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Sample records for e3640 decommissioning aberdeen

  1. Environmental geophysics: Building E3640 Decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Interim progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinnis, L.D.; Miller, S.F.; Borden, H.M.; Benson, M.A.; Thompson, M.D.; Padar, C.A.; Daudt, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    Building E3640 is a potentially contaminated site in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground. Noninvasive geophysical survey techniques, including magnetics, EM-31, EM-61, and ground-penetrating radar, were used as part of a sampling and monitoring program prior to decommissioning and dismantling of the building. Complex and large-amplitude anomalies caused by aboveground metal in this area obscure many smaller features produced by subsurface sources. No underground storage tanks were found in the areas surveyed. Major anomalies produced by subsurface sources include the following: EM-61 and EM-31 lineaments caused by a water line extending north from the south fence; a broad positive magnetic anomaly caused by magnetic fill north of the material and drum storage area and northeast of E3640; a 30-ft-wide band of EM-31 anomalies extending from the front gate to the southeast comer of E3640 and a coincident EM-61 anomaly produced by buried utilities; ground-penetrating radar images along three lines extending from a sump at the northeast comer of E3640 to the eastern fence; and EM-61, EM-31, and magnetic anomalies caused by overhead and underground pipes extending south from the north fence. Smaller, unidentified, localized anomalies observed throughout the survey area are also described in this report.

  2. Geophysics: Building E5375 decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Building E5375 was one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek area of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar (GPR), were conducted around the perimeter of the building to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. Several anomalies wear, noted: (1) An underground storage tank located 25 ft east of Building E5375 was identified with magnetic, resistivity, and GPR profiling. (2) A three-point resistivity anomaly, 12 ft east of the northeast comer of Building E5374 (which borders Building E5375) and 5 ft south of the area surveyed with the magnetometer, may be caused by another underground storage tank. (3) A 2,500-gamma magnetic anomaly near the northeast corner of the site has no equivalent resistivity anomaly, although disruption in GPR reflectors was observed. (4) A one-point magnetic anomaly was located at the northeast comer, but its source cannot be resolved. A chaotic reflective zone to the east represents the radar signature of Building E5375 construction fill

  3. Geophysics: Building E5481 decommissioning, Aberdeen Proving Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Building E5481 is one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek and Westwood areas of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May of 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, were conducted around the perimeter of the building to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. The building is located on the northern margin of a landfill that was sited in a wetland. The large number of magnetic sources surrounding the building are believed to be contained in construction fill that had been used to raise the grade. The smaller anomalies, for the most part, are not imaged with ground radar or by electrical profiling. A conductive zone trending northwest to southeast across the site is spatially related to an old roadbed. Higher resistivity areas in the northeast and east are probably representive of background values. Three high-amplitude, positive, rectangular magnetic anomalies have unknown sources. The features do not have equivalent electrical signatures, nor are they seen with radar imaging

  4. Evaluation of decommissioning alternatives for the Pilot Plant Complex, Aberdeen Proving Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueda, J.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    This report presents an evaluation of four decommissioning alternatives for the Pilot Plant Complex (PPC), an inactive chemical weapons research, development, and production facility consisting of nine buildings located in the Edgewood Area of the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland. Decommissioning the PPC involves six steps: (1) assessing existing conditions; (2) dismantling the aboveground portions of the buildings (including the floor slabs, paved roads, and sidewalks within the PPC); (3) reducing the size of the demolition debris and sealing the debris in containers for later testing and evaluation; (4) testing and evaluating the debris; (5) conducting site operation and maintenance activities; and (6) recycling or disposing of the debris with or without prior treatment, as appropriate.

  5. Interim progress report -- geophysics: Decommissioning of Buildings E5974 and E5978, Aberdeen Proving Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buildings E5974 and E5978, located near the mouth of Canal Creek, were among 10 potentially contaminated sites in the Westwood and Canal Creek areas of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May of 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including the complementary technologies of magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, were conducted around the perimeters of the buildings to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. The magnetic anomalies and the electrically conductive areas around these buildings have a spatial relationship similar to that observed in low-lying sites in the Canal Creek area; they are probably associated with construction fill. Electrically conductive terrain is dominant on the eastern side of the site, and resistive terrain predominates on the west. The smaller magnetic anomalies are not imaged with ground radar or by electrical profiling. The high resistivities in the northwest quadrant are believed to be caused by a natural sand lens. The causes of three magnetic anomalies in the high-resistivity area are unidentified, but they are probably anthropogenic

  6. Environmental geophysics: Buildings E5485, E5487, and E5489 decommissioning - the open-quotes Ghost Townclose quotes complex, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buildings E5485, E5487, and E5489, referred to informally as the open-quotes Ghost Townclose quotes complex, are potentially contaminated sites in the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, EM-31, EM-61, and ground-penetrating radar, were conducted to assist a sampling and monitoring program prior to decommissioning and dismantling of the buildings. The buildings are located on a marginal wetland bordering the west branch of Canal Creek. The dominant geophysical signature in the open-quotes Ghost Town close quotes complex is a pattern of northeast-southwest and northwest-southeast anomalies that appear to be associated with a trench/pipe/sewer system, documented by the presence of a manhole. Combinations of anomalies suggest that line sources include nonmetallic and ferromagnetic materials in trenches. On the basis of anomaly associations, the sewer lines probably rest in a trench, back-filled with conductive, amphibolitic, crushed rock. Where the sewer lines connect manholes or junctions with other lines, ferromagnetic materials are present. Isolated, unidentified magnetic anomalies litter the area around Building E5487, particularly to the north. Three small magnetic sources are located east of Building E5487

  7. Preliminary assessment of risk from toxic materials that might be mobilized in the decommissioning of Aberdeen Proving Ground Building E5032

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenblatt, D.H.; Brubaker, K.L.

    1991-12-01

    Aberdeen Proving Ground Building E5032 is scheduled for decommissioning, that is, for demolition. Because the building was formerly used for small-scale operations with incendiary and toxic chemical agents, it presents unusual concerns for occupational and public health safety during the demolition. For this reason, an anticipatory risk assessment was conducted, taking into consideration the building's history, properties of potential residual contaminants (particularly chemical and incendiary agents), and assumptions relating to meteorological conditions and envisioned modes of demolition. Safe maximum levels in concrete floors for the worst case were estimated to be: white phosphorus, 3200 mg/kg; mustard, 94 mg/kg; nerve agent GA (tabun), 6 mg/kg; cyanide, 500 mg/kg; and sulfide, 1400 mg/kg. These values will serve as planning guidance for the activities to follow. It is emphasized that the estimates must be reviewed, and perhaps revised, after sampling and analysis are completed, the demolition methodology is chosen, and dust emissions are measured under operating conditions.

  8. Preliminary assessment of risk from toxic materials that might be mobilized in the decommissioning of Aberdeen Proving Ground Building E5032

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenblatt, D.H.; Brubaker, K.L.

    1991-12-01

    Aberdeen Proving Ground Building E5032 is scheduled for decommissioning, that is, for demolition. Because the building was formerly used for small-scale operations with incendiary and toxic chemical agents, it presents unusual concerns for occupational and public health safety during the demolition. For this reason, an anticipatory risk assessment was conducted, taking into consideration the building`s history, properties of potential residual contaminants (particularly chemical and incendiary agents), and assumptions relating to meteorological conditions and envisioned modes of demolition. Safe maximum levels in concrete floors for the worst case were estimated to be: white phosphorus, 3200 mg/kg; mustard, 94 mg/kg; nerve agent GA (tabun), 6 mg/kg; cyanide, 500 mg/kg; and sulfide, 1400 mg/kg. These values will serve as planning guidance for the activities to follow. It is emphasized that the estimates must be reviewed, and perhaps revised, after sampling and analysis are completed, the demolition methodology is chosen, and dust emissions are measured under operating conditions.

  9. Clean-ups at Aberdeen Proving Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Defense has utilized radiative material in numerous applications over several decades. Aberdeen Proving Ground has been an integral player in the Army's Research, Development, and Testing of items incorporating radionuclides, as well as developing new and innovative applications. As new information becomes available and society progresses, we find that the best management practices used decades, or even sometimes years earlier are inadequate to meet the current demands. Aberdeen Proving Ground is committed to remediating historic disposal sites, and utilizing the best available technology in current operations to prevent future adverse impact. Two projects which are currently ongoing at Aberdeen Proving Ground illustrates these points. The first, the remediation of contaminated metal storage areas, depicts how available technology has provided a means for recycling material whereby preventing the continued stock piling, and allowing for the decommissioning of the areas. The second, the 26Th Street Disposal Site Removal Action, shows how historic methods of disposition were inadequate to meet today's needs

  10. Geophysics: Building E5476 decommissiong, Aberdeen Proving Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Building E5476 was one of ten potentially contaminated sites in the Canal Creek and Westwood areas of the Edgewood section of Aberdeen Proving Ground examined by a geophysical team from Argonne National Laboratory in April and May of 1992. Noninvasive geophysical surveys, including magnetics, electrical resistivity, and ground-penetrating radar, were conducted around the perimeter of the building to guide a sampling program prior to decommissioning and dismantling. The large number of magnetic sources surrounding the building are believed to be contained in construction fill. The smaller anomalies, for the most part, were not imaged with ground radar or by electrical profiling. Large magnetic anomalies near the southwest comer of the building are due to aboveground standpipes and steel-reinforced concrete. Two high-resistivity areas, one projecting northeast from the building and another south of the original structure, may indicate the presence of organic pore fluids in the subsurface. A conductive lineament protruding from the south wall that is enclosed by the southem, high-resistivity feature is not associated with an equivalent magnetic anomaly. Magnetic and electrical anomalies south of the old landfill boundary are probably not associated with the building. The boundary is marked by a band of magnetic anomalies and a conductive zone trending northwest to southeast. The cause of high resistivities in a semicircular area in the southwest comer, within the landfill area, is unexplained

  11. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present concepts on stages of, designing for and costs of decommissioning, together with criteria for site release, are described. Recent operations and studies and assessments in progress are summarized. Wastes from decommissioning are characterized

  12. Utility planning for decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Though the biggest impact on a utility of nuclear power plant decommissioning may occur many years from now, procrastination of efforts to be prepared for that time is unwarranted. Foresight put into action through planning can significantly affect that impact. Financial planning can assure the recovery of decommissioning costs in a manner equitable to customers. Decision-making planning can minimize adverse affects of current decisions on later decommissioning impacts and prepare a utility to be equipped to make later decommissioning decisions. Technological knowledge base planning can support all other planning aspects for decommissioning and prepare a utility for decommissioning decisions. Informed project planning can ward off potentially significant pitfalls during decommissioning and optimize the effectiveness of the actual decommissioning efforts

  13. 78 FR 60238 - Proposed Modification and Establishment of Restricted Areas; Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ...Areas; Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD AGENCY: Federal Aviation...at the U.S. Army's Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland. The purpose of the proposed...hazard to navigation in the Aberdeen Proving Ground airspace. DATES:...

  14. Economic aspects of decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two viewpoints on decommissioning are quoted; the first suggests that decommissioning can be viewed as a technical detail that is of limited relevance whereas the second suggests that decommissioning is a key financial issue. Both are specifically relevant to United Kingdom nuclear power stations. This paper attempts to reconcile the two views. It suggests that decommissioning does raise some important issues for regulation and financing of a privatised industry but, despite this, the economics of nuclear do remain insensitive. The paper begins by examining the significance of decommissioning costs in a number of contexts, including nuclear unit generating costs and financing requirements. It then addresses the degree of uncertainty in the decommissioning cost estimates. With privatisation on the horizon, the paper considers the significance of decommissioning and the associated uncertainty for the investor; this last section considers regulatory issues raised in relation to funding, accounting policy and electricity pricing. (author)

  15. Financial aspects of decommissioning (key aspects of decommissioning costing)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation the following aspects of NPPs decommissioning are discussed: Requirements and purpose of decommissioning costing; Decommissioning costing methodologies; Standardised decommissioning cost structure; Input data for cost estimate process; Waste management in cost estimate process; Grading aspects in cost estimating; Cost control in decommissioning projects; Summary of the cost estimation process; Conclusions and recommendations.

  16. Decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the currently accepted alternatives for decommissioning retired light water reactor fuel cycle facilities and the current state of decommissioning technology. Three alternatives are recognized: Protective Storage; Entombment; and Dismantling. Application of these alternatives to the following types of facilities is briefly described: light water reactors; fuel reprocessing plants, and mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants. Brief descriptions are given of decommissioning operations and results at a number of sites, and recent studies of the future decommissioning of prototype fuel cycle facilities are reviewed. An overview is provided of the types of operations performed and tools used in common decontamination and decommissioning techniques and needs for improved technology are suggested. Planning for decommissioning a nuclear facility is dependent upon the maximum permitted levels of residual radioactive contamination. Proposed guides and recently developed methodology for development of site release criteria are reviewed. 21 fig, 32 references

  17. International decommissioning strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The IAEA Safety Requirements for decommissioning states that the regulatory body shall establish requirements for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, including conditions on the end points of decommissioning. One of the main important issues is that the operator shall be responsible for all aspects of safety of the facility during its lifetime and of the decommissioning activities until its completion. A mechanism for providing adequate financial resources shall be established to cover the costs of radioactive waste management and, in particular the cost of decommissioning. It shall be put in place before operation and shall be updated, as necessary. A safety assessment of the proposed decommissioning strategy shall be performed and its implementation shall not begin until approval has been received by the regulatory body. A decommissioning plan shall be prepared for each facility, to show that decommissioning can be accomplished safely. The decommissioning plan shall be reviewed regularly and shall be updated as required to reflect, in particular, changes in the facility or regulatory requirements, advances in technology and, finally, the needs of decommissioning operation. If it is intended to defer decommissioning, it shall be demonstrated in the final decommissioning plan that such an option is safe. Decontamination and dismantling techniques shall be chosen which minimizes waste and appropriate means shall be in place for safe managing any wastell be in place for safe managing any waste that might be generated during the decommissioning process. A quality assurance programme shall be established for the decommissioning process. Before a site may be released for unrestricted use, a survey shall be performed to demonstrate that the end point conditions, as established by regulatory body, have been met. If site cannot be released for unrestricted use, appropriate control shall be maintained to ensure protection of human health and environment. The IAEA Safety Guidance mainly addresses the radiological hazards resulting from the activities associated with the decommissioning of nuclear reactors, primarily with decommissioning after planned final shutdown. Many of the provisions are also applicable to decommissioning after an abnormal event that has resulted in serious facility damage or contamination. In this case, this Safety Guide may be used as a basis for developing special decommissioning provisions, although additional considerations will be necessary. Due to the short extension of the present paper, we will emphasize only on some critical tasks of decommissioning research reactors. The removal of nuclear fuel from the reactor installation at the end of its operational lifetime should preferably be performed as part of operations or as one of the initial activities in decommissioning. At the beginning of decommissioning, all readily removable radioactive sources (operational waste, sealed sources, liquids) should be removed for reuse, storage in approved location or disposal. The removal of sources will normally result in a significant reduction of the radiation hazards. The operating organization should have, or have access to, competent staff to cover areas such as: safety requirements of the licence, radiation protection, waste management, quality management etc. Personnel should be competent to perform their assigned work safely. The management and staff involved in the decommissioning project should be made aware of and trained, if necessary, in the methods of minimizing the waste generated in the tasks assigned. Appropriate levels of control and supervision should be provided to ensure safety. The organizational structure to be employed during decommissioning should be described in the decommissioning plan. In the description of the organizational structure, there should be a clear delineation of authorities and responsibilities amongst the various units. This is particularly necessary when the operating organization uses outside contractors. In this case all license conditions apply to the

  18. Training for decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plants entering decommissioning face many challenges One of the most important is the challenge of training for decommissioning This is important because: The facility operators and management have spent many years successfully operating the facility; The facility management arrangements are geared to operation; Decommissioning will include non-nuclear specialists and other stakeholders; Other skills are needed to decommission successfully. UKAEA has decommissioned many facilities at its sites in Dounreay, Windscale, Harwell and Winfrith in the UK. We have faced all of the challenges previously described and have developed many training methods for ensuring the challenges are met safely and effectively. We have developed courses for specialised skills such as safety cases which can be deployed to support any decommissioning. (author)

  19. Decommissioning cost methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning cost methodologies have typically focused on the decontamination and removal aspects of facility termination. However, in recent years in the United States, several additional factors have increased the cost of decommissioning to previously unanticipated levels. These factors include the increased cost of low-level waste disposal, the unavailability of a federal spent fuel repository, and the need to include the removal of certain nonradioactive systems and structures in the decommissioning cost. These factors are discussed in details. (author) 4 refs

  20. Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) is of the view that every organisation should focus attention on the decommissioning of nuclear facilities after completion of their useful life. AERB is aware that, internationally there is a growing interest in plant life extension due to economic considerations. Regulatory bodies stipulate upgradation of safety features based on international experience and current safety standards. However, decommissioning becomes a necessity at some time after the extended life of the plant. Nuclear industry has demonstrated that, with modern technological developments, decommissioning of nuclear facilities can be carried out without undue risk to the occupational workers, members of the public and protection of the environment. In view of limited experience in the field of decommissioning, this document is being issued as a safety manual instead of a safety guide. This manual elaborates the various technical and safety considerations in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities including ultimate disposal of radioactive materials/ wastes generated during decommissioning. Details that are required to be furnished to the regulatory body while applying for authorisation for decommissioning and till its completion are enumerated. This manual is issued to assist Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) units in formulating a decommissioning programme. Since the subject of decommissioning of nuclear facilities is a continuously evolving process, AERB is a continuously evolving process, AERB is of the view, that provisions of this manual will apply for a period of five years from the date of issue and will be subsequently revised, if necessary

  1. NPP Krsko decommissioning concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the end of the operational lifetime of a nuclear power plant (NPP) it is necessary to take measures for the decommissioning as stated in different international regulations and also in the national Slovenian law. Based on these requirements Slovenian authorities requested the development of a site specific decommissioning plan for the NPP Krsko. In September 1995, the Nuklearna Elektrarna Krsko (NEK) developed a site specific scope and content for a decommissioning plan including the assumptions for determination of the decommissioning costs. The NEK Decommissioning Plan contains sufficient information to fulfill the decommissioning requirements identified by NRC, IAEA and OECD - NEA regulations. In this paper the activities and results of development of NEK Decommissioning Plan consisting of the development of three decommissioning strategies for the NPP Krsko and selection of the most suitable strategy based on site specific, social, technical, radiological and economic aspects, cost estimates for the strategies including the costs for construction of final disposal facilities for fuel/high level waste (fuel/HLW) and low/intermediate level waste (LLW/ILW) and scheduling of all activities necessary for the decommissioning of the NPP Krsko are presented. (author)

  2. Overview of the Aberdeen Tunnel Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    An underground laboratory (Aberdeen Tunnel Laboratory) was built inside a traffic tunnel (Aberdeen Tunnel) in the Hong Kong Island in the early 80's for the study of cosmic-ray muon anisotropy. The laboratory has an overburden of about 250 m of rock, which is comparable to those of the detector halls proposed for the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment in Guangdong Province, China. Given the very similar geographical location, the geology and background radiation to those in Daya Bay, the Aberdeen Tunnel Laboratory is an ideal testing ground for the Daya Bay Experiment. This project aims to study the neutrons initiated from cosmic muons by detecting the neutrons with a 0.5 ton neutron detector comprising of Gd-doped liquid scintillators viewed by PMTs. The events will be triggered by a muon tracker consisting of 3 horizontal layers of crossed stainless steel proportional counters and plastic scintillators, with 2 layers above and 1 layer below the neutron detector. It is hoped that the results will help in understanding and minimizing the neutron background in Gd-doped liquid scintillator based neutrino detectors. This paper presents an overview of the laboratory, the geology and radiation background, and the proposed detectors.

  3. Overview of the Aberdeen Tunnel Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An underground laboratory (Aberdeen Tunnel Laboratory) was built inside a traffic tunnel (Aberdeen Tunnel) in the Hong Kong Island in the early 80's for the study of cosmic-ray muon anisotropy. The laboratory has an overburden of about 250 m of rock, which is comparable to those of the detector halls proposed for the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment in Guangdong Province, China. Given the very similar geographical location, the geology and background radiation to those in Daya Bay, the Aberdeen Tunnel Laboratory is an ideal testing ground for the Daya Bay Experiment. This project aims to study the neutrons initiated from cosmic muons by detecting the neutrons with a 0.5 ton neutron detector comprising of Gd-doped liquid scintillators viewed by PMTs. The events will be triggered by a muon tracker consisting of 3 horizontal layers of crossed stainless steel proportional counters and plastic scintillators, with 2 layers above and 1 layer below the neutron detector. It is hoped that the results will help in understanding and minimizing the neutron background in Gd-doped liquid scintillator based neutrino detectors. This paper presents an overview of the laboratory, the geology and radiation background, and the proposed detectors.

  4. Tokai-1 decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokai-1 (GCR, Gas Cooled Reactor) nuclear power plant of JAPC (the Japan Atomic Power Company) started commercial operation in 1966 as the first commercial nuclear power plant in Japan and ceased its operation in 1998. Spent fuel elements were removed out of the reactor core and shipped to the reprocessing plant by June 2001. JAPC launched Tokai-1 decommissioning in December 2001 after the submission of the notification of decommissioning plan to the competent authority. This is the first instance of the decommissioning for a commercial nuclear power plant in Japan. During first five years, the conventional facilities were removed, such as turbine system. Cartridge Cooling Pond (CCP) water was also drained and CCP was cleaned up for future works. In 2006 JAPC started SRU (Steam Raising Unit) and auxiliary equipments removal. After the safe store of the reactor, Reactor Dismantling would be started. JAPC and Japanese Utilities make efforts on rulemaking for decommissioning and disposal in cooperation with METI. Nuclear Regulations were amended in December 2005. JAPC got approval of a Decommissioning Plan pursuant to the amended Regulations in June 2006. Under the new regulation, it is possible to be applied reasonable and phased measures to keep the unit safe in accordance with dismantling phases. Tokai-1 decommissioning project has an important role for demonstrating that the decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plant can be executed safely and economically, anan be executed safely and economically, and for establishing the key technologies for future LWR decommissioning in Japan. (author)

  5. Decommissioning Unit Cost Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arransses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for decommissioning at other facilities with similar equipment and labor costs. It also provides techniques for extracting information from limited data using extrapolation and interpolation techniques

  6. Nuclear decommissioning: Funding arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This statement describes the United Kingdom's approach to funding civil nuclear decommissioning activities and explain proposed changes to the current arrangements. The UK has nuclear operators both in the private and public sectors and the approach to decommissioning funding differs. British Energy (BE), which operates a fleet of AGR power stations and a PWR, is in the private sector. On privatization, a segregated fund was established to cover BE's future decommissioning costs. Money paid into the fund is invested and the accumulated assets used to meet future decommissioning and cleanup costs. The precise amount of money that will be required to cover decommissioning costs is not an exact science. That is why the performance of the segregated fund is reviewed at five yearly intervals, at which stage BE's annual contribution can be adjusted as appropriate. To ensure that the fund is managed effectively and investments are made wisely, the fund is managed by independent trustees jointly appointed by the Government and the company. So far, the fund is performing as expected and it is on target to cover BE's decommissioning costs. Operators in the public sector include British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL) and the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA). BNFL operates the fleet of Magnox power stations, a number of which are in various stages of decommissioning. BNFL also operates Sellafield (reprocessing, MOX and other operations) and Springfields (fuel manufactperations) and Springfields (fuel manufacture). UKAEA is responsible for decommissioning the UK's former research reactor sites at Dounreay, Windscale (Cumbria), Harwell and Winfrith (Dorset). Under current arrangements, taxpayers meet the cost of decommissioning and cleanup at UKAEA sites; taxpayers will also meet the costs associated with the decommissioning of Magnox power stations from 2008 onwards

  7. Safety Assessment for Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past few decades, international guidance has been developed on methods for assessing the safety of predisposal and disposal facilities for radioactive waste. More recently, it has been recognized that there is also a need for specific guidance on safety assessment in the context of decommissioning nuclear facilities. The importance of safety during decommissioning was highlighted at the International Conference on Safe Decommissioning for Nuclear Activities held in Berlin in 2002 and at the First Review Meeting of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management in 2003. At its June 2004 meeting, the Board of Governors of the IAEA approved the International Action Plan on Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities (GOV/2004/40), which called on the IAEA to: ''establish a forum for the sharing and exchange of national information and experience on the application of safety assessment in the context of decommissioning and provide a means to convey this information to other interested parties, also drawing on the work of other international organizations in this area''. In response, in November 2004, the IAEA launched the international project Evaluation and Demonstration of Safety for Decommissioning of Facilities Using Radioactive Material (DeSa) with the following objectives: -To develop a harmonized approach to safety assessment and to define the elements of safety assessment for decommissioning, includiny assessment for decommissioning, including the application of a graded approach; -To investigate the practical applicability of the methodology and performance of safety assessments for the decommissioning of various types of facility through a selected number of test cases; -To investigate approaches for the review of safety assessments for decommissioning activities and the development of a regulatory approach for reviewing safety assessments for decommissioning activities and as a basis for regulatory decision making; -To provide a forum for exchange of experience in evaluation and demonstration of safety during decommissioning of various types of facility using radioactive material. This book presents the outcomes of the work carried out in fulfilling the action plan through the DeSa project (November 2004-November 2007); it contains a summary of the whole project and a methodology for the safety assessment of the decommissioning of facilities using radioactive material. It is supported by technical reports provided in the annexes.

  8. Decommissioning at AWE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AWE (A) has been at the heart of the UK Nuclear deterrent since it was established in the early 1950's. It is a nuclear licensed site and is governed by the United Kingdoms Nuclear Installation Inspectorate (NII). AWE plc on behalf of the Ministry of Defence (MOD) manages the AWE (A) site and all undertakings including decommissioning. Therefore under NII license condition 35 'Decommissioning', AWE plc is accountable to make and implement adequate arrangements for the decommissioning of any plant or process, which may affect safety. The majority of decommissioning projects currently being undertaken are to do with Hazard category 3, 4 or 5 facilities, systems or plant that have reached the end of their operational span and have undergone Post-Operational Clean-Out (POCO). They were either built for the production of fissile components, for supporting the early reactor fuels programmes or for processing facility waste arisings. They either contain redundant contaminated gloveboxes associated process areas, process plant or systems or a combination of all. In parallel with decommissioning project AWE (A) are undertaking investigation into new technologies to aid decommissioning projects; to remove the operative from hands on operations; to develop and implement modifications to existing process and techniques used. AWE (A) is currently going thorough a sustained phase of upgrading its facilities to enhance its scientific capability, with older facilities, systems and plity, with older facilities, systems and plant being replaced, making decommissioning a growth area. It is therefore important to the company to reduce these hazards progressively and safety over the coming years, making decommissioning an important feature of the overall legacy management aspects of AWE PLC's business. This paper outlines the current undertakings and progress of Nuclear decommissioning on the AWE (A) site. (authors)

  9. University of Aberdeen: Dryland Rivers Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Colin P.

    This University of Aberdeen website "is intended to stimulate research by providing an information focus and provoking networking between those working on dryland rivers and the sediments they leave behind." Following an introduction to the subjects covered at the site and the latest news, users can discover what drylands are and why they occur. Researchers can explore the work of numerous researchers related to geomorphology, sedimentology, processes, techniques, and environment and engineering. Visitors can read posts on the bulletin board, and after registering, can reply to an item. Teachers can find educational materials and pictures in the Images link.

  10. Reactor Facility Decommissioning

    International Science & Technology Center (ISTC)

    The Development of Decommissioning of Operation Technology of the Reactor Facility with Research RA Reactor of the Institute of Atomic Energy of the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan.

  11. Decommissioning - A regulatory view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning is the final stage in the life of a facility and is regulated in a similar manner to the operational phase. The nuclear regulatory regime is described including the new regulations on Environmental Impact Assessment for reactors. The Health and Safety Executive has recently issued guidance to its inspectors on the regulation of facilities being decommissioned. A number of aspects of this guidance are discussed including strategies, timetables, safety cases, management and organisation and finally de-licensing. (authors)

  12. Decommissioning and Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's decommissioning and decontamination programme are (1) to develop, test and optimise the technologies and procedures for decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear installations in order to minimise the waste arising and the distributed dose; (2) to optimise the environmental impact; (3) to reduce the cost of the end-of-life of the installation; (4) to make these new techniques available to the industry; (5) to share skills and competences. The programme and achievements in 1999 are summarised

  13. Decommissioning of commercial reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the case of nuclear reactors, the diversion is often difficult as they are highly purposive, the disassembling is not easy as they are robust, and attention is required to handle the equipment containing radioactive substances. Decommissioning is defined as all the measures taken from the state that facilities become unused to the state of becoming green field. In Japan, already 40 years have elapsed since the effort for nuclear power was begun, and in this paper, the present state and future subjects of the decommissioning of nuclear power stations are summarized at the opportunity that the stop of commercial operation of Tokai Nuclear Power Station was decided recently. In the Tokai Nuclear Power Station, 166 MWe graphite-moderated, carbon dioxide-cooled reactor called improved Calder Hall type is installed, which started the operation in 1966. The circumstances of the decision to stop its operation are explained. The basic policy of the decommissioning of commercial nuclear power stations has been already published by the Advisory Committee for Energy. The state of the decommissioning in various foreign countries is reported. In Japan, the state of green field was realized in 1996 in the decommissioning of the JPDR in Japan Atomic Energy Research institute, and the decommissioning of the atomic powered ship ''Mutsu'' was completed. (K.I.)

  14. The decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This file includes five parts: the first part is devoted to the strategies of the different operators and includes the following files: the decommissioning of nuclear facilities Asn point of view, decommissioning of secret nuclear facilities, decommissioning at the civil Cea strategy and programs, EDF de-construction strategy, Areva strategy for decommissioning of nuclear facilities; the second one concerns the stakes of dismantling and includes the articles as follow: complete cleanup of buildings structures in nuclear facilities, decommissioning of nuclear facilities and safety assessment, decommissioning wastes management issues, securing the financing of long-term decommissioning and waste management costs, organizational and human factors in decommissioning projects, training for the decommissioning professions: the example of the Grenoble University master degree; the third part is devoted to the management of dismantling work sites and includes the different articles as follow: decommissioning progress at S.I.C.N. plant, example of decommissioning work site in Cea Grenoble: Siloette reactor decommissioning, matters related to decommissioning sites, decommissioning of french nuclear installations: the viewpoint of a specialist company, specificities of inspections during decommissioning: the Asn inspector point of view; the fourth part is in relation with the international approach and includes as follow: IAEA role in establishing a global safety regime on decomtablishing a global safety regime on decommissioning, towards harmonization of nuclear safety practices in Europe: W.E.N.R.A. and the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, EPA superfund program policy for decontamination and decommissioning, progress with remediation at Sellafield, progress and experiences from the decommissioning of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant in Belgium, activities of I.R.S.N. and its daughter company Risk-audit I.r.s.n./G.r.s. international in the field of decommissioning of nuclear facilities in eastern countries,; the fifth part presents the external points of view on dismantling with: the decommissioning of Saint-Laurent A, as seen by the local information committee, decommissioning: the urge for a public consultation, an evaluation of the work of the 'conseil superieur de la surete et de linformation nucleaire' (C.S.S.I.N.) - a consultative body dealing with information in the field of nuclear safety) on the issue of decommissioning basic nuclear installations, monitoring the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and examining applications. (N.C.)

