres por medidas de glicemia capilar Detection of venous thrombosis in free flaps by measurement of capillary blood glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lincoln Saito Millan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A monitorização do retalho livre após a cirurgia é de vital importância, especialmente nas primeiras horas de pós-operatório, pois o momento de reabordagem pode ser o definidor entre o salvamento ou a perda do retalho. Até o momento, não existe trabalho na literatura estudando a decisão de abordagem do retalho baseada em medidas objetivas ou a comparação da glicemia entre retalhos que evoluíram bem com os que sofreram sofrimento vascular. O objetivo deste estudo é avaliar a validade da medida da glicemia capilar do retalho como método de monitorização de retalhos microcirúrgicos comparando com a avaliação clínica. MÉTODO: Foram estudados prospectivamente 16 pacientes portadores de retalhos livres, realizados de maio de 2012 a julho de 2012. A glicemia capilar foi avaliada por equipe formada por profissionais não envolvidos com a cirurgia realizada. A avaliação clínica do retalho foi realizada no pós-operatório imediato, na chegada à UTI, a cada 3 horas e sempre que necessário. RESULTADOS: Dos 16 pacientes, 5 (31,3% apresentaram complicações nas primeiras 24 horas. Todas as complicações observadas foram trombose venosa. Foi observada diferença estatisticamente significante na glicemia capilar de portadores de retalhos que apresentaram trombose venosa em comparação àqueles que não tiveram a complicação, nas medidas realizadas 6 horas, 9 horas e 12 horas após a operação (P BACKGROUND: Monitoring of free flaps after surgery is vitally important, especially in the first few hours because the timing of reoperation can determine flap salvage or loss. To date, no study has examined the decision to reoperate on a flap based on the objective measure of glycemia or a comparison between flaps that showed good outcomes and those that showed vascular damage. The objective of this study was to evaluate the validity of blood glucose measurements within the flap as a method for monitoring free flaps and to compare the efficacy of this method with that of clinical assessments. METHODS: The study was prospective, included 16 patients with free flaps, and was conducted from May 2012 to July 2012. A team of professionals not involved in the surgery evaluated capillary glycemia. Flaps were clinically evaluated during the immediate postoperative period, on ICU admission, at every 3 hours, and as needed. RESULTS: Of the 16 patients, 5 (31.3% had venous thrombosis in the first 24 hours. Statistically significant differences were noted in capillary glycemia in patients with or without venous thrombosis in measurements obtained 6, 9, and 12 hours after surgery (P < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The measurement of capillary glycemia was not superior to clinical evaluation by an experienced professional for the detection of venous thrombosis within free flaps.

  16. Single Cell "Glucose Nanosensor" Verifies Elevated Glucose Levels in Individual Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Raphael A S; Özel, R?fat Emrah; Mak, Wai Han; Mulato, Marcelo; Singaram, Bakthan; Pourmand, Nader

    2016-02-10

    Because the transition from oxidative phosphorylation to anaerobic glycolytic metabolism is a hallmark of cancer progression, approaches to identify single living cancer cells by their unique glucose metabolic signature would be useful. Here, we present nanopipettes specifically developed to measure glucose levels in single cells with temporal and spatial resolution, and we use this technology to verify the hypothesis that individual cancer cells can indeed display higher intracellular glucose levels. The nanopipettes were functionalized as glucose nanosensors by immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOx) covalently to the tip so that the interaction of glucose with GOx resulted in a catalytic oxidation of ?-d-glucose to d-gluconic acid, which was measured as a change in impedance due to drop in pH of the medium at the nanopipette tip. Calibration studies showed a direct relationship between impedance changes at the tip and glucose concentration in solution. The glucose nanosensor quantified single cell intracellular glucose levels in human fibroblasts and the metastatic breast cancer lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 and revealed that the cancer cells expressed reproducible and reliable increases in glucose levels compared to the nonmalignant cells. Nanopipettes allow repeated sampling of the same cell, as cells remain viable during and after measurements. Therefore, nanopipette-based glucose sensors provide an approach to compare changes in glucose levels with changes in proliferative or metastatic state. The platform has great promise for mechanistic investigations, as a diagnostic tool to distinguish cancer cells from nonmalignant cells in heterogeneous tissue biopsies, as well as a tool for monitoring cancer progression in situ. PMID:26752097

  17. Monitoring of glucose in fermentation processes using a commercial glucose analyser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holst, O.; Miyabayashi, A.; Mattiasson, B.; Haakanson, H.

    1988-03-01

    A commercial glucose analyzer, originally designed for monitoring of blood glucose in patients, was tested for use in fermentation processes. The system operates in such a way that the measured value is updated every 90 second. The measuring range of the system is 0-5 g glucose/l and the accuracy is +-7%. The response time was found to be approximately 6 min. The system was used to follow fermentations with two different microorganisms, Sacharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli in media containing up to 5 g/l of glucose. The performance was fully satisfactory and the values had a very good correlation with off-line analyses.

  18. Conditions With High Intracellular Glucose Inhibit Sensing Through Glucose Sensor Snf3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karhumaa, Kaisa; Wu, B.Q.; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    2010-01-01

    amino acids. An alternating-access model of the function of transporter-like sensors has been previously suggested based on amino acid sensing, where intracellular ligand inhibits binding of extracellular ligand. Here we studied the effect of intracellular glucose on sensing of extracellular glucose...... through the transporter-like sensor Snf3 in yeast. Sensing through Snf3 was determined by measuring degradation of Mth1 protein. High intracellular glucose concentrations were achieved by using yeast strains lacking monohexose transporters which were grown on maltose. The apparent affinity of...... extracellular glucose to Snf3 was measured for cells grown in non-fermentative medium or on maltose. The apparent affinity for glucose was lowest when the intracellular glucose concentration was high. The results conform to an alternating-access model for transporter-like sensors. J. Cell. Biochem. 110: 920...

  19. Plasma glucose levels and flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomei G

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Noise is able to exert many adverse health effects, ranging from damages on various organs and systems to changes in biochemical and humoral markers. In literature, the effects of chronic exposure to noise on blood glucose levels have been reported, although these results are conflicting: some authors reported hyperglycaemia, others hypoglycaemia and many others recorded no changes in blood glucose levels. Objectives: Considering that the plasma glucose levels are not used as a biomarker of noise exposure, we conducted a pilot study on 6 subjects, 2 females and 4 males, working as clerks in a low noise environment in order to evaluate the possible occurrence of changes on plasma glucose levels in healthy subjects, non-diabetic and not accustomed to flight, exposed to noise and to flight-related stressors. Methods: The subjects completed a specific clinic-anamnestic questionnaire and underwent a general clinical examination. In the first phase of the study, participants underwent blood tests in order to assess the plasma glucose levels at three different times: at 8:00 a.m., on board of a turboprop transport aircraft before the take-off with the engine switched off, after 60 and 120 minutes’ flight. The second phase of the study was carried out one month after the first one and while working in the office; three blood tests were performed again, at fasting and after 60 and 120 minutes. The plasma glucose levels were measured on capillary blood by the refractometry method through the use of Glucoscan One Touch device. Results: The results show an increase of plasma glucose levels during the waiting for the flight and a statistically significant decrease of plasma glucose levels in the first hour of flight (p <0.001, persisting even at the second hour (p <0.001. No significant changes were found in the blood tests performed at work. Discussion: The data show an initial hyperglycaemic response, followed by a persistent and moderate decrease of glycaemia; a similar response was not observed in the same subjects during ordinary work activities. The Authors believe that the initial increase of the plasma glucose levels, recorded in absence of noise on board, could be related to the response to other stressors, such as anxiety linked to the waiting for the flight. The decrease of the plasma glucose levels observed after 60 and 120 minutes’ flight, that is in conditions of prolonged exposure to flight-related stressors and to noise, may be linked to the intervention of several mechanisms: partial phenomenon of adaptation-exhaustion of the neuroendocrine response to stress; hypoglycaemic effect of noise, CCK-mediated and VIP-mediated with consequent insulin release and decrease of the plasma glucose levels; synergistic action of the above mechanisms. The absence of changes on the plasma glucose levels during the usual work activity is probably due to the absence of those stressors considered able to induce the alterations of the plasma glucose levels recorded during the first phase of the study. Conclusions: These preliminary results suggest that exposure to flight-related stressors and in particular exposure to noise can cause a hypoglycaemic response.

  20. An NFC-Enabled CMOS IC for a Wireless Fully Implantable Glucose Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHennis, Andrew; Getzlaff, Stefan; Grice, David; Mailand, Marko

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated circuit (IC) that merges integrated optical and temperature transducers, optical interface circuitry, and a near-field communication (NFC)-enabled digital, wireless readout for a fully passive implantable sensor platform to measure glucose in people with diabetes. A flip-chip mounted LED and monolithically integrated photodiodes serve as the transduction front-end to enable fluorescence readout. A wide-range programmable transimpedance amplifier adapts the sensor signals to the input of an 11-bit analog-to-digital converter digitizing the measurements. Measurement readout is enabled by means of wireless backscatter modulation to a remote NFC reader. The system is able to resolve current levels of less than 10 pA with a single fluorescent measurement energy consumption of less than 1 μJ. The wireless IC is fabricated in a 0.6-μm-CMOS process and utilizes a 13.56-MHz-based ISO15693 for passive wireless readout through a NFC interface. The IC is utilized as the core interface to a fluorescent, glucose transducer to enable a fully implantable sensor-based continuous glucose monitoring system. PMID:26372659

  1. Terrestrial Spaceflight Analogs: Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in immune cell distribution and function, circadian misalignment, stress and latent viral reactivation appear to persist during Antarctic winterover at Concordia Station. Some of these changes are similar to those observed in Astronauts, either during or immediately following spaceflight. Others are unique to the Concordia analog. Based on some initial immune data and environmental conditions, Concordia winterover may be an appropriate analog for some flight-associated immune system changes and mission stress effects. An ongoing smaller control study at Neumayer III will address the influence of the hypoxic variable. Changes were observed in the peripheral blood leukocyte distribution consistent with immune mobilization, and similar to those observed during spaceflight. Alterations in cytokine production profiles were observed during winterover that are distinct from those observed during spaceflight, but potentially consistent with those observed during persistent hypobaric hypoxia. The reactivation of latent herpesviruses was observed during overwinter/isolation, that is consistently associated with dysregulation in immune function.

  2. Analogy, Explanation, and Proof

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Hummel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available People are habitual explanation generators. At its most mundane, our propensity to explain allows us to infer that we should not drink milk that smells sour; at the other extreme, it allows us to establish facts (e.g., theorems in mathematical logic whose truth was not even known prior to the existence of the explanation (proof. What do the cognitive operations underlying the (inductive inference that the milk is sour have in common with the (deductive proof that, say, the square root of two is irrational? Our ability to generate explanations bears striking similarities to our ability to make analogies. Both reflect a capacity to generate inferences and generalizations that go beyond the featural similarities between a novel problem and familiar problems in terms of which the novel problem may be understood. However, a notable difference between analogy-making and explanation-generation is that the former is a process in which a single source situation is used to reason about a single target, whereas the latter often requires the reasoner to integrate multiple sources of knowledge. This small-seeming difference poses a challenge to the task of marshaling our understanding of analogical reasoning in the service of understanding explanation. We describe a model of explanation, derived from a model of analogy, adapted to permit systematic violations of this one-to-one mapping constraint. Simulation results demonstrate that the resulting model can generate explanations for novel explananda and that, like the explanations generated by human reasoners, these explanations vary in their coherence.

  3. Radiopharmaceuticals. XXVII. 18F-labeled 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose as a radiopharmaceutical for measuring regional myocardial glucose metabolism in vivo: tissue distribution and imaging studies in animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    18F-2-Deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (18FDG) is rapidly extracted by the mouse heart, and the radioactivity in heart (3 to 4% per organ) remains relatively constant for 2 hr post injection. The brain uptake (2 to 3% per organ) remained relatively constant throughout the time course of the study. Liver, lungs, kidneys, small intestine, and blood all showed a rapid clearance of radioactivity after injection of 18FDG. At 120 min the heart-to-lung ratio was 12 and heart-to-liver ratio was 32. Urinary excretion of activity was approximately 16% of the injected dose at 60 min. The uptake of radioactivity by dog heart following the intravenous administration of 18FDG was 2.8 to 4.1% at 60 min and 2.4% at 135 min; it was regionally distributed, the areas of highest activity being the left ventricle and the interventricular septum. The brain activity was 2.1 to 3.5% at 120 min, with a ratio of gray matter-to-white matter of 2 to 3:1. Urinary excretion in dogs was 16% and 50% of the injected dose at 60 and 135 min. The chemical form of the activity in the urine, although unidentified, was not 18F-. Cross-sectional images of the mycardium of the dog after intravenous injection of 18FDG were obtained using emission tomography

  4. A Transiting Jupiter Analog

    CERN Document Server

    Kipping, David M; Henze, Chris; Teachey, Alex; Isaacson, Howard T; Petigura, Erik A; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Buchhave, Lars A; Chen, Jingjing; Bryson, Steve T; Sandford, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Decadal-long radial velocity surveys have recently started to discover analogs to the most influential planet of our solar system, Jupiter. Detecting and characterizing these worlds is expected to shape our understanding of our uniqueness in the cosmos. Despite the great successes of recent transit surveys, Jupiter analogs represent a terra incognita, owing to the strong intrinsic bias of this method against long orbital periods. We here report on the first validated transiting Jupiter analog, Kepler-167e (KOI-490.02), discovered using Kepler archival photometry orbiting the K4-dwarf KIC-3239945. With a radius of $(0.91\\pm0.02)$ $R_{\\mathrm{Jup}}$, a low orbital eccentricity ($0.06_{-0.04}^{+0.10}$) and an equilibrium temperature of $(131\\pm3)$ K, Kepler-167e bears many of the basic hallmarks of Jupiter. Kepler-167e is accompanied by three Super-Earths on compact orbits, which we also validate, leaving a large cavity of transiting worlds around the habitable-zone. With two transits and continuous photometric ...

  5. Prevalence of positive urinary dipstick analysis (leucocyte esterase, nitrite, haemoglobin, or glucose) in a population of 3645 adult subjects--consequence for measurement of urinary albumin excretion rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, P; Jensen, J S; Borch-Johnsen, K; Jensen, G; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1998-01-01

    glucose. Subjects with any positive dipstick analysis had significantly higher UAER than subjects with a negative analysis: 4.9 (4.4-5.3) (geometric mean (95% confidence interval)) vs 3.0 (2.9-3.1) mg 24 h(-1) (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence data of positive urinary dipstick analyses in a large...

  6. Analog processor for electroluminescent detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analog-signal processing channel of an electroluminescent gas proportional detector of soft x rays is examined. The analog processor performs the following functions: restores the dc component of the signal, since, under the operating conditions of the detector, the anode of the photomultiplier is at a positive potential, and the signals are sent through capacitors; integrates the detector signals and sends Start and Stop pulses to the time-interval-meter, the time between which is proportional to the pulse area; provides discrimination (gates) for the lower and upper levels of input-signal area; rejects signals that arrive during measurement of another; and counts the number of input pulses during a measurement cycle, which is set either from the front panel of the unit or through the CAMAC dataway. A time-interval meter or an amplitude analyzer can be used as a spectrometer. The dead time of the processor is 0.5-5 ?sec, depending on the input signal and the conversion scale

  7. Glucose-induced insulin resistance of skeletal-muscle glucose transport and uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Hansen, B F; Hansen, S A

    1988-01-01

    The ability of glucose and insulin to modify insulin-stimulated glucose transport and uptake was investigated in perfused skeletal muscle. Here we report that perfusion of isolated rat hindlimbs for 5 h with 12 mM-glucose and 20,000 microunits of insulin/ml leads to marked, rapidly developing......, impairment of insulin action on muscle glucose transport and uptake. Thus maximal insulin-stimulated glucose uptake at 12 mM-glucose decreased from 34.8 +/- 1.9 to 11.5 +/- 1.1 mumol/h per g (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 10) during 5 h perfusion. This decrease in glucose uptake was accompanied by a similar change in...... muscle glucose transport as measured by uptake of 3-O-[14C]-methylglucose. Simultaneously, muscle glycogen stores increased to 2-3.5 times initial values, depending on fibre type. Perfusion for 5 h in the presence of glucose but in the absence of insulin decreased subsequent insulin action on glucose...

  8. New agents for probing glucose turnover and receptor densities in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New radiopharmaceuticals are developed to enter the brain by the application of metabolic tracers or analogs labelled with short-lived radionuclides. These radionuclides are used in conjunction with emission tomography for regional functional imaging of the brain. This article is restricted to D-glucose and its analogs and receptor-specific radiopharmaceuticals. (Auth.)

  9. The Age of Analog Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Mattiussi, Claudio; Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL); Marbach, Daniel; Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL); Dürr, Peter; Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL); Floreano, Dario; Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL)

    2008-01-01

    A large class of systems of biological and technological relevance can be described as analog networks, that is, collections of dynamical devices interconnected by links of varying strength. Some examples of analog networks are genetic regulatory networks, metabolic networks, neural networks, analog electronic circuits, and control systems. Analog networks are typically complex systems which include nonlinear feedback loops and possess temporal dynamics at different timescales. When tackled b...

  10. 2-Deoxy-2-fluoro-d-glucose metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Fatangare, Amol; Paetz, Christian; Saluz, Hanspeter; Svatoš, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    2-Deoxy-2-fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) is glucose analog routinely used in clinical and animal radiotracer studies to trace glucose uptake but it has rarely been used in plants. Previous studies analyzed FDG translocation and distribution pattern in plants and proposed that FDG could be used as a tracer for photoassimilates in plants. Elucidating FDG metabolism in plants is a crucial aspect for establishing its application as a radiotracer in plant imaging. Here, we describe the metabolic fate of F...

  11. Glucose Recognition in Vitro Using Fluorescent Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noronha, G; Heiss, A M; Reilly, J R; Vachon, Jr, D J; Cary, D R; Zaitseva, N P; Reibold, R A; Lane, S M; Peyser, T A; Satcher, J H

    2001-04-25

    Diabetes is a disease that affects over 16 million people in the USA at a cost of 100 billion dollars annually. The ability to regulate insulin delivery in people with Type 1 diabetes is imperative as is the need to manage glucose levels in all people with this disease. Our current method for monitoring glucose is a (FDA approved) minimally invasive enzymatic sensor that can measure glucose levels in vivo for three days. We are focused on developing a noninvasive implantable glucose sensor that will be interrogated by an external device. The material must be robust, easy to process, biocompatible and resistant to biofouling. In this Presentation we will discuss the development of a new polymeric matrix that can recognize physiological levels of glucose in vitro using fluorescent spectroscopy.

  12. Interaction of ZnS nanoparticles with flavins and glucose oxidase: A fluorimetric investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interactions of luminescence, water soluble ZnS nanoparticles (NPs) with flavins and glucose oxidase have been thoroughly investigated through optical spectroscopy. The photoluminescence of ZnS nanoparticles was quenched severely (?60%) by riboflavin while other flavins such as flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) show quenching to different extents under analogous conditions. However, interestingly no effect in luminescence intensity of ZnS NPs was observed with protein bound flavins such as in glucose oxidase. Fluorescence lifetime measurement confirmed the quenching to be static in nature. Scavenging of photo-generated electron of ZnS nanoparticles by the flavin molecules may be attributed to the decrease in luminescence intensity. Quenching of ZnS nanoparticles with flavins follows the linear Stern–Volmer plot. The Stern–Volmer constants decreased in the following order: KS?V (Riboflavin)> KS?V (FAD)> KS?V (FMN). This interaction study could generate useful protocol for the fluorimetric determination of riboflavin (vitamin B2) content and also riboflavin status in biological systems. - Highlights: ? Unique interaction specificity of ZnS nanoparticles with flavins has been explored. ? Unlike protein-bound flavin, fluorescence of free flavins was quenched by ZnS nanoparticles. ? FMN and FAD show quenching to different extents under analogous conditions. ? Fluorescence lifetime measurement confirmed the quenching to be static in nature. ? This study is useful for probing riboflavin in biological systems.

  13. The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose has served as a very specific, sensitive, and repeatable assay for detection of glucose in biological samples. It has been used successfully for analysis of glucose in samples from blood and urine, to analysis of glucose released from starch or glycog...

  14. Towards Analog Reverse Time Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Habibi, O.; Patihnedj, U. R.; Dhar, M. O.

    2006-01-01

    We report the consequences of a destabilization process on a simulated General Purpose Analog Computer. This new technology overcomes problems linked with serial ambiguity, and provides an analog bias to encode algorithms whose complexity is over polynomial. We also implicitly demonstrate how countermesures of the Stochastic Aperture Degeneracy could efficiently reach higher computational classes, and would open a road towards Analog Reverse Time Computation.

  15. Glucokinase, the pancreatic glucose sensor, is not the gut glucose sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, R; Tura, A; Clark, P M; Holst, Jens Juul; Mari, A; Hattersley, A T

    2008-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotrophic peptide (GIP) are released from intestinal endocrine cells in response to luminal glucose. Glucokinase is present in these cells and has been proposed as a glucose sensor. The physiological...... role of glucokinase can be tested using individuals with heterozygous glucokinase gene (GCK) mutations. If glucokinase is the gut glucose sensor, GLP-1 and GIP secretion during a 75 g OGTT would be lower in GCK mutation carriers compared with controls. METHODS: We compared GLP-1 and GIP concentrations...... measured at five time-points during a 75 g OGTT in 49 participants having GCK mutations with those of 28 familial controls. Mathematical modelling of glucose, insulin and C-peptide was used to estimate basal insulin secretion rate (BSR), total insulin secretion (TIS), beta cell glucose sensitivity...

  16. Evidence that humans can taste glucose polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapis, Trina J; Penner, Michael H; Lim, Juyun

    2014-11-01

    The sense of taste is essential for identifying potential nutrients and poisons. Accordingly, specialized taste receptor cells are activated by food-derived chemicals. Because of its importance in the human diet, oral detection of starch, or its degradation products, would presumably be highly beneficial. Yet, it has long been assumed that simple sugars are the only class of carbohydrates that humans can taste. There is, however, considerable evidence that rodents can taste starch degradation products (i.e., glucose polymers composed of maltooligosaccharides with 3-10 glucose units and maltopolysaccharides with >10 glucose units) and that their detection is independent of the sweet taste receptor, T1R2/T1R3. The present study was designed 1) to measure individual differences in human taste perception of glucose polymers, 2) to understand individual differences in the activity of salivary α-amylase, and 3) to investigate the role that salivary α-amylase may play in the taste perception of glucose polymers. In the first experiment, subjects rated taste intensity of glucose, sucrose, NaCl, and glucose polymers of various chain lengths, while their noses were clamped. Saliva samples from the subjects were also collected and their salivary α-amylase activity was assayed. Results showed that the perceived intensities of glucose, sucrose, and NaCl were significantly correlated (r = 0.75-0.85, P < 0.001), but not with the longer chain glucose polymers, whereas intensity ratings of all glucose polymers were highly correlated with one another (r = 0.69-0.82, P < 0.001). Importantly, despite large individual differences in α-amylase activity among subjects, responsiveness to glucose polymers did not significantly differ between individuals with high and low α-amylase activity. A follow up experiment was conducted to quantify the concentrations of glucose and maltose that were inherently present in the glucose polymer stimuli and to determine whether the amounts were within a perceptually detectable range. Results revealed that the amounts of simple sugars present in the test stimuli were trivial and were mostly at an undetectable level. These data together provide strong evidence that humans can taste glucose polymers and that the responsiveness to glucose polymers is independent of that to simple sugars. PMID:25326592

  17. Wireless glucose monitoring watch enabled by an implantable self-sustaining glucose sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Pratyush; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2012-10-01

    Implantable glucose sensors can measure real time blood glucose as compared to conventional techniques involving drawing blood samples and in-vitro processing. An implantable sensor requires energy source for operation with wire inout provision for power and sending signals. Implants capable of generation-transmission of sensory signals, with minimal or no power requirement, can solve this problem. An implantable nanosensor design has been presented here, which can passively detect glucose concentration in blood stream and transmit data to a wearable receiver-recorder system or a watch. The glucose sensitive component is a redox pair of electrodes that generates voltage proportional to glucose concentration. The bio-electrode, made of carbon nanotubes-enzyme nanocluster, has been investigated because of the large surface area for taping electrical signals. This glucose sensor can charge a capacitor, which can be a part of a LCR resonance/inductive coupling based radio frequency (RF) sensor telemetry. Such a system can measure change in glucose concentration by the induced frequency shift in the LCR circuit. A simultaneous power transmission and signal transmission can be achieved by employing two separate LCR oscillating loops, one for each operation. The corresponding coupling LCR circuits can be housed in the wearable receiving watch unit. The data logged in this glucose monitoring watch can be instrumental in managing blood glucose as trigger for an insulin dispensing payload worn on person or implanted.

