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Environmental geophysics: Building E3640 Decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Interim progress report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Building E3640 is a potentially contaminated site in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground. Noninvasive geophysical survey techniques, including magnetics, EM-31, EM-61, and ground-penetrating radar, were used as part of a sampling and monitoring program prior to decommissioning and dismantling of the building. Complex and large-amplitude anomalies caused by aboveground metal in this area obscure many smaller features produced by subsurface sources. No underground storage tanks were found in the areas surveyed. Major anomalies produced by subsurface sources include the following: EM-61 and EM-31 lineaments caused by a water line extending north from the south fence; a broad positive magnetic anomaly caused by magnetic fill north of the material and drum storage area and northeast of E3640; a 30-ft-wide band of EM-31 anomalies extending from the front gate to the southeast comer of E3640 and a coincident EM-61 anomaly produced by buried utilities; ground-penetrating radar images along three lines extending from a sump at the northeast comer of E3640 to the eastern fence; and EM-61, EM-31, and magnetic anomalies caused by overhead and underground pipes extending south from the north fence. Smaller, unidentified, localized anomalies observed throughout the survey area are also described in this report.

McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Borden, H.M.; Benson, M.A.; Thompson, M.D.; Padar, C.A.; Daudt, C.R.

1995-01-01

2

Geophysics: Building E5481 decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Building E5481 is one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek and Westwood areas of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May of 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, were conducted around the perimeter of the building to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. The building is located on the northern margin of a landfill that was sited in a wetland. The large number of magnetic sources surrounding the building are believed to be contained in construction fill that had been used to raise the grade. The smaller anomalies, for the most part, are not imaged with ground radar or by electrical profiling. A conductive zone trending northwest to southeast across the site is spatially related to an old roadbed. Higher resistivity areas in the northeast and east are probably representive of background values. Three high-amplitude, positive, rectangular magnetic anomalies have unknown sources. The features do not have equivalent electrical signatures, nor are they seen with radar imaging.

1992-01-01

3

Geophysics: Building E5481 decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Building E5481 is one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek and Westwood areas of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May of 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, were conducted around the perimeter of the building to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. The building is located on the northern margin of a landfill that was sited in a wetland. The large number of magnetic sources surrounding the building are believed to be contained in construction fill that had been used to raise the grade. The smaller anomalies, for the most part, are not imaged with ground radar or by electrical profiling. A conductive zone trending northwest to southeast across the site is spatially related to an old roadbed. Higher resistivity areas in the northeast and east are probably representive of background values. Three high-amplitude, positive, rectangular magnetic anomalies have unknown sources. The features do not have equivalent electrical signatures, nor are they seen with radar imaging.

Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, M.G.; McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.

1992-11-01

4

Geophysics: Building E5190 decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Building E5190 is one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek area of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May 1992. A noninvasive geophysical survey, including the complementary technologies of magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, was conducted around the perimeter as a guide to developing a sampling and monitoring program prior to decommissioning and dismantling the building. The magnetics surveys indicated that multistation, positive magnetic sources are randomly distributed north and west of the building. Two linear trends were noted: one that may outline buried utility lines and another that is produced by a steel-covered trench. The resistivity profiling indicated three conductive zones: one due to increased moisture in a ditch, one associated with buried utility lines, and a third zone associated with the steel-covered trench. Ground-penetrating radar imaging detected two significant anomalies, which were correlated with small-amplitude magnetic anomalies. The objectives of the study -- to detect and locate objects and to characterize a located object were achieved.

Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, M.G.; McGinnis, L.D.

1992-07-01

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Geophysics: Building E5440 decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Building E5440 was one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek and Westwood areas of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar (GPR), were conducted around the perimeter of the building to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. The results show several complex geophysical signatures. Isolated, one-point, magnetic anomalies surrounding the building may be associated with construction fill. A 10-ft-wide band of strongly magnetic positive anomalies bordering the north side of the building obliterates small magnetic sources that might otherwise be seen. A prominent magnetic nose'' extending northward from this band toward a standpipe at 100N,63E may be connected to an underground tank. The southeast corner of the site is underlain by a rectangular, magnetized source associated with strong radar images. A magnetic lineament extending south from the anomaly may be caused by a buried pipe; the anomaly itself may be caused by subsurface equipment associated with a manhole or utility access pit. A 2,500-gamma, positive magnetic anomaly centered at 0N,20E, which is also the location of a 12 [Omega]-m resistivity minimum, may be caused by a buried vault. It appears on radar imaging as a strong reflector.

McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, M.G.

1992-11-01

6

Geophysics: Building E5375 decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Building E5375 was one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek area of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar (GPR), were conducted around the perimeter of the building to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. Several anomalies wear, noted: (1) An underground storage tank located 25 ft east of Building E5375 was identified with magnetic, resistivity, and GPR profiling. (2) A three-point resistivity anomaly, 12 ft east of the northeast comer of Building E5374 (which borders Building E5375) and 5 ft south of the area surveyed with the magnetometer, may be caused by another underground storage tank. (3) A 2,500-gamma magnetic anomaly near the northeast corner of the site has no equivalent resistivity anomaly, although disruption in GPR reflectors was observed. (4) A one-point magnetic anomaly was located at the northeast comer, but its source cannot be resolved. A chaotic reflective zone to the east represents the radar signature of Building E5375 construction fill.

McGinnis, M.G.; McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.

1992-08-01

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Geophysics: Building E5375 decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Building E5375 was one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek area of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar (GPR), were conducted around the perimeter of the building to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. Several anomalies wear, noted: (1) An underground storage tank located 25 ft east of Building E5375 was identified with magnetic, resistivity, and GPR profiling. (2) A three-point resistivity anomaly, 12 ft east of the northeast comer of Building E5374 (which borders Building E5375) and 5 ft south of the area surveyed with the magnetometer, may be caused by another underground storage tank. (3) A 2,500-gamma magnetic anomaly near the northeast corner of the site has no equivalent resistivity anomaly, although disruption in GPR reflectors was observed. (4) A one-point magnetic anomaly was located at the northeast comer, but its source cannot be resolved. A chaotic reflective zone to the east represents the radar signature of Building E5375 construction fill.

1992-01-01

8

Geophysics: Building E5032 decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

integration of data from surveys using three geophysical technologies has provided information used to define the locations of buried utilities, tanks, vaults, and debris near building E5032 at the Aberdeen Proving Ground. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) profiles indicate the presence of buried pipes, tanks, reinforcement rods (rebar), and remnants of railroad tracks. A magnetic map constructed from a detailed magnetic survey on the north side of the building outlines buried iron-rich objects that are interpreted to be iron pipes, tank, and other debris of uncertain origin at relatively shallow depths. Horizontal electrical resistivity surveys and vertical electrical resistivity soundings essentially corroborated the findings obtained with the magnetometer and GPR. In addition, a highly resistance layer was observed on the east side of the building where a former railroad bed with a thick grave fill is believed to immediately underlie the lawn. The resistivity data show no evidence of a conductive leachate plume. Geophysical measurements from three techniques over a buried concrete slab approximately 130 ft north of Building E5032 give geophysical signatures interpreted to be due to the presence of a large iron tank or vault. An attempt was made to gather meaningful magnetic data on the east, west, and south sides of the building; however, the quality of subsurface interpretations in those areas was poor because of the influence of surficial iron lids, pipes, grates, and the effects of the corrugated iron building itself. 11 figs., 1 tab.

McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.

1991-07-01

9

Interim progress report -- geophysics: Decommissioning of Buildings E5974 and E5978, Aberdeen Proving Ground  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Buildings E5974 and E5978, located near the mouth of Canal Creek, were among 10 potentially contaminated sites in the Westwood and Canal Creek areas of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May of 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including the complementary technologies of magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, were conducted around the perimeters of the buildings to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. The magnetic anomalies and the electrically conductive areas around these buildings have a spatial relationship similar to that observed in low-lying sites in the Canal Creek area; they are probably associated with construction fill. Electrically conductive terrain is dominant on the eastern side of the site, and resistive terrain predominates on the west. The smaller magnetic anomalies are not imaged with ground radar or by electrical profiling. The high resistivities in the northwest quadrant are believed to be caused by a natural sand lens. The causes of three magnetic anomalies in the high-resistivity area are unidentified, but they are probably anthropogenic.

McGinnis, M.G.; McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.

1992-11-01

10

Geophysics: Building E5481 decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground. Interim progress report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Building E5481 is one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek and Westwood areas of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May of 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, were conducted around the perimeter of the building to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. The building is located on the northern margin of a landfill that was sited in a wetland. The large number of magnetic sources surrounding the building are believed to be contained in construction fill that had been used to raise the grade. The smaller anomalies, for the most part, are not imaged with ground radar or by electrical profiling. A conductive zone trending northwest to southeast across the site is spatially related to an old roadbed. Higher resistivity areas in the northeast and east are probably representive of background values. Three high-amplitude, positive, rectangular magnetic anomalies have unknown sources. The features do not have equivalent electrical signatures, nor are they seen with radar imaging.

Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, M.G.; McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.

1992-11-01

11

Geophysics: Building E5440 decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground. Interim progress report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Building E5440 was one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek and Westwood areas of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar (GPR), were conducted around the perimeter of the building to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. The results show several complex geophysical signatures. Isolated, one-point, magnetic anomalies surrounding the building may be associated with construction fill. A 10-ft-wide band of strongly magnetic positive anomalies bordering the north side of the building obliterates small magnetic sources that might otherwise be seen. A prominent magnetic ``nose`` extending northward from this band toward a standpipe at 100N,63E may be connected to an underground tank. The southeast corner of the site is underlain by a rectangular, magnetized source associated with strong radar images. A magnetic lineament extending south from the anomaly may be caused by a buried pipe; the anomaly itself may be caused by subsurface equipment associated with a manhole or utility access pit. A 2,500-gamma, positive magnetic anomaly centered at 0N,20E, which is also the location of a 12 {Omega}-m resistivity minimum, may be caused by a buried vault. It appears on radar imaging as a strong reflector.

McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, M.G.

1992-11-01

12

Geophysics: Building E5375 decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground. Interim progress report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Building E5375 was one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek area of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar (GPR), were conducted around the perimeter of the building to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. Several anomalies wear, noted: (1) An underground storage tank located 25 ft east of Building E5375 was identified with magnetic, resistivity, and GPR profiling. (2) A three-point resistivity anomaly, 12 ft east of the northeast comer of Building E5374 (which borders Building E5375) and 5 ft south of the area surveyed with the magnetometer, may be caused by another underground storage tank. (3) A 2,500-gamma magnetic anomaly near the northeast corner of the site has no equivalent resistivity anomaly, although disruption in GPR reflectors was observed. (4) A one-point magnetic anomaly was located at the northeast comer, but its source cannot be resolved. A chaotic reflective zone to the east represents the radar signature of Building E5375 construction fill.

McGinnis, M.G.; McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.

1992-08-01

13

Interim progress report -- geophysics: Decommissioning of Buildings E5974 and E5978, Aberdeen Proving Ground  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Buildings E5974 and E5978, located near the mouth of Canal Creek, were among 10 potentially contaminated sites in the Westwood and Canal Creek areas of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May of 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including the complementary technologies of magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, were conducted around the perimeters of the buildings to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. The magnetic anomalies and the electrically conductive areas around these buildings have a spatial relationship similar to that observed in low-lying sites in the Canal Creek area; they are probably associated with construction fill. Electrically conductive terrain is dominant on the eastern side of the site, and resistive terrain predominates on the west. The smaller magnetic anomalies are not imaged with ground radar or by electrical profiling. The high resistivities in the northwest quadrant are believed to be caused by a natural sand lens. The causes of three magnetic anomalies in the high-resistivity area are unidentified, but they are probably anthropogenic.

1992-01-01

14

Geophysics: Building E5190 decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground. Interim progress report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Building E5190 is one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek area of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May 1992. A noninvasive geophysical survey, including the complementary technologies of magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, was conducted around the perimeter as a guide to developing a sampling and monitoring program prior to decommissioning and dismantling the building. The magnetics surveys indicated that multistation, positive magnetic sources are randomly distributed north and west of the building. Two linear trends were noted: one that may outline buried utility lines and another that is produced by a steel-covered trench. The resistivity profiling indicated three conductive zones: one due to increased moisture in a ditch, one associated with buried utility lines, and a third zone associated with the steel-covered trench. Ground-penetrating radar imaging detected two significant anomalies, which were correlated with small-amplitude magnetic anomalies. The objectives of the study -- to detect and locate objects and to characterize a located object were achieved.

Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, M.G.; McGinnis, L.D.

1992-07-01

15

Environmental geophysics: Buildings E5485, E5487, and E5489 decommissioning - the open-quotes Ghost Townclose quotes complex, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Buildings E5485, E5487, and E5489, referred to informally as the open-quotes Ghost Townclose quotes complex, are potentially contaminated sites in the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, EM-31, EM-61, and ground-penetrating radar, were conducted to assist a sampling and monitoring program prior to decommissioning and dismantling of the buildings. The buildings are located on a marginal wetland bordering the west branch of Canal Creek. The dominant geophysical signature in the open-quotes Ghost Town close quotes complex is a pattern of northeast-southwest and northwest-southeast anomalies that appear to be associated with a trench/pipe/sewer system, documented by the presence of a manhole. Combinations of anomalies suggest that line sources include nonmetallic and ferromagnetic materials in trenches. On the basis of anomaly associations, the sewer lines probably rest in a trench, back-filled with conductive, amphibolitic, crushed rock. Where the sewer lines connect manholes or junctions with other lines, ferromagnetic materials are present. Isolated, unidentified magnetic anomalies litter the area around Building E5487, particularly to the north. Three small magnetic sources are located east of Building E5487.

1994-01-01

16

Preliminary assessment of risk from toxic materials that might be mobilized in the decommissioning of Aberdeen Proving Ground Building E5032  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Aberdeen Proving Ground Building E5032 is scheduled for decommissioning, that is, for demolition. Because the building was formerly used for small-scale operations with incendiary and toxic chemical agents, it presents unusual concerns for occupational and public health safety during the demolition. For this reason, an anticipatory risk assessment was conducted, taking into consideration the building's history, properties of potential residual contaminants (particularly chemical and incendiary agents), and assumptions relating to meteorological conditions and envisioned modes of demolition. Safe maximum levels in concrete floors for the worst case were estimated to be: white phosphorus, 3200 mg/kg; mustard, 94 mg/kg; nerve agent GA (tabun), 6 mg/kg; cyanide, 500 mg/kg; and sulfide, 1400 mg/kg. These values will serve as planning guidance for the activities to follow. It is emphasized that the estimates must be reviewed, and perhaps revised, after sampling and analysis are completed, the demolition methodology is chosen, and dust emissions are measured under operating conditions.

Rosenblatt, D.H.; Brubaker, K.L.

1991-12-01

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Preliminary assessment of risk from toxic materials that might be mobilized in the decommissioning of Aberdeen Proving Ground Building E5032  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Aberdeen Proving Ground Building E5032 is scheduled for decommissioning, that is, for demolition. Because the building was formerly used for small-scale operations with incendiary and toxic chemical agents, it presents unusual concerns for occupational and public health safety during the demolition. For this reason, an anticipatory risk assessment was conducted, taking into consideration the building`s history, properties of potential residual contaminants (particularly chemical and incendiary agents), and assumptions relating to meteorological conditions and envisioned modes of demolition. Safe maximum levels in concrete floors for the worst case were estimated to be: white phosphorus, 3200 mg/kg; mustard, 94 mg/kg; nerve agent GA (tabun), 6 mg/kg; cyanide, 500 mg/kg; and sulfide, 1400 mg/kg. These values will serve as planning guidance for the activities to follow. It is emphasized that the estimates must be reviewed, and perhaps revised, after sampling and analysis are completed, the demolition methodology is chosen, and dust emissions are measured under operating conditions.

Rosenblatt, D.H.; Brubaker, K.L.

1991-12-01

18

Clean-ups at Aberdeen Proving Ground  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Department of Defense has utilized radiative material in numerous applications over several decades. Aberdeen Proving Ground has been an integral player in the Army's Research, Development, and Testing of items incorporating radionuclides, as well as developing new and innovative applications. As new information becomes available and society progresses, we find that the best management practices used decades, or even sometimes years earlier are inadequate to meet the current demands. Aberdeen Proving Ground is committed to remediating historic disposal sites, and utilizing the best available technology in current operations to prevent future adverse impact. Two projects which are currently ongoing at Aberdeen Proving Ground illustrates these points. The first, the remediation of contaminated metal storage areas, depicts how available technology has provided a means for recycling material whereby preventing the continued stock piling, and allowing for the decommissioning of the areas. The second, the 26Th Street Disposal Site Removal Action, shows how historic methods of disposition were inadequate to meet today's needs.

1994-03-03

19

The Ultimate Aberdeen Knot  

Science.gov (United States)

INTRODUCTION The Aberdeen knot has been shown to be stronger and more secure than a surgeon's knot for ending a suture line. No data exist as to the ideal configuration of the Aberdeen knot. The Royal College of Surgeons of England in their Basic Surgical Skills Course, 2002 recommended six throws. The aim of this experiment is to find the ideal combination of throws and turns. MATERIALS AND METHODS Aberdeen knots of various configurations were tied in O-PDS suture (Ethicon, Johnson and Johnson). Each configuration was tied 10 times. A materials testing machine was used to test the knots to destruction in a standardised manner. RESULTS The knots were seen to behave in two ways. They either slipped and unravelled, or broke. Knots tied with fewer than three throws were unreliable. Knots tied with three throws and two turns appear to be the strongest configuration. Adding further throws and turns does not increase the strength of an Aberdeen knot. CONCLUSIONS An Aberdeen knot tied with three throws and two turns is the ultimate Aberdeen knot.

Stott, Philip M; Ripley, Lionel G; Lavelle, Michael A

2007-01-01

20

City profile Aberdeen  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Although Aberdeen can trace its origins, many of its buildings and street patterns back over hundreds of years, it is the last three decades that have radically affected and shaped the modem city. The discovery of North Sea oil and the decision by the major oil companies to centre their exploration and development activities in Aberdeen has provided a unique opportunity, though one that has brought associated and significant problems of growth management. Oil-related prosperity has been accompanied by growing economic disparities, pressure for new housing and commercial development and demands for investment in transport infrastructure. The management of development versus conservation tensions, as well as the need to ensure oil-related growth benefits the whole community, have led to unique and groundbreaking public-private partnerships in the city. As the significance of oil in the local economy wanes attention is now increasingly being focused on how to ensure the longer term prosperity of the city. (Author)

Tiesdell, Steve; Allmendinger, Phil [Aberdeen Univ., European Urban and Regional Research Centre, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

2004-04-01

 
 
 
 
21

Brent Decommissioning  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The decommissioning project will include four stages: Identifying feasible decommissioning options; Selecting a final concept for the decommissioning project; Doing the detailed engineering to provide the required amount of detail and definition for the project so that safety can be ensured and any risks be managed; Executing the project.

Smy, P. [Shell EPE, Den Haag (Netherlands)

2008-10-15

22

Decommissioning options  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A copy of the slides from a paper on the decommissioning options for offshore platforms is given. Topics covered include topsides removal options, methods and technical considerations; concrete gravity base structure decommissioning options and technical considerations; and steel jacket decommissioning options, methods and technical considerations. (UK)

Gamblin, D.

1997-11-01

23

Initial building investigations at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland: Building E5190  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

As part of a building decommissioning and demolition program at Aberdeen Proving Ground, a detailed inspection of each target building is conducted in order to characterize and describe the state of the building as it currently exists and to identify areas potentially contaminated with toxic or other hazardous substances. Room surfaces, drains and sumps, remaining equipment, and such associated exterior aboveground and underground appurtenances as tanks and pipelines are among the features, generically termed compartments, that may be potentially contaminated. Detailed drawings are prepared to illustrate the existing structure of each building. This report presents the results of the inspection of building E5190 in the Edgewood/Canal Creek area of Aberdeen Proving Ground. This building houses a 10,000-gal tank formerly used to store xylene. Eleven potentially contaminated compartments were identified in this building and its vicinity.

Brubaker, K.L.; Dougherty, J.M.; Tome, C.

1993-10-01

24

Decommissioning Handbook  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Decommissioning Handbook is a technical guide for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The decommissioning of a nuclear facility involves the removal of the radioactive and, for practical reasons, hazardous materials to enable the facility to be released and not represent a further risk to human health and the environment. This handbook identifies and technologies and techniques that will accomplish these objectives. The emphasis in this handbook is on characterization; waste treatment; decontamination; dismantling, segmenting, demolition; and remote technologies. Other aspects that are discussed in some detail include the regulations governing decommissioning, worker and environmental protection, and packaging and transportation of the waste materials. The handbook describes in general terms the overall decommissioning project, including planning, cost estimating, and operating practices that would ease preparation of the Decommissioning Plan and the decommissioning itself. The reader is referred to other documents for more detailed information. This Decommissioning Handbook has been prepared by Enserch Environmental Corporation for the US Department of Energy and is a complete restructuring of the original handbook developed in 1980 by Nuclear Energy Services. The significant changes between the two documents are the addition of current and the deletion of obsolete technologies and the addition of chapters on project planning and the Decommissioning Plan, regulatory requirements, characterization, remote technology, and packaging and transportation of the waste materials.

1994-03-01

25

Nuclear decommissioning  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The paper on nuclear decommissioning was presented by Dr H. Lawton to a meeting of the British Nuclear Energy Society and Institution of Nuclear Engineers, 1986. The decommissioning work currently being undertaken on the Windscale advanced gas cooled reactor (WAGR) is briefly described, along with projects in other countries, development work associated with the WAGR operation and costs. (U.K.).

1987-02-01

26

77 FR 67689 - Fidelity Aberdeen Street Trust, et al.;  

Science.gov (United States)

...Release No. 30258; File No. 812-13731] Fidelity Aberdeen Street Trust, et al.; Notice of...section 17(a)(2) of the Act. Applicants: Fidelity Aberdeen Street Trust; Fidelity Advisor Series I; Fidelity Advisor Series...

2012-11-13

27

Decommissioning handbook  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] This document is a compilation of information pertinent to the decommissioning of surplus nuclear facilities. This handbook is intended to describe all stages of the decommissioning process including selection of the end product, estimation of the radioactive inventory, estimation of occupational exposures, description of the state-of-the-art in re decontamination, remote csposition of wastes, and estimation of program costs. Presentation of state-of-the-art technology and data related to decommissioning will aid in consistent and efficient program planning and performance. Particular attention is focused on available technology applicable to those decommissioning activities that have not been accomplished before, such as remote segmenting and handling of highly activated 1100 MW(e) light water reactor vessel internals and thick-walled reactor vessels. A summary of available information associated with the planning and estimating of a decommissioning program is also presented. Summarized in particular are the methodologies associated with the calculation and measurement of activated material inventory, distribution, and surface dose level, system contamination inventory and distribution, and work area dose levels. Cost estimating techniques are also presented and the manner in which to account for variations in labor costs as impacting labor-intensive work activities is explained

1980-01-01

28

Nuclear decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Sufficient work has now been done, on a world-wide basis, to justify confidence that full decommissioning of nuclear installations, both plant and reactors, can be carried out safely and efficiently. Projects in several countries should confirm this in the next few years. In the United Kingdom, good progress has been made with the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor and supporting development work is finding solutions to resolve uncertainties. Estimates from several sources suggest that decommissioning costs can be kept to an acceptable level. (author)

1987-01-01

29

Geophysics: Building E5476 decommissiong, Aberdeen Proving Ground  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Building E5476 was one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek and Westwood areas of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May of 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, were conducted around the perimeter of the building to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. The large number of magnetic sources surrounding the building are believed to be contained in construction fill. The smaller anomalies, for the most part, were not imaged with ground radar or by electrical profiling. Large magnetic anomalies near the southwest comer of the building are due to aboveground standpipes and steel-reinforced concrete. Two high-resistivity areas, one projecting northeast from the building and another south of the original structure, may indicate the presence of organic pore fluids in the subsurface. A conductive lineament protruding from the south wall that is enclosed by the southem, high-resistivity feature is not associated with an equivalent magnetic anomaly. Magnetic and electrical anomalies south of the old landfill boundary are probably not associated with the building. The boundary is marked by a band of magnetic anomalies and a conductive zone trending northwest to southeast. The cause of high resistivities in a semicircular area in the southwest comer, within the landfill area, is unexplained.

1992-01-01

30

Geophysics: Building E5476 decommissiong, Aberdeen Proving Ground  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Building E5476 was one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek and Westwood areas of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May of 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, were conducted around the perimeter of the building to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. The large number of magnetic sources surrounding the building are believed to be contained in construction fill. The smaller anomalies, for the most part, were not imaged with ground radar or by electrical profiling. Large magnetic anomalies near the southwest comer of the building are due to aboveground standpipes and steel-reinforced concrete. Two high-resistivity areas, one projecting northeast from the building and another south of the original structure, may indicate the presence of organic pore fluids in the subsurface. A conductive lineament protruding from the south wall that is enclosed by the southem, high-resistivity feature is not associated with an equivalent magnetic anomaly. Magnetic and electrical anomalies south of the old landfill boundary are probably not associated with the building. The boundary is marked by a band of magnetic anomalies and a conductive zone trending northwest to southeast. The cause of high resistivities in a semicircular area in the southwest comer, within the landfill area, is unexplained.

Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, M.G.; McGinnis, L.D.

1992-11-01

31

Aberdeen's plague epidemic of 1647-48.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article discusses the plague epidemic that broke out in Scotland in the mid 1640s, particularly its effects on the city of Aberdeen where it remained virulent from April 1647 until the end of the following year. Prevailing medical understandings of disease causation and transmission will be discussed, and it will be shown that governments attempted to restrict outbreaks in accordance with these beliefs. The spread of plague throughout Scotland from 1644 will be summarised, with the focus on the impact of the disease on Aberdeen in 1647-48. The surviving council registers and other primary sources will be used to show how the city's governors responded to the dual threat of miasma and contagion in well-established ways.

Jillings K

2010-08-01

32

1982 international decommissioning symposium  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Sixty-four papers were presented at the following sessions: policy, regulations, and standards; management of decommissioning wastes; decommissioning experience; decommissioning tooling and techniques; radiological concerns; and planning and engineering

1982-01-01

33

Workshop on decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A Nordic workshop on decommissioning of nuclear facilities was held at Risoe in Denmark September 13-15, 2005. The workshop was arranged by NKS in cooperation with the company Danish Decommissioning, DD, responsible for decommissioning of nuclear facilities at Risoe. Oral presentations were made within the following areas: International and national recommendations and requirements concerning decommissioning of nuclear facilities Authority experiences of decommissioning cases Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Denmark Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Sweden Plans for decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Norway Plans for decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Finland Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in German and the UK Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the former Soviet Union Results from research and development A list with proposals for future work within NKS has been prepared based on results from group-work and discussions. The list contains strategic, economical and political issues, technical issues and issues regarding competence and communication. (au)

2005-01-01

34

A radiographic survey of monumental masonry workers in Aberdeen  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Lloyd Davies, T. A., Doig, A. T., Fox, A. J., and Greenberg, M. (1973).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,30, 227-231. A radiographic survey of monumental masonry workers in Aberdeen. A survey of radiographic appearances of the lungs of monumental masonry workers in Aberdeen was carried out to d...

Davies, T. A. Lloyd; Doig, A. T.; Fox, A. J.; Greenberg, M.

35

Unexploded ordnance issues at Aberdeen Proving Ground: Background information  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This document summarizes currently available information about the presence and significance of unexploded ordnance (UXO) in the two main areas of Aberdeen Proving Ground: Aberdeen Area and Edgewood Area. Known UXO in the land ranges of the Aberdeen Area consists entirely of conventional munitions. The Edgewood Area contains, in addition to conventional munitions, a significant quantity of chemical-munition UXO, which is reflected in the presence of chemical agent decomposition products in Edgewood Area ground-water samples. It may be concluded from current information that the UXO at Aberdeen Proving Ground has not adversely affected the environment through release of toxic substances to the public domain, especially not by water pathways, and is not likely to do so in the near future. Nevertheless, modest but periodic monitoring of groundwater and nearby surface waters would be a prudent policy.

Rosenblatt, D.H.

1996-11-01

36

Utility planning for decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Though the biggest impact on a utility of nuclear power plant decommissioning may occur many years from now, procrastination of efforts to be prepared for that time is unwarranted. Foresight put into action through planning can significantly affect that impact. Financial planning can assure the recovery of decommissioning costs in a manner equitable to customers. Decision-making planning can minimize adverse affects of current decisions on later decommissioning impacts and prepare a utility to be equipped to make later decommissioning decisions. Technological knowledge base planning can support all other planning aspects for decommissioning and prepare a utility for decommissioning decisions. Informed project planning can ward off potentially significant pitfalls during decommissioning and optimize the effectiveness of the actual decommissioning efforts

1982-01-01

37

A consolidated environmental monitoring plan for Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The US Army operates facilities in Edgewood and Aberdeen under several licenses from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Compliance with each license is time consuming and could potentially result in duplicated efforts to demonstrate compliance with existing environmental regulations. The goal of the ERM plan is to provide the sampling necessary to ensure that operations at Edgewood and Aberdeen are within applicable regulatory guidelines and to provide a means of ensuring that adverse effects to the environment are minimized. Existing sampling plans and environmental data generated from those plans are briefly reviewed as part of the development of the present ERM plan. The new ERM plan was designed to provide data that can be used for assessing risks to the environment and to humans using Aberdeen and Edgewood areas. Existing sampling is modified and new sampling is proposed based on the results of the long-term DU fate study. In that study, different environmental pathways were identified that would show transport of DU at Aberdeen. Those pathways would also be impacted by other radioactive constituents from Aberdeen and Edgewood areas. The ERM plan presented in this document includes sampling from Edgewood and Aberdeen facilities. The main radioactive constituents of concern at Edgewood are C, P, N, S, H, I, Co, Cs, Ca, Sr and U that are used in radiolabeling different compounds and tracers for different reactions and syntheses. Air and water sampling are the thrust of efforts at the Edgewood area.

Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

1997-04-01

38

Recommended IAEA decommissioning levels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The areas covered by each of the two terms 'decommissioning' and 'dismantling' of a nuclear installation are defined in order to distinguish them with greater accuracy. Decommissioning is first an administrative decision and afterwards all the material operations involved by this decision. Dismantling is only one of the material operations of the decommissioning but it can be the most important. For the IAEA the possible outcomes for a decommissioned installation fall under three main headings (stages) which we call 'decommissioning levels'. - level 1: shut-down with surveillance, - level 2: conditional release for another use, - level 3: unconditional release of the site

1977-03-31

39

Financial aspects of decommissioning (key aspects of decommissioning costing)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In this presentation the following aspects of NPPs decommissioning are discussed: Requirements and purpose of decommissioning costing; Decommissioning costing methodologies; Standardised decommissioning cost structure; Input data for cost estimate process; Waste management in cost estimate process; Grading aspects in cost estimating; Cost control in decommissioning projects; Summary of the cost estimation process; Conclusions and recommendations.

2009-01-01

40

Decommissioning Yankee Rowe  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This article describes the process and progress of the decommissioning of the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Plant in Massachusetts. In 32 years Yankee Rowe was a safe, reliable and economical power source for New England. The uncertain near-term availability of disposal facilities for low-level waste, spent fuel, and other high level waste presents special challenges to the decommissioning. The decommissioning plan was submitted to the USNRC in December 1993 with final approval anticipated in 1994. Topics highlighted in this article are the decommissioning plan and the component removal program.

Heider, K.J.; Mellor, R.A.

1994-07-01

 
 
 
 
41

Decommissioning Yankee Rowe  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This article describes the process and progress of the decommissioning of the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Plant in Massachusetts. In 32 years Yankee Rowe was a safe, reliable and economical power source for New England. The uncertain near-term availability of disposal facilities for low-level waste, spent fuel, and other high level waste presents special challenges to the decommissioning. The decommissioning plan was submitted to the USNRC in December 1993 with final approval anticipated in 1994. Topics highlighted in this article are the decommissioning plan and the component removal program.

1994-01-01

42

NPP Krsko decommissioning concept  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] At the end of the operational lifetime of a nuclear power plant (NPP) it is necessary to take measures for the decommissioning as stated in different international regulations and also in the national Slovenian law. Based on these requirements Slovenian authorities requested the development of a site specific decommissioning plan for the NPP KRSKO. In September 1995, the Nuklearna Elektrarna Krsko (NEK) developed a site specific scope and content for decommissioning plan including the assumptions for determination of the decommissioning costs. The NEK Decommissioning Plan contains sufficient information to fulfill decommissioning requirements identified by NRC, IAEA and OECD - NEA regulations. In this paper the activities and the results of development of NEK Decommissioning Plan consisting of the development of three decommissioning strategies for the NPP Krsko and selection of the most suitable strategy based on site specific, social, technical, radiological and economical aspects, cost estimates for the strategies including the costs for construction of final disposal facilities for fuel/high level waste (fuel/HLW) and low/intermediate level waste (LLW/ILW) and scheduling all activities necessary for the decommissioning of the NPP KRSKO are presented. (author)

1996-01-01

43

NPP Krsko decommissioning concept  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] At the end of the operational lifetime of a nuclear power plant (NPP) it is necessary to take measures for the decommissioning as stated in different international regulations and also in the national Slovenian law. Based on these requirements Slovenian authorities requested the development of a site specific decommissioning plan for the NPP Krsko. In September 1995, the Nuklearna Elektrarna Krsko (NEK) developed a site specific scope and content for a decommissioning plan including the assumptions for determination of the decommissioning costs. The NEK Decommissioning Plan contains sufficient information to fulfill the decommissioning requirements identified by NRC, IAEA and OECD - NEA regulations. In this paper the activities and results of development of NEK Decommissioning Plan consisting of the development of three decommissioning strategies for the NPP Krsko and selection of the most suitable strategy based on site specific, social, technical, radiological and economic aspects, cost estimates for the strategies including the costs for construction of final disposal facilities for fuel/high level waste (fuel/HLW) and low/intermediate level waste (LLW/ILW) and scheduling of all activities necessary for the decommissioning of the NPP Krsko are presented. (author)

1996-01-01

44

Decommissioning of NPP A-1  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In this presentation the Operation history of A1 NPP, Project 'Decommissioning of A1 NPP' - I stage, Project 'Decommissioning of A1 NPP ' - II stage and Next stages of Project 'Decommissioning of A1 NPP ' are discussed.

2009-01-01

45

Decommissioning of reprocessing plants  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The paper illustrates, with detailed reference to the BNFL programme at Sellafield, that the decommissioning of full scale reprocessing facilities can be achieved within predicted targets and with technologies and techniques available today. With the experience gained to date and with the organising research and development programmes there can be confidence that the currently operating reprocessing plants can be safely decommissioned. (Author).

Kelly, W.S.; Sheil, A.E. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, Sellafield (United Kingdom)

1995-12-31

46

Decommissioning Unit Cost Data  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for decommissioning at other facilities with similar equipment and labor costs. It also provides techniques for extracting information from limited data using extrapolation and interpolation techniques

2002-01-01

47

Decommissioning Unit Cost Data  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for decommissioning at other facilities with similar equipment and labor costs. It also provides techniques for extracting information from limited data using extrapolation and interpolation techniques.

Sanford, P. C.; Stevens, J. L.; Brandt, R.

2002-02-26

48

Geophysics: Building E5476 decommissiong, Aberdeen Proving Ground. Interim progress report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Building E5476 was one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek and Westwood areas of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May of 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, were conducted around the perimeter of the building to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. The large number of magnetic sources surrounding the building are believed to be contained in construction fill. The smaller anomalies, for the most part, were not imaged with ground radar or by electrical profiling. Large magnetic anomalies near the southwest comer of the building are due to aboveground standpipes and steel-reinforced concrete. Two high-resistivity areas, one projecting northeast from the building and another south of the original structure, may indicate the presence of organic pore fluids in the subsurface. A conductive lineament protruding from the south wall that is enclosed by the southem, high-resistivity feature is not associated with an equivalent magnetic anomaly. Magnetic and electrical anomalies south of the old landfill boundary are probably not associated with the building. The boundary is marked by a band of magnetic anomalies and a conductive zone trending northwest to southeast. The cause of high resistivities in a semicircular area in the southwest comer, within the landfill area, is unexplained.

Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, M.G.; McGinnis, L.D.

1992-11-01

49

Decommissioning: an insurance perspective  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The nuclear insurance pools, through American Nuclear Insurers (ANI) and the Mutual Atomic Energy Liability Underwriters (MAELU), have been providing third-party nuclear liability insurance to the nuclear industry since 1957. Third-party liability and property damage coverage resulting from the nuclear hazard are provided by separate insurance policies issued by the nuclear insurance pools. A liability insurer's view of decommissioning is addressed by discussing the following: insurer's perspective of potential nuclear liability; insurance claim experience and trends; objectives and accomplishments of ANI/MAELU's involvement with facility decommissioning; and important nuclear liability considerations for facility decommissioning

1987-01-01

50

Reactor Facility Decommissioning  

International Science & Technology Center (ISTC)

The Development of Decommissioning of Operation Technology of the Reactor Facility with Research RA Reactor of the Institute of Atomic Energy of the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan.

51

Genetic characterization of Aberdeen Angus cattle using molecular markers  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in english Aberdeen Angus beef cattle from the Brazilian herd were studied genetically using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the kappa-casein - HinfI (CSN3 - HinfI), beta-lactoglobulin - HaeIII (LGB - HaeIII) and growth hormone AluI (GH- AluI) genes, as well as four microsatellites (TEXAN15, CSFM50, BM1224 and BM7160). The RFLP genotypes were determined using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by digestion with restriction endonucleases and electrophores (more) is in agarose gels. With the exception of the microsatellite BM7160, which was analyzed in an automatic sequencer, the PCR products were genotyped by silver staining. The allele and genotype frequencies, heterozygosities and gene diversity were estimated. The values for these parameters of variability were comparable to other cattle breeds. The genetic relationship of the Aberdeen Angus to other breeds (Caracu, Canchim, Charolais, Guzerath, Gyr, Nelore, Santa Gertrudis and Simmental) was investigated using Nei's genetic distance. Cluster analysis placed the Aberdeen Angus in an isolated group in the Bos taurus breeds branch. This fact is in agreement with the geographic origin of this breed.

Vasconcellos, Luciana Pimentel de Mello Klocker; Tambasco-Talhari, Daniella; Pereira, Andréa Pozzi; Coutinho, Luiz Lehmann; Regitano, Luciana Correia de Almeida

2003-01-01

52

Genetic characterization of Aberdeen Angus cattle using molecular markers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Aberdeen Angus beef cattle from the Brazilian herd were studied genetically using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the kappa-casein - HinfI (CSN3 - HinfI), beta-lactoglobulin - HaeIII (LGB - HaeIII) and growth hormone AluI (GH- AluI) genes, as well as four microsatellites (TEXAN15, CSFM50, BM1224 and BM7160). The RFLP genotypes were determined using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by digestion with restriction endonucleases and electrophoresis in agarose gels. With the exception of the microsatellite BM7160, which was analyzed in an automatic sequencer, the PCR products were genotyped by silver staining. The allele and genotype frequencies, heterozygosities and gene diversity were estimated. The values for these parameters of variability were comparable to other cattle breeds. The genetic relationship of the Aberdeen Angus to other breeds (Caracu, Canchim, Charolais, Guzerath, Gyr, Nelore, Santa Gertrudis and Simmental) was investigated using Nei's genetic distance. Cluster analysis placed the Aberdeen Angus in an isolated group in the Bos taurus breeds branch. This fact is in agreement with the geographic origin of this breed.

Vasconcellos Luciana Pimentel de Mello Klocker; Tambasco-Talhari Daniella; Pereira Andréa Pozzi; Coutinho Luiz Lehmann; Regitano Luciana Correia de Almeida

2003-01-01

53

Decommissioning Peach Bottom Unit 1  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Decommissioning activities are described for Peach Bottom Unit No. 1, a 40 mw(e) HTGR demonstration plant owned and operated by the Philadelphia Electric Company. Radiological aspects of decommission are discussed. The application of advance planning and effective health physics techniques used during the Peach Bottom decommission program demonstrated the feasibility of decommissioning a nuclear facility economically at low personnel exposure levels and with a negligible environmental impact

1979-09-19

54

Site decommissioning management plan  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

1993-10-01

55

Decommissioning licensing procedure  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Decommissioning or closure of a nuclear power plant, defined as the fact that takes place from the moment that the plant stops producing for the purpose it was built, is causing preocupation. So this specialist meeting on Regulatory Review seems to be the right place for presenting and discusing the need of considering the decommissioning in the safety analysis report. The main goal of this paper related to the licensing procedure is to suggest the need of a new chapter in the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (P.S.A.R.) dealing with the decommissioning of the nuclear power plant. Therefore, after a brief introduction the problem is exposed from the point of view of nuclear safety and finally a format of the new chapter is proposed. (author)

1979-11-09

56

Site decommissioning management plan  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff's strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites

1993-01-01

57

List of decommissioning work activities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The following outlines the topics discussed under List of Decommissioning Work Activities: (1) decommissioning project work breakdown structure, and (2) decommissioning work activities including prompt removal/dismantling work activities, entombment/delayed dismantling work activities, and mothballing/delayed dismantling work activities

1986-01-01

58

Decommissioning and Decontamination  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The objectives of SCK-CEN's decommissioning and decontamination programme are (1) to develop, test and optimise the technologies and procedures for decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear installations in order to minimise the waste arising and the distributed dose; (2) to optimise the environmental impact; (3) to reduce the cost of the end-of-life of the installation; (4) to make these new techniques available to the industry; (5) to share skills and competences. The programme and achievements in 1999 are summarised.

Massaut, V

2000-07-01

59

Decommissioning of IFEC  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The IFEC nuclear fuel fabrication plant operated in Italy for more then thirty years and has now been successfully decommissioned. The rules and regulations relating to Quality Assurance established during the fabrication of Cirene reactor fuel have been adhered to during the decommissioning phase. The use of personnel with large experience in the nuclear field has resulted in vast majority of cares of material and apparatus to be reutilized in conventional activities without the need of calling on the assistance of external firms. The whole decontamination process was successfully completed on time and in particular the quantity of contaminated wastes was kept to eminimun

1995-01-01

60

Management of decommissioning  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

An overview of the issues involved in decommissioning management in terms of key activities, legislation, options, and options according to regulations is presented in outline. This is followed by figures outlining a case study of the topsides removal of the Amoco NW Hutton Platform. A team exercise exploring the issues in decommissioning a typical offshore platform is set out and 22 figures from a teaching symposium are given. The final section of the paper gives details of legislation and guidelines related to field abandonment. (UK)

Butler, T.

1996-12-31

 
 
 
 
61

Communicating for decommissioning  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

After outlining the basic principles governing communications and their growing importance and role in today`s society, some experiences are given on the application of these principles to decommissioning offshore platforms. The recent example of a project sponsored in the UK and Norway is used to draw particular lessons. (UK)

Smith, L.