  15. Decommissioning plan - decommissioning project for KRR 1 and 2 (revised)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the revised Decommissioning Plan for the license of TRIGA research reactor decommissioning project according to Atomic Energy Act No. 31 and No. 36. The decommissioning plan includes the TRIGA reactor facilities, project management, decommissioning method, decontamination and dismantling activity, treatment, packaging, transportation and disposal of radioactive wastes. the report also explained the radiation protection plan and radiation safety management during the decommissioning period, and expressed the quality assurance system during the period and the site restoration after decommissioning. The first decommissioning plan was made by Hyundai Engineering Co, who is the design service company, was submitted to the Ministry of Science and Technology, and then was reviewed by the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety. The first decommissioning plan was revised including answers for the questions arising from review process

  16. Decommissioning of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactors of WWR-S type were built in countries under Soviet influence in '60, last century and consequently reached their service life. Decommissioning implies removal of all radioactive components, processing, conditioning and final disposal in full safety of all sources on site of radiological pollution. The WWR-S reactor at Bucuresti-Magurele was put into function in 1957 and operated until 1997 when it was stopped and put into conservation in view of decommissioning. Presented are three decommissioning variants: 1. Reactor shut-down for a long period (30-50 years) what would entail a substantial decrease of contamination with lower costs in dismantling, mechanical, chemical and physical processing followed by final disposal of the radioactive wastes. The drawback of this solution is the life prolongation of a non-productive nuclear unit requiring funds for personnel, control, maintenance, etc; 2. Decommissioning in a single stage what implies large funds for a immediate investment; 3. Extending the operation on a series of stages rather phased in time to allow a more convenient flow of funds and also to gather technical solutions, better than the present ones. This latter option seems to be optimal for the case of the WWR-S Research at Bucharest-Magurele Reactor. Equipment and technologies should be developed in order to ensure the technical background of the first operations of decommissioning: equipment for scarification, dismantling, dismemberment in aification, dismantling, dismemberment in a highly radioactive environment; cutting-to-pieces and disassembling technologies; decontamination modern technologies. Concomitantly, nuclear safety and quality assurance regulations and programmes, specific to decommissioning projects should be implemented, as well as a modern, coherent and reliable system of data acquisition, recording and storing. Also the impact of decommissioning must be thoroughly evaluated. The national team of specialists will be assisted by IAEA experts to ensure the observance of all the international regulations an practices in the field

  17. Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

  18. Financial aspects of decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    European Commission adopted recently two proposals of Directives designed to pave the way for a Community approach to the safety of nuclear power plants and the processing of radioactive waste. Nuclear safety cannot be guaranteed without making available adequate financial resources. With regard, in particular, to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, the Directive defines the Community rules for the establishment, management and use of decommissioning funds allocated to a body with legal personality separate from that of the nuclear operator. In order to comply with the acquis communautaire, Romanian Government issued the Emergency Ordinance no. 11/2003 which set up the National Agency for Radioactive Waste (ANDRAD) and soon will be established the financial mechanism for raising the necessary funds. Societatea Nationala 'Nuclearelectrica' S.A. operates, through one of its branches, Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 and has to prepare its decommissioning strategy and to analyze the options to assure the financing for covering the future costs. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the financial systems' mechanisms to the satisfaction of the nuclear operator obligations, according to the disbursement schedule foreseen by decommissioning projects . The availability of cash to pay for all the decommissioning expenditure must be foreseen by setting up assets and establishing a suitable financing plan. The different practices of assets management shall be presented in this paper on the basis of the international experience. Some calculation samples shall be given as an illustration. (author)

  19. Decommissioning Peach Bottom Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning activities are described for Peach Bottom Unit No. 1, a 40 mw(e) HTGR demonstration plant owned and operated by the Philadelphia Electric Company. Radiological aspects of decommission are discussed. The application of advance planning and effective health physics techniques used during the Peach Bottom decommission program demonstrated the feasibility of decommissioning a nuclear facility economically at low personnel exposure levels and with a negligible environmental impact

  20. Decommissioning funding: ethics, implementation, uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This status report on Decommissioning Funding: Ethics, Implementation, Uncertainties also draws on the experience of the NEA Working Party on Decommissioning and Dismantling (WPDD). The report offers, in a concise form, an overview of relevant considerations on decommissioning funding mechanisms with regard to ethics, implementation and uncertainties. Underlying ethical principles found in international agreements are identified, and factors influencing the accumulation and management of funds for decommissioning nuclear facilities are discussed together with the main sources of uncertainties of funding systems. (authors)

  1. Preparation for Ignalina NPP decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latest developments of atomic energy in Lithuania, works done to prepare Ignalina NPP for final shutdown and decommissioning are described. Information on decommissioning program for Ignalina NPP unit 1, decommissioning method, stages and funding is presented. Other topics: radiation protection, radioactive waste management and disposal. Key facts related to nuclear energy in Lithuania are listed

  2. Decommissioning of offshore installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeen, Sigrun; Iversen, Per Erik; Stokke, Reidunn; Nielsen, Frantz; Henriksen, Thor; Natvig, Henning; Dretvik, Oeystein; Martinsen, Finn; Bakke, Gunnstein

    2010-07-01

    New legislation on the handling and storage of radioactive substances came into force 1 January 2011. This version of the report is updated to reflect this new regulation and will therefore in some chapters differ from the Norwegian version (see NEI-NO--1660). The Ministry of the Environment commissioned the Climate and Pollution Agency to examine the environmental impacts associated with the decommissioning of offshore installations (demolition and recycling). This has involved an assessment of the volumes and types of waste material and of decommissioning capacity in Norway now and in the future. This report also presents proposals for measures and instruments to address environmental and other concerns that arise in connection with the decommissioning of offshore installations. At present, Norway has four decommissioning facilities for offshore installations, three of which are currently involved in decommissioning projects. Waste treatment plants of this kind are required to hold permits under the Pollution Control Act. The permit system allows the pollution control authority to tailor the requirements in a specific permit by evaluating conditions and limits for releases of pollutants on a case-to-case basis, and the Act also provides for requirements to be tightened up in line with the development of best available techniques (BAT). The environmental risks posed by decommissioning facilities are much the same as those from process industries and other waste treatment plants that are regulated by means of individual permits. Strict requirements are intended to ensure that environmental and health concerns are taken into account. The review of the four Norwegian decommissioning facilities in connection with this report shows that the degree to which requirements need to be tightened up varies from one facility to another. The permit for the Vats yard is newest and contains the strictest conditions. The Climate and Pollution Agency recommends a number of measures and requirements that should be considered in the regulation of decommissioning facilities for offshore installations. These facilities need sound expertise to be able to identify and deal with different types of waste, including hazardous waste such as heavy metals, other hazardous substances, low specific activity (LSA) radioactive material and asbestos. Facilities must be designed to allow safe handling of such waste, with no risk of runoff or infiltration into the soil. In addition, a decommissioning facility should have an effective collection system and an on-site treatment plant for contaminated water, including surface water. Each facility must have a sampling and analysis programme to monitor releases of the most relevant pollutants. The need for an environmental monitoring programme to follow developments in the recipient should also be considered. Other factors that must be closely monitored include noise and releases to air in connection with metal cutting and other operations. Moreover, decommissioning contracts must ensure that the costs of handling hazardous waste are met by the offshore operators. When decommissioning facilities for offshore installations are being sited, other interests must also be taken into account; for example, the use of nearby areas for housing, holiday housing or recreation. In addition, the implications for other sectors such as fisheries and agriculture must be taken into consideration. These are important issues that the municipalities must consider when preparing zoning plans and drawing up environmental impact assessments. In many cases, a regional authority is in a better position than a national one to make overall, cross-sectoral assessments of developments within the region. Nevertheless, the report recommends transferring the authority for regulating decommissioning facilities for offshore installations from the County Governors to the Climate and Pollution Agency. Regulating these facilities requires special expertise and overall assessments, and is best dealt with at central level. When new regulations have

  3. Site decommissioning management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff's strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites

  4. Site decommissioning management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

    1993-10-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

  5. Decommissioning nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of research at Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories into the decommissioning of nuclear power stations is to assess the safety implications of the various strategies which are being considered worldwide for the eventual dismantling of these stations. Although the BNL studies have primarily addressed the oldest of the CEGB's plant, the steel pressure vessel Magnox reactors, assessments of PWR decommissioning have also been undertaken to allow design changes to be introduced which will reduce eventual dismantling problems and minimise the production of radioactive waste. (author)

  6. Decommissioning of IFEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IFEC nuclear fuel fabrication plant operated in Italy for more then thirty years and has now been successfully decommissioned. The rules and regulations relating to Quality Assurance established during the fabrication of Cirene reactor fuel have been adhered to during the decommissioning phase. The use of personnel with large experience in the nuclear field has resulted in vast majority of cares of material and apparatus to be reutilized in conventional activities without the need of calling on the assistance of external firms. The whole decontamination process was successfully completed on time and in particular the quantity of contaminated wastes was kept to eminimun

  7. Decommissioning Work Modeling System for Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S. K.; Cho, W. H.; Choi, Y. D.; Moon, J. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    During the decommissioning activities of the KRR-1 and 2 (Korea Research Reactor 1 and 2) and UCP (Uranium Conversion Plant), all information and data, which generated from the decommissioning project, were record, input and managed at the DECOMMIS (DECOMMissioning Information management System). This system was developed for the inputting and management of the data and information of the man-power consumption, operation time of the dismantling equipment, the activities of the radiation control, dismantled waste management and Q/A activities. When a decommissioning is planed for a nuclear facility, an investigation into the characterization of the nuclear facility is first required. The results of such an investigation are used for calculating the quantities of dismantled waste volume and estimating the cost of the decommissioning project. That is why, the DEFACS (DEcommissioning FAcility Characterization DB System) was established for the management of the facility characterization data. The DEWOCS (DEcommissioning WOrk-unit productivity Calculation System) was developed for the calculation of the workability on the decommissioning activities. The work-unit productivities are calculated through this system using the data from the two systems, DECOMMIS and DEFACS. This result, the factors of the decommissioning work-unit productivities, will be useful for the other nuclear facility decommissioning planning and engineering. For this, to set up the items and plan for the decommissioning of the new objective facility, the DEMOS (DEcommissioning work Modeling System) was developed. This system is for the evaluation the cost, man-power consumption of workers and project staffs and technology application time. The factor of the work-unit productivities from the DEWOCS and governmental labor cost DB and equipment rental fee DB were used for the calculation the result of the DEMOS. And also, for the total system, DES (Decommissioning Engineering System), which is now developing for the decommissioning design and plan

  8. New projects related to decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PMU has been established in support of the KNPP Decommissioning Department. All of the Infrastructure Projects associated with Decommissioning have been identified and are being managed through the EBRD Procurement Process. The status of the following projects is presented: Evaluation of the Radiological Inventory for Units 1 to 4; Supply of Size Reduction and Decontamination Workshops; Dismantling Tools and Equipment; Heat Generation Plant; Environmental Assessment for Decommissioning; Decay Storage Site for Transitional RAW ; Information Centres for Decommissioning; Storage Site for Conventional Waste from Decommissioning; Inventory, Treatment an Conditioning of Contaminated Soil; Concrete Core Sampling Analysis; Asbestos Removal Equipment; Demolition Equipment

  9. Decommissioning methods and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper briefly describes the primary methods and equipment that have been developed and used in decommissioning. The major areas include: decontamination; removal of contaminated piping and components; vessel and internals cutting methods; and removal of radioactive concrete. The equipment required for these major activities is available and has been satisfactorily demonstrated for these applications

  10. Decontamination and decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, G.A.; Bowen, W.C.; Cromer, P.M.; Cwynar, J.C.; Jacoby, W.R.; Woodsum, H.G.

    1982-02-01

    The project scope of work included the complete decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Westinghouse ARD Fuel Laboratories at the Cheswick Site in the shortest possible time. This has been accomplished in the following four phases: (1) preparation of documents and necessary paperwork; packaging and shipping of all special nuclear materials in an acceptable form to a reprocessing agency; (2) decontamination of all facilities, glove boxes and equipment; loading of generated waste into bins, barrels and strong wooden boxes; (3) shipping of all bins, barrels and boxes containing waste to the designated burial site; removal of all utility services from the laboratories; and (4) final survey of remaining facilities and certification for nonrestricted use; preparation of final report. These four phases of work were conducted in accordance with applicable regulations for D and D of research facilities and applicable regulations for packaging, transportation, and burial and storage of radioactive materials. The final result is that the Advanced Fuel Laboratories now meet requirements of ANSI 13.12 and can be released for unrestricted use. The four principal documents utilized in the D and D of the Cheswick Site were: (1) Plan for Fully Decontaminating and Decommissioning, Revision 3; (2) Environmental Assessment for Decontaminating and Decommissioning the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, Pa.; (3) WARD-386, Quality Assurance Program Description for Decontaminating and Decommissioning Activities; and (4) Health Physics, Fire Control, and Site Emergency Manual. These documents are provided as Attachments 1, 2, 3 and 4.

  11. WAGR decommissioning manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarises the design of a manipulator which is to be used to remotely decommission Windscale's Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor. Its design follows principles established in previous manipulators produced for the CEGB. The manipulator carried various cutting tools and their design and development are also described. (author)

  12. Particle-accelerator decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opelka, J.H.; Mundis, R.L.; Marmer, G.J.; Peterson, J.M.; Siskind, B.; Kikta, M.J.

    1979-12-01

    Generic considerations involved in decommissioning particle accelerators are examined. There are presently several hundred accelerators operating in the United States that can produce material containing nonnegligible residual radioactivity. Residual radioactivity after final shutdown is generally short-lived induced activity and is localized in hot spots around the beam line. The decommissioning options addressed are mothballing, entombment, dismantlement with interim storage, and dismantlement with disposal. The recycle of components or entire accelerators following dismantlement is a definite possibility and has occurred in the past. Accelerator components can be recycled either immediately at accelerator shutdown or following a period of storage, depending on the nature of induced activation. Considerations of cost, radioactive waste, and radiological health are presented for four prototypic accelerators. Prototypes considered range from small accelerators having minimal amounts of radioactive mmaterial to a very large accelerator having massive components containing nonnegligible amounts of induced activation. Archival information on past decommissionings is presented, and recommendations concerning regulations and accelerator design that will aid in the decommissioning of an accelerator are given.

  13. Decontamination and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project scope of work included the complete decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Westinghouse ARD Fuel Laboratories at the Cheswick Site in the shortest possible time. This has been accomplished in the following four phases: (1) preparation of documents and necessary paperwork; packaging and shipping of all special nuclear materials in an acceptable form to a reprocessing agency; (2) decontamination of all facilities, glove boxes and equipment; loading of generated waste into bins, barrels and strong wooden boxes; (3) shipping of all bins, barrels and boxes containing waste to the designated burial site; removal of all utility services from the laboratories; and (4) final survey of remaining facilities and certification for nonrestricted use; preparation of final report. These four phases of work were conducted in accordance with applicable regulations for D and D of research facilities and applicable regulations for packaging, transportation, and burial and storage of radioactive materials. The final result is that the Advanced Fuel Laboratories now meet requirements of ANSI 13.12 and can be released for unrestricted use. The four principal documents utilized in the D and D of the Cheswick Site were: (1) Plan for Fully Decontaminating and Decommissioning, Revision 3; (2) Environmental Assessment for Decontaminating and Decommissioning the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, Pa.; (3) WARD-386, Quality Assurance Program Description for Decontaminating and Decommissioning Activities; and (4) Health Physics, Fire Control, and Site Emergency Manual. These documents are provided as Attachments 1, 2, 3 and 4

  14. Particle-accelerator decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generic considerations involved in decommissioning particle accelerators are examined. There are presently several hundred accelerators operating in the United States that can produce material containing nonnegligible residual radioactivity. Residual radioactivity after final shutdown is generally short-lived induced activity and is localized in hot spots around the beam line. The decommissioning options addressed are mothballing, entombment, dismantlement with interim storage, and dismantlement with disposal. The recycle of components or entire accelerators following dismantlement is a definite possibility and has occurred in the past. Accelerator components can be recycled either immediately at accelerator shutdown or following a period of storage, depending on the nature of induced activation. Considerations of cost, radioactive waste, and radiological health are presented for four prototypic accelerators. Prototypes considered range from small accelerators having minimal amounts of radioactive mmaterial to a very large accelerator having massive components containing nonnegligible amounts of induced activation. Archival information on past decommissionings is presented, and recommendations concerning regulations and accelerator design that will aid in the decommissioning of an accelerator are given

  15. Decommissioning project management unit started its activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Decommissioning Project Management Unit team comprises western experts as well as experts from INPP Decommissioning Service who all work as a single team. The DPMU will develop the Final Decommissioning Plan and a more detailed Decommissioning Project, which will describe how the plant will be removed from service and safely decommissioned

  16. Decommissioning in western Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives an overview of the situation in Western Europe. The original aim was to focus on organisational and human issues with regard to nuclear reactor decommissioning, but very few articles were found. This is in sharp contrast to the substantial literature on technical issues. While most of the reports on decommissioning have a technical focus, several provide information on regulatory issues, strategies and 'state of the art'. The importance of the human and organizational perspective is however discovered, when reading between the lines of the technical publications, and especially when project managers summarize lessons learned. The results are to a large extent based on studies of articles and reports, mainly collected from the INIS database. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities started already in the sixties, but then mainly research and experimental facilities were concerned. Until now about 70 reactors have been shutdown world-wide. Over the years there have been plenty of conferences for exchanging experiences mostly about technical matters. Waste Management is a big issue. In the 2000s there will be a wave of decommissioning when an increasing amount of reactors will reach the end of their calculated lifetime (40 years, a figure now being challenged by both life-extension and pre-shutdown projects). Several reactors have been shut-down for economical reasons. Shutdown and decommissioning is however not identical. A long period of time can sometimes pass before an owner decides to decommission and dismantle a facility. The conditions will also differ depending on the strategy, 'immediate dismantling' or 'safe enclosure'. If immediate dismantling is chosen the site can reach 'green-field status' in less than ten years. 'Safe enclosure', however, seems to be the most common strategy. There are several pathways, but in general a safe store is constructed, enabling the active parts to remain in safe and waterproof conditions for a longer period of time (sometimes hundred years or more), prior to final demolition. Among the reasons for deferring the dismantling are lack of waste repositories and decreasing dose-rates for the workers. Of Europe's 218 commercial reactors in operation, the majority, 151, are located i the Western part. The biggest producers are France, United Kingdom and Germany, with 58, 35 and 20 reactors respectively. Until now mostly research- and pilot reactors have been shut-down. There are yet few experiences from decommissioning of large-scale commercial reactors. The following commercial reactors are undergoing decommissioning. (There are also a great amount of nuclear facilities of other types being decommissioned.) The three gas-cooled twin reactor plants of Berkeley, Trawsfynydd and Hunterston in UK. In Germany Gundremmingen, Lingen, Kahl and Wuergassen are being decommissioned. All of them are located in the Western part of the country. The biggest project is however the dismantling of the gigantic Greifswald facility situated on the coast of the Baltic see in former Eastern Germany. The plant has eight Russian built reactors of VVER-type. Like the rest of the former GDR-plants Greifswald was shutdown after the reunification in 1990. The strategy chosen is immediate dismantling. France is decommissioning seven reactors (Chooz A1, Chinon A1, A2, A3, St Laurent A1, A2 and Bugey 1.) The oldest, Chinon A1, closed down in 1973 and the youngest, Bugey 1, in 1994. Italy closed down all NPPs (altogether four) in 1987 after a referendum. The first reactor of the Netherlands was shutdown in 1997 mainly for economical reasons. The development of a free European electricity market will make it less profitable to run certain facilities. Vandelos 1 in Spain is undergoing decommissioning after a fire in the turbines in 1989. IAEA, OECD/NEA and EU are co-operating in the field of decommissioning. Much work is spent on harmonizing rules and preparing international guidelines. The international agencies now consider decommissioning of nuclear facilities to be technically unproblematic. Decommissi

  17. Decommissioning a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of decommissioning a facility such as a nuclear reactor or reprocessing plant presents many waste management options and concerns. Waste minimization is a primary consideration, along with protecting a personnel and the environment. Waste management is complicated in that both radioactive and chemical hazardous wastes must be dealt with. This paper presents the general decommissioning approach of a recent project at Los Alamos. Included are the following technical objectives: site characterization work that provided a thorough physical, chemical, and radiological assessment of the contamination at the site; demonstration of the safe and cost-effective dismantlement of a highly contaminated and activated nuclear-fuelded reactor; and techniques used in minimizing radioactive and hazardous waste. 12 figs

  18. Licensing and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This part is relative to licensing and decommissioning. It includes: legal and policy issues relating to the burning of Mox fuel in licensed nuclear power reactors, government liability under German law, the overview on development of nuclear legislation in Latvia, the regulatory approaches in Ukraine relative to the decommissioning of nuclear installations, the development of nuclear legislation in Slovakia, Study on legal issue concerning the policy to construct nuclear power plant and a local referendum: the result of the MAKI town referendum, new development in the nuclear legislation of the Czech Republic, the system of related laws for the peaceful use of nuclear energy in the Republic of Korea and its prospects. (N.C.)

  19. Decommissioning and decontamination studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decommissioning of retired Hanford facilities requires careful consideration of environmentally-related factors. Applicable ecology programs have been designed to: develop the technology associated with burial ground stabilization, thereby minimizing biotic access and transport of radioactive wastes and, characterize present 300 Area burial grounds to ascertain the potential biotic transport of waste materials away from managed facilities. Results are reported from studies on the role of plants, small mammals, and ants as potential transport vectors of radionuclides from radioactive waste burial grounds

  20. 78 FR 663 - Decommissioning Planning During Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ...3150-AI55 [NRC-2011-0286] Decommissioning Planning During Operations AGENCY...regulatory guide (RG) 4.22, ``Decommissioning Planning During Operations.'' The...licenses in complying with the NRC's Decommissioning Planning Rule (DPR) (76 FR...

  1. 77 FR 41107 - Decommissioning Planning During Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ...70, and 72 [NRC-2011-0162] Decommissioning Planning During Operations AGENCY...regulatory guide (DG) 4014, ``Decommissioning Planning During Operations.'' This...use in complying with the NRC's Decommissioning Planning Rule. The NRC will...

  2. 76 FR 77431 - Decommissioning Planning During Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ...NRC-2011-0286; NRC-2008-0030] Decommissioning Planning During Operations AGENCY...regulatory guide (DG) DG-4014, ``Decommissioning Planning During Operations.'' This...use in complying with the NRC's Decommissioning Planning Rule. DATES: Submit...

  3. Decommissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of the main questions of decommissioning of nuclear power plants will be given in the sight of German utilities (VDEW-Working group 'Stillegung'). The main topics are: 1) Definitions of decommissioning, entombment, removal and combinations of such alternatives; 2) Radioactive inventory (build up and decay); 3) Experience up to now; 4) Possibilities to dismantle are given by possibility to repair nuclear power plants; 5) Estimated costs, waste, occupational radiation dose; 6) German concept of decommissioning. (orig./HK)

  4. Decommissioning of nuclear submarines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intention of this Report is to set out in simple terms the options open to the Ministry of Defence in disposing of nuclear submarines, and the extent of the problem. To this end oral evidence was taken from United Kingdom Nirex Limited (Nirex) and from the Ministry of Defence, and written evidence was taken from MoD, Nirex, the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority and Rolls-Royce and Associates Limited. The immediate problem is what to do with the nuclear submarine, DREADNOUGHT. Since decommissioning in 1982, the submarine has been lying at Rosyth Naval Base on the Firth of Forth. Upon decommissioning, the highly radioactive reactor core with the uranium fuel was removed and transported to the Sellafield reprocessing plant. The remaining radioactive part is the reactor compartment and it is the size of this, not its level of radioactivity which makes it hard to deal with. By the year 2000 a further seven nuclear submarines will have been decommissioned. There are three main options for disposing of the reactor compartments; dumping at sea, land burial in a shallow trench and land burial in a deep repository. Dumping at sea is the option favoured by the Ministry of Defence and Government, but shallow land burial remains an option. Deep burial is not an option which is available immediately as there will not be a repository ready until 2005. (author)

  5. Decommissioning and demolition 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decommissioning and demolition of structures offshore, onshore and in nuclear works involves new technologies and industries in demolition and removal. The aim of the conference was to provide a forum to keep up to date with technological developments, to publicise new techniques and to share and discuss present and future plans. A particular feature was the multi-disciplinary approach to promote and encourage communication between different sectors of this difficult field of operations. The conference emphasised not only technical issues but also legislative, management and health and safety aspects. Papers were presented by practising engineers, contractors and research workers involved in offshore structures, buildings, power stations, contaminated sites, nuclear plant and includes specialist techniques of cutting, lifting, explosives, ground treatment and decontamination. Many valuable case histories and records based on practical experience were reported. The volume provides a reference source on the state-of-the-art in decommissioning and demolition. The ten papers relevant to the decommissioning and demolition of nuclear facilities are indexed separately. (Author)

  6. Tokai-1 decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokai-1 (GCR, Gas Cooled Reactor) nuclear power plant of JAPC (the Japan Atomic Power Company) started commercial operation in 1966 as the first commercial nuclear power plant in Japan. The unit had helped introduction and establishment of the construction and operation technologies regarding nuclear power plant at early stage in Japan by its construction and operating experiences. However, The Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC), the operator and owner of Tokai-1, decided to cease its operation permanently because of a fulfillment of its mission and economical reason. The unit was finally shut down in March 1998 after about 32 year operation. It took about three years for removal of all spent fuels from the site, and then decommissioning started in 2001. JAPC, always on the forefront of the nation's nuclear power generation, is now grappling Japan's first decommissioning of a commercial nuclear power plant, striving to establish effective, advanced decommissioning. The decommissioning for Tokai-1 was scheduled as 20 years project. At the beginning, the reactor was started to be in a static condition ('safe storage period'). While the reactor had been safely stored, the phased decommissioning works started from non-radioactive or low radioactive equipment toward high radioactive equipment. First five years of the project, JAPC concentrated to drain and clean spent fuel cartridge cooling pond and to remove conventional equipments such as turbine, feed water pump and fuel such as turbine, feed water pump and fuel charge machine as planed and budgeted. From 2006, the project came into a new phase. JAPC has been trying to remove four Steam Raising Units (SRUs). The SRUs are huge component (750ton, ?6.3m, H24.7m) of the Gas Cooling Reactor (GCR) and inside of the SRUs are radioactively contaminated. Major concerns are workers safety and minimizing contamination areas during SRU removal. Therefore, JAPC is developing and introducing Jack-down method and remote control multi-functional dismantling system. This method is to cut and remove the SRUs in turn from the bottom to top remotely while lifting the SRU by a large jack system. The system enables cutting and holding not only the SRU body but also internals. This technology and experiences would be useful for the reactor removal in the near future. Skirt part of No.2 SRU cutting work was done carefully by well trained JAPC staff from August 2010 to December, 2010. (author)

  7. Updating nuclear decommissioning cost estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the article An Analysis of Decommissioning Cost Estimates for Nuclear Operating Plants, Richard R. Buta and Robert E. Palmer presented a comprehensive summary of considerations of developing up-to-date estimates of nuclear power plant decommissioning costs (Public Utilities Fortnightly, July 19, 1984, pages 47-49). However, Mr. Pilalis says, this summary focused exclusively on the factors that can affect increases in decommissioning costs at higher rates than the escalation rates of conventional cost indices. In his opinion, Buta and Palmer omitted any consideration of the following two areas that affect both the updating and the development of nuclear power plant decommissioning cost estimates: (1) developments in the areas of technology, operational experience, financing, and regulation of nuclear power plant decommissioning that could lower nuclear decommissioning costs and retard the escalation rate of individual decommissioning cost categories; and (2) inclusion of sizeable contingency factors in cost estimates that intend to address the uncertainty of future events in the operational and regulatory environment for nuclear power plant decommissioning. 8 references

  8. Nuclear decommissioning - The UK proposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author works for the law firm Hogan and Hartson in the London office and uses his experience in contractual matters to outline the effect which the formation of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority will have on those companies wishing to become subcontractors. The opportunities for such contracts in the decommissioning field are outlined. (author)

  9. ORNL decontamination and decommissioning program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A program has been initiated at ORNL to decontaminate and decommission surplus or abandoned nuclear facilities. Program planning and technical studies have been performed by UCC-ND Engineering. A feasibility study for decommissioning the Metal Recovery Facility, a fuel reprocessing pilot plant, has been completed

  10. Nuclear power-reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article summarizes the major findings of an evaluation of several alternatives for decommissioning 1100-MW(e) nuclear power reactors. The evaluation included the technical feasibility of decommissioning and the costs, schedule, environmental impacts, and occupational exposures for three decommissioning alternatives: mothballing, entombment, and prompt removal of radioactive components and dismantling. In addition, two combinations of these alternatives were evaluated: mothballing--delayed removal and dismantling and entombment--delayed removal and dismantling. The evaluation demonstrated that no new technology is required to safely decommission a large power reactor. The prompt removal of radioactive components and dismantling alternative is the highest in cost, requiring approximately $50 million and approximately 6 years to remove all structures at the end of useful life. The radiation exposures and environmental impacts are low for all the alternatives so that decommissioning can be accomplished without undue risk to public health and safety

  11. Decommissioning of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the United Kingdom the Electricity Boards, the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) and BNFL cooperate on all matters relating to the decommissioning of nuclear plant. The Central Electricity Generating Board's (CEGB) policy endorses the continuing need for nuclear power, the principle of reusing existing sites where possible and the building up of sufficient funds during the operating life of a nuclear power station to meet the cost of its complete clearance in the future. The safety of the plant is the responsibility of the licensee even in the decommissioning phase. The CEGB has carried out decommissioning studies on Magnox stations in general and Bradwell and Berkeley in particular. It has also been involved in the UKAEA Windscale AGR decommissioning programme. The options as to which stage to decommission to are considered. Methods, costs and waste management are also considered. (U.K.)