  18. ESD analog circuits and design

    CERN Document Server

    Voldman, Steven H

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive and in-depth review of analog circuit layout, schematic architecture, device, power network and ESD design This book will provide a balanced overview of analog circuit design layout, analog circuit schematic development, architecture of chips, and ESD design.  It will start at an introductory level and will bring the reader right up to the state-of-the-art. Two critical design aspects for analog and power integrated circuits are combined. The first design aspect covers analog circuit design techniques to achieve the desired circuit performance. The second and main aspect pres

  19. Deuterated prostaglandin analogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of deuterated prostaglandin analogs which are superior to the natural compounds regarding their pharmacological activity is described. They can be used as antihypertensive, antihtrombogenic and antifertile agent, furthermore as antineoplastic agent, bronchodilators or bronchoconstricters. Besides the type of compound, 9?, 13?-bisdeuterio-9?, 11?, 15?-trihydroxy-13-trans-prostenic acid, 9?, 13?-bisdeuterio-9?, 11?, 15?-trihydroxy-5-cis, 13-trans-prostadiene acid and 15?-deuterio-9?, 11?, 13?-trihydroxy-5 cis-13-trans-prostadiene acid are claimed, i.e. the preparation of each compound. Prescriptions for pharmaceutic preparations are described. (UWI)

  20. Discrete Calculus by Analogy

    CERN Document Server

    Izadi, F A; Bagirov, G

    2009-01-01

    With its origins stretching back several centuries, discrete calculus is now an increasingly central methodology for many problems related to discrete systems and algorithms. The topics covered here usually arise in many branches of science and technology, especially in discrete mathematics, numerical analysis, statistics and probability theory as well as in electrical engineering, but our viewpoint here is that these topics belong to a much more general realm of mathematics; namely calculus and differential equations because of the remarkable analogy of the subject to this branch of mathemati

  1. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Mail Close www.diabetes.org > Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Blood Glucose Testing Share: Print Page ... and-how-tos, In this section Living With Diabetes Treatment and Care Blood Glucose Testing Checking Your Blood ...

  2. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hyperglycemia? Your best bet is to practice good diabetes management and learn to detect hyperglycemia so you can ... and-how-tos, In this section Living With Diabetes Treatment and Care Blood Glucose Testing Checking Your Blood Glucose A1C ...

  3. Glucose monitoring during Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Abdul

    2015-05-01

    In patients with diabetes who intend to fast during Ramadan, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is an important tool. During this month, a long established treatment regimen, including medications, physical activity and diet plan, is changed to achieve concordance with the rules of fasting. Without proper glucose monitoring, it is not possible to achieve good glycaemic control. PMID:26013788

  4. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Mail Close www.diabetes.org > Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Blood Glucose Testing Share: Print Page Text Size: A A ... Frequent urination Increased thirst Part of managing your diabetes is checking your blood glucose often. Ask your doctor how often you should ...

  5. Continuous glucose monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klonoff, David C; Buckingham, Bruce; Christiansen, Jens S; Montori, Victor M; Tamborlane, William V; Vigersky, Robert A; Wolpert, Howard

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to formulate practice guidelines for determining settings where patients are most likely to benefit from the use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM).......The aim was to formulate practice guidelines for determining settings where patients are most likely to benefit from the use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM)....

  6. Analog-microchip for ALICE TRD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the ALICE Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) a first version of an analog chip was implemented and tested. It consists of a number of analog channels, and is the first block of the front end electronics receiving the signals from the detector pads. The current signals of the detector pads are first amplified by a charge-sensitive preamplifier. It is followed by a pole-zero cancellation circuit and a second order shaper-filter ensuring a shaped output pulse with about 125 ns FWHM. The last functional element of the analog channel chain is the output amplifier. It delivers an output signal according to the ADC requirements concerning driving capability and output levels. The overall gain of the analog channel is 5.2 mV/fC and the shaping type is CR-(RC)2. The output amplifier acts an external 8-bit 2 V range fast ADC (National type NS 08351). In the first version of the TRD analog chip 21-analog channels, basically the same, were provided. The only difference refers to the value of input pad resistance. There are 8 channels with 0 ohms, 8 channels with 50 ohms, 2 channels with 200 ohms and 2 channels with 500 ohms, to estimate the influence of the pad input resistance to overall noise. One additional channel with 50 ohms input resistance (probe channel) allows monitoring the signal in each main parts of the analog channel, not only to the output. The first results obtained from the measurements of the analog channels of the chip are very similar with those from simulation. The mains results are given in a table containing the Gain, Shaping Type, Input dynamic range, Equivalent input noise, Output pulse level, Integral nonlinearity and Max. power consumption/ch. The signals in the probe channel, corresponding to preamplifier, pole- zero circuit, shaper and output amplifier are shown. The first version of the analog chip for ALICE TRD was built and tested. The results fulfil the initial requirements. At present the chips of this first versions are used in the multichip module card (MMC), containing ADCs and a digital chip, which is the whole configuration of the front end electronics. Very soon the 2nd version of the analog chip will be submitted. For this the shaping type is CR-(RC)4, the estimated equivalent of 700 e, the input dynamic range of 165 fC, the gain of about 6.1 mV/fC, and the output of differential type. (authors)

  7. Albert Einstein, Analogizer Extraordinaire

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    Where does deep insight in physics come from? It is tempting to think that it comes from the purest and most precise of reasoning, following ironclad laws of thought that compel the clear mind completely rigidly. And yet the truth is quite otherwise. One finds, when one looks closely at any major discovery, that the greatest of physicists are, in some sense, the most crazily daring and irrational of all physicists. Albert Einstein exemplifies this thesis in spades. In this talk I will describe the key role, throughout Albert Einstein's fabulously creative life, played by wild guesses made by analogy lacking any basis whatsoever in pure reasoning. In particular, in this year of 2007, the centenary of 1907, I will describe how over the course of two years (1905 through 1907) of pondering, Einstein slowly came, via analogy, to understand the full, radical consequences of the equation that he had first discovered and published in 1905, arguably the most famous equation of all time: E = mc2.

  8. Noninvasive Continuous Monitoring of Tear Glucose Using Glucose-Sensing Contact Lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascaso, Francisco J; Huerva, Valentín

    2016-04-01

    : The incidence of diabetes mellitus is dramatically increasing in the developed countries. Tight control of blood glucose concentration is crucial to diabetic patients to prevent microvascular complications. Self-monitoring of blood glucose is widely used for controlling blood glucose levels and usually performed by an invasive test using a portable glucometer. Many technologies have been developed over the past decades with the purpose of obtaining a continuous physiological glycemic monitoring. A contact lens is the ideal vehicle for continuous tear glucose monitoring of glucose concentration in tear film. There are several research groups that are working in the development of contact lenses with embedded biosensors for continuously and noninvasively monitoring tear glucose levels. Although numerous aspects must be improved, contact lens technology is one step closer to helping diabetic subjects better manage their condition, and these contact lenses will be able to measure the level of glucose in the wearer's tears and communicate the information to a mobile phone or computer. This article reviews studies on ocular glucose and its monitoring methods as well as the attempts to continuously monitor the concentration of tear glucose by using contact lens-based sensors. PMID:26390345

  9. Glucose cycling is markedly enhanced in pancreatic islets of obese hyperglycemic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic islets from fed 7-month old lean and obese hyperglycemic mice (ob/ob) were incubated with 3H2O and 5.5 mM or 16.7 mM glucose. Incorporation of 3H into the medium glucose was taken as the measure of glucose-6-P hydrolysis to glucose. Glucose utilization was measured from the yield of 3H2O from [5-3H]glucose. Only 3-4% of the glucose phosphorylated was dephosphorylated by the lean mouse islets irrespective of the glucose concentration. In contrast, the ob/ob mouse islets at 5.5 mM glucose dephosphorylated 18% of the glucose phosphorylated and 30% at 16.7 mM. Thus, the islets of hyperglycemic mice demonstrate increased glucose cycling as compared to the islets of normoglycemic lean mice

  10. The Effect of Basal Analog Insulin on the Glycemic Variability in Type 2 Diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner Cander

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of insulin detemir and glargine on glycemic variability as determined by capillary blood glucose measurements in Type 2 diabetics treated with oral antidiabetic drugs. Material and Method: A total of 64 insulin-naive type 2 diabetics with a HbA1c level of 7.5%-10% were included in the study. The patients were randomized into 3 groups according to the basal insulin analog started; Group 1 (n=22 was started on once-daily detemir, Group 2 (n=22 twice-daily detemir, and Group 3 (n=20 insulin glargine. Basal insulin doses were titrated according to the morning/evening fasting capillary blood glucose levels. Standard deviations of the 8-point intraday fasting and postprandial blood glucose values were compared. Results: The fasting blood glucose intraday standard deviation values showed an improvement of 22.4% in Group 1, 21.4% in Group 2, and 26.4% in Group 3, while the intraday standard deviation for the postprandial values showed an improvement of 14.4%, 15.2%, and 38.7%, respectively (p>0.05. The standard deviation values did not show statistical significance when the groups were compared with each other. Baseline HbA1c values and insulin doses negatively correlated with the glycemic variability. Dicussion: Basal insulin added to treatment in Type 2 diabetics provided an improvement of 14.4% to 38.7% in glycemic variability. There was no significant difference between insulin glargine and detemir regarding this effect. Turk Jem 2014; 2: 33-38

  11. PACS with analog (video) inputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until ACR-NEMA standards are widely accepted, picture achieving and communications system (PACS) must use analog (video) input of image data from Mr and CT scanners. This paper investigates the dynamic range of data so stored and acquired, compared with conventional film. Representative MR and CT images of the brain and body were transferred by video signal both to a prototype PACS system (CommView, AT and T) and to a laser imager (3M). Quantitative measurement of output optical density versus original video input for the two systems were compared. For average widow and level settings, images from the laser imager possessed a greater dynamic range (gamma characteristic) that those from the PACS system

  12. Electronic devices for analog signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Rybin, Yu K

    2012-01-01

    Electronic Devices for Analog Signal Processing is intended for engineers and post graduates and considers electronic devices applied to process analog signals in instrument making, automation, measurements, and other branches of technology. They perform various transformations of electrical signals: scaling, integration, logarithming, etc. The need in their deeper study is caused, on the one hand, by the extension of the forms of the input signal and increasing accuracy and performance of such devices, and on the other hand, new devices constantly emerge and are already widely used in practice, but no information about them are written in books on electronics. The basic approach of presenting the material in Electronic Devices for Analog Signal Processing can be formulated as follows: the study with help from self-education. While divided into seven chapters, each chapter contains theoretical material, examples of practical problems, questions and tests. The most difficult questions are marked by a diamon...

  13. Pre-meal video game playing and a glucose preload suppress food intake in normal weight boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branton, Alyson; Akhavan, Tina; Gladanac, Branka; Pollard, Damion; Welch, Jo; Rossiter, Melissa; Bellissimo, Nick

    2014-12-01

    Increased food intake (FI) during television viewing has been reported in children, but it is unknown if this occurs following pre-meal video game playing (VGP). The objective was to determine the effect of pre-meal VGP for 30 min on subjective appetite and emotions, and FI in normal weight (NW) boys after a glucose or control preload. On four test mornings, NW boys (n = 19) received equally sweetened preloads of a non-caloric sucralose control or 50 g glucose in 250 mL of water, with or without VGP for 30 min. Food intake from an ad libitum pizza meal was measured immediately after. Subjective appetite was measured at 0, 15, 30, and 60 min. Subjective emotions were determined by visual analog scale at baseline and immediately before lunch. Both VGP (p = 0.023) and glucose (p <0.001) suppressed FI. Pre-meal VGP compared with no-VGP, and glucose compared with the non-caloric control, decreased FI by 59 and 170 kcal, respectively. Subjective average appetite increased to 30 min (p = 0.003), but was lower after glucose (p = 0.01) in both the VGP and no-VGP conditions compared with the control. Frustration and aggression scores increased after VGP (p <0.05), but did not correlate with FI. However, baseline and pre-meal happiness and excitement scores were inversely associated with FI. In conclusion, both pre-meal VGP and the glucose preload suppressed FI, supporting the roles of both physiologic and environmental factors in the regulation of short-term FI in 9- to 14-year-old NW boys. PMID:25150911

  14. Feedback in analog circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Ochoa, Agustin

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a consistent and direct methodology to the analysis and design of analog circuits with particular application to circuits containing feedback. The analysis and design of circuits containing feedback is generally presented by either following a series of examples where each circuit is simplified through the use of insight or experience (someone else’s), or a complete nodal-matrix analysis generating lots of algebra. Neither of these approaches leads to gaining insight into the design process easily. The author develops a systematic approach to circuit analysis, the Driving Point Impedance and Signal Flow Graphs (DPI/SFG) method that does not require a-priori insight to the circuit being considered and results in factored analysis supporting the design function. This approach enables designers to account fully for loading and the bi-directional nature of elements both in the feedback path and in the amplifier itself, properties many times assumed negligible and ignored. Feedback circuits a...

  15. Blood spot-based measures of glucose homeostasis and diabetes prevalence in a nationally representative population of young U.S. adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quynh C.; Whitsel, Eric A.; Tabor, Joyce W.; Cuthbertson, Carmen C.; Wener, Mark H.; Potter, Alan J.; Halpern, Carolyn T.; Killeya-Jones, Ley A; Hussey, Jon M.; Suchindran, Chirayath; Harris, Kathleen Mullan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We investigated under-studied, biomarker-based diabetes among young U.S. adults, traditionally characterized by low cardiovascular disease risk. Methods We examined 15,701 participants aged 24–32 years at Wave IV of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health, 2008). The study used innovative and relatively non-invasive methods to collect capillary whole blood via finger prick at in-home examinations in all fifty states. Results Assays of dried blood spots produced reliable and accurate values of HbA1c. Reliability was lower for fasting glucose and lowest for random glucose. Mean (standard deviation) HbA1c was 5.6% (0.8%). More than a quarter (27.4%) had HbA1c-defined pre-diabetes. HbA1c was highest in the black, non-Hispanic race/ethnic group; inversely associated with education; and more common among the overweight/obese, and physically inactive. The prevalence of diabetes defined by previous diagnosis or use of anti-diabetic medication was 2.9%. Further incorporating HbA1c and glucose values, the prevalence increased to 6.8%, and among these participants, 38.9% had a previous diagnosis of diabetes (i.e., aware). Among those aware, 37.6% were treated and 64.0% were controlled (i.e., HbA1c < 7%). Conclusions A contemporary cohort of young adults faces a historically high risk of diabetes but there is ample opportunity for early detection and intervention. PMID:25444890

  16. Abnormal temporal lobe response in Alzheimer's disease during cognitive processing as measured by 11C-2-deoxy-D-glucose and PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elderly controls and probable Alzheimer's disease patients underwent serial positron emission tomography (PET) studies during a baseline condition and while performing a verbal memory task. For the temporal lobes, all 7 Alzheimer patients demonstrated a relative shift in glucose metabolic rates to the right hemisphere during the memory condition relative to baseline, and 5 of 7 controls showed a shift to the left hemisphere. Baseline absolute regional metabolic rates replicate previous findings and were somewhat less useful than the memory challenge in differentiating patients from controls. These results indicate that a temporal lobe abnormality in Alzheimer's disease is related to memory performance

  17. Sex differences in glucose levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We aimed to examine whether sex differences in fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2 h post-OGTT plasma glucose (2hPG) and HbA(1c) could be explained by differences in body size and/or body composition between men and women in a general non-diabetic Danish population. Moreover, we aimed...... individuals. Height, weight and waist and hip circumferences were measured and BMI was calculated. Data were analysed in age-adjusted linear regression models. RESULTS: Men had higher FPG and HbA(1c) levels than women, and women had higher 2hPG levels than men. Sex differences in 2hPG levels were explained by...... differences in height and FPG levels, but sex differences in FPG or HbA(1c) levels were not explained by anthropometric measures. Among individuals with HbA(1c) in the high-risk range (6.0-6.5%), 73% had normal glucose tolerance. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Sex differences in 2hPG levels after an OGTT may to...

  18. Beginning analog electronics through projects

    CERN Document Server

    Singmin, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    Analog electronics is the simplest way to start a fun, informative, learning program. Beginning Analog Electronics Through Projects, Second Edition was written with the needs of beginning hobbyists and students in mind. This revision of Andrew Singmin's popular Beginning Electronics Through Projects provides practical exercises, building techniques, and ideas for useful electronics projects. Additionally, it features new material on analog and digital electronics, and new projects for troubleshooting test equipment.Published in the tradition of Beginning Electronics Through Projects an

  19. Boron analogs of ?-amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have been concerned with the synthesis, characterization, and definition of a class of novel isoelectronic and isostructural boron analogs of the ?-amino acids, glycine, alanine and betaine. This paper presents a brief review of the preparation and characterization of some of the first examples of the analogs and related compounds and describes their antitumor activity. The results of preliminary testing at Brookhaven as to the suitability of these analogs for use in BNCT are presented

  20. ESD design for analog circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Vashchenko, Vladislav A

    2010-01-01

    This book is on high voltage and system level circuit design. It covers many challenging ESD topics related to analog circuit design for both ESD device and ESD circuits at the network level. Included is extensive discussion of analog design for DC-DC buck/boost converters, level shifters, digital-analog converters, high speed and precision power amplifiers, and system level cable specs for interface applications.

  1. Error in the measurement of the Telector monitor, model 6112B (analogic); Error de medicion del monitor Telector, modelo 6112B (analogico)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz E, P.; Sanchez R, G.H.; Torres B, M.A.; Martinez, R.F. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: pce@nuclear.inin.mx

    2007-07-01

    This monitor is a portable equipment used with radiological protection ends in many areas where use of radioactive material is made, since account with a telescopic bar with two Geiger Mueller tubes (GM) to measure gamma radiation. The maker in his specifications indicates that the equipment is able to measure from 0.1 R/hr up to 1000 R/hr and their response doesn't depend on the energy in the interval of 300 keV to 3 MeV. However, personal of the Electronic Systems department carrying out tests in the Secondary Laboratory of Dosimetric Calibration (LSCD) of the ININ, it found that this monitor really presents an energy dependence for the energies of {sup 60}Co, in the scale of 2 R/hr. With base in an analysis of the equipment and the two GM detectors that it uses, was found that the origin of the problem is the point of saturation of the detector that uses for this scale, which coincides with the maximum measurement value that is of 2 R/hr. This flaw it can be solved using the detector that operates with the high scales, for which is required to make a modification to the electronic circuit in the part of the switch that selects the detector type. (Author)

  2. MIMO detection in analog VLSI

    OpenAIRE

    Soler Garrido, J; Piechocki, RJ; McNamara, DP; Maharatna, K

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we propose an analog VLSI approach to maximum a posteriori (MAP) detection in multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems. This detector can be seen as an extension of the well known analog decoding concept for error correcting codes, as it is constructed using similar building blocks. Therefore, it can naturally interact with analog decoders in order to perform turbo detection in MIMO systems. First transistor-level simulations for a small analog MIMO detector in a 0.25/spl m...

  3. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  4. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  5. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  6. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  7. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  8. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  9. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  10. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  12. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  13. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  14. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  15. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  16. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  17. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  18. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  19. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  20. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  1. Your Glucose Meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Your Glucose Meter Share Tweet ...

  2. Glucose: Detection and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galant, A L; Kaufman, R C; Wilson, J D

    2015-12-01

    Glucose is an aldosic monosaccharide that is centrally entrenched in the processes of photosynthesis and respiration, serving as an energy reserve and metabolic fuel in most organisms. As both a monomer and as part of more complex structures such as polysaccharides and glucosides, glucose also plays a major role in modern food products, particularly where flavor and or structure are concerned. Over the years, many diverse methods for detecting and quantifying glucose have been developed; this review presents an overview of the most widely employed and historically significant, including copper iodometry, HPLC, GC, CZE, and enzyme based systems such as glucose meters. The relative strengths and limitations of each method are evaluated, and examples of their recent application in the realm of food chemistry are discussed. PMID:26041177

  3. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  4. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  5. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  6. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  7. Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Human Services FDA U.S. Food and Drug Administration Protecting and Promoting Your Health A to Z ... Glucose NIH Medline Plus - Diabetes Spotlight FDA permits marketing of first system of mobile medical apps for ...

  8. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  9. Optimal wavelengths obtained from laws analogous to the Wien's law for monospectral and bispectral methods, and general methodology for multispectral temperature measurements taking into account global transfer function including non-uniform emissivity of surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodiet, Christophe; Remy, Benjamin; Degiovanni, Alain

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, it is shown how to select the optimal wavelengths minimizing the relative error and the standard deviation of the temperature. Furthermore, it is shown that the optimal wavelengths in mono-spectral and bi-spectral methods (for a Planck's law) can be determined by laws analogous to the displacement Wien's law. The simplicity of these laws can thus allow real-time selection of optimal wavelengths for a control/optimization of industrial processes, for example. A more general methodology to obtain the optimal wavelengths selection in a multi-spectral method (taking into account the spectral variations of the global transfer function including the emissivity variations) for temperature measurement of surfaces exhibiting non-uniform emissivity, is also presented. This latter can then find an interest in glass furnaces temperature measurement with spatiotemporal non-uniformities of emissivity, the control of biomass pyrolysis, the surface temperature measurement of buildings or heating devices, for example. The goal consists of minimizing the standard deviation of the estimated temperature (optimal design experiment). For the multi-spectral method, two cases will be treated: optimal global and optimal constrained wavelengths selection (to the spectral range of the detector, for example). The estimated temperature results obtained by different models and for different number of parameters and wavelengths are compared. These different points are treated from theoretical, numerical and experimental points of view.

  10. Backtracking quantum trajectories with analog feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange*, G.; Ristè*, D.; Tiggelman, M. J.; Eichler, C.; Tornberg, L.; Johansson, G.; Wallraff, A.; Schouten, R. N.; Dicarlo, L.

    2014-03-01

    Circuit quantum electrodynamics offers a nearly ideal platform for the fundamental study of continuous quantum measurement. A nondemolition measurement of a superconducting qubit can be performed via homodyne detection of microwave transmission through a dispersively coupled cavity. By boosting the homodyne signal with a nearly noiseless phase-sensitive parametric amplifier, we experimentally show that a form of measurement backaction, consisting of stochastic quantum phase kicks on the measured qubit, is highly correlated with the fluctuations in the continuous homodyne record. We demonstrate a real-time analog feedback scheme that counteracts these phase kicks and thereby reduces measurement-induced dephasing. We develop a numerical optimization technique to overcome the bandwidth limitations of the amplification chain and provide a theoretical model for the optimization result. A quantum efficiency of 50% is extracted for the complete analog feedback loop. Finally, we discuss the integration of this analog feedback technique to improve performance in our recent demonstration of entanglement by dispersive parity measurement. *equal contribution. Research funded by NWO and the EU projects SOLID and SCALEQIT.

  11. Hepatic glucose sensing is required to preserve ? cell glucose competence

    OpenAIRE

    Seyer, Pascal; Vallois, David; Poitry-Yamate, Carole; Schutz, Frédéric; Metref, Salima; Tarussio, David; Maechler, Pierre; Staels, Bart; Lanz, Bernard; Grueter, Rolf; Decaris, Julie; Turner, Scott; da Costa, Anabela; Preitner, Frédéric; Minehira, Kaori

    2013-01-01

    Liver glucose metabolism plays a central role in glucose homeostasis and may also regulate feeding and energy expenditure. Here we assessed the impact of glucose transporter 2 (Glut2) gene inactivation in adult mouse liver (LG2KO mice). Loss of Glut2 suppressed hepatic glucose uptake but not glucose output. In the fasted state, expression of carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) and its glycolytic and lipogenic target genes was abnormally elevated. Feeding, energy expenditu...

  12. Chemosensitizing and cytotoxic effects of 2-deoxy-D-glucose on breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Fanjie

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accelerated glucose uptake for anerobic glycolysis is one of the major metabolic changes found in malignant cells. This property has been exploited for imaging malignancies and as a possible anticancer therapy. The nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose (2 DG interferes with glucose metabolism leading to breast cancer cell death. Aims: To determine whether 2DG can synergize with chemotherapeutic agents commonly used in breast cancer treatment and identify cellular characteristics associated with sensitivity to 2DG. Materials and Methods: SkBr3 breast cancer cells were incubated with varying concentrations of 5-fluorouracil (5FU, doxorubicin, cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, or herceptin with or without 2DG. Cell viability was measured using the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Results: Combining 2DG with doxorubicin, 5 FU, cyclophosphamide, and herceptin resulted in enhanced cell death compared with each agent alone, while in combination with cisplatin, the amount of cell death was additive. Mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF mutated for p53 (-/- were 30% more sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of 2DG than the parental cell lines. Cells mutated for Bax/Bac, genes involved in protection from apoptosis, are slightly more sensitive than the parental cell lines. Conclusions: These results indicate that 2DG acts synergistically with specific chemotherapeutic agents in causing cell death and the class of chemicals most sensitive appear to be those which cause DNA damage.

  13. Prediction Methods for Blood Glucose Concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Standard diabetes insulin therapy for type 1 diabetes and late stages of type 2 is based on the expected development of blood glucose (BG) both as a consequence of the metabolic glucose consumption as well as of meals and exogenous insulin intake. Traditionally, this is not done explicitly, but the...... insulin amount is chosen using factors that account for this expectation. The increasing availability of more accurate continuous blood glucose measurement (CGM) systems is attracting much interest to the possibilities of explicit prediction of future BG values. Against this background, in 2014 a two......-day workshop on the design, use and evaluation of prediction methods for blood glucose concentration was held at the Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria. One intention of the workshop was to bring together experts working in various fields on the same topic, in order to shed light from different angles on...