1997-11-01

62

Decision time nears. Decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The article relates to the decommissioning of offshore installations in the North Sea area. The political debate has still some way to run, but the next few months will be crucial in deciding whether or not the United Kingdom and Norway stand with or against the rest of Europe regarding solutions for the abandonment of offshore oil and gas installations. 2 figs

1997-01-01

63

Decontamination and decommissioning  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The project scope of work included the complete decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Westinghouse ARD Fuel Laboratories at the Cheswick Site in the shortest possible time. This has been accomplished in the following four phases: (1) preparation of documents and necessary paperwork; packaging and shipping of all special nuclear materials in an acceptable form to a reprocessing agency; (2) decontamination of all facilities, glove boxes and equipment; loading of generated waste into bins, barrels and strong wooden boxes; (3) shipping of all bins, barrels and boxes containing waste to the designated burial site; removal of all utility services from the laboratories; and (4) final survey of remaining facilities and certification for nonrestricted use; preparation of final report. These four phases of work were conducted in accordance with applicable regulations for D and D of research facilities and applicable regulations for packaging, transportation, and burial and storage of radioactive materials. The final result is that the Advanced Fuel Laboratories now meet requirements of ANSI 13.12 and can be released for unrestricted use. The four principal documents utilized in the D and D of the Cheswick Site were: (1) Plan for Fully Decontaminating and Decommissioning, Revision 3; (2) Environmental Assessment for Decontaminating and Decommissioning the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, Pa.; (3) WARD-386, Quality Assurance Program Description for Decontaminating and Decommissioning Activities; and (4) Health Physics, Fire Control, and Site Emergency Manual. These documents are provided as Attachments 1, 2, 3 and 4.

Adams, G.A.; Bowen, W.C.; Cromer, P.M.; Cwynar, J.C.; Jacoby, W.R.; Woodsum, H.G.

1982-02-01

64

Decommissioning at Hanford  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of surplus facilities at Hanford has been ongoing for approximately twenty-three years, beginning with a very modest effort in terms of funding, manpower and equipment. The program has evolved into a very structured, well equipped organization that has become a recognized leader in D&D within the United States Department of Energy (DOE) complex.

Mihalic, M.A.; Jackson, P.K. [Bechtel Hanford, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-12-31

65

Decontamination and decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The project scope of work included the complete decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Westinghouse ARD Fuel Laboratories at the Cheswick Site in the shortest possible time. This has been accomplished in the following four phases: (1) preparation of documents and necessary paperwork; packaging and shipping of all special nuclear materials in an acceptable form to a reprocessing agency; (2) decontamination of all facilities, glove boxes and equipment; loading of generated waste into bins, barrels and strong wooden boxes; (3) shipping of all bins, barrels and boxes containing waste to the designated burial site; removal of all utility services from the laboratories; and (4) final survey of remaining facilities and certification for nonrestricted use; preparation of final report. These four phases of work were conducted in accordance with applicable regulations for D and D of research facilities and applicable regulations for packaging, transportation, and burial and storage of radioactive materials. The final result is that the Advanced Fuel Laboratories now meet requirements of ANSI 13.12 and can be released for unrestricted use. The four principal documents utilized in the D and D of the Cheswick Site were: (1) Plan for Fully Decontaminating and Decommissioning, Revision 3; (2) Environmental Assessment for Decontaminating and Decommissioning the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, Pa.; (3) WARD-386, Quality Assurance Program Description for Decontaminating and Decommissioning Activities; and (4) Health Physics, Fire Control, and Site Emergency Manual. These documents are provided as Attachments 1, 2, 3 and 4.

1982-01-01

66

Particle-accelerator decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Generic considerations involved in decommissioning particle accelerators are examined. There are presently several hundred accelerators operating in the United States that can produce material containing nonnegligible residual radioactivity. Residual radioactivity after final shutdown is generally short-lived induced activity and is localized in hot spots around the beam line. The decommissioning options addressed are mothballing, entombment, dismantlement with interim storage, and dismantlement with disposal. The recycle of components or entire accelerators following dismantlement is a definite possibility and has occurred in the past. Accelerator components can be recycled either immediately at accelerator shutdown or following a period of storage, depending on the nature of induced activation. Considerations of cost, radioactive waste, and radiological health are presented for four prototypic accelerators. Prototypes considered range from small accelerators having minimal amounts of radioactive mmaterial to a very large accelerator having massive components containing nonnegligible amounts of induced activation. Archival information on past decommissionings is presented, and recommendations concerning regulations and accelerator design that will aid in the decommissioning of an accelerator are given

1979-01-01

67

Decommissioning the WAGR  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The planned decommissioning of the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor, which will take about ten years, is discussed with especial reference to the radioactive decay of the reactor components, the problems of disposal of the resulting radioactive waste, and the planning of the necessary engineering works.

Lawton, H. (UKAEA Windscale Nuclear Power Development Labs.)

1982-11-01

68

Decommissioning of nuclear facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Collaborative studies are in progress in the U.K. between the U.K.A.E.A., the Generating Boards and other outside bodies, to identify the development issues and practical aspects of decommissioning redundant nuclear facilities. The various types of U.K.A.E.A. experimental reactors (D.F.R., W.A.G.R , S.G.H.W.R.) in support of the nuclear power development programme, together with the currently operating commercial 26 Magnox reactors in 11 stations, totalling some 5 GW will be retired before the end of the century and attention is focussed on these. The actual timing of withdrawal from service will be dictated by development programme requirements in the case of experimental reactors and by commercial and technical considerations in the case of electricity production reactors. Decommissioning studies have so far been confined to technical appraisals including the sequence logic of achieving specific objectives and are based on the generally accepted three stage progression. Stage 1, which is essentially a defuelling and coolant removal operation, is an interim phase. Stage 2 is a storage situation, the duration of which will be influenced by environmental pressures or economic factors including the re-use of existing sites. Stage 3, which implies removal of all active and non-active waste material and returning the site to general use, must be the ultimate objective. The engineering features and the radioactive inventory of the system must be assessed in detail to avoid personnel or environmental hazards during Stage 2. These factors will also influence decisions on the degree of Stage 2 decommissioning and its duration, bearing in mind that for Stage 3 activation may govern the waste disposal route and the associated radiation man-rem exposure during dismantling. Ideally, planning for decommissioning should be considered at the design stage of the facility. An objective of present studies is to identify features which would assist decommissioning of future systems

1977-05-13

69

Decommissioning in western Europe  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report gives an overview of the situation in Western Europe. The original aim was to focus on organisational and human issues with regard to nuclear reactor decommissioning, but very few articles were found. This is in sharp contrast to the substantial literature on technical issues. While most of the reports on decommissioning have a technical focus, several provide information on regulatory issues, strategies and 'state of the art'. The importance of the human and organizational perspective is however discovered, when reading between the lines of the technical publications, and especially when project managers summarize lessons learned. The results are to a large extent based on studies of articles and reports, mainly collected from the INIS database. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities started already in the sixties, but then mainly research and experimental facilities were concerned. Until now about 70 reactors have been shutdown world-wide. Over the years there have been plenty of conferences for exchanging experiences mostly about technical matters. Waste Management is a big issue. In the 2000s there will be a wave of decommissioning when an increasing amount of reactors will reach the end of their calculated lifetime (40 years, a figure now being challenged by both life-extension and pre-shutdown projects). Several reactors have been shut-down for economical reasons. Shutdown and decommissioning is however not identical. A long period of time can sometimes pass before an owner decides to decommission and dismantle a facility. The conditions will also differ depending on the strategy, 'immediate dismantling' or 'safe enclosure'. If immediate dismantling is chosen the site can reach 'green-field status' in less than ten years. 'Safe enclosure', however, seems to be the most common strategy. There are several pathways, but in general a safe store is constructed, enabling the active parts to remain in safe and waterproof conditions for a longer period of time (sometimes hundred years or more), prior to final demolition. Among the reasons for deferring the dismantling are lack of waste repositories and decreasing dose-rates for the workers. Of Europe's 218 commercial reactors in operation, the majority, 151, are located i the Western part. The biggest producers are France, United Kingdom and Germany, with 58, 35 and 20 reactors respectively. Until now mostly research- and pilot reactors have been shut-down. There are yet few experiences from decommissioning of large-scale commercial reactors. The following commercial reactors are undergoing decommissioning. (There are also a great amount of nuclear facilities of other types being decommissioned.) The three gas-cooled twin reactor plants of Berkeley, Trawsfynydd and Hunterston in UK. In Germany Gundremmingen, Lingen, Kahl and Wuergassen are being decommissioned. All of them are located in the Western part of the country. The biggest project is however the dismantling of the gigantic Greifswald facility situated on the coast of the Baltic see in former Eastern Germany. The plant has eight Russian built reactors of VVER-type. Like the rest of the former GDR-plants Greifswald was shutdown after the reunification in 1990. The strategy chosen is immediate dismantling. France is decommissioning seven reactors (Chooz A1, Chinon A1, A2, A3, St Laurent A1, A2 and Bugey 1.) The oldest, Chinon A1, closed down in 1973 and the youngest, Bugey 1, in 1994. Italy closed down all NPPs (altogether four) in 1987 after a referendum. The first reactor of the Netherlands was shutdown in 1997 mainly for economical reasons. The development of a free European electricity market will make it less profitable to run certain facilities. Vandelos 1 in Spain is undergoing decommissioning after a fire in the turbines in 1989. IAEA, OECD/NEA and EU are co-operating in the field of decommissioning. Much work is spent on harmonizing rules and preparing international guidelines. The international agencies now consider decommissioning of nuclear facilities to be technically unproblematic. Decommissi

1999-01-01

70

Planning for decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The following conclusions can be drawn: decommissioning of large commercial nuclear power plants is technical feasible. It can be done within the frame of licensing regulations. Costs for decommissioning will be high; however the overall economic advantages of nuclear power are not considerably influenced. Search for suitable storage facilities and transport methods for large quantities and large dimensions should be started in an early stage. Tools and processes for cutting and conditioning of large radioactive components are still to be developed in detail. (orig.)[de] Die folgenden Schlussfolgerungen koennen gezogen werden: die Stillegung eines grossen kommerziellen Kernkraftwerkes ist technisch moeglich. Sie kann innerhalb der Genehmigungsvorschriften erfolgen. Stillegungskosten werden hoch sein; die wirtschaftlichen Vorteile der Atomenergie als Ganzes werden nicht nennenswert beeinflusst. Mit der Suche nach geeigneten Lagerungsmoeglichkeiten und Transportmethoden fuer grosse Mengen und Laengenmasse sollte frueh begonnen werden. Hochentwickelte Werkzeuge und Methoden fuer das Schneiden und Aufbereiten von grossen radioaktiven Komponenten muessen noch hergestellt werden. (orig.)

1975-09-08

71

Decommissioning and decontamination studies  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The decommissioning of retired Hanford facilities requires careful consideration of environmentally-related factors. Applicable ecology programs have been designed to: develop the technology associated with burial ground stabilization, thereby minimizing biotic access and transport of radioactive wastes and, characterize present 300 Area burial grounds to ascertain the potential biotic transport of waste materials away from managed facilities. Results are reported from studies on the role of plants, small mammals, and ants as potential transport vectors of radionuclides from radioactive waste burial grounds

1978-01-01

72

Decommissioning of nuclear submarines  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The intention of this Report is to set out in simple terms the options open to the Ministry of Defence in disposing of nuclear submarines, and the extent of the problem. To this end oral evidence was taken from United Kingdom Nirex Limited (Nirex) and from the Ministry of Defence, and written evidence was taken from MoD, Nirex, the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority and Rolls-Royce and Associates Limited. The immediate problem is what to do with the nuclear submarine, DREADNOUGHT. Since decommissioning in 1982, the submarine has been lying at Rosyth Naval Base on the Firth of Forth. Upon decommissioning, the highly radioactive reactor core with the uranium fuel was removed and transported to the Sellafield reprocessing plant. The remaining radioactive part is the reactor compartment and it is the size of this, not its level of radioactivity which makes it hard to deal with. By the year 2000 a further seven nuclear submarines will have been decommissioned. There are three main options for disposing of the reactor compartments; dumping at sea, land burial in a shallow trench and land burial in a deep repository. Dumping at sea is the option favoured by the Ministry of Defence and Government, but shallow land burial remains an option. Deep burial is not an option which is available immediately as there will not be a repository ready until 2005. (author).

1989-06-21

73

Fort St. Vrain decommissioning project  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo), owner of the Fort St. Vrain nuclear generating station, achieved its final decommissioning goal on August 5, 1997 when the Nuclear Regulatory Commission terminated the Part 50 reactor license. PSCo pioneered and completed the world's first successful decommissioning of a commercial nuclear power plant after many years of operation. In August 1989, PSCo decided to permanently shutdown the reactor and proceed with its decommissioning. The decision to proceed with early dismantlement as the appropriate decommissioning method proved wise for all stake holders - present and future - by mitigating potential environmental impacts and reducing financial risks to company shareholders, customers, employees, neighboring communities and regulators. We believe that PSCo's decommissioning process set an exemplary standard for the world's nuclear industry and provided leadership, innovation, advancement and distinguished contributions to other decommissioning efforts throughout the world. (author)

1998-01-01

74

Decommissioning of nuclear power facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This is the first manual in Ukraine giving the complete review of the decommissioning process of the nuclear power facilities including the issues of the planning, design documentation development, advanced technology description. On the base of the international and domestic experience, the issues on the radwaste management, the decontamination methods, the equipment dismantling, the remote technology application, and also the costs estimate at decommissioning are considered. The special attention to the personnel safety provision, population and environment at decommissioning process is paid.

2005-01-01

75

Decommissioning funding: ethics, implementation, uncertainties  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] This status report on Decommissioning Funding: Ethics, Implementation, Uncertainties also draws on the experience of the NEA Working Party on Decommissioning and Dismantling (WPDD). The report offers, in a concise form, an overview of relevant considerations on decommissioning funding mechanisms with regard to ethics, implementation and uncertainties. Underlying ethical principles found in international agreements are identified, and factors influencing the accumulation and management of funds for decommissioning nuclear facilities are discussed together with the main sources of uncertainties of funding systems. (authors)

2006-01-01

76

The impact of oil on the Scottish economy with particular reference to the Aberdeen economy  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The establishment of the North Sea oil industry over the last 20 years has had far reaching and dramatic effects upon the whole Scottish economy but especially upon those areas where oil related activity is geographically concentrated. This chapter discusses the impact of oil on the Scottish economy with particular reference to developments in the Aberdeen area. It is comprised of five main sections. The first outlines the way in which the oil industry has developed in Britain, noting that, despite rapid growth, there have been many lost opportunities. The impact of oil related developments in Scotland is discussed next before the focus narrows to the Aberdeen economy. The third section describes the familiar benefits of oil developments in Aberdeen while the fourth section analyses some of the less familiar costs. Finally, there is some discussion of the way in which the gains and losses of oil developments in Aberdeen have been distributed. (author)

1992-01-01

77

Civilian Talent Management: A Proposed Approach for the Aberdeen Proving Ground Workforce.  

Science.gov (United States)

The Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) act of 2005 presents extraordinary challenges for the workforce at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland. In total, over 5,000 government civilian positions will be relocated to APG, and many will arrive unencumbe...

R. S. Cozby

2010-01-01

78

78 FR 60238 - Proposed Modification and Establishment of Restricted Areas; Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD  

Science.gov (United States)

...beginning. Designated altitudes. Surface 10,000 feet MSL. Time of designation. Continuous. Controlling agency. FAA, Potomac TRACON. Using agency. U.S. Army, Commander, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD. Issued in Washington, DC, on September 24,...

2013-10-01

79

Workshop on decommissioning; Seminarium om avveckling  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A Nordic workshop on decommissioning of nuclear facilities was held at Risoe in Denmark September 13-15, 2005. The workshop was arranged by NKS in cooperation with the company Danish Decommissioning, DD, responsible for decommissioning of nuclear facilities at Risoe. Oral presentations were made within the following areas: International and national recommendations and requirements concerning decommissioning of nuclear facilities Authority experiences of decommissioning cases Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Denmark Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Sweden Plans for decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Norway Plans for decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Finland Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in German and the UK Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the former Soviet Union Results from research and development A list with proposals for future work within NKS has been prepared based on results from group-work and discussions. The list contains strategic, economical and political issues, technical issues and issues regarding competence and communication. (au)

Broden, K. (ed.)

2005-12-15

80

Decommissioning Funding: Ethics, Implementation, Uncertainties  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] This status report on decommissioning funding: ethics, implementation, uncertainties is based on a review of recent literature and materials presented at NEA meetings in 2003 and 2004, and particularly at a topical session organised in November 2004 on funding issues associated with the decommissioning of nuclear power facilities. The report also draws on the experience of the NEA Working Party on Decommissioning and Dismantling (WPDD). This report offers, in a concise form, an overview of relevant considerations on decommissioning funding mechanisms with regard to ethics, implementation and uncertainties. Underlying ethical principles found in international agreements are identified, and factors influencing the accumulation and management of funds for decommissioning nuclear facilities are discussed together with the main sources of uncertainties of funding systems

2007-01-01

 
 
 
 
81

Designing Reactors to Facilitate Decommissioning  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Critics of nuclear power often cite issues with tail-end-of-the-fuel-cycle activities as reasons to oppose the building of new reactors. In fact, waste disposal and the decommissioning of large nuclear reactors have proven more challenging than anticipated. In the early days of the nuclear power industry the design and operation of various reactor systems was given a great deal of attention. Little effort, however, was expended on end-of-the-cycle activities, such as decommissioning and disposal of wastes. As early power and test reactors have been decommissioned difficulties with end-of-the-fuel-cycle activities have become evident. Even the small test reactors common at the INEEL were not designed to facilitate their eventual decontamination, decommissioning, and dismantlement. The results are that decommissioning of these facilities is expensive, time consuming, relatively hazardous, and generates large volumes of waste. This situation clearly supports critics concerns about building a new generation of power reactors.

Richard H. Meservey

2006-06-01

82

Geophysical study of the Building 103 Dump, Aberdeen Proving Ground  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Building 103 Dump is one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek and Westwood areas of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May of 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, resistivity, ground-penetrating radar, and seismic refraction, were conducted. These surveys indicate that much of the area is free of debris. However, prominent magnetic and resistivity anomalies occur along well-defined lineaments, suggestive of a dendritic stream pattern. Prior to the onset of dumping, the site was described as a ``sand pit,`` which suggests that headward erosion of Canal Creek tributaries cut into the surficial aquifer. Contaminants dumped into the landfill would have direct access to the surficial aquifer and thus to Canal Creek. Seismic refraction profiling indicates 6--12 ft of fill material now rests on the former land surface. Only the northern third of the former landfill was geophysically surveyed.

McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, M.G.

1992-12-01

83

Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Projects program  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The objective of the Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Projects (ENFDP) program is to provide the NRC licensing staff with data which will allow an assessment of radiation exposure during decommissioning and the implementation of ALARA techniques. The data will also provide information to determine the funding level necessary to ensure timely and safe decommissioning operations. Actual decommissioning costs, methods and radiation exposures are compared with those estimated by the Battelle-PNL and ORNL NUREGs on decommissioning. Exposure reduction techniques applied to decommissioning activities to meet ALARA objectives are described. The lessons learned concerning various decommissioning methods are evaluated.

Baumann, B.L.

1983-09-09

84

Nuclear installations: decommissioning and dismantling  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] This document is a compilation of seven talks given during the 1995 EUROFORUM conference about decommissioning and dismantling of Nuclear installations in the European Community. The first two papers give a detailed description of the legal, financial and regulatory framework of decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities in the European Union and a review of the currently available decommissioning techniques for inventory, disassembly, decontamination, remote operations and management of wastes. Other papers describe some legal and technical aspects of reactor and plants dismantling in UK, Germany, Spain and France. (J.S.)

1995-01-01

85

Sellafield decommissioning. A practical success  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A strategic overview of the decommissioning programme being carried out at BNFL`s Sellafield site in Cumbria is presented. The programme involves a wide variety of nuclear facilities including several types of plutonium plants, a complete spent fuel reprocessing plant, a spent fuel storage pond and de-canning facility, the Windscale Pile Reactor `chimneys` and a range of other plants. Current status is shown. Programme strategy development is discussed and the lessons learned through practical experience are highlighted. Concurrent with the decommissioning programme there is an extensive research and development programme and its impact on the practical decommissioning work is also referenced. (authors) 3 refs.

Davage, R.; Sheil, F.; Fleming, P. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, Risley (United Kingdom)

1995-12-31

86

Progress of JPDR decommissioning project  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR) decommissioning project is progressively achieving its final goal; the project will be finished by March 1996 to release the JPDR's site into unrestricted use in a green field condition. The new techniques which developed or improved in R and D, the first phase of this program, have been successfully applied to the actual dismantling activities. Some decommissioning wastes have been managed as the first case of onsite shallow land burial based on the new regulatory frame of radioactive waste management. The experiences and the data obtained from the JPDR dismantling activities are expected to contribute to future decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. (author).

1995-01-01

87

Corporate considerations in mine decommissioning  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The decision to proceed with mine decommissioning, generally involves a number of complex and independent factors. These factors, including potential for re-opening, legal requirements, contingent liability, asset depreciation, due diligence, and public relations are discussed in the context of the financial implications on a net-present-value basis. It is concluded that the decision to delay mine decommissioning is commonly not in the best financial interests of the mine operator. Some measures to reduce decommissioning costs and expedite the process are presented. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

Brodie, M.J. [Golder Associates Ltd., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

1995-04-01

88

Progress of JPDR decommissioning project  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR) decommissioning project is progressively achieving its final goal; the project will be finished by March 1996 to release the JPDR`s site into unrestricted use in a green field condition. The new techniques which developed or improved in R and D, the first phase of this program, have been successfully applied to the actual dismantling activities. Some decommissioning wastes have been managed as the first case of onsite shallow land burial based on the new regulatory frame of radioactive waste management. The experiences and the data obtained from the JPDR dismantling activities are expected to contribute to future decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. (author).

Kiyota, M.; Yanagihara, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

1995-07-01

89

Decommissioning Cost Assessment  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The future costs for dismantling, decommissioning and handling of associated radioactive waste of nuclear installations represents substantial liabilities. It is the generations that benefits from the use of nuclear installations that shall carry the financial burden. Nuclear waste programmes have occasionally encountered set-backs related to the trust from society. This has resulted in delayed, redirected or halted activities, which has the common denominator of costs increases. In modern democratic countries, information sharing, knowledge transfer and open communication about costs for the management of radioactive waste are prerequisites for the task to develop modern methods for public participation and thus to develop well-founded and justified confidence for further development of nuclear energy. Nuclear and radiation safety Authorities have a clear role to provide unbiased information on any health, safety, financial and environmental related issues. This task requires a good understanding of the values and opinion of the public, and especially those of the younger generation.

Labor, Bea

2012-11-01

90

Decommissioning Cost Assessment  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The future costs for dismantling, decommissioning and handling of associated radioactive waste of nuclear installations represents substantial liabilities. It is the generations that benefits from the use of nuclear installations that shall carry the financial burden. Nuclear waste programmes have occasionally encountered set-backs related to the trust from society. This has resulted in delayed, redirected or halted activities, which has the common denominator of costs increases. In modern democratic countries, information sharing, knowledge transfer and open communication about costs for the management of radioactive waste are prerequisites for the task to develop modern methods for public participation and thus to develop well-founded and justified confidence for further development of nuclear energy. Nuclear and radiation safety Authorities have a clear role to provide unbiased information on any health, safety, financial and environmental related issues. This task requires a good understanding of the values and opinion of the public, and especially those of the younger generation

2012-01-01

91

Decontamination & decommissioning focus area  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

NONE

1996-08-01

92

Classification of reactor decommissioning wastes  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Nuclear wastes from the conceptual decommissioning of a reference PWR and a reference BWR have been analyzed in terms of the waste classification requirements of 10 CFR 61 to determine the suitability of these wastes for disposal by shallow-land burial. Most of the nuclear waste from LWR decommissioning (approximately 80% to 98% of the total waste volume, depending on reactor type and decommissioning alternative) is considered to have radionuclide concentrations that permit its classification as Class A waste. A relatively small amount of the waste (approximately 1% to 15% of the total waste volume, depending on reactor type and decommissioning alternative) is considered to be Class B waste. Some neutron-activated stainless-steel reactor vessel internals with high concentrations of 59Ni, 63Ni, and 94Nb are considered to be Class C waste or waste that exceeds Class C limits

1985-01-01

93

Classification of reactor decommissioning wastes  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Nuclear wastes expected from the conceptual decommissioning of a reference PWR and a reference BWR have been reviewed in terms of the waste classification requirements of 10 CFR 61 to determine the suitability of these wastes for disposal by shallowland burial. Most of the nuclear waste from LWR decommissioning (approximately 80% to 98% of the total waste volume, depending on reactor type and decommissioning alternative) is considered to have radionuclide concentrations that permit its classification as Class A waste. A relatively small amount of the waste (approximately 1% to 15% of the total waste volume, depending on reactor type and decommissioning alternative) is considered to be Class B waste. Some neutron-activated stainless-steel reactor vessel internals with high concentrations of 59Ni, 63Ni, and 94Nb are considered to be either Class C waste or waste that exceeds Class C limits

1985-01-01

94

Decommissioning of the Loviisa NPP  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Imatran Voima Oy has revised the decommissioning plan for the Loviisa Nuclear Power Plant (Loviisa 1 and Loviisa 2) by the end of the year 1998. The thermal power of the power plant has been increased to 2x1500 MWth, and the life time has been designed to be extended to 45 years in the decommissioning plan. The decommissioning of the power plant is designed to begin in 2022 and it will be finished in 2048. The plan is based on immediate dismantlement (i.e. DECON) after the shut down of the power plant. Experienced plant personnel will still be available to lead the decommissioning work. Only the radioactive plant systems, components and structures will be dismantled and disposed of. Decommissioning wastes will be disposed into the underground disposal tunnels situating at the site in the depth of about 110 m. These tunnels are already partly ready for power plant wastes. The big and heavy reactor components, e.g. pressure vessels and steam generators, will be disposed of as such, without cutting them into smaller parts. This saves time and radiation doses. The total volume of decommissioning wastes is 14 800 m3, when packed in boxes. The manpower needed for decommissioning is about 2 800 manyears. The collective radiation dose for personnel is estimated to be about 9.2 manSv. The cost estimate of the decommissioning is about 1 117 million FIM. The spent fuel will be stored at the plant for 20 years after the shut down of the power plant. After that it will be transported from the site to the encapsulation plant for final disposal. (orig.)

1998-01-01

95

Tradução e adaptação cultural do Questionário Aberdeen para Veias Varicosas/ Translation and cultural adaptation of Aberdeen Varicose Veins Questionnaire  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese CONTEXTO: Atualmente há um crescente interesse por instrumentos de avaliação em saúde produzidos e validados em todo o mundo. Apesar disso, ainda não temos no Brasil instrumentos que avaliem o impacto da doença venosa crônica na vida de seu portador. Para utilização dessas medidas torna-se necessária a realização da tradução e da adaptação cultural ao idioma em questão. OBJETIVO: Traduzir e adaptar culturalmente para a população brasileira o Aberdeen Va (more) ricose Veins Questionnaire (AVVQ- Brasil). MÉTODOS: O processo consistiu de duas traduções e duas retrotraduções realizadas por tradutores independentes, da avaliação das versões seguida da elaboração de versão consensual e de pré-teste comentado. RESULTADOS: Os pacientes do pré-teste eram do sexo feminino, com média de idade de 49,9 anos, média de tempo de resposta 7,73 minutos, que variou entre 4,55 minutos (tempo mínimo) a 10,13 minutos (tempo máximo). Escolaridade: 20% analfabetismo funcional, 1º grau completo e 2º grau completo; 30% 1º grau incompleto; e 10% 3º grau completo. Gravidade clínica 40% C3 e C6S, 10% C2 e C5, havendo cinco termos incompreendidos na aplicação. CONCLUSÕES: A versão na língua portuguesa do Aberdeen Varicose Veins Questionnaire está traduzida e adaptada para uso na população brasileira, podendo ser utilizada após posterior análise de suas propriedades clinimétricas. Abstract in english BACKGROUND: Currently there is a growing interest in health assessment tools produced and validated throughout the world. Nevertheless, it is still inadequate the number of instruments that assess the impact of chronic venous disease in the life of its bearer. To use these measures it is necessary to accomplish the translation and cultural adaptation to the language in question. OBJECTIVE: Translate to Portuguese and culturally adapted for the Brazilian population the Abe (more) rdeen Varicose Veins Questionnaire (AVVQ-Brazil). METHODS: The process consisted of two translations and two back-translations performed by freelance translators, then the evaluation versions of the development of consensual version and commented pretest. RESULTS: The patients in the pre-test were female, mean age 49.9 years, average response time of 7.73 minutes, which ranged from 4.55 minutes (minimum) to 10.13 minutes (maximum time). Education: 20% functional illiteracy and first and second complete degrees; 30% first incomplete degree, and 10% third complete degree. Clinical severity: 40% C3 and C6s, 10% C2 and C5, with five misunderstood terms in the application. CONCLUSION: The Portuguese version of the Aberdeen Varicose Veins Questionnaire has been translated and adapted for use in the Brazilian population, and can be used after further analysis of their clinimetric properties, which is underway.

Leal, Flávia de Jesus; Couto, Renata Cardoso; Pitta, Guilherme Benjamin Brandão; Leite, Priscilla Tosatti Ferreira; Costa, Larissa Maranhão; Higino, Wesley J. F.; Sousa, Marina Sandrelle Correia de

2012-03-01

96

Environmental geophysics at Beach Point, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Geophysical studies at Beach Point Peninsula, in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, provide diagnostic signatures of the hydrogeologic framework and possible contaminant pathways. These studies permit construction of the most reasonable scenario linking dense, nonaqueous-phase liquid contaminants introduced at the surface with their pathway through the surficial aquifer. Subsurface geology and contaminant presence were identified by drilling, outcrop mapping, and groundwater sampling and analyses. Suspected sources of near-surface contaminants were defined by magnetic and conductivity measurements. Negative conductivity anomalies may be associated with unlined trenches. Positive magnetic and conductivity anomalies outline suspected tanks and pipes. The anomalies of greatest concern are those spatially associated with a concrete slab that formerly supported a mobile clothing impregnating plant. Resistivity and conductivity profiling and depth soundings were used to identify an electrical anomaly extending through the surficial aquifer to the basal pleistocene unconformity, which was mapped by using seismic reflection methods. The anomaly may be representative of a contaminant plume connected to surficial sources. Major activities in the area included liquid rocket fuel tests, rocket fuel fire suppression tests, pyrotechnic material and smoke generator tests, and the use of solvents at a mobile clothing impregnating plant.

McGinnis, L.D.; Daudt, C.R.; Thompson, M.D.; Miller, S.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Reclamation Engineering and Geosciences Section; Mandell, W.A. [Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Wrobel, J. [Dept. of Defense, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

1994-07-01

97

Environmental geophysics, offshore Bush River Peninsula, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Geophysical studies in shallow waters adjacent to the Bush River Peninsula, Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, have delineated the extent of waste disposal sites and established a hydrogeologic framework, which may control contaminant transport offshore. These studies indicate that during the Pleistocene Epoch, alternating stands of high and low sea levels resulted in a complex pattern of shallow channel-fill deposits around the Bush River Peninsula. Ground-penetrating radar studies reveal paleochannels greater than 50 ft deep. Some of the paleochannels are also imaged with marine seismic reflection. Conductivity highs measured with the EM-31 are also indicative of paleochannels. This paleochannel depositional system is environmentally significant because it may control the shallow groundwater flow regime beneath the peninsula. Magnetic, conductivity, and side-scan sonar anomalies outline anthropogenic anomalies in the study area. On the basis of geophysical data, underwater anthropogenic materials do exist in some isolated areas, but large-scale offshore dumping has not occurred in the area studied.

Miller, S.F.; Kuecher, G.J.; Davies, B.E. [and others

1995-11-01

98

Nuclear industry moves into decommissioning at WAGR  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Outlines briefly work on decommissioning the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor. The reactor was closed down in 1981 and work started on decommissioning in 1990. The main contractor is BNFL Magnox Generation.

Hodgson, Steve

2000-01-01

99

State of decommissioning process in Romania  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In Romania, there are several installations that arrived at the decommissioning stage. These installations are: VVR-S research reactor, Sub critical Assembly HELEN, and Zero Power Reactor (RP-0). In this paper, the methods the Romanian Regulatory Body is developing the legal framework for decommissioning process of nuclear installations are described. There is a draft of decommissioning norms for research reactors. This regulation provides each stage of decommissioning and requirements for decommissioning plan. Also, CNCAN has evaluated and made requirements for completion of a VVR-S research reactor decommissioning plan submitted by IFIN-HH. Further, the reasons for which the decommissioning plan was rejected and requirements that the owner of VVR-S research reactor must fulfil in order to receive decommissioning licence are presented. (author)

2002-01-01

100

Environmental geophysics at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Geophysical data collected at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, were used in the characterization of the natural hydrogeologic framework of the J-Field area and in the identification of buried disturbances (trenches and other evidences of contamination). Seismic refraction and reflection data and electrical resistivity data have aided in the characterization of the leaky confining unit at the base of the surficial aquifer (designated Unit B of the Tertiary Talbot Formation). Excellent reflectors have been observed for both upper and lower surfaces of Unit B that correspond to stratigraphic units observed in boreholes and on gamma logs. Elevation maps of both surfaces and an isopach map of Unit B, created from reflection data at the toxic burning pits site, show a thickening of Unit B to the east. Abnormally low seismic compressional-wave velocities suggest that Unit B consists of gassy sediments whose gases are not being flushed by upward or downward moving groundwater. The presence of gases suggests that Unit B serves as an efficient aquitard that should not be penetrated by drilling or other activities. Electromagnetic, total-intensity magnetic, and ground-penetrating radar surveys have aided in delineating the limits of two buried trenches, the VX burning pit and the liquid smoke disposal pit, both located at the toxic burning pits site. The techniques have also aided in determining the extent of several other disturbed areas where soils and materials were pushed out of disposal pits during trenching activities. Surveys conducted from the Prototype Building west to the Gunpowder River did not reveal any buried trenches.

Daudt, C.R.; McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.

1994-11-01

 
 
 
 
101

Fort St. Vrain decommissioning experience  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Nuclear plant decommissioning represents a significant expenditure of time and resources for nuclear utilities. Public Service Company of Colorado (PSC) is in the process of completing the decommissioning of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) Nuclear Station, the first large-scale commercial nuclear plant to be decommissioned under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) 1988 decommissioning rule. PSC's experience has included dispositioning spent fuel, choosing a decommissioning alternative, and actively decommissioning the plant from dismantlement and decontamination through final survey. When the plant was prematurely shut down in August 1989, PSC's initial task was to find a storage location for FSV's spent fuel. PSC had a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to ship FSV spent fuel to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and all previously removed spent fuel had been shipped there. However, Idaho legally blocked further FSV spent-fuel shipments to INEL, and PSC decided to license and build an on-site, passively cooled independent spent-fuel storage installation (ISFSI). By June 1992, all FSV spent fuel was transferred from the reactor building to the ISFSI. PSC has been able to use low-level radioactive waste (LLWR) disposal facilities in the Northwest Compact, and disposal costs are within estimates. Industrial and radiological safety have been emphasized throughout the project, and performance in these areas has been outstanding. PSC has obtained NRC Aprilproval of a final survey plan that allows for many of the plant's components and systems to remain in place, and final survey activities are nearing completion. PSC is in the process of repowering the facility with natural gas-fired combustion turbines and heat recovery boilers. The first combustion turbine was placed in service Ap 30, 1996.

1996-01-01

102

Fort St. Vrain decommissioning experience  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Nuclear plant decommissioning represents a significant expenditure of time and resources for nuclear utilities. Public Service Company of Colorado (PSC) is in the process of completing the decommissioning of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) Nuclear Station, the first large-scale commercial nuclear plant to be decommissioned under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) 1988 decommissioning rule. PSC`s experience has included dispositioning spent fuel, choosing a decommissioning alternative, and actively decommissioning the plant from dismantlement and decontamination through final survey. When the plant was prematurely shut down in August 1989, PSC`s initial task was to find a storage location for FSV`s spent fuel. PSC had a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to ship FSV spent fuel to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and all previously removed spent fuel had been shipped there. However, Idaho legally blocked further FSV spent-fuel shipments to INEL, and PSC decided to license and build an on-site, passively cooled independent spent-fuel storage installation (ISFSI). By June 1992, all FSV spent fuel was transferred from the reactor building to the ISFSI. PSC has been able to use low-level radioactive waste (LLWR) disposal facilities in the Northwest Compact, and disposal costs are within estimates. Industrial and radiological safety have been emphasized throughout the project, and performance in these areas has been outstanding. PSC has obtained NRC Aprilproval of a final survey plan that allows for many of the plant`s components and systems to remain in place, and final survey activities are nearing completion. PSC is in the process of repowering the facility with natural gas-fired combustion turbines and heat recovery boilers. The first combustion turbine was placed in service Ap 30, 1996.

Fisher, M.J.; Holmes, M.H. [Public Service Company of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States); Chestnutt, S.W. [Colorado Public Service Co., Platteville, CO (United States)

1996-12-31

103

Seminar on decommissioning at Visby 1983  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The Swedish National Institute of Radiation Protection arranged a nordic seminar on decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Current experience from decommissioning of a reprocessing pilot plant, and from research reactors were presented. Strategies for decommissioning and for deposition after early and after late shut-down of reactors was discussed. Research priorities were assessed. (P.Aa.)

1983-01-01

104

Platform decommissioning. Environmental challenges and practical solutions  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The publication gives a short introduction of platform decommissioning, followed by an overview of what to be decommissioned and removed. This will be followed by some of the vital technologies and methods within decommissioning, abandonment of wells, removal and handling of remains that is reuse and scrapping. A final presentation with a view of current research and developments is given. 3 figs

1998-01-01

105

Decommissioning of uranium conversion plant  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Since about 20 years have passed after the construction of the uranium conversion plant, most equipments installed have worn out. Liquid wastes stored in lagoons which were generated during the operation of this plant are needed to be treated safely. Therefore, the decommissioning project on the uranium conversion plant was started from 2001. This study is a preliminary step for the decommissioning of the uranium conversion plant. It was reviewed on the plant status overall, especially facility descriptions and operational histories for the installations located inside and outside of the plant and methods of decontamination and of dismantling to the contamination conditions. And some proper options on each main object was proposed.

106

Decommissioning of uranium conversion plant  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Since about 20 years have passed after the construction of the uranium conversion plant, most equipments installed have worn out. Liquid wastes stored in lagoons which were generated during the operation of this plant are needed to be treated safely. Therefore, the decommissioning project on the uranium conversion plant was started from 2001. This study is a preliminary step for the decommissioning of the uranium conversion plant. It was reviewed on the plant status overall, especially facility descriptions and operational histories for the installations located inside and outside of the plant and methods of decontamination and of dismantling to the contamination conditions. And some proper options on each main object was proposed.

Choi, Y. D.; Hwang, D. S.; Lee, K. I.; Jeong, W. S.; Park, J. H.; Hwang, S. T.; Jeong, K. J. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

2001-10-01

107

Decommissioning strategy for Brennilis France  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Brennilis is a heavy water moderated - gas cooled reactor with a capacity of 70 MWe. It is located in Brittany and has been jointly operated from 1967 to 1985 by EDF and CEA as an industrial prototype. The reactor was definitely shutdown in 1985. At that time, the decommissioning strategy was to reach the level 2 defined by IAEA for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, i.e. partial and conditional release of the installation, about ten years after final shutdown and then leave the reactor building in safe store condition for about 30 to 40 years to benefit from radioactive decay. (author)

2004-01-01

108

Focused Feasibility Study for the White Phosphorus Pits, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.  

Science.gov (United States)

The White Phosphorus Burning Pits (WPP) Area of Concern (AOC) is a site of about 5.5 acres (2.2 ha) located in the J-Field Study Area, in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland. Considerable information about the WPP exists as a resu...

B. Davies L. Martino

2007-01-01

109

Antibodies and the Aberdeen typhoid outbreak of 1964: I. The Widal reaction  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The outbreak of typhoid fever in Aberdeen during 1964 (Walker, 1965) presented an opportunity to study the antibody titres of typhoid fever patients and of TAB immunized individuals to obtain further knowledge concerning the behaviour of these titres with the passage of time.

Brodie, J.

110

Information Support for Storage Decommission  

International Science & Technology Center (ISTC)

Decision - Making Information Support of Territory Remediation in the Course of Decommissioning Temporary Radioactive Waste Storage Sites in the Northwestern Region of Russia. Elaboration of an Environmental Monitoring System for Enterprises Involved in Treating and Storing Low- and Intermediate- Radioactive Wastes in the Region

111

Decommissioning: a problem or a challenge?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available With the ageing of nuclear facilities or the reduced interest in their further operation, a new set of problems, related to the decommissioning of these facilities, has come into forefront. In many cases it turns out that the preparations for decommissioning have come too late, and that financial resources for covering decommissioning activities have not been provided. To avoid such problems, future liailities should be thoroughly estimated in drawing up the decommissioning and waste management programme for each nuclear facility in time, and financial provisions for implementing such programme should be provided. In this paper a presentation of current decommissioning experience in Slovenia is given. The main problems and difficulties in decommissioning of the Žirovski Vrh Uranium Mine are exposed and the lesson learned from this case is presented. The preparation of the decommissioning programme for the Nuclear Power Plant Krško is also described, and the situation at the TRIGA research reactor is briefly discussed.

Mele Irena

2004-01-01

112

76 FR 15936 - Opportunity for Designation in the Aberdeen, SD; Decatur, IL; Hastings, NE; Fulton, IL; the State...  

Science.gov (United States)

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration Opportunity for Designation in the Aberdeen, SD; Decatur, IL; Hastings, NE; Fulton, IL; the State of Missouri, and the State of South Carolina Areas; Request for...

2011-03-22

113

Status of the NRC Decommissioning Program  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

On July 21, 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published the final rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination (the License Termination Rule or LTR) as Subpart E to 10 CFR Part 20. NRC regulations require that materials licensees submit Decommissioning Plans to support the decommissioning of its facility if it is required by license condition, or if the procedures and activities necessary to carry out the decommissioning have not been approved by NRC and these procedures could increase the potential health and safety impacts to the workers or the public. NRC regulations also require that reactor licensees submit Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Reports and License Termination Plans to support the decommissioning of nuclear power facilities. This paper provides an update on the status of the NRC's decommissioning program that was presented during WM'02. It discusses the staff's current efforts to streamline the decommissioning process, current issues being faced in the decommissioning program, such as partial site release and restricted release of sites, as well as the status of the decommissioning of complex sites and those listed in the Site Decommissioning Management Plan. The paper discusses the status of permanently shut-down commercial power reactors and the transfer of complex decommissioning sites and sites listed on the SDMP to Agreement States. Finally the paper provides an update of the status of various tools and guidance the NRC is developing to assist licensees during decommissioning, including an effort to consolidate and risk-inform decommissioning guidance.

Orlando, D. A.; Camper, L.; Buckley, J.; Pogue, E.; Banovac, K.