  12. Financing nuclear power plant decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Much is at stake in developing a financial strategy for decommissioning nuclear power plants. Since decommissioning experience is limited to relatively small reactors, will the costs associated with larger reactors be significantly higher. Certainly the decommissioning issue intersects with other critical issues that will help to determine the future of commercial nuclear power in the US. The author examines briefly the basic concepts and terms related to decommissioning expenses, namely: (1) segregated fund; (2) non-segregated fund; (3) external method; and (4) internal method. He concludes that state regulatory commissions have turned increasingly to the external funding method because of increasing costs and related problems associated with nuclear power, changing conditions and uncertainties concerned with utility restructuring, and recent changes in federal tax laws related to decommissioning. Further, this trend is likely to continue if financial assurance remains a primary concern of regulators to protect this public interest

  13. Decommissioning Funding: Ethics, Implementation, Uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This status report on decommissioning funding: ethics, implementation, uncertainties is based on a review of recent literature and materials presented at NEA meetings in 2003 and 2004, and particularly at a topical session organised in November 2004 on funding issues associated with the decommissioning of nuclear power facilities. The report also draws on the experience of the NEA Working Party on Decommissioning and Dismantling (WPDD). This report offers, in a concise form, an overview of relevant considerations on decommissioning funding mechanisms with regard to ethics, implementation and uncertainties. Underlying ethical principles found in international agreements are identified, and factors influencing the accumulation and management of funds for decommissioning nuclear facilities are discussed together with the main sources of uncertainties of funding systems

  14. Decommissioning of Radiotherapy Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy units containing high activity sealed radioactive sources of 60Co or 137Cs are mainly use for medical, research or calibration applications. After several half-lives of decay, the radionuclide source has to be changed or the unit is decommissioned if no longer required. Before starting a decommissioning project it is very important to look for documents relating to any sources held or installed in equipment. In general this should be no problem because the recommended working life of such sealed radioactive sources is limited to 10 or a maximum of 15 years. These time periods are short in comparison with other facilities like research laboratories or small reactors. These documents (source certificates) will be very helpful to plan the decommissioning because they say everything about the original activity of the source at a reference date, the type of the source and the manufacturer. The next step may be to contact the machine supplier or the source manufacturer, but be aware that neither may still be in existence or may have changed their type of business. In such cases, it is recommended to contact national or international sealed source manufacturers or suppliers for help. Sometimes it is also helpful to contact colleagues in other hospitals or research centres to ask for information about specialists in this topic. In general it is not useful, and even very dangerous, to try to decommission such a unit without expert help It is ion such a unit without expert help It is essential to have specialist tools and shielded containers to recover the source out of the unit. It is strongly recommended to invite the source removal specialist for a site visit to review the situation before starting any decommissioning process. A further problem can occur, if the source must be transported to a national storage centre or even an international storage facility, as the source must be packaged to meet international transport requirements. The end state of such a project should be an empty room where the source is brought out safely within the type-tested container, typically type B. Decontamination of the room will be necessary if a sealed source has leaked, but this is very rare. If a source is leaking, the contamination can be very high and present a high risk to employees and workers due to high dose rates. Some therapy units are additionally shielded with depleted uranium or the source holder is fitted with collimators which are made of depleted uranium. The uranium shielding can cause some minor contamination of the shielded source housing or on the floor. A check should be made for any minor contamination using a surface contamination monitor or wipe tests. The risks of contamination from these sources are small, but can result in the prevention of the free release of the room. A decommissioning plan should be drafted following consultation with the regulator or the decommissioning specialist may undertake this task on behalf of the facility. Normally the specialist contractor will provide a health and safety plan for approval by the regulator and the customer. The decommissioning task of source removal and transport will in general take about 2 to 3 days, but the planning and preparatory work can take several weeks. The amount of preparatory work involved depends mainly of the transport regulations for the source in the type-tested containers and the preparatory work for infrastructures that will be required for decommissioning. Identification of infrastructure and resources. Before dismantling a teletherapy unit, a check should be made that the electrical supply remains connected and that the lighting is both functional and adequate. This will help to accelerate the working process on the unit. Before attempting to move the teletherapy source of unit outside of the building, ensure that the route to be used through the facility is passable (dimensions of doors, floors, etc.) and that the engineering structure of the pathway is sufficient to support the weight of the source or unit (e.g. maximum load limit of fl

  15. Decommissioning policy in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Sweden the nuclear power program is, according to a parliamentary decision, limited to twelve power producing reactors. The last reactor shall be taken out of service no later than the year 2010. As a result of the Chernobyl accident the program for taking the reactors out of service will be accelerated. This report is the first approach by the Swedish authorities to formulate a decommissioning policy. It is not the final policy document but it discusses the principal questions from the special Swedish viewpoint. (orig.)

  16. Decommissioning policy in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Sweden the nuclear power program is, according to a parliamentary decision, limited to twelve power producing reactors. The last reactor shall be taken out of service no later than the year 2010. As a result of the Chernobyl accident the program for taking the reactors out of service will be accelerated. The first approach by the Swedish authorities to formulate a decommissioning policy is discussed. It is not the final policy document but it discusses the principal questions from the special Swedish viewpoint

  17. NPP A1 Decommissioning Project - Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work author gives the overview of A1 NPP Jaslovske Bohunice decommissioning. Projects of decommissioning: 'NPP A1 Decommissioning Project - Phase I' (The project was implemented from 1999 to 2008) and 'NPP A1 Decommissioning Project - Phase II' (started in 2009 and it is planned up to 2016)are described in brief.

  18. Funding Decommissioning - UK Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Funding' started with CEGB and SSEB (state-owned electric utilities) in 1976 using the internal un-segregated fund route (i.e unfunded). This continued until privatisation of electricity industry (excluding nuclear) in 1990. Assets bought with the internal un-segregated fund were mostly transferred into non-nuclear private utilities. New state-owned Nuclear Electric (England and Wales) was given a 'Fossil Fuel Levy', a consumer charge of 10% on retail bills, amounting to c. BP 1 bn. annually. This allowed Nuclear Electric to trade legally (A reserve of BP 2.5 bn. was available from Government if company ran out of money). By 1996 the newer nuclear stations (AGRS plus PWR) were privatised as British Energy. British Energy started an external segregated fund, the Nuclear Decommissioning Fund, with a starting endowment of c. BP 225 m. - and BE made annual contributions of British Pound 16 m. into the Fund. Assumptions were that BE had 70 to accumulate cash and could get a 3.5% average annual real return. Older stations (Magnox) were left in private sector and went to BNFL in 1997. Magnox inherited the surplus cash in BE - mostly unspent Fossil Fuel Levy receipts - of c. BP 2.6 bn. Government gave an 'Undertaking' to pay BP 3.8 bn. (escalating at 4.5% real annually) for Magnox liabilities, should Magnox Electric run out of cash. BNFL inherited the BP 2.6 bn. and by 2000 had a 'Nuclear Liabilities Investment Portfolio' of c. BP 4 bn. This was a quasi-segregated internal fund for liabilities in general. [Note: overall UK nuclear liabilities in civilian sector were running at c. BP 48 bn. by now]. BE started profitable and paid BP 100 m. annually in dividends to private investors for several years. BE ran into severe financial problems after 2001 and Government organised restructuring aid, now approved by European Commission. Terms include: - BE now to contribute BP 20 m. a year into an expanded Nuclear Liabilities Fund; - A bond issue of BP 275 m. to go to Fund; - 65% of all BE free cash flow to go to the Fund; - Government would pay for all Stage 1/2/3 decommissioning expenses that BE could not meet. BE is still a private company in a formal sense but the UK Office of National Statistics classifies it as a public sector company, because it regards control (not ownership) as in State hands. Government is now setting up the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) to manage all public sector liabilities. Intention was to have a 'segregated account' to help give assurance that funding would be long-term and reliable. First draft Annual Plan does not mention segregation or any funding commitment beyond the first year (2005/6). The BNFL NLIP will presumably go to the Treasury. NLIP will presumably go to the Treasury. In conclusion, it is clean that the decommissioning funding system has been short term and has relied mainly on Government. Some consumer contributions have been made, but now that nuclear power competes in a private market place and is relatively expensive, there is no guarantee that consumers/polluters will pay for a significant proportion of decommissioning costs

  19. International Radiation Safety Recommendations on Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA Safety Standards for decommissioning state that the regulatory body shall establish requirements for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, including conditions on the end points of decommissioning. One of the main important issues is that the operator shall be responsible for all aspects of safety of the facility during its lifetime, including the decommissioning activities. The paper mainly addresses the activities associated with the decommissioning of research reactors, primarily with decommissioning after planned final shutdown. It is intended to provide guidance to national authorities and operating organizations for the planning and safe management of the decommissioning of such installations. (author)

  20. Investigations on the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study discusses and evaluates safety and licensing related aspects associated with the decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Important decommissioning projects and experiences with relevance to decommissioning are analyzed. Recent developments in the field of decommissioning techniques with the potential of reducing the occupational dose to decommissioning workers are described and their range of application is discussed. The radiological consequences of the recycling of scrap metal arising during decommissioning are assessed. The results may be used to evaluate present licensing practices and may be useful for future licensing procedures. Finally the environmental impact of radionuclide release via air and water pathways associated with decommissioning activities is estimated. (orig.)

  1. Population dose considerations for decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination and decommissioning of the now operating commercial nuclear reactors after their useful lifetime will provide a source of collective dose and, therefore, needs to be considered in any discussion of the overall collective dose from nuclear fuel-cycle operations. Estimates of the collective dose from decommissioning were made from the reports published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These reports contain generic ana/lyses of the Technology, Safety and Costs of decommissioning PWR and BWR stations. The three decommissioning alternatives considered by the NRC include DECON (immediate dismantlement), SAFSTOR (Safe Storage) with 30 years of decay, and ENTOMB (entombment). The collective dose estimates are controlled by the exposures to decommissioning workers, although additional population groups may be exposed. Using the data given in the NRC reports, along with current estimates of the number of operational reactors in the United States, rough estimates of the potential collective dose from decommissioning indicate that between 400 and 1,400 man Sv may result, depending upon the decommissioning alternative selected

  2. Planning for decommissioning of Hifar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has operated the 10MW HIFAR research reactor since 1958. In addition to its role in research, the reactor provides radioisotopes for medical and industrial use and is a major supplier of NTD silicon for the semi-conductor industry. It is anticipated that HIFAR will finally shut down operations in December 2006. Although ANSTO has successfully decommissioned MOATA and undertaken other smaller decommissioning projects the proposed HIFAR decommissioning project will be the largest ever undertaken by ANSTO. ANSTO faces a number of challenges in HIFAR's final year of operation. These include: the establishment of a modern decommissioning strategy in the absence of a long-term nuclear waste repository management facility or waste acceptance criteria for the material generated by the decommissioning; the impact of the impeding closure of the facility on staff morale and retention of key staff; and to meet the our customer's needs up to the final closure. These challenges are compounded by competition for skilled resources required to commission the new research reactor (OPAL) and the need to continue to supply radioisotopes. Important 'lessons in progress' that will be discussed in this paper include staffing the decommissioning team, maintenance of a strong safety culture during final stages of operation, working towards regulatory approval for decommissioning and strategies for knowledge retention. (author)rategies for knowledge retention. (author)

  3. Progress of JPDR decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR) decommissioning project is progressively achieving its final goal; the project will be finished by March 1996 to release the JPDR's site into unrestricted use in a green field condition. The new techniques which developed or improved in R and D, the first phase of this program, have been successfully applied to the actual dismantling activities. Some decommissioning wastes have been managed as the first case of onsite shallow land burial based on the new regulatory frame of radioactive waste management. The experiences and the data obtained from the JPDR dismantling activities are expected to contribute to future decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. (author)

  4. Recent decommissioning experience in BNFL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BNFL is now engaged in a long term programme to decommission surplus radioactive facilities. Certain projects have been deliberately selected to provide experience in decommissioning specific types of facilities whilst all have proven invaluable training grounds in decommissioning techniques and organisation. Four projects are included here, selected for the lessons and experience they have provided. These are the original Sellafield Fuel Storage Pond, a mixed oxide (Pu+U) fuel plant, redundant plutonium facilities within the main Magnox reprocessing plant, and the Capenhurst Gaseous Diffusion Uranium enrichment plant

  5. Decommissioning of TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the TRIGA Mark-II and III will be a new era for the safe development of nuclear industries in Korea. The design phase of the D and D project will be carried out by a domestic engineering company associated with foreign experienced one. This strategy will give us an opportunity for the solid development of the decommissioning technologies. These experiences and the compilation of the documents will be applied for the decontamination and decommissioning of the commercial nuclear power plants in Korea. (author). 4 refs., 13 tabs., 6 figs

  6. Considerations for NPP Krsko decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many interrelated considerations must be taken into account in choosing the appropriate decommissioning alternative for a specific situation.Factors influencing the decision-making process are presented as broad categories consisting of economic, political, safety and schedule assumptions. While safety during decommissioning is of principal concern to regulatory bodies and the general public, economic matters are probably the most important to owners, utility management and customers. The public involvement in decision.making process on both state and local levels is a prerequisite for successful decommissioning operation. (author)

  7. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  8. 76 FR 35511 - Decommissioning Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ...for an effective Historical Site Assessment...Comment G.4: Cost of required activities...funds to cover the costs of historical contamination at...by reviewing the historical expenditures...decommissioning costs may be...

  9. Genetic characterization of Aberdeen Angus cattle using molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Pimentel de Mello Klocker Vasconcellos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberdeen Angus beef cattle from the Brazilian herd were studied genetically using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP of the kappa-casein - HinfI (CSN3 - HinfI, beta-lactoglobulin - HaeIII (LGB - HaeIII and growth hormone AluI (GH- AluI genes, as well as four microsatellites (TEXAN15, CSFM50, BM1224 and BM7160. The RFLP genotypes were determined using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR followed by digestion with restriction endonucleases and electrophoresis in agarose gels. With the exception of the microsatellite BM7160, which was analyzed in an automatic sequencer, the PCR products were genotyped by silver staining. The allele and genotype frequencies, heterozygosities and gene diversity were estimated. The values for these parameters of variability were comparable to other cattle breeds. The genetic relationship of the Aberdeen Angus to other breeds (Caracu, Canchim, Charolais, Guzerath, Gyr, Nelore, Santa Gertrudis and Simmental was investigated using Nei's genetic distance. Cluster analysis placed the Aberdeen Angus in an isolated group in the Bos taurus breeds branch. This fact is in agreement with the geographic origin of this breed.

  10. Genetic characterization of Aberdeen Angus cattle using molecular markers

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Luciana Pimentel de Mello Klocker, Vasconcellos; Daniella, Tambasco-Talhari; Andréa Pozzi, Pereira; Luiz Lehmann, Coutinho; Luciana Correia de Almeida, Regitano.

    Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english Aberdeen Angus beef cattle from the Brazilian herd were studied genetically using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the kappa-casein - HinfI (CSN3 - HinfI), beta-lactoglobulin - HaeIII (LGB - HaeIII) and growth hormone AluI (GH- AluI) genes, as well as four microsatellites (TEXAN15, [...] CSFM50, BM1224 and BM7160). The RFLP genotypes were determined using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by digestion with restriction endonucleases and electrophoresis in agarose gels. With the exception of the microsatellite BM7160, which was analyzed in an automatic sequencer, the PCR products were genotyped by silver staining. The allele and genotype frequencies, heterozygosities and gene diversity were estimated. The values for these parameters of variability were comparable to other cattle breeds. The genetic relationship of the Aberdeen Angus to other breeds (Caracu, Canchim, Charolais, Guzerath, Gyr, Nelore, Santa Gertrudis and Simmental) was investigated using Nei's genetic distance. Cluster analysis placed the Aberdeen Angus in an isolated group in the Bos taurus breeds branch. This fact is in agreement with the geographic origin of this breed.

  11. Health assessment for Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Aberdeen, Maryland, Region 3. CERCLIS Nos. MD3210021355 and MD10020036. Preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-19

    The Aberdeen Proving Grounds site is located in Aberdeen (Harford County) Maryland. Preliminary on-site groundwater and surface water sampling results have identified various metals, phosphorus, and volatile organic compounds. They include: 1,2-dichloroethylene, chloroform, 1,2-dichloroethane, trichloroethylene, benzene, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, 1,4-dithiane and 1,2-dichloroethylene. In addition, it has been reported that among the substances disposed of on-site are significant quantities of toxic metals, cyanide compounds, phosphorus, phosgene, napalm, and mustard gas. The site is considered to be of public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the likelihood of human exposure to hazardous substances. Potential environmental pathways include those related to contaminated groundwater, surface water, on-site soils, and volatilization of contaminants in ambient air.

  12. Regulation of decommissioning power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, F.E.; Nettleton, J

    2005-03-15

    The Health and Safety Executive, for which the authors work, is responsible for the regulation of nuclear and conventional safety during decommissioning. Moving from the end of operation of a Nuclear Power Plant to its decommissioning brings many changes in staffing, processes and culture as well as in plant state. The challenge to the licensee of the plant is to manage these changes effectively so that the decommissioning work progresses efficiently and safely. The challenge to the regulator is to develop an approach which changes proportionately in line with the reduced nuclear hazard and enables the licensee to decommission sites effectively and safely. The Nuclear Reactors (Environmental Impact Assessment for Decommissioning) Regulations 1999 - EIADR99 - provides an open and transparent approach by requiring extensive public consultation on the environmental impacts of decommissioning. HSE's experience to date with this new legislation (as described in the article) suggests that the process is most effective when the public and other stakeholders are engaged early. To date, HSE has issued two consents under the regulations: for Hinkley Point A and Bradwell nuclear power stations and is considering applications from Calder Hall and Chapelcross. (author)

  13. Money Related Decommissioning and Funding Decision Making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Money makes the world go round', as the song says. It definitely influences decommissioning decision-making and financial assurance for future decommissioning. This paper will address two money-related decommissioning topics. The first is the evaluation of whether to continue or to halt decommissioning activities at Fermi 1. The second is maintaining adequacy of financial assurance for future decommissioning of operating plants. Decommissioning costs considerable money and costs are often higher than originally estimated. If costs increase significantly and decommissioning is not well funded, decommissioning activities may be deferred. Several decommissioning projects have been deferred when decision-makers determined future spending is preferable than current spending, or when costs have risen significantly. Decommissioning activity timing is being reevaluated for the Fermi 1 project. Assumptions for waste cost-escalation significantly impact the decision being made this year on the Fermi 1 decommissioning project. They also have a major impact on the estimated costs for decommissioning currently operating plants. Adequately funding full decommissioning during plant operation will ensure that the users who receive the benefit pay the full price of the nuclear-generated electricity. Funding throughout operation also will better ensure that money is available following shutdown to allow decommissioning to be conducted without need for additional fundsneed for additional funds

  14. Current status of Chernobyl NPP decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strategy of Chernobyl NPP decommissioning with the decommissioning license 2002-2064 is presented. The main activities at the stage of ChNPP units shutdown (2002 - 2012) are: units maintenance in safe state; decommissioning infrastructure construction; unloading of SNF – main activity determining the stage duration; systems and elements final shutdown; decommissioning life-support systems reconstruction; Comprehensive engineering and radiation survey (CERS); dismantling of the reactor facilities external equipment; removal of RAW from units; decommissioning documentation development. The decommissioning activities main results are presented

  15. Current international issues in decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1999, the Italian Environmental Protection authorities (ANPA at that time) hosted in Rome a Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) meeting on the Regulatory Aspects of Decommissioning. This 'stock-taking' conference heard views from regulatory authorities, the decommissioning industry, waste management organisations and other relevant industrial sectors (e.g. the scrap metal industry) regarding the issues and aspects of decommissioning that should be further addressed, particularly at an international level. From this conference, six issues of relevance were identified which, since that time, have been addressed within the framework of the NEA. These issues are: - Decommissioning policies and strategies; - Waste management and materials reuse considerations; - Authorised release of sites and facilities; - Securing long-term funding and responsibility; - Framework for safety regulation of decommissioning; - Research and development in decommissioning. The NEA has focused on the international aspects of these issues, and on the roles of national governments in addressing the national and international aspects of these issues. This paper will present an overview of the NEA's findings in these areas. Realizing that these issues are important to the work of other international organisations, the NEA has tried to assess and use as appropriate the work of others in discussing these issues. As such, a brief review of relevant work at other international organisations will be presenteternational organisations will be presented. Based on its work, and in order to further advance these issues, the NEA is planning a second workshop on the Regulatory Aspects of Decommissioning, which will again be hosted by the Italian authorities in Rome, and will be held during the second half of 2004. (author)

  16. National provisions for decommissioning and managing radioactive waste from decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large quantities of radioactive waste resulting from decommissioning activities of nuclear research reactors and nuclear power plant units will be generated in Romania in the near and distant future. The actual policy and strategy in the field of the management of radioactive waste in Romania are based on the stipulations of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management, ratified in Romania by the Law No. 105/1999. The paper gives an introduction of the current policy and strategy applied in Romania for nuclear decommissioning process and management of radioactive waste. The paper points out some key aspects of the national provisions concerning the nuclear decommissioning activities and management of the resulting radioactive waste: the legal framework, the responsibilities of the national authorities and of the licence holders, the main radioactive waste generators, the financing and budgeting mechanisms, etc. (author)

  17. 76 FR 3837 - Nuclear Decommissioning Funds; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-21

    ...Service 26 CFR Part 1 [TD 9512] RIN 1545-BF08 Nuclear Decommissioning Funds; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service...to deductions for contributions to trusts maintained for decommissioning nuclear power plants. DATES: This correction is...

  18. Decommissioning planning of Swedish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technologies required for the decommissioning work are for the most part readily proven. Taken into account that there will be many more years before the studied reactor units will undergo decommissioning, the techniques could even be called conventional at that time. This will help bring the decommissioning projects to a successful closure. A national waste fund is already established in Sweden to finance amongst others all dismantling and decommissioning work. This will assure that funding for the decommissioning projects is at hand when needed. All necessary plant data are readily available and this will, combined with a reliable management system, expedite the decommissioning projects considerably. Final repositories for both long- and short-lived LILW respectively is planned and will be constructed and dimensioned to receive the decommissioning waste from the Swedish NPP:s. Since the strategy is set and well thought-through, this will help facilitate a smooth disposal of the radioactive decommissioning waste. (orig.)

  19. State of decommissioning process in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Romania, there are several installations that arrived at the decommissioning stage. These installations are: VVR-S research reactor, Sub critical Assembly HELEN, and Zero Power Reactor (RP-0). In this paper, the methods the Romanian Regulatory Body is developing the legal framework for decommissioning process of nuclear installations are described. There is a draft of decommissioning norms for research reactors. This regulation provides each stage of decommissioning and requirements for decommissioning plan. Also, CNCAN has evaluated and made requirements for completion of a VVR-S research reactor decommissioning plan submitted by IFIN-HH. Further, the reasons for which the decommissioning plan was rejected and requirements that the owner of VVR-S research reactor must fulfil in order to receive decommissioning licence are presented. (author)

  20. The Tokai NPP decommissioning technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokai power station was closed down in March 1998 and started decommissioning from December 2001 as a pioneer of NPP decommissioning. This article presented current state of Tokai NPP decommissioning technique. As the second stage of decommissioning works, removal works of steam raising unit (four units of heat exchangers) were started from 2006 by jacking down method with decommissioning data accumulated. Each heat exchanger was divided into top head, seven 'tears' of shell and bottom head. Each 'tear' was out and separated into a cylinder, and then divided into two by remote-operated cutting equipment with manipulators for gas cutting and motor disk cutting under monitoring works by fixed and mobile cameras. Divided 'tear' was further cut into center baffle plate, heat transfer tubes and fine pieces of shell. Cutting works would produce radioactive fine particles, which were filtered by temporary ventilation equipment with exhaust fan and filters. Appropriate works using existing technique combined and their rationalization were important at this stage. (T. Tanaka)

  1. DOE's decommissioning policy and framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After decades of weapons production and testing at U.S. Department of Energy facilities across the nation, the DOE has hundreds of unneeded and unwanted buildings still in the complex, many of them contaminated with radioactive and hazardous substances. The DOE's environmental restoration program mission includes ensuring that risks posed by these surplus facilities are either eliminated or reduced to safe levels through decommissioning. More than 100 buildings in the former weapons complex have been decommissioned since the environmental restoration program began in late 1989. Another 800-plus structures have been declared surplus to the department's needs and placed in surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) programs awaiting final decommissioning activities. Several thousand more facilities are expected to be declared surplus, then deactivated, and placed in S ampersand M programs for eventual decommissioning by the Environmental Restoration program. The Baseline Environmental Management Report that the DOE prepared for Congress in March 1995 estimates that $46.5 billion will be needed over the next 75 years to decommission the department's contaminated surplus facilities

  2.  Heavy Lift Methods in Decommissioning of Installations

    OpenAIRE

    Breidablikk, Line Sma?ge

    2010-01-01

     In this report decommissioning of offshore petroleum platforms have been investigated. It treats decommissioning in general, the process of a typical project. A variety of suitable lifting vessels have been presented, and some concepts of removal have been evaluated.

    Decommissioning is important to go through with because of the environment and the use of the area after the petroleum activities ceases. Other ocean users benefit from the decommissioning because the area can...

  3. Decommissioning: a problem or a challenge?

    OpenAIRE

    Mele Irena

    2004-01-01

    With the ageing of nuclear facilities or the reduced interest in their further operation, a new set of problems, related to the decommissioning of these facilities, has come into forefront. In many cases it turns out that the preparations for decommissioning have come too late, and that financial resources for covering decommissioning activities have not been provided. To avoid such problems, future liailities should be thoroughly estimated in drawing up the decommissioning and waste manageme...

  4. Phenix Decommissioning Project - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first heading of your manuscript must be 'Introduction'. Phenix is the only remaining French fast breeder reactor after the shutdown of Superphenix (1999) and Rapsodie (1983). Phenix is located inside the Marcoule nuclear site along the Rhone river near Bagnols-sur-Ceze in southeastern France. Phenix is one of the facilities belonging the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) on the Marcoule site. It is a fast breeder reactor (FBR) developed at the end of the 1960's. that has been in operation since 1973 and was connected to the power grid in 1974. It is a second generation prototype developed while the first generation FBR, Rapsodie, was still in operation. Phenix is a 250 electrical MW power plant. During the first 20 years of operation, its main aim was to demonstrate the viability of sodium-cooled FBRs. Since the 1991 radioactive waste management act, Phenix has become an irradiation tool for the actinide transmutation program. To extend its operating life for 6 additional cycles, it was necessary to refurbish the plant; this involved major work performed from 1999 to 2003 at a total cost of about 250 M??. Today, with a realistic expectation, the final shutdown is planned for the beginning of 2009. The main objective of the Phenix dismantling project is to eliminate all the process equipment and clean all the building to remove all the radioactive zones. To reach this objective, three main hazards must be eliminated: Fuel (criticality hazard), Sodium, Radioactuel (criticality hazard), Sodium, Radioactive equipment. The complexity of decommissioning a facility such as Phenix is increased by: - the lack of storage facility for high radioactive material, - the decision to treat all the radioactive sodium and sodium waste inside the plant, - the very high irradiation of the core structures due to the presence of cobalt alloys. On the other hand, Phenix plant is still under operating with a qualified staff and the radioactivity coming from structural activation is well known. After the final shutdown, the first operations will be conducted by the same staff under the same safety report. Another interesting fact is that the decommissioning funds project exist and are available. The CEA decided to begin the dismantling phase without waiting because after a period of decay it is not really cheaper or easier to work. This approach needs interim storage facilities not long after the final shutdown. For the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste there are national storage centers but for the high-level wastes, each operator must manage its waste until a suitable disposal site is available. At Marcoule a new storage facility is now being designed and scheduled to begin operating after 2013-2014. After removal of the fuel and core elements, the primary sodium will be drained and eliminated by a carbonation process. To ensure biological shielding, the reference scenario calls for filling the primary vessel with water. The most radioactive structures (dia-grid and core support) will be cut up with remote tools, after which the rest of the structure will be cut up manually. Phenix contains about 1450 metric tons of sodium. The CEA initially planned to build ATENA, a new facility for all radioactive sodium waste from R and D and FBR facilities. For various reasons, but mainly to save money, the CEA decided to treat all radioactive sodium and sodium waste in the framework of the Phenix dismantling project. There are no real difficulties in the dismantling schedule because of the advanced state of development of the processes selected for the ATENA project. Because of the knowledge already obtained, the issues concern project management, waste management and human resources reduction more than technical challenge

  5. STATUS OF THE NRC'S DECOMMISSIONING PROGRAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On July 21, 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission published the final rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination (the License Termination Rule) as Subpart E to 10 CFR Part 20. NRC regulations require that materials licensees submit Decommissioning Plans to support the decommissioning of its facility if it is required by license condition, or if the procedures and activities necessary to carry out the decommissioning have not been approved by NRC and these procedures could increase the potential health and safety impacts to the workers or the public. NRC regulations also require that reactor licensees submit Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Reports and License Termination Plans to support the decommissioning of nuclear power facilities. This paper provides an update on the status of the NRC's decommissioning program. It discusses the status of permanently shut-down commercial power reactors, complex decommissioning sites, and sites listed in the Site Decommissioning Management Plan. The paper provides the status of various tools and guidance the NRC is developing to assist licensees during decommissioning, including a Standard Review Plan for evaluating plans and information submitted by licensees to support the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and the D and D Screen software for determining the potential doses from residual radioactivity. Finally, it discusses the status of the staff's current efforts to streamline the decommissioning prforts to streamline the decommissioning process

  6. Redevelopment of nuclear facilities after decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Being aware of reuse options for decommissioned sites is an important aspect of the decommissioning process. Early planning for site reuse can facilitate the transition from operation to decommissioning, possibly reduce the financial burden associated with decommissioning, re-employ workers and specialist staff, and alleviate the overall impact of decommissioning on the local community. Conversely, the lack of early planning for site reuse after completion of the decommissioning process can become a hindrance to implementing decommissioning in a cost effective and optimized manner. This strategic inadequacy may be caused by insufficient knowledge of experience with redevelopment opportunities that were exploited successfully in industries elsewhere. This report provides an overview of decommissioning projects implemented worldwide with reuse of the decommissioned sites for new purposes after delicensing. Lessons learned from these projects and practical guidance on factors creating reuse opportunities are highlighted. Operators of nuclear facilities, decision makers at government level, regulators/authorities and elected officials at all levels, environmental planners and the general public are all important stakeholders in the site redevelopment process. The subject area addressed in this report has not previously been addressed in IAEA publications on decommissioning except in only a marginal fashion. This report is intended to contribute to the systematic coverage to contribute to the systematic coverage of the entire range of decommissioning aspects within the IAEA's decommissioning programme

  7. Decommissioning in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithuania has no primary energy sources of its own. From the late 1980s, the Ignalina NPP (INPP) produced a large percentage of Lithuania's electricity. The Lithuanian electricity and gas networks are closely interrelated to the north-west power sectors of the Russian Federation. The plant, when originally constructed, was intended to supply the northwest region of the former Soviet Union rather than Lithuania alone. The first unit of INPP was commissioned in 1983 and the second unit in 1987. Since Lithuania became independent in 1990, INPP has typically contributed around 80% of national power supply. The plant is located in the north-eastern corner of Lithuania, close to the borders with Belarus and Latvia - 130 km from Vilnius, on the shore of lake Druksiai. Lithuania gained its independence from the former Soviet Union in 1990, and from then on took full responsibility for the safe operation of INPP. The plant, with two Soviet designed RBMK-1500 reactor units, is the only NPP of its type in the EU. The G7 high level meeting in Munich in 1992 was crucial to Lithuania and operation at INPP. The political decision was made that these RBMK reactors should be closed, as the reactors were judged incapable of being upgraded to Western safety levels. The first step in the preparations to close INPP was the International Donors Conference in the year 2000 in Vilnius. Shortly afterwards, the Ignalina International Decommissioning Support Fund (IIDSF) operated by the Europeapport Fund (IIDSF) operated by the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) has been established. The initial contributions to the fund were made by a number of European countries and by the EU. Since that time, only the EU has continued to contribute to the IIDSF, its contributions now totalling 389.5 million euros, equivalent to 93% of the fund

  8. The Italian decommissioning industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Italy's step out from nuclear activities in 1987 deeply affected an industry that, in the previous years, had managed to grow up in quality and technology levels to meet the nuclear standards. Only a few companies were able to partially retain their skills through activities abroad. The decommissioning program represents a new challenge for the Italian industry at large and will require a consistent effort to properly qualify the potential suppliers. On the other side, a program with such implications in terms of investments and so depending from social aspects cannot be effectively implemented without a significant involvement of the local industry. Essential conditions for the success are a reliable program, as well as a careful supply management scheme, which must facilitate aggregation of skills spread among different subjects. 'Human Resources: Maintaining a Nuclear Culture in Italy' Bruno Panella Politecnico di Torino, Giuseppe Forasassi, Universita di Pisa, Inter-University Consortium for the Nuclear Technological Research (CIRTEN). After a brief history of the nuclear engineering education in Italy within the international and national nuclear energy scenario, the present situation, with reference to the Italian universities, is shown. In order to maintain a nuclear culture in Italy the solution, exploited with different peculiarities in each University, is to carry out high quality research activities in reciprocal collaboration (mostly within the CIRTEN inter university Consortium) as well as with the Industry and research Organisations and to collaborate actively in establishing a stable network and a synergy of teaching activities in Europe in the field of Nuclear Engineering Education. The aim is to maintain at a high level and as updated as possible the Italian educational offer in nuclear engineering and also to attract the best students for the enrolment. (author)

  9. Fuel fabrication facility decommissioning experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the past several years, Sequoyah Fuels Corporation has been decommissioning its Cimarron Facility located in north central Oklahoma. The facility contained separate plutonium and enriched uranium fuel fabrication plants. The site also contained small settling lagoons and a small shallow burial area used to dispose of uranium - and thorium-contaminated wastes. The objective of the decommissioning activity is to decontaminate the facilities for termination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licenses, with no restrictions on future use of the property. The decommissioning work involved: decontamination of the plutonium fuel fabrication plant; decontamination of the enriched uranium fuel fabrication plant; excavation, packaging and shipment of the lagoon sediments and associated underground piping; and excavation, repackaging and shipment of the low-level radioactive wastes in the burial ground. These activities are discussed

  10. Fort St. Vrain decommissioning experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear plant decommissioning represents a significant expenditure of time and resources for nuclear utilities. Public Service Company of Colorado (PSC) is in the process of completing the decommissioning of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) Nuclear Station, the first large-scale commercial nuclear plant to be decommissioned under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) 1988 decommissioning rule. PSC's experience has included dispositioning spent fuel, choosing a decommissioning alternative, and actively decommissioning the plant from dismantlement and decontamination through final survey. When the plant was prematurely shut down in August 1989, PSC's initial task was to find a storage location for FSV's spent fuel. PSC had a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to ship FSV spent fuel to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and all previously removed spent fuel had been shipped there. However, Idaho legally blocked further FSV spent-fuel shipments to INEL, and PSC decided to license and build an on-site, passively cooled independent spent-fuel storage installation (ISFSI). By June 1992, all FSV spent fuel was transferred from the reactor building to the ISFSI. PSC has been able to use low-level radioactive waste (LLWR) disposal facilities in the Northwest Compact, and disposal costs are within estimates. Industrial and radiological safety have been emphasized throughout the project, and performance in these areas has been outstanding. PSC has these areas has been outstanding. PSC has obtained NRC Aprilproval of a final survey plan that allows for many of the plant's components and systems to remain in place, and final survey activities are nearing completion. PSC is in the process of repowering the facility with natural gas-fired combustion turbines and heat recovery boilers. The first combustion turbine was placed in service Ap 30, 1996

  11. Fort St. Vrain decommissioning experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, M.J.; Holmes, M.H. [Public Service Company of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States); Chestnutt, S.W. [Colorado Public Service Co., Platteville, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Nuclear plant decommissioning represents a significant expenditure of time and resources for nuclear utilities. Public Service Company of Colorado (PSC) is in the process of completing the decommissioning of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) Nuclear Station, the first large-scale commercial nuclear plant to be decommissioned under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) 1988 decommissioning rule. PSC`s experience has included dispositioning spent fuel, choosing a decommissioning alternative, and actively decommissioning the plant from dismantlement and decontamination through final survey. When the plant was prematurely shut down in August 1989, PSC`s initial task was to find a storage location for FSV`s spent fuel. PSC had a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to ship FSV spent fuel to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and all previously removed spent fuel had been shipped there. However, Idaho legally blocked further FSV spent-fuel shipments to INEL, and PSC decided to license and build an on-site, passively cooled independent spent-fuel storage installation (ISFSI). By June 1992, all FSV spent fuel was transferred from the reactor building to the ISFSI. PSC has been able to use low-level radioactive waste (LLWR) disposal facilities in the Northwest Compact, and disposal costs are within estimates. Industrial and radiological safety have been emphasized throughout the project, and performance in these areas has been outstanding. PSC has obtained NRC Aprilproval of a final survey plan that allows for many of the plant`s components and systems to remain in place, and final survey activities are nearing completion. PSC is in the process of repowering the facility with natural gas-fired combustion turbines and heat recovery boilers. The first combustion turbine was placed in service Ap 30, 1996.