  14. Multivariate image processing technique for noninvasive glucose sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Anthony J.; Cameron, Brent D.

    2010-02-01

    A potential noninvasive glucose sensing technique was investigated for application towards in vivo glucose monitoring for individuals afflicted with diabetes mellitus. Three dimensional ray tracing simulations using a realistic iris pattern integrated into an advanced human eye model are reported for physiological glucose concentrations ranging between 0 to 500 mg/dL. The anterior chamber of the human eye contains a clear fluid known as the aqueous humor. The optical refractive index of the aqueous humor varies on the order of 1.5x10-4 for a change in glucose concentration of 100 mg/dL. The simulation data was analyzed with a developed multivariate chemometrics procedure that utilizes iris-based images to form a calibration model. Results from these simulations show considerable potential for use of the developed method in the prediction of glucose. For further demonstration, an in vitro eye model was developed to validate the computer based modeling technique. In these experiments, a realistic iris pattern was placed in an analog eye model in which the glucose concentration within the fluid representing the aqueous humor was varied. A series of high resolution digital images were acquired using an optical imaging system. These images were then used to form an in vitro calibration model utilizing the same multivariate chemometric technique demonstrated in the 3-D optical simulations. In general, the developed method exhibits considerable applicability towards its use as an in vivo platform for the noninvasive monitoring of physiological glucose concentration.

  15. Evaluation of Postprandial Glucose Excursion Using a Novel Minimally Invasive Glucose Area-Under-the-Curve Monitoring System

    OpenAIRE

    Kuranuki, Sachi; Sato, Toshiyuki; Okada, Seiki; Hosoya, Samiko; Seko, Akinobu; Sugihara, Kaya; Nakamura, Teiji

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To develop a minimally invasive interstitial fluid extraction technology (MIET) to monitor postprandial glucose area under the curve (AUC) without blood sampling, we evaluated the accuracy of glucose AUC measured by MIET and compared with that by blood sampling after food intake. Methods: Interstitial fluid glucose AUC (IG-AUC) following consumption of 6 different types of foods was measured by MIET. MIET consisted of stamping microneedle arrays, placing hydrogel patches on the are...

  16. 14C-glucose binding assay of the glucose transporter binding sites in muscular cell membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of determining the binding sites of glucose transporter in rat muscular cell membrane was introduced. The crude products of cell membrane form the skeletal muscle of control and insulin treated rats were prepared, and then fractionated in sucrose gradient. Both plasma membrane and microsome membrane were incubated with D-[U-14C] glucose respectively for the measurement of radioactivity and Scatchard plot analysis. It was found that the binding sites of glucose transporter in plasma membrane and intracellular membrane were 5.6 nmol 14C-glucose/mg protein and 8.7 nmol 14C-glucose-mg protein respectively at basic state. Insulin treatment in experimental groups caused approximately 146% increase in plasma membrane fraction and 88% decrease in intracellular membrane fraction. Moreover, the kinetic data of Scatchard plot curve were similar to those of the [3H]-cytochalasin B binding assay. D-[U-14C] glucose binding assay of glucose transporter binding sites in muscular cell membrane is simple, easy and practicable. The D-[U-14C] glucose is commercially available

  17. Bayesian Analogy with Relational Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongjing; Chen, Dawn; Holyoak, Keith J.

    2012-01-01

    How can humans acquire relational representations that enable analogical inference and other forms of high-level reasoning? Using comparative relations as a model domain, we explore the possibility that bottom-up learning mechanisms applied to objects coded as feature vectors can yield representations of relations sufficient to solve analogy…

  18. Isolated transfer of analog signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezdek, T.

    1974-01-01

    Technique transfers analog signal levels across high isolation boundary without circuit performance being affected by magnetizing reactance or leakage inductance. Transfers of analog information across isolated boundary are made by interrupting signal flow, with switch, in such a manner as to produce alternating signal which is applied to transformer.

  19. Natural analog studies: Licensing perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, J.W. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This report describes the licensing perspective of the term {open_quotes}natural analog studies{close_quotes} as used in CFR Part 60. It describes the misunderstandings related to its definition which has become evident during discussions at the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission meetings and tries to clarify the appropriate applications of natural analog studies to aspects of repository site characterization.

  20. Musik som analogi og metafor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    Indeholder underkapitlerne: 2.5.1 Musik som analogi 2.5.2 Musik som metafor 2.5.3 Musikkens psykologiske funktioner - en taxonomi og metaforisk lytning til fire baroksatser......Indeholder underkapitlerne: 2.5.1 Musik som analogi 2.5.2 Musik som metafor 2.5.3 Musikkens psykologiske funktioner - en taxonomi og metaforisk lytning til fire baroksatser...

  1. Natural analog studies: Licensing perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the licensing perspective of the term open-quotes natural analog studiesclose quotes as used in CFR Part 60. It describes the misunderstandings related to its definition which has become evident during discussions at the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission meetings and tries to clarify the appropriate applications of natural analog studies to aspects of repository site characterization

  2. A Rational Reconstruction of ANALOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Yeli Zhu

    2009-01-01

    The idea of this project is to reconstruct Evans ANALGOY program (1968) that solved geometric-analogy problems. The report reviews the work of Evans on geometric analogies and explains the functionality, the proposed design and development for the new system. The report contains the timeline, the original documentation for the project, and the source code for the new system as well.

  3. Glucose oxidase--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankar, Sandip B; Bule, Mahesh V; Singhal, Rekha S; Ananthanarayan, Laxmi

    2009-01-01

    Glucose oxidase (beta-D-glucose:oxygen 1-oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.2.3.4) catalyzes the oxidation of beta-D-glucose to gluconic acid, by utilizing molecular oxygen as an electron acceptor with simultaneous production of hydrogen peroxide. Microbial glucose oxidase is currently receiving much attention due to its wide applications in chemical, pharmaceutical, food, beverage, clinical chemistry, biotechnology and other industries. Novel applications of glucose oxidase in biosensors have increased the demand in recent years. Present review discusses the production, recovery, characterization, immobilization and applications of glucose oxidase. Production of glucose oxidase by fermentation is detailed, along with recombinant methods. Various purification techniques for higher recovery of glucose oxidase are described here. Issues of enzyme kinetics, stability studies and characterization are addressed. Immobilized preparations of glucose oxidase are also discussed. Applications of glucose oxidase in various industries and as analytical enzymes are having an increasing impact on bioprocessing. PMID:19374943

  4. Kidney transplantation improves arterial function measured by pulse wave analysis and endothelium-independent dilatation in uraemic patients despite deterioration of glucose metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, Mads; Clausen, Peter; Idorn, Thomas; Hansen, Jesper Melchior; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of kidney transplantation on arterial function in relation to changes in glucose metabolism. METHODS: Included were 40 kidney recipients (Tx group, age 38 ± 13 years) and 40 patients without known diabetes remaining on the waiting list...... for kidney transplantation (uraemic control group, age 47 ± 11 years). Arterial function was estimated by the pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the carotid-femoral pulse wave, aortic augmentation index (AIX), flow-mediated (FMD) and nitroglycerin-induced vasodilatation (NID) of the brachial artery...... performed before transplantation and after 12 months. PWV recorded sequentially at the carotid and femoral artery is an estimate of arterial stiffness; AIX is an integrated index of vascular and ventricular function. FMD and NID are the dilatory capacities of the brachial artery after increased flow...

  5. Relationship between blood glucose and carotid intima media thickness: A meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Einarson Thomas R; Hunchuck Jonathan; Hemels Michiel

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Increased coronary intima media thickness (CIMT) has been associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes, as have increased glucose levels. The link has not been established between glucose and CIMT; therefore, we sought to assess the relationship between glucose and CIMT. Methods Medline, EMBASE, Scopus, and Cochrane databases were searched from inception through 2009 for original research reporting both postprandial glucose levels and CIMT measurements. Glucose was clas...

  6. Hydration dynamics of aqueous glucose probed with polarization-resolved fs-IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, C. C. M.; Bakker, H. J.

    2014-06-01

    The dynamics of water in aqueous solutions of glucose have been investigated using polarization-resolved femtosecond infrared spectroscopy of the hydroxyl stretch vibrations of water and glucose. Using reference measurements on solutions of glucose in dimethylsulfoxide and a spectral decomposition model, we are able to distinguish the reorientation dynamics of the glucose and water hydroxyl groups. We find that the water reorientation dynamics strongly slow down in the presence of glucose.

  7. Sensing of Salivary Glucose Using Nano-Structured Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Yunqing Du; Wenjun Zhang; Wang, Ming L

    2016-01-01

    The anxiety and pain associated with frequent finger pricking has always been troublesome for diabetics measuring blood glucose (BG) in their daily lives. For this reason, a reliable glucose monitoring system that allows noninvasive measurements is highly desirable. Our main objective is to develop a biosensor that can detect low-level glucose in saliva (physiological range 0.5–20 mg/dL). Salivary glucose (SG) sensors were built using a layer-by-layer self-assembly of single-walled carbon nan...

  8. Return of the glucoreceptor: Glucose activates the glucose-sensing receptor T1R3 and facilitates metabolism in pancreatic β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Itaru; Nakagawa, Yuko; Ohtsu, Yoshiaki; Hamano, Kunihisa; Medina, Johan; Nagasawa, Masahiro

    2015-05-01

    Subunits of the sweet taste receptor, namely T1R2 and T1R3, are expressed in mouse pancreatic islets. Quantitatively, the expression of messenger ribonucleic acid for T1R2 is much lower than that of T1R3, and immunoreactive T1R2 is in fact undetectable. Presumably, a homodimer of T1R3 could function as a signaling receptor. Activation of this receptor by adding an artificial sweetener, sucralose, leads to an increase in intracellular adenosine triphosphate ([ATP]c). This increase in [ATP]c is observed in the absence of ambient glucose. Sucralose also augments elevation of [ATP]c induced by methylsuccinate, a substrate for mitochondria. Consequently, activation of T1R3 promotes metabolism in mitochondria and increases [ATP]c. 3-O-Methylglucose, a non-metabolizable analog of glucose, also increases [ATP]c. Conversely, knockdown of T1R3 attenuates elevation of [ATP]c induced by glucose. Hence, glucose promotes its own metabolism by activating T1R3 and augmenting ATP production. Collectively, a homodimer of T1R3 functions as a cell surface glucose-sensing receptor and participates in the action of glucose on insulin secretion. The glucose-sensing receptor T1R3 might be the putative glucoreceptor proposed decades ago by Niki et al. The glucose-sensing receptor is involved in the action of glucose and modulates glucose metabolism in pancreatic β-cells. PMID:25969708

  9. Analog-to-digital conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Pelgrom, Marcel J M

    2010-01-01

    The design of an analog-to-digital converter or digital-to-analog converter is one of the most fascinating tasks in micro-electronics. In a converter the analog world with all its intricacies meets the realm of the formal digital abstraction. Both disciplines must be understood for an optimum conversion solution. In a converter also system challenges meet technology opportunities. Modern systems rely on analog-to-digital converters as an essential part of the complex chain to access the physical world. And processors need the ultimate performance of digital-to-analog converters to present the results of their complex algorithms. The same progress in CMOS technology that enables these VLSI digital systems creates new challenges for analog-to-digital converters: lower signal swings, less power and variability issues. Last but not least, the analog-to-digital converter must follow the cost reduction trend. These changing boundary conditions require micro-electronics engineers to consider their design choices for...

  10. Spatial relationship between tumor perfusion and endogeneous glucose distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earlier studies detecting glucose in tissue and solid tumors by bioluminescence imaging suggested, that glucose distribution patterns may be spatially related to functional vascularity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this relationship by comparing glucose distribution patterns as determined by bioluminescence imaging to perfusion patterns of endogeneous Hoechst 33342 in rats bearing mammary carcinomas. R 3230 mammary carcinoma cells have been implanted subcutaneously into 7 female Fischer 344 rats. Two months post implantation, after injection of Hoechst 33342 the tumors were removed and snap frozen to conserve metabolite levels. Concomitantly, blood was sampled from the animals for analysis of glucose concentrations using a micodialysis analyzer. Cryosections of the tumors have been prepared, and every slice has been analyzed for both, Hoechst binding by fluorescence microscopy, and for glucose distribution patterns using bioluminescence imaging. In many cases vascular structures could be retrieved by the spatial pattern of glucose distribution. In some cases however, higher glucose concentrations could be found independent from Hoechst signal. On the other hand, regions of high Hoechst signal are not necessarily correlated with high glucose concentrations. When comparing blood and tissue glucose levels, tissue glucose content as measured with bioluminescence imaging (1.9-3.5 mM) is considerably lower than blood glucose (5.6-8.0 mM), demonstrating the expected gradient from blood to tissue. This study demonstrates the feasibility of monitoring glucose gradients in relation to functional vasculature throughout the body, from blood down to tissue or tumor and further, throughout the microenvironment of the solid tumor. Glucose distribution patterns may be an important tool in perfusion studies, e. g. in detecting the direction of blood flow in ex-vivo samples or in estimating glucose consumption rates of tumor cells adjacent to or in between perfused vessels

  11. Analog systems for gravity duals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossenfelder, Sabine

    2015-06-01

    We show that analog gravity systems exist for charged, planar black holes in asymptotic anti-de Sitter space. These black holes have been employed to describe, via the gauge-gravity duality, strongly coupled condensed matter systems on the boundary of anti-de Sitter (AdS) space. The analog gravity system is a different condensed matter system that, in a suitable limit, describes the same bulk physics as the theory on the AdS boundary. This combination of the gauge-gravity duality and analog gravity therefore suggests a duality between different condensed matter systems.

  12. Analog Systems for Gravity Duals

    OpenAIRE

    Hossenfelder, S.

    2014-01-01

    We show that analog gravity systems exist for charged, planar black holes in asymptotic Anti-de Sitter space. These black holes have been employed to describe, via the gauge-gravity duality, strongly coupled condensed matter systems on the boundary of AdS-space. The analog gravity system is a different condensed matter system that, in a suitable limit, describes the same bulk physics as the theory on the AdS boundary. This combination of the gauge-gravity duality and analog gravity therefore ...

  13. Preoperative octreotide therapy and surgery in acromegaly: associations between glucose homeostasis and treatment response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helseth, R; Carlsen, S M; Bollerslev, J; Svartberg, J; Øksnes, M; Skeie, S; Fougner, S L

    2016-02-01

    In acromegaly, high GH/IGF-1 levels associate with abnormal glucose metabolism. Somatostatin analogs (SSAs) reduce GH and IGF-1 but inhibit insulin secretion. We studied glucose homeostasis in de novo patients with acromegaly and changes in glucose metabolism after treatment with SSA and surgery. In this post hoc analysis from a randomized controlled trial, 55 de novo patients with acromegaly, not using antidiabetic medication, were included. Before surgery, 26 patients received SSAs for 6 months. HbA1c, fasting glucose, and oral glucose tolerance test were performed at baseline, after SSA pretreatment and at 3 months postoperative. Area under curve of glucose (AUC-G) was calculated. Glucose homeostasis was compared to baseline levels of GH and IGF-1, change after SSA pretreatment, and remission both after SSA pretreatment and 3 months postoperative. In de novo patients, IGF-1/GH levels did not associate with baseline glucose parameters. After SSA pretreatment, changes in GH/IGF-1 correlated positively to change in HbA1c levels (both p acromegaly, disease activity did not correlate with glucose homeostasis. Surgical treatment of acromegaly improved glucose metabolism in both cured and not cured patients, while SSA pretreatment led to deterioration in glucose homeostasis in patients not achieving biochemical control. PMID:26179177

  14. Photometric properties of Mars soils analogs

    OpenAIRE

    Pommerol, Antoine; Thomas, Nicolas; Jost, Bernhard; Beck, P.; Okubo, C.; McEwen, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the bidirectional reflectance of analogs of dry, wet, and frozen Martian soils over a wide range of phase angles in the visible spectral range. All samples were produced from two geologic samples: the standard JSC Mars-1 soil simulant and Hawaiian basaltic sand. In a first step, experiments were conducted with the dry samples to investigate the effects of surface texture. Comparisons with results independently obtained by different teams with similar samples showed a satisfyi...

  15. Ingredients of a Casimir analog computer

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; McCauley, Alexander P.; John D Joannopoulos; Johnson, Steven G.

    2009-01-01

    We present the basic ingredients of a technique to compute quantum Casimir forces at micrometer scales using antenna measurements at tabletop, e.g. centimeter, scales, forming a type of analog computer for the Casimir force. This technique relies on a correspondence that we derive between the contour integration of the Casimir force in the complex frequency plane and the electromagnetic response of a physical dissipative medium in a finite, real frequency bandwidth.

  16. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrune Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency, or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI, is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea. Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty, generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency. GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib. Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21 and SLC37A4 (11q23 respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most commonly confirmed by G6PC (GSDIa or SLC37A4 (GSDIb gene analysis, and the indications of liver biopsy to measure G6P activity are getting rarer and rarer. Differential diagnoses include the other GSDs, in particular type III (see this term. However, in GSDIII, glycemia and lactacidemia are high after a meal and low after a fast period (often with a later occurrence than that of type I. Primary liver tumors and Pepper syndrome (hepatic metastases of neuroblastoma may be evoked but are easily ruled out through clinical and ultrasound data. Antenatal diagnosis is possible through molecular analysis of amniocytes or chorionic villous cells. Pre-implantatory genetic diagnosis may also be discussed. Genetic counseling should be offered to patients and their families. The dietary treatment aims at avoiding hypoglycemia (frequent meals, nocturnal enteral feeding through a nasogastric tube, and later oral addition of uncooked starch and acidosis (restricted fructose and galactose intake. Liver transplantation, performed on the basis of poor metabolic control and/or hepatocarcinoma, corrects hypoglycemia, but renal involvement may continue to progress and neutropenia is not always corrected in type Ib. Kidney transplantation can be performed in case of severe renal insufficiency. Combined liver-kidney grafts have been performed in a few cases. Prognosis is usually good: late hepatic and renal complications may occur, however, with adapted management, patients have almost normal life span. Disease name and synonyms Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency or G6P deficiency or glycogen storage disease type I or GSDI or type I glycogenosis or Von Gierke disease or Hepatorenal glycogenosis.

  17. High glucose impairs superoxide production from isolated blood neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Nielsen, S E; Rask-Madsen, J

    2003-01-01

    Superoxide (O(2)(-)), a key antimicrobial agent in phagocytes, is produced by the activity of NADPH oxidase. High glucose concentrations may, however, impair the production of O(2)(-) through inhibition of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), which catalyzes the formation of NADPH. This stud...... measured the acute effects of high glucose or the G6PD inhibitor dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on the production of O(2)(-) from isolated human neutrophils....

  18. Variable Classifications of Glycemic Index Determined by Glucose Meters

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Meng-Hsueh Amanda; Wu, Ming-Chang; Lin, Jenshinn

    2010-01-01

    The study evaluated and compared the differences of glucose responses, incremental area under curve (IAUC), glycemic index (GI) and the classification of GI values between measured by biochemical analyzer (Fuji automatic biochemistry analyzer (FAA)) and three glucose meters: Accue Chek Advantage (AGM), BREEZE 2 (BGM), and Optimum Xceed (OGM). Ten healthy subjects were recruited for the study. The results showed OGM yield highest postprandial glucose responses of 119.6 ± 1.5, followed by FAA, ...

  19. Autocorrelation optical coherence tomography for glucose quantification in blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, H.; Gilanie, G.; Hussain, F.; Ahmad, E.

    2015-12-01

    We report a new method for glucose monitoring in blood tissue based on the autocorrelation function (ACF) analysis in Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). We have determined the changes in OCT monitoring signals’ depth to characterize the modulations in ACFs for quantitative measurements of glucose concentrations in blood. We found that an increase in the concentration of glucose in blood results in decreased OCT monitoring signal due to the increase in the refractive index of the media.

  20. Oxytocin increases extrapancreatic glucagon secretion and glucose production in pancreatectomized dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infusion of oxytocin into normal dogs increases plasma levels of insulin and glucagon and glucose production and uptake. To determine whether infused oxytocin also increases glucagon secretion from extrapancreatic sites, pancreatectomized dogs, off insulin of 18 hr, were infused with oxytocin and plasma glucagon, and glucose production and uptake were measured using the [6-3H]glucose primer-infusion technique. The diabetic dogs, in the control period, had elevated plasma glucose and glucagon levels, an increased rate of glucose production, and a relative decrease in glucose uptake (decreased clearance). Infusion of oxytocin (500 ?U/kg/min) caused a rise in plasma glucagon and glucose levels, increased glucose production, and further decreased glucose clearance. it is concluded that oxytocin can stimulate secretion of extrapancreatic glucagon, which contributes to the increased glucose production

  1. Glucose feeding exacerbates parathion-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, K; Liu, J; Karanth, S; Zhang, H; Roane, D S; Pope, C N

    2001-06-22

    Excessive dietary intake of sugars could alter various biotransformation processes and the pharmacological and toxicological properties of numerous xenobiotics. In the present study, the effects of glucose supplementation were examined on the neurotoxicity of the organophosphorus (OP) pesticide parathion (PS) and its active metabolite, paraoxon (PO), a potent inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Rats (n = 6-12/treatment group) were given free access to tap water or 15% glucose (w/v) in tap water beginning 7 d prior to OP toxicant exposure. Food, caloric intake, and body weight were measured daily. Animals were challenged with either PS (4.5, 9, or 18 mg/kg, sc) or PO (0.3 0.5, or 0.7 mg/kg, sc) and clinical signs of neurotoxicity (i.e., autonomic dysfunction, involuntary movements) were recorded daily for the following 13 d. Glucose feeding was associated with a dramatic drop (approximately 50%) in feed intake and an increase (approximately 20% in total caloric consumption over the 7 d prior to OP exposure. Functional toxicity associated with PS exposure was increased in glucose-fed (GF) rats, but the glucose diet had no apparent effect on clinical signs of toxicity following PO treatment. Glucose feeding increased the magnitude of AChE inhibition in the frontal cortex and plasma at lower dosages (i.e., 4.5 and 9 mg/kg) 3 d following PS treatment. Time-course studies (3, 7, and 11 d after PS exposure, 18 mg/kg, sc) indicated significantly greater brain and plasma AChE inhibition in glucose-fed animals at later time points. In contrast, glucose feeding had no effect on the degree of AChE inhibition following PO exposure. Neither liver microsomal oxidative desulfuration of PS, nor liver or plasma paraoxonase, nor liver or plasma carboxylesterase activities were measurably affected by glucose feeding. Downregulation of muscarinic receptors 7 d after PS exposure (18 mg/kg, sc) was more extensive in GF rats. It is postulated that excessiveglucose consumption decreases the intake of other dietary components, in particular amino acids, limiting the de novo synthesis of AChE and consequent recovery of synaptic transmission. Due to the shorter duration of inhibition following PO exposure, sponta neous reactivation of AChE may be more important than de novo protein synthesis in recovery of function, and thus with the effects of glucose feeding on its toxicity. Individuals that derive a large proportion of their calories from sugars may be at higher risk of acute toxicity from organophosphorus pesticides such as PS. PMID:11437059

  2. An optimized analog to digital converter for WLAN analog front end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 10 bit 80 MSPS analog to digital converter optimized for WLAN analog front end is presented. In contrast to conventional 1.5 bit pipeline architecture, four optimized multi-bit multiply digital to analog converter stages are implemented. An on-chip low-noise reference buffer is proposed for SoC integration purposes, and a wide-bandwidth wide swing sample and hold amplifier is also presented for achieving a good dynamic range. The converter was fabricated in 0.18 μm 1P6M CMOS technology, and the core area occupies approximately 0.85 mm2. Measured results show that with an 11 MHz input signal, it provides a 9.4 bit effective number of bits and a 72 dBc spurious frequency dynamic range when sampled at 80 MHz. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  3. Is Reality Digital or Analog?

    OpenAIRE

    Mäkelä, Jarmo

    2011-01-01

    Comment: This essay, written in a form of a fictitious dialogue with Isaac Newton, received the First Prize in the Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi) essay contest "Is Reality Digital or Analog?"

  4. IMMOBILIZATION OF GLUCOSE OXIDASE IN SILICA SOL-GEL FILM FOR APPLICATION TO BIOSENSOR AND AMPEROMETRIC DETERMINATION OF GLUCOSE

    OpenAIRE

    N?ZAMETT?N DEM?RKIRAN; ERGUN EK?NC?; MELTEM AS?LTÜRK

    2012-01-01

    In this study, an electrochemical biosensor was developed by using a sol-gel coating solution. The modified platinum electrode used in the study was constructed by immobilization of glucose oxidase under a layer of sol-gel film. The sol-gel coating solution was prepared by using GLYMO, TEOS, and MTEOS. Electrochemical measurements were carried out amperometrically by determining hydrogen peroxide produced by the enzymatic reaction between glucose and glucose oxidase. The amperometric response...

  5. Blood glucose monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Sarah

    2014-06-10

    I found the CPD article on blood glucose monitoring and management in acute stroke care interesting and informative. As I am a mental health nursing student, my knowledge of chronic physical conditions is limited, so I learned a lot. PMID:24894257

  6. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose) Hyperglycemia is the technical term for ... prepend(' ' + ' ' + this.errorMessage + ' ' + ' '); } }); $('.survey-form').show(); } else { $('.survey-loading').remove(); $('#emailsurvey').hide(); $('#emailsurveythanks').show(); } } }; /* bind any forms ...