2003-02-24

114

Decommissioning Swedish nuclear power plants  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

'The problems of decommissioning nuclear power plants in Sweden and studying what to do with the wastes have been handed over to SKB, a subsidiary of the companies that produce electricity with atomic energy. Several general studies were conducted from 1979 to 1994. Between 2000-2005, studies are to be made of each plant. A methodology for dismantling these stations has been defined that uses proven techniques and entails assessing costs. It is based on the hypothesis that decommissioning should start once nuclear fuel has been removed. This approach is still theoretical since no timetable has been set for demolishing reactors; but Sweden already has the technical know-how and financial means necessary for these operations. (author)

115

Decommissioning of uranium mill facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The milling of radioactive ores results in contaminated buildings and facilities which must be decommissioned, and large quantities of tailings which must be managed safely so that residual environmental and health risks do not exceed acceptable levels. In the south of Spain on the outskirts of the town of Andujar an inactive uranium mill facility is under decommissioning. Mill equipment, buildings and process facilities have been dismantled and demolished and the resulting metal wastes and debris have been placed in the pile. The tailing mass is being reshaped by flattening the sideslopes and a cover system will be placed over the pile. This paper describes the safety aspects and technical approaches which are being used for the remediation and closure of the Andujar mill site. (author). 7 figs

1995-01-01

116

Planning activities for ANPP decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Armenian NPP consists of two WWER-440, model 270 pressurized water reactors. After an earthquake in northern Armenia in December 1988 both units were shut down for safety reasons: Unit 1 in February 1988, Unit 2 in March 1989, respectively. Unit 2 was restarted in November 1995 after a number of safety upgrades. Unit 1 remains in a long-term shutdown mode. The design lifetime of Unit 2 expires in 2015. Opportunity to shutdown earlier has been discussed in the last years. In particular a statement has been issued by EC asking for an early shutdown of Unit 2 in exchange for the TACIS support in implementing the safety upgrades in a short term. Currently the safety improvement program is being successfully implemented in the framework of US DOE and TACIS assistance. At the moment the date of the permanent plant shutdown is not specified. As with many older reactors throughout the world, a decommissioning plan has not been developed for Armenian NPP at the design stage. After shutdown of ANPP in 1988-1989 the radiological characterization campaign at Unit 1 had been carried out. Recently two studies in the decommissioning area have been performed for ANPP. The first one has been carried out under the US DOE Assistance Program. The purpose of this study was to identify and evaluate feasible decommissioning options for ANPP. Some critical issues related to the waste management had been specified and the near-term activities within this project will be focused on issues of waste characterization and information data base creation as an important prerequisite to manage waste safely. The model used to calculate many of the decommissioning costs was NRC CECP reprogrammed for WWER NPPs. The second study had been carried out in the framework of TACIS project 'Assistance to Energy Strategic Center'. The purpose of the study was to select the best strategy to phase-out and decommission the ANPP and evaluate conditions, implications and consequence of this decision. A suggested solution was a choice of SAFSTOR as a viable decommissioning option. Spent fuel management is not considered part of decommissioning; however it can strongly affect the decommissioning strategy. Currently the spent nuclear fuel is being stored on site in pools and in a newly constructed NUHOMS storage facility built by FRAMATOME under license of USA Transnuclear West Company. The facility includes 11 horizontal storage modules (HSM). Each HSM has a capacity of 56 non-failed fuel assemblies. A capacity of the existing dry storage facility is not sufficient to accommodate all spent fuel generated during plant operation. However, the NUHOMS concept is modular and it is possible to increase the storage capacity. The facility is designed for 50 years storage of spent nuclear fuel. In any case, these studies should be considered as an informative basis only. Much more additional information should be collected and the detailed characterization survey, i.e. the comprehensive engineering and radiological survey, conducted to have sufficient data for all further planning activities. (author)

2002-01-01

117

Preliminary nuclear decommissioning cost study  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The decommissioning of a nuclear power plant may involve one or more of three possible options: storage with surveillance (SWS), restricted site release (RSR), and unrestricted site use(USU). This preliminary study concentrates on the logistical, technical and cost aspects of decommissioning a multi-unit CANDU generating station using Pickering GS as the reference design. The procedure chosen for evaluation is: i) removal of the fuel and heavy water followed by decontamination prior to placing the station in SWS for thiry years; ii) complete dismantlement to achieve a USU state. The combination of SWS and USU with an interim period of surveillance allows for radioactive decay and hence less occupational exposure in achieving USU. The study excludes the conventional side of the station, assumes waste disposal repositories are available 1600 km away from the station, and uses only presently available technologies. The dismantlement of all systems except the reactor core can be accomplished using Ontario Hydro's current operating, maintenance and construction procedures. The total decommissioning period is spread out over approximately 40 years, with major activities concentrated in the first and last five years. The estimated dose would be approximately 1800 rem. Overall Pickering GS A costs would be $162,000,000 (1980 Canadian dollars).

1981-01-01

118

Planning For Armenian NPP Decommissioning  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Armenian Nuclear Power Plant (ANPP) is situated in Ararat valley near the Metzamor town, approximately 30 km west of Yerevan. The plant consists of two units of WWER-440 Model V-270 that is seismically upgraded version of standard V-230 design. The two units were put in commercial operation in 1976 and 1980 respectively. An earthquake in northern Armenia occurred in December 1988. Although both plants continued to operate after the earthquake, the USSR Council of Ministers ordered the shutdown of both plants for safety reasons. Unit 1 was shutdown in February 1989; Unit 2 was shutdown in March 1989. Shortly after Armenia became an independent republic, the ''energy crisis'' began, leaving the country with virtually no power for five years. The Armenian Government ordered the restart of Unit 2 ANPP. Unit 2 was restarted in November 1995. Unit 1 remains in a long-term shutdown mode. Currently nuclear share in total electricity generation is about 45%. The design life of Unit 2 expires in 2016. As with many older reactors throughout the world the decommissioning issues had not been considered for ANPP at the design stage. The planning activities for ANPP decommissioning were started in 2002 taking into account the IAEA recommendations that early planning will facilitate future decommissioning activities, and the complexity of preparatory and D and D activities as well. (author)

Ghazaryan, K.; Atoyan, V.; Pyuskyulyan, K. [Armenian Nuclear Power Plant CJSC, Metsamor, Armavir Marz, Republic of Armenia (Armenia)

2008-07-01

119

Planning For Armenian NPP Decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Armenian Nuclear Power Plant (ANPP) is situated in Ararat valley near the Metzamor town, approximately 30 km west of Yerevan. The plant consists of two units of WWER-440 Model V-270 that is seismically upgraded version of standard V-230 design. The two units were put in commercial operation in 1976 and 1980 respectively. An earthquake in northern Armenia occurred in December 1988. Although both plants continued to operate after the earthquake, the USSR Council of Ministers ordered the shutdown of both plants for safety reasons. Unit 1 was shutdown in February 1989; Unit 2 was shutdown in March 1989. Shortly after Armenia became an independent republic, the ''energy crisis'' began, leaving the country with virtually no power for five years. The Armenian Government ordered the restart of Unit 2 ANPP. Unit 2 was restarted in November 1995. Unit 1 remains in a long-term shutdown mode. Currently nuclear share in total electricity generation is about 45%. The design life of Unit 2 expires in 2016. As with many older reactors throughout the world the decommissioning issues had not been considered for ANPP at the design stage. The planning activities for ANPP decommissioning were started in 2002 taking into account the IAEA recommendations that early planning will facilitate future decommissioning activities, and the complexity of preparatory and D and D activities as well. (author)

2008-10-02

120

Decommissioning of naval nuclear ships  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

During the next decade the two major nuclear powers will each have to decommission more than 100 naval nuclear vessels, in particular submarines. The problems connected with this task is considered in this report. Firstly the size of the task is considered, i.e. the number of nuclear vessels that has to be decommissioned. Secondly the reactors of these vessels, their fuel elements, their power level, the number of reactors per vessel and the amount of radioactivity to be handled are discussed. Thirdly the decommissioning procedures, i.e. The removal of fuel from the vessels, the temporary storage of the reactor fuel near the base, and the cleaning and disposal of the reactor and the primary circuit components are reviewed. Finally alternative uses of the newer submarines are briefly considered. It should be emphasizes that much of the detailed information on which this report is based, may be of dubious nature, and that may to some extent affect the validity of the conclusions of the report. (au).

1993-01-01

 
 
 
 
121

Decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Japan  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

''Back end'' measures, which consist of establishment of the ways of appropriately accomplishing treatment and disposal of radioactive waste and decommissioning of nuclear facilities, are regarded as the most important remaining task for the sake of ensuring a consistent system of nuclear power generation. As for decommissioning of nuclear facilities the fundamental policy has been established and R and D has been being conducted, aimed at gaining the technologies necessary for actual decommissioning of commercial nuclear plant in future. This R and D activity covers the overall decommissioning technologies and includes actual decommissioning of nuclear facilities to verify the technologies. This paper outlines the national policy, regulations, and research and development programs of decommissioning. (Author)

1995-01-01

122

Decommissioning high-level waste surface facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The protective storage, entombment and dismantlement options of decommissioning a High-Level Waste Surface Facility (HLWSF) was investigated. A reference conceptual design for the facility was developed based on the designs of similar facilities. State-of-the-art decommissioning technologies were identified. Program plans and cost estimates for decommissioning the reference conceptual designs were developed. Good engineering design concepts were on the basis of this work identified

1978-01-01

123

Decommissioning of CANDU nuclear power stations  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report summarizes the results of a detailed study of the various procedures and costs associated with decommissioning a CANDU reactor. The three internationally recognized 'stages' of decommissioning (mothballing, encasement, and dismantling) are discussed. It is concluded that decommissioning is possible with presently available technology, and that costs could be financed by only a marginal increase in the cost of electricity during the life of the reactor. The environmental impact would be no greater than that of any large construction project. (auth).

1979-01-01

124

Planning and management for reactor decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report describes decommissioning strategy, planning process, regulation, management and organization, radiological characterization and safety. Planning is used to identify, define and organize the requirements for decommissioning including decommissioning options, items to be accomplished (objective, scope), to solve problems of how it is to be accomplished (methods, means and procedures), questions of who will execute it (resources, organization and responsibilities, interfacing), and time when it will be executed (schedule for meeting the objectives). A plan is highly dependent on the quality of the management team assembled to carry it out. Radiological characterization involves a survey of existing data, calculation, in situ measurements and/or sampling and analyses. Using this databases decommissioning planner may assess options, considering: decontamination processes, dismantling procedures, tools required, radiological protection of workers and public/environment, waste classification, and resulting costs. Comparison and optimization of these factors will lead to selection of a decommissioning strategy, i.e. typically, immediate or deferred dismantling. The planning and implementation of decommissioning for nuclear reactors should be referred both recent dismantling techniques and many decommissioning experiences. The technical lessons learned from many projects will help in the planning for future decommissioning projects. And systematic planning and management are essential to successful completion of a decommissioning project. (author)

2001-01-01

125

Designing systems of the decommissioning database  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

It has been reviewed and input and output system and chosen an items of input and output to embody of the decommissioning database. The relationship of the decommissioning informations has been found out using ERD(Entity Relationship Diagram) that is one of the major modeling tool. It has been expressed the process function of the decommissioning database system through DFD(Data Flow Diagram). These results will be used as the basic data to design the prototyping and graphic user interface for the decommissioning database.

2002-01-01

126

Designing systems of the decommissioning database  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

It has been reviewed and input and output system and chosen an items of input and output to embody of the decommissioning database. The relationship of the decommissioning informations has been found out using ERD(Entity Relationship Diagram) that is one of the major modeling tool. It has been expressed the process function of the decommissioning database system through DFD(Data Flow Diagram). These results will be used as the basic data to design the prototyping and graphic user interface for the decommissioning database.

Park, H. S.; Park, S. K.; Lee, K. W.; Park, J. H. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

2002-10-01

127

Decommissioning Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

It is predicted that the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant would happen in Korea since 2020 but the need of partial decommissioning and decontamination for periodic inspection and life extension still has been on an increasing trend and its domestic market has gradually been extended. Therefore, in this project we developed following several essential technologies as a decommissioning R and D. The measurement technology for in-pipe radioactive contamination was developed for measuring alpha/beta/gamma emitting nuclides simultaneously inside a in-pipe and it was tested into the liquid waste transfer pipe in KRR-2. And the digital mock-up system for KRR-1 and 2 was developed for choosing the best scenarios among several scenarios on the basis of various decommissioning information(schedule, waste volume, cost, etc.) that are from the DMU and the methodology of decommissioning cost estimation was also developed for estimating a research reactor's decommissioning cost and the DMU and the decommissioning cost estimation system were incorporated into the decommissioning information integrated management system. Finally the treatment and management technology of the irradiated graphites that happened after decommissioning KRR-2 was developed in order to treat and manage the irradiated graphites safely.

2007-01-01

128

Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 3: Ecological risk assessment  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Environmental Management Division of the U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) of the J-Field area at APG, pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of that activity, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted an ecological risk assessment (ERA) of the J-Field site. This report presents the results of that assessment.

Hlohowskyj, I.; Hayse, J.; Kuperman, R.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2000-02-25

129

Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 3: Ecological risk assessment  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Environmental Management Division of the U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) of the J-Field area at APG, pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of that activity, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted an ecological risk assessment (ERA) of the J-Field site. This report presents the results of that assessment

2000-01-01

130

Principles of record keeping for decommissioning purposes  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

At the siting and conceptual design stage of a nuclear facility the first records pertaining to that facility are produced and stored. Subsequent phases in the facility's life cycle (detailed design, construction, commissioning, operation and shutdown) will include the production and retention of a large variety of records. Design, as-built drawings and operational records are essential for safe and efficient operation of any nuclear facility. This set of records is constantly updated and augmented during operation. Records from all phases of a nuclear facility are important for planning its decommissioning. Although not all of these records need to be included explicitly in the decommissioning plan itself, the process of initial, ongoing and final planning utilizes pertinent records for, and ultimately achieves, safe and cost effective decommissioning. When a nuclear facility is shutdown for decommissioning, current operating experience may be lost. Therefore, one important element of planning is to identify, secure and store appropriate operational records to support decommissioning. This process is preferably initiated during the design and construction phase and continues throughout operation including shutdown. Part of the records inventory from operation will become records for decommissioning and it is cost effective to identify these records before final facility shutdown. Experience shows that lack of attention to record keeping may result in an undue waste of time, other resources and additional costs. The newly established Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management recognizes the importance of keeping decommissioning-related records. In addition, the systematic management of records is an essential part of quality assurance and is often a licence condition. A good comprehensive decommissioning records management system (RMS) is one specific application of the broader concepts of 'Protection of future generations' and 'Burden on future generations' as highlighted in the top-level IAEA document on Principles of Radioactive Waste Management. It should be noted that other programmes of the IAEA have addressed record keeping for radioactive waste management and disposal facilities. A newly-published IAEA report provides guidance in records relevant to decommissioning and its key statements are summarised in this paper. The contents is as follows: 1. Introduction; 2. Design and Operational Data Required for Decommissioning; 2.1. Decommissioning Strategy; 2.2 Primary Data Sources for Decommissioning; 2.2.1 Design, construction and modification data; 2.2.2. Operating, shutdown and post-shutdown data; 3. The Process of Selecting Decommissioning Records; 3.1 Establishing the Records Management System; 3.2 Selection of Decommissioning Records; 3.3. Documentation Prepared for Decommissioning; 4. Record Medium and Location.

Laraia, M. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2003-07-01

131

Research in decommissioning techniques for nuclear fuel cycle facilities in JNC. 7. JWTF decommissioning techniques  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Decommissioning techniques such as radiation measuring and monitoring, decontamination, dismantling and remote handling in the world were surveyed to upgrading technical know-how database for decommissioning of Joyo Waste Treatment Facility (JWTF). As the result, five literatures for measuring and monitoring techniques, 14 for decontamination and 22 for dismantling feasible for JWTF decommissioning were obtained and were summarized in tables. On the basis of the research, practical applicability of those techniques to decommissioning of JWTF was evaluated. This report contains brief surveyed summaries related to JWTF decommissioning. (H. Itami)

1999-01-01

132

Research in decommissioning techniques for nuclear fuel cycle facilities in JNC. 7. JWTF decommissioning techniques  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Decommissioning techniques such as radiation measuring and monitoring, decontamination, dismantling and remote handling in the world were surveyed to upgrading technical know-how database for decommissioning of Joyo Waste Treatment Facility (JWTF). As the result, five literatures for measuring and monitoring techniques, 14 for decontamination and 22 for dismantling feasible for JWTF decommissioning were obtained and were summarized in tables. On the basis of the research, practical applicability of those techniques to decommissioning of JWTF was evaluated. This report contains brief surveyed summaries related to JWTF decommissioning. (H. Itami)

Ogawa, Ryuichiro; Ishijima, Noboru [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

1999-02-01

133

Energia líquida no leite e desempenho de bezerros de vacas primíparas Aberdeen Angus/ Milk net energy and performance of calves from Aberdeen Angus primiparous cows  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese O estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a disponibilidade de energia líquida no leite de vacas primíparas Aberdeen Angus e sua relação com o desempenho ponderal dos bezerros. Foram utilizadas 47 vacas, criadas em condições extensivas, no município de Aceguá, RS, no período de setembro de 2005 a março de 2006. A produção de leite foi avaliada pelo método pesagem do bezerro anterior e posterior à mamada, do nascimento à desmama (189 dias), em intervalos de 21 dia (more) s. Para análise dos resultados foram incluídos no modelo estatístico como efeitos fixos, o resultado do diagnóstico de gestação (G) e nível de produção de leite (NPL): NPLa Abstract in english The availability of net energy in the milk of Aberdeen Angus primiparous cows and his relationship with the calves performance was studied. Fourty seven cows, raised under a range condition, in Aceguá. RS county, were evaluated between September 2005 to April 2006. Milk production (PL) was estimated by before and after suckle method, from birth to weaning (189days), every 21 days. Effects studied were pregnancy (G), and milk production level (NPL): NPLa (more) kg

Lemes, J.S.; Pimentel, M.A.; Brauner, C.C.; Moraes, J.C.F.

2011-12-01

134

Study of decommissioning cost evaluation technique for nuclear reactor dismantlement. Calculation of decommissioning cost by COSMARD  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A model for estimating decommissioning costs consisting of labor cost, device cost and expense, was developed for items which OECD/NEA had standardized, and was installed into the computer system for planning and management of reactor decommissioning (COSMARD). Input data files and databases for the decommissioning of JPDR were prepared, and the decommissioning cost was calculated with COSMARD. In addition, the decommissioning cost for a large scale BWR power plant was also calculated on the assumption of the advantage of scale. The calculations have shown that it is useful and efficient for studying the decommissioning costs for nuclear reactors to apply the COSMARD with database for cast estimation to the decommissioning cost calculation. (author)

2005-01-01

135

AREVA decommissioning strategy and programme  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] As with any industrial installation, a nuclear facility has an operating life that requires accounting for its shutdown. In compliance with its sustainable development commitments, AREVA accounts this via its own decommissioning resources to value and make sites fit for further use. These capabilities guarantee the reversibility of the nuclear industry. Thus, the nuclear site value development constitutes an important activity for AREVA, which contributes to the acceptance of nuclear in line with the AREVA continuous policy of sustainable development which is to be fully responsible from the creation, during the operation, to the dismantling of its facilities in all respects with safety, local acceptance and environment. AREVA has already performed a large variety of operation during the life-time of its installations such as heavy maintenance, equipment replacement, upgrading operation. Nowadays, a completely different dimension is emerging with industrial decommissioning operations of nuclear fuel cycle installations: enrichment gaseous diffusion plant, fuel assembly plants, recycling and reprocessing facilities. These activities constitute a major know-how for AREVA. For this reason, the group decided, beginning of 2008, to gather 4 projects in one business unit called Nuclear Site Value Development - a reprocessing plant UP2 400 on AREVA La Hague site, a reprocessing plant UP1 on AREVA Marcoule site, a MOX fuel plant on Cadarache and 2 sites (SICN Veurey and Annecy) that handled GCR fuel fabrication). The main objectives are to enhance the feed back, to contribute to performance improvements, to value professionals and to put innovation forward. The following article will describe in a first part the main decommissioning programmes managed by AREVA NC Nuclear Site Value Development Business Unit. The second part will deal with strategic approaches. A more efficient organization with integration of the supply chain and innovation will be part of the main drivers. (authors)

2008-10-02

136

Rancho Seco--Decommissioning Update  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station ceased operation in June of 1989 and entered an extended period of SAFSTOR to allow funds to accumulate for dismantlement. Incremental dismantlement was begun in 1997 of steam systems and based on the successful completion of work, the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) board of directors approved full decommissioning in July 1999. A schedule has been developed for completion of decommissioning by 2008, allowing decommissioning funds to accumulate until they are needed. Systems removal began in the Auxiliary Building in October of 1999 and in the Reactor Building in January of 2000. Systems dismantlement continues in the Reactor Building and should be completed by the end of 2003. System removal is near completion in the Auxiliary Building with removal of the final liquid waste tanks in progress. The spent fuel has been moved to dry storage in an onsite ISFSI, with completion on August 21, 2002. The spent fuel racks are currently being removed from the pool, packaged and shipped, and then the pool will be cleaned. Also in the last year the reactor coolant pumps and primary piping were removed and shipped. Characterization and planning work for the reactor vessel and internals is also in progress with various cut-up and/or disposal options being evaluated. In the year ahead the remaining systems in the Reactor Building will be removed, packaged and sent for disposal, including the pressurizer. Work will be started on embedded and underground piping and the large outdoor tanks. Building survey and decontamination will begin. RFP's for removal of the vessel and internals and the steam generators are planned to fix the cost of those components. If the costs are consistent with current estimates the work will go forward. If they are not, hardened SAFSTOR/entombment may be considered

2003-01-01

137

Hands-on glovebox decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Over recent years, the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) has undertaken the decommissioning of a large number of Plutonium glove boxes at Winfrith Technology Centre. UKAEA has managed this work on behalf of the DTI, who funded most of the work. Most of the planning and practical work was contracted to AEA Technology (AEAT), which, until 1996, was the commercial arm of UKAEA, but is now a private company. More than 70 gloveboxes, together with internal plant and equipment such as ball mills, presses and furnaces, have been successfully size reduced into drums for storage, leaving the area, in which they were situated, in a clean condition. (UK).

138

Decommissioning of nuclear facilities; Stilllegung kerntechnischer Anlagen  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The report on the decommissioning of nuclear facilities deals with the following topics: Survey on nuclear facilities; decommissioning strategies; stepwise dismantling of the nuclear power plant; safety and radiation protection; appropriate techniques; residue and waste management, cost estimation, international agreements on nuclear waste management: IAEA, OECD/NEA, EU, WENRA.

Stahl, Thorsten; Strub, Erik

2012-02-15

139

The decommissioning program of a nuclear reactor  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A decommission project for one of the Chinese reactors has being done in recent years. It is doing in several aspects, the investigation, the feasibility study, the engineering design will be done in more detail for smooth decommissioning operation at the site in the near future

1993-01-01

140

Meeting the challenge of BNFL's decommissioning programme  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The paper reviews the co-ordinated and integrated programme, adopted by BNFL, in the decommissioning of its radioactive plants. It examines BNFL's approach to the challenges posed by the eventual decommissioning of its 120 plants, its overall strategies, the constraints and the progress achieved to date, drawing on real experience from the 22 completed projects and the 24 projects currently underway. (author)

1997-01-01

 
 
 
 
141

Project gnome decontamination and decommissioning plan  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The document presents the operational plan for conducting the final decontamination and decommissioning work at the site of the first U.S. nuclear detonation designed specifically for peaceful purposes and the first underground event on the Plowshare Program to take place outside the Nevada Test Site. The plan includes decontamination and decommissioning procedures, radiological guidelines, and the NV concept of operations

1979-01-01

142

Powerplant decommissioning meets variety of challenges  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This article describes the challenges met in decommissioning the Shoreham nuclear station located in Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. The topics of the article include pre-decommissioning activities, systems dismantlement, boiling water reactor-vessel segmentation, safety and ALARA', scheduling and cost control, and overall program controls.

Hadden, J.K.

1993-04-01

143

Powerplant decommissioning meets variety of challenges  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This article describes the challenges met in decommissioning the Shoreham nuclear station located in Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. The topics of the article include pre-decommissioning activities, systems dismantlement, boiling water reactor-vessel segmentation, safety and 'ALARA', scheduling and cost control, and overall program controls.

1993-01-01

144

Decommissioning of nuclear ship 'Otto Hahn'  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The nuclear powered ship 'Otto Hahn' was commissioned in 1968, and ended its mission in 1979. The decommissioning was approved in December, 1980, and after the dismantling and removal of the reactor plant were completed, the decommissioning was recognized in September, 1982. The features of the method of decommissioning Otto Hahn were the carrying-out of the reactor pressure vessel together with the primary shielding tank as one body, and after the machinery, equipment and structures in the controlled area were removed or decontaminated, the ship was reconstructed to a diesel freighter. It is considered that the method of decommissioning of Otto Hahn and the data obtained by this work furnish much information for the decommissioning of nuclear power stations and nuclear powered ships hereafter. In this report, the course of decommissioning of Otto Hahn and its experience are synthetically summarized. The propulsion plant of Otto Hahn, the radiological condition, the conceptual design of decommissioning, the dismantling works, the procedures of permission and approval, the procedure for removing the control, the execution of decommissioning, and the removal of the controlled area are reported. (K.I.)

1990-01-01

145

Survey of decontamination and decommissioning techniques  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Reports and articles on decommissioning have been reviewed to determine the current technology status and also attempt to identify potential decommissioning problem areas. It is concluded that technological road blocks, which limited decommissioning facilities in the past have been removed. In general, techniques developed by maintenance in maintaining the facility have been used to decommission facilities. Some of the more promising development underway which will further simplify decommissioning activities are: electrolytic decontamination which simplifies some decontaminating operations; arc saw and vacuum furnace which reduce the volume of metallic contaminated material by a factor of 10; remotely operated plasma torch which reduces personnel exposure; and shaped charges, water cannon and rock splitters which simplify concrete removal. Areas in which published data are limited are detailed costs identifying various components included in the total cost and also the quantity of waste generated during the decommissioning activities. With the increased awareness of decommissioning requirements as specified by licensing requirements, design criteria for new facilities are taking into consideration final decommissioning of buildings. Specific building design features will evolve as designs are evaluated and implemented

1977-01-01

146

Environmental issues and impacts of decommissioning  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This article defines the nature and scope of marine pollution and then identifies the principal sources of pollution resulting from decommissioning offshore platforms. The environmental impacts of both the decommissioning process and potential waste inventories from offshore installations are then quantified followed by a quantification of the routes, treatment and/or safe disposal for these wastes. (UK)

Mumaw, G.R. [University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

1997-11-01

147

Interim Storage Facility decommissioning. Final report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Decontamination and decommissioning of the Interim Storage Facility were completed. Activities included performing a detailed radiation survey of the facility, removing surface and imbedded contamination, excavating and removing the fuel storage cells, restoring the site to natural conditions, and shipping waste to Hanford, Washington, for burial. The project was accomplished on schedule and 30% under budget with no measurable exposure to decommissioning personnel.

Johnson, R.P.; Speed, D.L.

1985-03-15

148

Interim Storage Facility decommissioning. Final report  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Decontamination and decommissioning of the Interim Storage Facility were completed. Activities included performing a detailed radiation survey of the facility, removing surface and imbedded contamination, excavating and removing the fuel storage cells, restoring the site to natural conditions, and shipping waste to Hanford, Washington, for burial. The project was accomplished on schedule and 30% under budget with no measurable exposure to decommissioning personnel

1985-01-01

149

Waste Management During RA Reactor Decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The objective of radioactive waste management during the RA reactor decommissioning is to deal with radioactive waste in a manner that protects human health and the environment now and in the future. The estimation of waste quantities to be expected during decommissioning is a very important step in the initial planning. (author)

2008-01-01

150

Decommissioning progress at Fort St Vrain  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station in Colorado in the United States is well along in Decommissioning for release of the site from its Nuclear Regulatory Commission license. This decommissioning is being performed under a fixed price contract between the owner, Public Service Company of Colorado and a team of Westinghouse and Morrison-Knudsen. This paper will discuss the innovative decommissioning technique of filling the gas cooled reactor with water for shielding and contamination control and the other practical and readily available technologies used. This Decommissioning is demonstrating that a full size commercial nuclear reactor can be successfully decommissioned with a reasonable schedule, cost, and radiation dose to the work force. (Author)

1995-01-01

151

Decommissioning of nuclear research facilities at KAERI  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

At the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), two research reactors (KRR-1 and KRR-2) and one uranium conversion plant (UCP) are being decommissioned. The main reason of the decommissioning was the diminishing utilities; the start of a new research reactor, HANARO, and the higher conversion cost than that of international market for the UCP. Another reason of the decommissioning was prevention from spreading radioactive materials due to the deterioration of the facilities. Two separate projects have already been started and are carried out as planned. The KAERI selected several strategies, considering the small scale of the projects, the internal standards in KAERI, and the future prospects of the decommissioning projects in Korea. In this paper, the current status of the decommissioning including the waste management and the technology development will be explained.

Park, Jinho; Chung, Unsoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2008-04-15

152

The Wuergassen decommissioning and dismantling project  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

After detection of cracks in the core shroud and bad economic prognoses, the owner/operator of the Wuergassen reactor, PreussenElektra, decided for decommissioning and direct dismantling of the reactor station, also because experience has shown that the decommissioning work poses no problems in terms of technology, safety, and environmental protection. The licensing application documents for the first decommissioning phase describe the remaining operation and dismantling of some components. Detailed documentation is produced and presented to the supervisory authority in line with progressing decommissioning work, so that documentation is reduced to the necessary extent. Planning work for the second phase and decontrolling measurements at the UNS building are underway. The operational and the project organisation were tuned for the decommissioning phases. Evaluation of results of the first phase will show whether the approaches taken fulfill expectations, particularly with respect to economic efficiency. (orig.).

1996-01-01

153

Decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The objectives of this coordinated research programme (CRP) were to promote the exchange of information on the practical experience by Member States in decontamination and decommissioning. The scope of the programme included several areas of decontamination and decommissioning rather than focusing on a single aspect of it, in line with recommendation of the experts who participated in Phase 1 of the CRP. Experts felt that this format would generate better awareness of decontamination and decommissioning and would be more effective vehicle for the exchange of information by stimulating broader discussion on all aspects of decontamination and decommissioning. Special emphasis was given to the development of principles and methodologies to facilitate decommissioning and to the new methods and techniques for optimization of decontamination and disassembly of equipment. Refs, figs, tabs.

1993-01-01

154

Conceptual data modeling on the decommissioning database  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

ISP (Information Strategy Planning), which is the first step of the whole database development, has been studied to manage effectively information and data related to the decommissioning activities of the Korea Research Reactor 1 and 2 (KRR 1 and 2). A record management system (RMS) of large nuclear facilities of national experience such as in the U. S. A., Japan, Belgium, and Russian were reviewed. In order to establish the scope of the decommissioning DB, user requirement and the importance of the information were analyzed and set up the conceptual design of the decommissioning DB. The results have been reviewed an national experience were recognized to acquire the technology of the decommissioning DB for the whole decommissioning process. It has been extracted the principle information such as working information, facilities information, radioactive waste treatment, and radiological surveying and analysis during the interviewing with an experts. These information and data will be used as the basic data to design the prototyping.

Park, H.; Park, S. K.; Jeong, K. J. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

2002-05-01

155

Conceptual data modeling on the decommissioning database  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] ISP (Information Strategy Planning), which is the first step of the whole database development, has been studied to manage effectively information and data related to the decommissioning activities of the Korea Research Reactor 1 and 2 (KRR 1 and 2). A record management system (RMS) of large nuclear facilities of national experience such as in the U. S. A., Japan, Belgium, and Russian were reviewed. In order to establish the scope of the decommissioning DB, user requirement and the importance of the information were analyzed and set up the conceptual design of the decommissioning DB. The results have been reviewed an national experience were recognized to acquire the technology of the decommissioning DB for the whole decommissioning process. It has been extracted the principle information such as working information, facilities information, radioactive waste treatment, and radiological surveying and analysis during the interviewing with an experts. These information and data will be used as the basic data to design the prototyping

2002-01-01

156

Decommissioning of nuclear power technological and research installations  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Strategy of reactor decommissioning was summarized on the World experience base. Analysis of Ukrainian NPP decommissioning process for three versions of the following nuclear power complex development is presented. Examples of organization and management in industrial NPP's decommissioning (USA, England, Japan, Russia) and research reactors (Russia, USA, Japan, Ukraine) are considered. Immediate dismantling during research reactor WWR-M decommissioning is proposed. 11 refs

2005-01-01

157

The decommissioning plan of the Nuclear Ship MUTSU  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] This paper describes the review about the decommissioning plan and present state of the Nuclear Ship Mutsu. The decommissioning of the Mutsu is carried out by Removal and Isolation method. The procedure of the decommissioning works is presented in this paper. The decommissioning works started in April, 1992 and it takes about four years after her last experimental voyage. (author)

1995-01-01

158

Development of a Decommissioning Certificate Program  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A Decommissioning Certificate Program has been developed at Washington State University Tri-Cities (WSU TC) in conjunction with Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)to address the increasing need for qualified professionals to direct and manage decommissioning projects. The cooperative effort between academia, industry, and government in the development and delivery of this Program of education and training is described, as well as the Program's design to prepare students to contribute sooner, and at a higher level, to decommissioning projects.

1999-02-17

159

Development of a Decommissioning Certificate Program; TOPICAL  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A Decommissioning Certificate Program has been developed at Washington State University Tri-Cities (WSU TC) in conjunction with Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)to address the increasing need for qualified professionals to direct and manage decommissioning projects. The cooperative effort between academia, industry, and government in the development and delivery of this Program of education and training is described, as well as the Program's design to prepare students to contribute sooner, and at a higher level, to decommissioning projects

1999-01-01

160

TA-2 Water Boiler Reactor Decommissioning Project  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This final report addresses the Phase 2 decommissioning of the Water Boiler Reactor, biological shield, other components within the biological shield, and piping pits in the floor of the reactor building. External structures and underground piping associated with the gaseous effluent (stack) line from Technical Area 2 (TA-2) Water Boiler Reactor were removed in 1985--1986 as Phase 1 of reactor decommissioning. The cost of Phase 2 was approximately $623K. The decommissioning operation produced 173 m3 of low-level solid radioactive waste and 35 m3 of mixed waste. 15 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs

1991-01-01

 
 
 
 
161

Stakeholder involvement in decommissioning nuclear facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Significant numbers of nuclear facilities will need to be decommissioned in the coming decades. In this context, NEA member countries are placing increasing emphasis on the involvement of stakeholders in the associated decision procedures. This study reviews decommissioning experience with a view to identifying stakeholder concerns and best practice in addressing them. The lessons learnt about the end of the facility life cycle can also contribute to better foresight in siting and building new facilities. This report will be of interest to all major players in the field of decommissioning, in particular policy makers, implementers, regulators and representatives of local host communities

2007-01-01

162

Decommissioning of the CANDU-PHW reactor  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report contains the results of a study of various aspects of decommissioning of reactors. The study places in perspective the size of the job, the hazards involved, the cost and the environmental impact. The three internationally agreed ''stages'' of decommissioning, namely, mothballing, entombment, and dismantling are defined and discussed. The single unit 600 MW(e) CANDU is chosen as the type of reactor on which the discussion is focussed but the conclusions reached will provide a basis for judgement of the costs and problems associated with decommissioning reactors of other sizes and types. (author)

1977-01-01

163

Bankruptcy potential threatens decommissioning funds, says NRC  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Electric utilities and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) disagreed at an America Nuclear Society seminar on how reactor decommissioning should be financed. Industry and state regulators claim it should be handled by standard depreciation methods without involving the NRC, which argues that it must guard against safety risks from industry bankruptices and premature decommissioning. Both sides agreed that funds must be collected, but disagreed on the best method. Their options include the deposit method, external sinking fund, internal reserve, and insurance or surety bond. The NRC feels that too many utilities face possible bankruptcy unrelated to decommissioning or accidents, and that this possibility should outweigh other considerations. 1 table

1981-01-01

164

Bankruptcy potential threatens decommissioning funds, says NRC  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Electric utilities and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) disagreed at an America Nuclear Society seminar on how reactor decommissioning should be financed. Industry and state regulators claim it should be handled by standard depreciation methods without involving the NRC, which argues that it must guard against safety risks from industry bankruptices and premature decommissioning. Both sides agreed that funds must be collected, but disagreed on the best method. Their options include the deposit method, external sinking fund, internal reserve, and insurance or surety bond. The NRC feels that too many utilities face possible bankruptcy unrelated to decommissioning or accidents, and that this possibility should outweigh other considerations. 1 table. (DCK)

1981-08-01

165

Social effects of decommissioning Trawsfynydd Power Station  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The decision to close Trawsfynydd in 1993 had significant implications for the staff and local community. The site is situated within a National Park and local employment opportunities are limited. The staff and local communities were consulted regarding the issues arising from closure and decommissioning. This consultation influenced the decommissioning strategy for the site, with emphasis placed on the mitigation of the effects of closure. Subsequent studies have shown that the adopted strategies have served to limit the social and economic effects. The experience at Trawsfynydd has proved to be generally applicable at other decommissioning sites. (author)

2001-01-01

166

TA-2 Water Boiler Reactor Decommissioning Project  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This final report addresses the Phase 2 decommissioning of the Water Boiler Reactor, biological shield, other components within the biological shield, and piping pits in the floor of the reactor building. External structures and underground piping associated with the gaseous effluent (stack) line from Technical Area 2 (TA-2) Water Boiler Reactor were removed in 1985--1986 as Phase 1 of reactor decommissioning. The cost of Phase 2 was approximately $623K. The decommissioning operation produced 173 m{sup 3} of low-level solid radioactive waste and 35 m{sup 3} of mixed waste. 15 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs.

Durbin, M.E. (ed.); Montoya, G.M.

1991-06-01

167

A proposal for a new decommissioning trend  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The decommissioning of the nuclear plants is one of the main issues related to the use of nuclear power as energy source. Radiological and technical problems are related to this topics and consist, not only in how to remove and to manage the reactors spent fuel elements and the process liquids, but also in how to disassemble all the reactor's activated and/or contaminated components and systems. After a short review of the present law regulations and of the main technological activities related to the decommissioning, new decommissioning oriented reactor design criteria are proposed. (author)

1998-01-01

168

Decommissioning and decontrolling the R1-reactor  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Sweden's first nuclear reactor - the research reactor R1 - situated in bedrock under the Royal Technical Institute of Stockholm, has in the period 1981-1983 been subject to a complete decommissioning. The National Institute for Radiation Protection has followed the work in detail, and has after the completion of the decommissioning performed measurements of radioactivity on site. The report gives an account of the work the Institute has done in preparation for- and during decommissioning and specifically report on the measurements for classification of the local as free for non-nuclear use. (aa)

1985-01-01

169

Carcass characteristics of small and medium-frame Aberdeen Angus young steers/ Características da carcaça de novilhos super jovens Aberdeen Angus de biótipos pequeno e médio  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese Avaliaram-se as características da carcaça de novilhos Aberdeen Angus super jovens de biótipos pequeno e médio, terminados em confinamento e abatidos com semelhante espessura de gordura subcutânea. A idade e o peso vivo médio de ingresso no confinamento foram de 298 dias e 202 kg. Os animais foram confinados durante 158 dias, abatidos com espessura de gordura subcutânea média de 6,4 mm. A alimentação foi composta por silagem de sorgo e concentrado, na razão vol (more) umoso:concentrado de 60:40 na matéria seca, nos primeiros 63 dias e após, 50:50 até o abate. O biótipo foi calculado utilizando a fórmula B=-11,548 + (0,4878xh) - (0,0289xID) + (0,0000146xID²) + (0,0000759xhxID), em que h representou a altura e o ID idade em dias. Novilhos com biótipo médio apresentaram superioridade nos aspectos importantes de comercialização, como o peso de carcaça quente (p Abstract in english Carcass characteristics of small and medium-frame Aberdeen Angus young steers, finished in feedlot and slaughtered with similar subcutaneous fat thickness are evaluated. The average age and live weight at the start of feedlot were respectively 298 days and 202 kg. The steers were confined during 158 days, and slaughtered with average subcutaneous fat thickness of 6.4 mm. The feed consisted of sorghum silage and concentrate at 60:40 ratio of dry matter during the first 63 (more) days and 50:50 afterward. The frame was calculated by formula F =-11.548 + (0.4878xh) - (0.0289xID) + (0.0000146xID²)+(0.0000759xIDxh), where h is the height and ID the age, in days. Steers with medium frame showed superiority in important marketing aspects such as warm (p

Arboitte, Miguelangelo Ziegler; Brondani, Ivan Luis; Restle, João; Freitas, Leandro da Silva; Pereira, Lucas Braido; Cardoso, Gilmar dos Santos

2012-03-01

170

Decommissioning the Research Nuclear Reactor Vvr-S Magurele - Analyze, Justification and Selection of Decommissioning Strategy  

Science.gov (United States)

The decommissioning of Research Nuclear Reactor VVR-S Magurele - Bucharest involves the removal of the radioactive and hazardous materials to permit the facility to be released without representing a further risk to human health and the environment [1-3]. A very important aspect of decommissioning is the analyze, justification and selection of the decommissioning strategy. Two strategies: DECON (Immediate Dismantling) and SAFSTOR (Safe Enclosure) are in study (see Table 1)... Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract and references only.

Dragusin, M.; Popa, V.; Boicu, A.; Tuca, C.; Iorga, I.; Mustata, C.

2004-09-01

171

Hydrogeologic data for the Canal Creek area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, April 1986-March 1988  

Science.gov (United States)

This report is a compilation of hydrologic and geologic data collected for the period April 1986 through March 1988 for the Canal Creek area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Geologic data include lithologic logs for 73 sites and geophysical logs for 71 sites. Hydrologic data consist of hydrographs and synoptic water level measurements. The hydrographs were taken from eight wells that were equipped with continuous water level recorders, and the synoptic water-level measurements were made four times during the study. Well-construction data also are included for 149 observation wells. (USGS)

Oliveros, J. P.; Gernhardt, Patrice

1989-01-01

172

Decommissioning strategy for Trawsfynydd power station  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Following the decision to close Trawsfynydd power station, Nuclear Electric adapted its generic decommissioning plans to suit the particular local circumstances. This resulted in an early reduced height safestore strategy which is described in the paper. (Author).

Jones, H.M.; Ellis, A.T. [Nuclear Electric plc, Barnwood (United Kingdom)

1995-12-31

173

Decommissioning strategy for Trawsfynydd power station  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Following the decision to close Trawsfynydd power station, Nuclear Electric adapted its generic decommissioning plans to suit the particular local circumstances. This resulted in an early reduced height safestore strategy which is described in the paper. (Author)

1995-01-01

174

Health physics considerations in decontamination and decommissioning  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

These proceedings contain papers on legal considerations, environmental aspects, decommissioning equipment and methods, instrumentation, applied health physics, waste classification and disposal, and project experience. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

1985-12-01

175

Decommissioning: from COMECON to CIS and RUSSIA  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

NPP decommissioning experience in the USSR and the Commonwealth Independent States (CIS) members was actively accumulated over ten years since 1982, by Russian experts in particular. Nevertheless, it is not well renowned throughout the scientists and engineers from both Russia and other near' (the CIS) and 'distant' foreign countries. A general review on NPP decommissioning in the CIS has been published just now. An unshown before NPP decommissioning issues are presented in the report. The first program on NPP decommissioning was developed under the aegis of COMECOM with the leadership of Russian experts. The most considerable results are the feasibility studies of Armenia NPP, the Novovoronezh NPP first construction stage (two units) and Bohunice V - 1 unit. (J.P.N.)

1995-01-01

176

Nuclear submarine decommissioning and related environmental problems  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The issue of nuclear powered submarines occupies a particular place among the problems related to nuclear wastes. Nuclear submarines that were withdrawn from military service as well as those intended fro utilization represent a potential source of both nuclear and radiation hazard. By the beginning of 1966 more than one hundred and fifty nuclear powered vessels were decommissioned in Russia both for the reason of expiration of their service life and due to treaties on reduction of strategic offensive weapons. By 200 this number is expected to increase to one hundred and seventy-eighty units. According to published data the number of nuclear submarines decommissioned in USA to date exceeds twenty units. Major problems associated with utilization of nuclear submarines are related to safety and special security measures are to undertaken for decommissioned nuclear submarines. One of the most significant problems is related with management and/or storage of spent fuel from decommissioned nuclear submarines

1998-01-01

177

Sellafield Decommissioning Programme - Update and Lessons Learned  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Sellafield site in North West England has over 240 active facilities covering the full nuclear cycle from fuel manufacture through generation, reprocessing and waste treatment. The Sellafield decommissioning programme was formally initiated in the mid 1980s though several plants had been decommissioned prior to this primarily to create space for other plants. Since the initiation of the programme 7 plants have been completely decommissioned, significant progress has been made in a further 16 and a total of 56 major project phases have been completed. This programme update will explain the decommissioning arrangements and strategies and illustrate the progress made on a number of the plants including the Windscale Pile Chimneys, the first reprocessing plan and plutonium plants. These present a range of different challenges and requiring approaches from fully hands on to fully remote. Some of the key lessons learned will be highlighted.