  12. Genetic characterization of Aberdeen Angus cattle using molecular markers

    OpenAIRE

    Vasconcellos Luciana Pimentel de Mello Klocker; Tambasco-Talhari Daniella; Pereira Andréa Pozzi; Coutinho Luiz Lehmann; Regitano Luciana Correia de Almeida

    2003-01-01

    Aberdeen Angus beef cattle from the Brazilian herd were studied genetically using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the kappa-casein - HinfI (CSN3 - HinfI), beta-lactoglobulin - HaeIII (LGB - HaeIII) and growth hormone AluI (GH- AluI) genes, as well as four microsatellites (TEXAN15, CSFM50, BM1224 and BM7160). The RFLP genotypes were determined using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by digestion with restriction endonucleases and electrophoresis in agarose gels. W...

  13. Decommissioning of uranium conversion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since about 20 years have passed after the construction of the uranium conversion plant, most equipments installed have worn out. Liquid wastes stored in lagoons which were generated during the operation of this plant are needed to be treated safely. Therefore, the decommissioning project on the uranium conversion plant was started from 2001. This study is a preliminary step for the decommissioning of the uranium conversion plant. It was reviewed on the plant status overall, especially facility descriptions and operational histories for the installations located inside and outside of the plant and methods of decontamination and of dismantling to the contamination conditions. And some proper options on each main object was proposed

  14. Decommissioning: a problem or a challenge?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mele Irena

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available With the ageing of nuclear facilities or the reduced interest in their further operation, a new set of problems, related to the decommissioning of these facilities, has come into forefront. In many cases it turns out that the preparations for decommissioning have come too late, and that financial resources for covering decommissioning activities have not been provided. To avoid such problems, future liailities should be thoroughly estimated in drawing up the decommissioning and waste management programme for each nuclear facility in time, and financial provisions for implementing such programme should be provided. In this paper a presentation of current decommissioning experience in Slovenia is given. The main problems and difficulties in decommissioning of the Žirovski Vrh Uranium Mine are exposed and the lesson learned from this case is presented. The preparation of the decommissioning programme for the Nuclear Power Plant Krško is also described, and the situation at the TRIGA research reactor is briefly discussed.

  15. Decommissioning of Facilities. General Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning is the last step in the lifetime management of a facility. It must also be considered during the design, construction, commissioning and operation of facilities. This publication establishes requirements for the safe decommissioning of a broad range of facilities: nuclear power plants, research reactors, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, facilities for processing naturally occurring radioactive material, former military sites, and relevant medical, industrial and research facilities. It addresses all the aspects of decommissioning that are required to ensure safety, aspects such as roles and responsibilities, strategy and planning for decommissioning, conduct of decommissioning actions and termination of the authorization for decommissioning. It is intended for use by those involved in policy development, regulatory control and implementation of decommissioning

  16. Shippingport: A relevant decommissioning project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crimi, F.P.

    1988-01-01

    The nuclear steam supply system of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station is a four-loop, 72-MW(electric) pressurized water reactor. The reactor plant and associated systems are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy. The 100-MW(electric) turbine-generator and balance of plant are owned by the Duquesne Light Company and are not part of the decommissioning scope of work. The station is located at Shippingport, Pennsylvania, on 7 acres of land leased until 1994 by DOE from DLCo. Defueling of the nuclear reactor was completed early September 1984, and the DOE portion of the station is now being decommissioned by General Electric Nuclear Energy under contract to the DOE. As of December 31, 1987, the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) was {approx}70% complete and was ahead of schedule and under budget. The main objectives of the SSDP are to (1) demonstrate the safe and cost-effective dismantlement of a large-scale nuclear power plant, and (2) provide useful data for the future decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. Reactor pressure vessel, steam generators, pressurizer, reactor coolant pumps, and other features are discussed specifically in the paper.

  17. Shippingport: A relevant decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear steam supply system of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station is a four-loop, 72-MW(electric) pressurized water reactor. The reactor plant and associated systems are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy. The 100-MW(electric) turbine-generator and balance of plant are owned by the Duquesne Light Company and are not part of the decommissioning scope of work. The station is located at Shippingport, Pennsylvania, on 7 acres of land leased until 1994 by DOE from DLCo. Defueling of the nuclear reactor was completed early September 1984, and the DOE portion of the station is now being decommissioned by General Electric Nuclear Energy under contract to the DOE. As of December 31, 1987, the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) was ?70% complete and was ahead of schedule and under budget. The main objectives of the SSDP are to (1) demonstrate the safe and cost-effective dismantlement of a large-scale nuclear power plant, and (2) provide useful data for the future decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. Reactor pressure vessel, steam generators, pressurizer, reactor coolant pumps, and other features are discussed specifically in the paper

  18. A Decommissioning Information Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1996, it was determined that research reactors, the KRR-1 and the KRR-2, would be shut down and dismantled. A project for the decommissioning of these reactors was launched in January 1997 with the goal of a completion by 2008. The total budget of the project was 19.4 million US dollars, including the cost for the waste disposal and for the technology development. The work scopes during the decommissioning project were the dismantling of all the facilities and the removal of all the radioactive materials from the reactor site. After the removal of the entire radioactivity, the site and buildings will be released for an unconditional use. A separate project for the decommissioning of the uranium conversion plant was initiated in 2001. The plant was constructed for the development of the fuel manufacturing technologies and the localization of nuclear fuels in Korea. It was shut downed in 1993 and finally it was concluded in 2000 that the plant would be decommissioned. The project will be completed by 2008 and the total budget was 9.2 million US dollars. During this project, all vessels and equipment will be dismantled and the building surface will be decontaminated to be utilized as general laboratories

  19. Decommissioning study of Forsmark NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anunti, Aake; Larsson, Helena; Edelborg, Mathias [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, Vaesteraas (Sweden)

    2013-06-15

    By Swedish law it is the obligation of the nuclear power utilities to satisfactorily demonstrate how a nuclear power plant can be safely decommissioned and dismantled when it is no longer in service as well as calculate the estimated cost of decommissioning of the nuclear power plant. Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (SKB) has been commissioned by the Swedish nuclear power utilities to meet the requirements of current legislation by studying and reporting on suitable technologies and by estimating the costs of decommissioning and dismantling of the Swedish nuclear power plants. The present report is an overview, containing the necessary information to meet the above needs, for the Forsmark NPP. Information is given for the plant about the inventory of materials and radioactivity at the time for final shutdown. A feasible technique for dismantling is presented and the waste management is described and the resulting waste quantities are estimated. Finally a schedule for the decommissioning phase is given and the costs associated are estimated as a basis for funding.

  20. Decommissioning Study of Oskarshamn NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Helena; Anunti, Aake; Edelborg, Mathias [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, Vaesteraas (Sweden)

    2013-06-15

    By Swedish law it is the obligation of the nuclear power utilities to satisfactorily demonstrate how a nuclear power plant can be safely decommissioned and dismantled when it is no longer in service as well as calculate the estimated cost of decommissioning of the nuclear power plant. Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (SKB) has been commissioned by the Swedish nuclear power utilities to meet the requirements of current legislation by studying and reporting on suitable technologies and by estimating the costs of decommissioning and dismantling of the Swedish nuclear power plants. The present report is an overview, containing the necessary information to meet the above needs, for Oskarshamn NPP. Information is given for the plant about the inventory of materials and radioactivity at the time for final shutdown. A feasible technique for dismantling is presented and the waste management is described and the resulting waste quantities are estimated. Finally a schedule for the decommissioning phase is given and the costs associated are estimated as a basis for funding.

  1. Shippingport station decommissioning project overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station (SAPS), the first commercial-sized nuclear power plant in the United States to undergo complete dismantlement. SAPS is located near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on approximately seven acres of land owned by Duquesne Light Company (DLC), and leased to the US Department of Energy. The Station consists of a 275' by 60' Fuel Handling Building containing the Reactor Containment Chamber, the Service Building, the Turbine Building, the Radioactive Waste Processing Building, the Administration Building, and other smaller support buildings. The Station has four coolant loops; most of the containment structures are located below grade. Shippingport Station was shutdown in October, 1982. Defueling operations began in 1983 and were completed by September 1984. At that time, responsibility for the plant was transferred from DOE Office of Assistant Secretary for Naval Reactors (NE-60) to DOE Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action (NE-20) and then to DOE Richland Operations Office (RL). Also at that time, responsibility for the operation/decommissioning of the station systems passed from DLC to General Electric Company (GE). A caretaker and site preparation period lasted from September, 1984 to September, 1985, at which time decommissioning activities started. The decommissioning period is scheduled as September, 1985 through April, 1990. Project total estimated cost is $98.3 million

  2. Information Support for Storage Decommission

    International Science & Technology Center (ISTC)

    Decision - Making Information Support of Territory Remediation in the Course of Decommissioning Temporary Radioactive Waste Storage Sites in the Northwestern Region of Russia. Elaboration of an Environmental Monitoring System for Enterprises Involved in Treating and Storing Low- and Intermediate- Radioactive Wastes in the Region

  3. A Decommissioning Information Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S. K.; Hong, S. B.; Chung, U. S.; Park, J. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    In 1996, it was determined that research reactors, the KRR-1 and the KRR-2, would be shut down and dismantled. A project for the decommissioning of these reactors was launched in January 1997 with the goal of a completion by 2008. The total budget of the project was 19.4 million US dollars, including the cost for the waste disposal and for the technology development. The work scopes during the decommissioning project were the dismantling of all the facilities and the removal of all the radioactive materials from the reactor site. After the removal of the entire radioactivity, the site and buildings will be released for an unconditional use. A separate project for the decommissioning of the uranium conversion plant was initiated in 2001. The plant was constructed for the development of the fuel manufacturing technologies and the localization of nuclear fuels in Korea. It was shut downed in 1993 and finally it was concluded in 2000 that the plant would be decommissioned. The project will be completed by 2008 and the total budget was 9.2 million US dollars. During this project, all vessels and equipment will be dismantled and the building surface will be decontaminated to be utilized as general laboratories.

  4. Nuclear decommissioning in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Italy is in a unique position. Italy has been in the past among the leading countries in the pacific use of nuclear energy, but, as a consequence of the 1987 referendum decided to shutdown all operating power plants, to leave uncompleted the plants under construction and to stop all related research and industrial activities declaring a 5 years moratorium on any future initiative. The moratorium ended unnoticed in 1992, since there was no political move to restart nuclear power in Italy and, in practice, it is still acting. Therefore, now the major efforts in the nuclear field are focused on the closure of past liabilities assuring safety and security highest levels. This is a duty to be carried out by the generation that used this form of energy, but, at least for somebody, also a precondition for the acceptance of any future renaissance of nuclear energy in Italy. SOGIN is a Company carrying out a service for the country and fully committed to solve the liabilities left by the interrupted nuclear industry in Italy. To this aim SOGIN is managed as a private company to assure the highest possible efficiency, but, at the same time, is driven by moral and ethical objectives and the vision of protecting the environment and health and safety of the public. SOGIN blends in a synergic way the various ENEL experiences (design and operation of NPP's) and ENEA experiences (engineering and operation of R and D and industrial facilities supporting NPP's). Such a comprehensive combination of technical competences should not be dispersed in the medium and long term and the management is committed to facilitate the technical growth of the impressing number of motivated young people joining the Company, whose enthusiasm is contaminating every day also the 'veterans', to assure for the country an asset and a presidium of very specialized multi-disciplinary nuclear competences. Speaking of possible scenarios for the future, we should mention that the current international situation in the oil market, both in terms of barrel cost and in terms of security of supplies, and the severe black-outs that have plagued also Italy (the major one in September 2003 lasting in some areas for about 24 hours), have started a widespread discussion about energy alternatives and strategic energy plans. In this frame an increasing number of politicians and scientists are calling for a reconsideration of nuclear energy as a viable option also for Italy in a new energy mix. It is clear that public acceptance of nuclear energy is strictly connected not only to the demonstration of high safety standards of future plants, but also to the solution of radioactive waste disposal and of plant decommissioning. This is the link that could make the SOGIN mission even more strategic for the country

  5. Status of the NRC Decommissioning Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On July 21, 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published the final rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination (the License Termination Rule or LTR) as Subpart E to 10 CFR Part 20. NRC regulations require that materials licensees submit Decommissioning Plans to support the decommissioning of its facility if it is required by license condition, or if the procedures and activities necessary to carry out the decommissioning have not been approved by NRC and these procedures could increase the potential health and safety impacts to the workers or the public. NRC regulations also require that reactor licensees submit Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Reports and License Termination Plans to support the decommissioning of nuclear power facilities. This paper provides an update on the status of the NRC's decommissioning program that was presented during WM'02. It discusses the staff's current efforts to streamline the decommissioning process, current issues being faced in the decommissioning program, such as partial site release and restricted release of sites, as well as the status of the decommissioning of complex sites and those listed in the Site Decommissioning Management Plan. The paper discusses the status of permanently shut-down commercial power reactors and the transfer of complex decommissioning sites and sites listed on the SDMP to Agreement States. Finally the paper provides an update of the status of various tools and guidance tthe status of various tools and guidance the NRC is developing to assist licensees during decommissioning, including an effort to consolidate and risk-inform decommissioning guidance

  6. The decommissioning program of UKAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The peaceful utilization of nuclear power in Britain began approximately twelve years earlier than in Germany. In addition, a military program was pursued in the country. UKAEA and BNFL are decommissioning fifteen experimental reactors, two reprocessing plants, and several laboratory buildings and multi-purpose building on the sites of Dounreay, Sellafield, Harwell, and Winfrith. The expense involved in demolishing the experimental nuclear facilities originally built with public funds is estimated at DM 20 billion. The cost of demolishing all civilian nuclear plants in the U.K. is estimated to run up to more than DM 100 billion. The legal framework of decommissioning in Britain differs fundamentally from conditions in Germany. This situation probably would have to be harmonized within the European Union. (orig.)

  7. Decommissioning of Gundremmingen Unit A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several nuclear power plants of the first generation in the world have finished their nuclear life and retired into the status of decommissioning. In 1980 this significant milestone was also settled for the nuclear power station KRB A. The reasons for this decision are of general interest and will be explained. The experiences of dismantling, disassembling, decontamination and surveying measurement resulting from the treatment of 3800 tons materials released out of the controlled area is described. The recycling of carbon steel for the production of waste containers made of cast iron is an important technique to reduce waste volume and has been performed with 1500 tons of steel scrap. Finally an outlook towards the intended decommissioning steps in the reactor building is given

  8. Decommissioning of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Government has offered British Energy plc for sale. This company operates the UK's AGR and PWR reactors, the most modern in the nuclear inventory. The older Magnox stations run by Magnox Electric plc will remain in the public sector. This paper briefly describes the history of development of the UK nuclear industry including details of the main differences between the three principal reactor types -Magnox, AGR and PWR stations. Current strategy, both physical and financial, for decommissioning at the end of their economic lives is presented. Arrangements are outlined for spent fuel management from the AGRs and PWR, including possible arrangements for the siting of dry stores for spent fuel prior to reprocessing. Information about methods for dealing with the liabilities of radioactive waste disposal and decommissioning in other countries is also included. (UK)

  9. International radiation safety recommendations on decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The IAEA Safety Requirements for decommissioning states that the regulatory body shall establish requirements for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, including conditions on the end points of decommissioning. One of the main important issues is that the operator shall be responsible for all aspects of safety of the facility during its lifetime and of the decommissioning activities until its completion. A mechanism for providing adequate financial resources shall be established to cover the costs of radioactive waste management and, in particular the cost of decommissioning. It shall be put in place before operation and shall be updated, as necessary. A safety assessment of the proposed decommissioning strategy shall be performed and its implementation shall not begin until approval has been received by the regulatory body. A decommissioning plan shall be prepared for each facility, to show that decommissioning can be accomplished safely. The decommissioning plan shall be reviewed regularly and shall be updated as required to reflect, in particular, changes in the facility or regulatory requirements, advances in technology and, finally, the needs of decommissioning operation. If it is intended to defer decommissioning, it shall be demonstrated in the final decommissioning plan that such an option is safe. Decontamination and dismantling techniques shall be chosen which minimizes waste and appropriate means shall be in place for safe managing any wastell be in place for safe managing any waste that might be generated during the decommissioning process. A quality assurance programme shall be established for the decommissioning process. Before a site may be released for unrestricted use, a survey shall be performed to demonstrate that the end point conditions, as established by regulatory body, have been met. If site cannot be released for unrestricted use, appropriate control shall be maintained to ensure protection of human health and environment. The IAEA Safety Guidance mainly addresses the radiological hazards resulting from the activities associated with the decommissioning of nuclear reactors, primarily with decommissioning after planned final shutdown. Many of the provisions are also applicable to decommissioning after an abnormal event that has resulted in serious facility damage or contamination. In this case, this Safety Guide may be used as a basis for developing special decommissioning provisions, although additional considerations will be necessary. Due to the short extension of the present paper, we will emphasize only on some critical tasks of decommissioning research reactors. The removal of nuclear fuel from the reactor installation at the end of its operational lifetime should preferably be performed as part of operations or as one of the initial activities in decommissioning. At the beginning of decommissioning, all readily removable radioactive sources (operational waste, sealed sources, liquids) should be removed for reuse, storage in approved location or disposal. The removal of sources will normally result in a significant reduction of the radiation hazards. The operating organization should have, or have access to, competent staff to cover areas such as: safety requirements of the licence, radiation protection, waste management, quality management etc. Personnel should be competent to perform their assigned work safely. The management and staff involved in the decommissioning project should be made aware of and trained, if necessary, in the methods of minimizing the waste generated in the tasks assigned. Appropriate levels of control and supervision should be provided to ensure safety. The organizational structure to be employed during decommissioning should be described in the decommissioning plan. In the description of the organizational structure, there should be a clear delineation of authorities and responsibilities amongst the various units. This is particularly necessary when the operating organization uses outside contractors. In this case all license conditions apply to the

  10. The decommissioning of Berkeley II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the decommissioning progress at the Magnox site at Berkeley in Gloucestershire.Throughout the work at Berkeley the emphasis has been on conducting decommissioning safely. This has been reflected in the progress of decommissioning starting with removal of the fuel from site and thus much greater than 99% of the radioactive inventory. The major radioactive hazard is the Intermediate Level Waste in the form of fuel element debris (graphite struts and extraneous magnox components removed to increase the packing density of fuel elements in flasks going to Sellafield), miscellaneous activated components, sludges and resins. Approximately 1500 m3 of such material exists and is stored in underground waste vaults on site. Work is underway to recover and encapsulate the waste in cement so rendering it 'passively safe'. All work on site is covered by a nuclear safety case which has a key objective of minimising the radiological exposures that could accrue to workers. Reflecting this an early decision has been taken to leave work on the Reactor Pressure Vessels themselves for several decades. Also important in protection of the workforce has been control of asbestos.Much material has been removed with redundant plant and equipment, but a programme of remediation in line with government legislation has been required to ensure personnel safety throughout the decommissioning period and into Care and Maintenance.In addition to health and safety matters the site approach to environmental issues has been consistent. Formally such standards as ISO 14001 have been adhered to and the appropriate certification maintained. At a working level the principles of reduce, reuse and recycle have been inculcated

  11. Decommissioning - The keys to success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) owns and operates five sites across the United Kingdom. The Winfrith site in Dorset was established in the late 1950's as a centre for development of prototype reactors. During its history, nine research reactors have operated on the site together with: a fuel fabrication facility; a post irradiation examination facility; radiochemistry laboratories, etc. The largest reactor, a 100MWe Steam Generating Heavy Water Reactor, was closed down in 1990 and the last research reactor was closed in 1995. Since the early 1990's the site has been undergoing a programme of progressive decommissioning with a view to releasing the site for alternative use unrestricted by the site's nuclear history. Key drivers for the design of the programme were safety, minimising adverse environmental effects, minimising costs and ensuring stakeholder support. One requirement of the stakeholders was to ensure that the site continued to provide high quality employment. This was successfully achieved by developing a Science and Technology Park on the nuclear site. Over 40 companies are now located on the Park providing over 1000 jobs. This paper will focus on the lessons learnt from over a decade of experience of decommissioning at Winfrith and will attempt to identify the 'keys to successful decommissioning'. These 'keys' will include: defining the site end-point; planning the programme; defining the commercial strategy; cost estimation; evaluationcial strategy; cost estimation; evaluation and management of risks; safety and environmental management; and stakeholder engagement. In particular, the paper will explore the very close relationship between: funding profiles; cost estimation; risk management and commercial strategy. It will show that these aspects of the programme cannot be considered separately. The paper will attempt to show that, with careful planning; decommissioning can be achieved safety and give good value for money to the funding authority. (author)

  12. 77 FR 8751 - Guidance for Decommissioning Planning During Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ...NRC-2011-0286] Guidance for Decommissioning Planning During Operations AGENCY...Regulatory Guide, DG-4014, ``Decommissioning Planning During Operations'' in...use in complying with the NRC's Decommissioning Planning Rule. DATES: Submit...

  13. 10 CFR 72.130 - Criteria for decommissioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Criteria for decommissioning. 72.130 Section 72.130...Criteria § 72.130 Criteria for decommissioning. The ISFSI or MRS must be designed for decommissioning. Provisions must be made to...

  14. 18 CFR 2.24 - Project decommissioning at relicensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Project decommissioning at relicensing. 2.24...Act § 2.24 Project decommissioning at relicensing. The Commission...statement of policy on project decommissioning at relicensing in...

  15. 26 CFR 1.88-1 - Nuclear decommissioning costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Nuclear decommissioning costs. 1.88-1 Section 1...Gross Income § 1.88-1 Nuclear decommissioning costs. (a) In general. ...provides that the amount of nuclear decommissioning costs directly or...

  16. Decommissioning of CANDU nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results of a detailed study of the various procedures and costs associated with decommissioning a CANDU reactor. The three internationally recognized 'stages' of decommissioning (mothballing, encasement, and dismantling) are discussed. It is concluded that decommissioning is possible with presently available technology, and that costs could be financed by only a marginal increase in the cost of electricity during the life of the reactor. The environmental impact would be no greater than that of any large construction project. (auth)

  17. Decommissioning high-level waste surface facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protective storage, entombment and dismantlement options of decommissioning a High-Level Waste Surface Facility (HLWSF) was investigated. A reference conceptual design for the facility was developed based on the designs of similar facilities. State-of-the-art decommissioning technologies were identified. Program plans and cost estimates for decommissioning the reference conceptual designs were developed. Good engineering design concepts were on the basis of this work identified

  18. Recovery of decommissioning and spent fuel charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is presented of the ANS meetings devoted to the problems of financing methods of power plant decommissioning. The NRC are seeking a mechanism which would provide reasonable assurance that funds would be available to pay the substantial cost of decommissioning. The cost of spent fuel disposal is also discussed; 360 $/KgHM (heavy metal) was the estimate in 1978 for transportation and storage in a geological repository. Comparisons are made with decommissioning and reprocessing in other countries. (U.K.)

  19. Preliminary nuclear decommissioning cost study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decommissioning of a nuclear power plant may involve one or more of three possible options: storage with surveillance (SWS), restricted site release (RSR), and unrestricted site use(USU). This preliminary study concentrates on the logistical, technical and cost aspects of decommissioning a multi-unit CANDU generating station using Pickering GS as the reference design. The procedure chosen for evaluation is: i) removal of the fuel and heavy water followed by decontamination prior to placing the station in SWS for thiry years; ii) complete dismantlement to achieve a USU state. The combination of SWS and USU with an interim period of surveillance allows for radioactive decay and hence less occupational exposure in achieving USU. The study excludes the conventional side of the station, assumes waste disposal repositories are available 1600 km away from the station, and uses only presently available technologies. The dismantlement of all systems except the reactor core can be accomplished using Ontario Hydro's current operating, maintenance and construction procedures. The total decommissioning period is spread out over approximately 40 years, with major activities concentrated in the first and last five years. The estimated dose would be approximately 1800 rem. Overall Pickering GS A costs would be $162,000,000 (1980 Canadian dollars)

  20. Decommissioning of naval nuclear ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the next decade the two major nuclear powers will each have to decommission more than 100 naval nuclear vessels, in particular submarines. The problems connected with this task is considered in this report. Firstly the size of the task is considered, i.e. the number of nuclear vessels that has to be decommissioned. Secondly the reactors of these vessels, their fuel elements, their power level, the number of reactors per vessel and the amount of radioactivity to be handled are discussed. Thirdly the decommissioning procedures, i.e. The removal of fuel from the vessels, the temporary storage of the reactor fuel near the base, and the cleaning and disposal of the reactor and the primary circuit components are reviewed. Finally alternative uses of the newer submarines are briefly considered. It should be emphasizes that much of the detailed information on which this report is based, may be of dubious nature, and that may to some extent affect the validity of the conclusions of the report. (au)

  1. Experience of TTR-1 decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toshiba Training Reactor-1 (TTR-1) was planned for improvement of technical level from the standpoint of nuclear reactor manufacturer, training of a nuclear engineer, and research of nuclear physics, radiochemistry, radiation shielding and others. TTR-1 was permitted for construction in May 1960, attained at the first criticality in March 1962 and has continued to operate over 40 years. TTR-1 was permanently shut down in March 2001, accomplishing the planned target. From the initial criticality to the shut down, total operating time amounts to 15,300 hours and 31 MWds. Decommissioning plan was submitted to the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology on August 8, 2001 and dismantling work was started. The spent fuel was transported outside the laboratory, and the first phase and the second phase dismantling work were completed at the end of February 2004. Some of the reactor equipments continue maintaining their performance, and waste materials generated from dismantling work are under the state of managed storage, until disposal of the dismantling radioactive waste becomes clear, when the third phase of dismantling work will be started. At the end of the third phase work, all the TTR-1 equipments are dismantled and all waste materials are removed from TTR-1, then decommissioning of TTR-1 is completed. The outline of the decommissioning plan, the actually performed dismantling work, and spent fuel transportation work is briefly described. (authorrtation work is briefly described. (author)

  2. European Decommissioning Academy (EDA). Ready to start

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slugen, Vladimir [Slovak University of Technology, Bratislava (Slovakia). Inst. of Nuclear and Physical Engineering

    2015-02-15

    According to analyses presented at EC meeting focused on decommissioning organized at 11 September 2012 in Brussels, it was stated that at least 2,000 new international experts for decommissioning will be needed in Europe up to 2025, which means about 150 each year. The article describes the European Decommissioning Academy (EDA) which is prepared for the first term in June 2015 in Slovakia. The main goal is a creation of new nuclear experts generation for decommissioning via the Academy, which will include lessons, practical exercises in laboratories as well as 2 days on-site training at NPP V-1 in Jaslovske Bohunice (Slovakia). Four days technical tour via most interesting European decommissioning facilities in Switzerland and Italy are planned as well. After the final exam, there is the option to continue in knowledge collection via participation at the 2nd Eastern and Central European Decommissioning (ECED) conference in Trnava (Slovakia). We would like to focus on VVER decommissioning issues because this reactor type is the most distributed design in the world and many of these units are actually in decommissioning process or will be decommissioned in the near future.