  7. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... produces daily around 4:00 a.m. to 5:00 a.m.). What are the Symptoms of Hyperglycemia? The signs and symptoms include the following: High blood glucose High levels of sugar in the urine Frequent urination Increased ...

  8. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing ... html Learn More Join Ryan Reed & Drive Your Health Access tools to help actively manage your diabetes. ... .survey-alert-wrap').remove(); if (data.submitSurveyResponse.success == 'false') { $('.survey-form'). ...

  9. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In Memory In Honor Become a Member En Español Type 1 Type 2 About Us Online Community ... Page Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose) Hyperglycemia is the technical ...

  10. Glucose Tolerance and Hyperkinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langseth, Lillian; Dowd, Judith

    Examined were medical records of 265 hyperkinetic children (7-9 years old). Clinical blood chemistries, hematology, and 5-hour glucose tolerance test (GTT) results indicated that hematocrit levels were low in 27% of the Ss, eosinophil levels were abnormally high in 86% of the Ss, and GTT results were abnormal in a maority of Ss. (CL)

  11. Effects of MDMA on blood glucose levels and brain glucose metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to assess changes in glucose metabolism in rats administered single or repeated doses of MDMA. Two different experiments were performed: (1) A single-dose study with four groups receiving 20 mg/kg, 40 mg/kg, saline or heat, and (2) a repeated-dose study with two groups receiving three doses, at intervals of 2 h, of 5 mg/kg or saline. Rats were imaged using a dedicated small-animal PET scanner 1 h after single-dose administration or 7 days after repeated doses. Glucose metabolism was measured in 12 cerebral regions of interest. Rectal temperature and blood glucose were monitored. Peak body temperature was reached 1 h after MDMA administration. Blood glucose levels decreased significantly after MDMA administration. In the single-dose experiment, brain glucose metabolism showed hyperactivation in cerebellum and hypo-activation in the hippocampus, amygdala and auditory cortex. In the repeated-dose experiment, brain glucose metabolism did not show any significant change at day 7. These results are the first to indicate that MDMA has the potential to produce significant hypoglycaemia. In addition, they show that MDMA alters glucose metabolism in components of the motor, limbic and somatosensory systems acutely but not on a long-term basis. (orig.)

  12. Effects of MDMA on blood glucose levels and brain glucose metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto-Montenegro, M.L.; Vaquero, J.J.; Garcia-Barreno, P.; Desco, M. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Laboratorio de Imagen, Medicina Experimental, Madrid (Spain); Arango, C. [Hospital General Gregorio Maranon, Departamento de Psiquiatria, Madrid (Spain); Ricaurte, G. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2007-06-15

    This study was designed to assess changes in glucose metabolism in rats administered single or repeated doses of MDMA. Two different experiments were performed: (1) A single-dose study with four groups receiving 20 mg/kg, 40 mg/kg, saline or heat, and (2) a repeated-dose study with two groups receiving three doses, at intervals of 2 h, of 5 mg/kg or saline. Rats were imaged using a dedicated small-animal PET scanner 1 h after single-dose administration or 7 days after repeated doses. Glucose metabolism was measured in 12 cerebral regions of interest. Rectal temperature and blood glucose were monitored. Peak body temperature was reached 1 h after MDMA administration. Blood glucose levels decreased significantly after MDMA administration. In the single-dose experiment, brain glucose metabolism showed hyperactivation in cerebellum and hypo-activation in the hippocampus, amygdala and auditory cortex. In the repeated-dose experiment, brain glucose metabolism did not show any significant change at day 7. These results are the first to indicate that MDMA has the potential to produce significant hypoglycaemia. In addition, they show that MDMA alters glucose metabolism in components of the motor, limbic and somatosensory systems acutely but not on a long-term basis. (orig.)

  13. Glucose biosensor based on glucose oxidase immobilized on unhybridized titanium dioxide nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A glucose biosensor has been fabricated by immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOx) on unhybridized titanium dioxide nanotube arrays using an optimized cross-linking technique. The TiO2 nanotube arrays were synthesized directly on a titanium substrate by anodic oxidation. The structure and morphology of electrode material were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical performances of the glucose biosensor were conducted by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry measurements. It gives a linear response to glucose in the 0.05 to 0.65 mM concentration range, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9981, a sensitivity of 199.6 μA mM−1 cm−2, and a detection limit as low as 3.8 µM. This glucose biosensor exhibited high selectivity for glucose determination in the presence of ascorbic acid, sucrose and other common interfering substances. This glucose biosensor also performed good reproducibility and long-time storage stability. This optimized cross-linking technique could open a new avenue for other enzyme biosensors fabrication. (author)

  14. Towards power centric analog design

    OpenAIRE

    Svensson, Christer

    2015-01-01

    Power consumption of analog systems is poorly understoodtoday, in contrast to the very well developed analysis of digitalpower consumption. We show that there is good opportunity todevelop also the analog power understanding to a similar levelas the digital. Such an understanding will have a large impact inthe design of future electronic systems, where low power consumptionwill be crucial. Eventually we may reach a power centricanalog design methodology.

  15. Close interrelationships among glucose oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have reported that alloxan, a ?-cytotoxic agent, inhibited glucose oxidation and glucose-induced 45Ca uptake of pancreatic ?-cells; the non-?-cell mass was not inhibited by alloxan pretreatment. Therefore it is feasible to assess glucose metabolism and Ca uptake in the mass composed of ?-cells alone, by subtracting glucose oxidation and Ca uptake in the alloxan treated islets from the non-alloxan treatted islets. In order to elucidate the interrelationship between glycolysis, glucose-induced Ca uptake and insulin release in the pancreatic ?-cell mass, but not in the pancreatic islets, we investigated 14CO2 formation from 14C-U-D-glucose, glucose-induced 45Ca uptake and insulin release in alloxan treated and non-alloxan treated islets. In vitro incubation of collagenase digested isolated islets of Langerhans was employed. The relationships between the three parameters in the presumed pancreatic ?-cell mass (14CO2 formation from 14C-U-D-glucose, glucose-induced 45Ca uptake and insulin release) and glucose concentration in the media were clearly sigmoidal. The threshold values of the three parameters are approximately 5 mM of glucose. The half maximum rates of 14CO2 formation, 45Ca uptake and insulin release required 13.4 mM, 13.6 mM and 12.8 mM of glucose, respectively. The near maximum stimulation of the three parameters was obtained at 20 mM of glucose. (orig.)

  16. Glucose Regulates the Expression of the Apolipoprotein A5 Gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruchart, Jamila; Nowak, Maxime; Helleboid-Chapman, Audrey; Jakel, Heidelinde; Moitrot, Emmanuelle; Rommens, Corinne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart, Jean-Charles

    2008-04-07

    The apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) is a key player in determining triglyceride concentrations in humans and mice. Since diabetes is often associated with hypertriglyceridemia, this study explores whether APOA5 gene expression is regulated by alteration in glucose homeostasis and the related pathways. D-glucose activates APOA5 gene expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner in hepatocytes, and the glycolytic pathway involved was determined using D-glucose analogs and metabolites. Together, transient transfections, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level through an increase of USF1/2 binding to an E-box in the APOA5 promoter. We show that this phenomenon is not due to an increase of mRNA or protein expression levels of USF. Using protein phosphatases 1 and 2A inhibitor, we demonstrate that D-glucose regulates APOA5 gene via a dephosphorylation mechanism, thereby resulting in an enhanced USF1/2-promoter binding. Last, subsequent suppressions of USF1/2 and phosphatases mRNA through siRNA gene silencing abolished the regulation. We demonstrate that APOA5 gene is up regulated by D-glucose and USF through phosphatase activation. These findings may provide a new cross talk between glucose and lipid metabolism.

  17. An ozone budget for the UK: using measurements from the national ozone monitoring network; measured and modelled meteorological data, and a 'big-leaf' resistance analogy model of dry deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coyle, M.; Smith, R.; Fowler, D

    2003-05-01

    A method of calculating a mass budget for O{sub 3} in the UK boundary layer is presented which shows that the spatial scale of the UK is small relative to the footprint of the atmosphere influenced by UK emissions. - Data from the UK national air-quality monitoring network are used to calculate an annual mass budget for ozone (O{sub 3}) production and loss in the UK boundary layer during 1996. Monthly losses by dry deposition are quantified from 1 kmx1 km scale maps of O{sub 3} concentration and O{sub 3} deposition velocities based on a 'big-leaf' resistance analogy. The quantity of O{sub 3} deposition varies from {approx}50 Gg-O{sub 3} month{sup -1} in the winter to over 200 Gg-O{sub 3} month{sup -1} in the summer when vegetation is actively absorbing O{sub 3}. The net O{sub 3} production or loss in the UK boundary layer is found by selecting days when the UK is receiving 'clean' Atlantic air from the SW to NW. In these conditions, the difference in O{sub 3} concentration observed at Mace Head and a rural site on the east coast of the UK indicates the net O{sub 3} production or loss within the UK boundary layer. A simple box model is then used to convert the concentration difference into a mass. The final budget shows that for most of the year the UK is a net sink for O{sub 3} (-25 to -800 Gg-O{sub 3} month{sup -1}) with production only exceeding losses in the photochemically active summer months (+45 Gg-O{sub 3} month{sup -1})

  18. An ozone budget for the UK: using measurements from the national ozone monitoring network; measured and modelled meteorological data, and a 'big-leaf' resistance analogy model of dry deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of calculating a mass budget for O3 in the UK boundary layer is presented which shows that the spatial scale of the UK is small relative to the footprint of the atmosphere influenced by UK emissions. - Data from the UK national air-quality monitoring network are used to calculate an annual mass budget for ozone (O3) production and loss in the UK boundary layer during 1996. Monthly losses by dry deposition are quantified from 1 kmx1 km scale maps of O3 concentration and O3 deposition velocities based on a 'big-leaf' resistance analogy. The quantity of O3 deposition varies from ∼50 Gg-O3 month-1 in the winter to over 200 Gg-O3 month-1 in the summer when vegetation is actively absorbing O3. The net O3 production or loss in the UK boundary layer is found by selecting days when the UK is receiving 'clean' Atlantic air from the SW to NW. In these conditions, the difference in O3 concentration observed at Mace Head and a rural site on the east coast of the UK indicates the net O3 production or loss within the UK boundary layer. A simple box model is then used to convert the concentration difference into a mass. The final budget shows that for most of the year the UK is a net sink for O3 (-25 to -800 Gg-O3 month-1) with production only exceeding losses in the photochemically active summer months (+45 Gg-O3 month-1)

  19. Interaction of Glucose with ZnO Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Samanta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of the extent of interaction as well as the formation of a bioconjugate of glucose with Zinc Oxide nano particles (ZnO NPs to understand the non-invasive monitoring of glucose by semiconductor NPs. We performed an array of photophysical as well as microscopic measurements to quantify the interaction between ZnO NPs and glucose. We have found that time constant of interaction (t1  18.47 min for the binding glucose with surface of ZnO NPs and follows a single exponential association process.

  20. Nonoxidative Glucose Consumption during Focal Physiologic Neural Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Peter T.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Mintun, Mark A.; Dence, Carmen

    1988-07-01

    Brain glucose uptake, oxygen metabolism, and blood flow in humans were measured with positron emission tomography, and a resting-state molar ratio of oxygen to glucose consumption of 4.1:1 was obtained. Physiological neural activity, however, increased glucose uptake and blood flow much more (51 and 50 percent, respectively) than oxygen consumption (5 percent) and produced a molar ratio for the increases of 0.4:1. Transient increases in neural activity cause a tissue uptake of glucose in excess of that consumed by oxidative metabolism, acutely consume much less energy than previously believed, and regulate local blood flow for purposes other than oxidative metabolism.

  1. Analog approach to mixed analog-digital circuit simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrodzki, Jan

    2013-10-01

    Logic simulation of digital circuits is a well explored research area. Most up-to-date CAD tools for digital circuits simulation use an event driven, selective trace algorithm and Hardware Description Languages (HDL), e.g. the VHDL. This techniques enable simulation of mixed circuits, as well, where an analog part is connected to the digital one through D/A and A/D converters. The event-driven mixed simulation applies a unified, digital-circuits dedicated method to both digital and analog subsystems. In recent years HDL techniques have been also applied to mixed domains, as e.g. in the VHDL-AMS. This paper presents an approach dual to the event-driven one, where an analog part together with a digital one and with converters is treated as the analog subsystem and is simulated by means of circuit simulation techniques. In our problem an analog solver used yields some numerical problems caused by nonlinearities of digital elements. Efficient methods for overriding these difficulties have been proposed.

  2. Blood glucose in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2009-01-01

    Blood glucose is often elevated in acute stroke, and higher admission glucose levels are associated with larger lesions, greater mortality and poorer functional outcome. In patients treated with thrombolysis, hyperglycemia is associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation of...... risk of inducing potentially harmful hypoglycemia has been raised. Still, basic and observational research is overwhelmingly in support of a causal relationship between blood glucose and stroke outcome and further research on glucose-lowering therapy in acute stroke is highly warranted....

  3. Total and high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin levels and measures of glucose and lipid metabolism following pioglitazone treatment in a randomized placebo-controlled study in polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, D.; Frystyk, J.; Hojlund, K.; Andersen, Katrine Krogh; Henriksen, J.E.; Hermann, A.P.; Hagen, C.; Flyvbjerg, A.; Andersen, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recent studies suggested that the effect of adiponectin on insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism is mediated primarily by the high molecular weight (HMW) form of adiponectin. In the present study we evaluated total and HMW adiponectin in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients and...... controls and examined possible mechanisms for increased insulin sensitivity during pioglitazone treatment. STUDY SUBJECTS: Thirty PCOS patients randomized to pioglitazone, 30 mg/day, or placebo for 16 weeks and 14 weight-matched healthy females were studied. DESIGN: Total and HMW adiponectin levels were...... measured, and euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamps and indirect calorimetry were performed. Delta-values denoted changes during pioglitazone treatment (16 weeks--basal). RESULTS: Pretreatment adiponectin levels were decreased in PCOS patients vs. controls (P < 0.05), whereas no significant differences were...

  4. Study of diabetes using naturally enriched 13C-glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the work undertaken by Duchesne et al. since 1968, results from the use of a new method in the area of glucose metabolism are presented. Because of differences in their photosynthetic pathway, some vegetables, e.g., maize and sugarcane, are a little richer in 13C than most common foodstuffs. This weak, but significant, enrichment allows the use of maize glucose as a natural and nonradioactive tracer. In this procedure the variations of the 13C/12C ratio of exhaled CO2 are measured by mass spectrometry. By this method, we can follow, in man, the complete conversion of an oral glucose load into CO2 during a glucose tolerance test. At the same time, measurements of blood glucose and of respiratory quotient are made. They permit a useful comparison of the level of glucose in blood, the total amount of glucose consumed, and the fraction of exogenous glucose burned in the hours following oral administration. New information was obtained from these studies concerning glucose metabolism. The method was used in normal subjects and in obese and diabetic patients. Some of the diabetics were receiving an oral antidiabetic treatment. Significant differences were obtained in these cases, not only between them but also with the information given by the classical methods

  5. Genetic variation in GIPR influences the glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saxena, Richa; Hivert, Marie-France; Langenberg, Claudia; Tanaka, Toshiko; Pankow, James S; Vollenweider, Peter; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Dupuis, Josée; Jackson, Anne U; Kao, W H Linda; Li, Man; Glazer, Nicole L; Manning, Alisa K; Luan, Jian'an; Stringham, Heather M; Prokopenko, Inga; Johnson, Toby; Grarup, Niels; Boesgaard, Trine W; Lecoeur, Cécile; Shrader, Peter; O'Connell, Jeffrey; Ingelsson, Erik; Couper, David J; Rice, Kenneth; Song, Kijoung; Andreasen, Camilla H; Dina, Christian; Köttgen, Anna; Le Bacquer, Olivier; Pattou, François; Taneera, Jalal; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Rybin, Denis; Ardlie, Kristin; Sampson, Michael; Qi, Lu; van Hoek, Mandy; Weedon, Michael N; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Voight, Benjamin F; Grallert, Harald; Balkau, Beverley; Bergman, Richard N; Bielinski, Suzette J; Bonnefond, Amelie; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Böttcher, Yvonne; Brunner, Eric; Buchanan, Thomas A; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chines, Peter S; Collins, Francis S; Cornelis, Marilyn; J Crawford, Gabriel; Delplanque, Jerome; Doney, Alex; Egan, Josephine M; Erdos, Michael R; Firmann, Mathieu; Forouhi, Nita G; Fox, Caroline S; Goodarzi, Mark O; Graessler, Jürgen; Hingorani, Aroon; Isomaa, Bo; Jørgensen, Torben; Kivimaki, Mika; Kovacs, Peter; Krohn, Knut; Kumari, Meena; Lauritzen, Torsten; Lévy-Marchal, Claire; Mayor, Vladimir; McAteer, Jarred B; Meyre, David; Mitchell, Braxton D; Mohlke, Karen L; Morken, Mario A; Narisu, Narisu; Palmer, Colin N A; Pakyz, Ruth; Pascoe, Laura; Payne, Felicity; Pearson, Daniel; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Sandbaek, Annelli; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Scott, Laura J; Sharp, Stephen J; Sijbrands, Eric; Singleton, Andrew; Siscovick, David S; Smith, Nicholas L; Sparsø, Thomas; Swift, Amy J; Syddall, Holly; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Valle, Timo T; Waeber, Gérard; Walley, Andrew; Waterworth, Dawn M; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zhao, Jing Hua; Illig, Thomas; Wichmann, H Erich; Wilson, James F; van Duijn, Cornelia; Hu, Frank B; Morris, Andrew D; Frayling, Timothy M; Hattersley, Andrew T; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Nilsson, Peter; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Shuldiner, Alan R; Walker, Mark; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter; Williams, Gordon H; Nathan, David M; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Cooper, Cyrus; Marmot, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Mooser, Vincent; Stumvoll, Michael; Loos, Ruth J F; Altshuler, David; Psaty, Bruce M; Rotter, Jerome I; Boerwinkle, Eric; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Florez, Jose C; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Barroso, Inês; Sladek, Robert; Froguel, Philippe; Meigs, James B; Groop, Leif; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watanabe, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    Glucose levels 2 h after an oral glucose challenge are a clinical measure of glucose tolerance used in the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. We report a meta-analysis of nine genome-wide association studies (n = 15,234 nondiabetic individuals) and a follow-up of 29 independent loci (n = 6,958-30,620)...... with 2-h glucose. Of the three newly implicated loci (GIPR, ADCY5 and VPS13C), only ADCY5 was found to be associated with type 2 diabetes in collaborating studies (n = 35,869 cases, 89,798 controls, OR = 1.12, 95% CI 1.09-1.15, P = 4.8 x 10(-18))....

  6. Characterization of 6-deoxy-6-iodo-D-glucose: A potential new tool to assess glucose transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    6-deoxy-6-iodo-D-glucose (6-DIG) was rapidly taken up by adipocytes. Insulin increased 6-DIG transport in adipocytes isolated from both rats and mice. This stimulation was more important in rat than in mouse adipocytes, in agreement with their respective amount of Glut 4 transporters. In two insulin-resistant states, the biological behavior of 6-DIG and 3-O-methyl-D-glucose was similar. These results indicated that 6-DIG, which was transported into the cells via the glucose transporters, could be potentially useful to measure modifications of glucose transport

  7. Effect of erythropoietin on the glucose transport of rat erythrocytes and bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of Ep on radioactive glucose and methyl-alpha-D-glucoside transport by rat erythrocytes and bone marrow cells were studied. There is initial linearity followed by saturation kinetics of [14C]glucose transport by the erythrocytes of starved and starved plus Ep-treated rats at different concentrations of glucose. Starvation caused slight inhibition of glucose transport which increased markedly on Ep administration to starved rats. Normal animals failed to show any significant change in glucose transport after Ep treatment. Methyl-alpha-D-glucoside inhibited the Ep-stimulated glucose transport significantly. Ep also stimulated the transport of radioactive methyl-alpha-D-glucoside which was competitively inhibited in presence of D-glucose. Glucose transport in erythrocytes was found to be sensitive to metabolic inhibitors like azide and DNP. A sulfhydryl reagent and ouabain also inhibited the transport process. Ep stimulated glucose and methyl-alpha-D-glucoside transport in the bone marrow cells of starved rats. The sugar analog competitively inhibited the glucose transport in bone marrow cells and vice versa

  8. Hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John G

    2016-06-01

    The liver has a central role in the regulation of systemic glucose and lipid fluxes during feeding and fasting and also relies on these substrates for its own energy needs. These parallel requirements are met by coordinated control of carbohydrate and lipid fluxes into and out of the Krebs cycle, which is highly tuned to nutrient availability and heavily regulated by insulin and glucagon. During progression of type 2 diabetes, hepatic carbohydrate and lipid biosynthesis fluxes become elevated, thus contributing to hyperglycaemia and hypertriacylglycerolaemia. Over this interval there are also significant fluctuations in hepatic energy state. To date, it is not known to what extent abnormal glucose and lipid fluxes are causally linked to altered energy states. Recent evidence that the glucose-lowering effects of metformin appear to be mediated by attenuation of hepatic energy generation places an additional spotlight on the interdependence of hepatic biosynthetic and oxidative fluxes. The transition from fasting to feeding results in a significant re-direction of hepatic glucose and lipid fluxes and may also incur a temporary hepatic energy deficit. At present, it is not known to what extent these variables are additionally modified by type 2 diabetes and/or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Thus, there is a compelling need to measure fluxes through oxidative, gluconeogenic and lipogenic pathways and determine their relationship with hepatic energy state in both fasting and fed conditions. New magnetic resonance-based technologies allow these variables to be non-invasively studied in animal models and humans. This review summarises a presentation given at the symposium entitled 'The liver in focus' at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by two other reviews on topics from this symposium (by Kenneth Cusi, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3952-1 , and by Hannele Yki-Järvinen, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3944-1 ) and a commentary by the Session Chair, Michael Roden (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3911-x ). PMID:27048250

  9. Performance report for Stanford/SLAC Microstore Analog Memory Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tests of a newly developed Analog Memory Unit (AMU) are described. The device contains 256 analog storage cells consisting of pass transistors, a storage capacitor and a differential read out buffer. By addressing the storage cells sequentially, the shape of the signal present at the input can be recorded in time. Fast response and good amplitude resolution were the design goals for the development. Measurements on individual devices will be presented and the status of hybridized subsystems containing eight AMUs discussed

  10. Analog electronics for radiation detection

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Analog Electronics for Radiation Detection showcases the latest advances in readout electronics for particle, or radiation, detectors. Featuring chapters written by international experts in their respective fields, this authoritative text: Defines the main design parameters of front-end circuitry developed in microelectronics technologies Explains the basis for the use of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors for the detection of charged particles and other non-consumer applications Delivers an in-depth review of analog-to-digital converters (ADCs), evaluating the pros and cons of ADCs integrated at the pixel, column, and per-chip levels Describes incremental sigma delta ADCs, time-to-digital converter (TDC) architectures, and digital pulse-processing techniques complementary to analog processing Examines the fundamental parameters and front-end types associated with silicon photomultipliers used for single visible-light photon detection Discusses pixel sensors ...

  11. Digital plus analog output encoder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafle, R. S. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The disclosed encoder is adapted to produce both digital and analog output signals corresponding to the angular position of a rotary shaft, or the position of any other movable member. The digital signals comprise a series of binary signals constituting a multidigit code word which defines the angular position of the shaft with a degree of resolution which depends upon the number of digits in the code word. The basic binary signals are produced by photocells actuated by a series of binary tracks on a code disc or member. The analog signals are in the form of a series of ramp signals which are related in length to the least significant bit of the digital code word. The analog signals are derived from sine and cosine tracks on the code disc.