Lutwyche, P. R.; Challinor, S. F.

2003-02-24

178

Environmental impact assessment of NPP decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In this presentation the following potential impacts of decommissioning of NPP are discussed: - Impacts on population; Impacts on natural environment; Land impacts; Impacts on urban complex and land utilisation; Possible impacts on area as a result of failure.

2009-01-01

179

Decommissioning commercial nuclear power plants. [Monograph  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The decommissioning of nuclear power plants is complicated by technical details as well as policies. This paper present the technological options and highlights alternatives to decommissioning, regulations, and financing as major policy questions. It concludes with the recommendation that utilities be required to submit plans for handling wastes and for decommissioning to focus public attention on the need for a permanent solution at the federal level. It also recommends the consideration of decommission in design criteria; rejects permanent mothballing and entombment, but recommends their use in conjunction with delayed dismantlement; and suggests that arrangements for financing should be part of state and federal regulatory policy, with top priority on public health and safety. 9 references. (DCK)

Anderson, J.; Aquilina, D.; Rodbourne, D.

1980-01-01

180

The total decommissioning of nuclear facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The following nuclear facilities in the Federal Republic of Germany are now ready for total decommissioning: the power plant Niederaichbach (KKN), the nuclear ship Otto Hahn and the research reactor FR2. Planning work on KKN commenced in 1979 and the approval procedure was begun in early 1980 when the approval contract was submitted. At the beginning of 1980 the contract for decommissioning the nuclear facilities on the Otto Hahn was awarded. Approval was received in December 1980 and work was begun on decommissioning the plant. FR2 is still in operation and will be shut down at the end of 1981. Planning work for decommissioning the nuclear part began at the end of 1980. The planning and the methods which are intended to be used for the three plants are described. (orig.)

1981-01-01

 
 
 
 
181

Decommissioning of DR 1, Final report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The report describes the decommissioning activities carried out at the 2kW homogeneous reactor DR 1 at Risoe National Laboratory. The decommissioning work took place from summer 2004 until late autumn 2005. The components with the highest activity, the core vessel the recombiner and the piping and valves connected to these, were dismantled first by Danish Decommissioning's own technicians. Demolition of the control rod house and the biological shield as well as the removal of the floor in the reactor hall was carried out by an external demolition contractor. The building was emptied and left for other use. Clearance measurements of the building showed that radionuclide concentrations were everywhere below the clearance limit set by the Danish nuclear regulatory authorities. Furthermore, measurements on the surrounding area showed that there was no contamination that could be attributed to the operation and decommissioning of DR 1. (au)

Lauridsen, Kurt

2006-01-15

182

Decommissioning of DR 1, Final report  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The report describes the decommissioning activities carried out at the 2kW homogeneous reactor DR 1 at Risoe National Laboratory. The decommissioning work took place from summer 2004 until late autumn 2005. The components with the highest activity, the core vessel the recombiner and the piping and valves connected to these, were dismantled first by Danish Decommissioning's own technicians. Demolition of the control rod house and the biological shield as well as the removal of the floor in the reactor hall was carried out by an external demolition contractor. The building was emptied and left for other use. Clearance measurements of the building showed that radionuclide concentrations were everywhere below the clearance limit set by the Danish nuclear regulatory authorities. Furthermore, measurements on the surrounding area showed that there was no contamination that could be attributed to the operation and decommissioning of DR 1. (au)

183

Health physics considerations in decontamination and decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] These proceedings contain papers on legal considerations, environmental aspects, decommissioning equipment and methods, instrumentation, applied health physics, waste classification and disposal, and project experience. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers

1985-01-01

184

Decommissioning of uranium mines in Canada  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) regulates the nuclear fuel cycle in Canada. This paper overviews the nature and function of the AECB; discusses its {open_quotes}site-specific{close_quotes} approach to regulating the decommissioning of uranium mining facilities; catalogues the location and status of inactive uranium tailings impoundments in Canada; and, summarizes the decommissioning work at the licensed Elliot Lake tailings impoundments.

Zgola, M.B. [Atomic Energy Control Board, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

1996-12-31

185

Russian nuclear-powered submarine decommissioning  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Russia is facing technical, economic and organizational difficulties in dismantling its oversized and unsafe fleet of nuclear powered submarines. The inability of Russia to deal effectively with the submarine decommissioning crisis increases the risk of environmental disaster and may hamper the implementation of the START I and START II treaties. This paper discusses the nuclear fleet support infrastructure, the problems of submarine decommissioning, and recommends international cooperation in addressing these problems.

Bukharin, O. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Handler, J. [Greenpeace International`s Disarmament Campaign, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-11-01

186

Decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test (R and T) reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives (DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment)) are studied to compare the costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts of implementing each of the alternatives.

Konzek, G.J.

1982-10-01

187

Peculiarities and problems of Chernobyl NPP decommission  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A review of peculiarities and analysis of main problems associated with Chernobyl NPP decommission has been carried out. A necessity of comprehensive approach to the today's solution of given problems is shown. In particular, the activity on 1-3 Units decommission and 'Ukryttia' conversion into an ecologically safe system is not coordinated enough. The basic conceptual principles for the solution of problem are offered, and the list of top-priority problems to be solved is given

2001-01-01

188

Regulation of decommissioning in the United Kingdom  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Since 1940, the United Kingdom's (UK) nuclear programme has included the decommissioning of Research Reactors; Fuel Conversion, Enrichment and Fabrication Plants; Power Reactors, and Waste Treatment Plants. The newly formed Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) has developed a programme for all of the UK's civil nuclear liabilities including five Magnox reactors that are currently undergoing decommissioning, two undergoing defuelling and four due to cease operation over the next 5 years. The UK Health and Safety Executive's (HSE) Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) regulates safety and the management of radioactive waste at nuclear licensed sites in the United Kingdom. The main legislation is the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 (HSAW74) and its associated statutory provisions, which include the Nuclear Installations Act (as amended) 1965 (NIA 65). Additionally, NII enforces the Nuclear Reactors (Environmental Impact Assessment for Decommissioning) Regulations 1999. Under NIA65, no site may be used for installing or operating any nuclear installation unless a site licence has been granted by the HSE. NIA65 allows HSE to attach conditions to the site licence in the interests of safety, or with respect to the handling, treatment and disposal of nuclear matter, including radioactive waste. These licence conditions include decommissioning arrangements, supervision and control, emergency arrangements, training, operating rules and operating instructions. NII is reviewing the regulation of decommissioning Magnox power reactors, to ensure its approach to regulation remains proportionate and consistent. The review includes consideration of hazard levels and associated risks at such sites; public expectations of regulators; regulation of the health and safety of workers; environmental impact assessment and management; and the need to optimise the effectiveness of NII's inspectors. The paper summarises UK's approach to regulation of decommissioning nuclear facilities and presents the considerations included within the review of regulation of decommissioning Magnox power reactors. (author)

2006-01-01

189

Decommissioning of the BR3 PWR  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The objectives, programme and main achievements of SCK-CEN's decommissioning programme in 1997 are summarised. Particular emphasis is on the BR3 decommissioning project. In 1997, auxiliary equipment and loops were dismantled; concrete antimissile slabs were decontaminated; the radiology of the primary loop was modelled; the quality assurance procedure for dismantling loops and equipment were implemented; a method for the dismantling of the reactor pressure vessel was selected; and contaminated thermal insulation of the primary loop containing asbestos was removed

1998-01-01

190

Investigation on decommissioning of smelting conversion facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] To carry out decommissioning of smelting and conversion plant (containing apparatuses) in future, it is required to develop planned businesses. As JNC constructed a general WBS on the decommissioning on last fiscal years, further detailed investigations on WBS is necessary for promotion of its operations. Therefore, aiming at construction of detailed WBS with less than the fourth level, intention of updating on subdivision and radioactive decommission, and addition of data on determining methods on polluting condition of uranium series wastes, here were reported results on four items, such as reviewing of WBS on the decommissioning, construction of detailed WBS with less than the fourth level, updating of databases on subdivision and decommission, and data addition on determining methods on polluting conditions of uranium series wastes to the subdivision and the decommission databases. On this fiscal year, it was carried out investigation on contents of WBS on the 'Construction of investigating items on subdivision and removal engineerings (sixteen sheets of construction figure)' to consult WBS with less than the fourth level for eight sheets of figure in details on the second item, to carry out literature retrieval on reuse since 1998, to input sixty extracted data to database on the third item, and to carry out literature retrieval on the determining method since 1990, to input eight extracted data to database by preparing a new term in 'testing'. (G.K.)

2000-01-01

191

Decision analysis approach to prioritizing decommissioning alternatives  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A decision-analysis tool has been developed to assist utilities in performing high-level economic analysis of decommissioning strategies that explicitly address uncertainty and risk. This paper describes economic analysis of decommissioning activities and priorities for decision making for a shut down nuclear power plant. This decision-analysis tool represents the first step in developing a generic decision-support tool to aid utilities in their decommissioning planning process for operating plants. Decommissioning of commercial nuclear plants in the United States is estimated to cost electric utilities and their rate-payers hundreds of millions of dollars per plant over the next several decades. In addition, since decommissioning activities will take place over as many as 60 yr, the range of uncertainty in the various cost components is very large. Understanding the effects of these uncertainties, accounting for alternative timing scenarios, and making better overall decisions can provide high value to utilities by helping to reduce the total economic impact of decommissioning activities.

Wood, C.J.; Gjerde, A.R.

1994-12-31

192

Lessons learned from preparation for decommissioning of Ignalina NPP  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The decision for decommissioning of Unit 1 of Ignalina NPP (INPP) was made in October 1999. At that time only a Preliminary Decommissioning Plan had been developed. INPP was then faced with number of issues, namely: To define the strategy for decommissioning; To define the steps necessary to implement preparation for decommissioning; To seek funding for decommissioning; To establish and develop the organizational structure for dealing with decommissioning; To develop Project Management, Commercial and Engineering skills to manage decommissioning; To develop the relationships between operating and decommissioning parts of INPP; To develop a plan for the conversion of an Operating Nuclear Power plant to a Decommissioning Organization. Each of the above issues represents significant and challenging demands on INPP Management and staff. Lessons have and continue to be learned. INPP are proceeding with the immediate dismantling strategy of this RBMK design reactor. (author)

2006-01-01

193

"…to merit the countenance of the magistrates' : Gender and Civic Identity in eighteenth-century Aberdeen  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

In the context of shifting ideas fostered by the Enlightenment and by a drive for civility, this chapter focuses on the construction of male and female civic identities and the tensions between reconstructed masculinity and femininity. Changing views of sexual difference and ideals of masculinity and femininity informed the gendered nature of work, public life and political activity, while several different pressures came together to shape an emphasis on propriety and the desirability of establishing a civic identity that was not only personal, but also represented the town as a whole. It meant that personal civic identity was linked to the perception and outward projections of the town. Thus the chapter articulates the role and strategies of Aberdeen’s town council in regulating not only the economy but also civic spaces. It will look at how the council ‘managed’ the town with reference to the gendered character of decision-making in the face of shifting ideas of sociability, civility and town image and demonstrates how public behaviour, usually female activity, which was potentially damaging to the town’s civic identity was condemned, chastened and policed. A key issue is that men of standing and status, bourgeois men of position and wealth, largely policed women of the working classes according to the concept of civic nicety and politeness at ‘the council’s pleasure’.

Simonton, Deborah Leigh

2014-01-01

194

Air monitoring for volatile organic compounds at the Pilot Plant Complex, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The US Army`s Aberdeen Proving Ground has been a test site for a variety of munitions, including chemical warfare agents (CWA). The Pilot Plant Complex (PPC) at Aberdeen was the site of development, manufacture, storage, and disposal of CWA. Deterioration of the buildings and violations of environmental laws led to closure of the complex in 1986. Since that time, all equipment, piping, and conduit in the buildings have been removed. The buildings have been declared free of surface CWA contamination as a result of air sampling using the military system. However, no air sampling has been done to determine if other hazardous volatile organic compounds are present in the PPC, although a wide range of toxic and/or hazardous materials other than CWA was used in the PPC. The assumption has been that the air in the PPC is not hazardous. The purpose of this air-monitoring study was to screen the indoor air in the PPC to confirm the assumption that the air does not contain volatile organic contaminants at levels that would endanger persons in the buildings. A secondary purpose was to identify any potential sources of volatile organic contaminants that need to be monitored in subsequent sampling efforts.

Schneider, J.F.; O`Neill, H.J.; Raphaelian, L.A.; Tomczyk, N.A.; Sytsma, L.F.; Cohut, V.J.; Cobo, H.A.; O`Reilly, D.P.; Zimmerman, R.E.

1995-03-01

195

Ecological survey of M-Field, Edgewood Area Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

An ecological survey was conducted on M-Field, at the Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. M-Field is used routinely to test army smokes and obscurants, including brass flakes, carbon fibers, and fog oils. The field has been used for testing purposes for the past 40 years, but little documented history is available. Under current environmental regulations, the test field must be assessed periodically to document the presence or potential use of the area by threatened and endangered species. The M-Field area is approximately 370 acres and is part of the US Army`s Edgewood Area at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, Maryland. The grass-covered field is primarily lowlands with elevations from about 1.0 to 8 m above sea level, and several buildings and structures are present on the field. The ecological assessment of M-Field was conducted in three stages, beginning with a preliminary site visit in May to assess sampling requirements. Two field site visits were made June 3--7, and August 12--15, 1991, to identify the biota existing on the site. Data were gathered on vegetation, small mammals, invertebrates, birds, large mammals, amphibians, and reptiles.

Downs, J.L.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Fitzner, R.E.; Rogers, L.E.

1991-12-01

196

Ecological survey of M-Field, Edgewood Area Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

An ecological survey was conducted on M-Field, at the Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. M-Field is used routinely to test army smokes and obscurants, including brass flakes, carbon fibers, and fog oils. The field has been used for testing purposes for the past 40 years, but little documented history is available. Under current environmental regulations, the test field must be assessed periodically to document the presence or potential use of the area by threatened and endangered species. The M-Field area is approximately 370 acres and is part of the US Army's Edgewood Area at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, Maryland. The grass-covered field is primarily lowlands with elevations from about 1.0 to 8 m above sea level, and several buildings and structures are present on the field. The ecological assessment of M-Field was conducted in three stages, beginning with a preliminary site visit in May to assess sampling requirements. Two field site visits were made June 3--7, and August 12--15, 1991, to identify the biota existing on the site. Data were gathered on vegetation, small mammals, invertebrates, birds, large mammals, amphibians, and reptiles.

Downs, J.L.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Fitzner, R.E.; Rogers, L.E.

1991-12-01

197

Ehrlichia chaffeensis (Rickettsiales: Ehrlichieae) infection in Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae) at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME) is a sometimes fatal, emerging tick-borne disease caused by the bacterium Ehrlichia chaffeensis. It is frequently misdiagnosed because its symptoms mimic those of the flu. Current evidence indicates that Amblyomma americanum (L.), the lone star tick, is the major vector of HME. To determine if E. chaffeensis is present in ticks at Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, questing A. americanum ticks were collected from 33 sites. Nucleic acid was extracted from 34 adult and 81 nymphal pools. Sequences diagnostic for E. chaffeensis from three different loci (16S rRNA, 120-kDa protein, and a variable-length polymerase chain reaction [PCR] target, or VLPT) were targeted for amplification by the PCR. Fifty-two percent of the collection sites yielded pools infected with E. chaffeensis, confirming the presence and widespread distribution of E. chaffeensis at Aberdeen Proving Ground. Analysis with the both the 120-kDa protein primers and the VLPT primers showed that genetic variance exists. A novel combination of variance for the two loci was detected in two tick pools. The pathogenic implications of genetic variation in E. chaffeensis are as yet unknown.

Stromdahl EY; Randolph MP; O'Brien JJ; Gutierrez AG

2000-05-01

198

Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Status report. Humboldt Bay Power Plant Unit 3, SAFSTOR decommissioning  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This document explains the purpose of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Projects (ENFDP) program and summarizes information concerning the decommissioning of the Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 facility. Preparations to put this facility into a custodial safe storage (SAFSTOR) mode are currently scheduled for completion by June 30, 1986. This report gives the status of activities as of June 1985. A final summary report will be issued after completion of this SAFSTOR decommissioning activity. Information included in this status report has been collected from the facility decommissioning plan, environmental report, and other sources made available by the licensee. This data has been placed in a computerized data base system which permits data manipulation and summarization. A description of the computer reports that can be generated by the decommissioning data system (DDS) for Humboldt Bay and samples of those reports are included in this document.

Baumann, B.L.; Haffner, D.R.; Miller, R.L.; Scotti, K.S.

1986-06-01

199

Desempenho em confinamento de machos bovinos inteiros Canchim, Aberdeen angus e cruzamentos recíprocos Feedlot performance of canchim, aberdeen angus and reciprocal crossbred males  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Foram analisados o consumo diário de matéria seca (MS) por 100kg de peso vivo (CMS), a conversão alimentar (CA) e o ganho de peso médio diário (GMD) de 118 machos bovinos inteiros Canchim (Cn), Aberdeen Angus (Ab) e cruzamentos recíprocos (CnAb (F1, 3/4Cn+1/4Ab, 5/8Cn+3/8Ab e 11/16Cn+5/16Ab) e AbCn (F1, 5/8Ab+3/8Cn e 11/16Ab+5/16Cn)). Esses animais foram alimentados em baias individuais por 84 a 95 dias com silagem de milho à vontade mais concentrado (17,8% de PB e 79% de NDT) fornecido à base de 1% do peso vivo do animal por dia. As características foram analisadas por um modelo que incluiu os efeitos fixos de ano do confinamento, grupo genético, período e ano x período e o efeito aleatório de animal dentro de grupo genético dentro de ano. A relação MS do concentrado:MS da silagem foi incluída como co-variável no modelo. Posteriormente, as características foram analisadas por um modelo de regressão que incluiu coeficientes representando as frações esperadas de Ab nos genótipos dos animais e das mães e as heterozigoses individual e materna. As médias para CMS, CA e GMD foram 2,44kg de MS/100kg de PV/dia, 6,97kg de MS/kg de GMD e 1,435kg/dia, respectivamente. O grupo genético influenciou o CMS (PDaily dry matter intake (CMS), feed conversion (CA) and average daily gain (ADG) of 118 Canchim (Cn), Aberdeen Angus (Ab) and reciprocal crossbred (CnAb and AbCn) males were analyzed. The CnAb group included F1, 3/4Cn+1/4Ab, 5/8Cn+3/8Ab and 11/16Cn+5/16Ab. The AbCn included F1, 5/8Ab+3/8Cn and 11/16Ab+5/16Cn. These animals were fed in individual stalls for 84 to 95 days receiving corn silage ad libitum plus a concentrate containing 17.8% CP and 79% TDN fed 1% of live animal weight per day. The traits were first analyzed by a model that included the fixed effects of year, genetic group, period and year x period interaction and the random effect of animal within genetic group within year. The ratio between the dry matter of the concentrate to the dry matter of the silage was included as a continuous variable in the model. Later, the traits were analyzed by a multiple regression model that included coefficients for the expected fractions of Ab in the genotypes of animals and dams and for expected individual and maternal heterozygosities. Means for CMS, CA and ADG were, respectively, 2.44kg of DM/100kg of live weight/day, 6.97kg of DM/kg of ADG and 1.435kg/day. Genetic group influenced CMS (P<0.01) and ADG (P<0.06). The Ab was equal to AbCn, showing higher CMS and lower ADG than the other two groups. There was no heterosis for any of the traits indicating that rotational crossing between Canchim and Aberdeen Angus was equal to the average of the parental breeds.

Daniel Perotto; José Luiz Moletta; Carlos Lesskiu

2002-01-01

200

Decommissioning of fast reactors after sodium draining  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Acknowledging the importance of passing on knowledge and experience, as well mentoring the next generation of scientists and engineers, and in response to expressed needs by Member States, the IAEA has undertaken concrete steps towards the implementation of a fast reactor data retrieval and knowledge preservation initiative. Decommissioning of fast reactors and other sodium bearing facilities is a domain in which considerable experience has been accumulated. Within the framework and drawing on the wide expertise of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR), the IAEA has initiated activities aiming at preserving the feedback (lessons learned) from this experience and condensing those to technical recommendations on fast reactor design features that would ease their decommissioning. Following a recommendation by the TWG-FR, the IAEA had convened a topical Technical Meeting (TM) on 'Operational and Decommissioning Experience with Fast Reactors', hosted by CEA, Centre d'Etudes de Cadarache, France, from 11 to 15 March 2002 (IAEA-TECDOC- 1405). The participants in that TM exchanged detailed technical information on fast reactor operation and decommissioning experience with various sodium cooled fast reactors, and, in particular, reviewed the status of the various decommissioning programmes. The TM concluded that the decommissioning of fast reactors to reach safe enclosure presented no major difficulties, and that this had been accomplished mainly through judicious adaptation of processes and procedures implemented during the reactor operation phase, and the development of safe sodium waste treatment processes. However, the TM also concluded that, on the path to achieving total dismantling, challenges remain with regard to the decommissioning of components after sodium draining, and suggested that a follow-on TM be convened, that would provide a forum for in-depth scientific and technical exchange on this topic. This publication constitutes the Proceedings of this follow-up TM held in Cadarache, France, 26-30 September 2005

2002-03-15

 
 
 
 
201

Carcass characteristics of small and medium-frame Aberdeen Angus young steers=Características da carcaça de novilhos super jovens Aberdeen Angus de biótipos pequeno e médio  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Carcass characteristics of small and medium-frame Aberdeen Angus young steers, finished in feedlot and slaughtered with similar subcutaneous fat thickness are evaluated. The average age and live weight at the start of feedlot were respectively 298 days and 202 kg. The steers were confined during 158 days, and slaughtered with average subcutaneous fat thickness of 6.4 mm. The feed consisted of sorghum silage and concentrate at 60:40 ratio of dry matter during the first 63 days and 50:50 afterward. The frame was calculated by formula F =-11.548 + (0.4878xh) - (0.0289xID) + (0.0000146xID²)+(0.0000759xIDxh), where h is the height and ID the age, in days. Steers with medium frame showed superiority in important marketing aspects such as warm (p Avaliaram-se as características da carcaça de novilhos Aberdeen Angus super jovens de biótipos pequeno e médio, terminados em confinamento e abatidos com semelhante espessura de gordura subcutânea. A idade e o peso vivo médio de ingresso no confinamento foram de 298 dias e 202 kg. Os animais foram confinados durante 158 dias, abatidos com espessura de gordura subcutânea média de 6,4 mm. A alimentação foi composta por silagem de sorgo e concentrado, na razão volumoso:concentrado de 60:40 na matéria seca, nos primeiros 63 dias e após, 50:50 até o abate. O biótipo foi calculado utilizando a fórmula B=-11,548 + (0,4878xh) - (0,0289xID) + (0,0000146xID²) + (0,0000759xhxID), em que h representou a altura e o ID idade em dias. Novilhos com biótipo médio apresentaram superioridade nos aspectos importantes de comercialização, como o peso de carcaça quente (p < 0,0001) e fria (p < 0,0001). As medidas de musculosidade da carcaça como a área de longissimus dorsi em relação ao peso de carcaça fria (p = 0,0477) e de corpo vazio (0,0419) foram menores nos novilhos de biótipo médio. A conformação da carcaça, área de longissimus dorsi em cm² e espessura de coxão foram semelhantes entre os biótipos. Os cortes comerciais, dianteiro (p < 0,0001), costilhar (p = 0,009) e traseiro especial (p = 0,0003) em kg foram superiores nos de biótipo médio. Em percentagem, o corte traseiro diminuiu 0,18% com o aumento no biótipo (p = 0,0404). Em peso, os tecidos constituintes da carcaça aumentaram com o biótipo do novilho, já quanto à percentagem o tecido muscular apresentou queda de 0,57% (p = 0,0410).

Miguelangelo Ziegler Arboitte; Ivan Luis Brondani; João Restle; Leandro da Silva Freitas; Lucas Braido Pereira; Gilmar dos Santos Cardoso

2012-01-01

202

Regulatory experience in nuclear power station decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In the UK, decommissioning on a licensed nuclear site is regulated and controlled by HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate on behalf of the Health and Safety Executive. The same legislative framework used for operating nuclear power stations is also applied to decommissioning activities and provides a continuous but flexible safety regime until there is no danger from ionising radiations. The regulatory strategy is discussed, taking into account Government policy and international guidance for decommissioning and the implications of the recent white paper reviewing radioactive waste management policy. Although each site is treated on a case by case basis as regulatory experience is gained from decommissioning commercial nuclear power stations in the UK, generic issues have been identified and current regulatory thinking on them is indicated. Overall it is concluded that decommissioning is an evolving process where dismantling and waste disposal should be carried out as soon as reasonably practicable. Waste stored on site should, where it is practical and cost effective, be in a state of passive safety. (Author)

1995-01-01

203

Verification for radiological decommissioning - Lessons learned  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

During the past 10 years, the Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) at Oak ridge Associated Universities has performed radiological surveys to confirm the adequacy of cleanup and/or decommissioning actions at sites and facilities where radioactive materials have been handled. These surveys are part of the independent oversight programs of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Results of verification activities have been discouraging. Numerous independent surveys have identified residual contamination requiring further remediation; in some cases, initial decontamination and postremedial action monitoring were totally inadequate. While participating in decommission projects, ESSAP learned valuable lessons and has given this information to regulating agencies and decommissioning sites. The goal of this presentation is to highlight the difficulties encountered by ESSAP in its involvement with NRC and DOE decommissioning projects. Decommissioning projects require teamwork, and success depends to a large degree on the communication, cooperation, and coordination of efforts among the individual organizations involved. This information could be used by organizations involved in future decontamination projects to avoid some of the pitfalls associated with this process.

1990-01-01

204

Systematic Approach for Decommissioning Planning and Estimating  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Nuclear facility decommissioning, satisfactorily completed at the lowest cost, relies on a systematic approach to the planning, estimating, and documenting the work. High quality information is needed to properly perform the planning and estimating. A systematic approach to collecting and maintaining the needed information is recommended using a knowledgebase system for information management. A systematic approach is also recommended to develop the decommissioning plan, cost estimate and schedule. A probabilistic project cost and schedule risk analysis is included as part of the planning process. The entire effort is performed by a experienced team of decommissioning planners, cost estimators, schedulers, and facility knowledgeable owner representatives. The plant data, work plans, cost and schedule are entered into a knowledgebase. This systematic approach has been used successfully for decommissioning planning and cost estimating for a commercial nuclear power plant. Elements of this approach have been used for numerous cost estimates and estimate reviews. The plan and estimate in the knowledgebase should be a living document, updated periodically, to support decommissioning fund provisioning, with the plan ready for use when the need arises.

Dam, A. S.

2002-02-26

205

Economical aspect of the decommissioning for NPP  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The estimated, analysed and founding of the economical aspect at decommissioning of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) have been studied. The data that have been obtained from literature, then the calculation and analysing have been done base to the future condition. The cost for NPP decommissioning depend on the internal factor such as type, capacity and safe storage time, and the external factor such as policy, manpower and the technology preparation. The successfulness of funding, depend on the rate of inflation, discount rate of interest and the currency fluctuation. For the internal factor, the influence of the type of the reactor (BWR or PWR) to the decommissioning cost is negligible, the big reactor capacity (±1100 MW), and the safe storage between 30 to 100 years are recommended, and for the external factor, specially Indonesia, to meet the future need the ratio of decommissioning cost and capital cost will be lower than in develop countries at the present (10%). The ratio between decommissioning fund and electricity generation cost relatively very low, are more less than 1.79 % for 30 years safe storage, and discount rate of interest 3%, or more less than 0.30 % for safe storage 30 years, and discount rate of interest 6%. (author)

1998-01-01

206

Nuclear Decommissioning. The strategic, practical, and environmental considerations  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This volume contains 38 papers presented at the International Conference on Nuclear Decommissioning organised by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers and the British Nuclear Energy Society in 1995. The topics covered include: descriptions of the decommissioning of specific reactors; aspects of decommissioning of nuclear facilities in general; cyclotron and hot laboratory decommissioning; decontamination and dismantling; equipment; regulatory regimes; nuclear liabilities management. A separate abstract has been prepared for each paper. (UK)

1995-01-01

207

Colloquium on the decommissioning of the NS Otto Hahn  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] After successful conclusion of the decommissioning of NS Otto Hahn during the summer of 1982 a specialists meeting was organized by GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH in order to give information about planning, procedures used and experience resulting from the decommissioning process. The state-of-the-art decommissioning techniques as used for this first German nuclear powered merchant ship are shown by experts from licensing authorities, the decommissioning company and the ship operator. (orig./HP)

1983-01-26

208

The IAEA RADWASS safety standard on decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

It is generally felt that, in the technological area of decommissioning, the existing IAEA publications by and large satisfy the current needs of Member States. Therefore, over the years emphasis has been enhanced in another area of interest which covers regulations, standards and guides. More specifically, the IAEA should demonstrate harmonization of approach at the international level by promulgating standards that are developed, discussed and agreed upon internationally. In response to this request by Member States, the IAEA in 1991 established the RADioactive Waste Safety Standards (RADWASS) programme to develop a special series of safety documents specifically directed at radioactive waste management. In the decommissioning field, an IAEA Safety Standard on decommissioning is being prepared. (Author)

1995-01-01

209

Decommissioning of DR 2. Final report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report describes the work of dismantling and demolishing reactor DR 2, the waste volumes generated, the health physical conditions and the clearance procedures used for removed elements and waste. Since the ultimate goal for the decommissioning project was not clearance of the building, but downgrading the radiological classification of the building with a view to converting it to further nuclear use, this report documents how the lower classification was achieved and the known occurrence of remaining activity. The report emphasises some of the deliberations made and describes the lessons learned through this decommissioning project. The report also intends to contribute towards the technical basis and experience basis for further decommissioning of the nuclear facilities in Denmark. (au)

Strufe, N.

2009-02-15

210

Experience of decommissioning of transport flasks  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

With a fleet of 4000 transport flasks and associated materials, COGEMA is involved with EDF and other foreign customers (Japan, Germany) in the transportation of nuclear materials (fissile and spent fuel, plutonium, uranyl nitrate, vitrified and low-activity level residues). Providing this service since the start of civil nuclear activity, we are currently faced with solving the industrial problem created by decommissioning of such materials. An original process was implemented by MMT for decommissioning baskets made of mixed stainless steel and aluminium structure that was used for transporting spent fuels from Pressurized Water Reactors. Other methods were used for decommissioning obsolete trailers, tanks and flasks. The purpose of this paper is to present the technical solutions taking into account the nuclear safety and security constraints and the industrial choices made for optimizing economic aspects. (authors)

Andreosso, S. [MMT, 78 - Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (France); Sallaber, D. [Cogema, 78 - Velizy-Villacoublay (France); Samson, J. [MMT, 50 - Beaumont Hague (France)

1998-12-31

211

Site Decommissioning Management Plan. Supplement 1  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 51 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety, they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC stairs strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 51 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites. This is supplement number one to NUREG-1444, which was published in October 1993.

1995-01-01

212

The economics and financing of decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Economics and financing have the most immediate interest to the public. Largely this interest stems from the effect of decommissioning on current utility rates, but there are other related issues as well. These include the question of whether adequate funds will be available when needed, how they will be collected and invested, and what constitute reasonable contingency factors and discount rates. Preliminary examination of the economics of decommissioning raises more questions than it answers. Each country or area of a country (as in the USA) will be faced with establishing its own policies. Whichever methods and logic are finally applied to the economics of decommissioning in the United Kingdom, the public will eventually pay. For this reason, a clear working knowledge of the principal elements of this consideration is important. (author).

1990-01-01

213

Decommissioning of the Loviisa power plant  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In accordance with the provisions laid in the decision of the Ministry for Trade and Industry Imatran Voima Oy has revised the decommissioning plan for the Loviisa power plant, and submitted it to the authorities for review in December 1993. The plan outlines the technical measures needed to dismantle the radioactive parts of the Loviisa power plant, explains how the resulting waste will be packed and disposed of, and estimates how many people will be needed for the decommissioning waste will be. A general timetable and a cost estimate have also been drawn up on the basis of a detailed working plan. In this report the plan has been revised for cost estimate, activity inventory of the decommissioning waste and radiation dose caused by dismantling work. (orig.). (11 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.).

1993-01-01

214

Decommissioning trust funds ordered by PSC  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Wisconsin public service commission ordered four electric utilities to set up external trust funds for decommissioning expenses instead of collecting the money from its ratepayers to offset current borrowing needs. The change is to assure that funds will be available when they are needed for the Point Beach 1 and 2 and the Kewaunee plants, which are due for relicensing and possible decommissioning in 2007 and 2008. The external fund will be available at a time when ratepayers will likely be paying for replacement power plants. Critics claim the order will cost utility customers $800 million over the next 23 years, and note that Wisconsin Electric Power Co. has a reputation for financial health. One area of concern is the treatment of funds already collected for decommissioning

1986-01-01

215

Waste from decommissioning of nuclear power plants  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] This report is based on the assumption that all twelve nuclear power plants will be shut down no later than A.D. 2010, as was decided by the parliament after the referendum on the future of nuclear power in Sweden. The recent 'Party agreement on the energy policy' of January 15, 1991 does, indeed, leave the door open for an extension of the operational period for the nuclear reactors. This will, however, not change the recommendations and conclusions drawn in this report. The report consists of two parts. Part 1 discusses classification of waste from decommissioning and makes comparisons with the waste arising from reactor operation. Part 2 discusses the documentation required for decommissioning waste. Also this part of the report draws parallels with the documentation required by the authorities for the radioactive waste arising from operation of the nuclear power plants. To some extent these subjects depend on the future use of the nuclear power plant sites after decommissioning of the plants. The options for future site use are briefly discussed in an appendix to the report. There are many similarities between the waste from reactor operations and the waste arising from dismantling and removal of decommissioned nuclear power plants. Hence it seems natural to apply the same criteria and recommendations to decommissioning waste as those presently applicable to reactor waste. This is certainly true also with respect to documentation, and it is strongly recommended that the documentation requirements on decommissioning waste are made identical, or at least similar, to the documentation requirements for reactor waste in force today. (au)

1992-01-01

216

Decommissioning of the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A conceptual plan is presented for the decommissioning of the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant. Deferred dismantlement after a storage period of 30 years is the main alternative. No detailed work plan for the demolition of structures is included. However, the world-wide development of demolition techniques for nuclear facilities has proven that the task can be performed using the existing technology. The decommissioning waste will be packed into concrete containers and wooden boxes. The total package volume is estimated at 8.000 and 30.000 m3 depending on the treatment method. The higher figure stands for packing without any volume reduction. The activated reactor core components (fuel channels, control rods, neutron flux detectors) from the operational time of the Olkiluoto power plant are included in the decommissioning plan. The total activity of the contaminated and activated structures to be dismantled will be about 1x1016 Bq after 30 years from the shut-down. The corresponding figure for the activated core components will be about 2x1016 Bq. The radiation doses to personnel can be kept very low if the surface contamination of the large systems remains at a low level as it has done so far. The decommissioning waste is planned to be disposed of at the Olkiluoto site next to the reactor waste repository in the granitic bedrock at a depth of 50-100 m. The decommissioning waste repository will consist of two silos for the low-level waste and a hall for the activated metal waste. The barriers in the case of the metal waste hall will consist of the waste packages themselves, of 0.75 and 1 m thick concrete walls, of the 1 m thick bentonite/crushed rock backfill, and of the bedrock. The dismantlement will be finished by the year 2050, and the repository can be closed and sealed by 2055. The estimated decommissioning cost is FIM 808 million including the long-term storage and disposal

1987-01-01

217

NEA activities in economics and funding of decommissioning  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

There are three main aspects of this topic that have been studied by the NEA under auspices of its Nuclear Development Committee. They are the estimated costs of decommissioning; the burden of decommissioning on electricity generation costs; and the mechanisms for ensuring that resources will be available when decommissioning expenditures fall due. (Author).

Stevens, G.H. [International Energy Agency, 75 - Paris (France). Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations

1995-12-31

218

Feedback Experience from Decommissioning of Uranium Conversion Plant  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

KAERI has been conducting decommissioning activities of Uranium Conversion Plant (UCP) for the last decade. As a result of all this work KAERI has accumulated significant experience in the field of decommissioning of nuclear facilities. On the basis of the experience gained from decommissioning activities, this paper describes several lessons learned

Hwang, D. S.; Lee, K. I.; Choi, Y. D.; Moon, J. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2011-10-15

219

Feedback Experience from Decommissioning of Uranium Conversion Plant  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

KAERI has been conducting decommissioning activities of Uranium Conversion Plant (UCP) for the last decade. As a result of all this work KAERI has accumulated significant experience in the field of decommissioning of nuclear facilities. On the basis of the experience gained from decommissioning activities, this paper describes several lessons learned

2011-01-01

220

26 CFR 1.88-1 - Nuclear decommissioning costs.  

Science.gov (United States)

...deduction for amounts paid to a nuclear decommissioning fund, see...88 and this section apply to nuclear decommissioning costs directly... (2) If the amount of nuclear decommissioning costs directly...of the taxpayer that was in effect when such amount was...

2013-04-01

 
 
 
 
221

An apparatus for studying spallation neutrons in the Aberdeen Tunnel laboratory  

CERN Multimedia

In this paper, we describe the design, construction and performance of an apparatus installed in the Aberdeen Tunnel laboratory in Hong Kong for studying spallation neutrons induced by cosmic-ray muons under a vertical rock overburden of 611 meter water equivalent (m.w.e.). The apparatus comprises of six horizontal layers of plastic-scintillator hodoscopes for determining the direction and position of the incident cosmic-ray muons. Sandwiched between the hodoscope planes is a neutron detector filled with 650 kg of liquid scintillator doped with about 0.06% of Gadolinium by weight for improving the e?ciency of detecting the spallation neutrons. Performance of the apparatus is also presented.

Blyth, S C; Chen, X C; Chu, M C; Hahn, R L; Ho, T H; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Lau, Y P; Lee, K P; Leung, J K C; Leung, K Y; Lin, G L; Lin, Y C; Luk, K B; Luk, W H; Ngai, H Y; Ngan, S Y; Pun, C S J; Shih, K; Tam, Y H; Tsang, R H M; Wang, C H; Wong, C M; Wong, H L; Wong, H H C; Wong, K K; Yeh, M

2013-01-01

222

Field studies; analysis of urban air in the city of Aberdeen for volatile organic compounds (VOCs)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The development of suitable methodology described in this paper for twelve different VOCs or tropospheric interest is based on target compound analysis. Their characterization by GLC from more volatile to less volatile hydrocarbons adsorbed on charcoal with subsequent desorption in xylene solvent in described. The chromatography of this group of volatile organic compounds with detection limit sample injection volume and chromatographic performance of the packed column is critically discussed for urban air samples of Aberdeen City (UK), pumped sampling on charcoal was used with subsequent desorption into xylene. The only problem is the volume of solvent required in routine analysis, usually of the order of the milliliter, sine only a micro-litter of extracts is injected into the GLC, which reduces the sensitivity of the method compared to that of thermal desorption

1999-01-01

223

Knowledge management during decommissioning of Chornobyl NPP  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The article deals with issues on knowledge management during decommissioning by the example of the Chornobyl NPP. This includes how the duration of decommissioning stage, change in organization goal and final state of the site influence on human resources and knowledge management system. The main attention is focused on human assets and intellectual strength of Chornobyl NPP. Mathematical dependencies are proposed to substantiate numerical values. An analysis is given for the current situation, and forecast estimates for values dynamics is performed. The conclusion gives solutions on providing experienced staff in the future.

2010-01-01

224

Optimization in the decommissioning of uranium tailings  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report examines in detail the problem of choosing the optimal decommissioning approach for uranium and mill tailings sites. Various decision methods are discussed and evaluated, and their application in similar decision problems are summarized. This report includes, by means of a demonstration, a step by step guide of how a number of selected techniques can be applied to a decommissioning problem. The strengths and weaknesses of various methods are highlighted. A decision system approach is recommended for its flexibility and incorporation of many of the strengths found in other decision methods

1987-01-01

225

The Morsleben radwaste repository. Preparing for decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The publication is intended to illustrate with a brief chronology the history and the present situation of the Morsleben radwaste repository, including specific aspects such as the geology of the site and construction and engineering activities, the particulars of waste form emplacement and log-term storage conditions, topical issues relating to radiological safety during operation and after decommissioning. The brochure is designed for the general audience interested in background information on all aspects of the uses, operation and decommissioning of a radwaste repository in Germany. (orig./CB)

2001-01-01

226

Decommissioning of a tritium-contaminated laboratory  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A tritium laboratory facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, was decommissioned in 1979. The project involved dismantling the laboratory equipment and disposing of the equipment and debris at an on-site waste disposal/storage area. The laboratory was constructed in 1953 and was in service for tritium research and fabrication of lithium tritide components until 1974. The major features of the laboratory included some 25 meters of gloveboxes and hoods, associated vacuum lines, utility lines, exhaust ducts, electrodryers, blowers, and laboratory benches. This report presents details on the decommissioning, health physics, waste management, environmental surveillance, and costs for the operation

1981-01-01

227

The decommissioning and redevelopment of NECSA site  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: The South African nuclear programme started in 1948 and was focussed on research and development in the nuclear field. In the early 70s a uranium conversion plant and a uranium enrichment plant were constructed on the NECSA site. The enriched uranium was used for military purposes, as fuel for the research reactor SAFARI-1 at Necsa. A semi-commercial uranium enrichment plant and a fuel manufacturing plant were commissioned in the 80's to supply fuel for the nuclear power plant at Koeberg near Cape Town. Currently the research reactor is utilized for the generation of radioactive isotopes for industrial and medical applications. Various other research projects were initiated and buildings constructed on the Necsa site to accommodate the different projects. The uranium conversion and enrichment projects were terminated in the early 90's, and many buildings on the Necsa site became redundant. An initial decommissioning strategy was to return the Necsa site to green fields. This endpoint of decommissioning has changed dramatically with the nuclear renaissance to include redevelopment and reuse options. In the case of a multi-facility nuclear site, such as the Necsa site, it is vital to develop a total site redevelopment plan rather than to decommission and allocate individual facilities for isolated reuse demands. A holistic approach should be assured by considering current and projected future redevelopment demands in the development of a redevelopment and reuse plan. It is important not to allow the redevelopment and reuse of a single facility on a multi-facility site based on short- term financial gain. With the recent increase in demand for nuclear facilities the redevelopment and reuse of nuclear facilities for non-nuclear applications should generally not be considered due to the inherent advantages associated with an existing licensed site. The initial decommissioning plan did not consider the Necsa site as a whole. Decommissioning costs, and the reuse of equipment were not optimised and the uncoordinated redevelopment and reuse lead to decommissioning to lower levels than required. A holistic approach towards redevelopment and reuse could have resulted in minimising decommissioning waste. In the past decommissioning was aimed at the final disposal of waste and the remediation of a site. This concept is currently challenged and decommissioning should not be viewed as an endpoint of a facility or site but should rather be the starting phase of a redevelopment and reuse opportunity for a facility or site. A decommissioning strategy based on the final closure of a facility or site should be a last resort and the focus should move to redevelopment and reuse options. The decommissioning of a nuclear site is usually associated with remaining liabilities, which require resources to ensure management of stored radiological waste etc. If the nuclear site is redeveloped and reused, these control measures and infrastructure could be included as part of the reuse scenario which is beneficial to the redevelopment and to liability management. (author)

2008-01-01

228

Good practices in decommissioning planning and pre-decommissioning activities for the Magurele VVR-S nuclear research reactor  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The VVR-S Nuclear Research Reactor at the 'Horia Hulubei' National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering in Magurele, Bucharest, will be decommissioned applying the immediate dismantling strategy. The implementation of the decommissioning project started in 2010 and is planned for completion within 11 years. Good practices in decommissioning planning, organization, funding, and logistics are described in this paper. (author)

2011-01-01

229

Good practices in decommissioning planning and pre-decommissioning activities for the Magurele VVR-S nuclear research reactor  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The VVR-S Nuclear Research Reactor at the “Horia Hulubei” National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering in Magurele, Bucharest, will be decommissioned applying the immediate dismantling strategy. The implementation of the decommissioning project started in 2010 and is planned for completion within 11 years. Good practices in decommissioning planning, organization, funding, and logistics are described in this paper.