  3. Program of BN-350 reactor decommissioning activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BN-350 is being decommissioned according to and for fulfillment of a decision of the RK Government of April 22, 1999, /456/ 'About decommissioning of BN-350 in Aktau-City of Mangistau region', which states that BN-350 reactor is to be decommissioned and preserved for 50 years prior to its disassembling and burial. The BN-350 reactor plant with the fast reactor and a liquid-metal coolant was being operated from 1973 through 1999 year as a part of the productive complex of Mangishlak nuclear power combine factory. The reactor plant was intended for a steam supply to the turbogenerators and sea water desalination system. The design heat power of the reactor is 100 MWt. Since at the moment of making a decision on BN-350 reactor decommissioning there was no a developed draft on the decommissioning, the decommissioning activity is being planned step-by-step. The activity specified in the plan was started in July 1999. Its completion is scheduled in July 2001, when, as expected, the BN-350 decommissioning will be approved. Taking into account the fact that Kazakhstan is not adequately experienced in and does not possess the full range of equipment and technologies on NPP decommissioning, the progress of the activity on BN-350 reactor decommissioning depends, to a considerable extent, on international support in this field

  4. Decommissioning Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is predicted that the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant would happen in Korea since 2020 but the need of partial decommissioning and decontamination for periodic inspection and life extension still has been on an increasing trend and its domestic market has gradually been extended. Therefore, in this project we developed following several essential technologies as a decommissioning R and D. The measurement technology for in-pipe radioactive contamination was developed for measuring alpha/beta/gamma emitting nuclides simultaneously inside a in-pipe and it was tested into the liquid waste transfer pipe in KRR-2. And the digital mock-up system for KRR-1 and 2 was developed for choosing the best scenarios among several scenarios on the basis of various decommissioning information(schedule, waste volume, cost, etc.) that are from the DMU and the methodology of decommissioning cost estimation was also developed for estimating a research reactor's decommissioning cost and the DMU and the decommissioning cost estimation system were incorporated into the decommissioning information integrated management system. Finally the treatment and management technology of the irradiated graphites that happened after decommissioning KRR-2 was developed in order to treat and manage the irradiated graphites safely

  5. Decommissioning Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. W.; Kang, Y. A.; Kim, G. H. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    It is predicted that the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant would happen in Korea since 2020 but the need of partial decommissioning and decontamination for periodic inspection and life extension still has been on an increasing trend and its domestic market has gradually been extended. Therefore, in this project we developed following several essential technologies as a decommissioning R and D. The measurement technology for in-pipe radioactive contamination was developed for measuring alpha/beta/gamma emitting nuclides simultaneously inside a in-pipe and it was tested into the liquid waste transfer pipe in KRR-2. And the digital mock-up system for KRR-1 and 2 was developed for choosing the best scenarios among several scenarios on the basis of various decommissioning information(schedule, waste volume, cost, etc.) that are from the DMU and the methodology of decommissioning cost estimation was also developed for estimating a research reactor's decommissioning cost and the DMU and the decommissioning cost estimation system were incorporated into the decommissioning information integrated management system. Finally the treatment and management technology of the irradiated graphites that happened after decommissioning KRR-2 was developed in order to treat and manage the irradiated graphites safely.

  6. Research in decommissioning techniques for nuclear fuel cycle facilities in JNC. 7. JWTF decommissioning techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Ryuichiro; Ishijima, Noboru [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1999-02-01

    Decommissioning techniques such as radiation measuring and monitoring, decontamination, dismantling and remote handling in the world were surveyed to upgrading technical know-how database for decommissioning of Joyo Waste Treatment Facility (JWTF). As the result, five literatures for measuring and monitoring techniques, 14 for decontamination and 22 for dismantling feasible for JWTF decommissioning were obtained and were summarized in tables. On the basis of the research, practical applicability of those techniques to decommissioning of JWTF was evaluated. This report contains brief surveyed summaries related to JWTF decommissioning. (H. Itami)

  7. Decommissioning strategies and programme developments of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As of August 2003, there are 52 nuclear power plants in operation producing approximately 35% electricity of total supply in Japan. The Japan Atomic Power Company decided to shutdown the Tokai-1 Power Station (Gas cooled reactor, 166 MWe) at the end of March in 1998 due to the economical reasons such as increase in operation and repair costs. The Fugen reactor, which is a prototype of an advanced thermal reactor, also was shutdown at the end of March in 2003 because of the completion of its initial objectives. In order to ensure stable supply of nuclear energy in the future, decommissioning of retired nuclear facilities is indispensable in Japan for securing sites for the next facilities. Therefore, early dismantling of nuclear power plant facilities after shutdown is required as Japanese basic policy on decommissioning. Based on this basic policy, research and development programs have actively been conducted in both government organizations and private sectors in recent years. Regulatory systems for decommissioning nuclear facilities including waste managements have progressed in the regulatory side taking these situations into account. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities is now getting one of the important issues of nuclear power in Japan. This paper describes the strategies and programs of the decommissioning in Japan. The paper has the following sections: 1. Introduction; 2. National policy on decommissioning; 3. Regulation; 4. Funding; 5. Decommissioning progrtion; 4. Funding; 5. Decommissioning programs; 5.1. JPDR Decommissioning Project; 5.2. Tokai-1 Power Station Decommissioning Project; 5.3. Fugen Decommissioning Project; 6. Technology Development; 7. Radioactive waste management

  8. Pre-decommissioning, during decommissioning, and post-decommissioning radiological characterization of shutdown research reactors and their sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this lecture is to provide guidance to national governments, regulatory bodies, and operators for the timely and safe decommissioning of research reactors and small nuclear facilities. The emphasis of this lecture will be on characterization in support of decommissioning the facility. It is understood that each facility brings with it a unique set of problems itself. This lecture presents a general overview of the process and some important aspects of the radiological characterization process before, during, and after decommissioning is completed. A graded approach to the effort and resources needed to address this aspect of a decommissioning project is recommended, taking into account the associated risks and hazards. A realistic decommissioning plan must be built upon taking adequate account of the facility radiological conditions

  9. Decommissioning strategy and waste management in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The commercial nuclear power plants in Sweden will eventually be shut down and decommissioned. This paper describes the strategy in planning these future activities. It also describes the cost calculations and the funding mechanism. The paper contains the following sections: Nuclear power plants In Sweden; Decommissioning strategies; Waste management and availability of repositories; Cost calculations and funding; The current financing act

  10. The decommissioning of light water reactors - experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than ten nuclear power plants in Germany have been decommissioned or are under dismantling. Objectives, strategies, preparatory work, licensing, technical dismantling and safety considerations are explained from the utility point of view, using the Stade (KKS) decommissioning as an example. Challenges with respect to characterisation, logistics and economy are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Meeting the challenge of BNFL's decommissioning programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews the co-ordinated and integrated programme, adopted by BNFL, in the decommissioning of its radioactive plants. It examines BNFL's approach to the challenges posed by the eventual decommissioning of its 120 plants, its overall strategies, the constraints and the progress achieved to date, drawing on real experience from the 22 completed projects and the 24 projects currently underway. (author)

  12. Survey of decontamination and decommissioning techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reports and articles on decommissioning have been reviewed to determine the current technology status and also attempt to identify potential decommissioning problem areas. It is concluded that technological road blocks, which limited decommissioning facilities in the past have been removed. In general, techniques developed by maintenance in maintaining the facility have been used to decommission facilities. Some of the more promising development underway which will further simplify decommissioning activities are: electrolytic decontamination which simplifies some decontaminating operations; arc saw and vacuum furnace which reduce the volume of metallic contaminated material by a factor of 10; remotely operated plasma torch which reduces personnel exposure; and shaped charges, water cannon and rock splitters which simplify concrete removal. Areas in which published data are limited are detailed costs identifying various components included in the total cost and also the quantity of waste generated during the decommissioning activities. With the increased awareness of decommissioning requirements as specified by licensing requirements, design criteria for new facilities are taking into consideration final decommissioning of buildings. Specific building design features will evolve as designs are evaluated and implemented

  13. Project gnome decontamination and decommissioning plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document presents the operational plan for conducting the final decontamination and decommissioning work at the site of the first U.S. nuclear detonation designed specifically for peaceful purposes and the first underground event on the Plowshare Program to take place outside the Nevada Test Site. The plan includes decontamination and decommissioning procedures, radiological guidelines, and the NV concept of operations

  14. Brief Assessment of Krsko NPP Decommissioning Costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of the paper gives a brief description of decommissioning scenarios and models of financing the decommissioning of NPPs. The second part contains a review of decommissioning costs for certain PWR plants with a brief description of methods used for that purpose. The third part of the paper the authors dedicated to the assessment of decommissioning costs for Krsko NPP. It does not deal with ownership relations and obligations ensuing from them. It starts from the simple point that decommissioning is an structure of the decommissioning fund is composed of three basic cost items of which the first refers to radioactive waste management, the second to storage and disposal of the spent nuclear fuel and the third to decommissioning itself. The assessment belongs to the category of preliminary activities and as such has a limited scope and meaning. Nevertheless, the authors believe that it offers a useful insight into the basic costs that will burden the decommissioning fund of Krsko NPP. (author)

  15. Decommissioning of Russian research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the most of our research facilities were built and put in operation more than 30 years ago there had been neither requirements no regulations concerning their future decommissioning (D and D). And due to that fact nobody thought of that in the initial designs of these facilities. The situation changed when in 1994 a top-level safety standard 'Safety Provision for Safety of Research Reactors' was issued by Gosatomnadzor of Russia with a special chapter 7, devoted to D and D issues. Unfortunately, it was just one page of requirements pertaining RR D and D in general terms and was not specific. Only in 2001 Gosatomnadzor of Russia developed and issued a more specific standard 'Rules for Safety Decommissioning of Nuclear Research Facilities'. From the total number of 85 Nuclear Research Facilities, including 34 research reactors, 36 critical assemblies and 15 subcritical assemblies, we have now 7 facilities under decommissioning. The situation is inevitably changing over the time. In the end of 2003 the decision was made to permanently shutdown two RR: AM, graphite type with channels, 15 MBt; BR-10, LMFR type, 10 MBt, and to start preparatory work for their future decommissioning, starting from 2005. It needs to be mentioned that from this list we have 6 reactors with which we face many difficulties in developing decommissioning technologies, namely: for TVR reactor: handling of heavy water and high radiation field in the core; for MR reactor: very complex reactor wie; for MR reactor: very complex reactor with many former radioactive spills, which is required a careful and expensive D and D work; AM: graphite utilization problem; BR-10: a problem of coolant poisoned with other heavy metals (like lead, bismuth); IBR-30: the fuel cannot be removed from the core prior the D and D project starts; RG-1M: location is above Arctic Circle, problem of transfer of irradiated parts of the reactor. The decision was made to bury then on the site thus creating a shallow-land radwaste storage facility. The established D and D standard explains in more or less detail the procedures to be accomplished before the actual decommissioning process can start. Basically these are: remove fuel from the reactor core to an interim SF storage facility at the reactor; after specified time of cooling, remove the fuel from the reactor building; drain coolant by using operational manual and remove it from the reactor building; conduct Engineering and Radiation Monitoring of the facility to get initial data on radiation conditions; Develop a Principal D and D Programme; develop a D and D documentation; develop a D and D SAR. Only after these procedures and documents have been accomplished and prepared an operating organization may apply for a D and D license to be issued by Gosatomnadzor of Russia. When a D and D project is fully accomplished by an operating organization the final results/conditions at the former RR site shall be evidenced by a special commission, including a Gosatomnadzor of Russia representative. A Final Report on D and D with the radiation data achieved in the end of its implementation shall be written and submitted to Gosatomnadzor of Russia for review and making decision on taking a research facility out of regulatory control

  16. AREVA decommissioning strategy and programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, A. [AREVA NC - Nuclear Site Value Development Business Unit., 75 - Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    As with any industrial installation, a nuclear facility has an operating life that requires accounting for its shutdown. In compliance with its sustainable development commitments, AREVA accounts this via its own decommissioning resources to value and make sites fit for further use. These capabilities guarantee the reversibility of the nuclear industry. Thus, the nuclear site value development constitutes an important activity for AREVA, which contributes to the acceptance of nuclear in line with the AREVA continuous policy of sustainable development which is to be fully responsible from the creation, during the operation, to the dismantling of its facilities in all respects with safety, local acceptance and environment. AREVA has already performed a large variety of operation during the life-time of its installations such as heavy maintenance, equipment replacement, upgrading operation. Nowadays, a completely different dimension is emerging with industrial decommissioning operations of nuclear fuel cycle installations: enrichment gaseous diffusion plant, fuel assembly plants, recycling and reprocessing facilities. These activities constitute a major know-how for AREVA. For this reason, the group decided, beginning of 2008, to gather 4 projects in one business unit called Nuclear Site Value Development - a reprocessing plant UP2 400 on AREVA La Hague site, a reprocessing plant UP1 on AREVA Marcoule site, a MOX fuel plant on Cadarache and 2 sites (SICN Veurey and Annecy) that handled GCR fuel fabrication). The main objectives are to enhance the feed back, to contribute to performance improvements, to value professionals and to put innovation forward. The following article will describe in a first part the main decommissioning programmes managed by AREVA NC Nuclear Site Value Development Business Unit. The second part will deal with strategic approaches. A more efficient organization with integration of the supply chain and innovation will be part of the main drivers. (authors)

  17. The IAEA Safety Regime for Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: The International Atomic Energy Agency is developing an international framework for decommissioning of nuclear facilities that consists of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management, and a hierarchy of Safety Standards applicable to decommissioning. The Joint Convention entered into force on 18 June 2001 and as of December 2001 had been ratified by 27 IAEA Member States. The Joint Convention contains a number of articles dealing with planning for, financing, staffing and record keeping for decommissioning. The Joint Convention requires Contracting Parties to apply the same operational radiation protection criteria, discharge limits and criteria for controlling unplanned releases during decommissioning that are applied during operations. The IAEA has issued Safety Requirements document and three Safety Guides applicable to decommissioning of facilities. The Safety Requirements document, WS-R-2, Pre-disposal Management of Radioactive Waste, including Decommissioning, contains requirements applicable to regulatory control, planning and funding, management of radioactive waste, quality assurance, and environmental and safety assessment of the decommissioning process. The three Safety Guides are WS-G-2.1, Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Plants and Research Reactors, WS-G-2.2, Decommissioning of Medical, Industrial and Research Facilities, an WS-G-2.4, Decommissioning of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities. They contain guidance on how to meet the requirements of WS-R-2 applicable to decommissioning of specific types of facilities. These Standards contain only general requirements and guidance relative to safety assessment and do not contain details regarding the content of the safety case. More detailed guidance will be published in future Safety Reports currently in preparation within the Waste Safety Section of the IAEA. Because much material arising during the decommissioning of nuclear facilities may be only slightly contaminated with radioactivity, an important matter for decommissioning of facilities is the level of contamination, which may be released from regulatory control. This issue is being addressed in a Safety Guide being prepared by the IAEA dealing with the Scope of Regulatory Control. This Safety Guide will attempt to rationalise levels of radioactivity subject to exclusion, exemption, discharge, recycle, contained in commodities, and released from regulatory control, taking into consideration levels of radioactivity in naturally occurring radioactive materials. This Safety Guide is scheduled to be completed late in 2002 or in 2003. The IAEA is organizing, in cooperation with the Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, an International Conference on Safe Decommissioning for Nuclear Activities. The Conference will take place 14 to 18 October 2002 in Berlin, Germany

  18. Decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this coordinated research programme (CRP) were to promote the exchange of information on the practical experience by Member States in decontamination and decommissioning. The scope of the programme included several areas of decontamination and decommissioning rather than focusing on a single aspect of it, in line with recommendation of the experts who participated in Phase 1 of the CRP. Experts felt that this format would generate better awareness of decontamination and decommissioning and would be more effective vehicle for the exchange of information by stimulating broader discussion on all aspects of decontamination and decommissioning. Special emphasis was given to the development of principles and methodologies to facilitate decommissioning and to the new methods and techniques for optimization of decontamination and disassembly of equipment. Refs, figs, tabs

  19. Asbestos removal in Shippingport Decommissioning Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) is being performed under contract to the DOE by the General Electric Company and its integrated subcontractor, MK-Ferguson Company, as the Decommissioning Operations Contractor (DOC). During the planning of this project, it was found that asbestos was the primary insulating material which was used on the nuclear steam supply system and the plant heating system. The original decommissioning plan required that each subcontractor remove the asbestos from the particular component(s) they had to remove. However, since removal of the radioactivity-contaminated asbestos would require special procedures and worker training, the original decommissioning plan was modified so that a single subcontractor removed all of the asbestos prior to other decommissioning tasks. IT Corporation was selected as the asbestos removal subcontractor. Their approach to the project is described

  20. Safe, efficient and cost-effective decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 6-10 September 2004, an international NEA workshop was held in Rome on 'Safe, Efficient and Cost-effective Decommissioning'. The workshop was a follow-on to the Rome workshop of May 1999 on regulatory aspects of decommissioning. The scope was broader, however, in order to enable experts to determine progress in decommissioning since then and to formulate proposals for future international co-operation in this field. The chairman of the workshop was Margaret Federline, Deputy Director of the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards at the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The meeting format involved presentations from key experts followed by extensive discussion. In all areas covered during the workshop, future challenges were identified as well as suggested solutions. The workshop included the following main sessions: international stock-taking; the Italian decommissioning context; disposal and materials management; techniques; management of transition and change throughout decommissioning; funding and costs; regulation and safety. (authors)

  1. Decommissioning Project for the Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2008, tried to complete the whole decommissioning project of KRR-1 and KRR-2 and preparing work for memorial museum of KRR-1 reactor. Now the project is delayed for 3 months because of finding unexpected soil contamination around facility and treatment of. To do final residual radioactivity assessment applied by MARSSIM procedure. Accumulated decommissioning experiences and technologies will be very usefully to do decommissioning other nuclear related facility. At the decommissioning site of the uranium conversion plant, the decontamination of the dismantled carbon steel waste are being performed and the lagoon 1 sludge waste is being treated this year. The technologies and experiences obtained from the UCP dismantling works are expected to apply to other fuel cycle facilities decommissioning. The lagoon sludge treatment technology is the first applied technology in the actual field and it is expected that this technology could be applied to other country

  2. Decommissioning of nuclear research facilities at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), two research reactors (KRR-1 and KRR-2) and one uranium conversion plant (UCP) are being decommissioned. The main reason of the decommissioning was the diminishing utilities; the start of a new research reactor, HANARO, and the higher conversion cost than that of international market for the UCP. Another reason of the decommissioning was prevention from spreading radioactive materials due to the deterioration of the facilities. Two separate projects have already been started and are carried out as planned. The KAERI selected several strategies, considering the small scale of the projects, the internal standards in KAERI, and the future prospects of the decommissioning projects in Korea. In this paper, the current status of the decommissioning including the waste management and the technology development will be explained

  3. Shippingport shows costs of PWR decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning of the Shippingport nuclear power station commences in September 1985 and is due for completion in April 1990. After 25 years of operation as a pioneering power plant, Shippingport will now become the most significant reactor decommissioning operation so far anywhere in the world. It is close enough to a full scale commercial nuclear power station to give hard data on costs and relevant experience on the practical implications of decommissioning. The operating history of Shippingport is summarised, then the decommissioning programme is tabulated. The two aims of the decommissioning are; no primary system decontamination and one-piece removal of the reactor pressure vessel. These are discussed. The estimated cost is given. (U.K.)

  4. Measuring and reporting on decommissioning progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the challenges facing AECL, as well as other organizations charged with the responsibility of decommissioning nuclear facilities, is the means by which to measure and report on decommissioning progress to various audiences which, in some cases, may only have a peripheral knowledge or understanding of the complexities associated with the decommissioning process. The reporting and measurement of decommissioning progress is important for a number of reasons, i.e., It provides a vehicle by which to effectively communicate the nature of the decommissioning process; It ensures that stakeholders and shareholders are provided with a transparent and understandable means for assessing value for money; It provides a means by which to integrate the planning, measurement, and operational aspects of decommissioning One underlying reason behind the challenge of reporting decommissioning progress lies in the fact that decommissioning programs are generally executed over periods of time that far exceed those generally associated with typical design and build projects. For example, a decommissioning program could take decades to complete in which case progress on the order of a few percent in any one year might be typical. However, such progress may appear low compared to that seen with more typical projects that can be completed in a matter of years. As a consequence, AECL undertook to develop a system by which to measure decommissioning progress in a straightforward, meaningfug progress in a straightforward, meaningful, and understandable fashion. The system is not rigorously objective, and there are subjective aspects that are necessitated by the need to keep the system readily understandable. It is also important to note that while the system is simple in concept, there is, nonetheless, significant effort involved in generating and updating the parameters used as input, and in the actual calculations. (author)

  5. The wider perspective of decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As we come upon the time of a 'full earth', we must think more about the consequences of our various economic ventures, especially when these consequences are far away or long term. We have come to realize the importance of this approach as we have expanded our use of nuclear power, but it is applicable as well with all manner of derelict non-nuclear facilities. Decommissioning, then, is a generic issue. The earliest focus of decommissioning attention rightly stresses nuclear power plants because of the hazards, scale, expense, and public connection, but this focus must also be wide enough to encompass non-nuclear facilities such as conventional power plants, offshore drilling platforms, disused mines, and all manner and variety of other remnants as well. Although radioactivity sets nuclear installations apart from all others, non-radioactive equipment nevertheless burdens the landscape. This may not be seen to be as important in a large country such as the USA, but in smaller countries such as the United Kingdom all resources must be husbanded wisely and this includes the safe sequential use of its land and offshore resources. Such considerations are common with all types of resource development and lead us quite naturally to the growing need for 'life-cycle' planning in all our endeavours. (author)

  6. The decommissioning NPP A-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Project of decommissioning NPP A-1 is split into 4 main groups of tasks. Tasks in group 1 are focused on the solution of selected problems that have immediate impact on the environment. It is mainly the solution of problems in the building of cleaning station of wastage water and in the building with underground storage tanks for wastage water and solid radwaste, including the prevention of wash-out and penetration of contaminated soil from these buildings into surface and underground waters. A part of addressing these tasks is a controlled of generated radwaste-predominatly sludge with various physical and chemical properties. Tasks in group 2- following the removal of spent fuel-are focused on the management of all radwaste in the long-term storage facility, in the short-term storage facility, equipment of transport and technology part, equipment in hot cells. Tasks in group 3 are focused on development of technology procedures for treatment and conditioning of sludge, contaminated soils and concrete crush, saturated ionexes and ash from incineration facility of the Bohunice radwaste treatment and conditioning complex. Tasks in group 4 are focused on the methodology. And technical support for particular activities applicable during decommissioning NPP

  7. Decontamination Concept for Decommissioning (DCD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Once a plant reaches the end of its life cycle, one of the most challenging phases begins: decommissioning and dismantlement. During this phase decontamination is a key step for reducing the personnel radiation exposure and minimizing rad waste amounts. In the past decades, AREVA has optimized its Decontamination Concept for Decommissioning (DCD). It can be applied in plants from all main constructors and designs, with Full System Decontamination (FSD) being a major topic. During the decontamination, the dose rate causing oxide deposits inside the primary circuit are dissolved, the dissolved activity and corrosion products are then fixed on ion exchangers for safe disposal, and the organic acids used are decomposed in-situ in a UV-catalyzed reaction so that they do not contribute to the amount of waste generated. Since with a FSD the complete primary circuit is treated as is, with only minor interventions required for connecting the decontamination equipment in charge of chemical injection, decomposition and water purification, dose exposure is minimized during this operation. Subsequent dismantlement activities can then take place in an environment with far lower dose and contamination. AREVA's DCD is presented, also including practical information such as time requirements for application and waste volumes to be expected. An overview of the experience accumulated and results achieved is also provided as proof of concept.

  8. Uranium hexafluoride production plant decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research - IPEN is a research and development institution, located in a densely populated area, in the city of Sao Paulo. The nuclear fuel cycle was developed from the Yellow Cake to the enrichment and reconversion at IPEN. After this phase, all the technology was transferred to private enterprises and to the Brazilian Navy (CTM/SP). Some plants of the fuel cycle were at semi-industrial level, with a production over 20 kg/h. As a research institute, IPEN accomplished its function of the fuel cycle, developing and transferring technology. With the necessity of space for the implementation of new projects, the uranium hexafluoride (UF6) production plant was chosen, since it had been idle for many years and presented potential leaking risks, which could cause environmental aggression and serious accidents. This plant decommission required accurate planning, as this work had not been carried out in Brazil before, for this type of facility, and there were major risks involving gaseous hydrogen fluoride aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid (HF) both highly corrosive. Evaluations were performed and special equipment was developed, aiming to prevent leaking and avoid accidents. During the decommissioning work, the CNEN safety standards were obeyed for the whole operation. The environmental impact was calculated, showing to be not relevant.The radiation doses, after the work, were within the limits for the public and the area was released for new projects. (author)

  9. The decommissioning plan of the Nuclear Ship MUTSU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the review about the decommissioning plan and present state of the Nuclear Ship Mutsu. The decommissioning of the Mutsu is carried out by Removal and Isolation method. The procedure of the decommissioning works is presented in this paper. The decommissioning works started in April, 1992 and it takes about four years after her last experimental voyage. (author)

  10. Government Assigns New Supervisory Task. Safe Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the Government decided to shutdown one of the two Barsebaeck reactors in February of 1998, it presented SKI with a task that came much earlier than expected; the supervision of the decommissioning of a reactor. As a result of proposals presented in Parliament, SKI began the formulation of a long-term strategy in 1997 for the inspection of a nuclear plant during the decommissioning process. As a preliminary task, SKI started a research programme dealing with the potential risks associated with the transition from normal operations through shutdown to final deconstruction of the power plant. Emphasis was laid on safety culture issues and on questions of organization, as opposed to an earlier stress on the purely technical aspects of decommissioning. After a long period of uncertainty, following much discussion, in July 1998 a Government decision was finally reached to shutdown the first reactor at Barsebaeck. This was carried out in November 1999. It is still uncertain as to when the other reactor will be decommissioned; a decision is expected at the earliest in 2004. This uncertainty, resulting from the prolonged decision making process, could be detrimental to the safety culture on the site; motivation could diminish, and key personnel could be lost. Decommissioning is a new phase in the life cycle of a plant, giving rise to new inspection issues of supervision. During the period of uncertainty, while awaiting SKI has identified ten key areas, dealing with the santified ten key areas, dealing with the safety culture of the organization, in connection with the decommissioning of Barsebaeck 1. 1. Obtaining and retaining staff competence during decommissioning; 2. Sustaining organizational memory; 3. Identifying key organizational functions and management skills that are critical during the transition from operations to decommissioning. 4. Sustaining organizational viability and accountability for decommissioning; 5. Sustaining motivation and trust in management of dismantlement; 6. Overseeing contractors; 7. Decommissioning multi-unit sites when one unit continues to operate; 8. Delaying dismantling of decommissioning nuclear power plants; 9. Establishing organizational processes and control systems to identify and address emerging as well as known safety issues; 10. Determining and communicating the level of risk during decommissioning. The list of safety issues that can be linked to safety culture, and questions of organisation, illustrates the scope of supervision that must be performed during decommissioning of a nuclear power plant. Given the myriad of complex activities taking place, this focus is a useful way to assist the regulator to articulate concerns to the power plant management in terms of links to potential safety problems

  11. Planning of the BN-350 reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental and commercial BN-350 NPP equipped with a fast neutron sodium cooled reactor is located in Kazakhstan near the Aktau city on the Caspian Sea coast. It was commissioned in 1973 and intended for weapon-grade plutonium production and as stream supply to a water desalination facility and the turbines of the Mangyshlak Atomic Energy Complex. Taking into account technical, financial and political issues, the Government of Kazakhstan enacted the Decree no. 456 'On Decommissioning of the Reactor BN-350 in the Aktau City of the Mangystau Region'. Because the decision on reactor decommissioning was adopted before the end of scheduled operation (2003), the plan to decommission the BN-350 reactor has not yet been developed. To determine the activities required for ensuring reactor safety and in preparation for decommission in the period prior, the development and ensuring approval by the Republic of Kazakhstan Government of the decommissioning plan, a 'Plan of Priority Actions for BN-350 Reactor Decommissioning' was developed and approved. Actions provided for in the plan include the following: Development of BN-350 Reactor Decommissioning Plan; Accident prevention during the period of transition; Unloading nuclear fuel from reactor and draining the coolant from the heat exchange circuits. Decommission is defined as a complex of administrative and technical actions taken to allow the removal of some or all of regulatory controls over a nuclear facility. These actontrols over a nuclear facility. These actions involve decontamination, dismantling and removal of radioactive materials, waste, components and structures. They are carried out to achieve a progressive and systematic reduction in radiological hazards and are undertaken on the basis of planning and assessment in order to ensure safety decommissioning operations. In accordance with the decision of Kazakhstan Government, three basic stages for BN-350 reactor decommissioning are envisaged: First stage - Placement of BN-350 into long-term storage SAFSTOR; Second stage - SAFSTOR; Third stage - Dismantling (partial or complete). According to international experience, the decommissioning of a nuclear reactor is an extremely expensive activity. Therefore, Kazakhstan organizations involved in the decommissioning are trying as much as possible to draw from the experience, technologies and financial and technical support of potential donor countries, In order ti achieve this goal, Kazakhstan, with the financial and technical support of the US, EC and Japan, is developing a BN-350 Decommissioning Plan for international peer review. The main objective of the plan is identify areas of potential technical support by technologically developed countries

  12. Planning the Decommissioning of Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Czech Republic, three research nuclear reactors are in operation. According to the valid legislation, preliminary decommissioning plans have been prepared for all research reactors in the Czech Republic. The decommissioning plans shall be updated at least every 5 years. Decommissioning funds have been established and financial resources are regularly deposited. Current situation in planning of decommissioning of research reactors in the Czech Republic, especially planning of decommissioning of the LVR-15 research reactor is described in this paper. There appeared new circumstances having wide impact on the decommissioning planning of the LVR-15 research reactor: (1) Shipment of spent fuel to the Russian Federation for reprocessing and (2) preparation of processing of radioactive waste from reconstruction of the VVR-S research reactor (now LVR-15 research reactor). The experience from spent fuel shipment to the Russian Federation and from the process of radiological characterization and processing of radioactive waste from reconstruction of the VVR-S research reactor (now the LVR-15 research reactor) and the impact on the decommissioning planning is described in this paper. (author)

  13. Waste management in decommissioning projects at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two decommissioning projects are carried out at the KAERI (Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute), one for the Korea research reactors, KRR-1 and KRR-2, and another for the uranium conversion plant (UCP). The concept of the management of the wastes from the decommissioning sites was reviewed with a relation of the decommissioning strategies, technologies for the treatment and the decontamination, and the characteristics of waste. All the liquid waste generated from KRR-1 and KRR-2 decommissioning site is evaporated by a solar evaporation facility and all the liquid waste from the UCP is treated together with lagoon sludge waste. The solid wastes from the decommissioning sites are categorized into three groups; not contaminated, restricted releasable and radioactive waste. The not-contaminated waste will be reused and/or disposed at an industrial disposal site, and the releasable waste is stored for the future disposal at the KAERI. The radioactive waste is packed in containers, and will be stored at the decommissioning sites till they are sent to a national repository site. The reduction of the radioactive solid waste is one of the strategies for the decommissioning projects and could be achieved by the repeated decontamination. By the achievement of the minimization strategy, the amount of radioactive waste was reduced and the disposal cost will be reduced, but the cost for manpower, for direct materials and for administration was increasedion was increased

  14. An air quality survey and emissions inventory at Aberdeen Harbour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, I. L.; Rosser, D. P.; Meneses, C. A.

    A network of 10 stations, with passive sampling for VOCs (including benzene), NO 2, and SO 2, over 2-week periods, grab sampling for CO, and 48-h pumped sampling for PM 10, was set up to make an air quality survey for 12 months around Aberdeen Harbour. Benzene, CO, SO 2 and PM 10 were always well below the AQS target values. However, NO 2 frequently showed a pronounced gradient across the harbour reaching its highest concentrations at the city end, indicating that the road traffic was the principal source of the pollution. This was backed up by the predominance of aromatics in the VOCs in the city centre, derived from petrol engined vehicles, compared to the predominance of alkanes and alkenes around the docks, derived from diesel engined heavy trucks and possibly ships. Black carbon on the PM 10 filters also showed a gradient with highest levels in the city centre. It is proposed that for such surveys in future, NO 2 and black carbon would be the two most informative parameters. This emissions inventory has shown first, that trucks contribute very little to the total, and second, that the ro-ro ferries are the major contributors as they burn light fuel oil while the oil platform supply vessels burn low-sulphur marine gas oil with around 0.1% S. When the whole picture of the emissions from the city is considered, the emissions from the harbour constitute only a small part.