  12. The interaction among glucose transport, hexokinase, and glucose-6-phosphatase with respect to 3H-2-deoxyglucose retention in murine tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of new diagnostic/therapeutic modalities for cancer requires a specific understanding of how tumors differ from normal tissues. Though the key components involved in the selective accumulation of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) analogs in tumors are known, the relative importance of each is controversial. For this reason glucose transport protein (GLUT) density, hexokinase/glucose-6-phosphatase (GP) activity, and 2-DG biodistribution were measured together in four tumor models and normal murine tissues. Direct binding studies with 3H-cytochalasin B showed that GLUT density was elevated 20-fold in LX-1 tumors. Immunohistochemically in all tumors, the expression of GLUT-1 was highest in the necrotic/perinecrotic foci and similar in cells not adjacent to necrotic foci. As the retention of 3H-2-DG was similar in all tumors, these data suggest that the GLUT-1 in perinecrotic tumor cells were not rate limiting for 3H-2-DG uptake. Kidney, liver, and lung had high GP activity and rapid clearance of 3H-2-DG. Sodium orthovanadate (5 μmol), a GP inhibitor, increased the concentration of 3H-2-DG in these tissues, suggesting that GP is a rate-limiting enzyme for 3H-2-DG clearance. All tumor homogenates had low GP activity, and hexokinase activity was not elevated compared to normal tissues. Thus, in the tumors studied, the selective accumulation of 3H-2-DG consistently occurred in the absence of significant GP activity without the marked overexpression of hexokinase or GLUT

  13. Theory of analogous force on number sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general statistical thermodynamic theory that considers given sequences of x-integers to play the role of particles of known type in an isolated elastic system is proposed. By also considering some explicit discrete probability distributions px for natural numbers, we claim that they lead to a better understanding of probabilistic laws associated with number theory. Sequences of numbers are treated as the size measure of finite sets. By considering px to describe complex phenomena, the theory leads to derive a distinct analogous force fx on number sets proportional to (∂px/∂x)T at an analogous system temperature T. In particular, this yields to an understanding of the uneven distribution of integers of random sets in terms of analogous scale invariance and a screened inverse square force acting on the significant digits. The theory also allows to establish recursion relations to predict sequences of Fibonacci numbers and to give an answer to the interesting theoretical question of the appearance of the Benford's law in Fibonacci numbers. A possible relevance to prime numbers is also analyzed. (author)

  14. Multilateral Collaborations in Analog Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, R. l.

    2016-01-01

    International collaborations in studies utilizing ground-based space flight analogs are an effective means for answering research questions common to participating agencies. These collaborations bring together worldwide experts to solve important space research questions. By collaborating unnecessary duplication of science is reduced, and the efficiency of analog use is improved. These studies also share resources among agencies for cost effective solutions to study implementation. Recently, NASA has engaged in collaborations with international partners at a variety of analog sites. The NASA Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) is currently hosting investigator studies from NASA and from the German Space Agency (DLR). These isolation studies will answer questions in the areas of team cohesion, sleep and circadian rhythms, and neurobehavioral correlates to function. Planning for the next HERA campaign is underway as proposal selections are being made from the International Life Sciences Research Announcement (ILSRA). Studies selected from the ILSRA will be conducted across 4 HERA missions in 2017. NASA is planning collaborative studies with DLR at the :envihab facility in Cologne, Germany. Investigations were recently selected to study the effects of 0.5% CO2 exposure over 30 days of bed rest. These studies will help to determine the fidelity of this ground-based analog for studying the visual impairment intracranial pressure syndrome. NASA is also planning a multilateral collaboration at :envihab with DLR and the European Space Agency (ESA) to examine artificial gravity as a countermeasure to mitigate the effects of 60 days of bed rest. NASA is also considering collaborations with the Russian Institute for Biomedical Problems (IBMP) in studies that will utilize their Ground-based Experimental Facility (NEK). The NEK is comprised of 4 interconnected modules and a Martian surface simulator. This isolation analog can support 3 -10 crew members for long duration confinement studies. Multilateral involvement in study campaigns is planned.

  15. Hepatic glucose sensing is required to preserve ? cell glucose competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyer, Pascal; Vallois, David; Poitry-Yamate, Carole; Schütz, Frédéric; Metref, Salima; Tarussio, David; Maechler, Pierre; Staels, Bart; Lanz, Bernard; Grueter, Rolf; Decaris, Julie; Turner, Scott; da Costa, Anabela; Preitner, Frédéric; Minehira, Kaori; Foretz, Marc; Thorens, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    Liver glucose metabolism plays a central role in glucose homeostasis and may also regulate feeding and energy expenditure. Here we assessed the impact of glucose transporter 2 (Glut2) gene inactivation in adult mouse liver (LG2KO mice). Loss of Glut2 suppressed hepatic glucose uptake but not glucose output. In the fasted state, expression of carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) and its glycolytic and lipogenic target genes was abnormally elevated. Feeding, energy expenditure, and insulin sensitivity were identical in LG2KO and control mice. Glucose tolerance was initially normal after Glut2 inactivation, but LG2KO mice exhibited progressive impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion even though ? cell mass and insulin content remained normal. Liver transcript profiling revealed a coordinated downregulation of cholesterol biosynthesis genes in LG2KO mice that was associated with reduced hepatic cholesterol in fasted mice and reduced bile acids (BAs) in feces, with a similar trend in plasma. We showed that chronic BAs or farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist treatment of primary islets increases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, an effect not seen in islets from Fxr(-/-) mice. Collectively, our data show that glucose sensing by the liver controls ? cell glucose competence and suggest BAs as a potential mechanistic link. PMID:23549084

  16. Piceatannol, a resveratrol derivative, promotes glucose uptake through glucose transporter 4 translocation to plasma membrane in L6 myocytes and suppresses blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetic model db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakawa, Miki; Miura, Yutaka; Yagasaki, Kazumi

    2012-06-01

    The skeletal muscle cells are one of the main sites of glucose uptake through glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in response to insulin. In muscle cells, 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is known as another GLUT4 translocation promoter. Natural compounds that activate AMPK have a possibility to overcome insulin resistance in the diabetic state. Piceatannol is a natural analog and a metabolite of resveratrol, a known AMPK activator. In this study, we investigate the in vitro effect of piceatannol on glucose uptake, AMPK phosphorylation and GLUT4 translocation to plasma membrane in L6 myocytes, and its in vivo effect on blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetic model db/db mice. Piceatannol was found to promote glucose uptake, AMPK phosphorylation and GLUT4 translocation by Western blotting analyses in L6 myotubes under a condition of insulin absence. Promotion by piceatannol of glucose uptake as well as GLUT4 translocation to plasma membrane by immunocytochemistry was also demonstrated in L6 myoblasts transfected with a glut4 cDNA-coding vector. Piceatannol suppressed the rises in blood glucose levels at early stages and improved the impaired glucose tolerance at late stages in db/db mice. These in vitro and in vivo findings suggest that piceatannol may be preventive and remedial for type 2 diabetes and become an antidiabetic phytochemical. PMID:22579688

  17. Analog video to ARINC 818

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Many commercial and military aircraft still use analog video, such as RS-170, RS-343, or STANEG 3350. Though the individual digital components many be inexpensive, the cost to certify and retrofit an entire aircraft fleet may be prohibitively expensive. A partial or incremental upgrade program where analog cameras remain in use but data is converted and processed digitally can be an attractive option. This paper describes Great River Technology's experience in converting multiple channels of RS-170 and multiplexing them through a concentrator to put them onto a single fiber or cable. The paper will also discuss alternative architectures and how ARINC 818 can be utilized with legacy systems.

  18. Application handbook for analog IC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book consists of ten chapters, which are prolog on analog IC and digital, basic function of OP amp for operation, characteristic on direct current and interchange, Op amp and linear circuit, nonlinear arithmetic circuit, filter circuit, oscillation circuit and V-F converter, D-A converter, A-D converter on introduction eight bit and 12 bit, I C for power supply and switching regulator. Each chapter has the explanations of specific function of the programs, filter circuit, converters. So, this book is a application handbook for analog IC.

  19. Carbon balance studies of glucose metabolism in rat cerebral cortical synaptosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, U.; Brand, K.

    1982-07-01

    Synaptosomes were isolated from rat cerebral cortex and incubated with (U-/sup 14/C)-, (1-/sup 14/C)- or (6-/sup 14/C)glucose. Glucose utilization and the metabolic partitioning of glucose carbon in products were determined by isotopic methods. From the data obtained a carbon balance was constructed, showing lactate to be the main product of glucose metabolism, followed by CO/sup 2/, amino acids and pyruvate. Measuring the release of /sup 14/CO/sup 2/ from glucose labelled in three different positions allowed the construction of a flow diagram of glucose carbon atoms in synaptosomes, which provides information about the contribution of the various pathways of glucose metabolism. Some 2% of glucose utilized was calculated to be degraded via the pentose phosphate pathway. Addition of chlorpromazine, imipramine or haloperidol at concentrations of 10(-5) M reduced glucose utilisation by 30% without changing the distribution pattern of radioactivity in the various products.

  20. Assessment of insulin action in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus using [6(14)C]glucose, [3(3)H]glucose, and [2(3)H]glucose. Differences in the apparent pattern of insulin resistance depending on the isotope used

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether [2(3)H], [3(3)H], and [6(14)C]glucose provide an equivalent assessment of glucose turnover in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and nondiabetic man, glucose utilization rates were measured using a simultaneous infusion of these isotopes before and during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps. In the nondiabetic subjects, glucose turnover rates determined with [6(14)C]glucose during insulin infusion were lower (P less than 0.02) than those determined with [2(3)H]glucose and higher (P less than 0.01) than those determined with [3(3)H]glucose. In IDDM, glucose turnover rates measured with [6(14)C]glucose during insulin infusion were lower (P less than 0.05) than those determined with [2(3)H]glucose, but were not different from those determined with [3(3)H]glucose. All three isotopes indicated the presence of insulin resistance. However, using [3(3)H]glucose led to the erroneous conclusion that glucose utilization was not significantly decreased at high insulin concentrations in the diabetic patients. [6(14)C] and [3(3)H]glucose but not [2(3)H]glucose indicated impairment in insulin-induced suppression of glucose production. These results indicate that tritiated isotopes do not necessarily equally reflect the pattern of glucose metabolism in diabetic and nondiabetic man

  1. Análise de diferentes medidas antropométricas na identificação de síndrome metabólica, com ou sem alteração do metabolismo glicídico Analysis of several anthropometric measurements for the identification of metabolic syndrome, with or without disturbance of glucose metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Pereira da Rocha

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este estudo comparou parâmetros antropométricos e de resistência à insulina de indivíduos sem e com síndrome metabólica (SM, subestratificados pela presença de anormalidades glicêmicas. SUJEITOS E MÉTODOS: Foram incluídos 454 indivíduos (66% mulheres, 54% brancos, sendo 155 alocados para o grupo 1 (sem SM, sem anormalidade glicêmica, 32 para o grupo 2 (sem SM, com anormalidade glicêmica, 104 no grupo 3 (com SM, sem anormalidade glicêmica e 163 no grupo 4 (com SM e anormalidade glicêmica. Os grupos foram comparados por ANOVA. RESULTADOS: Os grupos com SM (3 e 4 apresentaram os piores perfis antropométrico e lipídico; no grupo 2, apesar de glicemias significantemente mais elevadas, as médias das variáveis antropométricas e lipídicas não diferiram do grupo 1. Os maiores valores médios de HOMA-IR foram encontrados nos grupos com SM, enquanto o grupo 2 apresentou o menor HOMA-?. A trigliceridemia foi a variável metabólica com coeficientes de correlação mais elevados com a antropometria. Porém, as correlações mais fortes foram da circunferência da cintura (r = 0,503 e da razão cintura-altura (r = 0,513 com o HOMA-IR (p OBJECTIVE: This study compared anthropometric measurements and insulin resistance indexes of individuals with or without metabolic syndrome (MS, stratified by the presence of glycemic abnormalities. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: 454 individuals (66% women, 54% Caucasians were included, being 155 allocated to group 1 (without MS, without glycemic abnormality, 32 to group 2 (without MS, with glycemic abnormality, 104 to group 3 (with MS, without glycemic abnormality, and 163 to group 4 (with MS, with glycemic abnormality. Groups were compared by ANOVA. RESULTS: Those with MS (3 e 4 showed the worst anthropometric and lipid profiles; in group 2, despite higher plasma glucose levels, the mean values of anthropometric variables and lipids did not differ from group 1. The highest mean values of HOMA-IR were found in the groups with MS, while group 2 showed the lowest HOMA-?. Triglyceride was the metabolic variable with the highest correlation coefficients with anthropometry. However, the strongest correlations were those of waist circumference (r = 0.503 and waist-to-height ratio (r = 0.513 with HOMA-IR (p < 0.01. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that, in a sample of the Brazilian population, any anthropometric measure identifies individuals with MS, but such measurements seem to be unable to differentiate those with glycemic disturbance. We reinforce the strongest relationship of measures of central adiposity with insulin resistance, suggesting utility for the waist-to-height. An autoimmune component may be contributing to the deterioration of glucose metabolism of individuals from group 2.

  2. Proximal small intestinal mucosal injury. Maintenance of glucose and glucose polymer absorption, attenuation of disaccharide absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, M; Madariaga, H; Heitlinger, L; Lee, P C; Lebenthal, E

    1989-03-01

    The effect of chronic intragastric infusion of hypertonic mannitol on small intestinal mucosal structure and function was studied in adult rats. Animals were gavage-fed 20% mannitol (1300 mosm) at a dose of 5 ml/100 g body weight daily for seven days. Control animals were gavage-fed tap water on the same schedule. On day 8, the animals were anesthetized, the duodenum cannulated, and a test sugar (glucose, glucose polymer, lactose, sucrose, or maltose) was infused at a dose of 0.5 g/kg body weight in 2.5 ml distilled water over less than 1 min. Portal vein glucose was measured at 30-min intervals from 0 to 120 min. Mannitol treatment resulted in histologic and biochemical alterations (reduced lactase, sucrase, maltase) limited to the proximal small intestine compared to the control group. The absorption of glucose and glucose polymers was similar in mannitol-treated and control animals. In contrast, digestion and absorption of lactose, sucrose, and maltose was significantly diminished in mannitol-treated animals when compared to controls. No changes in permeability to polyethylene glycol 4000 or Na+-coupled glucose transport were observed in mannitol-treated animals compared to controls. These data suggest that when the intestinal mucosa is exposed to hyperosmolar loads that the digestive capacity for disaccharides is suppressed more than its glucose absorptive capacities. Furthermore, glucose oligomers may be more readily digested and absorbed than disaccharides, in this setting, due, in part, to the proximal injury and less pronounced proximal-distal gradient for glucoamylase than other brush-border carbohydrases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2493365

  3. Copper-incorporated SBA-15 with peroxidase-like activity and its application for colorimetric detection of glucose in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Jianshuai; He, Yun; Wang, Yan

    2016-02-01

    The copper incorporated SBA-15 (Cu-SBA-15) materials with different amount of Cu in framework were synthesized, and the products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and N2 adsorption/desorption. The Cu contents incorporated into the framework of SBA-15 were measured by inductively coupling plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). Cu-SBA-15 samples were found to exhibit the peroxidase-like activity, similar to the natural peroxidase. The effect of various parameters such as the content of Cu incorporated, pH and temperature on the peroxidase-like activity was studied. Based on the peroxidase-like activity, the Cu-SBA-15 was applied to the determination of H2O2. The linear range for detecting H2O2 was from 0.8 to 60mM with a detection limit of 3.7µM. Coupled with glucose oxidase, the Cu-SBA-15 was successfully used for the determination of glucose with the linear range of 2-80mM and a detection limit of 5.4µM. The determination of glucose in human serum showed high accuracy, good reproducibility, as well as high selectivity against uric acid, ascorbic acid, dopamine and glucose analogs including fructose, maltose and lactose. PMID:26653419

  4. Whole body glucose kinetics in type I diabetes studied with [6,6-2H] and [U-13C]-glucose and the artificial B-cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic aspects of whole body glucose metabolism were assessed in ten young adult insulin-dependent (type I) diabetic men. Using a primed, continuous intravenous infusion of [6,6-2H]glucose and [U-13C]glucose, endogenous production, tissue uptake, carbon recycling, and oxidation of glucose were measured in the postabsorptive state. These studies were undertaken after blood glucose had been maintained overnight at 5.9 +/- 0.4 mmol/L (n = 10), and on another night at 10.5 +/- 0.4 mmol/L (n = 4) or 15.2 +/- 0.6 mmol/L (n = 6). In the normoglycemic state, endogenous glucose production averaged 2.15 +/- 0.13 mg x kg-1 x min-1. This value, as well as the rate of glucose carbon recycling (0.16 +/- 0.04 mg x kg-1 x min-1) and glucose oxidation (1.52 +/- 0.16 mg x kg-1 x min-1) are comparable to those found in nondiabetic controls. In the hyperglycemic states at 10 or 15 mmol/L, endogenous glucose production was increased by 11% (P less than .01) and 60% (P less than .01) compared to the normoglycemic states, respectively. Glucose carbon recycling contributed only a small percentage to this variation in glucose production (15% at the 15 mmol/L glucose level). This suggests that if gluconeogenesis participates in the increased glucose output, it is not dependent on a greater systemic supply of three-carbon precursors. The increased rate of glucose production in the hyperglycemic state was quantitatively offset by a rise in urinary glucose excretion. Glucose tissue uptake, as well as glucose oxidation, did not vary between normoglycemic and hyperglycemic states

  5. Development of a long-acting insulin analog using albumin fusion technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duttaroy, Alokesh; Kanakaraj, Palanisamy; Osborn, Blaire L; Schneider, Helmut; Pickeral, Oxana K; Chen, Cecil; Zhang, Guiyi; Kaithamana, Shashi; Singh, Mallika; Schulingkamp, Robert; Crossan, Dan; Bock, Jason; Kaufman, Thomas E; Reavey, Peter; Carey-Barber, Melisa; Krishnan, Surekha R; Garcia, Andy; Murphy, Kelly; Siskind, Jana K; McLean, Malia A; Cheng, Susan; Ruben, Steve; Birse, Charles E; Blondel, Olivier

    2005-01-01

    The primary therapeutic goal for the treatment of diabetes is maintenance of a long-term, near-normoglycemic condition and prevention of the onset or progression of the complications associated with the disease. Although several analogs of human insulin have been developed, the currently prescribed long-acting insulin analogs do not provide a stable basal glycemia for more than a few hours. Here, we report the development of Albulin, a long-acting insulin analog obtained by direct gene fusion of a single-chain human insulin to human serum albumin. Albulin showed an elimination t(1/2) of approximately 7 h in normoglycemic mice. In vitro pharmacodynamic profiles for Albulin characterized by receptor binding, inhibition of gluconeogenesis, induction of glucose uptake, and global regulation of gene expression in relevant cell types showed that Albulin produced similar activity profiles compared with that of recombinant human insulin. A single Albulin administration in vivo normalized blood glucose level in diabetic mice in a relatively peakless and sustained (24-h) fashion. A further reduction in glucose levels was achieved by administering a recombinant human insulin a few hours after Albulin injection in mice, indicating the potential for Albulin therapy in combination with available fast-acting insulin derivatives. In summary, Albulin displays characteristics of a potent long-acting insulin analog that can be evaluated for use as a novel insulin therapy for patients with insulin-dependent diabetes. PMID:15616036

  6. Effects of lindane on the glucose metabolism in rat brain cortex cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of 0.5 mM γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH, lindane) on glucose transport has been investigated using the analog 3-O-methyl-D(U-14C) glucose. The glucose uptake was lineal for at least 10 sec. Preincubation of dissociated brain cortex cells with lindane decreased the transport of glucose with respect to the controls. The treatment of brain cortex cells with other organochlorine compounds indicated that the α-, δ-HCH isomers and dieldrin reproduced the same inhibitory pattern, while β-HCH and endrin were inactive. The total radioactivity incorporated into CO2 from (U-14C) glucose in the cerebral cortex is also inhibited by lindane in a time dependent manner

  7. Effects of lindane on the glucose metabolism in rat brain cortex cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulido, J.A.; del Hoyo, N.; Perez-Albarsanz, M.A. (Univ. of Alcala, Madrid (Spain))

    1990-01-01

    The influence of 0.5 mM {gamma}-hexachlorocyclohexane ({gamma}-HCH, lindane) on glucose transport has been investigated using the analog 3-O-methyl-D(U-{sup 14}C) glucose. The glucose uptake was lineal for at least 10 sec. Preincubation of dissociated brain cortex cells with lindane decreased the transport of glucose with respect to the controls. The treatment of brain cortex cells with other organochlorine compounds indicated that the {alpha}-, {delta}-HCH isomers and dieldrin reproduced the same inhibitory pattern, while {beta}-HCH and endrin were inactive. The total radioactivity incorporated into CO{sub 2} from (U-{sup 14}C) glucose in the cerebral cortex is also inhibited by lindane in a time dependent manner.

  8. Analogical priming via semantic relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellman, B A; Holyoak, K J; Morrison, R G

    2001-04-01

    Research on semantic memory has often tacitly treated semantic relations as simple conduits for spreading activation between associated object concepts, rather than as integral components of semantic organization. Yet conceptual relations, and the role bindings they impose on the objects they relate, are central to such cognitive tasks as discourse comprehension, inference, problem solving, and analogical reasoning. The present study addresses the question of whether semantic relations and their bindings can influence access to semantic memory. The experiments investigated whether, and under what conditions, presenting a prime pair of words linked by 1 of 10 common semantic relations would facilitate processing of a target pair of words linked by the same relation. No effect was observed when participants merely read the prime; however, relational priming was observed under instructions to note and use the semantic relations. Participants were faster at making a lexical decision or naming a word on a related pair of target words when that pair was primed with an analogously related pair of words than when the prime pair consisted of either two unrelated words or two words linked by some other relation. This evidence of analogical priming suggests that under an appropriate strategic set, lexical decisions and naming latencies can be influenced by a process akin to analogical mapping. PMID:11407415

  9. Mathematical Analogy and Metaphorical Insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicky, Jan

    2010-01-01

    How are we to understand the power of certain literary metaphors? The author argues that the apprehension of good metaphors is importantly similar to the apprehension of fruitful mathematical analogies: both involve a structural realignment of vision. The author then explores consequences of this claim, drawing conceptually significant parallels…

  10. Analog Input Data Acquisition Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    DAQ Master Software allows users to easily set up a system to monitor up to five analog input channels and save the data after acquisition. This program was written in LabVIEW 8.0, and requires the LabVIEW runtime engine 8.0 to run the executable.

  11. PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF MAGNESIUM IONIC LIQUID ANALOGOUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaiyou Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the solubility of Choline chloride (ChCl in ethylene glycol (EG was measured by isothermal method in the temperature range between 0°C and 120°C. The solubility of MgCl2 in saturated ChCl-EG mixture was measured by isothermal method at 20°C, 50°C and 70°C, respectively. Ionic liquid analogous containing MgCl2 was prepared based on the measured solubility data. The structure of the ionic liquid analogous is preliminarily investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The physical and electrochemical properties of the ionic liquid such as viscosity, conductivity, molar conductivity and density were measured as function of temperature and compositions. It was found that magnesium ionic liquid analogous was highly conducting and low viscosity. The ChCl and MgCl2 had a great effect on the studied properties.

  12. READ - Remote Analog ASIC Design System

    OpenAIRE

    Auer, Michael E.; Danilo G. Zutin

    2006-01-01

    The scope of this work is to present a solution to implement a remote electronic laboratory for testing and designing analog ASICs (ispPAC10). The application allows users to create circuit schematics, upload the design to the device and perform measurements. The software used for designing circuits is the PAC-Designer and it runs on a Citrix server. The signals are generated and the responses are acquired by a data acquisition board controlled by LabView. The virtual instruments interact wi...

  13. Cerebral muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor measurement in Alzheimer`s disease patients on {sup 11}C-N-methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate. Comparison with cerebral blood flow and cerebral glucose metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi; Sasaki, Masayuki; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Ichimiya, Atsushi; Takita, Masashi; Ogomori, Koji; Masuda, Kouji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1998-02-01

    We studied the cerebral muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor (mACh-R) by means of {sup 11}C-N-methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate ({sup 11}C-NMPB) and positron emission tomography (PET) in Alzheimer`s disease (AD) cases, and the findings were compared with the cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the glucose metabolism (CMRGlc) to evaluate the relationship between the mACh-R and the CBF or the CMRGlc. The subjects consisted of 18 patients with AD and 18 age and sex matched normal volunteers. The patients were clinically diagnosed according to the criteria of the NINDS-ADRDA as having ``probable AD`` and were thus classified into two groups (mild and moderate AD) according to the severity of dementia determined by DSM-III-R. The CBF was measured by {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT, and the CMRGlc was measured by {sup 18}FDG PET. The {sup 11}C-NMPB uptake was evaluated by the graphical method and the ratio method (ROIs/Cerebellum). A significant mACh-R decrease and more severe CMRGlc decrease in the cortical region was seen in mild and moderate AD. The decrease in the CBF was not as obvious as that in the mACh-R and the CMRGlc. Our study thus suggested that the mACh-R decreased in patients with AD, and that the {sup 18}FDG PET was the most sensitive method for detecting the degenerative regions in patients with AD. (author)

  14. Plasma glucose levels and flight

    OpenAIRE

    Tomei G; Loreti B; Rosati MV; Tomao E; Sinibaldi F; De Sio S; Casale T; Pimpinella B; Di Pastena C; Tomei F; Stansfeld S; Andrè JC; Caciari T

    2013-01-01

    Background: Noise is able to exert many adverse health effects, ranging from damages on various organs and systems to changes in biochemical and humoral markers. In literature, the effects of chronic exposure to noise on blood glucose levels have been reported, although these results are conflicting: some authors reported hyperglycaemia, others hypoglycaemia and many others recorded no changes in blood glucose levels. Objectives: Considering that the plasma glucose levels are not used as a b...