Dragusin Mitica; Pavelescu Octavian Alexandru; Iorga Ioan

2011-01-01

230

Decommissioning of the nuclear merchant ship OTTO HAHN  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

With NS OTTO HAHN for the first time in the world a nuclear merchant ship and for the first time in FRG a nuclear power plant was decommissioned. Starting from the existing technical and radiological state of the plant the decommissioning concept is shown. Licensind and release procedures including the applied measuring techniques are described and the single phases of the decommissioning work are dealt with. The total masses and activities are balanced and the results of the decommissioning are discussed. With the suspension of the control area and the release of the ship the decommissioning work was finished in June 1982. (orig.).

1983-01-01

231

The market opportunity for decommissioning oil and gas platforms on the United Kingdom continental shelf; Decommissioning  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

'The UKCS offshore decommissioning market report 2010-2040' recently released, reveals that the total cost of decommissioning the 260+ offshore oil and gas platforms - together with associated wells, manifolds, pipelines and umbilicals - located on the UK Continental Shelf (UKCS) could be in excess of USD 30 billion over the next 30 years. This article investigates the scale of work required and the market opportunity for the oil services industry - especially vessel operators and well service companies. (AG)

Sanderson, Oliver

2011-07-01

232

The planning of decommissioning activities within nuclear facilities - Generating a Baseline Decommissioning Plan  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] BNFL Environmental Services has developed planning tools to meet the emerging need for nuclear liabilities management and decommissioning engineering both in the UK and globally. It can provide a comprehensive baseline planning service primarily aimed at nuclear power stations and nuclear plant. The paper develops the following issues: Decommissioning planning; The baseline decommissioning plan;The process; Work package; Compiling the information; Deliverables summary; Customer Benefits; - Planning tool for nuclear liability life-cycle management; - Robust and reliable plans based upon 'real' experience; - Advanced financial planning; - Ascertaining risk; - Strategy and business planning. The following Deliverables are mentioned:1. Site Work Breakdown Structure; 2. Development of site implementation strategy from the high level decommissioning strategy; 3. An end point definition for the site; 4. Buildings, operational systems and plant surveys; 5. A schedule of condition for the site; 6. Development of technical approach for decommissioning for each work package; 7. Cost estimate to WBS level 5 for each work package; 8. Estimate of decommissioning waste arisings for each work package; 9. Preparation of complete decommissioning programme in planning software to suit client; 10. Risk modelling of work package and overall project levels; 11. Roll up of costs into an overall cost model; 12. Cash flow, waste profiling and resource profiling against the decommissioning programme; 13. Preparation and issue of Final Report. Finally The BDP process is represented by a flowchart listing the following stages: [Power Station project assigned] ? [Review project and conduct Characterisation review of power station] ? [Identify work packages] ? [Set up WBS to level 3] ? [Assign work packages] ? [Update WBS to level 4] ?[Develop cost model] ? [Develop logic network] ? [Develop risk management procedure] ] ? [Develop project strategy document]? [Work package process? [Compile all work packages into overall programme, cost model and risk register (draft BDP)] ? [Carry out project risk assessment] ? [Review and update draft BDP] ? [Peer Review BDP] ? [Power Station project assigned] ?[Issue BDP to customer for comment

2003-01-01

233

The Dynamics of the Regional Innovation around the Oil and Gas Industries: Cases of Stavanger and Aberdeen  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper presents the IRIS and MIT comparative study of the two oil capitals in Europe: Aberdeen and Stavanger, in order to analyze two successful oil and gas clusters. The Norwegian innovation system would be presented in detail. The article also examines the intrinsic role between the universities and the industrial context in the regional innovation system.//Este artículo presenta el estudio comparativo entre las dos capitales petroleras de Europa, Aberdeen y Stavanger, realizado por IRIS y MIT, con el objetivo de analizar dos clusters exitosos de gas y petróleo. Se exhibe en detalle el sistema noruego de innovación. Asimismo, este artículo examina la relación intrínseca entre las universidades y el contexto industrial en el sistema regional de innovación.

Martin Gjelsvik

2011-01-01

234

Thermal energy supply optimization for Edgewood Area, US Army Aberdeen Proving Ground: Energy supply alternatives. Final report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Relatively poor performance at the aging central heating plants (OH Ps) and planned changes in steam demand at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) Edgewood Area, Aberdeen, MD warranted an investigation of alternatives for providing thermal energy to the installation. This study: (1) evaluated the condition of the APG CHPs and heat distribution system, (2) identified thermal energy supply problems and cost-effective technologies to maintain APG`s capability to produce and distribute the needed thermal energy, and (3) recommended renovation and modernization projects for the system. Heating loads were analyzed using computer simulations, and life cycle costs were developed for each alternative. Recommended alternatives included upgrading the existing system, installing new boilers, consolidating the central heating plants, and introducing the use of absorption chilling.

McCammon, T.L.; Dilks, C.L.; Savoie, M.J.

1995-09-01

235

Screening methods for chemical warfare agents in environmental samples at the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The U.S. Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center, the U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground Support Activity, Directorate of Safety, Health and the Environment and SciTech Services Inc., an independent contractor, have developed an approach for screening environmental samples for the presence of chemical warfare agents. Since 1918, the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground has been a research and testing ground for toxic agent compounds. Since these materials are considered highly toxic, screening for their presence in environmental samples is necessary for safe shipment to contract laboratories for testing by EPA guidelines. The screening ensures worker safety and maintains U.S. Army standards for transportation of materials potentially contaminated with chemical warfare agents. This paper describes the screening methodology.

Jakubowski, E.M.; Borland, M.M.; Norris, L.; Lattin, F.G.; Wrobel, J. [Army Directorate of Safety, Health and Environment, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

1995-06-01

236

Decontamination and decommissioning of Shippingport commercial reactor  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

To a certain degree, the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Shippingport reactor was a joint venture with Duquesne Light Company. The structures that were to be decommissioned were to be removed to at least three feet below grade. Since the land had been leased from Duquesne Light, there was an agreement with them to return the land to them in a radiologically safe condition. The total enclosure volume for the steam and nuclear containment systems was about 1.3 million cubic feet, more than 80% of which was below ground. Engineering plans for the project were started in July of 1980 and the final environmental impact statement (EIS) was published in May of 1982. The plant itself was shut down in October of 1982 for end-of-life testing and defueling. The engineering services portion of the decommissioning plans was completed in September of 1983. DOE moved onto the site and took over from the Navy in September of 1984. Actual physical decommissioning began after about a year of preparation and was completed about 44 months later in July of 1989. This paper describes the main parts of D and D.

Schreiber, J. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1989-11-01

237

WAK decommissioning - description of dismantling stages  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

As of July 1, 1991 the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, in coordination with the Federal Government and state, has been in charge of this project and has entrusted the WAK BGmbH, against reimbursement of prime cost, with the zero and residual plant operation and HAW storage, and with decommissioning and HAWC management measures to be specified. (orig.)

1992-01-01

238

BNFL nuclear decommissioning liabilities management program  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The objective of this paper is to describe BNFL's policy and strategy for decommissioning and also to summarize the overall scope of nuclear liabilities in the wider field of waste retrieval and storage, as well as the dismantling and demolition aspects of decommissioning. BNFL's recently established organisational arrangements for discharging all types of these liabilities are explained, together with a review of practical progress in dealing with them. Organisational changes in recent years have amalgamated decommissioning work with operations covering waste storage and retrieval operations. A strategy of minimising residual activity in shutdown plants is pursued, followed by dismantling and demolition on appropriate time scales to minimise risk and cost. Since April 1995, a new BNFL subsidiary, Nuclear Liabilities Management Company Limited has taken responsibility for discharge of BNFL's Waste Retrieval and Decommissioning liabilities on all BNFL sites. NLM has the objectives of optimal and lowest cost management of liabilities and much clearer segregation of physical operations from project specification and planning. The Ministry of Defense (MoD) policy, strategy, work programmes and progress for the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) are also outlined. MoD/AEA has established an equivalent strategy for dealing with its liabilities. (J.S.). 5 refs., 2 figs., 4 appends

1995-01-01

239

UK nuclear decommissioning policy: time for decision  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report presents the results of an investigation into the current United Kingdom policy on the decommissioning of nuclear reactors. The most controversial feature of the policy is the plan to postpone the most difficult stage of decommissioning, the dismantling of the core, for over 100 years. While this policy has clear advantages to the present generation there are strong ethical arguments against such a long delay which also poses technical and economic questions. The work will be left to future generations, who will have to bear both the opportunity costs of labour and capital and some risk of radioactive contamination. Uncertainties exist over the availability of finance to complete the decommissioning so far into the future and assumptions have to be made that the relevant nuclear technology will still be available. It is suggested that a more active policy is needed to demonstrate that decommissioning can be carried out safely within expected costs and that higher priority needs to be given to the construction of safe waste repositories. (UK).

1994-01-01

240

75 FR 80697 - Nuclear Decommissioning Funds  

Science.gov (United States)

...decommissioning fund. Such term includes the tax imposed by section 468A(e)(2) and Sec. 1.468A-4(a), any State or local tax imposed on the income or the assets of the fund, legal expenses, accounting expenses, actuarial expenses and...

2010-12-23

 
 
 
 
241

Radioactive waste composition when NPP decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] On analyzing published data as well as the results of radiation studies of Armenian and Novovoronezhskaya NPPs the radionuclide composition has been predicted for the contamination of equipment and structures during the period of decommissioning and long-term waste storage. Dosimetric properties of nuclides and their role in personnel exposure during dismantling operations have been considered

1995-01-01

242

Radiological characterization of nuclear plants under decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] In the present work a description of major problems encountered in qualitative and quantitative radiological characterization of nuclear plants for decommissioning and decontamination purpose is presented. Referring to several nuclear plant classes activation and contamination processes, direct and indirect radiological analysis and some italian significant experience are descripted

1989-01-01

243

Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Program  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is part of the Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) Programs (ERWM). The objective of the ER Program is to provide Y-12 the capability to meet applicable environmental regulations through facility development activities and site remedial actions. The WM Program supports the ER program. The D and D Program provides collective management of sites within the Plant which are in need of decontamination and decommissioning efforts, prioritizes those areas in terms of health, safety, and environmental concerns, and implements the appropriate level of remedial action. The D and D Program provides support to identifiable facilities which formerly served one or more of the many Plant functions. Program activities include (1) surveillance and maintenance of facilities awaiting decommissioning; (2) planning safe and orderly facility decommissioning; and (3) implementing a program to accomplish facility disposition in a safe, cost effective, and timely manner. In order to achieve the first objective, a formal plan which documents the surveillance and maintenance needs for each facility has been prepared. This report provides this documentation for the Y-12 facilities currently included in the D and D Program, as well as those planned for future inclusion in the Program, and includes projected resource requirements for the planning period of FY 1993 through FY 2000

1992-01-01

244

The decommissioning of the water boiler reactor  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Following completion of service, the Water Boiler Reactor (WBR) has been decommissioned by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) under the Atomic Energy Council's (AEC) regulation. The WBR is a light water moderated and graphite reflected research reactor with peak thermal power of 100 kW. The unique feature of the WBR is that it is fueled with uranyl sulfate (UO2SO4) which is in liquid form. Since there is another research reactor owned by I7NER of megawatt scale in the planning stages for decommissioning, the WBR project was conducted with great care to accumulate experience. Extensive planning by INER and step-by-step regulative activities by AEC were followed regardless of the structural simplicity of the WBR. Valuable information was gathered in the task and will be useful for preparing future decommissioning needs. The major work in the WBR decommissioning project was finished within six months and the accumulated dose received during the work was 1 9.63mSv. (author)

1998-01-01

245

Estimation of decommissioning costs: History and status  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In the mid-1970s. the subject of the cost of decommissioning nuclear power stations became a topic of considerable interest to the industry. A number of early demonstration plants in the US had been retired and most had been entombed. Only one plant, the Elk River Reactor (a small boiling water facility) had been totally dismantled and removed from the site (Welsh 1974). Thus, there was a very limited data base from which to develop estimates for decommissioning the much larger stations then under construction and coming into service. The nuclear industry sponsored another study for estimating decommissioning costs using an approach known as the Unit Cost Factor (UCF) method. This methodology is documented in AIF/NESP-0036 (LaGuardia 1986). and forms the basis for many of the estimates prepared by (or for) utilities for usein making submissions to their utility rate commissions to recover future decommissioning costs through current rates. This and other estimating approaches mentioned above are discussed in more detail in this paper

1992-11-12

246

Sodium Reactor Experiment decommissioning. Final report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) located at the Rockwell International Field Laboratories northwest of Los Angeles was developed to demonstrate a sodium-cooled, graphite-moderated reactor for civilian use. The reactor reached full power in May 1958 and provided 37 GWh to the Southern California Edison Company grid before it was shut down in 1967. Decommissioning of the SRE began in 1974 with the objective of removing all significant radioactivity from the site and releasing the facility for unrestricted use. Planning documentation was prepared to describe in detail the equipment and techniques development and the decommissioning work scope. A plasma-arc manipulator was developed for remotely dissecting the highly radioactive reactor vessels. Other important developments included techniques for using explosives to cut reactor vessel internal piping, clamps, and brackets; decontaminating porous concrete surfaces; and disposing of massive equipment and structures. The documentation defined the decommissioning in an SRE dismantling plan, in activity requirements for elements of the decommissioning work scope, and in detailed procedures for each major task.

Carroll, J.W.; Conners, C.C.; Harris, J.M.; Marzec, J.M.; Ureda, B.F.

1983-08-15

247

Decommissioning technology development for research reactors  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Although it is expected that the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant will happen since 2020, the need of partial decommissioning and decontamination for periodic inspection and life extension has been on an increasing trend and domestic market has gradually been extended. Therefore, in this project the decommissioning DB system on the KRR-1 and 2 was developed as establishing the information classification system of the research reactor dismantling and the structural design and optimization of the decommissioning DB system. Also in order to secure the reliability and safety about the dismantling process, the main dismantling simulation technology that can verify the dismantling process before their real dismantling work was developed. And also the underwater cutting equipment was developed to remove these stainless steel parts highly activated from the RSR. First, the its key technologies were developed and then the design, making, and capability analysis were performed. Finally the actual proof was achieved for applying the dismantling site. an automatic surface contamination measuring equipment was developed in order to get the sample automatically and measure the radiation/radioactivity

248

Development of the Decommissioning Project Management System, DECOMMIS  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

At the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI), two projects for decommissioning of the research reactors and uranium conversion plant are carried out. The management of the projects can be defined as 'the decision of the changes of the decommissioning methodologies for the more efficient achievement of the project at an adequate time and to an improved method'. The correct decision comes from the experiences on the decommissioning project and the systematic experiences can be obtained from the good management of the decommissioning information. For this, a project management tool, DECOMMIS, was developed in the D and D Technology Division, which has the charge of the decommissioning projects at the KAERI, and its purpose was extended to following fields; generation of reports on the dismantling waste for WACID, record keeping for the next decommissioning projects of nuclear facilities, provision of fundamental data for the R and D of the decommissioning technologies.

Chung, U. S.; Park, J. H.; Lee, K. W.; Hwang, D. S.; Park, S. K.; Hwang, S. T.; Paik, S. T.; Choi, Y. D.; Chung, K. H.; Lee, K. I.; Hong, S. B

2007-03-15

249

A database structure for radiological optimization analyses of decommissioning operations  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The structure of a database for decommissioning experiences is described. Radiological optimization is a major radiation protection principle in practices and interventions, involving radiological protection factors, economic costs, social factors. An important lack of knowledge with respect to these factors exists in the domain of the decommissioning of nuclear power plants, due to the low number of decommissioning operations already performed. Moreover, decommissioning takes place only once for a installation. Tasks, techniques, and procedures are in most cases rather specific, limiting the use of past experiences in the radiological optimization analyses of new decommissioning operations. Therefore, it is important that relevant data or information be acquired from decommissioning experiences. These data have to be stored in a database in a way they can be used efficiently in ALARA analyses of future decommissioning activities.

1995-01-01

250

Roadmap for implementation of light water reactor decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

While decommissioning of Tokai-mura reactor and JATR reactor has already started in Japan, Tsuruga reactor is announced shutdown in 2010 as the first decommissioning of commercial light water reactor (LWR). In 2030s or may be more earlier due to economic reasons, decommissioning of LWRs will take place in succession. Since rational decommissioning needs operating data of individual plants, ample time should be allowed for planning the reactor decommissioning. Committee of Nuclear Power Engineering Cooperation (NUPEC) had identified relevant issues to implement LWR decommissioning and established roadmaps showing fundamental approaches to solve seventeen items categorized in seven areas as action items. Harmonization of policy, regulations and technology development as a whole and reflection of accumulated lessons learned from overseas decommissioning experiences needed further study. (T. Tanaka)

2008-01-01

251

AVR decommissioning, achievements and future programme  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Safestore decommissioning of the AVR 15 MWe experimental nuclear power plant with pebble bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) began in March 1994 with defueling (phase 1). Beginning of Aug. 1997, defueling as to 81% completed. Other achievements: The dismantling in the turbine hall and outside the buildings is nearly terminated, the cooling towers are demolished, and the helium bottle-battery storage and helium compressors were removed from the ring buildings in Dec. 1996. The latter was the first dismantling inside the reactor building and belonged to projects that had been advanced from the 2nd into the 1st phase of Safestore decommissioning because of the delay in defueling. Furthermore, the licence for a first supplement to Safestore decommissioning was granted in March 1997. Inside the containment, the removal of shielding material and of insulation material from the secondary circuit components is either already or will shortly be terminated. This will give access for cutting and sealing the 120 steam generator pipe penetrations above the outer reactor vessel. The scope of Safestore decommissioning, as licensed in March 1994, will be extended by three supplements, comprising mainly the dismantling of (1) the fuel handling system, coolant circulators, and interspace convection pipe, (2) the coolant purification system, and condensation coolers, and (3) the shutdown rod system. The goal is to clear the containment from all auxiliary systems and to seal the outer reactor vessel until the end of 2001. The final goal of Continued dismantling is the restoration of the green field until 2011. The term indicated the direct transition from the present Safestore decommissioning and a stepwise procedure that can be interrupted after each step and be transferred into a Safestore mode. The decision for Continued dismantling is expected in 1998; a contract for the design and licence planning will be awarded soon. (author)

1998-01-01

252

International Decommissioning Network as a Forum to Support Decommissioning Activities In Countries with Limited Resources and Experience: the Serbian Case  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Vinca Institute Nuclear Decommissioning Program (VIND Program) is aimed to improve nuclear and radiation safety in the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Serbia, by repatriation of the leaking spent nuclear fuel, expanding the capabilities for radioactive waste treatment and storage, and the decommissioning of several nuclear legacy sites. In this paper the case of heavy water research reactor decommissioning is considered, some specific needs for the support through IAEA International Decommissioning Network are elaborated, and proposals for events and activities which could help the preparation and implementation of key decommissioning tasks are made. (authors)

2009-01-01

253

Decommissioning in western Europe; Kaernkraftsavveckling i Vaesteuropa  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report gives an overview of the situation in Western Europe. The original aim was to focus on organisational and human issues with regard to nuclear reactor decommissioning, but very few articles were found. This is in sharp contrast to the substantial literature on technical issues. While most of the reports on decommissioning have a technical focus, several provide information on regulatory issues, strategies and 'state of the art'. The importance of the human and organizational perspective is however discovered, when reading between the lines of the technical publications, and especially when project managers summarize lessons learned. The results are to a large extent based on studies of articles and reports, mainly collected from the INIS database. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities started already in the sixties, but then mainly research and experimental facilities were concerned. Until now about 70 reactors have been shutdown world-wide. Over the years there have been plenty of conferences for exchanging experiences mostly about technical matters. Waste Management is a big issue. In the 2000s there will be a wave of decommissioning when an increasing amount of reactors will reach the end of their calculated lifetime (40 years, a figure now being challenged by both life-extension and pre-shutdown projects). Several reactors have been shut-down for economical reasons. Shutdown and decommissioning is however not identical. A long period of time can sometimes pass before an owner decides to decommission and dismantle a facility. The conditions will also differ depending on the strategy, 'immediate dismantling' or 'safe enclosure'. If immediate dismantling is chosen the site can reach 'green-field status' in less than ten years. 'Safe enclosure', however, seems to be the most common strategy. There are several pathways, but in general a safe store is constructed, enabling the active parts to remain in safe and waterproof conditions for a longer period of time (sometimes hundred years or more), prior to final demolition. Among the reasons for deferring the dismantling are lack of waste repositories and decreasing dose-rates for the workers. Of Europe's 218 commercial reactors in operation, the majority, 151, are located i the Western part. The biggest producers are France, United Kingdom and Germany, with 58, 35 and 20 reactors respectively. Until now mostly research- and pilot reactors have been shut-down. There are yet few experiences from decommissioning of large-scale commercial reactors. The following commercial reactors are undergoing decommissioning. (There are also a great amount of nuclear facilities of other types being decommissioned.) The three gas-cooled twin reactor plants of Berkeley, Trawsfynydd and Hunterston in UK. In Germany Gundremmingen, Lingen, Kahl and Wuergassen are being decommissioned. All of them are located in the Western part of the country. The biggest project is however the dismantling of the gigantic Greifswaldfacility situated on the coast of the Baltic see in former Eastern Germany. The plant has eight Russian built reactors of VVER-type. Like the rest of the former GDR-plants Greifswald was shutdown after the reunification in 1990. The strategy chosen is immediate dismantling. France is decommissioning seven reactors (Chooz A1, Chinon A1, A2, A3, St Laurent A1, A2 and Bugey 1.) The oldest, Chinon A1, closed down in 1973 and the youngest, Bugey 1, in 1994. Italy closed down all NPPs (altogether four) in 1987 after a referendum. The first reactor of the Netherlands was shutdown in 1997 mainly for economical reasons. The development of a free European electricity market will make it less profitable to run certain facilities. Vandelos 1 in Spain is undergoing decommissioning after a fire in the turbines in 1989. IAEA, OECD/NEA and EU are co-operating in the field of decommissioning. Much work is spent on harmonizing rules and preparing international guidelines. The international agencies now consider decommissioning of nuclear

Lundqvist, K. [Castor arbetslivskonsulter AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

1999-12-01

254

Disposition of fuel elements from the Aberdeen and Sandia pulse reactor (SPR-II) assemblies  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

We describe the disposition of fuel from the Aberdeen (APR) and the Sandia Pulse Reactors (SPR-II) which were used to provide intense neutron bursts for radiation effects testing. The enriched Uranium - 10% Molybdenum fuel from these reactors was shipped to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for size reduction prior to shipment to the Savannah River Site (SRS) for final disposition in the H Canyon facility. The Shipper/Receiver Agreements (SRA), intra-DOE interfaces, criticality safety evaluations, safety and quality requirements and key materials management issues required for the successful completion of this project will be presented. This work is in support of the DOE Consolidation and Disposition program. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has operated pulse nuclear reactor research facilities for the Department of Energy since 1961. The Sandia Pulse Reactor (SPR-II) was a bare metal Godiva-type reactor. The reactor facilities have been used for research and development of nuclear and non-nuclear weapon systems, advanced nuclear reactors, reactor safety, simulation sources and energy related programs. The SPR-II was a fast burst reactor, designed and constructed by SNL that became operational in 1967. The SPR-ll core was a solid-metal fuel enriched to 93% {sup 235}U. The uranium was alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum to ensure the phase stabilization of the fuel. The core consisted of six fuel plates divided into two assemblies of three plates each. Figure 1 shows a cutaway diagram of the SPR-II Reactor with its decoupling shroud. NNSA charged Sandia with removing its category 1 and 2 special nuclear material by the end of 2008. The main impetus for this activity was based on NNSA Administrator Tom D'Agostino's six focus areas to reenergize NNSA's nuclear material consolidation and disposition efforts. For example, the removal of SPR-II from SNL to DAF was part of this undertaking. This project was in support of NNSA's efforts to consolidate the locations of special nuclear material (SNM) to reduce the cost of securing many SNM facilities. The removal of SPR-II from SNL was a significant accomplishment in SNL's de-inventory efforts and played a key role in reducing the number of locations requiring the expensive security measures required for category 1 and 2 SNM facilities. A similar pulse reactor was fabricated at the Y-12 National Security Complex beginning in the late 1960's. This Aberdeen Pulse Reactor (APR) was operated at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) located at the Aberdeen Test Center (ATC) in Maryland. When the APRF was shut down in 2003, a portion of the DOE-owned Special Nuclear Material (SNM) was shipped to an interim facility for storage. Subsequently, the DOE determined that the material from both the SPR-II and the APR would be processed in the H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Because of the SRS receipt requirements some of the material was sent to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for size-reduction prior to shipment to the SRS for final disposition.

Mckerley, Bill [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bustamante, Jacqueline M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costa, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Drypolcher, Anthony F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hickey, Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01

255

Disposition of fuel elements from the Aberdeen and Sandia pulse reactor (SPR-II) assemblies  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

We describe the disposition of fuel from the Aberdeen (APR) and the Sandia Pulse Reactors (SPR-II) which were used to provide intense neutron bursts for radiation effects testing. The enriched Uranium - 10% Molybdenum fuel from these reactors was shipped to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for size reduction prior to shipment to the Savannah River Site (SRS) for final disposition in the H Canyon facility. The Shipper/Receiver Agreements (SRA), intra-DOE interfaces, criticality safety evaluations, safety and quality requirements and key materials management issues required for the successful completion of this project will be presented. This work is in support of the DOE Consolidation and Disposition program. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has operated pulse nuclear reactor research facilities for the Department of Energy since 1961. The Sandia Pulse Reactor (SPR-II) was a bare metal Godiva-type reactor. The reactor facilities have been used for research and development of nuclear and non-nuclear weapon systems, advanced nuclear reactors, reactor safety, simulation sources and energy related programs. The SPR-II was a fast burst reactor, designed and constructed by SNL that became operational in 1967. The SPR-ll core was a solid-metal fuel enriched to 93% 235U. The uranium was alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum to ensure the phase stabilization of the fuel. The core consisted of six fuel plates divided into two assemblies of three plates each. Figure 1 shows a cutaway diagram of the SPR-II Reactor with its decoupling shroud. NNSA charged Sandia with removing its category 1 and 2 special nuclear material by the end of 2008. The main impetus for this activity was based on NNSA Administrator Tom D'Agostino's six focus areas to reenergize NNSA's nuclear material consolidation and disposition efforts. For example, the removal of SPR-II from SNL to DAF was part of this undertaking. This project was in support of NNSA's efforts to consolidate the locations of special nuclear material (SNM) to reduce the cost of securing many SNM facilities. The removal of SPR-II from SNL was a significant accomplishment in SNL's de-inventory efforts and played a key role in reducing the number of locations requiring the expensive security measures required for category 1 and 2 SNM facilities. A similar pulse reactor was fabricated at the Y-12 National Security Complex beginning in the late 1960's. This Aberdeen Pulse Reactor (APR) was operated at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) located at the Aberdeen Test Center (ATC) in Maryland. When the APRF was shut down in 2003, a portion of the DOE-owned Special Nuclear Material (SNM) was shipped to an interim facility for storage. Subsequently, the DOE determined that the material from both the SPR-II and the APR would be processed in the H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Because of the SRS receipt requirements some of the material was sent to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for size-reduction prior to shipment to the SRS for final disposition.

2010-01-01

256

Nuclear submarine decommissioning. Radiation risk assessments  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Decommissioning of the ships and vessels with nuclear power installations is a problem of primary and worldwide importance. It is essential for both the naval fleet and the military industrial complex as a whole. Nuclear submarines decommissioning is accompanied by a number of questions concerning the development and performance of the safe technologies for managing radioactive equipment and nuclear waste from the vessels with the nuclear power facilities. Decommissioning of nuclear submarines including unloading of the spent fuel should take place at the operating ship yards and repairing plants that are usually situated close to the densely populated areas and living blocks. Decommissioning includes a series of the potentially dangerous operations with radioactive materials, e.g. fuel unloading, disposal of coolant, dismantling of the contaminated equipment, cutting out the reactor compartment, etc. As a result a great amount of highly radioactive liquid and solid wastes are formed including the cut-out reactor compartment and spent fuel that produce additional radioactive load on the local environment and population. Estimation of the radiation risk for the environment and population due to decommissioning becomes an actual and necessary question. Apart from this the process of decommissioning may cause accidents followed by complicated radiation situation with high dose rates and contamination of the environment. Analysis of the most probable scenarios of the accident development and estimation of the expected radiation consequences should help to assess the risk rate for radiation impact on the environment and population as well as to develop an adequate environmental monitoring and to undertake measures for the accident localisation and liquidation of its consequences. A separate problem is management of the reactor compartment containing radioactive equipment of the steam producing installation and biological protection. Since there are no specialised facilities with an adequate equipment for decomposition of reactor compartments incorporating highly active equipment they need to be stored in special containers for a long period until radiation level decreases to the level safe for decomposing operations without special remote and protection equipment. Various storage techniques are discussed, e.g. in floating regime, burial in shallow waters, open ground, etc. (author)

2000-01-01

257

NMSS handbook for decommissioning fuel cycle and materials licensees  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission amended its regulations to set forth the technical and financial criteria for decommissioning licensed nuclear facilities. These regulations were further amended to establish additional recordkeeping requirements for decommissioning; to establish timeframes and schedules for the decommissioning; and to clarify that financial assurance requirements must be in place during operations and updated when licensed operations cease. Reviews of the Site Decommissioning Management Plan (SDMP) program found that, while the NRC staff was overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear facilities in a manner that was protective of public health and safety, progress in decommissioning many sites was slow. As a result NRC determined that formal written procedures should be developed to facilitate the timely decommissioning of licensed nuclear facilities. This handbook was developed to aid NRC staff in achieving this goal. It is intended to be used as a reference document to, and in conjunction with, NRC Inspection Manual Chapter (IMC) 2605, ``Decommissioning Inspection Program for Fuel Cycle and Materials Licensees.`` The policies and procedures discussed in this handbook should be used by NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at licensed fuel cycle and materials sites; formerly licensed sites for which the licenses were terminated; sites involving source, special nuclear, or byproduct material subject to NRC regulation for which a license was never issued; and sites in the NRC`s SDMP program. NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear reactor facilities subject to regulation under 10 CFR Part 50 are not required to use the procedures discussed in this handbook.

Orlando, D.A.; Hogg, R.C.; Ramsey, K.M. [and others

1997-03-01

258

NMSS handbook for decommissioning fuel cycle and materials licensees  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission amended its regulations to set forth the technical and financial criteria for decommissioning licensed nuclear facilities. These regulations were further amended to establish additional recordkeeping requirements for decommissioning; to establish timeframes and schedules for the decommissioning; and to clarify that financial assurance requirements must be in place during operations and updated when licensed operations cease. Reviews of the Site Decommissioning Management Plan (SDMP) program found that, while the NRC staff was overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear facilities in a manner that was protective of public health and safety, progress in decommissioning many sites was slow. As a result NRC determined that formal written procedures should be developed to facilitate the timely decommissioning of licensed nuclear facilities. This handbook was developed to aid NRC staff in achieving this goal. It is intended to be used as a reference document to, and in conjunction with, NRC Inspection Manual Chapter (IMC) 2605, ''Decommissioning Inspection Program for Fuel Cycle and Materials Licensees.'' The policies and procedures discussed in this handbook should be used by NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at licensed fuel cycle and materials sites; formerly licensed sites for which the licenses were terminated; sites involving source, special nuclear, or byproduct material subject to NRC regulation for which a license was never issued; and sites in the NRC's SDMP program. NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear reactor facilities subject to regulation under 10 CFR Part 50 are not required to use the procedures discussed in this handbook

1997-01-01

259

Decommissioning of the universities research reactor  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Universities Research Reactor was a 300 kW Argonaut type water moderated and cooled reactor located on a site jointly owned by the Universities of Manchester and Liverpool. It was shut down in 1991. BNFL were contracted to decommission the reactor, dispose of all waste and return the site to a ''greefield'' condition. The defuelling, decommissioning and dismantling programme is described. Low-level radioactive wastes have been disposed of at BNFL's Drigg site and intermediate-level wastes are at a storage site pending ultimate disposal at the National Nuclear Waste repository when constructed. Demolition of the reactor hall and all associated buildings was planned for 1995 with a view to making formal application for the delicensing of the site in November 1995. (UK)

1995-01-01

260

Decommissioning of an uranium hexafluoride pilot plant  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Institute of Nuclear and Energetic Researches has completed fifty years of operation, belongs to the National Commission for Nuclear Energy, it is situated inside the city of Sao Paulo. The IPEN-CNEN/SP is a Brazilian reference in the nuclear fuel cycle, researches in this field began in 1970, having dominance in the cycle steps from Yellow Cake to Uranium Hexafluoride technology. The plant of Uranium Hexafluoride produced 35 metric tonnes of this gas by year, had been closed in 1992, due to domain and total transference of know-how for industrial scale, demand of new facilities for the improvement of recent researches projects. The Institute initiates decommissioning in 2002. Then, the Uranium Hexafluoride pilot plant, no doubt the most important unit of the fuel cycle installed at IPEN-CNEN/SP, beginning decommissioning and dismantlement (D and D) in 2005. Such D and D strategies, planning, assessment and execution are described, presented and evaluated in this paper. (author)

2009-10-02

 
 
 
 
261

Gnome site decontamination and decommissioning project  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In July 1977, DOE/Headquarters directed DOE/NV to design a decontamination and decommissioning plan for the Gnome site, 48 kilometers southeast of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The plan incorporated three distinct phases. During Phase I, both aerial and ground radiological surveys were conducted on the site. Radiological decontamination criteria were established, and a decontamination plan was developed based on the radiological survey results. During Phase II, site preparatory and rehabilitation work was completed. The actual land area decontamination was accomplished during Phase III with conventional earthmoving equipment. A gravity water injection system deposited 36,700 metric tons of contaminated soil and salt in the Gnome cavity. After completion of the decontamination and decommissioning operations, the Gnome site was returned to the Bureau of Land Management for unrestricted surface use.

Orcutt, J.A.; Sorom, E.R.

1982-08-01

262

Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D and D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D and D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget

2003-01-01

263

Decommissioning? Why not use a robot  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Tasks which may be accomplished by robots alone or in conjunction with human workers in decommissioning nuclear facilities include: routine surveillance in contaminated areas; radiation surveys and sampling; preparation of work area; decontamination of walls and floors; disassembly of contaminated equipment and piping; internal decontamination of piping and waste storage/processing tanks; sorting materials; removal of large activated/contaminated structures; asbestos removal and packaging; transport of waste from disassembly areas; tending waste processing equipment; waste packaging for storage. The status of the technology is briefly reviewed and examples of the use of robots in decommissioning work in the USA are described. Although the use of robots in this field is not extensive so far, that use is increasing and information on its costs and benefits are becoming available. (UK).

1995-01-01

264

Law regulations on decommissioning of reactors  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Concerning the decommissioning of reactors, the major provisions are discussed in the Electricity Enterprises Act and The Law for the Regulations of Nuclear Source Material, Nuclear Fuel Material and Reactors. Tokai Unit 1 in Tokai Power Station, Japan's first nuclear power plant, will be subject to the low regulations on reactor decommissioning about ten years hence. JPDR (Japan Power Demonstration Reactor) is being dismantled in the near future. Accoring to the Act the electricity enterprise must obtain the permission thereon from the Ministry for International Trade and Industry. According to the Low, the reactor owner must report thereon in advance to the competent Minister and the competent Minister may give orders concerning the necessary measures etc. (Mori, K.).

1985-01-01

265

Decommissioning of aqueous homogeneous critical facility (AHCF)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Aqueous Homogeneous Critical Facility (AHCF), constructed to investigate the characteristics of a heavy water moderated homogeneous reactor, had been operated until 1966 since it was reached to the critical state in 1961. As it performed its mission, the license for the operation of the facility was revoked at December 25, 1962, and thereafter the facility has been mothballed safely. This critical facility was determined to remove and dismantle at this time in order to obtain some information for decommissioning of a nuclear power reactor and utilize the area thereof effectively. This paper describes the program and methods for this decommissioning work, the amount of wastes generated, treatment of nuclear fuel, removal of fuel handling facility, and radiation protection and safety during this work. (author)

1982-01-01

266

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference pressurized water reactor power station: Technical support for decommissioning matters related to preparation of the final decommissioning rule  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Preparation of the final Decommissioning Rule by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff familiar with decommissioning matters. These efforts have included updating previous cost estimates developed during the series of studies on conceptually decommissioning reference licensed nuclear facilities for inclusion in the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (FGEIS) on decommissioning; documenting the cost updates; evaluating the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits on decommissioning; developing a revised scaling formula for estimating decommissioning costs for reactor plants different in size from the reference pressurized water reactor (PWR) described in the earlier study; defining a formula for adjusting current cost estimates to reflect future escalation in labor, materials, and waste disposal costs; and completing a study of recent PWR steam generator replacements to determine realistic estimates for time, costs and doses associated with steam generator removal during decommissioning. This report presents the results of recent PNL studies to provide supporting information in four areas concerning decommissioning of the reference PWR: updating the previous cost estimates to January 1986 dollars; assessing the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits; assessing the cost and dose impacts of recent steam generator replacements; and developing a scaling formula for plants different in size than the reference plant and an escalation formula for adjusting current cost estimates for future escalation

1988-01-01

267

The WAK decommissioning and dismantling program  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The decommissioning and dismantling of the german pilot plant for reprocessing of nuclear fuel (WAK) is performed in six steps with the task of recultivation the site at the Research Centre in Karlsruhe to became a open-quotes green meadowclose quotes. Since 70 m3 of high active waste concentrate (HAWC) are still stored on the site presently all dismantling measures arc concentrated on the former reprocessing building

1996-01-01

268

Decommissioning of the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant (WAK)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

After nearly twenty years of operation WAK-GmbH, the company operating WAK, discontinued operation of the plant. Preparatory planning to decommissioning was performed the results of which will be reported here. Based on experience a mixed concept of manual and remote disassembly was chosen for the dismantling operations. This is considered to constitute the optimized solution in terms of economy and taking into consideration the stipulations of the Atomic Energy Act. Detailed documents have already been elaborated for this task. (author)

1991-01-01

269

Decommissioning plan for the National Ignition Facility  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a US Department of Energy inertial confinement laser fusion experimental facility currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). To ensure that decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) issues at the end-of-life are manageable, this subject has received attention from an early stage. This paper summarizes the NIF D&D issues, and the status of the D&D plan.

Brereton, S., LLNL

1998-05-27

270

Decommissioning and decontamination (burial ground stabilization) studies  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The decommissioning and decontamination of retired Hanford facilities and the future use of surrounding landscapes require isolation of contaminated wastes from the biosphere. Burial ground stabilization studies were conducted to determine the effectiveness of physical barriers for isolating contaminated wastes in shallow-land burial sites from plants and animals. This study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of using a layer of loose rock between the waste and the surface soil covering to prevent both plant root and animal penetrations.

1980-01-01

271

The WAK decommissioning and dismantling program  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The decommissioning and dismantling of the german pilot plant for reprocessing of nuclear fuel (WAK) is performed in six steps with the task of recultivation the site at the Research Centre in Karlsruhe to became a {open_quotes}green meadow{close_quotes}. Since 70 m{sup 3} of high active waste concentrate (HAWC) are still stored on the site presently all dismantling measures arc concentrated on the former reprocessing building.

Eiben, K.; Fritz, P. [Wiederaufarbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe (Germany)

1996-12-31

272

Decommissioning a tritium glove-box facility  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A large glove-box facility for handling reactive metal tritides was decommissioned. Major sections of the glove box were decontaminated and disassembled for reuse at another tritium facility. To achieve the desired results, decontamnation required repeated washing, first with organic liquids, then with water and detergents. Worker protection was provided by simple ventilation combined with careful monitoring of the work areas and employees. Several innovative techniques are described

1979-09-19

273

Decommissioning experience with Whiteshell Reactor 1  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Whiteshell Reactor 1 (WR-1) is an organic-cooled heavy-water-moderated research reactor that operated from 1965 to 1985. The reactor is owned by AECL, and is located at Whiteshell Laboratories at Pinawa, Manitoba. The reactor was shut down in 1985. Fuel was removed from the reactor and placed in the fuel storage bays, system fluids were removed or transferred to drain tanks, and some selective dismantling and refurbishment of space has take place as part of the post-operational cleanup. An overall decommissioning plan was prepared, and formal decommissioning operations commenced in 1989. The first-phase work essentially completes Stage 2 decommissioning as defined by IAEA guidelines. To optimize use of the reactor building by the Whiteshell site during a proposed deferment period of 50 a, dismantling and decontamination of premium space consistent with Stage 2 criteria is included in Phase 1. The primary objective of Phase 1 is to complete shutdown and cleanup activities and to secure the reactor and contaminated process systems to reduce the monitoring and surveillance requirements during the deferment period. This paper addresses the actual operations carried out to date. It includes the work techniques and emphasizes the manner in which these apply specifically to a research reactor. The end state for the Phase 1 work will be documented to describe the building and facility condition in support of a license for the reactor in a mothballed state. End-state documentation includes procedures for meeting monitoring and surveillance requirements. The overall decommissioning plan will be maintained and updated, as required by the regulator, throughout the deferment period.

Helbrecht, R.A. [Whiteshell Labs., Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada). Whiteshell Operations Branch

1993-12-31

274

Decommissioning the N. S. Otto Hahn  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

After more than ten years of troublefree operation the German commercial nuclear vessel N.S. Otto Hahn was decommissioned in Februar 1979 following the burnup of its second core, because the scientific results expected from another four years of operation with a third core would no longer have justified the financial expenditure. The activated components of the reactor will now be dismantled and removed, the other systems decontaminated; in this way the ship can subsequently be used for conventional operation.