  15. Environmental geophysics, offshore Bush River Peninsula, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S.F.; Kuecher, G.J.; Davies, B.E. [and others

    1995-11-01

    Geophysical studies in shallow waters adjacent to the Bush River Peninsula, Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, have delineated the extent of waste disposal sites and established a hydrogeologic framework, which may control contaminant transport offshore. These studies indicate that during the Pleistocene Epoch, alternating stands of high and low sea levels resulted in a complex pattern of shallow channel-fill deposits around the Bush River Peninsula. Ground-penetrating radar studies reveal paleochannels greater than 50 ft deep. Some of the paleochannels are also imaged with marine seismic reflection. Conductivity highs measured with the EM-31 are also indicative of paleochannels. This paleochannel depositional system is environmentally significant because it may control the shallow groundwater flow regime beneath the peninsula. Magnetic, conductivity, and side-scan sonar anomalies outline anthropogenic anomalies in the study area. On the basis of geophysical data, underwater anthropogenic materials do exist in some isolated areas, but large-scale offshore dumping has not occurred in the area studied.

  16. Bioeconomic model and selection indices in Aberdeen Angus cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, G S; Braccini Neto, J; Oaigen, R P; Cardoso, F F; Cobuci, J A; Kern, E L; Campos, L T; Bertoli, C D; McManus, C M

    2014-08-01

    A bioeconomic model was developed to calculate economic values for biological traits in full-cycle production systems and propose selection indices based on selection criteria used in the Brazilian Aberdeen Angus genetic breeding programme (PROMEBO). To assess the impact of changes in the performance of the traits on the profit of the production system, the initial values ??of the traits were increased by 1%. The economic values for number of calves weaned (NCW) and slaughter weight (SW) were, respectively, R$ 6.65 and R$ 1.43/cow/year. The selection index at weaning showed a 44.77% emphasis on body weight, 14.24% for conformation, 30.36% for early maturing and 10.63% for muscle development. The eighteen-month index showed emphasis of 77.61% for body weight, 4.99% for conformation, 11.09% for early maturing, 6.10% for muscle development and 0.22% for scrotal circumference. NCW showed highest economic impact, and SW had important positive effect on the economics of the production system. The selection index proposed can be used by breeders and should contribute to greater profitability. PMID:24438200

  17. Depleted uranium risk assessment at Aberdeen Proving Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Science Group at Los Alamos and the Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) are assessing the risk of depleted uranium (DU) testing at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG). Conceptual and mathematical models of DU transfer through the APG ecosystem have been developed in order to show the mechanisms by which DU migrates or remains unavailable to different flora and fauna and to humans. The models incorporate actual rates of DU transfer between different ecosystem components as much as possible. Availability of data on DU transport through different pathways is scarce and constrains some of the transfer rates that can be used. Estimates of transfer rates were derived from literature sources and used in the mass-transfer models when actual transfer rates were unavailable. Objectives for this risk assessment are (1) to assess if DU transports away from impact areas; (2) to estimate how much, if any, DU migrates into Chesapeake Bay; (3) to determine if there are appreciable risks to the ecosystems due to DU testing; (4) to estimate the risk to human health as a result of DU testing

  18. Decommissioning activities for Salaspils research reactor - 59055

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In May 1995, the Latvian government decided to shut down the Salaspils Research Reactor (SRR). The reactor is out of operation since July 1998. A conceptual study for the decommissioning of SRR has been carried out by Noell-KRC-Energie- und Umwelttechnik GmbH at 1998-1999. The Latvian government decided to start the direct dismantling to 'green field' in October 26, 1999. The upgrade of decommissioning and dismantling plan was performed in 2003-2004 years, which change the main goal of decommissioning to the 'brown field'. The paper deals with the SRR decommissioning experience during 1999-2010. The main decommissioning stages are discussed including spent fuel and radioactive wastes management. The legal aspects and procedures for decommissioning of SRR are described in the paper. It was found, that the involvement of stakeholders at the early stages significantly promotes the decommissioning of nuclear facility. Radioactive waste management's main efforts were devoted to collecting and conditioning of 'historical' radioactive wastes from different storages outside and inside of reactor hall. All radioactive materials (more than 96 tons) were conditioned in concrete containers for disposal in the radioactive wastes repository 'Radons' at Baldone site. The dismantling of contaminated and activated components of SRR systems is discussed in paper. The cementation of dismantled radioactive wastes in concrete containers is discussed. Infrastructure of SRR, including persoed. Infrastructure of SRR, including personal protective and radiation measurement equipment, for decommissioning purposes was upgraded significantly. Additional attention was devoted to the free release measurement's technique. The certified laboratory was installed for supporting of all decommissioning activities. All non-radioactive equipments and materials outside of reactor buildings were released for clearance and dismantled for reusing or conventional disposing. Weakly contaminated materials from reactor hall were collected, decontaminated and removed for clearance measurements. (authors)

  19. Studies on the decommissioning cost of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study analyzes the existing literature on decommissioning costs abroad systematically, giving special attention to the OECD member states. Then, the feasible range of decommissioning costs obtained by the analysis is compared to the decommissioning fund being raised by the country's only electric utility, KEPCO. This study concludes that the decommissioning fund is being raised enough to cover future expenses for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants. 1 fig., 13 tabs., 8 refs. (Author)

  20. 30 CFR 250.1704 - When must I submit decommissioning applications and reports?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... false When must I submit decommissioning applications and reports? ...THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Decommissioning Activities General § 250.1704 When must I submit decommissioning applications and reports?...

  1. 30 CFR 285.900 - Who must meet the decommissioning obligations in this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Who must meet the decommissioning obligations in this subpart? 285.900...FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Decommissioning Decommissioning Obligations and Requirements §...

  2. 30 CFR 285.904 - Can I request a departure from the decommissioning requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...false Can I request a departure from the decommissioning requirements? 285.904 Section 285...FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Decommissioning Decommissioning Obligations and Requirements §...

  3. Stakeholder involvement in decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant numbers of nuclear facilities will need to be decommissioned in the coming decades. In this context, NEA member countries are placing increasing emphasis on the involvement of stakeholders in the associated decision procedures. This study reviews decommissioning experience with a view to identifying stakeholder concerns and best practice in addressing them. The lessons learnt about the end of the facility life cycle can also contribute to better foresight in siting and building new facilities. This report will be of interest to all major players in the field of decommissioning, in particular policy makers, implementers, regulators and representatives of local host communities

  4. Pipeline Decommissioning Trial AWE Berkshire UK - 13619

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Paper details the implementation of a 'Decommissioning Trial' to assess the feasibility of decommissioning the redundant pipeline operated by AWE located in Berkshire UK. The paper also presents the tool box of decommissioning techniques that were developed during the decommissioning trial. Constructed in the 1950's and operated until 2005, AWE used a pipeline for the authorised discharge of treated effluent. Now redundant, the pipeline is under a care and surveillance regime awaiting decommissioning. The pipeline is some 18.5 km in length and extends from AWE site to the River Thames. Along its route the pipeline passes along and under several major roads, railway lines and rivers as well as travelling through woodland, agricultural land and residential areas. Currently under care and surveillance AWE is considering a number of options for decommissioning the pipeline. One option is to remove the pipeline. In order to assist option evaluation and assess the feasibility of removing the pipeline a decommissioning trial was undertaken and sections of the pipeline were removed within the AWE site. The objectives of the decommissioning trial were to: - Demonstrate to stakeholders that the pipeline can be removed safely, securely and cleanly - Develop a 'tool box' of methods that could be deployed to remove the pipeline - Replicate the conditions and environments encountered along the route of the pipeline The onsite trial was also designed to replicate the physical prevailing conditions and constraints encountered along the remainder of its route i.e. working along a narrow corridor, working in close proximity to roads, working in proximity to above ground and underground services (e.g. Gas, Water, Electricity). By undertaking the decommissioning trial AWE have successfully demonstrated the pipeline can be decommissioned in a safe, secure and clean manor and have developed a tool box of decommissioning techniques. The tool box of includes; - Hot tapping - a method of breaching the pipe while maintaining containment to remove residual liquids, - Crimp and shear - remote crimping, cutting and handling of pipe using the excavator - Pipe jacking - a way of removing pipes avoiding excavations and causing minimal disturbance and disruption. The details of the decommissioning trial design, the techniques employed, their application and effectiveness are discussed and evaluated here in. (authors)

  5. Radionuclide source term measurements for decommission assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project is to provide an up-to-date regulatory assessment of the radiological factors, criteria and problem areas associated with the technology, safety, and costs pertaining to reactor decommissioning and related waste disposal. This is being accomplished through a measurements and appraisal program focused in the following key areas: radiological characterization during Shippingport Station decommissioning; radiological characterization of intermediate-level wastes (highly activated reactor internal materials greater than Class C); evaluation of the accuracy of predictive activation codes and methods; and assessment of decommissioning waste disposal options

  6. Development of a Decommissioning Certificate Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Decommissioning Certificate Program has been developed at Washington State University Tri-Cities (WSU TC) in conjunction with Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)to address the increasing need for qualified professionals to direct and manage decommissioning projects. The cooperative effort between academia, industry, and government in the development and delivery of this Program of education and training is described, as well as the Program's design to prepare students to contribute sooner, and at a higher level, to decommissioning projects

  7. Planning considerations in nuclear facility decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors' experience in planning the decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station has led to a number of pertinent conclusions concerning the planning concepts and sequences which should be applied when considering the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Planning thoughts are presented for four different areas: for the period of time before operations start; for accumulation and recording of data during the operational life of the facility; for guiding the detailed engineering; and for the actual field dismantling period, when certain sequences are important. Definitive, well-conceived planning is required in all these areas if the decommissioning effort is to be efficiently and safely performed

  8. TA-2 Water Boiler Reactor Decommissioning Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This final report addresses the Phase 2 decommissioning of the Water Boiler Reactor, biological shield, other components within the biological shield, and piping pits in the floor of the reactor building. External structures and underground piping associated with the gaseous effluent (stack) line from Technical Area 2 (TA-2) Water Boiler Reactor were removed in 1985--1986 as Phase 1 of reactor decommissioning. The cost of Phase 2 was approximately $623K. The decommissioning operation produced 173 m3 of low-level solid radioactive waste and 35 m3 of mixed waste. 15 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities other than reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the first IAEA publication dealing specifically with decommissioning of non-reactor nuclear facilities. It applies particularly to the nuclear fuel cycle, including uranium conversion, enrichment and fuel fabrication facilities, reprocessing plants, and waste/spent fuel storage and treatment facilities, and includes analytical and research laboratories. The main objective of the report is to highlight distinctive factors in decommissioning non-reactor nuclear facilities as compared to those for reactors, and it offers results from past, ongoing and planned decommissioning activities

  10. Social effects of decommissioning Trawsfynydd Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decision to close Trawsfynydd in 1993 had significant implications for the staff and local community. The site is situated within a National Park and local employment opportunities are limited. The staff and local communities were consulted regarding the issues arising from closure and decommissioning. This consultation influenced the decommissioning strategy for the site, with emphasis placed on the mitigation of the effects of closure. Subsequent studies have shown that the adopted strategies have served to limit the social and economic effects. The experience at Trawsfynydd has proved to be generally applicable at other decommissioning sites. (author)

  11. Decommissioning and decontrolling the R1-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweden's first nuclear reactor - the research reactor R1 - situated in bedrock under the Royal Technical Institute of Stockholm, has in the period 1981-1983 been subject to a complete decommissioning. The National Institute for Radiation Protection has followed the work in detail, and has after the completion of the decommissioning performed measurements of radioactivity on site. The report gives an account of the work the Institute has done in preparation for- and during decommissioning and specifically report on the measurements for classification of the local as free for non-nuclear use. (aa)

  12. Decommissioning cost estimates based on the international structure for decommissioning costing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning cost estimates is essential part of decommissioning planning in all stages of nuclear installation lifetime. It has been recognized that there is a variety of formats, content and practice in decommissioning costing, due to the specific national requirement or to different assumptions. These differences make the process of decommissioning costing less transparent and more complicated to review. To solve these issues the document: 'A Proposed Standardised List of Items for Costing Purposes in the Decommissioning of Nuclear Installation' (known as 'Yellow Book') was jointly published by IAEA, OECD/NEA and EC in 1999. After a decade, the document was revised and issued by same organizations under the title: 'International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC) of Nuclear Installation. ISDC as the list of typical decommissioning activities (could be used also a check-list) provides s general cost structure suitable for use for all types of nuclear installations i.e. power plants, research reactors, fuel cycle facilities or laboratories. The purpose of the ISDC, is to facilitate the communication and to promote uniformity and to provide a common platform in presenting the decommissioning costs. Clear definition of ISDC items supports the common understanding of cost items, i.e. what is behind the cost. ISDC decommissioning activities are organised in a hierarchical structure, with the 1st and 2nd levels being aggregations of basind levels being aggregations of basic activities identified at the 3rd level. At (author)

  13. ECED 2013: Eastern and Central Europe Decommissioning. International Conference on Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities. Conference Guide and Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Conference included the following sessions: (I) Opening session (2 contributions); (II) Managerial and Funding Aspects of Decommissioning (5 contributions); (III) Technical Aspects of Decommissioning I (6 contributions); (IV) Experience with Present Decommissioning Projects (4 contributions); (V) Poster Session (14 contributions); (VI) Eastern and Central Europe Decommissioning - Panel Discussion; (VII) Release of Materials, Waste Management and Spent Fuel Management (6 contributions); (VIII) Technical Aspects of Decommissioning II (5 contributions).

  14. Detritiation studies for JET decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perevezentsev, A.N. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Alexander.Perevezentsev@iter.org; Bell, A.C.; Williams, J.; Brennan, P.D. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    JET is the world's largest tokamak and has operated with tritium plasma. In the Deuterium-Tritium Experiment (DTE1) about 30% of tritium fed to the tokamak was retained in the vessel and in-vessel components. It is expected that in a several years time JET will cease experimental operations and enter a decommissioning phase. In situ detritiation of the vacuum vessel is likely to be needed prior to its dismantling. To reduce cost of subsequent storage and disposal, post-dismantling detritiation of components and waste will be needed. The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, which operates the JET machine, has been carrying out studies of various detritiation techniques in order to select and experimentally prove technologies for in situ and ex situ detritiation of potential waste. This paper summarises the results.

  15. Detritiation studies for JET decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JET is the world's largest tokamak and has operated with tritium plasma. In the Deuterium-Tritium Experiment (DTE1) about 30% of tritium fed to the tokamak was retained in the vessel and in-vessel components. It is expected that in a several years time JET will cease experimental operations and enter a decommissioning phase. In situ detritiation of the vacuum vessel is likely to be needed prior to its dismantling. To reduce cost of subsequent storage and disposal, post-dismantling detritiation of components and waste will be needed. The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, which operates the JET machine, has been carrying out studies of various detritiation techniques in order to select and experimentally prove technologies for in situ and ex situ detritiation of potential waste. This paper summarises the results

  16. The cost of decommissioning uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report identifies several key operations that are commonly carried out during decommissioning of tailings areas in the Canadian environment. These operations are unit costed for a generic site to provide a base reference case. The unit costs have also been scaled to the quantities required for the decommissioning of four Canadian sites and these scaled quantities compared with site-specific engineering cost estimates and actual costs incurred in carrying out the decommissioning activities. Variances in costing are discussed. The report also recommends a generic monitoring regime upon which both short- and longer-term environmental monitoring costs are calculated. Although every site must be addressed as a site-specific case, and monitoring programs must be tailored to fit a specific site, it would appear that for the conventional decommissioning and monitoring practices that have been employed to date, costs can be reasonably estimated when site-specific conditions are taken into account

  17. Decommissioning and disposal costs in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction Goal: Secure sufficient financial resources. Question: How much money is needed? Mean: Concrete plans for decommissioning and waste disposal. - It is the task of the operators to elaborate these plans and to evaluate the corresponding costs - Plans and costs are to be reviewed by the authorities Decommissioning Plans and Costs - Comprise decommissioning, dismantling and management (including disposal) of the waste. - New studies 2001 for each Swiss nuclear power plant (KKB 2 x 380 MWe, KKM 370 MWe, KKG 1020 MWe, KKL 1180 MWe). - Studies performed by NIS (D). - Last developments taken into account (Niederaichbach, Gundremmingen, Kahl). Decommissioning: Results and Review Results: Total cost estimates decreasing (billion CHF) 1994 1998 2001 13.7 13.1 11.8 Lower costs for spent fuel conditioning and BE/HAA/LMA repository (Opalinus Clay) Split in 2025: 5.6 bil. CHF paid by NPP 6.2 billion CHF in Fund Review: Concentrates on disposal, ongoing

  18. Nuclear submarine decommissioning and related environmental problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The issue of nuclear powered submarines occupies a particular place among the problems related to nuclear wastes. Nuclear submarines that were withdrawn from military service as well as those intended fro utilization represent a potential source of both nuclear and radiation hazard. By the beginning of 1966 more than one hundred and fifty nuclear powered vessels were decommissioned in Russia both for the reason of expiration of their service life and due to treaties on reduction of strategic offensive weapons. By 200 this number is expected to increase to one hundred and seventy-eighty units. According to published data the number of nuclear submarines decommissioned in USA to date exceeds twenty units. Major problems associated with utilization of nuclear submarines are related to safety and special security measures are to undertaken for decommissioned nuclear submarines. One of the most significant problems is related with management and/or storage of spent fuel from decommissioned nuclear submarines

  19. Regulatory framework and licensing of decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decommissioning of a nuclear power plant is a complex technical and administrative process, which includes multiple and diverse activities whose final global objective is the plant disappearance and the release of its site for conventional uses, without causing non acceptable radiological effects to the workers, the general public or the environment. The licensing process to grant the necessary administrative authorizations is also complex and the available experience is still limits. This paper reviews the applicable Spanish regulatory framework for decommissioning, from the view point of both, the regulator and the operator and summarizes the licensing process of decommissioning project. It also presents some considerations on the regulatory control of the decommissioning activities performed by CSN, as well as the new regulatory developments the CSN is working on, with the collaboration of the operator (ENRESA). (Author)

  20. Decommissioning strategy for Trawsfynydd power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the decision to close Trawsfynydd power station, Nuclear Electric adapted its generic decommissioning plans to suit the particular local circumstances. This resulted in an early reduced height safestore strategy which is described in the paper. (Author)

  1. The total decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following nuclear facilities in the Federal Republic of Germany are now ready for total decommissioning: the power plant Niederaichbach (KKN), the nuclear ship Otto Hahn and the research reactor FR2. Planning work on KKN commenced in 1979 and the approval procedure was begun in early 1980 when the approval contract was submitted. At the beginning of 1980 the contract for decommissioning the nuclear facilities on the Otto Hahn was awarded. Approval was received in December 1980 and work was begun on decommissioning the plant. FR2 is still in operation and will be shut down at the end of 1981. Planning work for decommissioning the nuclear part began at the end of 1980. The planning and the methods which are intended to be used for the three plants are described. (orig.)

  2. Decommissioning of DR 1, Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the decommissioning activities carried out at the 2kW homogeneous reactor DR 1 at Risoe National Laboratory. The decommissioning work took place from summer 2004 until late autumn 2005. The components with the highest activity, the core vessel the recombiner and the piping and valves connected to these, were dismantled first by Danish Decommissioning's own technicians. Demolition of the control rod house and the biological shield as well as the removal of the floor in the reactor hall was carried out by an external demolition contractor. The building was emptied and left for other use. Clearance measurements of the building showed that radionuclide concentrations were everywhere below the clearance limit set by the Danish nuclear regulatory authorities. Furthermore, measurements on the surrounding area showed that there was no contamination that could be attributed to the operation and decommissioning of DR 1. (au)

  3. Decommissioning of DR 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauridsen, Kurt

    2006-01-15

    The report describes the decommissioning activities carried out at the 2kW homogeneous reactor DR 1 at Risoe National Laboratory. The decommissioning work took place from summer 2004 until late autumn 2005. The components with the highest activity, the core vessel the recombiner and the piping and valves connected to these, were dismantled first by Danish Decommissioning's own technicians. Demolition of the control rod house and the biological shield as well as the removal of the floor in the reactor hall was carried out by an external demolition contractor. The building was emptied and left for other use. Clearance measurements of the building showed that radionuclide concentrations were everywhere below the clearance limit set by the Danish nuclear regulatory authorities. Furthermore, measurements on the surrounding area showed that there was no contamination that could be attributed to the operation and decommissioning of DR 1. (au)

  4. Decommissioning of AECL Whiteshell laboratories - 16311

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whiteshell Laboratories (WL) is a Nuclear Research and Test Establishment near Winnipeg, Canada, operated by AECL since the early 1960's and now under decommissioning. WL occupies approximately 4400 hectares of land and employed more than 1000 staff up to the late-1990's, when the closure decision was made. Nuclear facilities at WL included a research reactor, hot cell facilities and radiochemical laboratories. Programs carried out at the WL site included high level nuclear fuel waste management research, reactor safety research, nuclear materials research, accelerator technology, biophysics, and industrial radiation applications. In preparation for decommissioning, a comprehensive environmental assessment was successfully completed [1] and the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission issued a six-year decommissioning licence for WL starting in 2003 - the first decommissioning licence issued for a Nuclear Research and Test Establishment in Canada. This paper describes the progress in this first six-year licence period. A significant development in 2006 was the establishment of the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP), by the Government of Canada, to safely and cost effectively reduce, and eventually eliminate the nuclear legacy liabilities and associated risks, using sound waste management and environmental principles. The NLLP endorsed an accelerated approach to WL Decommissioning, which meant advancing the full decommissioning of buildings and facilities that had orig of buildings and facilities that had originally been planned to be decontaminated and prepared for storage-with-surveillance. As well the NLLP endorsed the construction of enabling facilities - facilities that employ modern waste handling and storage technology on a scale needed for full decommissioning of the large radiochemical laboratories and other nuclear facilities. The decommissioning work and the design and construction of enabling facilities are fully underway. Several redundant non-nuclear buildings have been removed and redundant nuclear facilities are being decontaminated and prepared for demolition. Along with decommissioning of redundant structures, site utilities are being decommissioned and reconfigured to reduce site operating costs. New waste handling and waste clearance facilities have been commissioned and a large shielded modular above ground storage (SMAGS) structure is in final design in preparation for construction in 2010. The eventual goal is full decommissioning of all facilities and infrastructure and removal of stored wastes from the site. (authors)

  5. Regulation of decommissioning in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1940, the United Kingdom's (UK) nuclear programme has included the decommissioning of Research Reactors; Fuel Conversion, Enrichment and Fabrication Plants; Power Reactors, and Waste Treatment Plants. The newly formed Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) has developed a programme for all of the UK's civil nuclear liabilities including five Magnox reactors that are currently undergoing decommissioning, two undergoing defuelling and four due to cease operation over the next 5 years. The UK Health and Safety Executive's (HSE) Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) regulates safety and the management of radioactive waste at nuclear licensed sites in the United Kingdom. The main legislation is the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 (HSAW74) and its associated statutory provisions, which include the Nuclear Installations Act (as amended) 1965 (NIA 65). Additionally, NII enforces the Nuclear Reactors (Environmental Impact Assessment for Decommissioning) Regulations 1999. Under NIA65, no site may be used for installing or operating any nuclear installation unless a site licence has been granted by the HSE. NIA65 allows HSE to attach conditions to the site licence in the interests of safety, or with respect to the handling, treatment and disposal of nuclear matter, including radioactive waste. These licence conditions include decommissioning arrangements, supervision and control, emergency arrangements, training, operating rules and operating instructions. NII is reules and operating instructions. NII is reviewing the regulation of decommissioning Magnox power reactors, to ensure its approach to regulation remains proportionate and consistent. The review includes consideration of hazard levels and associated risks at such sites; public expectations of regulators; regulation of the health and safety of workers; environmental impact assessment and management; and the need to optimise the effectiveness of NII's inspectors. The paper summarises UK's approach to regulation of decommissioning nuclear facilities and presents the considerations included within the review of regulation of decommissioning Magnox power reactors. (author)

  6. Decommissioning Project Manager's Implementing Instructions (PMII)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning Project personnel are responsible for complying with these PMII. If at any time in the performance of their duties a conflict between these instructions and other written or verbal direction is recognized or perceived, the supervisor or worker shall place his/her work place in a safe condition, stop work, and seek resolution of the conflict from the Decommissioning Project Manager or his designee

  7. Decommissioning preliminary activities of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decommissioning preliminary activities of a nuclear power plant at the end of its operating life consist in a number of technical, licensing and management actions by which the plant is set in a 'monitored storage' condition (or 'passive safe storage' condition) before the final stage of the decommissioning for site release. In this article the goals, the problems and the strategies of this preliminary activities are described

  8. Decommissioning of nuclear activities. Indian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of decommissioning begins after the final shutdown of the facility or after an abnormal event when the facility is no longer considered viable for operation and ends with the release of the site for use by a responsible organization as authorised by AERB or for unrestricted use by the public. Decommissioning of a nuclear facility involves decontamination, dismantling, cutting, packaging and transportation of plant equipment and materials and handling, treatment, conditioning, storage/disposal of radioactive and inactive wastes generated. In India, AERB has issued a Safety manual AERB/SM/DECOM-1 on Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities which discusses various aspects of decommissioning including: criteria for occupational exposures, discharge of radionuclides to the environment, criteria for long term waste disposal and clearance levels. It also prescribes the requirements with regard to advance planning for decommissioning of nuclear facilities and quality assurance during decommissioning. The criteria for categorisation of wastes and their mode of disposal is also prescribed. In India, the complete decommissioning of a major nuclear activities has not been carried out. However, as a part of life extension programme, en-masse coolant channel replacement of RAPS-2 at Kota, Rajasthan has been performed. The irradiated reactor components coming out from the core of the reactor were safely disposed in tile holes at a near surface disposal facility at the solid waste management plant. This experience has provided confidence that, with modern technological developments, decommissioning of NPPs and other facilities can be carried out without undue risk to the occupational workers, members of the public and the environment. (author)

  9. Russian nuclear-powered submarine decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russia is facing technical, economic and organizational difficulties in dismantling its oversized and unsafe fleet of nuclear powered submarines. The inability of Russia to deal effectively with the submarine decommissioning crisis increases the risk of environmental disaster and may hamper the implementation of the START I and START II treaties. This paper discusses the nuclear fleet support infrastructure, the problems of submarine decommissioning, and recommends international cooperation in addressing these problems

  10. Safety of Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: ensuring safety during all stages of facility life cycle is a widely recognised responsibility of the operators, implemented under the supervision of the regulatory body and other competent authorities. As the majority of the facilities worldwide are still in operation or shutdown, there is no substantial experience in decommissioning and evaluation of safety during decommissioning in majority of Member States. The need for cooperation and exchange of experience and good practices on ensuring and evaluating safety of decommissioning was one of the outcomes of the Berlin conference in 2002. On this basis during the last three years IAEA initiated a number of international projects that can assist countries, in particular small countries with limited resources. The main IAEA international projects addressing safety during decommissioning are: (i) DeSa Project on Evaluation and Demonstration of Safety during Decommissioning; (ii) R2D2P project on Research Reactors Decommissioning Demonstration Project; and (iii) Project on Evaluation and Decommissioning of Former Facilities that used Radioactive Material in Iraq. This paper focuses on the DeSa Project activities on (i) development of a harmonised methodology for safety assessment for decommissioning; (ii) development of a procedure for review of safety assessments; (iii) development of recommendations on application of the graded approach to the performance and reviraded approach to the performance and review of safety assessments; and (iv) application of the methodology and procedure to the selected real facilities with different complexities and hazard potentials (a nuclear power plant, a research reactor and a nuclear laboratory). The paper also outlines the DeSa Project outcomes and planned follow-up activities. It also summarises the main objectives and activities of the Iraq Project and introduces the R2D2 Project, which is a subject of a complementary paper

  11. New decommissioning system for nuclear power plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject matter of this paper discusses the new decommissioning system for nuclear power plants in Japan, including the system for the disposal of demolition waste and the decommissioning cost allowance system. The Nuclear Regulations Law, established in 1957, ordering that decommissioning be carried out, it was naturally impossible to set proper safety regulations. While the present safety regulation system is focused on the regulations required for construction and operation, the legislation for the nuclear reactor facilities is not necessarily considered sufficient for decommissioning post-termination. Japan decided to revise a part of the Nuclear Regulations Law to prepare for a future of decommissioning. The point of the new decommissioning system is to change it from the current notification system of decommissioning procedures to an approval system, to adopt step-by-step safety regulations for the decommissioning phase and to establish positive involvement of the government in the decommissioning activities, which a nuclear licensee performs. (author)

  12. Decommissioning cost estimating and contingency application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The funding of nuclear power plant decommissioning has matured into an integral part of utility planning. State public utility commission regulators and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission have recognized the need to assure the availability of funds to safely decommission these facilities at the end of their useful lives. The cost estimates for decommissioning need to reflect the changes in labor and material costs due to inflation, changes in waste disposal costs for packaging, transporting and burying radioactive materials, and the site-specific factors for each unit that account for differences in plant design and construction. Decommissioning activities involve remote tooling to segment the reactor vessel and internals, decontamination of contaminated systems to reduce occupational exposure, controlled blasting to demolish concrete structures, and removal and disposal of radioactive wastes by controlled burial. The unforeseeable problems encountered in performing these activities result in additional costs that are accounted for through contingency. The recent progress in nuclear power plant decommissioning cost estimation and contingency application are discussed. The important factor to be included in planning for the establishment of a decommissioning fund are identified, and typical results of recent estimates are provided. The nuclear industry is probably one of the first industries to plan for the eventual retirement of its facilities, and the public needs t of its facilities, and the public needs to be aware of these efforts

  13. Safety in decommissioning of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Guide covers the technical and administrative considerations relevant to the nuclear aspects of safety in the decommissioning of reactors, as they apply to the reactor and the reactor site. While the treatment, transport and disposal of radioactive wastes arising from decommissioning are important considerations, these aspects are not specifically covered in this Guide. Likewise, other possible issues in decommissioning (e.g. land use and other environmental issues, industrial safety, financial assurance) which are not directly related to radiological safety are also not considered. Generally, decommissioning will be undertaken after planned final shutdown of the reactor. In some cases a reactor may have to be decommissioned following an unplanned or unexpected event of a series or damaging nature occurring during operation. In these cases special procedures for decommissioning may need to be developed, peculiar to the particular circumstances. This Guide could be used as a basis for the development of these procedures although specific consideration of the circumstances which create the need for them is beyond its scope

  14. Investigation on decommissioning of smelting conversion facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To carry out decommissioning of smelting and conversion plant (containing apparatuses) in future, it is required to develop planned businesses. As JNC constructed a general WBS on the decommissioning on last fiscal years, further detailed investigations on WBS is necessary for promotion of its operations. Therefore, aiming at construction of detailed WBS with less than the fourth level, intention of updating on subdivision and radioactive decommission, and addition of data on determining methods on polluting condition of uranium series wastes, here were reported results on four items, such as reviewing of WBS on the decommissioning, construction of detailed WBS with less than the fourth level, updating of databases on subdivision and decommission, and data addition on determining methods on polluting conditions of uranium series wastes to the subdivision and the decommission databases. On this fiscal year, it was carried out investigation on contents of WBS on the 'Construction of investigating items on subdivision and removal engineerings (sixteen sheets of construction figure)' to consult WBS with less than the fourth level for eight sheets of figure in details on the second item, to carry out literature retrieval on reuse since 1998, to input sixty extracted data to database on the third item, and to carry out literature retrieval on the determining method since 1990, to input eight extracted data to database by preparing a new term in 'testing'. (G.K.) new term in 'testing'. (G.K.)