  15. Oat β-glucan depresses SGLT1- and GLUT2-mediated glucose transport in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Nazanin N; Purslow, Peter P; Tosh, Susan M; Bakovic, Marica

    2016-06-01

    Oat β-glucan consumption is linked to reduced risk factors associated with diabetes and obesity by lowering glycemic response and serum level of low-density lipoproteins. The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanism of action of oat β-glucan at the interface between the gut wall and the lumen responsible for attenuating glucose levels. We proposed that viscous oat β-glucan acts as a physical barrier to glucose uptake in normally absorptive gut epithelial cells IEC-6 by affecting the expression of intestinal glucose transporters. Concentration and time-dependent changes in glucose uptake were established by using a nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-d-glucose. The effectiveness of nutrient transport in IEC-6 cells was shown by significant differences in glucose uptake and corresponding transporter expression. The expressions of glucose transporters sodium-glucose-linked transport protein 1 (SGLT1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) increased with time (0-60 minutes) and glucose levels (5-25 mmol/L). The suppression of glucose uptake and SGLT1 and GLUT2 expression by increasing concentrations (4-8 mg/mL) of oat β-glucan demonstrated a direct effect of the physical properties of oat β-glucan on glucose transport. These results affirmed oat β-glucan as a dietary agent for minimizing postprandial glucose and showed that modulating the activity of the key intestinal glucose transporters with oat β-glucan could be an effective way of lowering blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes. PMID:27188900

  16. Influence of glucose and urea on 125I transport across an anion exchange paper membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the influence of glucose and urea on the 125I transport across an anion exchange paper membrane, the transmembrane potential, the fluxes, and the concentrations of 125I, glucose and urea within the membrane were measured in the Na125I concentration-cell system containing glucose or urea. Glucose and urea increased the membrane/solution distribution of the iodide ion, but scarcely affected the diffusion process of iodide ion within the membrane

  17. A Unified Potentiostat for Electrochemical Glucose Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong-Seuk Kim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A unified potentiostat circuit for both O2- and H2O2- based electrochemical glucose sensors was proposed and itsfunction was verified by circuit simulations and measurement results of a fabricated chip. This circuit consisted ofan operational amplifier, a comparator and current mirrors. The proposed circuit was fabricated with a 0.13 ㎛ thickoxide CMOS process and an active area of 360 ㎛ × 100 ㎛. The measurements revealed an input operation range from0.5 V to 1.6 V in the H2O2- based bio-sensor and from 1.7 V to 2.6 V in the O2- based bio-sensor with a supply voltage of 3.3V. The evaluation results showed that the proposed potentiostat circuit is suitable for measuring the electrochemicalcell currents of both O2- and H2O2- based glucose sensors.

  18. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mikkel; Vedtofte, Louise; Holst, Jens Juul; Vilsbøll, Tina; Knop, Filip K

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the glucose dependency of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) effects on insulin and glucagon release in 10 healthy male subjects ([means ± SEM] aged 23 ± 1 years, BMI 23 ± 1 kg/m2, and HbA1c 5.5 ± 0.1%). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Saline or physiological doses...... contrast, GIP increases glucagon levels during fasting and hypoglycemic conditions, where it has little or no effect on insulin secretion. Thus, GIP seems to be a physiological bifunctional blood glucose stabilizer with diverging glucose-dependent effects on the two main pancreatic glucoregulatory hormones....

  19. Analog circuit design art, science and personalities

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Jim

    1991-01-01

    This book is far more than just another tutorial or reference guide - it's a tour through the world of analog design, combining theory and applications with the philosophies behind the design process. Readers will learn how leading analog circuit designers approach problems and how they think about solutions to those problems. They'll also learn about the `analog way' - a broad, flexible method of thinking about analog design tasks.A comprehensive and useful guide to analog theory and applications. Covers visualizing the operation of analog circuits. Looks at how to rap

  20. Postoperative myocardial performance during glucose-induced hypophosphatemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, A; Buus, S; Hessov, I

    1985-01-01

    Long-lasting hypophosphatemia was previously found to diminish myocardial performance. The present study aimed to elucidate if postoperative glucose-induced hypophosphatemia is of importance for myocardial performance. Sixteen patients undergoing elective colonic or rectal surgery were given 100 g...... glucose intravenously (as 20% glucose solution) on the first and second postoperative days. The infusion rate was 0.3 g/kg/hour. On both days the glucose infusion caused significant fall in P-phosphate (0.94 to 0.67 and 0.71 to 0.47 mmol/l, respectively). No changes were seen in P-calcium, P-potassium or...... P-sodium. Measurements of stroke volume and frequency, central venous pressure and mean arterial pressure were made immediately before and after the glucose infusions. Stroke volume and cardiac output were unaffected during the infusions, and also from the first to the second postoperative day. As...

  1. Determination of serum glucose by isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accurate and precise method for determination of serum glucose by isotope dilution mass spectrometry was studied for use in establishing the accuracy of glucose methods in clinical laboratories. After adding uniformly labeled [13C6] glucose to the serum, glucose was separated from the serum matrix and converted into ?-D-glucofranose cyclic 1,2 : 3,5-bis(n-butylboronate)-6-acetate (glucose-BBA). Measurements were performed with combined capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The ratios of the peak areas at m/z 297 and 303 for samples and calibration mixtures were used for quantification. Analytical results of the SRM serum showed satisfactory agreement with the certified value and a coefficient of variation of the replicates was within 0.5% for all the serum samples tested. (author)

  2. Determination of serum glucose by isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accurate and precise method for the determination of serum glucose by isotope dilution mass spectrometry was studied for use in establishing the accuracy of glucose methods in clinical laboratories. After adding uniformly labeled [13C6] glucose to the serum, glucose was separated from the serum matrix and converted into ?-D-glucofranose cyclic 1,2:3,5-bis(n-butylboronate)-6-acetate (glucose-BBA). Measurements were performed with combined capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The ratios of the peak areas at m/z 297 and 303 for samples and the calibration mixtures were used for quantification. Analytical results of the SRM serum showed satisfactory agreement with the certified value and the relative standard deviation of the replicates was within 0.5 % for all of the serum samples tested. (author)

  3. Glucose metabolism in ischemic myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We determined the myocardial metabolic rate for glucose (MMRGlc) in the ischemic or infarcted myocardium using 18-F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18-FDG) with positron emission tomography (PET), and studied energy metabolism in the ischemic myocardium. In some cases, we compared glucose metabolism images by 18-FDG with myocardial blood flow images using 15-oxygen water. Two normal subjects, seven patients with myocardial infarction and four patients with angina pectoris were studied. Coronary angiography was performed within two weeks before or after the PET study to detect ischemic areas. PET studies were performed for patients who did not eat for 5 to 6 hours after breakfast. Cannulation was performed in the pedal artery to measure free fatty acid, blood sugar, and insulin. After recording the transmission scan for subsequent correction of photon attenuation, blood pool images were recorded for two min. after the inhalation of carbon monoxide (oxygen-15) which labeled the red blood cells in vivo. After 20 min., oxygen-15 water (15 to 20 mCi) was injected for dynamic scans, and flow images were obtained. Thirty min. after this procedure, 18-FDG (5 to 6 mCi) was injected, and 60 min later, a static scan was performed and glucose metabolism images were obtained. Arterial blood sampling for the time activity curve of the tracer was performed at the same time. According to the method of Phelps et al, MMRGlc was calculated in each of the region of interest (ROI) which was located in the left ventricular wall. MMRGlc obtained from each ROI was 0 to 17 mg/100 ml/min. In normal subjects MMRGlc was 0.4 to 7.3 mg/100 ml/min. In patients with myocardial infarction, it ranged from 3 to 5 mg/100 ml/min in the infarcted lesion. In patients with angina pectoris and subendocardial infarction, MMRGlc was 7 to 17 mg/100 ml/min in the ischemic lesion. In this lesion, myocardial blood flow was relatively low by oxygen-15 imagings (so-called mismatch). (J.P.N.)

  4. Optimisation of cancer therapy : glucose antimetabolites as adjuvants in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhibiting the repair of radiation damage in the neoplastic cells and thus differentially increasing radiation damage can be one of the ways to improve efficiency of radiotherapy of cancer. The glucose antimetabolite 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) which is known to inhibit glycolysis and ATP production in different cell systems, has been studied as to its effects on energy supply and repair of radiation damage in wild type yeast cells which are analogous to normal cells, and in respirator-deficient (RD) mutants which are analogous to hypoxic tumour cells. Results indicate that : (1) 2-DG/glucose in molar cencentration ratio of 1 completely inhibits the repair of potentially lethal X-radiation damage in RD mutants, (2) 2-DG enhances repair of sublethal radiation damage in wild-type yeast cells, (3) 2-DG induces a sharp fall in ATP level in RD-mutants as compared to that in wild type cells, (4) 2-DG inhibits repair of potentially lethal X-radiation damage in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells, (5) 2-DG induces greater cell loss from the hypoxic as well as euoxic tumour cell population of sarcoma tumour-180 in mice, and (6) 2-DG increases the survival of normal mice when given whole-body gamma irradiaition. These results, therefore, show that 2-DG may differentially inhibit the repair process in tumours while enhancing repair in normal tissues. (M.G.B.)

  5. Gravitatomagnetic Analogs of Electric Transformers

    CERN Document Server

    Swain, John

    2010-01-01

    Linearized general relativity admits a formulation in terms of gravitoelectric and gravitomagnetic fields that closely parallels the description of the electromagnetic field by Maxwell's equations. For steady mass currents, this formalism has been used to understand gravitomagnetic effects like the Lense-Thirring dragging of inertial frames. For time-varying mass-energy currents, the analog of Faraday's law suggests new effects based on the gravitational equivalent of a transformer where such currents take the place of electrical currents. New experimental possibilities are suggested including a novel coupling mechanism of electromagnetism to gravity, new tests of general relativity in the ultrarelativistic limit using particle beams in the LHC, and searches for a materials exhibiting the gravitational analog of ferromagnetism.

  6. Superconductive analog signal processing devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real-time signal processing is stressed in many emerging applications, such as pulse-compression radar, spread-spectrum communications, and electronic warfare. The required digitally equivalent computational rate for these applications is on the order of 1012 arithmetic operations per second and the required instantaneous bandwidths could approach 10 GHz. These exceed by nearly three orders of magnitude the capabilities projected for digital systems in the near future, and even exceed that of recently developed analog technologies, such as surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) signal-processing devices. To meet anticipated future system needs, superconductive analog signal-processing components with bandwidths exceeding 2 GHz have recently been realized [1]-[3] and the technology is being developed for the realization of 10-GHz bandwidths

  7. Battery hydrometer with analog output

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patis, B.L.

    1982-09-21

    There is disclosed a battery hydrometer for providing an analog electrical signal having a magnitude related to the specific gravity of a battery electrolyte. The hydrometer includes a source of radiation for providing a detectable beam of radiation and a piston member arranged to be submerged within the electrolyte and to intercept and modulate the beam of radiation in response to the specific gravity of the electrolyte. The piston member is suspended within the electrolyte by a spring which exerts a compressive force upon the piston member against which the electrolyte must act. The hydrometer further includes a radiation detector aligned with the radiation source for providing an analog electrical signal having a magnitude responsive to the modulated beam of radiation.

  8. Synaptic dynamics in analog VLSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolozzi, Chiara; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2007-10-01

    Synapses are crucial elements for computation and information transfer in both real and artificial neural systems. Recent experimental findings and theoretical models of pulse-based neural networks suggest that synaptic dynamics can play a crucial role for learning neural codes and encoding spatiotemporal spike patterns. Within the context of hardware implementations of pulse-based neural networks, several analog VLSI circuits modeling synaptic functionality have been proposed. We present an overview of previously proposed circuits and describe a novel analog VLSI synaptic circuit suitable for integration in large VLSI spike-based neural systems. The circuit proposed is based on a computational model that fits the real postsynaptic currents with exponentials. We present experimental data showing how the circuit exhibits realistic dynamics and show how it can be connected to additional modules for implementing a wide range of synaptic properties. PMID:17716003

  9. Regional differences in adipocyte lactate production from glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Having shown that lactate is an important product of glucose metabolism by rat epididymal adipocytes, the authors investigated possible regional differences in adipocyte lactate production and the role of the animals' nutritional state and stage of development. [U-14C]glucose metabolism, lactate production, and response to insulin were measured in fat cells isolated from four adipose regions from young lean and older fatter rats, killed either in the fed state or after fasting for 48 h. In the absence of insulin, mesenteric fat cells from either age group metabolized significantly more glucose per cell and converted more glucose to lactate than cells from other depots, regardless of nutritional state. Adipocytes from fasted lean rats showed a significant increase in the relative glucose conversion to lactate in all depots when compared with cells from fed lean rats. Fasting of older fatter rats, however, had limited effects on the relative adipocyte glucose conversion to lactate since lactate production was already high. Mesenteric fat cells had the lowest relative response to insulin, possibly due to the high basal rate of glucose metabolism. These findings indicate that differences exist among adipose regions in the rates of glucose metabolism, lactate production and response to insulin. The anatomical location of the mesenteric adipose depot, coupled with a high metabolic rate and blood perfusion, suggests that mesenteric adipocytes may provide a unique and more direct contribution of metabolic substrates for hepatic metabolism than adipocytes from other depots

  10. Low Power CMOS Analog Multiplier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipra Sachan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper Low power low voltage CMOS analog multiplier circuit is proposed. It is based on flipped voltage follower. It consists of four voltage adders and a multiplier core. The circuit is analyzed and designed in 0.18um CMOS process model and simulation results have shown that, under single 0.9V supply voltage, and it consumes only 31.8µW quiescent power and 110MHZ bandwidth.

  11. Evolutionary synthesis of analog networks

    OpenAIRE

    Mattiussi, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    The significant increase in the available computational power that took place in recent decades has been accompanied by a growing interest in the application of the evolutionary approach to the synthesis of many kinds of systems and, in particular, to the synthesis of systems like analog electronic circuits, neural networks, and, more generally, autonomous systems, for which no satisfying systematic and general design methodology has been found to date. Despite some interesting results in the...

  12. suPAR associates to glucose metabolic aberration during glucose stimulation in HIV-infected patients on HAART

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Kofoed, Kristian; Iversen, Johan; Haugaard, Steen B

    2008-01-01

    extend these findings by investigating the association of suPAR to glucose metabolic insufficiency during an oral glucose challenge (OGTT). METHODS: In 16 HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy and 15 HIV-infected patients without lipodystrophy, glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity (ISI......PAR correlated inversely with ISI(composite) and positively with 2h plasma glucose, fasting insulin secretion, fasting intact proinsulin and FFA level during the OGTT (all P<0.05). In multiple regression analyses, in which anthropometric measures (BMI, limbadiposity and fat mass), immune markers (CD4, HIV......-RNA, duration of HIV infection), and dyslipidemia (plasma total cholesterol, triglyceride and free fatty acid level during the OGTT) were included, suPAR remained a significant marker of glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Plasma suPAR exhibited a small CV (11%) during the 3h OGTT. CONCLUSIONS: su...

  13. A Study on the Glucose and Immunoreactive Insulin Response during Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Patients with Chronic Liver Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The blood glucose and plasma immunoreactive insulin (IRI) levels were measured during aral glucose tolerance test in 7 healthy subjects and 6 patients with chronic liver diseases. The glucose tolerance was impaired in 5 of the 6 patients and normal in I. Plasma IRI responses were markedly increased and delayed in all patients, suggesting endogenous insulin resistance. Patients with more glucose intolerance showed less increase in plasma IRI than the group with less intolerance. lt is suggested that some insulin antagonists may decrease the peripheral insulin sensitivity and stimulate compensatory hyperactivity of pancreatic islets. If the compensatory hyperactivity is inadequate due to gemetic predisposition to diabetes mellitus or exhaustion of ?-cells of pancreatic islets, the glucose intolerance and overt diabetes mellitus may ensue.

  14. An Integrated Glucose Sensor with an All-Solid-State Sodium Ion-Selective Electrode for a Minimally Invasive Glucose Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Kojima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We developed a minimally invasive glucose monitoring system that uses a microneedle to permeate the skin surface and a small hydrogel to accumulate interstitial fluid glucose. The measurement of glucose and sodium ion levels in the hydrogel is required for estimating glucose levels in blood; therefore, we developed a small, enzyme-fixed glucose sensor with a high-selectivity, all-solid-state, sodium ion-selective electrode (ISE integrated into its design. The glucose sensor immobilized glucose oxidase showed a good correlation between the glucose levels in the hydrogels and the reference glucose levels (r > 0.99, and exhibited a good precision (coefficient of variation = 2.9%, 0.6 mg/dL. In the design of the sodium ISEs, we used the insertion material Na0.33MnO2 as the inner contact layer and DD16C5 exhibiting high Na+/K+ selectivity as the ionophore. The developed sodium ISE exhibited high selectivity (\\( \\log \\,k^{pot}_{Na,K} = -2.8\\ and good potential stability. The sodium ISE could measure 0.4 mM (10−3.4 M sodium ion levels in the hydrogels containing 268 mM (10−0.57 M KCl. The small integrated sensor (ϕ < 10 mm detected glucose and sodium ions in hydrogels simultaneously within 1 min, and it exhibited sufficient performance for use as a minimally invasive glucose monitoring system.

  15. Evidence that downregulation of hexose transport limits intracellular glucose in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of initial glucose entry rate and intracellular glucose concentration in cultured cells are difficult because of rapid transport relative to intracellular volume and a substantial extracellular space from which glucose cannot be completely removed by quick exchanges of medium. In 3T3-L1 cells, we obtained good estimates of initial entry of [14C]methylglucose and D-[14C]glucose with (1) L-[3H]glucose as an extracellular marker together with the [14C]glucose or [14C]methylglucose in the substrate mixture, (2) sampling times as short as 2 s, (3) ice-cold phloretin-containing medium to stop uptake and rinse away the extracellular label, and (4) nonlinear regression of time courses. Methylglucose equilibrated in two phases--the first with a half-time of 1.7 s and the second with a half-time of 23 s; it eventually equilibrated in an intracellular space of 8 microliters/mg protein. Entry of glucose remained almost linear for 10 s, making its transport kinetics easier to study (Km = 5.7 mM, Vmax = 590 nmol.s-1.ml-1 cell water). Steady-state intracellular glucose concentration was 75-90% of extracellular glucose concentration. Cells grown in a high-glucose medium (24 mM) exhibited a 67% reduction of glucose-transport activity and a 50% reduction of steady-state ratio of intracellular glucose to extracellular glucose

  16. Type 2 diabetes, obesity, and sex difference affect the fate of glucose in the human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Linda R; Herrero, Pilar; Coggan, Andrew R; Kisrieva-Ware, Zulia; Saeed, Ibrahim; Dence, Carmen; Koudelis, Deborah; McGill, Janet B; Lyons, Matthew R; Novak, Eric; Dávila-Román, Víctor G; Waggoner, Alan D; Gropler, Robert J

    2015-06-15

    Type 2 diabetes, obesity, and sex difference affect myocardial glucose uptake and utilization. However, their effect on the intramyocellular fate of glucose in humans has been unknown. How the heart uses glucose is important, because it affects energy production and oxygen efficiency, which in turn affect heart function and adaptability. We hypothesized that type 2 diabetes, sex difference, and obesity affect myocardial glucose oxidation, glycolysis, and glycogen production. In a first-in-human study, we measured intramyocardiocellular glucose metabolism from time-activity curves generated from previously obtained positron emission tomography scans of 110 subjects in 3 groups: nonobese, obese, and diabetes. Group and sex difference interacted in the prediction of all glucose uptake, utilization, and metabolism rates. Group independently predicted fractional glucose uptake and its components: glycolysis, glycogen deposition, and glucose oxidation rates. Sex difference predicted glycolysis rates. However, there were fewer differences in glucose metabolism between diabetic patients and others when plasma glucose levels were included in the modeling. The potentially detrimental effects of obesity and diabetes on myocardial glucose metabolism are more pronounced in men than women. This sex difference dimorphism needs to be taken into account in the design, trials, and application of metabolic modulator therapy. Slightly higher plasma glucose levels improve depressed glucose oxidation and glycogen deposition rates in diabetic patients. PMID:25888511

  17. Abnormal transient rise in hepatic glucose production after oral glucose in non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorburn, A; Litchfield, A; Fabris, S; Proietto, J

    1995-05-01

    A transient rise in hepatic glucose production (HGP) after an oral glucosa load has been reported in some insulin-resistant states such as in obese fa/fa Zucker rats. The aim of this study was to determine whether this rise in HGP also occurs in subjects with established non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Glucose kinetics were measured basally and during a double-label oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 12 NIDDM subjects and 12 non-diabetic 'control' subjects. Twenty minutes after the glucose load, HGP had increased 73% above basal in the NIDDM subjects (7.29 +/- 0.52 to 12.58 +/- 1.86 mumol/kg/min, P < 0.02). A transient rise in glucagon (12 pg/ml above basal, P < 0.004) occurred at a similar time. In contrast, the control subjects showed no rise in HGP or plasma glucagon. HGP began to suppress 40-50 min after the OGTT in both the NIDDM and control subjects. A 27% increase in the rate of gut-derived glucose absorption was also observed in the NIDDM group, which could be the result of increased gut glucose absorption or decreased first pass extraction of glucose by the liver. Therefore, in agreement with data in animal models of NIDDM, a transient rise in HGP partly contributes to the hyperglycemia observed after an oral glucose load in NIDDM subjects. PMID:7587920

  18. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kayikci, Omur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and...

  19. Alginate cryogel based glucose biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatoni, Amin; Windy Dwiasi, Dian; Hermawan, Dadan

    2016-02-01

    Cryogel is macroporous structure provides a large surface area for biomolecule immobilization. In this work, an alginate cryogel based biosensor was developed to detect glucose. The cryogel was prepared using alginate cross-linked by calcium chloride under sub-zero temperature. This porous structure was growth in a 100 μL micropipette tip with a glucose oxidase enzyme entrapped inside the cryogel. The glucose detection was based on the colour change of redox indicator, potassium permanganate, by the hydrogen peroxide resulted from the conversion of glucose. The result showed a porous structure of alginate cryogel with pores diameter of 20-50 μm. The developed glucose biosensor was showed a linear response in the glucose detection from 1.0 to 5.0 mM with a regression of y = 0.01x+0.02 and R2 of 0.994. Furthermore, the glucose biosensor was showed a high operational stability up to 10 times of uninterrupted glucose detections.

  20. Atheism and Analogy: Aquinas Against the Atheists

    OpenAIRE

    Linford, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    In the 13th century, Thomas Aquinas developed two models for how humans may speak of God - either by the analogy of proportion or by the analogy of proportionality. Aquinas's doctrines initiated a theological debate concerning analogy that spanned several centuries. In the 18th century, there appeared two closely related arguments for atheism which both utilized analogy for their own purposes. In this thesis, I show that one argument, articulated by the French materialist Paul-Henri Thiry Bar...

  1. Hegel, Analogy, and Extraterrestrial Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Joseph T.

    Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel rejected the possibility of life outside of the Earth, according to several scholars of extraterrestrial life. Their position is that the solar system and specifically the planet Earth is the unique place in the cosmos where life, intelligence, and rationality can be. The present study offers a very different interpretation of Hegel's statements about the place of life on Earth by suggesting that, although Hegel did not believe that there were other solar systems where rationality is present, he did in fact suggest that planets in general, not the Earth exclusively, have life and possibly also intelligent inhabitants. Analogical syllogisms are superficial, according to Hegel, insofar as they try to conclude that there is life on the Moon even though there is no evidence of water or air on that body. Similar analogical arguments for life on the Sun made by Johann Elert Bode and William Herschel were considered by Hegel to be equally superficial. Analogical arguments were also used by astronomers and philosophers to suggest that life could be found on other planets in our solar system. Hegel offers no critique of analogical arguments for life on other planets, and in fact Hegel believed that life would be found on other planets. Planets, after all, have meteorological processes and therefore are "living" according to his philosophical account, unlike the Moon, Sun, and comets. Whereas William Herschel was already finding great similarities between the Sun and the stars and had extended these similarities to the property of having planets or being themselves inhabitable worlds, Hegel rejected this analogy. The Sun and stars have some properties in common, but for Hegel one cannot conclude from these similarities to the necessity that stars have planets. Hegel's arguments against the presence of life in the solar system were not directed against other planets, but rather against the Sun and Moon, both of which he said have a different nature from Earth and planets. Although he did not explicitly discuss the possibility of life on comets, the fourth type of body in his theory of the solar system, it is clear that he rejected the views of Bode and Johann Heinrich Lambert, who did defend this possibility. Again, Hegel's critique of the use of analogical argument is important here. The Sun, comets, and moons are not analogous to the Earth or to the planets; these are four different bodies with different forms of motion and different physical constitutions. Only planets have completeness according to Hegel because only they have water, air, earth, and light, and completeness in this sense is necessary for life. Hegel discerned a need to make distinctions in nature rather than to consider superficially different realities as fundamentally similar. Celestial bodies should not be considered, according to Hegel, as all of one type or nature, as one kind.