1980-11-01

275

Decommissioning of the Risoe Hot Cell facility  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Concise descriptions of actions taken in relation to the decommissioning of the hot cell facility at Risoe National Laboratory are presented. The removal of fissile material, removal and decontamination of large cell internals, and of large equipment such as glove boxes and steel boxes, in addition to dose commitments, are explained. Tables illustrating the analysis of smear tests, constants for contamination level examination, contamination and radiation levels after cleaning and total contamination versus measured radiation are included. (AB)

1991-01-01

276

Decommissioning of a vitrification facility: rinsing phase  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Marcoule site was the host of the very first electricity-generating nuclear reactors (3 gas-graphite reactors operated between 1956 and 1984) and spent fuel reprocessing plant (UP1 and various ancillaries operated between 1958 and 1997). Reprocessing plant has been shut down ten years ago and since this time decommissioning, dismantling and waste retrieval activities are under way. An important part of this decommissioning program concerns the vitrification facility of Marcoule. This facility includes 20 tanks devoted to interim storage of highly active solutions, awaiting for vitrification. The main objectives of the rinsing phase are to decrease radiological activity in equipment before dismantling and to minimize the amount of highly radioactive waste resulting from rinsing, which are to be vitrified. In 2006, the rinsing program was defined: - during the period 2007 to 2010, rinsing of all tanks and equipment with specific reagents is taking place, - during the period 2009 to 2010, vitrification of concentrated liquid solutions will be performed. Then, decommissioning of the vitrification facility will be started. This strategy aims at producing less than 5% 'B' type waste (Long lived active waste) from the decommissioning operations of the tanks, as well as reducing the dose rate and the risks by simplifying remote dismantling. Clean up operations had begun in 2007 and radiological surveys are followed up so as to monitor the efficiency of the decontamination process. The paper will assess the main options that were selected regarding the decontamination process, and will present the first results and the feed back experience of the rinsing operations. (authors)

2009-01-01

277

Decommissioning of Pu contaminated glove box system  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The co-conversion test units had used for an engineering test of a co-conversion process with a microwave direct denitration process since 1979. The important data and operational experience, which have been collected by the operation of this units in these 9 years, were very useful for a design and operation of Plutonium Conversion Development Facility. And co-converted power (0.8 ton Pu) had been fed as saw materials of 'Joyo' and 'Fugen' fuels. By the 9 years operation of this test units, main process equipments and glove boxes had been superannuated. Then, this test units was decommissioned from January 1988 until January 1989. Pu contamination in glove boxes was the highest and total volume of glove boxes was the largest compered with past experiences on the decommissioning of glove boxes. So that, many new and/or improved method was applied to this decommissioning. Then, it was completed not only with a decrease of personal exposure and waste volume but also without any trouble. (author).

Oshima, Hirofumi; Miyo, Hiroaki; Kashiro, Kashio; Asano, Takashi

1989-06-01

278

Decommissioning of Pu contaminated glove box system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The co-conversion test units had used for an engineering test of a co-conversion process with a microwave direct denitration process since 1979. The important data and operational experience, which have been collected by the operation of this units in these 9 years, were very useful for a design and operation of Plutonium Conversion Development Facility. And co-converted power (0.8 ton Pu) had been fed as saw materials of 'Joyo' and 'Fugen' fuels. By the 9 years operation of this test units, main process equipments and glove boxes had been superannuated. Then, this test units was decommissioned from January 1988 until January 1989. Pu contamination in glove boxes was the highest and total volume of glove boxes was the largest compered with past experiences on the decommissioning of glove boxes. So that, many new and/or improved method was applied to this decommissioning. Then, it was completed not only with a decrease of personal exposure and waste volume but also without any trouble. (author)

1989-01-01

279

Large transport packages for decommissioning waste  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The main tasks performed during the period related to the influence of manufacture, transport and disposal on the design of such packages. It is deduced that decommissioning wastes will be transported under the IAEA Transport Regulations under either the Type B or Low Specific Activity (LSA) categories. If the LSA packages are self-shielded, reinforced concrete is the preferred material of construction. But the high cost of disposal implies that there is a strong reason to investigate the use of returnable shields for LSA packages and in such cases they are likely to be made of ferrous metal. Economic considerations favour the use of spheroidal graphite cast iron for this purpose. Transport operating hazards have been investigated using a mixture of desk studies, routes surveys and operations data from the railway organisations. Reference routes were chosen in the Federal Republic of Germany, France and the United Kingdom. This work has led to a description of ten accident scenarios and an evaluation of the associated accident probabilities. The effect of disposal on design of packages has been assessed in terms of the radiological impact of decommissioning wastes, an in addition corrosion and gas evolution have been examined. The inventory of radionuclides in a decommissioning waste package has low environmental impact. If metal clad reinforced concrete packages are to be used, the amount of gas evolution is such that a vent would need to be included in the design. Similar unclad packages would be sufficiently permeable to gases to prevent a pressure build-up. (author)

1988-01-01

280

Radiation protection at decommissioning of ''hot cells''  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] One of VKTA's assignments is the decommissioning of numerous old nuclear plants in the area of the Research Center Rossendorf. Here highly active liquids of many different nuclides (e. p. Cs-137, Sr-90, U- and Pu-isotopes) were handled to produce radiopharmaceuticals. Industrial sources were generated on the basis of highly active solids like Na, Co, Cs and Ir irradiated in a power reactor. According to this there are various forms of contamination in these former isotope production plants also referred to as ''hot cells''. Thus the requirements on the planning and work-accompanying radiation protection service were high when decommissioning these plants. Avoidance of incorporations had to be brought in line with minimization of outer exposition. This has been achieved by using graduated material and person sluices monitored small meshed in terms of radiation protection to allow fast reactions for person's protection and safety and also by applying remote controlled measuring systems as well as teleguided decommission machines in a huge scale. (orig.)

2005-01-01

 
 
 
 
281

Decommissioning of the Salaspils Research Reactor  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In May 1995, the Latvian government decided to shut down the Salaspils Research Reactor and to dispense with nuclear energy in the future. The reactor has been out of operation since July 1998. A conceptual study on the decommissioning of the Salaspils Research Reactor was drawn up by Noell-KRC-Energie- und Umwelttechnik GmbH in 1998-1999. On October 26th, 1999, the Latvian government decided to start the direct dismantling to “green-field” in 2001. The upgrading of the decommissioning and dismantling plan was carried out from 2003-2004, resulting in a change of the primary goal of decommissioning. Collecting and conditioning of “historical” radioactive wastes from different storages outside and inside the reactor hall became the primary goal. All radioactive materials (more than 96 tons) were conditioned for disposal in concrete containers at the radioactive wastes depository “Radons” at the Baldone site. Protective and radiation measurement equipment of the personnel was upgraded significantly. All non-radioactive equipment and materials outside the reactor buildings were released for clearance and dismantled for reuse or conventional disposal. Contaminated materials from the reactor hall were collected and removed for clearance measurements on a weekly basis.

Abramenkovs Andris

2011-01-01

282

Lessons learned on stakeholder issues in decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Issues of public concern during decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) are partly the same and partly different from those of the preceding phases (planning, construction and operation). While in the course of construction and operation the main challenges include meeting expectations of a higher quality of life, accommodating a growing population, mitigating construction nuisances, and assuring the safe operation of the facility, the main concerns in the D and D phase are decreasing employment rate, the eventual reduction of revenues for the municipality, the future use of the affected land and negative social impacts (e.g., out-migration). The decommissioning phase is characterised by heterogeneity of stakeholder interests and values, difficulties of reaching consensus or compromise, and difficulties in connection with the harmonization of energy production, environmental protection and sustainable socio-economic development considerations. Typically, there might also be tensions between local and regional decisions. As in other phases, the building of trust between stakeholder is crucial from the point of view of conflict management, and social lessons learnt from the siting and developments of nuclear facilities are widely applicable in the field of D and D as well. A review is presented of major lessons to be learnt from NEA activities in the field of decommissioning and stakeholder involvement. (author)

2008-10-02

283

Investment management for nuclear decommissioning trusts  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

According to Nuclear Regulatory Commission estimates, and assuming a 4 percent annual inflation rate, minimum decommissioning requirements for a single reactor could total almost $350 million after 30 years. Consequently, reducing customer contributions to decommissioning funds is a potentially rewarding activity. In fact, improving the after-tax return earned on an NDT fund by as little as one percentage point can reduce customer contributions to the fund by 15% over its life. Unfortunately, many electric utilities are headed in the wrong direction and are unlikely to achieve satisfactory results. The main problem is the prevalence of the conventional wisdom, most of which has been appropriated from the area of pension fund management. This is an area which is familiar to most utility managements, but which has only superficial similarity to the issue of NDT investing. The differences are pronounced: NDTs, unlike pensions, are fully taxable at corporate income tax rates. In addition, NDT managers should be concerned with protecting the inflation-adjusted or real value of fund investments at a single, future decommissioning date. Pension managers, on the other hand, may be concerned with satisfying nominal contractual obligations spread over an extended future time horizon. In view of the large stakes involved in the management of NDTs, the authors summarize five key tenets of the conventional wisdom in this area and demonstrate where they feel they are in error.

Stimes, P.C.; Flaherty, R.T. (Flaherty and Crumrine Inc., Pasadena, CA (USA))

1990-11-22

284

Decommissioning strategies for facilities using radioactive material  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The planning for the decommissioning of facilities that have used radioactive material is similar in many respects to other typical engineering projects. However, decommissioning differs because it involves equipment and materials that are radioactive and therefore have to be handled and controlled appropriately. The project management principles are the same. As with all engineering projects, the desired end state of the project must be known before the work begins and there are a number of strategies that can be used to reach this end state. The selection of the appropriate strategy to be used to decommission a facility can vary depending on a number of factors. No two facilities are exactly the same and their locations and conditions can result in different strategies being considered acceptable. The factors that are considered cover a wide range of topics from purely technical issues to social and economic issues. Each factor alone may not have a substantial impact on which strategy to select, but their combination could lead to the selection of the preferred or best strategy for a particular facility. This Safety Report identifies the factors that are normally considered when deciding on the most appropriate strategy to select for a particular facility. It describes the impact that each factor can have on the strategy selection and also how the factors in combination can be used to select an optimum strategy

2007-01-01

285

Health physics program for the Edgemont Uranium Mill decommissioning project  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is actively involved in decommissioning a uranium mill located near the town of Edgemont, South Dakota. The Edgemont Mill Decommissioning Project, which is unique in many respects, will involve dismantlement of the old inactive mill building and excavation and transportation of several million tons of uranium mill tailings to a permanent disposal site. To ensure that workers are adequately protected from radiation exposure during decommissioning operations, a health physics program appropriate for the decommissioning situation was developed. The Edgemont Mill Decommissioning Project Health Physics Manual (HPM) gives the programmatic requirements for worker radiation protection. The requirements of the HPM are implemented by means of detailed onsite operating procedures. The Edgemont project health physics program was developed using currently available regulations and guidance for an operating uranium mill with appropriate modifications for decommissioning. This paper discusses the development, implementation, and documentation of that program

1986-01-01

286

Evaluation of decommissioning programs: Material, waste and cost analysis  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The estimation of decommissioning materials, waste and costs constitutes one of the major activities in decommissioning programs. These estimates are required for new installations or installations still in operation in order to plan future waste management programs and to define the financial provisions necessary to ensure satisfactory execution of future programs. The estimates are also required for installations currently being decommissioned in order to plan detailed programs and to verify and update previous evaluations. The Belgian legislator entrusted the National Agency with several assignments regarding decommissioning of nuclear installations. To perform these assignments, the Agency set up an integrated data processing system able to record the inventory of a plant and to evaluate the nature and the quantities of decommissioning materials and waste as well as the decommissioning costs.

Schrauben, M.

1995-12-31

287

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's decommissioning process  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The term 'Decommission' is defined in the U.S.. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (USNRC's) regulations at 10 CFR 20.1003 as to remove a facility or site safely from service and reduce residual radioactivity to a level that permits 1) release of the property for unrestricted use and termination of the license; or, 2) release of the property under restricted conditions and the termination of the license. USNRC's decommissioning program encompasses the decommissioning of all NRC licensed facilities, ranging from routine license terminations for sealed source users, to the oversight of complex sites and those on the Site Decommissioning Management Plan (SDMP), as well as power and non-power reactors. This paper describes the USNRC's decommissioning process for materials and reactor facilities and presents an overview of USNRC's decommissioning program activities. (author)

2002-01-01

288

Key issues in the planning for commercial reactor decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The process of decommissioning a nuclear facility is quite straightforward from an execution standpoint. The physical acts of decontamination, removal of activated equipment and materials, followed by the removal of supporting systems and structures lend themselves to a very simple critical path with the opportunity for many parallel decommissioning activities involving systems and structures that are non-essential to the critical path. Unfortunately, the actual process of decommissioning is the only thing about the topic that is straightforward. The process of planning for decommissioning is fraught with pitfalls. The causes include: The impact of the high level waste repository debacle. The impact of regional low level waste disposal sites. The impact of FERC and state public utility commissions on the allowable end product of decommissioning as well as the magnitude of allowable costs. The impact of the June, 1988 NRC regulations on the allowable level of decommissioning costs. The specific effects of these causative factors are discussed in this paper.

1990-01-01

289

Environmental geophysics at Kings Creek Disposal Site and 30th Street Landfill, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Geophysical studies on the Bush River Peninsula in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, delineate landfill areas and provide diagnostic signatures of the hydrogeologic framework and possible contaminant pathways. These studies indicate that, during the Pleistocene Epoch, alternating stands of high and low seal levels resulted in a complex pattern of shallow channel-fill deposits in the Kings Creek area. Ground-penetrating radar studies reveal a paleochannel greater than 50 ft deep, with a thalweg trending offshore in a southwest direction into Kings Creek. Onshore, the ground-penetrating radar data indicate a 35-ft-deep branch to the main channel, trending to the north-northwest directly beneath the 30th Street Landfill. Other branches are suspected to meet the offshore paleochannel in the wetlands south and east of the 30th Street Landfill. This paleochannel depositional system is environmentally significant because it may control the shallow groundwater flow regime beneath the site. Electromagnetic surveys have delineated the pre-fill lowland area currently occupied by the 30th Street Landfill. Magnetic and conductive anomalies outline surficial and buried debris throughout the study area. On the basis of geophysical data, large-scale dumping has not occurred north of the Kings Creek Disposal Site or east of the 30th Street Landfill.

Davies, B.E.; Miller, S.F.; McGinnis, L.D.; Daudt, C.R.; Thompson, M.D.; Stefanov, J.E.; Benson, M.A.; Padar, C.A.

1995-01-01

290

Characterization of the hydrogeologic framework at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, using marine seismic reflection profiling  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

High-resolution, single-channel, marine seismic reflection profiles were collected in the shallow waters of the Chesapeake Bay estuarine system surrounding the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, NM. This data set furthers our understanding of the hydrogeologic framework by identifying paleochannel locations, delineating paleochannel geometries, and characterizing relationships between multiple generations of paleochannels. Fine-grained bottom sediment resting in deeper, low-energy waters were found to block high-frequency acoustic wave transmission; therefore, data acquisition is limited to areas near-shore were water depths are less than three meters. Approximately 120 km of shoreline were surveyed yielding 50 km of high quality data. Three major reflectors are identified as erosional unconformities, and are interpreted to be Pleistocene paleochannel surfaces. Paleochannels are found to be spatially and physiographically associated with all modem subaerial lowlands and their local drainage systems. The marine seismic reflection data provide strong evidence that present-day lowlands are underlain by an aquifer dominated by paleochannels. Paleochannel configurations, together with paleochannel-fill models, indicate these paleochannels have the potential support vertical and horizontal contaminant migration.

Benson, M.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Carpenter, P.J. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); McGinnis, L.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sylwester, R.E. [Golder Associates, Inc., Redmond, WA (United States)

1997-10-01

291

Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Remedial investigation results  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report presents the results of the remedial investigation (RI) conducted at J-Field in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), a U.S. Army installation located in Harford County, Maryland. Since 1917, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, and testing of chemical agents and munitions and the subsequent destruction of these materials at J-Field by open burning and open detonation. These activities have raised concerns about environmental contamination at J-Field. This RI was conducted by the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division, Directorate of Safety, Health and Environmental Division of APG, pursuant to requirements outlined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). The RI was accomplished according to the procedures developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988). The RI provides a comprehensive evaluation of the site conditions, nature of contaminants present, extent of contamination, potential release mechanisms and migration pathways, affected populations, and risks to human health and the environment. This information will be used as the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions to be performed during the remedial action phase, which will follow the feasibility study (FS) for J-Field.

2000-01-01

292

Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Remedial investigation results  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report presents the results of the remedial investigation (RI) conducted at J-Field in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), a U.S. Army installation located in Harford County, Maryland. Since 1917, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, and testing of chemical agents and munitions and the subsequent destruction of these materials at J-Field by open burning and open detonation. These activities have raised concerns about environmental contamination at J-Field. This RI was conducted by the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division, Directorate of Safety, Health and Environmental Division of APG, pursuant to requirements outlined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). The RI was accomplished according to the procedures developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988). The RI provides a comprehensive evaluation of the site conditions, nature of contaminants present, extent of contamination, potential release mechanisms and migration pathways, affected populations, and risks to human health and the environment. This information will be used as the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions to be performed during the remedial action phase, which will follow the feasibility study (FS) for J-Field.

Yuen, C. R.; Martino, L. E.; Biang, R. P.; Chang, Y. S.; Dolak, D.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R. A.; Patton, T. L.; Prasad, S.; Quinn, J.; Rosenblatt, D. H.; Vercellone, J.; Wang, Y. Y.

2000-03-14

293

Phase II environmental geophysics at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Geophysical studies were conducted at eight sites on the tip of Gunpowder Neck (J-Field) in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The results of the studies were used to delineate the extent of three former burning pits and help determine the necessity of further investigation at five potential areas of concern (PAOCs). Intensive investigations were performed at the three former burning pits and two of the PAOCs by using electromagnetic (EM-31 and EM-61), total field magnetometry, and ground-penetrating radar geophysical techniques. The successful integration of the four data sets characterized the extent, the approximate depth and nature of fill material, and the location of metallic debris at the three former burning pits. At the two PAOC sites that were intensively investigated, no continuous areas of metallic debris, indicating organized burials, were present. Less extensive exploratory profiles conducted at three other PAOC sites indicated the presence of buried metal objects, but they were inconclusive in defining the nature and extent of buried materials.

Davies, B.E.; Thompson, M.D.; Yuen, C.R. [and others

1995-09-01

294

An accelerated remedial strategy developed for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

For an installation with many disposal sites and multiple contaminant sources, successful remediation at minimum cost can be complicated by insufficient geologic and hydrogeologic information, incomplete records of historical disposal activities, and uncertainty about the effectiveness of different investigative methods. To reduce these uncertainties and to increase the probability of successful remediation at minimum cost, a ``Phased and pilot`` accelerated remedial strategy has been developed for the J-Field area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The strategy includes four phases. First, the most contaminated site is selected as a pilot for detailed investigation. Second, the most contaminated areas within the pilot site are chosen as a pilot source area for interim action study, and a remedial action is developed to remove the primary contaminant sources. The subsequent sitewide investigation uses the effective tools developed in the first phase. Third, a cleanup operation is initiated in the pilot source area, while a sitewide feasibility study is developed by taking advantage of lessons learned in the interim action. Fourth, a sitewide cleanup operation proceeds.

Yuen, C.R.; Martino, L.; Patton, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wrobel, J. [US Army Directorate of Safety, Health, and Environment, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

1995-06-01

295

Review of analytical results from the proposed agent disposal facility site, Aberdeen Proving Ground  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Argonne National Laboratory reviewed the analytical results from 57 composite soil samples collected in the Bush River area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. A suite of 16 analytical tests involving 11 different SW-846 methods was used to detect a wide range of organic and inorganic contaminants. One method (BTEX) was considered redundant, and two {open_quotes}single-number{close_quotes} methods (TPH and TOX) were found to lack the required specificity to yield unambiguous results, especially in a preliminary investigation. Volatile analytes detected at the site include 1, 1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene, all of which probably represent residual site contamination from past activities. Other volatile analytes detected include toluene, tridecane, methylene chloride, and trichlorofluoromethane. These compounds are probably not associated with site contamination but likely represent cross-contamination or, in the case of tridecane, a naturally occurring material. Semivolatile analytes detected include three different phthalates and low part-per-billion amounts of the pesticide DDT and its degradation product DDE. The pesticide could represent residual site contamination from past activities, and the phthalates are likely due, in part, to cross-contamination during sample handling. A number of high-molecular-weight hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon derivatives were detected and were probably naturally occurring compounds. 4 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

Brubaker, K.L.; Reed, L.L.; Myers, S.W.; Shepard, L.T.; Sydelko, T.G.

1997-09-01

296

Spatial relationships among soil biota in a contaminated grassland ecosystem at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Spatial relationships among soil nematodes and soil microorganisms were investigated in a grassland ecosystem contaminated with heavy metals in the US Army`s Aberdeen Proving Ground. The study quantified fungal and bacterial biomass, the abundance of soil protozoa, and nematodes. Geostatistical techniques were used to determine spatial distributions of these parameters and to evaluate various cross-correlations. The cross-correlations among soil biota numbers were analyzed using two methods: a cross general relative semi-variogram and an interactive graphical data representation using geostatistically estimated data distributions. Both the visualization technique and the cross general relative semi-variogram and an interactive graphical data representation using geostatistically estimated data distributions. Both the visualization technique and the cross general relative semi-variogram showed a negative correlation between the abundance of fungivore nematodes and fungal biomass, the abundance of bacterivore nematodes and bacterial biomass, the abundance of omnivore/predator nematodes and numbers of protozoa, and between numbers of protozoa and both fungal and bacterial biomass. The negative cross-correlation between soil biota and metal concentrations showed that soil fungi were particularly sensitive to heavy metal concentrations and can be used for quantitative ecological risk assessment of metal-contaminated soils. This study found that geostatistics are a useful tool for describing and analyzing spatial relationships among components of food webs in the soil community.

Kuperman, R. [Army ERDEC, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States); Williams, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Parmelee, R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1995-12-31

297

Contamination source review for Building E3180, Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report was prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to document the results of a contamination source review of Building E3180 at the Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) in Maryland. The report may be used to assist the US Army in planning for the future use or disposition of this building. The review included a historical records search, physical inspection, photographic documentation, geophysical investigation, collection of air samples, and review of available records regarding underground storage tanks associated with Building E3180. The field investigations were performed by ANL during 1994. Building,E3180 (current APG designation) is located near the eastern end of Kings Creek Road, north of Kings Creek, and about 0.5 miles east of the airstrip within APG`s Edgewood Area. The building was constructed in 1944 as a facsimile of a Japanese pillbox and used for the development of flame weapons systems until 1957 (EAI Corporation 1989). The building was not used from 1957 until 1965, when it was converted and used as a flame and incendiary laboratory. During the 1970s, the building was converted to a machine (metal) shop and used for that purpose until 1988.

Zellmer, S.D.; Smits, M.P.; Rueda, J.; Zimmerman, R.E.

1995-09-01

298

Hydrogeology and soil gas at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Science.gov (United States)

Disposal of chemical warfare agents, munitions, and industrial chemicals in J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, has contaminated soil, groundwater and surface water. Seven exploratory borings and 38 observation wells were drilled to define the hydrogeologic framework at J-Field and to determine the type, extent, and movement of contaminants. The geologic units beneath J-Field consist of Coastal Plain sediments of the Cretaceous Patapsco Formation and Pleistocene Talbot Formation. The Patapsco Formation contains several laterally discontinuous aquifers and confining units. The Pleistocene deposits were divided into 3 hydrogeologic units--a surficial aquifer, a confining unit, and a confined aquifer. Water in the surficial aquifer flows laterally from topographically high areas to discharge areas in marshes and streams, and vertically to the underlying confined aquifer. In offshore areas, water flows from the deeper confined aquifers upward toward discharge areas in the Gunpowder River and Chesapeake Bay. Analyses of soil-gas samples showed high relative-flux values of chlorinated solvents, phthalates, and hydrocarbons at the toxic-materials disposal area, white-phosphorus disposal area, and riot-control-agent disposal area. The highest flux values were located downgradient of the toxic materials and white phosphorus disposal areas, indicating that groundwater contaminants are moving from source areas beneath the disposal pits toward discharge points in the marshes and estuaries. Elevated relative-flux values were measured upgradient and downgradient of the riot-control agent disposal area, and possibly result from soil and (or) groundwater contamination.

Hughes, W. B.

1993-01-01

299

Natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a freshwater tidal wetland, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Science.gov (United States)

Ground-water contaminant plumes that are flowing toward or currently discharging to wetland areas present unique remediation problems because of the hydrologic connections between ground water and surface water and the sensitive habitats in wetlands. Because wetlands typically have a large diversity of microorganisms and redox conditions that could enhance biodegradation, they are ideal environments for natural attenuation of organic contaminants, which is a treatment method that would leave the ecosystem largely undisturbed and be cost effective. During 1992-97, the U.S. Geological Survey investigated the natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOC's) in a contaminant plume that discharges from a sand aquifer to a freshwater tidal wetland along the West Branch Canal Creek at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Characterization of the hydrogeology and geochemistry along flowpaths in the wetland area and determination of the occurrence and rates of biodegradation and sorption show that natural attenuation could be a feasible remediation method for the contaminant plume that extends along the West Branch Canal Creek.

Lorah, Michelle M.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Smith, Barrett L.; Johnson, Mark A.; Fleck, William B.

1997-01-01

300

Hydrogeologic and chemical data for the O-Field area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Science.gov (United States)

O-Field, located at the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground , Maryland, was periodically used for disposal of munitions, waste chemicals, and chemical-warfare agents from World War II through the 1950' s. This report includes various physical, geologic, chemical, and hydrologic data obtained from well-core, groundwater, surface water, and bottom-sediment sampling sites at and near the O-Field disposal area. The data are presented in tables and hydrographs. Three site-location maps are also included. Well-core data include lithologic logs for 11 well- cluster sites, grain-size distributions, various chemical characteristics, and confining unit characteristics. Groundwater data include groundwater chemistry, method blanks for volatile organic carbon, available data on volatile and base/neutral organics, and compilation of corresponding method blanks, chemical-warfare agents, explosive-related products, radionuclides, herbicides, and groundwater levels. Surface-water data include field-measured characteristics; concentrations of various inorganic constituents including arsenic; selected organic constituents with method blanks; detection limits of organics; and a compilation of information on corresponding acids, volatiles, and semivolatiles. Bottom- sediment data include inorganic properties and constituents; organic chemistry; detection limits for organic chemicals; a compilation of information on acids, volatiles, and semivolatiles; and method blanks corresponding to acids, volatiles, and semivolatiles. A set of 15 water- level hydrographs for the period March 1986 through September 1987 also is included in the report. (USGS)

Nemoff, P. R.; Vroblesky, D. A.

1989-01-01

 
 
 
 
301

Unrestricted re-use of decommissioned nuclear laboratories  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A decommissioning strategy was developed by the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN. In this strategy decommissioning works are limited to the radioactive parts of the nuclear installation. After obtaining an attestation for unrestricted reuse of the building after removal of all radioactivity, the building can be used for new industrial purposes outside the nuclear field. The decommissioning activities according to this strategy have been applied in four buildings. The results are described.

Cornelissen, R.; Noynaert, L.; Harnie, S.; Marien, J.

1996-09-18

302

Training practices to support decommissioning of nuclear facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Adequate numbers of competent personnel must be available during any phase of a nuclear facility life cycle, including the decommissioning phase. While a significant amount of attention has been focused on the technical aspects of decommissioning and many publications have been developed to address technical aspects, human resource management issues, particularly the training and qualification of decommissioning personnel, are becoming more paramount with the growing number of nuclear facilities of all types that are reaching or approaching the decommissioning phase. One of the keys to success is the training of the various personnel involved in decommissioning in order to develop the necessary knowledge and skills required for specific decommissioning tasks. The operating organisations of nuclear facilities normally possess limited expertise in decommissioning and consequently rely on a number of specialized organisations and companies that provide the services related to the decommissioning activities. Because of this there is a need to address the issue of assisting the operating organisations in the development and implementation of human resource management policies and training programmes for the facility personnel and contractor personnel involved in various phases of decommissioning activities. The lessons learned in the field of ensuring personnel competence are discussed in the paper (on the basis of information and experiences accumulated from various countries and organizations, particularly, through relevant IAEA activities). Particularly, the following aspects are addressed: transition of training from operational to decommissioning phase; knowledge management; target groups, training needs analysis, and application of a systematic approach to training (SAT); content of training for decommissioning management and professional staff, and for decommissioning workers; selection and training of instructors; training facilities and tools; and training as the integral part of management of human resources. (author)

2006-01-01

303

Administrative requirements of financial securities to cover decommissioning operations  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper points out that the lack of experience in decommissioning of nuclear power plants is reflected by the absence of specific legislation regarding the economic, fiscal and accounting aspects of the process. The author suggests that a fund be created for decommissioning costs through contributions deriving from plant operation. The paper analyses the procedures to be followed and draws attention to the need for clear legislation on decommissioning. (NEA).

1983-01-01

304

Operation and dismantling report 2004 for Danish Decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The report describes the operations at Danish Decommissioning (DD) that are essential for the nuclear inspection authorities' assessment of safety related issues. The report presents an account of safety and of the work at DD, including the decommissioning projects in 2004 for the nuclear facilities. The radioactive waste treatment facility in operation is described, and inspection and maintenance reports of the nuclear facilities prepared for decommissioning are presented. (ln)

2005-01-01

305

Decommissioning nuclear power plants - the wave of the future  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The paper discusses the project controls developed in the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant. Considerations are given to the contaminated piping and equipment that have to be removed and the spent and used fuel that has to be disposed of. The storage issue is of primary concern here. The cost control aspects and the dynamics of decommissioning are discussed. The effects of decommissioning laws on the construction and engineering firms are mentioned. 5 refs.

Griggs, F.S. Jr. [Raytheon Engineers and Contractors, Cumberland City, TN (United States)

1994-12-31

306

Decommissioning nuclear power plants - the wave of the future  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The paper discusses the project controls developed in the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant. Considerations are given to the contaminated piping and equipment that have to be removed and the spent and used fuel that has to be disposed of. The storage issue is of primary concern here. The cost control aspects and the dynamics of decommissioning are discussed. The effects of decommissioning laws on the construction and engineering firms are mentioned. 5 refs

1994-01-01

307

Planning for decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The overall objective of the project is to place Shippingport in a long term radiologically safe condition following termination of operations and to perform the decommissioning in such a manner so as to provide engineering, technology and cost information for future projects. The Decommissioning Assessment, Environmental Assessment, and a draft outline for the EIS have been completed. The results of the assessments are summarized. In addition, the management of the Shippingport decommissioning project is discussed

1979-09-19

308

The operators` perspective on the decommissioning of UKCS offshore installations  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The UK offshore business has installed just over 200 oil and gas producing facilities since it started in 1966. It has decommissioned nine of these, which were all floaters or in shallow water and were totally removed. However, the North Sea also has some much larger structures where the practicalities of decommissioning are more challenging. These deeper water structures, where decommissioning options other than total removal are potentially applicable, account for about 25 percent of all UK. (author)

Dymond, P.F. [UKOOA (United Kingdom)

1995-04-01

309

Automatized material and radioactivity flow control tool in decommissioning process  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In this presentation the automatized material and radioactivity flow control tool in decommissioning process is discussed. It is concluded that: computer simulation of the decommissioning process is one of the important attributes of computer code Omega; one of the basic tools of computer optimisation of decommissioning waste processing are the tools of integral material and radioactivity flow; all the calculated parameters of materials are stored in each point of calculation process and they can be viewed; computer code Omega represents opened modular system, which can be improved; improvement of the module of optimisation of decommissioning waste processing will be performed in the frame of improvement of material procedures and scenarios.

2009-01-01

310

Study on cost evaluation methods for decommissioning of nuclear facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A method for evaluating decommissioning cost efficiently and in a short time was made based on the features of various types of nuclear facilities. The evaluation method can calculate decommissioning cost using conversion factors corresponding to weight of components and structures of nuclear facilities, etc. The conversion factors were made based on the experience of the JPDR decommissioning projects in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and of replacements of the reprocessing plant of the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). In this report, the decommissioning cost evaluation method of nuclear facilities that had been made before unification of JAERI and JNC was revaluated as a new decommissioning cost evaluation method to reasonably advance decommissioning plants of various nuclear facilities. Moreover, the decommissioning cost of JPDR to which the decommissioning had already been finished was calculated to evaluate the applicability of the new evaluation method. As a result, it was found that the evaluation method is effective to calculate the decommissioning cost of nuclear facilities. (author)

2007-01-01

311

Decommissioning commercial nuclear power plants. Publications No. 80-6  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The decommissioning of nuclear power plants is an exceedingly complex subject. One can quickly become immersed (and lost) in the myriad technical details. In this paper decommissioning is approached, not as a strictly technological problem but as a policy issue. Technical aspects of decommissioning are dealt with to the extent necessary to present the basic technological options and to highlight important policy questions. The goal is to provide a useful orientation to decommissioning for those who wish to understand and deal with these questions.

Anderson, J.; Aquilina, D.; Rodbourne, D.

1980-01-01

312

Fossil plant decommissioning: Tracking deferred costs in a competitive market  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Widespread concern over nuclear plant decommissioning has triggered similar interest in the decommissioning of fossil-fired steam generating stations. This rising interest stems in part from the emergence of a competitive market in electric generation, which, among other things, threatens impairment of assets. Fossil decommissioning issues are not nearly as contentious as those that attend nuclear plants. Nevertheless, the magnitude of cost estimates for fossil decommissioning, when expressed as a percentage of station investment, is high enough to demand attention from accountants and regulators.

Ferguson, J.S.

1995-06-15

313

Vandellos 1 NPP decommissioning feedback experience  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Vandellos 1 Nuclear Power Plant (CNV1) is located on the Mediterranean coast in the province of Tarragona (Spain). The Plant is of the European Natural Uranium Graphite-Gas type. The thermal power of the plant amounts to 1,670 MWt, its electrical output being 500 Mwe. The Plant started-up commercial service in May 1972; its final shutdown, due to a fire in the turbines, occurred in October 1989, after 17 years of operation with an accumulated energy production of 55,647 GWh. The option of decommissioning accepted by the Ministry of Industry, consists of first removing the spent fuel and conditioning the operating radioactive wastes, and then undertaking dismantling of almost all the structures and components located outside the reactor vessel, except those ensuring confinement of the vessel itself and the safety and surveillance of the facility and site. No action will be taken with respect to the vessel, in which the reactor will remain confined without nuclear fuel and with its internal components intact until completion of the waiting (dormancy) period. The site itself will be kept under surveillance during dormancy phase, following partial clearance, the remaining installations being left within the new site perimeter in a situation of monitored confinement. Following the dormancy period, which will last some 30 years, total dismantling of the remaining installations will be undertaken, this implying subsequent complete clearance of the site. The project was started in November of 1992, and the works on site began in 1998. The safe enclosure consists only in the reactor pressure vessel, which will be left on site. The activity content of the vessel is about 100 000 Ci, mostly Co 60. Part of the Stage 2 concept is the total static isolation of this vessel. The vessel has 1 700 penetrations, the pipes of which were cut, seal-welded and inspected. After five years of works in Vandellos 1 NPP decommissioning, ENRESA has an experience and knowledge, that is necessary to support in order to reuse and apply the model to others projects. This knowledge and experience are mostly in three areas: -Data Bases, -Basic Document and - Lessons Learned which are described. Lessons Learned are summarized in eleven conclusions: a) The dilemma about the difference between an installation in operation and a decommissioning works. A NPP in operation is an installation; a NPP in decommissioning process is an activity, this impact is fundamental from the documentary and controls points of view; b) The flexibility of the time schedule of the project. In opposition with a construction, the time schedule of a decommissioning project it possible to maintain with small delays due to the versatility of parallel tasks; c) The authorization procedure is one of the key points, before and during the process. As a new activity, decommissioning was born without specifics regulation; day by day all the actors realize that is necessary to reflect back together in order to define and establish new standards to regulate the decommissioning processes; d) The prevention of the risks on site is a topic not only related to the Protection Radiation, the conventional risks have more importance in the decommissioning tasks. The issue of the new regulation about it, impact directly in the executions of the works. The training and the information to the workers are the best corrective tool again the risks; e) Some performances or characteristics of the auxiliary systems must be taken in account in the procurement process for decommissioning, namely, the modularity, versatility of the auxiliary systems and the reuse as a way of reducing wastes and save row materials. The radiation protection is the subject concern during all the operations; Important issues of radioprotection as operational radiological history, the characterization of the materials and the environment to prevent the risk, and special care with the internal contamination of the body; g) The very big amount of material generated during the decommissioning works, the different types, the different

Fernandez, Rodriguez A. [Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radioactivos, ENPRESA, Madrid (Spain)

2003-07-01

314

Vandellos 1 NPP decommissioning feedback experience  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Vandellos 1 Nuclear Power Plant (CNV1) is located on the Mediterranean coast in the province of Tarragona (Spain). The Plant is of the European Natural Uranium Graphite-Gas type. The thermal power of the plant amounts to 1,670 MWt, its electrical output being 500 Mwe. The Plant started-up commercial service in May 1972; its final shutdown, due to a fire in the turbines, occurred in October 1989, after 17 years of operation with an accumulated energy production of 55,647 GWh. The option of decommissioning accepted by the Ministry of Industry, consists of first removing the spent fuel and conditioning the operating radioactive wastes, and then undertaking dismantling of almost all the structures and components located outside the reactor vessel, except those ensuring confinement of the vessel itself and the safety and surveillance of the facility and site. No action will be taken with respect to the vessel, in which the reactor will remain confined without nuclear fuel and with its internal components intact until completion of the waiting (dormancy) period. The site itself will be kept under surveillance during dormancy phase, following partial clearance, the remaining installations being left within the new site perimeter in a situation of monitored confinement. Following the dormancy period, which will last some 30 years, total dismantling of the remaining installations will be undertaken, this implying subsequent complete clearance of the site. The project was started in November of 1992, and the works on site began in 1998. The safe enclosure consists only in the reactor pressure vessel, which will be left on site. The activity content of the vessel is about 100 000 Ci, mostly Co 60. Part of the Stage 2 concept is the total static isolation of this vessel. The vessel has 1 700 penetrations, the pipes of which were cut, seal-welded and inspected. After five years of works in Vandellos 1 NPP decommissioning, ENRESA has an experience and knowledge, that is necessary to support in order to reuse and apply the model to others projects. This knowledge and experience are mostly in three areas: -Data Bases, -Basic Document and - Lessons Learned which are described. Lessons Learned are summarized in eleven conclusions: a) The dilemma about the difference between an installation in operation and a decommissioning works. A NPP in operation is an installation; a NPP in decommissioning process is an activity, this impact is fundamental from the documentary and controls points of view; b) The flexibility of the time schedule of the project. In opposition with a construction, the time schedule of a decommissioning project it possible to maintain with small delays due to the versatility of parallel tasks; c) The authorization procedure is one of the key points, before and during the process. As a new activity, decommissioning was born without specifics regulation; day by day all the actors realize that is necessary to reflect back together in order to define and establish new standards to regulate the decommissioning processes; d) The prevention of the risks on site is a topic not only related to the Protection Radiation, the conventional risks have more importance in the decommissioning tasks. The issue of the new regulation about it, impact directly in the executions of the works. The training and the information to the workers are the best corrective tool again the risks; e) Some performances or characteristics of the auxiliary systems must be taken in account in the procurement process for decommissioning, namely, the modularity, versatility of the auxiliary systems and the reuse as a way of reducing wastes and save row materials. The radiation protection is the subject concern during all the operations; Important issues of radioprotection as operational radiological history, the characterization of the materials and the environment to prevent the risk, and special care with the internal contamination of the body; g) The very big amount of material generated during the decommissioning works, the different types, the different

2003-01-01

315

26 CFR 1.468A-0 - Nuclear decommissioning costs; table of contents.  

Science.gov (United States)

... (c) Disqualification of nuclear decommissioning fund. (1...excess contribution. (3) Effect of disqualification. (4) Further effects of disqualification. (d) Termination of nuclear decommissioning fund upon...

2013-04-01

316

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a refernce boiling water reactor power station: Technical support for decommissioning matters related to preparation of the final decommissioning rule  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Preparation of the final Decommissioning Rule by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff familiar with decommissioning matters. These efforts have included updating previous cost estimates developed during the series of studies of conceptually decommissioning reference licensed nuclear facilities for inclusion in the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (FGEIS) on decommissioning; documenting the cost updates; evaluating the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits on decommissioning; developing a revised scaling formula for estimating decommissioning costs for reactor plants different in size from the reference boiling water reactor (BWR) described in the earlier study; and defining a formula for adjusting current cost estimates to reflect future escalation in labor, materials, and waste disposal costs. This report presents the results of recent PNL studies to provide supporting information in three areas concerning decommissioning of the reference BWR: updating the previous cost estimates to January 1986 dollars; assessing the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits; and developing a scaling formula for plants different in size than the reference plant and an escalation formula for adjusting current cost estimates for future escalation

1988-01-01

317

Natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a freshwater tidal wetland, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Water-resources investigations  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

During 1992-97, the U.S. Geological Survey investigated the natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOC`s) in a contaminant plume that discharges from a sand aquifer to a freshwater tidal wetland along the West Branch Canal Creek at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Characterization of the hydrogeology and geochemistry along flowpaths in the wetland area and determination of the occurrence and rates of biodegradation and sorption show that natural attenuation could be a feasible remediation method for the contaminant plume that extends along the West Branch Canal Creek.

Lorah, M.M.; Olsen, L.D.; Smith, B.L.; Johnson, M.A.; Fleck, W.B.

1997-12-31

318

Hydrogeologic, soil, and water-quality data for j-field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, 1989-94  

Science.gov (United States)

Disposal of chemical-warfare agents, munitions, and industrial chemicals in J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, has resulted in ground-water, surface-water, and soil contamination. This report presents data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from Novembr 1989 through September 1994 as part of a remedial investigation of J-Field in response to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Hydrogeologic data, soil-gas and soil-quality data, and water-qualtiy data are included.

Phelan, D. J.

1996-01-01

319

FAMS DECOMMISSIONING END-STATE ALTERNATIVE EVALUATION  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Nuclear Material Management (NMM) completed a comprehensive study at the request of the Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR) in 2004 (Reference 11.1). The study evaluated the feasibility of removal and/or mitigation of the Pu-238 source term in the F-Area Material Storage (FAMS) facility during on-going material storage operations. The study recommended different options to remove and/or mitigate the Pu-238 source term depending on its location within the facility. During April 2005, the Department of Energy (DOE) sent a letter of direction (LOD) to Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) directing WSRC to implement a new program direction that would enable an accelerated shutdown and decommissioning of FAMS (Reference 11.2). Further direction in the LOD stated that effective December 1, 2006 the facility will be transitioned to begin deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) activities. To implement the LOD, Site D&D (SDD) and DOE agreed the planning end-state would be demolition of the FAMS structure to the building slab. SDD developed the D&D strategy, preliminary cost and schedule, and issued the deactivation project plan in December 2005 (Reference 11.3). Due to concerns and questions regarding the FAMS planning end-state and in support of the project's Critical Decision 1, an alternative study was performed to evaluate the various decommissioning end-states and the methods by which those end-states are achieved. This report documents the results of the alternative evaluation which was performed in a structured decision-making process as outlined in the E7 Manual, Procedure 2.15, ''Alternative Studies'' (Reference 11.4).

Grimm, B; Stephen Chostner, S; Brenda Green, B

2006-05-25

320

Decommissioning of nuclear installations at CIEMAT  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report presents the work carried out by CIEMAT in the frame of decommissioning the research reactor JEN-1. Studies for evaluating different metal cutting techniques, including plasma-arc cutting, contact-arc cutting and mechanical saw cutting led to assessing the performance, advantages and associated problems for each technique. The main metallic material studied was aluminium, but some experiments with stainless steel were also conducted. Melting was also studied as a decontamination technique and as a way to reduce volume and facilitate the management of radioactive waste. (author)

 
 
 
 
321

Decontamination and decommissioning techniques for research reactors  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Evaluation of soil decontamination process and the liquid decontamination waste treatment technology are investigation of organic acid as a decontamination agent, investigation of the liquid waste purification process and identification of recycling the decontamination agents. Participation on IAEA CRP meeting are preparation of IAEA technical report on 'studies on decommissioning of TRIGA reactors and site restoration technologies' and exchange the research result, technology, experience and safety regulation of the research reactor D and D of USA, Great Britain, Canada, Belgium, Italy, India and so forth.