  15. High resolution seismic reflection profiling at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effectiveness of shallow high resolution seismic reflection (i.e., resolution potential) to image geologic interfaces between about 70 and 750 ft at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland (APG), appears to vary locally with the geometric complexity of the unconsolidated sediments that overlay crystalline bedrock. The bedrock surface (which represents the primary geologic target of this study) was imaged at each of three test areas on walkaway noise tests and CDP (common depth point) stacked data. Proven high resolution techniques were used to design and acquire data on this survey. Feasibility of the technique and minimum acquisition requirements were determined through evaluation and correlation of walkaway noise tests, CDP survey lines, and a downhole velocity check shot survey. Data processing and analysis revealed several critical attributes of shallow seismic data from APG that need careful consideration and compensation on reflection data sets. This survey determined: (1) the feasibility of the technique, (2) the resolution potential (both horizontal and vertical) of the technique, (3) the optimum source for this site, (4) the optimum acquisition geometries, (5) general processing flow, and (6) a basic idea of the acoustic variability across this site. Source testing involved an accelerated weight drop, land air gun, downhole black powder charge, sledge hammer/plate, and high frequency vibrator. Shallow seismic reflection profiles provided for a more detailection profiles provided for a more detailed picture of the geometric complexity and variability of the distinct clay sequences (aquatards), previously inferred from drilling to be present, based on sparse drill holes and basewide conceptual models. The seismic data also reveal a clear explanation for the difficulties previously noted in correlating individual, borehole-identified sand or clay units over even short distances

  16. Problems in decommissioning uranium exploration facility and monitoring parameters after decommission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discussed the problems in the decommission of uranium exploration facilities. Tailings with the uranium over cut-off grade was suggested to fill back to the pit, while those under cut-off grade can be buried in shallow depth. The parameters to monitor the facility after decommission was also discussed in the paper. (author)

  17. Risk reduction approach to decommissioning hazards of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Risk reduction approach to decommissioning hazards of nuclear facilities. • Radiological and non-radiological hazards of decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities. • Risk assessment for decommissioning hazards. • Countermeasures to radiological hazards and non-radiological hazards. - Abstract: Decommissioning activities include radiological hazards and non-radiological hazards. Radiological hazards are mainly due to radiation exposure whereas non-radiological hazards are mainly due to industrial hazards such as fire, explosions, toxic materials, and electrical and physical hazards. Based on characteristics of decommissioning activities, risk calculation method of decommissioning hazards and countermeasures of radiological hazards and non-radiological hazards were suggested

  18. International Atomic Energy Agency activities in decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been addressing the safety and technical issues of decommissioning for over 20 years, but their focus has been primarily on planning. Up to know, the activities have been on an ad hoc basis and sometimes, important issues have been missed. A new Action Plan on the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities has recently been approved by the Agency's board of Governors which will focus the Agency's efforts and ensure that our Member States' concerns are addressed. The new initiatives associated with this Action Plan will help ensure that decommissioning activities in the future are performed in a safe and coherent manner. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been preparing safety and technical documents concerning decommissioning since the mid-1980's. There have been over 30 documents prepared that provide safety requirements, guidance and supporting technical information. Many of these documents are over 10 years old and need updating. The main focus in the past has been on planning for decommissioning. During the past five years, a set of Safety Standards have been prepared and issued to provide safety requirements and guidance to Member States. However, decommissioning was never a real priority with the Agency, but was something that had to be addressed. To illustrate this point, the first requirements documents on decommissioning were issued as part of a Safety Requirements [1] on pre-disposal management of radioactive waste. It was felt that decommissioning did not deserve its own document because it was just part of the normal waste management process. The focus was mostly on waste management. The Agency has assisted Member States with the planning process for decommissioning. Most of these activities have been focused on nuclear power plants and research reactors. Now, support for the decommissioning of other types of facilities is being requested. The Agency is currently providing technical assistance to Bulgaria, China, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Philippines, Romania, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Tajikistan and Ukraine. This list of countries requesting assistance from the Agency continues to grow every year. A recently published Safety Guide entitled 'Application of the Concepts of Exclusion, Exemption and Clearance' (RS-G-1.7) [2] provides guidance to national authorities and operating organizations on the application of the concepts of exclusion, exemption and clearance as established in the Basic Safety Standards [3]. It provides specific values of activity concentrations for both radionuclides of natural origin and those of artificial origin that may be used for bulk amounts of material for the purposes of applying exemption. The document also provides guidance on the application of these values for clearance

  19. Overview of decommissioning activities in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. has been involved the successful decontamination, decommissioning and reutilization of nuclear facilities for over 20 years. A number of commercial power plants in the United States have either completed their decommissioning, or will be in the next few years. In addition, the U.S. DOE has taken an aggressive approach to site remediation focusing on site closures so as to better utilize its financial resources. The U.S. initiative to deregulate the electrical generation industry to promote competition and presumably to reduce electricity prices to the consumer, is again in flux. Some utilities, facing the real or perceived threat of competition in its markets decided to shut down the 'costly' nuclear plants to alleviate the drain on their financial reserves. The older nuclear units experienced serious mechanical problems, entailing expensive repairs and replacements. Such difficulties have caused owner-operator utilities to decide to decommission these facilities rather than incur the expense of upgrading or repairing the plants to meet current regulatory and design criteria. Plants that were marginally cost-competitive, or not at all competitive, were shut down and decommissioned. Other utilities have bought some of the older nuclear plants in the Northeast (a high power demand region) to operate them and to extend their licenses for continued life. This paper will discuss the decommissioning lessons learned, management approaches, site characterization and ent approaches, site characterization and challenges faced in disposition of radioactive waste and large components, contracting practice, and the status of several of these shut down reactor-decommissioning programs. The industry has proven that nuclear power plants can be cost effectively and safely decommissioned. (author)

  20. Overview of decommissioning activities in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaGuardia, T.S. [TLG Services Inc., Bridgewater, Connecticut (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. has been involved the successful decontamination, decommissioning and reutilization of nuclear facilities for over 20 years. A number of commercial power plants in the United States have either completed their decommissioning, or will be in the next few years. In addition, the U.S. DOE has taken an aggressive approach to site remediation focusing on site closures so as to better utilize its financial resources. The U.S. initiative to deregulate the electrical generation industry to promote competition and presumably to reduce electricity prices to the consumer, is again in flux. Some utilities, facing the real or perceived threat of competition in its markets decided to shut down the 'costly' nuclear plants to alleviate the drain on their financial reserves. The older nuclear units experienced serious mechanical problems, entailing expensive repairs and replacements. Such difficulties have caused owner-operator utilities to decide to decommission these facilities rather than incur the expense of upgrading or repairing the plants to meet current regulatory and design criteria. Plants that were marginally cost-competitive, or not at all competitive, were shut down and decommissioned. Other utilities have bought some of the older nuclear plants in the Northeast (a high power demand region) to operate them and to extend their licenses for continued life. This paper will discuss the decommissioning lessons learned, management approaches, site characterization and challenges faced in disposition of radioactive waste and large components, contracting practice, and the status of several of these shut down reactor-decommissioning programs. The industry has proven that nuclear power plants can be cost effectively and safely decommissioned. (author)

  1. IAEA decommissioning Initiatives: strategy and programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past decade, the IAEA has strengthened and consolidated its efforts to respond to the needs of member states in the provision of decommissioning services. The need for these services is evidenced by the large number of nuclear facilities that are either shut-down or approaching the end of their useful lives and seen in the growing demands on the IAEA for decommissioning support. The objectives of the IAEA's decommissioning programme are to: Strengthen the safe and timely decommissioning of installations and the release or remediation of sites affected by radioactive residues Update and disseminate information on strategies, methodologies and state-of-the-art practices and technologies Provide advice and assistance to develop and strengthen national capabilities for decommissioning The role of the IAEA in promoting and facilitating international co-operation amongst its member states is put forward in Article VIII(C) of the Statute, which says that the IAEA shall take positive steps to encourage the exchange among its members of information relating to the nature and peaceful uses of atomic energy and shall serve as an intermediary among its members for this purpose. This role is supported by the Member States, as noted for example in Resolutions 46 and 47 of the 2007 General Conference, which welcomed the outcomes of the International Conference on Lessons Learned from the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities and the launch of the International Decommissioni launch of the International Decommissioning Network to serve as a mechanism for exchanging information and providing practical training and demonstrations with a regional or thematic focus. (authors)

  2. Securing decommissioning funds. Why organization matters?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Securing decommissioning funds requires that the financial resources set aside for the purpose of decommissioning be managed prudently. Decommissioning of nuclear power plant is prescribed by National Atomic Laws or by other nuclear legislation. It is a mandatory operation. The operators of nuclear power plants set money aside for that purpose. This is known as 'Decommissioning reserve fund'. Decommissioning implies costs very distant in time. Thus, it is obvious, from an economic point of view, that the funds set aside should be managed. As decommissioning is mandatory, the funds accumulated should be secured. In others words, they should be available when needed. Availability of funds is influenced by endogenous and exogenous factors. Endogenous factors are a matter of design of the reserve funds. They include the management of the funds, its monitoring and control... Availability of funds is influenced by these factors, depending on the rules to which the behaviour of the manager of the funds is subjected. In contrast, exogenous factors deal with the energy context. These factors are mainly the electricity sector organisation and/or the overall economic situation. They are decisive factors of the economic performance of the reserve fund for a given design. Therefore, the requirement of availability of funds, when needed, is a matter of compatibility between the design of the decommissioning funds and the electricity context. Put differently, reserve fund's design need to be consistent with the electricity context's features in respect of the availability of funds. Current reserve funds were designed in a context of monopoly regime. In this context, availability of decommissioning funds was not questionable. At least, as far as the design of the reserve funds is concerned. This is because nuclear generator didn't confront any competition pressure. Electricity prices were set trough rate base mechanism, and all the business risks were borne by the customers. Because of electricity sector restructuring, businesses are no longer protected from market sanctions and stock market volatility. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the compatibility of the design of reserve fund models with the liberalised electricity context. The paper first considers the design of reserve funds and concludes that there is no single design. Based on the variety of design, section two assess their respective compatibility with the new electricity context. It appears that the monitoring and control of the management of the funds are the main determinant of compatibility. The paper concludes that, as secure funding is a dimension of safe decommissioning, there is a necessity for an optimal design of decommissioning funds model. The paper also suggests that external management solution improve the credibility of decommissioning commitment. This paper has completed two objectives. Firstly, it has highlighted the diversity of designs of the decommissioning reserve funds. We have seen that the reserve funds are organised differently, regarding the key features of their design, namely the collection of funds, the management of the funds collected, and the monitoring and control of that management. Secondly, and in respect of the objective to ensure the availability of the funds when needed, the paper has shown that current designs of decommissioning reserve funds are not equally compatible with the constraints of the electricity sector liberalisation. In fact, the new electricity context is characterised by electricity price volatility with, at some conditions, harmful effects on the financial viability of electric companies. The paper has shown that external fund designs offer a satisfactory compatibility with these constraints. This is because the design of external funds imposes clear limitations on the behaviour of the manager of the funds. Therefore, the paper suggests that in a context of liberalised electricity market, external funds model improves the credibility of the commitment to handle the financial burden of decommissioni

  3. Decommissioning: Think about the back end first

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Decommissioning is different from operating a nuclear plant.While both involve a reactor, the priorities and activities differ. This summary will address the keys to successful decommissioning as learned from decommissioning Fermi 1. This project shows that plants can be decommissioned after a safe storage period. Fermi 1 was a sodium cooled fast breeder reactor that was permanently shut down in 1972. Decommissioning is under way now following a safe storage period. The four keys to successful decommissioning are: Thinking about the back end first; Planning where you are going; Evaluating how you will get there; Assessing the journey. The most important key is to think about the back end first: think about the waste that will be generated before work is started. This waste needs to be assessed from more than just the radiological standpoint. For example, some paints at Fermi 1 contain lead and/or PCBs. Work was stopped earlier this year when more paint was found to have PCBs than expected from earlier sampling. A hazards assessment programme was prepared and arrangements made for waste disposal of painted equipment, piping and structural members before dismantling resumed of any materials where the paint could contain PCBs. In planning the removal of sodium residues, the by-products from the reaction of the residues in situ needed to be addressed. Plans were made for contaminated hydrogen gas and caustic before starting the processing. Waste needs to be chating the processing. Waste needs to be characterized before it is produced for both radiological and hazardous constituents. Good planning that integrates waste management with activity planning is essential for success. To plan where the project is going, first the end state needs to be determined. Then steps to get the facility in the desired condition can be evaluated. The steps need to be communicated, then scheduled.The schedule needs to be communicated for success. Safety is the key to evaluating how the end state will be reached. Safety is more important during decommissioning than plant operation. There are more challenges and people are performing hazardous activities daily. The hazards need to be evaluated for each activity and work planned to minimize hazards. As decommissioning proceeds, what has been learned at the facility and by others needs to be assessed.Then, what should continue to be done and what should be changed to be safer or more efficient can be identified. The biggest lesson from the Fermi 1 decommissioning project is that hazardous materials and conditions need to be considered first before starting work activities to ensure that waste can be disposed of and people will go home safely at the end of every day. (author)

  4. Germany: Management of decommissioning waste in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past two decades, Germany has gained a substantial amount of experience in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities of different types and sizes. Many research reactors and all prototype nuclear power plants, as well as a few larger nuclear power plants and fuel cycle facilities, are currently at varying stages of decommissioning. Several facilities have been fully dismantled and the sites have been cleared for reuse. The decommissioning projects comprise 18 power and prototype reactors, 33 research reactors and 11 fuel cycle facilities which are being or have been decommissioned. In the future, further nuclear power plants will be shut down and decommissioned in accordance with Germany?s energy policy to phase out the use of nuclear power for commercial electricity generation as given in the April 2002 amendment of the Atomic Energy Act. Radioactive waste, from operations as well as from decommissioning activities, is to be conditioned in such a way as to comply with the waste acceptance requirements of a repository. In Germany, all types of radioactive waste (i.e., short-lived and long-lived) are to be disposed of in deep geological formations. A distinction is being made for heat generating waste (i.e., high level waste) and waste with negligible heat generation (i.e., low level and intermediate level waste). Radioactive decommissioning waste is waste with negligible heat generation. Waste acceptance requirements of a repository are of particular importanof a repository are of particular importance for the conditioning of radioactive waste, including decommissioning waste. The waste acceptance requirements, as they resulted from the Konrad licensing procedure, are being applied by the waste generators for the conditioning of decommissioning waste. Compliance with these requirements must be demonstrated through the waste package quality control, even if the waste will be disposed of in the future. In 2002 the Konrad repository was licensed for the disposal of all types of waste with negligible heat generation. Konrad is an abandoned iron-ore mine to be reconstructed for use as disposal facility. It is not yet in operation as the license is actually examined by court. Dismissal of legal action is an important prerequisite for the realization of the Konrad project. Furthermore, the Federal Government needs to take a final decision on the reconstruction and operation of the Konrad repository. (author)

  5. Technical and cost aspects of radioactive wastes from decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning was established in 1985 to share the experience and information emerging from on-going decommissioning projects within member countries. The main aim of the programme is to gather and collate such data, which can then provide the basis for planning the future industrial phase of decommissioning of commercial nuclear plants. Starting with 10 decommissioning projects in 1985, today the programme has 35 participating projects from 12 countries. Apart from exchanging valuable information, task groups have been set up for in-depth analysis and studies of areas of common interest, among which are the recycling of material from decommissioning projects and decommissioning costs. This paper will describe the structure and mode of operation of the programme. Some of the results of the work in the task groups will be presented, with particular emphasis on the management of materials from decommissioning and on decommissioning costs. (author)

  6. 77 FR 14047 - Guidance for Decommissioning Planning During Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ...REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0286] Guidance for Decommissioning Planning During Operations AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...comment period for Draft Regulatory Guide (DG)-4014, ``Decommissioning Planning During Operations.'' This action is...

  7. Panel Discussion - Eastern and Central Europe decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In conjunction with technical session 'Experience with Present Decommissioning Projects' the Panel Discussion is organized in the frame of ECED 2013 Conference. The main purposes of the panel was to analyse more in details the information given in the previous session and mainly to answer the questions from the audience. The panel was focused on the on-going decommissioning projects and on the projects in the final phase of preparation in the region of Eastern and Central Europe as follows: - Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant in Lithuania - RBMK-1500 reactors; - Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine - RBMK-1000 reactors; - Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant in Bulgaria - VVER-440 reactors; - Metsamor Armenian Nuclear Power Plant - VVER-440 reactors; - Greifswald Nuclear Power Plant in Germany (former East Germany) - VVER-440 reactors; - V1 Nuclear Power Plant in Slovakia - VVER-440 reactors; - A1 Nuclear Power Plant in Slovakia - Heavy Water Gas Cooled Reactor; shutdown after accident. The panel speakers listed the skilled and experienced representatives from all above mentioned countries and from Russian Federation where many decommissioning projects are ongoing or under preparation. The region of Eastern and Central Europe has actually become very important in the field of decommissioning and the lessons learned from the performed projects could make a significant base for decommissioning projects worldwide.

  8. Management of Sellafield site decommissioning - recent experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    History of the British Nuclear Site Sellafield - located in Western Cambria goes back to 1940, when it served for military and energy independence tasks in the Great Britain. Since then Sellafield served as the major British nuclear site providing wide range of services to the British nuclear industry, including fuel and waste storage/management, nuclear fuel reprocessing, electricity production and decommissioning. Currently the Sellafield site is one of the largest site under decommissioning facing serious challenges associated with the process and cost management. In November 2008 the Nuclear Management Partners, the consortium consisting URS Washington Group, AMEC and AREVA NC, were awarded the contract as the new Parent Body Organization of Sellafield Ltd. that provides management expertise and governance to the client (Nuclear Decommissioning Authority). Since 2008 AMEC has gained extensive experiences from management of complex decommissioning projects that are applicable across different geographies and projects of similar nature. Presentation describes the development of the process system of the project management from the side of PBO as well as complex scheme of the Sellafield site decommissioning project. (author)

  9. Verification for radiological decommissioning - Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past 10 years, the Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) at Oak ridge Associated Universities has performed radiological surveys to confirm the adequacy of cleanup and/or decommissioning actions at sites and facilities where radioactive materials have been handled. These surveys are part of the independent oversight programs of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Results of verification activities have been discouraging. Numerous independent surveys have identified residual contamination requiring further remediation; in some cases, initial decontamination and postremedial action monitoring were totally inadequate. While participating in decommission projects, ESSAP learned valuable lessons and has given this information to regulating agencies and decommissioning sites. The goal of this presentation is to highlight the difficulties encountered by ESSAP in its involvement with NRC and DOE decommissioning projects. Decommissioning projects require teamwork, and success depends to a large degree on the communication, cooperation, and coordination of efforts among the individual organizations involved. This information could be used by organizations involved in future decontamination projects to avoid some of the pitfalls associated with this process

  10. Shippingport station decommissioning project - a summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission of this project was to decommission the government-owned portion of the Shippingport atomic power plant and thereby (1) demonstrate safe and cost-effective dismantlement of a large full-scale commercial nuclear plant, (2) optimize the number of subcontractors to expand technology base and experience, and (3) provide a technology transfer program (adequate records) for future decommissioning projects and industry standards. The technical baseline for the project's decommissioning plant required that (1) all government-owned structures be removed to 3 ft below grade, (2) all radwaste be removed from the site and buried at Hanford, and (3) the reactor pressure vessel/neutron shield tank (RPV/NST) be removed as a single unit, and (4) the site be released to the owner, Duquesne Light Company (DLC), for unrestricted use. The objectives of the project were accomplished with completion of the mission within the established technical baseline under cost and ahead of schedule. Some conclusions drawn are that with proper planning and prompt funding, the technology, equipment, and skills exist, as regularly demonstrated in nuclear power plant outages, to decontaminate and decommission any size power plant without the expenditure of huge sums of money or overly extended application of labor or effort. Benefits were derived at Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project

  11. Colloquium on the decommissioning of the NS Otto Hahn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After successful conclusion of the decommissioning of NS Otto Hahn during the summer of 1982 a specialists meeting was organized by GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH in order to give information about planning, procedures used and experience resulting from the decommissioning process. The state-of-the-art decommissioning techniques as used for this first German nuclear powered merchant ship are shown by experts from licensing authorities, the decommissioning company and the ship operator. (orig./HP)

  12. Assessment of financial expenditure for Rivne NPP power units decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article covers some financial aspects of developing a decommissioning concept for Rivne NPP power units with reactor VVER-440 and VVER-1000. Possible methodological approaches to costs estimate have been analyzed. Preliminary results of cost estimation are presented for two decommissioning options: deferred and immediate dismantling. Principally possible options for accumulating assets have been analyzed to finance measures related to Rivne NPP decommissioning. A mathematical model has been proposed for creating decommissioning financial reserve

  13. Decommissioning of research nuclear reactor WWR-S Bucharest. Analysis, justification and selection of decommissioning strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decommissioning of Research Nuclear Reactor WWR-S Bucharest involves the removal of the radioactive and hazardous materials to enable the facility to be released and not represent a further risk to human health and the environment. The National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering has overall responsibilities in decommissioning including actions of contractors, submit a decommissioning plan to the regulatory body for approval and no decommissioning activities shall begin without the appropriate approval of the regulatory body. A very important aspect of decommissioning is analysis, justification and selection of decommissioning strategy. There are three strategies: Immediate Dismantling, Safe Enclosure, and Entombment. These strategies have been analyzed taking into account: - Future use of site and facilities; - Infrastructure of the specific site and facilities; - Waste storage and disposal options; - Financial aspects; - Geographical Location; - National, Local and International Legislation; - Facility characterization; Identification of decommissioning objectives; - Description of alternatives: scope, features, specific end points, release criteria, risks and safety issues, effectiveness, feasibility, nature and amount of waste of generated and disposal plans, material recycling/reusing opportunities, cost, schedule, comparative analysis; - Rationale for selecting the preferred alternative. (authors)

  14. The planning of decommissioning activities within nuclear facilities - Generating a Baseline Decommissioning Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BNFL Environmental Services has developed planning tools to meet the emerging need for nuclear liabilities management and decommissioning engineering both in the UK and globally. It can provide a comprehensive baseline planning service primarily aimed at nuclear power stations and nuclear plant. The paper develops the following issues: Decommissioning planning; The baseline decommissioning plan;The process; Work package; Compiling the information; Deliverables summary; Customer Benefits; - Planning tool for nuclear liability life-cycle management; - Robust and reliable plans based upon 'real' experience; - Advanced financial planning; - Ascertaining risk; - Strategy and business planning. The following Deliverables are mentioned:1. Site Work Breakdown Structure; 2. Development of site implementation strategy from the high level decommissioning strategy; 3. An end point definition for the site; 4. Buildings, operational systems and plant surveys; 5. A schedule of condition for the site; 6. Development of technical approach for decommissioning for each work package; 7. Cost estimate to WBS level 5 for each work package; 8. Estimate of decommissioning waste arisings for each work package; 9. Preparation of complete decommissioning programme in planning software to suit client; 10. Risk modelling of work package and overall project levels; 11. Roll up of costs into an overall cost model; 12. Cash flow, waste profiling and resource profiling against the decommissioning pro profiling against the decommissioning programme; 13. Preparation and issue of Final Report. Finally The BDP process is represented by a flowchart listing the following stages: [Power Station project assigned] ? [Review project and conduct Characterisation review of power station] ? [Identify work packages] ? [Set up WBS to level 3] ? [Assign work packages] ? [Update WBS to level 4] ?[Develop cost model] ? [Develop logic network] ? [Develop risk management procedure] ] ? [Develop project strategy document]? [Work package process? [Compile all work packages into overall programme, cost model and risk register (draft BDP)] ? [Carry out project risk assessment] ? [Review and update draft BDP] ? [Peer Review BDP] ? [Power Station project assigned] ?[Issue BDP to customer for comment

  15. Technical and legal aspects of the decommissioning of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many of the plants licensed at the start of nuclear power programmes will require decommissioning in the 1990's and this issue should now be confronted by the nuclear industry, its regulators and governments. This paper deals with the United States programme and experience in the decommissioning of nuclear installations and describes alternative decommissioning methods including safety and financial aspects. (NEA)

  16. Feedback Experience from Decommissioning of Uranium Conversion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KAERI has been conducting decommissioning activities of Uranium Conversion Plant (UCP) for the last decade. As a result of all this work KAERI has accumulated significant experience in the field of decommissioning of nuclear facilities. On the basis of the experience gained from decommissioning activities, this paper describes several lessons learned

  17. Detritiation studies for JET decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JET is the world largest tokamak and has the capacity of operating with a tritium plasma. Three experimental campaigns, the Preliminary Tritium Experiment (0.1g T2) in 1991, the Trace Tritium Experiment (5g T2) in 2005, and the large experiment, the Deuterium-Tritium Experiment (DTE1) (100g T2) in 1997, were carried out at JET with tritium plasmas. In DTE1 about 35 grams of tritium were fed directly into the vacuum vessel, with about 30% of this tritium being retained inside the vessel. In several years time JET will cease experimental operations and enter a decommissioning phase. In preparation for this the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, the JET Operator, has been carrying out studies of various detritiation techniques. The materials which have been the subject of these studies include solid materials, such as various metals (Inconel 600 and 625, stainless steel 316L, beryllium, ''oxygen-free'' copper, aluminium bronze), carbon fibre composite tiles, ''carbon'' flakes and dust present in the vacuum vessel and also soft housekeeping materials. Liquid materials include organic liquids, such as vacuum oils and scintillation cocktails, and water. Detritiation of gas streams was also investigated. The purpose of the studies was to select and experimentally prove primary and auxiliary technologies for in-situ detritiation of in-vessel components and ex-situ detritiation of components removed from the vessel. The targets of ex-vessed from the vessel. The targets of ex-vessel detritiation were a reduction of the tritium inventory in and the rate of tritium out-gassing from the materials, and conversion, if possible, of intermediate level waste to low level waste and a reduction in volume of waste for disposal. The results of experimental trials and their potential application are presented. (orig.)

  18. Detritiation studies for JET decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perevezentsev, A.N.; Bell, A.C.; Williams, J.; Brennan, P.D. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fussion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01

    JET is the world largest tokamak and has the capacity of operating with a tritium plasma. Three experimental campaigns, the Preliminary Tritium Experiment (0.1g T{sub 2}) in 1991, the Trace Tritium Experiment (5g T{sub 2}) in 2005, and the large experiment, the Deuterium-Tritium Experiment (DTE1) (100g T{sub 2}) in 1997, were carried out at JET with tritium plasmas. In DTE1 about 35 grams of tritium were fed directly into the vacuum vessel, with about 30% of this tritium being retained inside the vessel. In several years time JET will cease experimental operations and enter a decommissioning phase. In preparation for this the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, the JET Operator, has been carrying out studies of various detritiation techniques. The materials which have been the subject of these studies include solid materials, such as various metals (Inconel 600 and 625, stainless steel 316L, beryllium, 'oxygen-free' copper, aluminium bronze), carbon fibre composite tiles, 'carbon' flakes and dust present in the vacuum vessel and also soft housekeeping materials. Liquid materials include organic liquids, such as vacuum oils and scintillation cocktails, and water. Detritiation of gas streams was also investigated. The purpose of the studies was to select and experimentally prove primary and auxiliary technologies for in-situ detritiation of in-vessel components and ex-situ detritiation of components removed from the vessel. The targets of ex-vessel detritiation were a reduction of the tritium inventory in and the rate of tritium out-gassing from the materials, and conversion, if possible, of intermediate level waste to low level waste and a reduction in volume of waste for disposal. The results of experimental trials and their potential application are presented. (orig.)

  19. SOGIN Decommissioning strategy and funding (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statement: In Italy, as it is well known, there are no more operational NPPs. The four existing nuclear plants are definitely shutdown and ready for decommissioning. Considerations on decommissioning funding system have to take into account this particular situation. Strategy for decommissioning: New inputs given to SOGIN by the Italian Government are: conditioning all radioactive waste existing on the NPPs within the year 2010, release all nuclear sites - free of radiological constraints - by 2020. The last task is conditioned by availability of the national waste repository by the year 2009. Strategy for decommissioning: Key issue is prompt dismantling considering No more nuclear activities in Italy and Progressive loss of competencies. Previously Existing funds: Before plant shutdown, ENEL has cumulated provisions for decommissioning, even in absence of a clear regulatory framework. These provisions were not sufficient for decommissioning, considering the early closure of the plants. An additional fund was granted to ENEL by the government, in the form of a 'credit' to be paid by the 'electric system' (CCSE). This fund (provisions + credit) was considered sufficient by ENEL for a decommissioning with Safe Store strategy (fund = discounted foreseen costs). The total fund (provisions + credit) was assigned to Sogin at the incorporation date. The amount, money 1999, was about 800 M euros. Considering the new context: new strategy (Prompt Dismantling with site release by 2020), Sogin constitution (societal costs), new economic conditions. The fund was not considered sufficient for all Sogin tasks. This conclusion was agreed upon also by the independent 'Authority for electric energy and gas'. A new regulatory framework was therefore defined. Regulatory aspects: The Legislative Decree 79/99 has stated that costs for the decommissioning of NPP, fuel cycle back end and related activities should be considered as stranded costs for the general electric system. The same Decree stated that a specific company should have been established for the management of these activities. Consequently, Sogin has been incorporated, all nuclear assets and liabilities of Enel being assigned to the Company. Sogin is responsible for decommissioning and fuel back end, under the policy indicated by the Government. The Ministerial Decree 26.01.2000 precisely defined which costs can be considered as stranded costs. As a matter of fact, the decree confirms that all costs incurred in by Sogin for decommissioning, fuel cycle back end, wastes disposal are to be considered. The same Decree defines modalities for funding Sogin for the above mentioned activities. The same Decrees define that in the 'related activities' the dismantling of research plants for the nuclear fuel cycle should be considered. These plants are now property of Enea and FN. The Decree defines modalities for funding Sogin for the above mentioned activities. Sogin is entitled to receive also the funds for the decommissioning of Enea plants, providing a Consortium with Enea. Funding mechanism - Main Criteria: Costs are financed with a levy on the price of kWh for final consumers. The amount of the levy, for different categories of consumers, is defined by the 'Authority for electric energy and gas'. Regulatory procedure: Sogin presents to the Authority, each year, a complete program with scheduled activities and cost estimates for the overall project. Present estimates consider a global cost of about 2600 M euros for power plants and 630 M euros for Research plants. The Authority, every three years, determines the total amount of the expenses on the basis of Sogin documentation, taking into account efficiency criteria. Annual re-considerations are possible if major events occur. On this basis, the Authority defines the amount of the levy. In early 2002, the Authority issued the first resolution for the determination of decommissioning costs Specific reference was made to costs foreseen for 2002-2004, in the general context of the pluri-annual program. The Authority endorsed the cost esti

  20. Reactor decommissioning in a deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper seeks to summarise BNFL's experience with regard to recent developments in reactor decommissioning and demonstrate how commercial projects in crucial areas of strategy development, project implementation and site restoration are beginning to reduce the risks and uncertainties associated with this important aspect of the nuclear power generation industry. Although the reactor decommissioning market cannot yet be regarded as mature, the key elements of strategy development, waste treatment, dismantling and delicensing have been separately demonstrated as achievable. Together with the implementation of the right organisation, and the developing technology, the risks are being reduced. As more decommissioning projects are delivered, the risks will be reduced further and the confidence of the regulator in the process will improve. This paper sets out to demonstrate this viewpoint. (author)

  1. The economics and financing of decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economics and financing have the most immediate interest to the public. Largely this interest stems from the effect of decommissioning on current utility rates, but there are other related issues as well. These include the question of whether adequate funds will be available when needed, how they will be collected and invested, and what constitute reasonable contingency factors and discount rates. Preliminary examination of the economics of decommissioning raises more questions than it answers. Each country or area of a country (as in the USA) will be faced with establishing its own policies. Whichever methods and logic are finally applied to the economics of decommissioning in the United Kingdom, the public will eventually pay. For this reason, a clear working knowledge of the principal elements of this consideration is important. (author)

  2. Nuclear data requirements for fission reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting was attended by 13 participants from 8 Member States and 2 International Organizations who reviewed the status of the nuclear data libraries and computer codes used to calculate the radioactive inventory in the reactor unit components for the decommissioning purposes. Nuclides and nuclear reactions important for determination of the radiation fields during decommissioning and for the final disposal of radioactive waste from the decommissioned units were identified. Accuracy requirements for the relevant nuclear data were considered. The present publication contains the text of the reports by the participants and their recommendations to the Nuclear Data Section of the IAEA. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these reports. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. Narbalek uranium mine: from EIS to decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nabarlek uranium mine operated in Northern Australia from 1979 until 1989 and was the first of the 'new generation' of uranium mines to go through the cycle of EIS, operation and decommissioning. The paper describes the environmental and operational approval processes, the regulatory regime and the decommissioning procedures at the mine. The mine was located on land owned by indigenous Aboriginal people and so there were serious cultural considerations to be taken into account throughout the mine's life. Site work for decommissioning and rehabilitation was completed in 1995 but revegetation assessment has continued until the present time (1999). The paper concludes with the latest assessment and monitoring data and discusses the lessons learned by all parties from the completion of the cycle of mine life 'from cradle to grave'. (author)

  4. Decommissioning of DR 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strufe, N.

    2009-02-15

    This report describes the work of dismantling and demolishing reactor DR 2, the waste volumes generated, the health physical conditions and the clearance procedures used for removed elements and waste. Since the ultimate goal for the decommissioning project was not clearance of the building, but downgrading the radiological classification of the building with a view to converting it to further nuclear use, this report documents how the lower classification was achieved and the known occurrence of remaining activity. The report emphasises some of the deliberations made and describes the lessons learned through this decommissioning project. The report also intends to contribute towards the technical basis and experience basis for further decommissioning of the nuclear facilities in Denmark. (au)

  5. Development of improved technology for decommissioning operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the technology development activities conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory under US Department of Energy sponsorship to help ensure the availability of safe, cost-effective and environmentally sound decommissioning technology for radioactively contaminated facilities. These improved decommissioning technologies include techniques for the removal of contaminated concrete surfaces and coatings, adaptation of electropolishing and vibratory finishing decontamination techniques for field decommissioning applications, development of sensitive field instrumentation and methods for the monitoring of large surface areas, techniques for the field sectioning of contaminated components, improved contamination-stabilizing coatings and application methods, and development of a small solidification system for the field solidification of liquid waste. The results of cost/benefit studies for the vibratory finishing and sectioning technologies are also reported. 14 references, 1 table

  6. Decommissioning projects at the Juelich Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the Juelich Research Center was being developed, the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor GmbH, whose shareholders were municipal electricity utilities, built the AVR reactor on the same site. Contractual agreement with the Center covered fuel supply and disposal, electricity generation, numerous reactor experiments within the framework of the Center's research activities about the HTR, and decommissioning of the plant. Since 1994, all decommissioning efforts have been financed completely out of funds from the share-holders, i.e. the Federal Government (BMBF) and the State of North Rhine-Westphalia (MWF). The solid and liquid radioactive waste arising from disassembly and demolition is processed at the Decontamination. Department of the Research Center, conditioned for repository storage, and held in interim storage. As the decommissioning project will extend over a period of more than a decade, the Center has taken the costly steps of upgrading the processing plants and installations. (orig.)