  2. Improvement in glucose biosensing response of electrochemically grown polypyrrole nanotubes by incorporating crosslinked glucose oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palod, Pragya Agar; Singh, Vipul

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a novel enzymatic glucose biosensor has been reported in which platinum coated alumina membranes (Anodisc™s) have been employed as templates for the growth of polypyrrole (PPy) nanotube arrays using electrochemical polymerization. The PPy nanotube arrays were grown on Anodisc™s of pore diameter 100 nm using potentiostatic electropolymerization. In order to optimize the polymerization time, immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx) was first performed using physical adsorption followed by measuring its biosensing response which was examined amperometrically for increasing concentrations of glucose. In order to further improve the sensing performance of the biosensor fabricated for optimum polymerization duration, enzyme immobilization was carried out using cross-linking with glutaraldehyde and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Approximately six fold enhancement in the sensitivity was observed in the fabricated electrodes. The biosensors also showed a wide range of linear operation (0.2-13 mM), limit of detection of 50 ?M glucose concentration, excellent selectivity for glucose, notable reliability for real sample detection and substantially improved shelf life. PMID:26117773

  3. Blood glucose in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2009-01-01

    Blood glucose is often elevated in acute stroke, and higher admission glucose levels are associated with larger lesions, greater mortality and poorer functional outcome. In patients treated with thrombolysis, hyperglycemia is associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation of...... infarcts. For a number of years, tight glycemic control has been regarded as beneficial in critically illness, but recent research has been unable to support this notion. The only completed randomized study on glucose-lowering therapy in stroke has failed to demonstrate effect, and concerns relating to the...... risk of inducing potentially harmful hypoglycemia has been raised. Still, basic and observational research is overwhelmingly in support of a causal relationship between blood glucose and stroke outcome and further research on glucose-lowering therapy in acute stroke is highly warranted....

  4. Glucose transport in malignant glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the dynamic PET mode with 18FDG and H215O, glucose transport in patients with glioma was investigated. The values of the rate constants (k1*, k2*), the CBF, the distribution volume, the glucose extraction, and the permeability-surface (PS) products were obtained. The values of k1*, k2, the blood flow, and the PS products were higher in the high-grade glioma and the contralateral cortex, and lower in the low-grade glioma, while the value of glucose extraction was the reverse. The only statistically significant difference between high-grade glioma and the contra-lateral cortex was noted in the distribution volume, which was lower in the high-grade glioma. The present study revealed no increase in the glucose transport in high-grade glioma. Further study is necessary in order to determine the functional significance of the distribution volume and the relevance to glucose transporters in gliomas. (author)

  5. Analogical specification reuse during requirements analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Maiden, N.A.M.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis investigates analogy as a paradigm for retrieving, understanding and customising reusable specifications during requirements engineering. Cooperation between software engineers and support tools is necessary for effective analogical reuse. Retrieval uses a computational implementation of analogical reasoning to search and match many reusable specifications. On the other hand understanding, transferring and adapting specifications requires cooperation between the tool and software ...

  6. Glucagon responses to increasing oral loads of glucose and corresponding isoglycaemic intravenous glucose infusions in patients with type 2 diabetes and healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Jonatan I; Knop, Filip K; Lund, Asger; Holst, Jens Juul; Vilsbøll, Tina

    2014-01-01

    increasing amounts of glucose given orally and corresponding isoglycaemic i.v. glucose infusions (IIGIs) in patients with type 2 diabetes and in healthy controls. METHODS: Plasma glucagon responses were measured during three 4 h OGTTs with increasing loads of glucose (25 g, 75 g and 125 g) and three...... oral glucose loads this difference increased and also became evident in healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: In patients with type 2 diabetes increasing amounts of oral glucose elicit hypersecretion of glucagon, whereas corresponding IIGIs result in significant glucagon suppression; a...... phenomenon that is also observed in healthy individuals when larger glucose loads are ingested orally. This suggests that the hyperglucagonaemic response to oral glucose in type 2 diabetes may represent a pathological version of a gut-derived physiological phenomenon. Trial registration: Clinical...

  7. A portable instrument for continuous glucose monitoring by the integration of microfluidic chip and micro-glucose sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dachao; Ji, Yongjie; Liang, Wenshuai; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yu, Haixia; Xu, Kexin

    2013-03-01

    Interstitial fluid (ISF) can be transdermally extracted using low-frequency ultrasound and continuous vacuum pressure on skin surface. But the tiny volume of transdermally extracted ISF makes the transdermal extraction, collection, transport, volumetric detection and glucose concentration measurement of the ISF very difficult. Based on a microfluidic chip for transdermally extraction of interstitial fluid and a micro glucose sensor for glucose concentration measurement, a continuous glucose monitoring instrumentby ISF transdermal extraction with minimally invasive way is developed. In the paper, various parts of the device and their interface circuits are designed; the hardware and software of the instrument are built; the simulating experiments of transdermal ISF extraction, collection and volume measurement with full-thickness pig skin are performed using this integrated system; and the functionalities of this device is verified for future clinical application.

  8. Glucose oxidase-magnetite nanoparticle bioconjugate for glucose sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Liane M; Quach, Ashley D; Rosenzweig, Zeev

    2004-10-01

    Immobilization of bioactive molecules on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles is of great interest, because the magnetic properties of these bioconjugates promise to greatly improve the delivery and recovery of biomolecules in biomedical applications. Here we present the preparation and functionalization of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles 20 nm in diameter and the successful covalent conjugation of the enzyme glucose oxidase to the amino-modified nanoparticle surface. Functionalization of the magnetic nanoparticle surface with amino groups greatly increased the amount and activity of the immobilized enzyme compared with immobilization procedures involving physical adsorption. The enzymatic activity of the glucose oxidase-coated magnetic nanoparticles was investigated by monitoring oxygen consumption during the enzymatic oxidation of glucose using a ruthenium phenanthroline fluorescent complex for oxygen sensing. The glucose oxidase-coated magnetite nanoparticles could function as nanometric glucose sensors in glucose solutions of concentrations up to 20 mmol L(-1). Immobilization of glucose oxidase on the nanoparticles also increased the stability of the enzyme. When stored at 4 degrees C the nanoparticle suspensions maintained their bioactivity for up to 3 months. PMID:15448967

  9. Optical coherence tomography for glucose monitoring in blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Hafeez; Hussain, Fayyaz; Ikram, Masroor

    2015-08-01

    In this review, we have discussed the potential application of the emerging imaging modality, i.e., optical coherence tomography (OCT) for glucose monitoring in biological tissues. OCT provides monitoring of glucose diffusion in different fibrous tissues like in sclera by determining the permeability rate with acceptable accuracy both in type 1 and in type 2 diabetes. The maximum precision of glucose measurement in Intralipid suspensions, for example, with the OCT technique yields the accuracy up to 4.4 mM for 10 % Intralipid and 2.2 mM for 3 % Intralipid.

  10. Professional continuous glucose monitoring in subjects with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Hasselstrøm; Christensen, Toke Folke; Tarnow, Lise; Mahmoudi, Zeinab; Johansen, Mette Dencker; Hejlesen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    plasma glucose (PG) readings were obtained from 17 data sets of 10 type 1 diabetes patients undergoing insulin-induced hypoglycemia. The CGM readings were automatically classified into a hypoglycemic group and a nonhypoglycemic group on the basis of different features from CGM readings and insulin......BACKGROUND: An important task in diabetes management is detection of hypoglycemia. Professional continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), which produces a glucose reading every 5 min, is a powerful tool for retrospective identification of unrecognized hypoglycemia. Unfortunately, CGM devices tend to be...... the diabetes patient's glycemic control and in initiating necessary measures for improving glycemic control....

  11. Glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant; OGTT - non-pregnant; Diabetes - glucose tolerance test ... to diagnose diabetes in people who are not pregnant are: Fasting blood glucose level: diabetes is diagnosed ...

  12. Fluorescence studies with conformationally constrained tryptophan analogs: implications on the mechanisms of intramolecular quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftink, Maurice R.; Hu, D.; Jia, Y. W.

    1992-04-01

    The fluorescence properties of a set of tryptophan analogs, including several that are conformationally restricted, is reported. The conformationally restricted analogs include tetrahydrocarboline-3-carboxylic acid, 3-amino-3-carboxytetrahydrocarbazole, 3- aminotetrahydrocarbazole, and 3-carboxytetrahydrocarbazole. Steady-state and time-resolved measurements were made. The fluorescence decay of most of the conformationally restricted analogs is a bi-exponential. The fluorescence quantum yield and average lifetime of the restricted analogs is a bi-exponential. The fluorescence quantum yield and average lifetime of the restricted analogs are higher than the values for tryptophan and corresponding flexible tryptophan analogs. This indicates that the effective rate constant for intramolecular non- radiative (quenching) processes, knx, is smaller for the restricted tryptophan analogs than for the flexible analogs. For a series of flexible analogs, having a bifunctional side chain, there is synergism between the two functional groups (i.e., (alpha) -NH3+ and (alpha) -CO2- groups) in determining the effective knx. Potential mechanisms for intramolecular quenching mechanisms, which contribute to knx, include proton transfer from a side chain ammonium group to position four of the excited indole ring and charge transfer from the excited indole ring to a side chain acceptor group. By measuring the rate of photo-induced isotope exchange into position four of an analog's indole ring, we have estimated the contribution of proton transfer quenching to the total intramolecular quenching rate constant for several flexible tryptophan derivatives.

  13. JNT multiplexer and analog input processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the design, implementation, and performance of a working model of the Multiplexer-Analog Input Processor (AIP) System for the transmission and measurements of Johnson Noise Power Thermometer sensor information. The goal of this study was to determine the practical circuit limitations, investigate the circuit/component degradations due to radiation, develop an interference cancellation technique, and evaluate the measurements accuracy as a function of temperature, radition, and interference levels. By using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) for spectral estimation, the tuned-circuit parameters of the JNT Preamplifiers can be measured and the temperature computed from the power integrated over a limited bandwidth, thereby greatly reducing the system bandwidth requirements and the amplifier noise contamination. Preliminary measurements show that the temperature measurement can be made to ±10K for temperatures below 1000 K and ±1% above 1000K, for approximately 1 second of integration time. Multiple interfering signals, down to negative Signal-to-Interference Ratios (SIR), are eliminated with no significant degradation in the temperature measured. The AIP also adaptively monitors and extracts an estimate of the Preamplifier's noise contribution, eliminating this error from the overall JNT noise power measurement

  14. Potentiation of glucose-induced insulin release in islets by desHis1[Glu9]glucagon amide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Hans; Unson, C G; Merrifield, R B

    1988-01-01

    Glucagon and secretin and some of their hybrid analogs potentiate glucose-induced release of insulin from isolated mouse pancreatic islets. It was recently shown that the synthetic glucagon analog, desHis1[Glu9]glucagon amide, does not stimulate the formation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate in...... release of insulin by 30% and maintained that level for the full 30-min test period. The rate of insulin release returned to the glucose-induced base line after removal of the peptide. The same insulin level was produced by 3 x 10(-9) M glucagon, and at 3 x 10(-7) M glucagon insulin release was enhanced...

  15. Analog and mixed-signal electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Stephan, Karl

    2015-01-01

    A practical guide to analog and mixed-signal electronics, with an emphasis on design problems and applications This book provides an in-depth coverage of essential analog and mixed-signal topics such as power amplifiers, active filters, noise and dynamic range, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion techniques, phase-locked loops, and switching power supplies. Readers will learn the basics of linear systems, types of nonlinearities and their effects, op-amp circuits, the high-gain analog filter-amplifier, and signal generation. The author uses system design examples to motivate

  16. Analog circuit design art, science, and personalities

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Jim

    1991-01-01

    Analog Circuit Design: Art, Science, and Personalities discusses the many approaches and styles in the practice of analog circuit design. The book is written in an informal yet informative manner, making it easily understandable to those new in the field. The selection covers the definition, history, current practice, and future direction of analog design; the practice proper; and the styles in analog circuit design. The book also includes the problems usually encountered in analog circuit design; approach to feedback loop design; and other different techniques and applications. The text is

  17. The exoplanets analogy to the Multiverse

    CERN Document Server

    Kinouchi, Osame

    2015-01-01

    The idea of a Mutiverse is controversial, although it is a natural possible solution to particle physics and cosmological fine-tuning problems (FTPs). Here I explore the analogy between the Multiverse proposal and the proposal that there exist an infinite number of stellar systems with planets in a flat Universe, the Multiplanetverse. Although the measure problem is present in this scenario, the idea of a Multiplanetverse has predictive power, even in the absence of direct evidence for exoplanets that appeared since the 90s. We argue that the fine-tuning of Earth to life (and not only the fine-tuning of life to Earth) could predict with certainty the existence of exoplanets decades or even centuries before that direct evidence. Several other predictions can be made by studying only the Earth and the Sun, without any information about stars. The analogy also shows that theories that defend that the Earth is the unique existing planet and that, at the same time, is fine-tuned to life by pure chance (or pure phy...

  18. Classical analogy of Fano resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an analogy of Fano resonances in quantum interference to classical resonances in the harmonic oscillator system. It has a manifestation as a coupled behaviour of two effective oscillators associated with propagating and evanescent waves. We illustrate this point by considering a classical system of two coupled oscillators and interfering electron waves in a quasi-one-dimensional narrow constriction with a quantum dot. Our approach provides a novel insight into Fano resonance physics and provides a helpful view in teaching Fano resonances

  19. Practical analog electronics for technicians

    CERN Document Server

    Kimber, W A

    2013-01-01

    'Practical Analog Electronics for Technicians' not only provides an accessible introduction to electronics, but also supplies all the problems and practical activities needed to gain hands-on knowledge and experience. This emphasis on practice is surprisingly unusual in electronics texts, and has already gained Will Kimber popularity through the companion volume, 'Practical Digital Electronics for Technicians'. Written to cover the Advanced GNVQ optional unit in electronics, this book is also ideal for BTEC National, A-level electronics and City & Guilds courses. Together with 'Practical Digit

  20. Glucose Sensing Neurons in the Ventromedial Hypothalamus

    OpenAIRE

    Routh, Vanessa H.

    2010-01-01

    Neurons whose activity is regulated by glucose are found in a number of brain regions. Glucose-excited (GE) neurons increase while glucose-inhibited (GI) neurons decrease their action potential frequency as interstitial brain glucose levels increase. We hypothesize that these neurons evolved to sense and respond to severe energy deficit (e.g., fasting) that threatens the brains glucose supply. During modern times, they are also important for the restoration of blood glucose levels following i...

  1. Modelling, verification, and calibration of a photoacoustics based continuous non-invasive blood glucose monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Praful P.; Sanki, Pradyut K.; Sarangi, Satyabrata; Banerjee, Swapna

    2015-06-01

    This paper examines the use of photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) at an excitation wavelength of 905 nm for making continuous non-invasive blood glucose measurements. The theoretical background of the measurement technique is verified through simulation. An apparatus is fabricated for performing photoacoustic measurements in vitro on glucose solutions and in vivo on human subjects. The amplitude of the photoacoustic signals measured from glucose solutions is observed to increase with the solution concentration, while photoacoustic amplitude obtained from in vivo measurements follows the blood glucose concentration of the subjects, indicating a direct proportionality between the two quantities. A linear calibration method is applied separately on measurements obtained from each individual in order to estimate the blood glucose concentration. The estimated glucose values are compared to reference glucose concentrations measured using a standard glucose meter. A plot of 196 measurement pairs taken over 30 normal subjects on a Clarke error grid gives a point distribution of 82.65% and 17.35% over zones A and B of the grid with a mean absolute relative deviation (MARD) of 11.78% and a mean absolute difference (MAD) of 15.27 mg/dl (0.85 mmol/l). The results obtained are better than or comparable to those obtained using photoacoustic spectroscopy based methods or other non-invasive measurement techniques available. The accuracy levels obtained are also comparable to commercially available continuous glucose monitoring systems.

  2. A photonic crystal fiber glucose sensor filled with silver nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X. C.; Lu, Y.; Wang, M. T.; Yao, J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    We report a photonic crystal fiber glucose sensor filled with silver nanowires in this paper. The proposed sensor is both analyzed by COMSOL multiphysics software and demonstrated by experiments. The extremely high average spectral sensitivity 19009.17 nm/RIU for experimental measurement is obtained, equivalent to 44.25 mg/dL of glucose in water, which is lower than 70 mg/dL for efficient detection of hypoglycemia episodes. The silver nanowires diameter which may affect the sensor's spectral sensitivity is also discussed and an optimal range of silver nanowires diameter 90-120 nm is obtained. We expect that the sensor can provide an effective platform for glucose sensing and potentially leading to a further development towards minimal-invasive glucose measurement.

  3. Glucose metabolism of lactobacillus divergens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to compile an optimal growth and selective medium for Lactobacillus divergens and to determine the pathway by which it metabolised glucose. The optimum growth temperature is 25oC which is lower than that of most other lactobacilli. Citrate stimulates growth up to a concentration of 1% while acetate inhibits the organism at neutral pH, but it stimulates growth at pH 8.5 up to a concentration of 0.8%. MRS medium was therefore modified in order to obtain maximum growth of the organism. The acetate was omitted, sucrose was substituted for glucose and the pH was adjusted to 8.5. Sucrose was used, since a neutral pH is obtained after sterilisation of glucose in alkaline (pH ≥ 7.5) solution due to the degradation of glucose by the Maillard reaction. Various inhibitors and dyes were tested in order to formulate a selective medium. In the present study differently labelled glucose precursors were fermented by L. divergens and the fermentation products isolated by HPLC. The concentrations of acetate and formate were determined by comparison to a standard while the concentration of lactate and glucose was determined by enzymic assay. The radioactivity was determined by liquid scintillation counting and the positional labelling in lactate and acetate by chemical degradation. Fermentation of D-[U-14C]-glucose was included to correct for endogenous product dilution

  4. Radioimmunoassay of Plasma Insulin during Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Thyrotoxicosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood glucose and immunoreactive insulin (IRI) were measured during oral glucose tolerance test in 15 thyrotoxic patients and 8 normal controls, to study the glucose metabolism in thyrotoxicosis. Following were the results;1) In thyrotoxicosis, there is noticed late rise and late fall of plasma IRI during oral glucose tolerance test, like as phenomenon of mild diabetes mellitus. 2) When the thyrotoxic patients were divided into normal and abnormal responsive groups after the level of blood glucose by Wilkerson Criteria, no significant difference in plasma IRI levels were noticed between two groups. 3) This result may be interpreted as relative deficiency of insulin secretion from panaceas and suggest genetically related defects.

  5. Ingestion of Diet Soda Before a Glucose Load Augments Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Rebecca J.; Walter, Mary; Kristina I. Rother

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The goal of this study was to determine the effect of artificial sweeteners on glucose, insulin, and glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 in humans. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS For this study, 22 healthy volunteers (mean age 18.5 ± 4.2 years) underwent two 75-g oral glucose tolerance tests with frequent measurements of glucose, insulin, and GLP-1 for 180 min. Subjects drank 240 ml of diet soda or carbonated water, in randomized order, 10 min prior to the glucose load. RESULTS Glucose excur...

  6. Conversion of glucose to sorbose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Mark E.; Gounder, Rajamani

    2016-02-09

    The present invention is directed to methods for preparing sorbose from glucose, said method comprising: (a) contacting the glucose with a silica-containing structure comprising a zeolite having a topology of a 12 membered-ring or larger, an ordered mesoporous silica material, or an amorphous silica, said structure containing Lewis acidic Ti.sup.4+ or Zr.sup.4+ or both Ti.sup.4+ and Zr.sup.4+ framework centers, said contacting conducted under reaction conditions sufficient to isomerize the glucose to sorbose. The sorbose may be (b) separated or isolated; or (c) converted to ascorbic acid.

  7. Sex differences in glucose levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faerch, K; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Vaag, A; Jørgensen, Torben; Witte, D R

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to examine whether sex differences in fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2 h post-OGTT plasma glucose (2hPG) and HbA(1c) could be explained by differences in body size and/or body composition between men and women in a general non-diabetic Danish population. Moreover, we aimed to study to what...... degree the newly suggested high-risk HbA(1c) criteria overlapped with the current OGTT-based criteria of glucose intolerance....

  8. In Vivo Blood Glucose Quantification Using Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Jingwei; Lin, Manman; Li, Yongqing; Li, Xue; Liu, Junxian; Liang, Jianpin; Yao, Huilu

    2012-01-01

    We here propose a novel Raman spectroscopy method that permits the noninvasive measurement of blood glucose concentration. To reduce the effects of the strong background signals produced by surrounding tissue and to obtain the fingerprint Raman lines formed by blood analytes, a laser was focused on the blood in vessels in the skin. The Raman spectra were collected transcutaneously. Characteristic peaks of glucose (1125 cm-1) and hemoglobin (1549 cm-1) were observed. Hemoglobin concentration s...

  9. Maternal Lipids Are as Important as Glucose for Fetal Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Smita R.; Kumaran, Kalyanaraman; Rao, Shobha R.; Chougule, Suresh D.; Deokar, Tukaram M.; Bhalerao, Ankush J.; Solat, Vishnu A.; Bhat, Dattatray S.; Fall, Caroline H D; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the relationship between maternal circulating fuels and neonatal size and compare the relative effects of glucose and lipids. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Pune Maternal Nutrition Study (1993–1996) investigated the influence of maternal nutrition on fetal growth. We measured maternal body size and glucose and lipid concentrations during pregnancy and examined their relationship with birth size in full-term babies using correlation and regression techniques. RESULTS The mo...

  10. Analog computation with dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegelmann, Hava T.; Fishman, Shmuel

    1998-09-01

    Physical systems exhibit various levels of complexity: their long term dynamics may converge to fixed points or exhibit complex chaotic behavior. This paper presents a theory that enables to interpret natural processes as special purpose analog computers. Since physical systems are naturally described in continuous time, a definition of computational complexity for continuous time systems is required. In analogy with the classical discrete theory we develop fundamentals of computational complexity for dynamical systems, discrete or continuous in time, on the basis of an intrinsic time scale of the system. Dissipative dynamical systems are classified into the computational complexity classes P d, Co-RP d, NP d and EXP d, corresponding to their standard counterparts, according to the complexity of their long term behavior. The complexity of chaotic attractors relative to regular ones leads to the conjecture P d ≠ NP d. Continuous time flows have been proven useful in solving various practical problems. Our theory provides the tools for an algorithmic analysis of such flows. As an example we analyze the continuous Hopfield network.

  11. Analog-to-digital conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Pelgrom, Marcel J. M

    2013-01-01

    This textbook is appropriate for use in graduate-level curricula in analog to digital conversion, as well as for practicing engineers in need of a state-of-the-art reference on data converters.  It discusses various analog-to-digital conversion principles, including sampling, quantization, reference generation, nyquist architectures and sigma-delta modulation.  This book presents an overview of the state-of-the-art in this field and focuses on issues of optimizing accuracy and speed, while reducing the power level. This new, second edition emphasizes novel calibration concepts, the specific requirements of new systems, the consequences of 45-nm technology and the need for a more statistical approach to accuracy.  Pedagogical enhancements to this edition include more than twice the exercises available in the first edition, solved examples to introduce all key, new concepts and warnings, remarks and hints, from a practitioner’s perspective, wherever appropriate.  Considerable background information and pr...

  12. Quantitation of the pathways of hepatic glycogen formation on ingesting a glucose load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnusson, I.; Chandramouli, V.; Schumann, W.C.; Kumaran, K.; Wahren, J.; Landau, B.R.

    1987-12-01

    Diflunisal, 5-(2',4'-difluorophenyl)salicylic acid, excreted in urine as its glucuronide, was given to normal humans (n = 6) along with a glucose load specifically labeled with /sup 14/C. Glucuronide excreted by each subject was reduced to its glucoside and glucose from it degraded to yield the distribution of 14 C in its six carbons. Randomization of the /sup 14/C from the specifically labeled glucose was taken as a measure of the extent to which glucose was deposited indirectly (i.e., glucose----lactate----glucose----6-P----glycogen), rather than directly (i.e., glucose----glucose-6-P----glycogen). The maximum contribution to glycogen formation by the direct pathway was estimated to be 65 +/- 1%, on the assumption that glucuronide and glycogen are derived from the same hepatic pool of glucose-6-P in liver. Evidence that supports that assumption was obtained by comparing the randomization of /sup 14/C in the urinary glucuronide with that in glucose in blood from the hepatic vein of four of the subjects before and after they were given glucagon. Other evidence supporting the assumption was obtained by comparing in two subjects /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratios in glucose from hepatic vein blood before and after glucagon administration with that in urinary glucuronide, having labeled the uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose in their livers with /sup 14/C by giving them 1-(/sup 14/C)galactose and their circulating glucose with /sup 3/H by giving a 5-(/sup 3/H)glucose-labeled load. It is concluded that glucuronide formation in humans can be used to trace glucose metabolism in the liver, and that in humans the indirect pathway of glucose metabolism is active.

  13. Rapid kinetics of liver microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase. Evidence for tight-coupling between glucose-6-phosphate transport and phosphohydrolase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapid kinetics of both glucose-6-P uptake and hydrolysis in fasted rat liver microsomes were investigated with a recently developed fast-sampling, rapid-filtration apparatus. Experiments were confronted with both the substrate transport and conformational models currently proposed for the glucose-6-phosphatase system. Accumulation in microsomes of 14C products from [U-14C]glucose-6-P followed biexponential kinetics. From the inside to outside product concentrations, it could be inferred that mostly glucose should accumulate inside the vesicles. While biexponential kinetics are compatible with the mathematical predictions of a simplified substrate transport model, the latter fails in explaining the burst in total glucose production over a similar time scale to that used for the uptake measurements. Since the initial rate of the burst phase in untreated microsomes exactly matched the steady-state rate of glucose production in detergent-treated vesicles, it can be definitely concluded that the substrate transport model does not describe adequately our results. While the conformational model accounts for both the burst of glucose production and the kinetics of glucose accumulation into the vesicles, it cannot explain the burst in 32Pi production from [32P]glucose-6-P measured under the same conditions. Since the amplitude of the observed bursts is not compatible with a presteady state in enzyme activity, we propose that a hysteretic transition best explains our results in both untreated and permeabilized microsomes, thus providing a new rationale to understand the molecular mechanism of the glucose-6-phosphatase system

  14. Noninvasive in vivo glucose sensing using an iris based technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Anthony J.; Cameron, Brent D.