2002-01-01

322

Barseback NPP in Sweden - transition to decommissioning  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

On 5 February 1998, the government decided, [on the basis of the law on the phasing-out of nuclear power], that Barsebaeck 1 should close in June 1998. An appeal to the Supreme Administrative Court meant that the closure was temporarily postponed. After the Supreme Administrative Court declared that the government's decision should stand, Barsebaeck 1 was closed permanently on 30 November 1999. BKAB organization during service operation, labour turnover, scenario for decommissioning of Barsebaeck-1 and personnel development and staff reduction are presented. (author)

Lorentz, H. [Barseback, Kraft AB (BKAB) (Sweden)

2008-07-01

323

Calculation Study of the Wwer Decommissioning Problem  

Science.gov (United States)

Several Russian WWER units are to be removed from service in the near future. To study the main calculation problems concerned with decommissioning, the typical WWER-440 unit was selected. The 1D & 2D models of a core, vessel and shielding were designed to apply in transport and inventory calculations. The 2D KASKAD code based on the discrete ordinates technique was applied in criticality and transport calculations. To confirm the results at the mid-plane, the 1D ROZ-6 discrete ordinates code was used as well as the MCNP Monte-Carlo code. The most important inventory calculations were performed with the ORIGEN-S code.

Grudzevich, Oleg; Klinov, Dmitry; Kurachenko, Yury; Yavshits, Sergei

2003-06-01

324

Decontamination and decommissioning techniques for research reactors  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Evaluation of soil decontamination process and the liquid decontamination waste treatment technology are investigation of organic acid as a decontamination agent, investigation of the liquid waste purification process and identification of recycling the decontamination agents. Participation on IAEA CRP meeting are preparation of IAEA technical report on 'studies on decommissioning of TRIGA reactors and site restoration technologies' and exchange the research result, technology, experience and safety regulation of the research reactor D and D of USA, Great Britain, Canada, Belgium, Italy, India and so forth.

Oh, Won Zin; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. H.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Lee, K. W

2002-05-01

325

Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2007  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Major articles/reports in this issue include: An interesting year ahead of us, by Tom Christopher, AREVA NP Inc.; U.S.-India Civil Nuclear Cooperation; Decontamination and recycling of retired components, by Sean P. Brushart, Electric Power Research Institute; and, ANO is 33 and going strong, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The industry innovation article is: Continuous improvement process, by ReNae Kowalewski, Arkansas Nuclear One

2007-01-01

326

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants - safety aspects  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The stages of decommissioning a nuclear power plant are presented in popular form. There exist two alternatives: Safe containment of activated and highly contaminated components within the nuclear power plant unit or dismantling of all components and buildings. Stage 1 provides for safe containment in a) previously sealed buildings without any dismantling; b) containment resp. reactor building; c) underground structures. Stage 2 provides for partial dismantling with safe containment of the remaining parts a) within the biological shield, b) underground, after dismantling the parts above ground level. Stage 3 provides for total dismantling. (orig.)

1979-01-01

327

Decommissioning cost evaluation for Korean Nuclear Power Plants  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A systematic study was performed to develop decommissioning cost evaluation technology and to establish optimum decommissioning plan for Korean nuclear power plants. Eight decommissioning options for Kori unit I including DECON, SAFSTOR and ENTOMB were considered for detailed cost analysis. Immediate and delayed dismantling scenarios were compared each other in regards to economic, technical and social aspects. Fourteen decommissioning unit activities were considered in estimating unit cost factors including labor cost, consumables cost and equipment cost. The decommissioning cost for Kori unit 1 was lowest for DECON option and highest for ENTOMB-3 option in which the site recovery was made after entombment of 300 years. The main cost of the SAFSTOR option resulted from the dismantling and extended safe storage. For a long decommissioning period, the discount rate is crucial in estimating the decommissioning cost. The difference among decommissioning options was negligible in cost if a discount rate of 2% was assumed. The long-term safe storage option also became advantageous relative to the immediate dismantling option as the discount rate increased. (author)

Song, Myungjae; Lee, Myungchan [Korea Electric Power Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

1998-07-01

328

Estimated doses from decommissioning activities at commercial nuclear power stations  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper reviews generic population dose estimates for decommissioning reference boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and provides extrapolated estimates of the total collective dose resulting from decommissioning commercial nuclear reactors operated in the United States. Decontamination and decommissioning of retired nuclear power reactors is a necessary part of the nuclear fuel cycle. During decommissioning of large facilities, radioactivity will be encountered in activated reactor components and in contaminated piping, equipment, and building surfaces. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored a series of studies to evaluate the technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a variety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The NRC adopted the following standardized definitions concerning decommissioning: (1) decommissioning: the measures taken at the end of a facility's operating lifetime to ensure the protection of the public from any residual radioactivity or other hazards present in the facility; (2) DECON: immediate decontamination leading to the release of the facility for unrestricted use; (3) SAFSTOR: safe storage plus deferred decontamination leading to release of the facility for unrestricted use; and (4) ENTOMB: entombment plus decay leading to release of the facility for unrestricted use. In the NRC studies, the most likely decommissioning alternative for most facilities was assumed to be DECON or SAFSTOR.

Napier, B.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

1989-01-01

329

Estimated doses from decommissioning activities at commercial nuclear power stations  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper reviews generic population dose estimates for decommissioning reference boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and provides extrapolated estimates of the total collective dose resulting from decommissioning commercial nuclear reactors operated in the United States. Decontamination and decommissioning of retired nuclear power reactors is a necessary part of the nuclear fuel cycle. During decommissioning of large facilities, radioactivity will be encountered in activated reactor components and in contaminated piping, equipment, and building surfaces. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored a series of studies to evaluate the technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a variety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The NRC adopted the following standardized definitions concerning decommissioning: (1) decommissioning: the measures taken at the end of a facility's operating lifetime to ensure the protection of the public from any residual radioactivity or other hazards present in the facility; (2) DECON: immediate decontamination leading to the release of the facility for unrestricted use; (3) SAFSTOR: safe storage plus deferred decontamination leading to release of the facility for unrestricted use; and (4) ENTOMB: entombment plus decay leading to release of the facility for unrestricted use. In the NRC studies, the most likely decommissioning alternative for most facilities was assumed to be DECON or SAFSTOR

1989-01-01

330

The expenses forecast for decommissioning of WWER type energy units  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The forecast results of work forces and cost for WWER-440 and WWER-1000 energy units decommissioning are presented in the article. The radioactive waste volumes which will arise at the decommissioning of WWER type energy units are estimated, as far as expenses for its disposal. The comparison with the international estimations is carried out.

2003-01-01

331

Technical considerations in characterizing and classifying a decommissioned reactor vessel  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper discusses background material related to the Pathfinder decommissioning, and emphasizes the technical considerations taken into account during the characterization and classification of the decommissioned Pathfinder reactor vessel. The second half of this paper emphasizes the details of meeting 10 CFR 71 packaging requirements. (author)

1992-01-01

332

Decommissioning of nuclear ship 'Otto Hahn'  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The nuclear powered ship 'Otto Hahn' was commissioned in 1968, and ended its mission in 1979. The decommissioning was approved in December, 1980, and after the dismantling and removal of the reactor plant were completed, the decommissioning was recognized in September, 1982. The features of the method of decommissioning Otto Hahn were the carrying-out of the reactor pressure vessel together with the primary shielding tank as one body, and after the machinery, equipment and structures in the controlled area were removed or decontaminated, the ship was reconstructed to a diesel freighter. It is considered that the method of decommissioning of Otto Hahn and the data obtained by this work furnish much information for the decommissioning of nuclear power stations and nuclear powered ships hereafter. In this report, the course of decommissioning of Otto Hahn and its experience are synthetically summarized. The propulsion plant of Otto Hahn, the radiological condition, the conceptual design of decommissioning, the dismantling works, the procedures of permission and approval, the procedure for removing the control, the execution of decommissioning, and the removal of the controlled area are reported. (K.I.).

Hayashi, Kingo; Yamada, Takeshi; Shiro, Yoshiaki; Iwao, Yoshiaki (Hitachi Shipbuilding and Engineering Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan))

1990-06-01

333

Decommissioning and material recycling. Radiation risk management issues  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Once nuclear fuel cycle facilities have permanently stopped operations they have to be decommissioned. The decommissioning of a nuclear facility involves the surveillance and dismantling of the facility systems and buildings, the management of the materials resulting from the dismantling activities and the release of the site for further use. The management of radiation risks associated with these activities plays an important role in the decommissioning process. Existing legislation covers many aspects of the decommissioning process. However, in most countries with nuclear power programmes legislation with respect to decommissioning is incomplete. In particular this is true in the Netherlands, where government policy with respect to decommissioning is still in development. Therefore a study was performed to obtain an overview of the radiation risk management issues associated with decommissioning and the status of the relevant legislation. This report describes the results of that study. It is concluded that future work at the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation on decommissioning and radiation risk management issues should concentrate on surveillance and dismantling activities and on criteria for site release. (orig.)

1996-01-01

334

The regulatory process for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The objective of this publication is to provide general guidance to Member States for regulating the decommissioning of nuclear facilities within the established nuclear regulatory framework. The Guide should also be useful to those responsible for, or interested in, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The Guide describes in general terms the process to be used in regulating decommissioning and the considerations to be applied in the development of decommissioning regulations and guides. It also delineates the responsibilities of the regulatory body and the licensee in decommissioning. The provisions of this Guide are intended to apply to all facilities within the nuclear fuel cycle and larger industrial installations using long lived radionuclides. For smaller installations, however, less extensive planning and less complex regulatory control systems should be acceptable. The Guide deals primarily with decommissioning after planned shutdown. Most provisions, however, are also applicable to decommissioning after an abnormal event, once cleanup operations have been terminated. The decommissioning planning in this case must take account of the abnormal event. 28 refs, 1 fig

1990-01-01

335

Manual for collecting management data concerning decommissioning of nuclear facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In the JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency), the decommissioning engineering system (DENESYS) has been developed to support examination of decommissioning plan aiming to use management data and experiences obtained through decommissioning of nuclear facilities effectively. In the development of the DENESYS, it is important efficiently to collect, and to analyze management data obtained from actual decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Then, collecting items of management data needed to examine decommissioning plan were extracted. And en efficient collecting method of the extracted collecting items was examined based on the JPDR (Japan Power Demonstration Reactor) decommissioning project. As a result, collecting items are work management data such as manpower and weight of components, waste management data such as weight and radioactivity in drums. These data would be collected by using daily work management report, waste record, and secondary record data in each JAEA site. In this report outline of collecting items and collecting method for decommissioning of nuclear facilities were described. And manual for collecting management data concerning decommissioning of nuclear facilities was introduced. (author)

2010-01-01

336

Decontamination and decommissioning project for the nuclear facilities  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The final goal of this project is to complete the decommissioning of the Korean Research Reactor no.1 and no. 2(KRR-1 and 2) and uranium conversion plant safely and successfully. The goal of this project in 2006 is to complete the decontamination of the inside reactor hall of the KRR-2 which will be operating as a temporary storage for the radioactive waste until the construction and operation of the national repository site. Also the decommissioning work of the KRR-1 and auxiliary facilities is being progress. As the compaction of decommissioning project is near at hand, a computer information system was developed for a systematically control and preserve a technical experience and decommissioning data for the future reuse. The nuclear facility decommissioning, which is the first challenge in Korea, is being closed to the final stages. We completed the decommissioning of all the bio-shielding concrete for KRR-2 in 2005 and carried out the decontamination and waste material grouping of the roof, wall and bottom of the reactor hall of the KRR-2. The decommissioning for nuclear facility were demanded the high technology, remote control equipment and radioactivity analysis. So developed equipment and experience will be applied at the decommissioning for new nuclear facility in the future.

Park, J. H.; Paik, S. T.; Park, S. W. (and others)

2007-02-15

337

Decontamination and decommissioning project for the nuclear facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The final goal of this project is to complete the decommissioning of the Korean Research Reactor no.1 and no. 2(KRR-1 and 2) and uranium conversion plant safely and successfully. The goal of this project in 2006 is to complete the decontamination of the inside reactor hall of the KRR-2 which will be operating as a temporary storage for the radioactive waste until the construction and operation of the national repository site. Also the decommissioning work of the KRR-1 and auxiliary facilities is being progress. As the compaction of decommissioning project is near at hand, a computer information system was developed for a systematically control and preserve a technical experience and decommissioning data for the future reuse. The nuclear facility decommissioning, which is the first challenge in Korea, is being closed to the final stages. We completed the decommissioning of all the bio-shielding concrete for KRR-2 in 2005 and carried out the decontamination and waste material grouping of the roof, wall and bottom of the reactor hall of the KRR-2. The decommissioning for nuclear facility were demanded the high technology, remote control equipment and radioactivity analysis. So developed equipment and experience will be applied at the decommissioning for new nuclear facility in the future

2007-01-01

338

Studies on future decommissioning of the Swiss nuclear power plants  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The financing of future decommissioning of the Swiss nuclear power plants and the permanent, safe disposal of the wastes arising therefrom is secured by payments into a legally established decommissioning fund. In order to update the required level of payments into the fund, which have been ongoing since 1984, 20 years after the first study the costs of decommissioning have been re-calculated from scratch using complete decommissioning studies for each plant. Following the specification of boundary conditions which take into account the specific situation in Switzerland, decommissioning concepts are drawn up for the individual plants. The measures outlined in these concepts are integrated into a cost structuring plan and the decommissioning costs are then calculated using standard models (e.g. STILLKO). The radiological inventory, which is re-calculated for each plant, has a significant influence on costs. Furthermore, the disposal costs which can be allocated to decommissioning waste have to be determined; these are based on a concept in which only two types of containers are considered for disposal. The studies have resulted in decommissioning costs which, with a range between 200 and 390 million Euro, are comparable with costs in other countries. (orig.)

Achermann, H. [Elektrizitaetswerk Laufenburg AG (Switzerland); Gunten, A. von [Bernische Kraftwerke A.G., Muehleberg (Switzerland); Heep, W. [Nationale Genossenschaft fuer die Lagerung Radioaktiver Abfaelle (NAGRA), Baden (Switzerland); Kaiser, P. [Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt A.G. (Switzerland); Maxeiner, H. [Nationale Genossenschaft fuer die Lagerung Radioaktiver Abfaelle (NAGRA), Baden (Switzerland); Paul, R. [Nuklear-Ingenieur Service GmbH, Hanau (Germany); Utzinger, E. [ATEL Aare-Tessin Ltd. for Electricity, Otten (Switzerland)

2001-07-01

339

Studies on future decommissioning of the Swiss nuclear power plants  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The financing of future decommissioning of the Swiss nuclear power plants and the permanent, safe disposal of the wastes arising therefrom is secured by payments into a legally established decommissioning fund. In order to update the required level of payments into the fund, which have been ongoing since 1984, 20 years after the first study the costs of decommissioning have been re-calculated from scratch using complete decommissioning studies for each plant. Following the specification of boundary conditions which take into account the specific situation in Switzerland, decommissioning concepts are drawn up for the individual plants. The measures outlined in these concepts are integrated into a cost structuring plan and the decommissioning costs are then calculated using standard models (e.g. STILLKO). The radiological inventory, which is re-calculated for each plant, has a significant influence on costs. Furthermore, the disposal costs which can be allocated to decommissioning waste have to be determined; these are based on a concept in which only two types of containers are considered for disposal. The studies have resulted in decommissioning costs which, with a range between 200 and 390 million Euro, are comparable with costs in other countries. (orig.)

2001-01-01

340

Ecological risk assessment at a hazardous waste site on Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Toxic Burning Pits (TBP) area of the J-Field site, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, was used in the past for disposal and destruction of munitions and chemical agents. The TBP area, located at the end of a large peninsula on Chesapeake Bay, covers about 9 acres adjacent to a marsh containing a large freshwater pond. An ecological risk assessment (ERA) was conducted at the site to determine whether current levels of contamination at the site are producing demonstrable ecological effects, whether contaminated media are toxic to biota, and to estimate potential risks to biota from direct and indirect contaminant uptake from site media. The ERA incorporated field studies, tissue residue analyses, media toxicity tests, and uptake modeling for wildlife species. Areas with contaminated soil had lower abundance, diversity, and biomass of terrestrial vegetation and soil-dwelling invertebrates; altered trophic structure of nematode communities; reduced soil respiration and litter decomposition rates; and reduced soil microbial enzyme activities. Test showed that contaminated soils were toxic to vegetation, insect eggs, and earthworms. Contamination and toxicity of aquatic media were limited to adjacent portions of the marsh that receive surface runoff from the TBP area. Uptake modeling indicated current contamination levels at the TBP area may pose unacceptable risks to several wildlife species and that the risks are associated primarily with soil-based uptake pathways. The ERA results identified soil to be the medium posing the greatest risk to ecological receptors, and the assessment results are currently being used to assist in the development and evaluation of remedial alternatives for the contaminated soil.

Iohowskyi, I.; Hayse, J.W.; Kuperman, R.; Lonkhuyzen, R. van [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-12-31

 
 
 
 
341

Carcass characteristics of small and medium-frame Aberdeen Angus young steers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Carcass characteristics of small and medium-frame Aberdeen Angus young steers, finished in feedlot and slaughtered with similar subcutaneous fat thickness are evaluated. The average age and live weight at the start of feedlot were respectively 298 days and 202 kg. The steers were confined during 158 days, and slaughtered with average subcutaneous fat thickness of 6.4 mm. The feed consisted of sorghum silage and concentrate at 60:40 ratio of dry matter during the first 63 days and 50:50 afterward. The frame was calculated by formula F =-11.548 + (0.4878xh) - (0.0289xID) + (0.0000146xID²)+(0.0000759xIDxh), where h is the height and ID the age, in days. Steers with medium frame showed superiority in important marketing aspects such as warm (p < 0.0001) and cold carcass (p < 0.0001) weights. Muscularity measurements such as longissimus dorsi area in relation to cold carcass (p = 0.0477) and empty body (p = 0.0419) weights were lower for medium-frame steers. Carcass conformation, longissimus dorsi area and cushion thickness were similar in both frame. The commercial cuts, forequarter (p < 0.001), flank (p = 0.009) and saw cut (p = 0.0003) in kg were higher for medium-frame steers. Saw cut decreased 0.18% with an increase in frame (p = 0.0404). Weight of the carcass tissues increased with the steers frame, whereas the percentage of muscle tissue decreased 0.57% (p = 0.0410)

Miguelangelo Ziegler Arboitte; Ivan Luiz Brondani; João Restle; Leandro da Silva Freitas; Lucas Braido Pereira; Gilmar dos Santos Cardoso

2011-01-01

342

Work plan for conducting an ecological risk assessment at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Environmental Management Division of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. J-Field is within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland, and activities at the Edgewood Area since World War II have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. The J-Field site was used to destroy chemical agents and munitions by open burning and open detonation. This work plan presents the approach proposed to conduct an ecological risk assessment (ERA) as part of the RI/FS program at J-Field. This work plan identifies the locations and types of field studies proposed for each area of concern (AOC), the laboratory studies proposed to evaluate toxicity of media, and the methodology to be used in estimating doses to ecological receptors and discusses the approach that will be used to estimate and evaluate ecological risks at J-Field. Eight AOCs have been identified at J-Field, and the proposed ERA is designed to evaluate the potential for adverse impacts to ecological receptors from contaminated media at each AOC, as well as over the entire J-Field site. The proposed ERA approach consists of three major phases, incorporating field and laboratory studies as well as modeling. Phase 1 includes biotic surveys of the aquatic and terrestrial habitats, biological tissue sampling and analysis, and media toxicity testing at each AOC and appropriate reference locations. Phase 2 includes definitive toxicity testing of media from areas of known or suspected contamination or of media for which the Phase 1 results indicate toxicity or adverse ecological effects. In Phase 3, the uptake models initially developed in Phase 2 will be finalized, and contaminant dose to each receptor from all complete pathways will be estimated.

Hlohowskyj, I.; Hayse, J.; Kuperman, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.] [and others

1995-03-01

343

Responsiveness of individual questions from the venous clinical severity score and the Aberdeen varicose vein questionnaire.  

Science.gov (United States)

OBJECTIVES: The venous clinical severity score (VCSS) and the Aberdeen varicose vein questionnaire (AVVQ) improve after treating chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). The aim was to examine how and why they improve by evaluating the change in each individual question. METHODS: This was an analysis on prospectively collected data from a clinical study on 100 patients (58% female) with CVI (C(2) = 34, C(3) = 14, C(4a) = 29, C(4b) = 9, C(5) = 7, C(6) = 7) who were randomized to endovenous laser ablation (n = 50) or foam sclerotherapy (n = 50). The change scores (performance) of each question of the VCSS (questions 1-10) and the AVVQ (questions 1-13) were calculated by subtracting the score at three weeks, and three months, from the pre-treatment score. RESULTS: Both the median, interquartile range (IQR), VCSS and the AVVQ scores improved from 6 (4) and 21.4 (15.1) at baseline to 3 (4) and 18.6 (12.1) at three weeks (P < 0.0005, P = 0.031) to 2 (3) and 8.8 (13.6) at three months, (P < 0.0005, P < 0.0005), respectively. The performance of the first three questions of the VCSS (pain, extent of varicosities, oedema) were the most contributory to the overall score. Questions 5, 7, 8, 9 on ulceration improved the most individually but did not contribute significantly to the overall score. Questions 5, 9 of the AVVQ on stocking use and ulceration failed to contribute statistically to the overall improvement at three months. CONCLUSION: The majority of the individual questions of the VCSS and AVVQ responded to change. However, the cause of a poor response was multifactorial with statistical dilution playing a significant role. Stratification of patients according to ulceration may allow better comparisons. PMID:23180751

Lattimer, C R; Kalodiki, E; Azzam, M; Geroulakos, G

2012-11-22

344

Responsiveness of individual questions from the venous clinical severity score and the Aberdeen varicose vein questionnaire.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: The venous clinical severity score (VCSS) and the Aberdeen varicose vein questionnaire (AVVQ) improve after treating chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). The aim was to examine how and why they improve by evaluating the change in each individual question. METHODS: This was an analysis on prospectively collected data from a clinical study on 100 patients (58% female) with CVI (C(2) = 34, C(3) = 14, C(4a) = 29, C(4b) = 9, C(5) = 7, C(6) = 7) who were randomized to endovenous laser ablation (n = 50) or foam sclerotherapy (n = 50). The change scores (performance) of each question of the VCSS (questions 1-10) and the AVVQ (questions 1-13) were calculated by subtracting the score at three weeks, and three months, from the pre-treatment score. RESULTS: Both the median, interquartile range (IQR), VCSS and the AVVQ scores improved from 6 (4) and 21.4 (15.1) at baseline to 3 (4) and 18.6 (12.1) at three weeks (P < 0.0005, P = 0.031) to 2 (3) and 8.8 (13.6) at three months, (P < 0.0005, P < 0.0005), respectively. The performance of the first three questions of the VCSS (pain, extent of varicosities, oedema) were the most contributory to the overall score. Questions 5, 7, 8, 9 on ulceration improved the most individually but did not contribute significantly to the overall score. Questions 5, 9 of the AVVQ on stocking use and ulceration failed to contribute statistically to the overall improvement at three months. CONCLUSION: The majority of the individual questions of the VCSS and AVVQ responded to change. However, the cause of a poor response was multifactorial with statistical dilution playing a significant role. Stratification of patients according to ulceration may allow better comparisons.

Lattimer CR; Kalodiki E; Azzam M; Geroulakos G

2012-11-01

345

A state-of-the art on decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Japan  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] While proceeding the KRR-1 and 2 decommissioning project, we are carried out study for the state of the art on decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Japan. Also, we are studied for the research reactors and commercial power plant that has the object of decommissioning, and for the government and the organization related on decommissioning operation. We are investigated for decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities achieved by JAERI, and collected the information and data for decommissioning techniques and computational system through the JPDR(Japan Power Demonstration Reactor) decommissioning activities. Such techniques are applying for Tokai Power Station began the decommissioning project from last year, and for Fugen Nuclear Power Station to be planned the decommissioning from 2003. Recent techniques for decommissioning was acquired by direct contact. The status of the treatment for decommissioning waste and the disposal facility for the very low-level radioactive concrete wastes was grasped

346

Qualidade do sêmen de touros das raças Aberdeen Angus e Brangus-Ibagé em frente à degeneração testicular experimental induzida por dexametasona/ Bulls semen quality of Aberdeen Angus and Brangus-Ibagé breeds after experimental testicular degeneration induced by dexamethasone  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese Foi administrada dexametasona para indução de degeneração testicular experimental em touros de uma raça taurina pura (Aberdeen Angus) e de sua sintética derivada (Brangus-Ibagé). O objetivo deste estudo foi o de averiguar a diferença de sensibilidade na função gametogênica em frente à degeneração experimental. Para tal, foram avaliados os aspectos físicos e morfológicos do sêmen. Os dados obtidos foram analisados considerando o dia de coleta e genótipo. (more) Os resultados revelaram que os dois grupos raciais comportaram-se semelhantemente ao longo das coletas. A despeito do número de animais empregados, o uso da degeneração testicular experimental possibilitou evidenciar que não há diferença entre as duas raças quanto à intensidade da degeneração e tempo necessário para o restabelecimento do quadro espermático normal. Abstract in english Testicular degeneration was induced by dexamethasone injection in bulls from a European breed Aberdeen Angus and a derived synthetic crossbreed (Brangus-Ibagé). Aiming to investigate differential sensibility on gametogenic function in these genotypes, physical and morphological semen characteristics were evaluated. The data analysed considered the day of the semen samples and the breed. Our results reveal that both breeds behave similarly during the experimental period. (more) Even considering the number of bulls used in this experiment, the employed methodology gives no evidence of any difference between breeds, intensity of degeneration or time required to the reestablishment of normal sperm frequencies after experimental induction of testicular degeneration.

Horn, Marilise Mesquita; Moraes, José Carlos Ferrugem; Galina, Carlos Salvador

1999-09-01

347

Qualidade do sêmen de touros das raças Aberdeen Angus e Brangus-Ibagé em frente à degeneração testicular experimental induzida por dexametasona Bulls semen quality of Aberdeen Angus and Brangus-Ibagé breeds after experimental testicular degeneration induced by dexamethasone  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Foi administrada dexametasona para indução de degeneração testicular experimental em touros de uma raça taurina pura (Aberdeen Angus) e de sua sintética derivada (Brangus-Ibagé). O objetivo deste estudo foi o de averiguar a diferença de sensibilidade na função gametogênica em frente à degeneração experimental. Para tal, foram avaliados os aspectos físicos e morfológicos do sêmen. Os dados obtidos foram analisados considerando o dia de coleta e genótipo. Os resultados revelaram que os dois grupos raciais comportaram-se semelhantemente ao longo das coletas. A despeito do número de animais empregados, o uso da degeneração testicular experimental possibilitou evidenciar que não há diferença entre as duas raças quanto à intensidade da degeneração e tempo necessário para o restabelecimento do quadro espermático normal.Testicular degeneration was induced by dexamethasone injection in bulls from a European breed Aberdeen Angus and a derived synthetic crossbreed (Brangus-Ibagé). Aiming to investigate differential sensibility on gametogenic function in these genotypes, physical and morphological semen characteristics were evaluated. The data analysed considered the day of the semen samples and the breed. Our results reveal that both breeds behave similarly during the experimental period. Even considering the number of bulls used in this experiment, the employed methodology gives no evidence of any difference between breeds, intensity of degeneration or time required to the reestablishment of normal sperm frequencies after experimental induction of testicular degeneration.

Marilise Mesquita Horn; José Carlos Ferrugem Moraes; Carlos Salvador Galina

1999-01-01

348

Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Process of V1 NPP Decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Through the adoption of Governmental Resolution No. 801/99 the Slovak Republic undertook a commitment to shutdown units 1 and 2 of Jaslovske Bohunice V 1 NPP (WWER 230 reactor type) in 2006 and 2008 respectively. Therefore the more intensive preparation of a decommissioning documentation has been commenced. Namely, the VI NPP Conceptual Decommissioning Plan and subsequently the Environmental Impact Assessment Report of VI NPP Decommissioning were developed. Thus, the standard environmental impact assessment process was performed and the most suitable alternative of V1 NPP decommissioning was selected as a basis for development of further decommissioning documents. The status and main results of the environmental impact assessment process and EIA report are discussed in more detail in this paper. (authors)

2007-01-01

349

Comparing nuclear decommissioning in the UK and France  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] In this paper we will compare the decommissioning policies in the UK and France. Both countries have a long nuclear history and decommissioning has taken place since the 1960. However, the proposed decommissioning of Magnox and AGR sites in the UK and of UNGG sites in France brings decommissioning efforts to a new level. Whilst we explore in detail the approaches and methodologies adopted in each country we remain sensitive to the effects that political and economic history play in shaping the policy response. In this paper we draw upon interviews conducted with a range of key stakeholders including: national regulators, companies involved in decommissioning, local politicians and community representatives. We also analyse key academic and non academic literature. (authors)

2008-10-02

350

Comparing nuclear decommissioning in the UK and France  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In this paper we will compare the decommissioning policies in the UK and France. Both countries have a long nuclear history and decommissioning has taken place since the 1960. However, the proposed decommissioning of Magnox and AGR sites in the UK and of UNGG sites in France brings decommissioning efforts to a new level. Whilst we explore in detail the approaches and methodologies adopted in each country we remain sensitive to the effects that political and economic history play in shaping the policy response. In this paper we draw upon interviews conducted with a range of key stakeholders including: national regulators, companies involved in decommissioning, local politicians and community representatives. We also analyse key academic and non academic literature. (authors)

Walls, J. [Durham Univ., Waste of the World Project (United Kingdom); Garcier, R. [Sheffield Univ., Waste of the World Project (United Kingdom)

2008-07-01

351

Decommissioning of a mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Decommissioning of the coprecipitation plant, which made plutonium/uranium oxide fuel, is a lead project in the BNFL Sellafield decommissioning programme. The overall programme has the objectives of gaining data and experience in a wide range of decommissioning operations and hence in this specific project to pilot the decommissioning of plant heavily contaminated with plutonium and other actinides. Consequently the operations have been used to test improvements in temporary containment, contamination control and decontamination methods and also to develop in situ plutonium assay, plutonium recovery and size-reduction methods. Finally the project is also yielding data on manpower requirements, personnel radiation uptake and waste arisings to help in the planning of future decommissioning projects

1990-01-01

352

Apollo decommissioning project, Apollo, Pennsylvania. Final technical report  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In November, 1991 Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) received a grant to partially fund the decommissioning of the former Apollo Nuclear Fuel Facility. The decommissioning was performed in accordance with a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approved decommissioning plan. This report summarizes the decommissioning of the Apollo Nuclear Fuel Facility and the radiological surveying of the site to demonstrate that these decommissioning activities were effective in reducing residual activity well below NRC's criteria for release for unrestricted use. The Apollo Nuclear Fuel Facility was utilized by the Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) and B and W for nuclear research and production under Atomic Energy Commission and Department of Energy (DOE) contracts during 20 plus years of nuclear fuel manufacturing operations.

1997-01-01

353

Decommissioning: Review of 1995--1997 and the global opportunities  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The international oil and natural gas exploration and production industry has described decommissioning as the process of deciding how best to shut down operations at the end of a field`s life, then closing the wells, cleaning, making the offshore platform or drilling rig safe, removing some or all of the facilities and disposing or reusing them. Decommissioning operations have been on going for over 20 years in the Gulf of Mexico. An overview of the Gulf of Mexico decommissioning experience will be presented with some basic statistics to give a better understanding of the depth of experience that exists in this region. Gulf of Mexico decommissioning experience will provide a basis for exploring several critical decommissioning issues that have arisen over the last decade. These issues have been recently discussed in two industry forums, the 1996 Marine Board Report and MMS International Workshop on Lease Abandonment.

Thornton, W.L.

1997-07-01

354

Project and feedback experience on nuclear facility decommissioning  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This series of 6 short articles presents the feedback experience that has been drawn from various nuclear facility dismantling and presents 3 decommissioning projects: first, the WAGR project that is the UK demonstration project for power reactor decommissioning (a review of the tools used to dismantle the reactor core); secondly, the dismantling project of the Bugey-1 UNGG reactor for which the dismantling works of the reactor internals is planned to be done underwater; and thirdly, the decommissioning project of the MR reactor in the Kurchatov Institute. The feedback experience described concerns nuclear facilities in Spain (Vandellos-1 and the CIEMAT research center), in Belgium (the Eurochemic reprocessing plant), and in France (the decommissioning of nuclear premises inside the Fontenay-aux-roses Cea center and the decommissioning of the UP1 spent fuel reprocessing plant at the Marcoule site). (A.C.)

Santiago, J.L. [ENRESA (Spain); Benest, T.G. [United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, Windscale, Cumbria (United Kingdom); Tardy, F.; Lefevre, Ph. [Electricite de France (EDF/CIDEN), 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Willis, A. [VT Nuclear Services (United Kingdom); Gilis, R.; Lewandowski, P.; Ooms, B.; Reusen, N.; Van Laer, W.; Walthery, R. [Belgoprocess (Belgium); Jeanjacques, M. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Bohar, M.P.; Bremond, M.P.; Poyau, C.; Mandard, L.; Boissonneau, J.F.; Fouquereau, A.; Pichereau, E.; Binet, C. [CEA Fontenay aux Roses, 92 (France); Fontana, Ph.; Fraize, G. [CEA Marcoule 30 (France); Seurat, Ph. [AREVA NC, 75 - Paris (France); Chesnokov, A.V.; Fadin, S.Y.; Ivanov, O.P.; Kolyadin, V.I.; Lemus, A.V.; Pavlenko, V.I.; Semenov, S.G.; Shisha, A.D.; Volkov, V.G.; Zverkov, Y.A. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-11-15

355

Project and feedback experience on nuclear facility decommissioning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] This series of 6 short articles presents the feedback experience that has been drawn from various nuclear facility dismantling and presents 3 decommissioning projects: first, the WAGR project that is the UK demonstration project for power reactor decommissioning (a review of the tools used to dismantle the reactor core); secondly, the dismantling project of the Bugey-1 UNGG reactor for which the dismantling works of the reactor internals is planned to be done underwater; and thirdly, the decommissioning project of the MR reactor in the Kurchatov Institute. The feedback experience described concerns nuclear facilities in Spain (Vandellos-1 and the CIEMAT research center), in Belgium (the Eurochemic reprocessing plant), and in France (the decommissioning of nuclear premises inside the Fontenay-aux-roses Cea center and the decommissioning of the UP1 spent fuel reprocessing plant at the Marcoule site). (A.C.)

2008-01-01

356

Decommissioning concept for the nuclear power plants of German utilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Nuclear power plants, like any other industrial installation, must be decommissioned at the end of their technical and economic life. Some 120 nuclear power plants worldwide are down for good. Most of them are prototype facilities of the first generation. Two out of the seventeen nuclear power plants permanently decommissioned in Germany, namely the Niederaichbach nuclear power station and the HDR in Karlstein, have been dismantled completely and restored to green field conditions. The other plants are in various stages of disassembly and safe containment, respectively. Preparatory planning and work on decommissioning nuclear power plants was begun early, both on a national and an international level. Since the seventies, the German electricity utilities prepared for this final phase of their plants in the Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning project group. A decommissioning concept was developed to demonstrate technical feasibility and assess the cost. ''Decommissioning'' as a generic term includes all activities after the end of power operation. These are the post-operations phase, which is characterized mainly by the removal of the fuel elements from the plant, followed by decommissioning proper, which may be carried out in a number of approaches, the key factor being the timetable. This step can be followed by immediate complete demolition, partial demolition with safe containment for some time, or safe containment for some time followed by demolition. The final objective in all cases is restoration to green field conditions. The current database allows the decommissioning costs for German power reactors to be calculated. They amount to DM 690 to 770 million for a complete plant. The experience in decommissioning and demolition acquired domestically and abroad on the basis of these concepts confirms that decommissioning is technically feasible, radiologically safe, and economically viable. (orig.)

2001-01-01

357

DECOMMISSIONING OF HOT CELL FACILITIES AT THE BATTELLE COLUMBUS LABORATORIES  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL), located in Columbus, Ohio, must complete decontamination and decommissioning activities for nuclear research buildings and grounds at its West Jefferson Facilities by 2006, as mandated by Congress. This effort includes decommissioning several hot cells located in the Hot Cell Laboratory (Building JN-1). JN-1 was originally constructed in 1955, and a hot cell/high bay addition was built in the mid 1970s. For over 30 years, BCL used these hot cell facilities to conduct research for the nuclear power industry and several government agencies, including the U.S. Navy, U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force, and the U.S. Department of Energy. As a result of this research, the JN-1 hot cells became highly contaminated with mixed fission and activation products, as well as fuel residues. In 1998, the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP) began efforts to decommission JN-1 with the goal of remediating the site to levels of residual contamination allowing future use without radiological restrictions. This goal requires that each hot cell be decommissioned to a state where it can be safely demolished and transported to an off-site disposal facility. To achieve this, the BCLDP uses a four-step process for decommissioning each hot cell: (1) Source Term Removal; (2) Initial (i.e., remote) Decontamination; (3) Utility Removal; and (4) Final (i.e., manual) Decontamination/Stabilization. To date, this process has been successfully utilized on 13 hot cells within JN-1, with one hot cell remaining to be decommissioned. This paper will provide a case study of the hot cell decommissioning being conducted by the BCLDP. Discussed will be the methods used to achieve the goals of each of the hot cell decommissioning stages and the lessons learned that could be applied at other sites where hot cells need to be decommissioned.

Weaver, Patrick; Henderson, Glenn; Erickson, Peter; Garber, David

2003-02-27

358

Green Vinca - Vinca Institute nuclear decommissioning program  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Current conditions related to the nuclear and radiation safety in the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro are the result of the previous nuclear programs in the former Yugoslavia and strong economic crisis during the previous decade. These conditions have to be improved as soon as possible. The process of establishment and initialisation of the Vinca Institute Nuclear Decommissioning (VIND) Program, known also as the 'Green Vinca' Program supported by the Government of the Republic Serbia, is described in this paper. It is supposed to solve all problems related to the accumulated spent nuclear fuel, radioactive waste and decommissioning of RA research reactor. Particularly, materials associated to the RA reactor facility and radioactive wastes from the research, industrial, medical and other applications, generated in the previous period, which are stored in the Vinca Institute, are supposed to be proper repackaged and removed from the Vinca site to some other disposal site, to be decided yet. Beside that, a research and development program in the modern nuclear technologies is proposed with the aim to preserve experts, manpower and to establish a solid ground for new researchers in field of nuclear research and development. (author)

2003-01-01

359

The Decommissioning Facility Characterization DB System (DEFACS)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The computer system for the characterization on the nuclear facilities is established as the name of the DEFACS (DEcommissioning FAcility Characterization DB System). his system is consist of the four main part with the grouping of the items and it's code creation and management system, data input system, data processing and data out put system. All the data was processed by a simplified and formatted manner to provide useful information to the decommissioning planner. The four nuclear facilities are objected for the system; the KRR-1 and 2 (Research reactor), Uranium conversion plant (Nuclear chemical plant), UF4 pilot plant and the North Korea nuclear facility (5MWe Research Reactor). All the data from a nuclear facility was categorized and inputted into the several data fields in the input system, which were chosen by considering the facility characteristics. All the hardware is workstation for Web and DB server and PC grade computers for the users and the software 'ORACLE, RDBMS 11g' operated on the WINDOW 2008 O/S, was selected

2010-01-01

360

The Decommissioning Facility Characterization DB System (DEFACS)  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The computer system for the characterization on the nuclear facilities is established as the name of the DEFACS (DEcommissioning FAcility Characterization DB System). his system is consist of the four main part with the grouping of the items and it's code creation and management system, data input system, data processing and data out put system. All the data was processed by a simplified and formatted manner to provide useful information to the decommissioning planner. The four nuclear facilities are objected for the system; the KRR-1 and 2 (Research reactor), Uranium conversion plant (Nuclear chemical plant), UF4 pilot plant and the North Korea nuclear facility (5MWe Research Reactor). All the data from a nuclear facility was categorized and inputted into the several data fields in the input system, which were chosen by considering the facility characteristics. All the hardware is workstation for Web and DB server and PC grade computers for the users and the software 'ORACLE, RDBMS 11g' operated on the WINDOW 2008 O/S, was selected

Park, S. K.; Ji, Y. H.; Park, J. H.; Chung, U. S.; Song, I. T.

2010-09-15

 
 
 
 
361

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies.

Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

1990-09-01

362

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The 576 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the tenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title work, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords.

Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Ferguson, S.D.; Fielden, J.M.; Schumann, P.L.

1989-09-01

363

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The 576 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the tenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title work, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords.

1989-01-01

364

Intelligence, Social Class of Origin, Childhood Behavior Disturbance and Education as Predictors of Status Attainment in Midlife in Men: The Aberdeen Children of the 1950s Study  

Science.gov (United States)

In a birth cohort of 6281 men from Aberdeen, Scotland, social class of origin, childhood intelligence, childhood behavior disturbance and education were examined as predictors of status attainment in midlife (46 to 51 years). Social class of origin, intelligence and behavior disturbance were conceptualized as correlated predictors, whose effects…

von Stumm, Sophie; Macintyre, Sally; Batty, David G.; Clark, Heather; Deary, Ian J.

2010-01-01

365

Decontamination and Decommissioning project for the Nuclear Facilities  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The final goal of this project is to complete the decommissioning of the Korean Research Reactor no.1 and no.2(KRR-1 and 2) and uranium conversion plant safely and successfully. The decommissioning the five incidental facilities was successfully carried out and the scoping survey and characterization survey of radioactivity on KRR-1 and KRR-2 site were proven as basic steps for the final evaluation of the residual radioactivity and assessment of the rehabilitation of the KRR-1 and KRR-2 site in 2008. After this works, the FSSR(Final Status Survey Report) will be submitted to the regulatory body for the release of the site from the regulation in 2009. The first decommissioning project of a domestic nuclear facility is now in its closing stages. The decommissioning for nuclear facility may demand the high technologies, remote control equipment and radioactivity assessment. So the developed technologies and the obtained experiences could be applied to new decommissioning projects of the nuclear facilities in the future, including north Korea nuclear facilities. At the decommissioning site of the uranium conversion plant, the decontamination of the stainless steel waste was performed and the all the sludge of the lagoon-2 waste was completely treated in this year. The technologies and experiences obtained from the UCP dismantling works are expected to apply to other fuel cycle facilities. The lagoon sludge treatment technology was the technology firstly tried in actual decommissioning sites in Korea and it is expected that this technology could be applied to other country

Chung, U. S.; Park, J. H.; Paik, S. T. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2008-02-15

366

Technology development of decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear reactor  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Decontamination and decommissioning technology of nuclear reactors is in the stage of technical demonstration even in advanced countries in the nuclear field. The retired TRIGA MARK II research reactor at KAERI was selected to demonstrate the relevant technologies. The results of the study carried this year can be summarized as the following three parts; 1. State of the arts of decontamination and dismantling technology 1) Examining the methods for radionuclide inventory estimation 2) Comparing and analyzing the methods and applications for decontamination and dismantling technologies. 3) Examining the present status of decommissioning activities for commercial and research reactor in the world. 2. Study of TRIGA reactor decommissioning plan. The decommissioning study for the retired TRIGA MARK II research reactor at KAERI has been carried out and two decommissioning plans were prepared: one is for complete dismantling and the other for conversion to museum. The radionuclide inventory and the man-rem exposures for workers were also estimated in the study by using ANISN computer code. The Korea regulations concerning decommissioning has been analyzed compared with the U.S. regulations, 10 CFR and Reg. Guide. The decommissioning cost, schedule and manpower development including organization for two alternatives were also prepared. 3. Study of decontamination for radioactively contaminated metals. Experimental works for the decontamination of the contaminated stainless steel metal were carried out. The experimental results shows that the chemical ultrasonic method gives acceptable decontamination factor of around 20 for metals. (Author)

1987-01-01

367

Decommissioning Plan of the Musashi Reactor and Its Progress  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The Musashi Reactor is a TRIGA-II, tank-type research reactor, as shown in Table 1. The reactor had been operated at maximum thermal power level of 100 kW since first critical, January 30, 1963. Reactor operation was shut down due to small leakage of water from the reactor tank on December 21,1989. After shutdown, investigation of the causes, making plan of repair and discussions on restart or decommissioning had been done. Finally, decision of decommissioning was made in May, 2003. The initial plan of the decommissioning was submitted to the competent authority in January, 2004. Now, the reactor is under decommissioning. The plan of decommissioning and its progress are described. In conclusion: considering the status of undertaking plan of the waste disposal facility for the low level radioactive waste from research reactors, the phased decommissioning was selected for the Musashi Reactor. First phase of the decommissioning activities including the actions of permanent shutdown and delivering the spent nuclear fuels to US DOE was completed

2008-01-01

368

DECOMMISSIONING OF A CAESIUM-137 SEALED SOURCE PRODUCTION FACILITY  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Amersham owns a former Caesium-137 sealed source production facility. They commissioned RWE NUKEM to carry out an Option Study to determine a strategy for the management of this facility and then the subsequent decommissioning of it. The decommissioning was carried out in two sequential phases. Firstly robotic decommissioning followed by a phase of manual decommissioning. This paper describes the remote equipment designed built and operated, the robotic and manual decommissioning operations performed, the Safety Management arrangements and summarizes the lessons learned. Using the equipment described the facility was dismantled and decontaminated robotically. Some 2300kg of Intermediate Level Waste containing in the order of 4000Ci were removed robotically from the facility. Ambient dose rates were reduced from 100's of R per hour ? to 100's of mR per hour ?. The Telerobotic System was then removed to allow man access to complete the decommissioning. Manual decommissioning reduced ambient dose rates further to less than 1mR per hour ? and loose contamination levels to less than 0.25Bq/cm2. This allowed access to the facility without respiratory protection.

2003-01-01

369

Procedures and Practices - Challenges for Decommissioning Management and Teamwork  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The mental and practical approach to a decommissioning project is often not the same at all levels of an organization. Studies indicate that the early establishment of a decommissioning mindset throughout an organization is an important and frequently overlooked process. It is not enough to establish procedures, if practices and mental approaches are overlooked; and for decommissioning projects that are more often than not dominated by one of a kind problem solving, procedure design is challenging, and new requirements are put on communication. Our research considers stakeholder involvement in these processes in the wider sense of the term; however the main stakeholders in focus are regulators and the work force that will perform or lead the tasks related to decommissioning. Issues here treated include: Decommissioning mindset and the manifestation of mindset issues in decommissioning projects, including challenges and prospective solutions; trust building and trust breaking factors in communication and collaboration relevant to transition and decommissioning; new technologies for collaboration and communication and how these may impair or empower participants - experiences from several domains. This paper is based on work done in collaboration with the OECD NEA Halden Reactor Project. (author)

2013-01-01

370

Decontamination and Decommissioning project for the Nuclear Facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The final goal of this project is to complete the decommissioning of the Korean Research Reactor no.1 and no.2(KRR-1 and 2) and uranium conversion plant safely and successfully. The decommissioning the five incidental facilities was successfully carried out and the scoping survey and characterization survey of radioactivity on KRR-1 and KRR-2 site were proven as basic steps for the final evaluation of the residual radioactivity and assessment of the rehabilitation of the KRR-1 and KRR-2 site in 2008. After this works, the FSSR(Final Status Survey Report) will be submitted to the regulatory body for the release of the site from the regulation in 2009. The first decommissioning project of a domestic nuclear facility is now in its closing stages. The decommissioning for nuclear facility may demand the high technologies, remote control equipment and radioactivity assessment. So the developed technologies and the obtained experiences could be applied to new decommissioning projects of the nuclear facilities in the future, including north Korea nuclear facilities. At the decommissioning site of the uranium conversion plant, the decontamination of the stainless steel waste was performed and the all the sludge of the lagoon-2 waste was completely treated in this year. The technologies and experiences obtained from the UCP dismantling works are expected to apply to other fuel cycle facilities. The lagoon sludge treatment technology was the technology firstly tried in actual decommissioning sites in Korea and it is expected that this technology could be applied to other country

2008-01-01

371

Fertility traits in spring-calving Aberdeen Angus cattle. 2. Model comparison.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of this study was to investigate the possible superiority of a threshold-linear (TL) approach for calving day (CD) and calving success (CS) analysis in beef cattle over 2 multiple-trait (MT), censored models, considering CD at the first 3 calving opportunities. The CD observations on animals that failed to calve in the latter models were defined as cows being assigned a penalty value of 21 d beyond the last observed CD record within contemporary group (PEN model) or censored CD values that were randomly obtained from a truncated normal distribution (CEN-model). In the TL model, CD records were treated as missing if a cow failed to calve, and parameters were estimated in a TL analysis including CS traits (TLMISS-model). The models included the effects of contemporary group (herd x year of calving x mating management), age at calving, physiological status at mating (lactating or nonlactating cow), animal additive genetic effects, and residual. Field data included 6,763 calving records obtained from first, second, and third parities of 3,442 spring-calving Uruguayan Aberdeen Angus cows. Models were contrasted using a data splitting technique, analyzing correlations between predicted breeding values (PBV) for each pair of subsamples, by rank correlations between PBV obtained with the different models, and by inspecting percentage of sires selected in common using the different approaches at 10 and 25% hypothetical percentages of animals selected. Breeding value correlations of CD between the subsamples for the TLMISS approach were greater (0.67 to 0.68) than correlations for the censored MT models (0.49 to 0.54). Average correlations between PBV of CD in 1 subsample obtained by CEN (PEN, TLMISS) and PBV of CS in the other subsample were -0.53 (-0.55, -0.60) in the first calving opportunity (CO), -0.54 (-0.58, -0.63) in the second CO, and -0.50 (-0.49, -0.58) in the third CO. Rank correlations between PBV for CD in PEN and CEN were high (0.93 to 0.97), but correlations of either method with PBV of CD in TLMISS ranged from 0.50 to 0.71. Common identification of bulls for the top 10% of sires (25% of sires), when selected with PEN/CEN models or the TLMISS model, varied between 50 (44%) and 60 (52%). The use of the TL animal model for genetic evaluation seems attractive for genetic evaluation of fertility traits in beef cattle.

Urioste JI; Misztal I; Bertrand JK

2007-11-01

372

Fertility traits in spring-calving Aberdeen Angus cattle. 1. Model development and genetic parameters.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Calving records (n = 6,763) obtained from first, second, and third parities of 3,442 spring-calving, Uruguayan Aberdeen Angus cows were used to estimate heritabilities and genetic correlations for the linear trait calving day (CD) and the binary trait calving success (CS), using models that considered CD and CS at 3 calving opportunities as separate traits. Three approaches were defined to handle the CD observations on animals that failed to calve: 1) the cows were assigned a penalty value of 21 d beyond the last observed CD record within contemporary group (PEN); 2) the censored CD values were randomly obtained from a truncated normal distribution (CEN); and 3) the CD records were treated as missing, and the parameters were estimated in a joint threshold-linear analysis including CS traits (TLMISS). The models included the effects of contemporary group (herd x year of calving x mating management), age at calving (3 levels), physiological status at mating (nonlactating or lactating), animal additive genetic effects, and residual. Estimates of heritability for CD traits in the PEN and CEN data sets ranged from 0.20 to 0.31, with greater values in the first calving opportunity. Genetic correlations were positive and medium to high in magnitude, 0.57 to 0.59 in the PEN data set and 0.38 to 0.91 in the CEN data set. In the TLMISS data set, heritabilities ranged from 0.19 to 0.23 for CD and 0.37 to 0.42 for CS. Genetic correlations between CD traits varied between 0.82 and 0.88; between CS traits, genetic correlations varied between 0.56 and 0.80. Negative (genetically favorable), medium to high genetic correlations (-0.54 to -0.91) were estimated between CD and CS traits, suggesting that CD could be used as an indicator trait for CS. Data recording must improve in quality for practical applications in genetic evaluation for fertility traits.

Urioste JI; Misztal I; Bertrand JK

2007-11-01

373

Fertility traits in spring-calving Aberdeen Angus cattle. 2. Model comparison.  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study was to investigate the possible superiority of a threshold-linear (TL) approach for calving day (CD) and calving success (CS) analysis in beef cattle over 2 multiple-trait (MT), censored models, considering CD at the first 3 calving opportunities. The CD observations on animals that failed to calve in the latter models were defined as cows being assigned a penalty value of 21 d beyond the last observed CD record within contemporary group (PEN model) or censored CD values that were randomly obtained from a truncated normal distribution (CEN-model). In the TL model, CD records were treated as missing if a cow failed to calve, and parameters were estimated in a TL analysis including CS traits (TLMISS-model). The models included the effects of contemporary group (herd x year of calving x mating management), age at calving, physiological status at mating (lactating or nonlactating cow), animal additive genetic effects, and residual. Field data included 6,763 calving records obtained from first, second, and third parities of 3,442 spring-calving Uruguayan Aberdeen Angus cows. Models were contrasted using a data splitting technique, analyzing correlations between predicted breeding values (PBV) for each pair of subsamples, by rank correlations between PBV obtained with the different models, and by inspecting percentage of sires selected in common using the different approaches at 10 and 25% hypothetical percentages of animals selected. Breeding value correlations of CD between the subsamples for the TLMISS approach were greater (0.67 to 0.68) than correlations for the censored MT models (0.49 to 0.54). Average correlations between PBV of CD in 1 subsample obtained by CEN (PEN, TLMISS) and PBV of CS in the other subsample were -0.53 (-0.55, -0.60) in the first calving opportunity (CO), -0.54 (-0.58, -0.63) in the second CO, and -0.50 (-0.49, -0.58) in the third CO. Rank correlations between PBV for CD in PEN and CEN were high (0.93 to 0.97), but correlations of either method with PBV of CD in TLMISS ranged from 0.50 to 0.71. Common identification of bulls for the top 10% of sires (25% of sires), when selected with PEN/CEN models or the TLMISS model, varied between 50 (44%) and 60 (52%). The use of the TL animal model for genetic evaluation seems attractive for genetic evaluation of fertility traits in beef cattle. PMID:17686900

Urioste, J I; Misztal, I; Bertrand, J K

2007-08-08

374

Fertility traits in spring-calving Aberdeen Angus cattle. 1. Model development and genetic parameters.  

Science.gov (United States)

Calving records (n = 6,763) obtained from first, second, and third parities of 3,442 spring-calving, Uruguayan Aberdeen Angus cows were used to estimate heritabilities and genetic correlations for the linear trait calving day (CD) and the binary trait calving success (CS), using models that considered CD and CS at 3 calving opportunities as separate traits. Three approaches were defined to handle the CD observations on animals that failed to calve: 1) the cows were assigned a penalty value of 21 d beyond the last observed CD record within contemporary group (PEN); 2) the censored CD values were randomly obtained from a truncated normal distribution (CEN); and 3) the CD records were treated as missing, and the parameters were estimated in a joint threshold-linear analysis including CS traits (TLMISS). The models included the effects of contemporary group (herd x year of calving x mating management), age at calving (3 levels), physiological status at mating (nonlactating or lactating), animal additive genetic effects, and residual. Estimates of heritability for CD traits in the PEN and CEN data sets ranged from 0.20 to 0.31, with greater values in the first calving opportunity. Genetic correlations were positive and medium to high in magnitude, 0.57 to 0.59 in the PEN data set and 0.38 to 0.91 in the CEN data set. In the TLMISS data set, heritabilities ranged from 0.19 to 0.23 for CD and 0.37 to 0.42 for CS. Genetic correlations between CD traits varied between 0.82 and 0.88; between CS traits, genetic correlations varied between 0.56 and 0.80. Negative (genetically favorable), medium to high genetic correlations (-0.54 to -0.91) were estimated between CD and CS traits, suggesting that CD could be used as an indicator trait for CS. Data recording must improve in quality for practical applications in genetic evaluation for fertility traits. PMID:17504968

Urioste, J I; Misztal, I; Bertrand, J K

2007-05-15

375

Decontamination and Decommissioned Small Nuclear AIP Hybrid Systems Submarines  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Being equipped with small reactor AIP is the trend of conventional submarine power in 21st century as well as a real power revolution in conventional submarine. Thus, the quantity of small reactor AIP Submarines is on the increase, and its decommissioning and decontamination will also become a significant international issue. However, decommissioning the small reactor AIP submarines is not only a problem that appears beyond the lifetime of the small reactor nuclear devices, but the problem involving the entire process of design, construction, running and closure. In the paper, the problem is explored based on the conception and the feasible decommissioning and decontamination means are supplied to choose from.

Guangya Liu; Daping Qiu

2013-01-01

376

Analysis of decommissioning cost estimates for nuclear operating plants  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Rate adjustments to accumulate the capital needed to decommission nuclear power plants require complex cost estimates that must be accurate, plant-specific, and defensible. The radioactive nature of the facility makes it more difficult to estimate decommissioning than construction costs. Of the decommissioning methods, safe storage (SAFSTOR) and entombment (ENTOMB) are interim solutions, with dismantlement (DECON) taking place after 30 to 100 years. This analysis shows DECON to be the least expensive over the long term and the most attractive. New technical knowledge and more stringent industry standards call for periodic adjustments of the cost estimates, which now have only a periodic escalation for inflation. This results in understated costs. 3 figures.

Buta, R.R.; Palmer, R.E.

1984-07-19

377

Decommissioning and back working of Greifswald nuclear power plant  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

At Nuclear Power Plant Greifswald, the Energiewerke Nord are carrying out the presently world's largest decommissioning project. This requires the gathering up of experience from the operation of the nuclear power plants at Greifswald, the decommissioning of other nuclear power plants, waste management, project management and licensing procedures for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants. That confirmed that the back working of nuclear plants is not a technical problem but a challenge for project management and logistics. It shows that the dismantling and disposal of nuclear plants is an ordinary process in our economic life. (orig.).

1998-01-01

378

Disposal-specific requirements on radioactive waste originating from decommissioning  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In the Federal Republic of Germany, decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear installations started in the last decade and will be of growing importance beyond the year 2000. Information is given on the respective nuclear fuel cycle installations including a survey on the types and expected amounts of radioactive waste originating from decommissioning and dismantling. Guidance for processing and packaging this waste is given in the waste acceptance requirements established for Morsleben repository and the Konrad repository project. The main requirements to be met are addressed. In addition, the planned disposal of decommissioning and dismantling waste is outlined. (Author).

Brennecke, P.; Kugel, K. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Salzgitter (Germany)

1995-12-31

379

The decommissioning of eight graphite-moderated reactors  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The approximately 1,450 km/sup 2/ Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State was commissioned for the production of special nuclear material in 1943. Eight graphite-moderated, water-cooled reactors were constructed in five self-supporting complexes between 1943 and 1955. These reactors and their ancillary structures have been declared surplus and are in the process of being decommissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its operations contractor, the Westinghouse Hanford Company. This paper describes the eight reactors to be decommissioned and discusses decommissioning alternatives, cost and schedules, estimated radiation exposure, and the experience leading up to this project. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Daugherty, H.F.; Miller, C.E. Jr.

1988-03-01

380

The decommissioning of eight graphite-moderated reactors  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The approximately 1,450 km2 Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State was commissioned for the production of special nuclear material in 1943. Eight graphite-moderated, water-cooled reactors were constructed in five self-supporting complexes between 1943 and 1955. These reactors and their ancillary structures have been declared surplus and are in the process of being decommissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its operations contractor, the Westinghouse Hanford Company. This paper describes the eight reactors to be decommissioned and discusses decommissioning alternatives, cost and schedules, estimated radiation exposure, and the experience leading up to this project. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

 
 
 
 
381

Kafad Group I Decontamination Decommissioning Project Overview*  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In this paper, the author describes the activities recentlycompleted by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC for the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations office todecontaminate and decommission five radiologicallycontaminated buildings at the East Tennessee Technology Park.During their operating years, these five buildings were used fordecontaminating equipment, feeding and withdrawing uraniumhexafluoride from process equipment, and as developmentfacilities. The five buildings include the K-725 BerylliumBuilding, the nearby K-724 Storage Building, K-1131 Feed andTails Building, K-1410 Plating Facility, and the adjacent K1031Maintenance Support Building.The five buildings, referred to as Group I of the K-25Auxiliary Facilities Demolition Project, were demolished under aComprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, andLiability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) non-time-critical removal action.Two subcontractors performed the decontamination anddemolition work, one for ...

Kafad Group; I Decontamination; Gary A. Person; Bechtel Jacobs Company

382

Large packages for reactor decommissioning waste  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This study was carried out jointly by the Atomic Energy Establishment at Winfrith (now called the Winfrith Technology Centre), Windscale Laboratory and Ove Arup and Partners. The work involved the investigation of the design of large transport containers for intermediate level reactor decommissioning waste, ie waste which requires shielding, and is aimed at European requirements (ie for both LWR and gas cooled reactors). It proposes a design methodology for such containers covering the whole lifetime of a waste disposal package. The design methodology presented takes account of various relevant constraints. Both large self shielded and returnable shielded concepts were developed. The work was generic, rather than specific; the results obtained, and the lessons learned, remain to be applied in practice

1991-01-01

383

Dismantling and decommissioning, experience of commercial PWR  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Regarding the relatively youthness of FRAMATOME PWR's in operation none of these reactor needs to be decommissioned before 1992. However feasibility studies have been carried out by FRAMATOME for an on site entombment of active components and heavy equipments. In the past, partial dismantling of the reactor internals of the CHOOZ reactor: PWR of 320 MWe and a complete removal of the thermal shield protecting the reactor vessel were conducted successfully. After repair, the reactor power output has been upgraded of 10 % and the reactor operates satisfactorily since 1970. More recently the discovery of scarce defects affecting centering pins of control guide tube located in the upper reactor internals of 900 MWe plants has initiated the construction of several Hot stand equipments for the systematic replacement of these centering pins

1986-01-01

384

Decommissioning support system, using RFID and USN  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

RFID and USN are key technology in the ubiquitous computing systems. Actual physical environmental information can be used to remote control systems and management using various sensor technology and wireless network. These are used to managing physical distribution systems, complex monitoring environments such as fire detecting and various environments in the field of u-healthcare. Recently, decontamination and dismantling for nuclear plant have increasing interest after Fucushima nuclear accident. In this paper, a decommissioning support system is suggested for an effective management and control of work efficiency and of worker's status. This system makes effective real-time monitoring worker's location, work status and radiation exposure and effective response for worker's safety and emergency situation

Cho, W. H.; Park, S. K.; Choi, Y. D.; Lee, K. I.; Moon, J. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2012-05-15

385

Decommissioning support system, using RFID and USN  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] RFID and USN are key technology in the ubiquitous computing systems. Actual physical environmental information can be used to remote control systems and management using various sensor technology and wireless network. These are used to managing physical distribution systems, complex monitoring environments such as fire detecting and various environments in the field of u-healthcare. Recently, decontamination and dismantling for nuclear plant have increasing interest after Fucushima nuclear accident. In this paper, a decommissioning support system is suggested for an effective management and control of work efficiency and of worker's status. This system makes effective real-time monitoring worker's location, work status and radiation exposure and effective response for worker's safety and emergency situation

2012-01-01

386

Uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

One of the most challenging issues facing the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management is the cleanup of the three gaseous diffusion plants. In October 1992, Congress passed the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and established the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund to accomplish this task. This mission is being undertaken in an environmentally and financially responsible way by: devising cost-effective technical solutions; producing realistic life-cycle cost estimates, based on practical assumptions and thorough analysis; generating coherent long-term plans which are based on risk assessments, land use, and input from stakeholders; and, showing near-term progress in the cleanup of the gaseous diffusion facilities at Oak Ridge.

1994-01-01

387

Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2008  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Articles and reports in this issue include: D and D technical paper summaries; The role of nuclear power in turbulent times, by Tom Chrisopher, AREVA, NP, Inc.; Enthusiastic about new technologies, by Jack Fuller, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; It's important to be good citizens, by Steve Rus, Black and Veatch Corporation; Creating Jobs in the U.S., by Guy E. Chardon, ALSTOM Power; and, and, An enviroment and a community champion, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The Industry Innovations article is titled Best of the best TIP achievement 2008, by Edward Conaway, STP Nuclear Operating Company.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2008-07-15

388

Constructing Predictive Estimates for Worker Exposure to Radioactivity During Decommissioning: Analysis of Completed Decommissioning Projects - Master Thesis  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

An analysis of completed decommissioning projects is used to construct predictive estimates for worker exposure to radioactivity during decommissioning activities. The preferred organizational method for the completed decommissioning project data is to divide the data by type of facility, whether decommissioning was performed on part of the facility or the complete facility, and the level of radiation within the facility prior to decommissioning (low, medium, or high). Additional data analysis shows that there is not a downward trend in worker exposure data over time. Also, the use of a standard estimate for worker exposure to radioactivity may be a best estimate for low complete storage, high partial storage, and medium reactor facilities; a conservative estimate for some low level of facility radiation facilities (reactor complete, research complete, pits/ponds, other), medium partial process facilities, and high complete research facilities; and an underestimate for the remaining facilities. Limited data are available to compare different decommissioning alternatives, so the available data are reported and no conclusions can been drawn. It is recommended that all DOE sites and the NRC use a similar method to document worker hours, worker exposure to radiation (person-rem), and standard industrial accidents, injuries, and deaths for all completed decommissioning activities.

Dettmers, Dana Lee; Eide, Steven Arvid

2002-10-01

389

Organization and management for decommissioning of large nuclear facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

For nuclear facilities, decommissioning is the final phase in the life-cycle after siting, design, construction, commissioning and operation. It is a complex process involving operations such as detailed surveys, decontamination and dismantling of plant equipment and facilities, demolition of buildings and structures, and management of resulting waste and other materials, whilst taking into account aspects of health and safety of the operating personnel and the general public, and protection of the environment. Careful planning and management is essential to ensure that decommissioning is accomplished in a safe and cost effective manner. Guidance on organizational aspects may lead to better decision making, reductions in time and resources, lower doses to the workers and reduced impact on public health and the environment. The objective of this report is to provide information and guidance on the organization and management aspects for the decommissioning of large nuclear facilities which will be useful for licensees responsible for discharging these responsibilities. The information contained in the report may also be useful to policy makers, regulatory bodies and other organizations interested in the planning and management of decommissioning. In this report, the term 'decommissioning' refers to those actions that are taken at the end of the useful life of a nuclear facility in withdrawing it from service with adequate regard for the health and safety of workers and members of the public and for the protection of the environment. The term 'large nuclear facilities' involves nuclear power plants, large nuclear research reactors and other fuel cycle facilities such as reprocessing plants, fuel conversion, fabrication and enrichment plants, as well as spent fuel storage and waste management plants. Information on the planning and management for decommissioning of smaller research reactors or other small nuclear facilities can be found elsewhere. The report covers organizational aspects of decommissioning and describes factors relevant to the planning and management of a decommissioning project. It identifies the general issues to be addressed and provides an overview of organizational activities necessary to manage a decommissioning project in a safe, timely and cost effective manner. There are a number of facilities that present special cases and include those which have undergone a major accident as well as uranium mines and mills and radioactive waste repositories. These facilities are not dealt with in this report. This report is structured as follows. Section 1 contains background information, objectives and scope of the document. In Section 2 considerations important for decommissioning management are discussed which could affect the organization. Section 3 deals with the management for active phases of decommissioning and provides a discussion on the organization of the decommissioning management team. Section 4 gives an overview of the decommissioning planning and approval process. Section 5 provides information on quality assurance issues relevant to decommissioning. Management of decommissioning wastes is briefly discussed in Section 6. Responsibilities and qualifications of the decommissioning management team are dealt with in Section 7. Conclusions and recommendations are given in Section 8. The report is supplemented with references, Appendix I giving details on recent experience on data management, a glossary, and national annexes, some of which indicate how the principles set out in the main report are to be utilized in different countries, and some of which are real examples of arrangements used in decommissioning projects. A list of drafting and reviewing bodies is also included

2000-01-01

390

Decommissioning and deactivation of nuclear facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) is responsible for the decommissioning and deactivation of all relevant nuclear facilities in Argentina. A D and D Subprogram was created in 2000, within Technology Branch of the CNEA, in order to fulfill this responsibility. The D and D Subprogram has organized its activities in four fields: Planning; Technology development; Human resources development and training; International cooperation. The paper describes the work already done in those 4 areas, as well as the nuclear facilities existing in the country. Planning is being developed for the decommissioning of research reactors, beginning with RA-1, as well as for the Atucha I nuclear power station. An integral Management System has been developed, compatibilizing requirements from ISO 9001, ISO 14001, the national norm for Safety and Occupational Health (equivalent to BS 8800), and IAEA 50-SG Q series. Technology development is for the time being concentrated on mechanical decontamination and concrete demolition. A review has been made of technologies already developed both by CNEA and Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A. (the nuclear power utility) in areas of chemical and electrochemical decontamination, cutting techniques and robotics. Human resources development has been based on training abroad in the areas of decontamination, cutting techniques, quality assurance and planning, as well as on specific courses, seminars and workshops. An IAEA regional training course on D and D has been given on April 2002 at CNEA's Constituyentes Atomic Center, with the assistance of 22 university graduates from 13 countries in the Latin American and Caribbean Region, and 11 from Argentina. CNEA has also given fellowships for PhD and Master thesis on the subject. International cooperation has been intense, and based on: - IAEA Technical Cooperation Project and experts missions; - Cooperation agreement with the US Department of Energy; - Cooperation agreement with Germany; - Cooperation agreement with ENRESA from Spain; - Cooperation agreement with SCK-CEN from Mol, Belgium. The paper gives details on all of these activities. (authors)

2003-01-01

391

Disponibilidade de energia líquida no leite e desempenho ponderal de bezerros Hereford e Aberdeen Angus do nascimento à desmama/ Availability of net energy in the milk and weight performance in Hereford and Aberdeen Angus calves from birth to weaning  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese Esta pesquisa foi realizada com o objetivo de avaliar o desempenho ponderal de bezerros do nascimento aos 189 dias de vida. Foram utilizados 95 bezerros (55 Aberdeen Angus e 40 Hereford) manejados em campo nativo. A produção de leite das vacas foi estimada pelo método pesagem-mamada-pesagem, e o desempenho ponderal dos bezerros foi avaliado em intervalos de 21 dias a partir do nascimento. A parição foi dividida em época 1 (setembro) e época 2 (outubro). Para análi (more) se foram incluídos no modelo estatístico como efeitos fixos a raça das vacas, o sexo dos bezerros à época de parição, a ordem de parto e a gestação. Os dados foram submetidos à análise estatística, adotando-se 0,5 como nível crítico de probabilidade. A raça das mães influenciou o peso dos bezerros ao desmame, o ganho médio diário e a eficiência das vacas com 191,90 e 163,02 kg; 0,78 e 0,64 kg; e 45,24 e 39,40% para Aberdeen Angus e Hereford, respectivamente. Vacas multíparas superaram as primíparas nos pesos dos bezerros ao nascimento e ao desmame e no ganho médio diário. A época de nascimento afetou os pesos do bezerro ao nascimento e ao desmame, o ganho médio diário e a produção total de leite, cujos valores para setembro e outubro foram, respectivamente, 31,15 e 37,19 kg; 183,63 e 171,29 kg; 0,76 e 0,67 kg; e, 1605,04 e 1378,78 kg. Setembro foi o melhor período para peso do bezerro ao desmame, ganho médio diário e produção total de leite, enquanto outubro foi melhor apenas para o peso do bezerro ao nascimento. O desempenho dos bezerros não é influenciado pelo sexos nem pela prenhez da vaca. Abstract in english This research aimed at evaluating ponderal performance of the calves from birth to 189 days of age. Ninety-five calves were used (55 Aberdeen Angus and 40 Hereford), grazing natural pasture. Milk production of cows was estimated by the weight-suckled-weight method, and ponderal performance of the calves was evaluated in 21-day intervals from birth. Calving season was divided at time 1 (September) and time 2 (October). For analyses, it was included in the statistical model (more) as fixed effects, breed of the cows, calf sex in the calving season, calving order and pregnancy. Data were submitted to statistical analyses, adopting 0.5 as critical levels of probability. Breed of the dams influenced calves weaning weight, average daily weight gain and cow efficiency, with 191.90 and 163.02 kg, 0.78 and 0.64 kg, and, 45.24 and 39.40%, for Aberdeen Angus and Hereford, respectively. Multiparous cows were superior to primiparous on weight of the calves on birth and on weaning on average daily weight gain. Calving season affected weights of the calves on birth and on weaning, average daily weight gain and total milk production with the following values for September and October: 31.15 and 37.19 kg; 183.63 and 171.29 kg; 0.76 and 0.67 kg; and, 1,605.04 and 1,378.78 kg, respectively. September was the best time for calf weight at weaning, average daily weight gain and total milk production, while October was better only for birth weight. Performance of calves is not influenced by their sex neither by pregnancy.

Forster, Karine Maciel; Pimentel, Marcelo Alves; Moraes, José Carlos Ferrugem

2010-11-01

392

Disponibilidade de energia líquida no leite e desempenho ponderal de bezerros Hereford e Aberdeen Angus do nascimento à desmama Availability of net energy in the milk and weight performance in Hereford and Aberdeen Angus calves from birth to weaning  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Esta pesquisa foi realizada com o objetivo de avaliar o desempenho ponderal de bezerros do nascimento aos 189 dias de vida. Foram utilizados 95 bezerros (55 Aberdeen Angus e 40 Hereford) manejados em campo nativo. A produção de leite das vacas foi estimada pelo método pesagem-mamada-pesagem, e o desempenho ponderal dos bezerros foi avaliado em intervalos de 21 dias a partir do nascimento. A parição foi dividida em época 1 (setembro) e época 2 (outubro). Para análise foram incluídos no modelo estatístico como efeitos fixos a raça das vacas, o sexo dos bezerros à época de parição, a ordem de parto e a gestação. Os dados foram submetidos à análise estatística, adotando-se 0,5 como nível crítico de probabilidade. A raça das mães influenciou o peso dos bezerros ao desmame, o ganho médio diário e a eficiência das vacas com 191,90 e 163,02 kg; 0,78 e 0,64 kg; e 45,24 e 39,40% para Aberdeen Angus e Hereford, respectivamente. Vacas multíparas superaram as primíparas nos pesos dos bezerros ao nascimento e ao desmame e no ganho médio diário. A época de nascimento afetou os pesos do bezerro ao nascimento e ao desmame, o ganho médio diário e a produção total de leite, cujos valores para setembro e outubro foram, respectivamente, 31,15 e 37,19 kg; 183,63 e 171,29 kg; 0,76 e 0,67 kg; e, 1605,04 e 1378,78 kg. Setembro foi o melhor período para peso do bezerro ao desmame, ganho médio diário e produção total de leite, enquanto outubro foi melhor apenas para o peso do bezerro ao nascimento. O desempenho dos bezerros não é influenciado pelo sexos nem pela prenhez da vaca.This research aimed at evaluating ponderal performance of the calves from birth to 189 days of age. Ninety-five calves were used (55 Aberdeen Angus and 40 Hereford), grazing natural pasture. Milk production of cows was estimated by the weight-suckled-weight method, and ponderal performance of the calves was evaluated in 21-day intervals from birth. Calving season was divided at time 1 (September) and time 2 (October). For analyses, it was included in the statistical model as fixed effects, breed of the cows, calf sex in the calving season, calving order and pregnancy. Data were submitted to statistical analyses, adopting 0.5 as critical levels of probability. Breed of the dams influenced calves weaning weight, average daily weight gain and cow efficiency, with 191.90 and 163.02 kg, 0.78 and 0.64 kg, and, 45.24 and 39.40%, for Aberdeen Angus and Hereford, respectively. Multiparous cows were superior to primiparous on weight of the calves on birth and on weaning on average daily weight gain. Calving season affected weights of the calves on birth and on weaning, average daily weight gain and total milk production with the following values for September and October: 31.15 and 37.19 kg; 183.63 and 171.29 kg; 0.76 and 0.67 kg; and, 1,605.04 and 1,378.78 kg, respectively. September was the best time for calf weight at weaning, average daily weight gain and total milk production, while October was better only for birth weight. Performance of calves is not influenced by their sex neither by pregnancy.

Karine Maciel Forster; Marcelo Alves Pimentel; José Carlos Ferrugem Moraes

2010-01-01

393

Fatores de correção para perímetro escrotal ao sobreano para tourinhos mestiços Aberdeen Angus x Nelore/ Adjustment factors for scrotal circumference at yearling for crossbred Aberdeen Angus x Nelore young bulls  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese Obtiveram-se fatores de correção (FC) para o perímetro escrotal ao sobreano (PES) para os efeitos de grupo genético (GG), heterozigose individual (HI), peso ao sobreano (PS) e idade do animal à pesagem de sobreano (IDS), utilizando-se registros de peso corporal e medidas de perímetro escrotal obtidos de 11.662 tourinhos das raças Aberdeen Angus, Nelore e de produtos do cruzamento entre elas, criados nas regiões Sul, Sudeste e Centro-Oeste do Brasil, nascidos entre (more) 1987 e 2001. Os coeficientes de regressão que geraram os FC foram estimados pelo método dos quadrados mínimos, adotando um modelo que incluiu os efeitos de grupo de contemporâneos ao sobreano (GC), GG, heterozigose materna (HM), HI, PS e IDS. Todos os efeitos incluídos no modelo foram significativos (P Abstract in english Adjustment factors (AF) for scrotal circumference at yearling (SCY) were figured out for effects of genetic group (GG), individual heterozygosis (IH), yearling weight (YW), and age of the animal at yearling weight (AYW) using body weight and scrotal circumference records from 11,662 Aberdeen Angus, Nelore, and their crosses. The animals were born from 1987 to 2001 and were raised in the South East and Central West Regions of Brazil. The regression coefficients to obtain A (more) F were estimated by least squares means method. The model included the fixed effects of contemporaneous group at yearling (CG), maternal heterozygosis (MH), IH, and the covariates YW (linear and quadratic effects) and AYW (linear effect). All the factors included in the model showed significant effects (P

Lopes, J.S.; Rorato, P.R.N.; Weber, T.; Comin, J.G.; Araújo, R.O.

2009-04-01

394

Heterose sobre os pesos de bovinos Canchim e Aberdeen Angus e de seus cruzamentos recíprocos/ Heterosis upon weights in Canchim and Aberdeen Angus calves and in their reciprocal crosses  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese O trabalho foi conduzido para estimar a heterose sobre os pesos ao nascimento (PNT), à desmama (P210) e ao ano (P365) e sobre os ganhos de pesos médios diários do nascimento à desmama (G210) e da desmama ao ano (G365) nas quatro primeiras gerações do sistema de cruzamentos alternados entre as raças Canchim (C) e Aberdeen Angus (A). Os dados de 1.147 bezerros nascidos de 1981 a 1998 foram analisados pelo método dos mínimos quadrados, ajustando-se um modelo linear (more) que incluiu os efeitos linear e quadrático da idade da mãe do bezerro e os efeitos fixos de sexo, grupo genético, mês e ano de nascimento do bezerro. Estimativas de heterose e de outras diferenças genéticas foram estimadas por contrastes entre médias e testadas pelo teste t. O contraste "CA" foi positivo e significativo (P Abstract in english The study was conducted to estimate heterosis upon birth weight (PNT), weaning weight (P210), yearling weight (P365) and daily weight gain from birth to weaning (G210) and from weaning to one year of age (G365) in the first, second, third and fourth generations of a rotational crossbreeding system between Canchim (C) and Aberdeen Angus (A). Data from 1,147 calves born from 1981 to 1998 were analyzed by least squares procedures fitting a linear model that included the line (more) ar and the quadratic effects of age of the dam of the calf plus the fixed effects of sex, genetic group, month and year of birth of calf. Estimates of heterosis and of other genetic differences were obtained by linear contrasts of appropriate means and tested by the t test. The contrast CA was positive and significant (P

PEROTTO, DANIEL; CUBAS, ANTONIO CARLOS; MOLETTA, JOSÉ LUIZ; LESSKIU, CARLOS

2000-12-01

395

Decommissioning the UHTREX Reactor Facility at Los Alamos, New Mexico  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] The Ultra-High Temperature Reactor Experiment (UHTREX) facility was constructed in the late 1960s to advance high-temperature and gas-cooled reactor technology. The 3-MW reactor was graphite moderated and helium cooled and used 93% enriched uranium as its fuel. The reactor was run for approximately one year and was shut down in February 1970. The decommissioning of the facility involved removing the reactor and its associated components. This document details planning for the decommissioning operations which included characterizing the facility, estimating the costs of decommissioning, preparing environmental documentation, establishing a system to track costs and work progress, and preplanning to correct health and safety concerns in the facility. Work to decommission the facility began in 1988 and was completed in September 1990 at a cost of $2.9 million. The facility was released to Department of Energy for other uses in its Los Alamos program

1992-01-01

396

Developing Integrated Decommissioning Information Management System (IDIMS) of nuclear facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In Taiwan, the Taiwan Research Reactor (TRR) was shut down in January 1988, and a few nuclear facilities were accompanied to stop operation within Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER). For public health and safety reasons, INER dismantled step by step its expired nuclear facilities. Integrated Decommissioning Information Management System (IDIMS) was developed to ensure safety of dismantling and to record all activity data during the decommissioning project. These recorded activity data range from data of planning, licensing, post-operation to those of radioactive waste management and storage. In addition, IDIMS was expected to preserve decommissioning knowledge using information technology from practical data and problem solving. It also is anticipated that IDIMS will be an important knowledge repository and design base for decommissioning projects of nuclear power plants in Taiwan. (author)

2006-01-01

397

Decommissioning of the Wuergassen nuclear power plant, a commercial challenge  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In response to the inspection results which detected cracks in the core shroud, economic aspects have induced PreussenElektra to opt for decommissioning and dismantling of the Wuergassen reactor. As this shutdown of the nuclear power plant is not a planned shutdown, costs arising in addition to the original decommissioning framework studies have to be assessed, especially the expenditure for the adjusted plant manpower requirements, and the additional operating and phase-out costs. Experience has shown that the decommissioning of a nuclear power plants does not pose problems in terms of safety or technology, but still is a commercial challenge. Expense forecasts have to be adjusted in response to the unplanned shutdown. PreussenElektra therefore has set up a modified project and operating structure. The analysis and evaluation of the first decommissioning phase will show whether the cost assessment approaches are in agreement with reality. (orig.).

1996-01-01

398

Database structure for radiological optimization analyses of decommissioning operations.  

Science.gov (United States)

The structure of a database for decommissioning experiences is described. Radiological optimization is a major radiation protection principle in practices and interventions, involving radiological protection factors, economic costs, social factors. An imp...

T. Zeevaert B. Van de Walle

1995-01-01

399

Development of the Decommissioning Technology for Nuclear Facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The evaluation technology of decommissioning process must be developed and will be used for the ALARA planning tool of decommissioning process and demonstrated for tools of decommissioning equipment. Also, this technology can be used for tools workplaces with high work difficulty such as large-scale chemical plant, under water and space. The monitoring system for high alpha radioactive contamination measurement will be use in the high radioactivity decommissioning sites such as hot-cell or glove box. Also, it will be use in the general nuclear facilities as the radiation monitoring unit. The preparation technology of the radiation sensor for high radioactive contamination measurement will be transferred to the company for the industrialization. The remote monitoring system can prevent the workers exposure using the optical fiber to separate the sensor and electronics

2010-01-01

400

Large transport containers for nuclear reactor decommissioning waste  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The following topics are discussed: decommissioning alternatives; reference nuclear power plants; inventory of neutron-activated radionuclides; inventory of radionuclide contamination; regulations and transport category; means of transportation; and package design criteria

1983-01-01

 
 
 
 
401

Scheme of database structure on decommissioning of the research reactor  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] ISP (Information Strategy Planning), which is the first step of the whole database development, has been studied to manage effectively information and data related to the decommissioning activities of the Korea Research Reactor 1 and 2 (KRR-1 and 2). Since Korea has not acquired the technology of the decommissioning database management system, some record management system (RMS) of large nuclear facilities of national experience such as in the U.S.A, Japan, Belgium, and Russian were reviewed. In order to construct the database structure of the whole decommissioning activities such as the working information, radioactive waste treatment, and radiological surveying and analysis has been extracted from the whole dismantling process. These information and data will be used as the basic data to analyzed the matrix to find the entity relationship diagram and will contribute to the establishment of a business system design and the development of a decommissioning database system as well

2001-01-01

402

Scheme of database structure on decommissioning of the research reactor  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

ISP (Information Strategy Planning), which is the first step of the whole database development, has been studied to manage effectively information and data related to the decommissioning activities of the Korea Research Reactor 1 and 2 (KRR-1 and 2). Since Korea has not acquired the technology of the decommissioning database management system, some record management system (RMS) of large nuclear facilities of national experience such as in the U.S.A, Japan, Belgium, and Russian were reviewed. In order to construct the database structure of the whole decommissioning activities such as the working information, radioactive waste treatment, and radiological surveying and analysis has been extracted from the whole dismantling process. These information and data will be used as the basic data to analyzed the matrix to find the entity relationship diagram and will contribute to the establishment of a business system design and the development of a decommissioning database system as well.

Park, H. S.; Park, S. K.; Kim, H. R.; Lee, D. K.; Jung, K. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Reserach Institute, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

2001-11-15

403

DECOST: computer routine for decommissioning cost and funding analysis  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

One of the major controversies surrounding the decommissioning of nuclear facilities is the lack of financial information on just what the eventual costs will be. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has studies underway to analyze the costs of decommissioning of nuclear fuel cycle facilities and some other similar studies have also been done by other groups. These studies all deal only with the final cost outlays needed to finance decommissioning in an unchangeable set of circumstances. Funding methods and planning to reduce the costs and financial risks are usually not attempted. The DECOST program package is intended to fill this void and allow wide-ranging study of the various options available when planning for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

1979-01-01

404

Decommissioning of the ICI TRIGA Mark I reactor  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper considers the fuel removal, transportation and subsequent decommissioning of the ICI TRIGA Mark I Reactor at Billingham, UK. BNFL Waste Management and Decommissioning carried out this work on behalf of ICI. The decommissioning methodology was considered in the four stages to be described, namely Preparatory Works, Reactor Defueling, Intermediate Level Waste Removal and Low Level Waste Removal. This paper describes the principal methodologies involved in the defueling of the reactor and subsequent decommissioning operations, highlighting in particular the design and safety case methodologies used in order to achieve a solution which was completed without incident or accident and resulted in a cumulative radiation dose to personnel of only 1.57 mSv. (author)

2000-01-01

405

Decommissioning and waste management plan of Tokai Power Station  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Tokai Nuclear Power Station of the Japan Atomic Power Company ceased commercial operation in March, '98. We had been started removing spent fuel out of the reactor core and shipp