    2011-03-01

    Physiological glucose monitoring is important aspect in the treatment of individuals afflicted with diabetes mellitus. Although invasive techniques for glucose monitoring are widely available, it would be very beneficial to make such measurements in a noninvasive manner. In this study, a New Zealand White (NZW) rabbit animal model was utilized to evaluate a developed iris-based imaging technique for the in vivo measurement of physiological glucose concentration. The animals were anesthetized with isoflurane and an insulin/dextrose protocol was used to control blood glucose concentration. To further help restrict eye movement, a developed ocular fixation device was used. During the experimental time frame, near infrared illuminated iris images were acquired along with corresponding discrete blood glucose measurements taken with a handheld glucometer. Calibration was performed using an image based Partial Least Squares (PLS) technique. Independent validation was also performed to assess model performance along with Clarke Error Grid Analysis (CEGA). Initial validation results were promising and show that a high percentage of the predicted glucose concentrations are within 20% of the reference values.

  15. Determination of glucose concentration using Fourier domain optical coherence tomogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawy, Yasser H.

    2009-02-01

    In order to enhance cell culture growth in biosensors such as those for glucose detection must be developed that are capable of monitoring cell culture processes continuously and accurate. Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) is used to obtain cell images with nanometer level resolution by analyzing the interference pattern by the mixing of reference and objective light to determine glucose concentration in doped double distilled water and create a glucose signature spectrum in salt-sugar solution. We demonstrate ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of in vitro biological cells and an improved deflection angle measurements formal and back projection method is used to reconstruct the two-dimensional glucose concentration performs refractive index distribution. Slopes of OCT signals decreased substantially and almost linearly with the increase of glucose concentration from 2.5 to 15 mg/dl. Phantom studies demonstrated 1% accuracy of scattering- coefficient measurement. Our theoretical and experimental studies suggest that glucose concentration can potentially be measured non-invasively with high sensitivity and accuracy with OCT systems.

  16. The analog of the Hawking effect in BECs

    OpenAIRE

    Fabbri, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The observation of the Hawking effect from black holes in the astrophysical context is unlikely. However, the analog of this effect is present in condensed matter systems. We focus on Bose-Einstein condensates, and on a proposal to detect it through correlation measurements.

  17. High precision, integrable, static memory for analog signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A circuit is presented which can be used for the realization of low cost, high precision integrated static memories for analog signals. Such memories could be advantageously employed for the implementation of multiple programmable voltage sources for control and measurement applications

  18. The 130Te (p,p') reaction on analog resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angular distributions for elastic and inelastic scattering have been measured on six analog resonances in the 130Te + p system and at two off resonance energies. Partial widths are deduced from the angular distributions. Formulae for the spectroscopic amplitudes within the framework of quasiparticle random phase approximation are presented. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical predictions. (Author)

  19. Teamwork in high-risk environments analogous to space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, Barbara G.

    1990-01-01

    Mountaineering expeditions combine a number of factors which make them potentially good analogs to the planetary exploration facet of long-duration space missions. A study of mountain climbing teams was conducted in order to evaluate the usefulness of the environment as a space analog and to specifically identify the factors and issues surrounding teamwork and 'successful' team performance in two mountaineering environments. This paper focuses on social/organizational factors, including team size and structure, leadership styles and authority structure which were found in the sample of 22 climb teams (122 individuals). The second major issue discussed is the construction of a valid performance measure in this high-risk environment.

  20. Analytical Performance of Glucose Monitoring Systems at Different Blood Glucose Ranges and Analysis of Outliers in a Clinical Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Hasslacher, Christoph; Kulozik, Felix; Platten, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the analytical accuracy of 27 glucose monitoring systems (GMS) in a clinical setting, using the new ISO accuracy limits. In addition to measuring accuracy at blood glucose (BG) levels 100 mg/dl, we also analyzed devices performance with respect to these criteria at 5 specific BG level ranges, making it possible to further differentiate between devices with regard to overall performance. Carbohydrate meals and insulin injections were used to induce an increase...

  1. Validation of 123I-6-deoxy-6-iodo-D-glucose (6-DIC) as tracer for the in-vivo glucose transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of the glucose transport is very important clinically because alterations of this transport were described in numerous pathologies, in neurology, oncology and endocrinology. A new analog of the 123I-labelled has been synthesized: 123I-6-deoxy-6-iodo-D-glucose (6-DIG). Its in-vitro biological behaviour is similar to that of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (3-OMG), the reference tracer of glucose transport. The aim of the study was to determine if it is possible to make evident by 6-DIG a variations of in-vivo glucose transport. The studies were effected on a model of homozygote mice (db/db), genetically diabetic (NIDDM), presenting a severe insulin-resistance, characterized by deficient glucose transport in response to insulin. The studies of 6-DIG biodistribution (5 nmol/mouse) with (1.5 UI/Kg) or without exogenous insulin, were conducted in diabetic mice (db/db) and in non-diabetic (db/+) control mice. The results show that the capture of 6-DIG, as well as that of glucose, increases (by 30%) in response to insulin in most of insulin-sensitive tissues in control mice. In the insulin-resistant and hyperglycemic db/db mouse, the capture of 6-DIG is not modified, no matter whether the exogenous insulin is present. In conclusion, the 6-DIG is able to make evident a lack of glucose transport in heart, diaphragm and skeletal muscle in diabetic mouse and a physiological variation of this transport in response to insulin, in the control mouse. This result should be stressed because for the first time it is possible to evidence in-vivo variations into glucose transport with a iodated molecule

  2. Membrane Affinity of Platensimycin and Its Dialkylamine Analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Rowe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Membrane permeability is a desired property in drug design, but there have been difficulties in quantifying the direct drug partitioning into native membranes. Platensimycin (PL is a new promising antibiotic whose biosynthetic production is costly. Six dialkylamine analogs of PL were synthesized with identical pharmacophores but different side chains; five of them were found inactive. To address the possibility that their activity is limited by the permeation step, we calculated polarity, measured surface activity and the ability to insert into the phospholipid monolayers. The partitioning of PL and the analogs into the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli was assessed by activation curve shifts of a re-engineered mechanosensitive channel, MscS, in patch-clamp experiments. Despite predicted differences in polarity, the affinities to lipid monolayers and native membranes were comparable for most of the analogs. For PL and the di-myrtenyl analog QD-11, both carrying bulky sidechains, the affinity for the native membrane was lower than for monolayers (half-membranes, signifying that intercalation must overcome the lateral pressure of the bilayer. We conclude that the biological activity among the studied PL analogs is unlikely to be limited by their membrane permeability. We also discuss the capacity of endogenous tension-activated channels to detect asymmetric partitioning of exogenous substances into the native bacterial membrane and the different contributions to the thermodynamic force which drives permeation.

  3. HIGH RESOLUTION ANALOG / DIGITAL POWER SUPPLY CONTROLLER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrector magnets for the SPEAR-3 synchrotron radiation source require precision, high-speed control for use with beam-based orbit feedback. A new Controller Analog/Digital Interface card (CANDI) has been developed for these purposes. The CANDI has a 24-bit DAC for current control and three 24-bit Δ-Σ ADCs to monitor current and voltages. The ADCs can be read and the DAC updated at the 4 kHz rate needed for feedback control. A precision 16-bit DAC provides on-board calibration. Programmable multiplexers control internal signal routing for calibration, testing, and measurement. Feedback can be closed internally on current setpoint, externally on supply current, or beam position. Prototype and production tests are reported in this paper. Noise is better than 17 effective bits in a 10 mHz to 2 kHz bandwidth. Linearity and temperature stability are excellent

  4. A QCD analogy for quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Holdom, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Quadratic gravity presents us with a renormalizable, asymptotically free theory of quantum gravity. When its couplings grow strong at some scale, as in QCD, then this strong scale sets the Planck mass. QCD has a gluon that does not appear in the physical spectrum. Quadratic gravity has a spin-2 ghost that we conjecture does not appear in the physical spectrum. We discuss how the QCD analogy leads to this conjecture and to the emergence of general relativity. Certain aspects of the QCD path integral and its measure could also be similar for quadratic gravity. With the addition of the Einstein-Hilbert term, quadratic gravity has a dimensionful parameter that seems to control a quantum phase transition and the size of a mass gap in the strong phase.

  5. Superconducting circuit probe for analog quantum simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Liang-Hui; You, J. Q.; Tian, Lin

    2015-07-01

    Analog quantum simulators can be used to study quantum correlation in novel many-body systems by emulating the Hamiltonian of these systems. One essential question in quantum simulation is to probe the properties of an emulated many-body system. Here we present a circuit QED scheme for probing such properties by measuring the spectrum of a superconducting resonator coupled to a quantum simulator. We first study a general framework of this approach and show that the spectrum of the resonator is directly related to the correlation function of the coupling operator between the resonator and the simulator. We then apply this scheme to a simulator of the transverse field Ising model implemented with superconducting qubits, where the resonance peaks in the resonator spectrum correspond to the frequencies of the elementary excitations. The effects of resonator damping, qubit decoherence, and resonator backaction are also discussed. This setup can be used to probe a broad range of many-body models.

  6. READ - Remote Analog ASIC Design System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Auer

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this work is to present a solution to implement a remote electronic laboratory for testing and designing analog ASICs (ispPAC10. The application allows users to create circuit schematics, upload the design to the device and perform measurements. The software used for designing circuits is the PAC-Designer and it runs on a Citrix server. The signals are generated and the responses are acquired by a data acquisition board controlled by LabView. The virtual instruments interact with some ActiveX controls specially designed to look like real oscilloscope and function generator devices and represent the user interface of the lab. These ActiveX give users the control over the LabView VIs and the access to its facilities in order to perform electronic exercises.

  7. Effects of glucagon, glucose, adrenaline and insulin infusion on blood glucose level in the common African toad (bufo regularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyebola, D D; Ariwodola, J O; Alada, A R

    1998-01-01

    Male toads, weighing 70-123 g, were divided into 13 groups with 8 toad in each group. Animals in each group were fasted overnight before the experiments. Toads in groups 1 to 4 were infused for 30 minutes with adrenaline, 5 ugkg-1 min-1, glucose, 5.5 mg kg-1 min-1; glucagon 2 ugkg-1 min-1; and insulin 2000 uU kg-1 min-1, respectively. Blood samples for blood glucose measurement were taken before, during and after each infusion. The experiment was repeated in groups 5 and 6 using 3.5 mg kg-1 min-1 and 7.5 mg kg-1 min-1 of glucose respectively. Toads in groups 7 to 9 were pretreated with prazosin, 0.2 mg/kg and those in groups 10 to 12 were pretreated with propranolol, 0.5 mg/kg. After pretreatment, glucose, glucagon and insulin infusions were repeated in the alpha-blocked and beta-blocked toads, respectively. Group 13 was infused with 0.7% saline and served as the control. The results showed that infusions of adrenaline, glucose and glucagon resulted in significant hyperglycaemia while insulin caused hypoglycaemia. The hyperglycaemic response to glucose was dose-dependent. The experiments using blockers showed that the glycaemic effects of glucagon and insulin are mediated via beta adrenoceptors, that for glucose is via alpha adrenoceptors and from an earlier study, the glycaemic response of adrenaline is through both alpha and beta adrenoceptors. PMID:10456139

  8. Dysregulated hepatic expression of glucose transporters in chronic disease: contribution of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase to hepatic glucose uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Sumera; Liaskou, Evaggelia; Fear, Janine; Garg, Abhilok; Reynolds, Gary; Claridge, Lee; Adams, David H; Newsome, Philip N; Lalor, Patricia F

    2014-12-15

    Insulin resistance is common in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD). Serum levels of soluble vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) are also increased in these patients. The amine oxidase activity of VAP-1 stimulates glucose uptake via translocation of transporters to the cell membrane in adipocytes and smooth muscle cells. We aimed to document human hepatocellular expression of glucose transporters (GLUTs) and to determine if VAP-1 activity influences receptor expression and hepatic glucose uptake. Quantitative PCR and immunocytochemistry were used to study human liver tissue and cultured cells. We also used tissue slices from humans and VAP-1-deficient mice to assay glucose uptake and measure hepatocellular responses to stimulation. We report upregulation of GLUT1, -3, -5, -6, -7, -8, -9, -10, -11, -12, and -13 in CLD. VAP-1 expression and enzyme activity increased in disease, and provision of substrate to hepatic VAP-1 drives hepatic glucose uptake. This effect was sensitive to inhibition of VAP-1 and could be recapitulated by H2O2. VAP-1 activity also altered expression and subcellular localization of GLUT2, -4, -9, -10, and -13. Therefore, we show, for the first time, alterations in hepatocellular expression of glucose and fructose transporters in CLD and provide evidence that the semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase activity of VAP-1 modifies hepatic glucose homeostasis and may contribute to patterns of GLUT expression in chronic disease. PMID:25342050

  9. Analog to digital workflow improvement: a quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wideman, Catherine; Gallet, Jacqueline

    2006-01-01

    This study tracked a radiology department's conversion from utilization of a Kodak Amber analog system to a Kodak DirectView DR 5100 digital system. Through the use of ProModel Optimization Suite, a workflow simulation software package, significant quantitative information was derived from workflow process data measured before and after the change to a digital system. Once the digital room was fully operational and the radiology staff comfortable with the new system, average patient examination time was reduced from 9.24 to 5.28 min, indicating that a higher patient throughput could be achieved. Compared to the analog system, chest examination time for modality specific activities was reduced by 43%. The percentage of repeat examinations experienced with the digital system also decreased to 8% vs. the level of 9.5% experienced with the analog system. The study indicated that it is possible to quantitatively study clinical workflow and productivity by using commercially available software. PMID:16953340

  10. Titanium-Beta Zeolites Catalyze the Stereospecific Isomerization of D-Glucose to L-Sorbose via Intramolecular C5-C1 Hydride Shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gounder, Rajamani [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Davis, Mark E. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Pure-silica zeolite beta containing Lewis acidic framework Ti4+ centers (Ti-Beta) is shown to catalyze the isomerization of D-glucose to L-sorbose via an intramolecular C5–C1 hydride shift. Glucose–sorbose isomerization occurs in parallel to glucose–fructose isomerization on Ti-Beta in both water and methanol solvents, with fructose formed as the predominant product in water and sorbose as the predominant product in methanol (at 373 K) at initial times and over the course of >10 turnovers. Isotopic tracer studies demonstrate that 13C and D labels placed respectively at the C1 and C2 positions of glucose are retained respectively at the C6 and C5 positions of sorbose, consistent with its formation via an intramolecular C5–C1 hydride shift isomerization mechanism. This direct Lewis acid-mediated pathway for glucose–sorbose isomerization appears to be unprecedented among heterogeneous or biological catalysts and sharply contrasts indirect base-mediated glucose–sorbose isomerization via 3,4-enediol intermediates or via retro-aldol fragmentation and recombination of sugar fragments. Measured first-order glucose–sorbose isomerization rate constants (per total Ti; 373 K) for Ti-Beta in methanol are similar for glucose and glucose deuterated at the C2 position (within a factor of ~1.1), but are a factor of ~2.3 lower for glucose deuterated at each carbon position, leading to H/D kinetic isotope effects expected for kinetically relevant intramolecular C5–C1 hydride shift steps. Optical rotation measurements show that isomerization of D-(+)-glucose (92% enantiomeric purity) with Ti-Beta in water (373 K) led to the formation of L-(-)-sorbose (73% enantiomeric purity) and D-(-)-fructose (87% enantiomeric purity) as the predominant stereoisomers, indicating that stereochemistry is preserved at carbon centers not directly involved in intramolecular C5–C1 or C2–C1 hydride shift steps, respectively. This new Lewis acid-mediated rearrangement of glucose to sorbose does not appear to have a metalloenzyme analog.

  11. Correlation of salivary glucose, blood glucose and oral candidal carriage in the saliva of type 2 diabetics: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study the correlation between blood glucose levels and salivary glucose levels in type 2 diabetic patients, to study the relationship between salivary glucose levels and oral candidal carriage in type 2 diabetic patients and to determine whether salivary glucose levels could be used as a noninvasive tool for the measurement of glycemic control in type 2 diabetics. Study Design: The study population consisted of three groups: Group 1 consisted of 30 controlled diabetics and Group 2 consisted of 30 uncontrolled diabetics based on their random nonfasting plasma glucose levels. Group 3 consisted of 30 healthy controls. Two milliliters of peripheral blood was collected for the estimation of random nonfasting plasma glucose levels and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c. Unstimulated saliva was collected for the estimation of salivary glucose. Saliva was collected by the oral rinse technique for the estimation of candidal counts. Results: The salivary glucose levels were significantly higher in controlled and uncontrolled diabetics when compared with controls. The salivary candidal carriage was also significantly higher in uncontrolled diabetics when compared with controlled diabetics and nondiabetic controls. The salivary glucose levels showed a significant correlation with blood glucose levels, suggesting that salivary glucose levels can be used as a monitoring tool for predicting glycemic control in diabetic patients. Conclusion: The present study found that estimation of salivary glucose levels can be used as a noninvasive, painless technique for the measurement of diabetic status of a patient in a dental set up. Increased salivary glucose levels leads to increased oral candidal carriage; therefore, oral diagnosticians are advised to screen the diabetic patients for any oral fungal infections and further management.

  12. A Unified Potentiostat for Electrochemical Glucose Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Yeong-Seuk Kim; Seok-Jae Oh; Eui-Jin Kim; Jeong-Min Gim; Nam-Soo Kim; Ki-Sung Sohn; Jong-Won Kim

    2013-01-01

    A unified potentiostat circuit for both O2- and H2O2- based electrochemical glucose sensors was proposed and itsfunction was verified by circuit simulations and measurement results of a fabricated chip. This circuit consisted ofan operational amplifier, a comparator and current mirrors. The proposed circuit was fabricated with a 0.13 ㎛ thickoxide CMOS process and an active area of 360 ㎛ × 100 ㎛. The measurements revealed an input operation range from0.5 V to 1.6 V in the H2O2- based bio-senso...

  13. Effect of physical training on glucose transporter protein and mRNA levels in rat adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stallknecht, B; Andersen, P H; Vinten, J; Bendtsen, L L; Sibbersen, J; Pedersen, O; Galbo, H

    Physical training increases insulin-stimulated glucose transport and the number of glucose transporters in adipocytes measured by cytochalasin B binding. In the present study we used immunoblotting to measure the abundance of two glucose transporters (GLUT-4, GLUT-1) in white adipocytes from...... trained rats. Furthermore, the abundance of the mRNAs for these proteins and glucose transport was measured. Rats were swim-trained for 10 wk, and adipocytes were isolated from epididymal fat pads. The amount of GLUT-4/adipocyte volume unit was significantly higher in trained animals compared with both...

  14. Automatic activation of categorical and abstract analogical relations in analogical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Adam E; Fugelsang, Jonathan A; Dunbar, Kevin N

    2006-10-01

    We examined activation of concepts during analogical reasoning. Subjects made either analogical judgments or categorical judgments about four-word sets. After each four-word set, they named the ink color of a single word in a modified Stroop task. Words that referred to category relations were primed (as indicated by longer response times on Stroop color naming) subsequent to analogical judgments and categorical judgments. This finding suggests that activation of category concepts plays a fundamental role in analogical thinking. When colored words referred to analogical relations, priming occurred subsequent to analogical judgments, but not to categorical judgments, even though identical four-word stimuli were used for both types of judgments. This finding lends empirical support to the hypothesis that, when people comprehend the analogy between two items, they activate an abstract analogical relation that is distinct from the specific content items that compose the analogy. PMID:17263066

  15. Regulation of glycolysis and sugar phosphotransferase activities in Streptococcus lactis: growth in the presence of 2-deoxy-D-glucose.

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, J.; Chassy, B M

    1983-01-01

    Streptococcus lactis K1 has the capacity to grow on many sugars, including sucrose and lactose, in the presence of high levels (greater than 500 mM) of 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Initially, growth of the organism was transiently halted by the addition of comparatively low concentrations (less than 0.5 mM) of the glucose analog to the culture. Inhibition was coincident with (i) rapid accumulation of 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate (ca. 120 mM) and preferential utilization of phosphoenolpyruvate via the ...

  16. The Effect of Working Memory on Analogical Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Lismanis, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Analogical mapping is important in how humans learn new information from novel situations. There are two main types of analogies; scene analogies which are similar to everyday life requiring the relationship to be found and proportional analogies which are where a relationship is given and people use this to answer for a third item. In this experiment a third type of analogy is created by combining the scene analogy and the proportional analogy. This proportional scene analogy is an everyday ...

  17. Quasirelativistic analogs of lax equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrable systems are rare; they are instances of well-organized structures. Even rarer are nonrelativistic mechanical systems which have (special) relativistic analogs viewed mathematically as regular deformations with the parameter ? = c-2, c being the speed of light. Until 1986 there was no hint that these two rare classes have common elements, when Ruijsenaars and Schneider found a relativistic version of the Calogero-Moser system and then later on Ruijsenaars discovered a relativistic Toda lattice. Bruschi, Calogero, Ragnisco, S. Alber, and others have analyzed and elucidated these systems, and Gibbons and the author have found a general ansatz for all scalar Lax equations which, when applied to the Lax representation of the Toda lattice, produces a Lax representation for the relativistic Toda lattice. Here the author reports new developments, especially on the Hamiltonian aspects of the theory

  18. Bylocks Drakskeppstrilogi – analogi och kulturmöten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingemansson, Mary

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In my thesis “It could just as well have happened today”: Maj Bylock's Drakskeppstrilogi and historical consciousness in ten- to twelve-year-olds, I provide a textual, thematic analysis of the three novels from 1997–1998. Further, in an empirical study I have documented the reading of Bylock's fictitious, historical trilogy about the Viking era as done by 11-year-old children, whose thematic work and development of a historical consciousness also have been part of the study. This article deals only with the textual analysis aspect, which purpose is to show what in the texts might produce a historical consciousness in children as well as how the characters are portrayed in order for children to identify with them. Two functions of the novels are studied: knowledge and analogy. The focus is on the main character Petite/Åsa and her development with a view to gender, ethnicity and class as seen from an intersectional perspective. I use postcolonial concepts such as diaspora and hybrid identity in order to describe cultural encounters brought on by migration. I portray female characters gaining a higher level of empowerment, a term used by Joanne Brown and Nancy St. Clair. Bylock claims that she is reflecting the present in her historical texts and that this is more straightforwardly achieved when the events are set several hundred years ago. As a result irrelevant details can be removed and the focus be placed on timeless, human phenomena, for instance cultural encounters. In the light of the above and ideas about how best to describe cultural encounters I analyse the cultural contexts in which the main character finds herself focusing on her transition from a girl into a woman and her quest for a multicultural identity. I elaborate on the concepts mentioned in the previous by describing two cultural encounters which provide an analogy with the present.

  19. Priming analogical reasoning with false memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Mark L; Garner, Sarah R; Threadgold, Emma; Ball, Linden J

    2015-08-01

    Like true memories, false memories are capable of priming answers to insight-based problems. Recent research has attempted to extend this paradigm to more advanced problem-solving tasks, including those involving verbal analogical reasoning. However, these experiments are constrained inasmuch as problem solutions could be generated via spreading activation mechanisms (much like false memories themselves) rather than using complex reasoning processes. In three experiments we examined false memory priming of complex analogical reasoning tasks in the absence of simple semantic associations. In Experiment 1, we demonstrated the robustness of false memory priming in analogical reasoning when backward associative strength among the problem terms was eliminated. In Experiments 2a and 2b, we extended these findings by demonstrating priming on newly created homonym analogies that can only be solved by inhibiting semantic associations within the analogy. Overall, the findings of the present experiments provide evidence that the efficacy of false memory priming extends to complex analogical reasoning problems. PMID:25784574

  20. Ranking Relations using Analogies in Biological and Information Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Ricardo; Ghahramani, Zoubin; Airoldi, Edoardo M

    2010-01-01

    Analogical reasoning depends fundamentally on the ability to learn and generalize about relations between objects. We develop an approach to relational learning which, given a set of pairs of objects S = {A1:B1, A2:B2, >..., AN:BN}, measures how well other pairs A:B fit in with the set S. Our work addresses the question: is the relation between objects A and B analogous to those relations found in S? Such questions are particularly relevant in information retrieval, where an investigator might want to search for analogous pairs of objects that match the query set of interest. There are many ways in which objects can be related, making the task of measuring analogies very challenging. Our approach combines a similarity measure on function spaces with Bayesian analysis to produce a ranking. It requires data containing features of the objects of interest and a link matrix specifying which relationships exist; no further attributes of such relationships are necessary. We illustrate the potential of our method on ...