  7. Decommissioning trust funds ordered by PSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Wisconsin public service commission ordered four electric utilities to set up external trust funds for decommissioning expenses instead of collecting the money from its ratepayers to offset current borrowing needs. The change is to assure that funds will be available when they are needed for the Point Beach 1 and 2 and the Kewaunee plants, which are due for relicensing and possible decommissioning in 2007 and 2008. The external fund will be available at a time when ratepayers will likely be paying for replacement power plants. Critics claim the order will cost utility customers $800 million over the next 23 years, and note that Wisconsin Electric Power Co. has a reputation for financial health. One area of concern is the treatment of funds already collected for decommissioning

  8. Site Decommissioning Management Plan. Supplement 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 51 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety, they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC stairs strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 51 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites. This is supplement number one to NUREG-1444, which was published in October 1993

  9. Platform decommissioning: Socio-economic impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this presentation is to evaluate the socio-economic effects of the decommissioning of steel jacket platforms in the North Sea and in the North East Atlantic in the period up to 2020 in their entirety. It is focused on two different decommissioning options, namely total and partial removal of installations. Partial removal applies only to installations in water deeper than 75 meters. All other installations, i.e those in waters shallower than 75 meters, have to be totally removed and brought onshore for disposal. Areas being analyzed cover costs of different decommissioning options, effects of the different options on employment, fiscal aspects of the different options, and aspects of recycling onshore. 6 figs., 13 tabs

  10. The total decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following nuclear facilities in the Federal Republic of Germany are now ready for total decommissioning: the power plant Niederaichbach (KK00, the nuclear ship 'Otto Hahn' and the research reactor FR2. Planning work on KKN commenced in 1979 and the approval was begun in early 1980 when the approval contract was submitted. At the beginning of 1980 the contract for decommissioning the nuclear facilities on the 'Otto Hahn' was awarded. Approval was received in December 1980 and work was begun on decommissioning the plant. FR2 is still in operation and will be shut down at the end of 1980. The planning and the methods which are intended to be used for the three plants are described. (orig.)

  11. Nuclear data needs for fission reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations of radioactive inventories in fission reactor components for decommissioning purposes were reviewed at the International Atomic Energy Agency(IAEA) Advisory Group Meeting on Nuclear Data Required for Fission Reactor Decommissioning in Vienna, September 1992. Details of neutron transport calculations through pressure vessel and bioshield necessary to determine fluxes and spectra at these locations were discussed. In contrast to embrittlement studies the main interest for this problem is in accurate description of transport of thermal neutrons. The codes and data libraries used by the specialists in this field were identified. Actions necessary to improve the accuracy were agreed upon. Procedures for calculating activation of materials in reactor components were also assessed. The need for compilation of a special data library and a benchmark testing of libraries together with available codes against an experimentally measured data for a real plant at the decommissioning stage was established. Phase 1 of such a benchmark exercise is now under preparation at the IAEA

  12. Waste from decommissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is based on the assumption that all twelve nuclear power plants will be shut down no later than A.D. 2010, as was decided by the parliament after the referendum on the future of nuclear power in Sweden. The recent 'Party agreement on the energy policy' of January 15, 1991 does, indeed, leave the door open for an extension of the operational period for the nuclear reactors. This will, however, not change the recommendations and conclusions drawn in this report. The report consists of two parts. Part 1 discusses classification of waste from decommissioning and makes comparisons with the waste arising from reactor operation. Part 2 discusses the documentation required for decommissioning waste. Also this part of the report draws parallels with the documentation required by the authorities for the radioactive waste arising from operation of the nuclear power plants. To some extent these subjects depend on the future use of the nuclear power plant sites after decommissioning of the plants. The options for future site use are briefly discussed in an appendix to the report. There are many similarities between the waste from reactor operations and the waste arising from dismantling and removal of decommissioned nuclear power plants. Hence it seems natural to apply the same criteria and recommendations to decommissioning waste as those presently applicable to reactor waste. This is certainly true also with respect to documentation, and it is strongly recommended that the documentation requirements on decommissioning waste are made identical, or at least similar, to the documentation requirements for reactor waste in force today. (au)

  13. Maintaining Quality in a Decommissioning Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decommissioning of AECL's Whiteshell Laboratories is Canada's largest nuclear decommissioning project to date. This research laboratory has operated for forty years since it was set up in 1963 in eastern Manitoba as the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment, complete with 60 MW(Th) test reactor, hot cells, particle accelerators, and multiple large-scale research programs. Returning the site to almost complete green state will require several decades of steady work in combination with periods of storage-with-surveillance. In this paper our approach to maintaining quality during the long decommissioning period is explained. In this context, 'quality' includes both regulatory aspects (compliance with required standards) and business aspects (meeting the customers' needs and exceeding their expectations). Both aspects are discussed, including examples and lessons learned. The five years of development and implementation of a quality assurance program for decommissioning the WL site have led to a number of lessons learned. Many of these are also relevant to other decommissioning projects, in Canada and elsewhere: - Early discussions with the regulator can save time and effort later in the process; - An iterative process in developing documentation allows for steady improvements and input throughout the process; - Consistent 2-way communication with staff regarding the benefits of a quality program assists greatly in adoption of the philosophy and procedures; - Top-n of the philosophy and procedures; - Top-level management must lead in promoting quality; - Field trials of procedures ('beta testing') ensures they are easy to use as well as useful. Success in decommissioning the Whiteshell Laboratories depends on the successful implementation of a rigorous quality program. This will help to ensure both safety and efficiency of all activities on site, from planning through execution and reporting. The many aspects of maintaining this program will continue to occupy quality practitioners in AECL, reaping steady benefits to AECL and to its customers, the people of Canada

  14. Truss up, top out, seal off [decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reports on the decommissioning of the United Kingdom's first Magnox power station at Berkeley, in Gloucestershire. The aim of the work in progress at present is to seal off the buildings, leaving the structure maintenance free for thirty years to allow levels of radioactivity inside to fall. To reduce the visual impact of the station the top quarter of each building is also being removed. The three phases of the current scheme are described, as are the strategies in place for ensuring that construction workers are not exposed to radiation. Lessons learnt here will be applied to the decommissioning of Trawsfynydd power station. (UK)

  15. Safety assessment for decommissioning of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning is the final stage in the life cycle of each nuclear facility, including research reactors. In the past, there was a tendency to address related aspects at a very late period of operation of the facility or even after final shut down stage. While this tendency has been changing especially in case of nuclear power plants and research reactors, the international community recommended to IAEA in the Berlin Conference in 2002 to stipulate an early addressing of decommissioning. This emphasis took also into consideration the fact that worldwide there are over 500 research reactors and critical assembly units that will eventually require decommissioning. In addition, the international community recommended to IAEA to provide general assistance in development and review of safety assessments related to decommissioning. Accordingly, in its International Action Plan on Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities, approved by the IAEA Board of Governors in 2004, IAEA reflected these recommendations and initiated the international project on Evaluation and Demonstration of Safety during Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities (DeSa Project). or the last three years about fifty experts from over thirty Member States have been working in the DeSa project on; (i) the establishment of a harmonized general safety assessment methodology for decommissioning; on (ii) the development of recommendations for a regulatory review process of such safety assessments; (iii) development uch safety assessments; (iii) development of recommendations on the application of a graded approach to performance and review of safety assessment, which ensures that the extent of the safety assessment is commensurate which the risks posed by the facility and the proposed decommissioning activities, and finally (iv) the application of the assessment methodology, the regulatory review procedure and graded approach recommendations to three test cases with different complexities and hazard potentials - a nuclear power plant, a research reactor and a nuclear laboratory. This paper provides an overview on current status of the DeSa project activities, and their application to the development of the Research Reactor Test Case, including the presentation of preliminary lessons learned from applying the graded approach on a research reactor. The DeSa project results, including the outcomes of the review of the Research Reactor Test Case by applying the review procedures are envisaged to be summarized at the 4th Joint DeSa meeting in October 2007, where the scope and objectives of a follow-up project will be also discussed. (author)

  16. Hanford radiochemical site decommissioning demonstration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A program is proposed for the innovation, development, and demonstration of technologies necessary to decommission the Hanford radiochemical plant area to the extent that the sites can have unrestricted public access. The five tasks selected for development and demonstration of restoration techniques were restoration of a burial ground, decommissioning of a separations plant, restoration of a separations plant waste interim storage tank farm, restoration of a liquid disposal area, and disposal of large contaminated equipment. Process development requirements are tabulated and discussed. A proposed schedule and estimated costs are given

  17. Decommissioning of the Salaspils Research Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Abramenkovs Andris

    2011-01-01

    In May 1995, the Latvian government decided to shut down the Salaspils Research Reactor and to dispense with nuclear energy in the future. The reactor has been out of operation since July 1998. A conceptual study on the decommissioning of the Salaspils Research Reactor was drawn up by Noell-KRC-Energie- und Umwelttechnik GmbH in 1998-1999. On October 26th, 1999, the Latvian government decided to start the direct dismantling to “green-field” in 2001. The upgrading of the decommission...

  18. Decommissioning of a tritium-contaminated laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tritium laboratory facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, was decommissioned in 1979. The project involved dismantling the laboratory equipment and disposing of the equipment and debris at an on-site waste disposal/storage area. The laboratory, constructed in 1953, was in service for tritium research and fabrication of lithium tritide components until 1974. The major features of the laboratory included 25 meters of gloveboxes and hoods, associated vacuum lines, utility lines, exhaust ducts, electrodryers, blowers, and laboratory benches. This report presents details on the decommissioning, health physics, waste management, environmental surveillance, and costs for the operation

  19. Decommissioning of a tritium-contaminated laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tritium laboratory facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, was decommissioned in 1979. The project involved dismantling the laboratory equipment and disposing of the equipment and debris at an on-site waste disposal/storage area. The laboratory was constructed in 1953 and was in service for tritium research and fabrication of lithium tritide components until 1974. The major features of the laboratory included some 25 meters of gloveboxes and hoods, associated vacuum lines, utility lines, exhaust ducts, electrodryers, blowers, and laboratory benches. This report presents details on the decommissioning, health physics, waste management, environmental surveillance, and costs for the operation

  20. Optimization in the decommissioning of uranium tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report examines in detail the problem of choosing the optimal decommissioning approach for uranium and mill tailings sites. Various decision methods are discussed and evaluated, and their application in similar decision problems are summarized. This report includes, by means of a demonstration, a step by step guide of how a number of selected techniques can be applied to a decommissioning problem. The strengths and weaknesses of various methods are highlighted. A decision system approach is recommended for its flexibility and incorporation of many of the strengths found in other decision methods

  1. Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Major articles/reports in this issue include: NPP Krsko revised decommissioning program, by Vladimir Lokner and Ivica Levanat, APO d.o.o., Croatia, and Nadja Zeleznik and Irena Mele, ARAO, Slovenia; Supporting the renaissance, by Marilyn C. Kray, Exelon Nuclear; Outage world an engineer's delight, by Tom Chrisopher, Areva, NP Inc.; Optimizing refueling outages with R and D, by Ross Marcoot, GE Energy; and, A successful project, by Jim Lash, FirstEnergy

  2. Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2006-07-15

    The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Major articles/reports in this issue include: NPP Krsko revised decommissioning program, by Vladimir Lokner and Ivica Levanat, APO d.o.o., Croatia, and Nadja Zeleznik and Irena Mele, ARAO, Slovenia; Supporting the renaissance, by Marilyn C. Kray, Exelon Nuclear; Outage world an engineer's delight, by Tom Chrisopher, Areva, NP Inc.; Optimizing refueling outages with R and D, by Ross Marcoot, GE Energy; and, A successful project, by Jim Lash, FirstEnergy.

  3. Knowledge management during decommissioning of Chornobyl NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article deals with issues on knowledge management during decommissioning by the example of the Chornobyl NPP. This includes how the duration of decommissioning stage, change in organization goal and final state of the site influence on human resources and knowledge management system. The main attention is focused on human assets and intellectual strength of Chornobyl NPP. Mathematical dependencies are proposed to substantiate numerical values. An analysis is given for the current situation, and forecast estimates for values dynamics is performed. The conclusion gives solutions on providing experienced staff in the future.

  4. Good practices in decommissioning planning and pre-decommissioning activities for the Magurele VVR-S nuclear research reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragusin Mitica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The VVR-S Nuclear Research Reactor at the “Horia Hulubei” National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering in Magurele, Bucharest, will be decommissioned applying the immediate dismantling strategy. The implementation of the decommissioning project started in 2010 and is planned for completion within 11 years. Good practices in decommissioning planning, organization, funding, and logistics are described in this paper.

  5. The decommissioning and redevelopment of NECSA site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The South African nuclear programme started in 1948 and was focussed on research and development in the nuclear field. In the early 70s a uranium conversion plant and a uranium enrichment plant were constructed on the NECSA site. The enriched uranium was used for military purposes, as fuel for the research reactor SAFARI-1 at Necsa. A semi-commercial uranium enrichment plant and a fuel manufacturing plant were commissioned in the 80's to supply fuel for the nuclear power plant at Koeberg near Cape Town. Currently the research reactor is utilized for the generation of radioactive isotopes for industrial and medical applications. Various other research projects were initiated and buildings constructed on the Necsa site to accommodate the different projects. The uranium conversion and enrichment projects were terminated in the early 90's, and many buildings on the Necsa site became redundant. An initial decommissioning strategy was to return the Necsa site to green fields. This endpoint of decommissioning has changed dramatically with the nuclear renaissance to include redevelopment and reuse options. In the case of a multi-facility nuclear site, such as the Necsa site, it is vital to develop a total site redevelopment plan rather than to decommission and allocate individual facilities for isolated reuse demands. A holistic approach should be assured by considering current and projected future redevelopment demands in the development of a redevelopment and reuse plan. It is important not to allow the redevelopment and reuse of a single facility on a multi-facility site based on short- term financial gain. With the recent increase in demand for nuclear facilities the redevelopment and reuse of nuclear facilities for non-nuclear applications should generally not be considered due to the inherent advantages associated with an existing licensed site. The initial decommissioning plan did not consider the Necsa site as a whole. Decommissioning costs, and the reuse of equipment were not optimised and the uncoordinated redevelopment and reuse lead to decommissioning to lower levels than required. A holistic approach towards redevelopment and reuse could have resulted in minimising decommissioning waste. In the past decommissioning was aimed at the final disposal of waste and the remediation of a site. This concept is currently challenged and decommissioning should not be viewed as an endpoint of a facility or site but should rather be the starting phase of a redevelopment and reuse opportunity for a facility or site. A decommissioning strategy based on the final closure of a facility or site should be a last resort and the focus should move to redevelopment and reuse options. The decommissioning of a nuclear site is usually associated with remaining liabilities, which require resources to ensure management of stored radiological waste etc. If the nuclear site is redeveloped and reused, these control measures and infrastructure could be included as part of the reuse scenario which is beneficial to the redevelopment and to liability management. (author)

  6. The institutional framework of decommissioning in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Decommissioning of the NPP is generally viewed in a negative framework. On the contrary, it is an activity which aims is said to obtain the final removal of the risk factors from the environment. It is the last step of the production cycle, whose importance is underlined by the Regulation recently issued for the correct management of resources in the territory. Decommissioning NPP involves the final arrangements of the radioactive wastes, produced either during the past operation period or resulting from the dismantling operation. All the radioactive wastes must be conditioned and maintained in safe conditions. Radioactive waste management is no longer a problem for those countries that decided to face it, that is the majority of the industrialised countries. Correct technological solutions exist, due exist, respectful of the environment, of the people, of the ethical principles. The centrality of the problem is also decreed by the fact that sometimes now, the European Commission has been working on the issue of the directive on waste management, an effort which Italy has strongly supported, also during the Presidency period. Decommissioning on NPP is moreover an activity that implies advanced technological solutions, multilateral overlapping programs, working of style situations. Not many countries have completed yet (the) decommissioning of their plants: such activity should therefore be seen as an opportunity for the growth and the assertion of the Italian industry, also in view of the potential new market and the alliance with European industries. Of the 530 nuclear reactors present in world today, approximately 100 are undergoing decommissioning. In the next 2 years another 100 will reach the end of their operative life. Probably after the necessary system improvement many of them will continue to work, but it is clear that the international market of the decommissioning will continue to grow in the next years. Italy can play an important role in this scenario: the decommissioning program produced by Sogin can therefore be a springboard for specific activities. Decommissioning of the Italian NPP will cost a total of approximately 3.5 billions euro. This amount of money will be founded by the electricity market (electricity bill): in order to optimise this huge amount, the efficiency and efficacy of the decommissioning program must be guaranteed. For this reason in 2003 the Italian government gave a significant drive for the centralisation of all the activities and responsibilities to a unique operator, also assigning Sogin with the management of the ENEA fuel cycle plants and related companies. Decommissioning program for Italian nuclear plants have been issued since 1999 and have under-gone the complex licensing procedure foreseen by a specific regulation of the sector, the law 241/2000 and by the regulation regarding the Environmental Impact Assessment. This regulatory frame is a recent one and, for some aspects, is still not completed and has, for the same reasons, sometimes caused some delay in activities. Other factors providing delays involved the excessive sensitivity of some local situation which, even though guaranteed by regulation that envisage the direct participation in decision making, see the decommissioning as a risk factor that they can't control directly. In order to proceed in completing this unpostponable operations in the most correct and effective manner, it is important that the different institutional bodies involved in the licensing procedure co-operate in the success of the program. The issue of the decree envisaged by law 230/95 constitutes a test table to this end. Working along these lines, the government has already began by signed the institutional agreement for the coordination of the licensing procedure related to the mention law 230/95 and the Environmental Impact Assessment. (author)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging-the Aberdeen perspective on developments in the early years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the beginnings of medical imaging with radioactivity, an account is given of the development in Aberdeen of CT scanners in nuclear medicine, and their clinical value, leading to the present-day gamma-cameras. Early animal work with electron magnetic resonance is described, which developed into a programme towards nuclear magnetic resonance of water in body tissues. The 1974 NMR image of a mouse, using the nuclear medicine experience, led to a quest to build the first clinically useful whole-body MRI. The work of other teams is outlined, and the steps which led to successful diagnostic images being made with the Aberdeen machine in 1980. The welcome from the medical fraternity, and the output of the multinational medical imaging companies, has led to the present-day, worldwide use of the MRI technique. (review)

  8. The Preliminary Decommissioning Plan of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, after 25 years of operation, a preliminary decommissioning plan for the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) has been produced but as yet it has not been implemented due to the continued operations of the reactor. However, from the early phases of facility design and construction and during operation, the aspects that facilitate decommissioning process have been considered. This paper outlines the DNRR general description, the organization that manages the facility, the decommissioning strategy and associated project management, and the expected decommissioning activities. The paper also considers associated cost and funding, safety and environmental issues and waste management aspects amongst other considerations associated with decommissioning a nuclear research reactor. (author)

  9. Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 3: Ecological risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Management Division of the U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) of the J-Field area at APG, pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of that activity, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted an ecological risk assessment (ERA) of the J-Field site. This report presents the results of that assessment

  10. Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 3: Ecological risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Hayse, J.; Kuperman, R.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2000-02-25

    The Environmental Management Division of the U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) of the J-Field area at APG, pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of that activity, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted an ecological risk assessment (ERA) of the J-Field site. This report presents the results of that assessment.

  11. The sedimentology of the Teekloof Formation east of Aberdeen C.P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Teekloof Formation (Beaufort Group) sediments to the east of Aberdeen (South Africa) consist of mudstone, siltstone and fine-to very fine-grained lithic wackes and arenites. Sandstone lithosomes commonly have erosive bases and the vertical and lateral arrangement of lithofacies indicate that the environment of deposition was fluviatile. Uranium mineralization was syndepositional and was supplied to the stream waters in the form of soluble complexes by the weathering and leaching of acid volcanic and granitic rocks

  12. An apparatus for studying spallation neutrons in the Aberdeen Tunnel laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Blyth, Sc; Chan, Yl; Chen, Xc; Chu, Mc; Hahn, Rl; Ho, Th; Hsiung, Yb; Hu, Bz; Kwan, Kk; Kwok, Mw; Kwok, T.; Lau, Yp; Lee, Kp; Leung, Jkc; Leung, Ky

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design, construction and performance of an apparatus installed in the Aberdeen Tunnel laboratory in Hong Kong for studying spallation neutrons induced by cosmic-ray muons under a vertical rock overburden of 611 meter water equivalent (m.w.e.). The apparatus comprises of six horizontal layers of plastic-scintillator hodoscopes for determining the direction and position of the incident cosmic-ray muons. Sandwiched between the hodoscope planes is ...

  13. Development of computer program for estimating decommissioning cost - 59037

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The programs for estimating the decommissioning cost have been developed for many different purposes and applications. The estimation of decommissioning cost is required a large amount of data such as unit cost factors, plant area and its inventory, waste treatment, etc. These make it difficult to use manual calculation or typical spreadsheet software such as Microsoft Excel. The cost estimation for eventual decommissioning of nuclear power plants is a prerequisite for safe, timely and cost-effective decommissioning. To estimate the decommissioning cost more accurately and systematically, KHNP, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd, developed a decommissioning cost estimating computer program called 'DeCAT-Pro', which is Decommission-ing Cost Assessment Tool - Professional. (Hereinafter called 'DeCAT') This program allows users to easily assess the decommissioning cost with various decommissioning options. Also, this program provides detailed reporting for decommissioning funding requirements as well as providing detail project schedules, cash-flow, staffing plan and levels, and waste volumes by waste classifications and types. KHNP is planning to implement functions for estimating the plant inventory using 3-D technology and for classifying the conditions of radwaste disposal and transportation automatically. (authors)

  14. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Feasibility, needs and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor decommissioning activities generally are considered to begin after operations have ceased and the fuel has been removed from the reactor, although in some countries the activities may be started while the fuel is still at the reactor site. The three principal alternatives for decommissioning are described. The factors to be considered in selecting the decommissioning strategy, i.e. a stage or a combination of stages that comprise the total decommissioning programme, are reviewed. One presents a discussion of the feasibility of decommissioning techniques available for use on the larger reactors and fuel cycle facilities. The numbers and types of facilities to be decommissioned and the resultant waste volumes generated for disposal will then be projected. Finally, the costs of decommissioning these facilities, the effect of these costs on electricity generating costs, and alternative methods of financing decommissioning are discussed. The discussion of decommissioning draws on various countries' studies and experience in this area. Specific details about current activities and policies in NEA Member Countries are given in the short country specific Annexes. The nuclear facilities that are addressed in this study include reactors, fuel fabrication facilities, reprocessing facilities, associated radioactive waste storage facilities, enrichment facilities and other directly related fuel cycle support facilities. The present study focuses on the technical feasibility, needs, and costs of decommissioning the larger commercial facilities in the OECD member countries that are coming into service up to the year 2000. It is intended to inform the public and to assist in planning for the decommissioning of these facilities

  15. Development of the Decommissioning Project Management System, DECOMMIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, U. S.; Park, J. H.; Lee, K. W.; Hwang, D. S.; Park, S. K.; Hwang, S. T.; Paik, S. T.; Choi, Y. D.; Chung, K. H.; Lee, K. I.; Hong, S. B

    2007-03-15

    At the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI), two projects for decommissioning of the research reactors and uranium conversion plant are carried out. The management of the projects can be defined as 'the decision of the changes of the decommissioning methodologies for the more efficient achievement of the project at an adequate time and to an improved method'. The correct decision comes from the experiences on the decommissioning project and the systematic experiences can be obtained from the good management of the decommissioning information. For this, a project management tool, DECOMMIS, was developed in the D and D Technology Division, which has the charge of the decommissioning projects at the KAERI, and its purpose was extended to following fields; generation of reports on the dismantling waste for WACID, record keeping for the next decommissioning projects of nuclear facilities, provision of fundamental data for the R and D of the decommissioning technologies.

  16. Development of the Decommissioning Project Management System, DECOMMIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI), two projects for decommissioning of the research reactors and uranium conversion plant are carried out. The management of the projects can be defined as 'the decision of the changes of the decommissioning methodologies for the more efficient achievement of the project at an adequate time and to an improved method'. The correct decision comes from the experiences on the decommissioning project and the systematic experiences can be obtained from the good management of the decommissioning information. For this, a project management tool, DECOMMIS, was developed in the D and D Technology Division, which has the charge of the decommissioning projects at the KAERI, and its purpose was extended to following fields; generation of reports on the dismantling waste for WACID, record keeping for the next decommissioning projects of nuclear facilities, provision of fundamental data for the R and D of the decommissioning technologies

  17. Decommissioning of the Northrop TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the administrative and operational aspects of decommissioning and dismantling the Northrop Mark F TRIGA Reactor, including: planning and preparation, personnel requirements, government interfacing, costs, contractor negotiations, fuel shipments, demolition, disposal of low level waste, final survey and disposition of the concrete biological shielding. (author)

  18. Decontamination and decommissioning focus area. Technology summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This report presents details of the facility deactivation, decommissioning, and material disposition research for development of new technologies sponsored by the Department of Energy. Topics discussed include; occupational safety, radiation protection, decontamination, remote operated equipment, mixed waste processing, recycling contaminated metals, and business opportunities.

  19. Financing strategies for nuclear power decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1980-07-01

    The report analyzes several alternatives for financing the decommissioning of nuclear power plants from the point of view of assurance, cost, equity, and other criteria. Sensitivity analyses are performed on several important variables and possible impacts on representative companies' rates are discussed and illustrated.

  20. 75 FR 80697 - Nuclear Decommissioning Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ...each member of the group that possesses a...the same nuclear power plant by filing a...decommissioning of a nuclear power plant to which a...treated as having distributed all of its assets...each member of the group that possesses a...the same nuclear power plant by filing...

  1. Current status of Tokai-1 decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAPC launched Tokai-1 decommissioning in December 2001 after the submission of the notification of decommissioning plan to the government (METI). This is the first instance of the decommissioning of a commercial nuclear power plant in Japan. As the whole project is planned to take a long term of 17 years, the project program is divided into three phases. In the First Phase of 5 years, from 2001 to 2005, the underwater equipment in Cartridge Cooling Pond(CCP), Turbine Generator, Reactor Auxiliary equipment and Fuel Charge Machines are removed. In the Second Phase of 5 years, from 2006 to 2010, Steam Raising Units will be removed. The Third Phase of 7 years, from 2011 to 2017, all reactor structures, Reactor Building and miscellaneous buildings will be dismantled. The project will be completed adjusting the land to ground level. Total amount of arising wastes is 177 thousand ton. 18 thousand ton of the waste are classified as the Low Level radioactive Waste (LLW). The total cost of the Tokai-1 decommissioning project is estimated at 89 billion yen (740M$) as of year 2001, in which about 35 billion-yen (290M$) is for dismantling cost and 54 billion yen (450M$) is for radioactive waste treatment and disposal cost. (author)

  2. The decommissioning of a small nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The JEEP II reactor at Kjeller, Norway has been used as a model for a study of the decommissioning of a small research reactor. A radiological survey is given and a plan for volume reducing, packaging, certifying, classifying and shipping of the radioactive waste is described. 23 refs., 4 figs

  3. Decommissioning of US conventional uranium production centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is a quasi-independent Organization within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), responsible for collecting, analyzing, and disseminating information on energy including the U.S. uranium industry and nuclear power generation. The EIA is also actively involved in assisting the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management to implement the reimbursement of mill tailing remediation costs in compliance with Title X of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. As one of our recent projects, we examined the decommissioning efforts of conventional uranium production centers. This paper summarizes that work. For conventional uranium production centers, decommissioning involves a decontamination and dismantling the mill itself, reclaiming the tailings pile(s), restoring groundwater to acceptable conditions, and long term monitoring of the site. In examining these Issues, this paper: (1) presents a brief history of the development of the regulations that govern the industry, (2) describes the decommissioning process for conventional uranium production centers and (3) compares aggregated decommissioning cost data for six selected conventional uranium mills, based on filings with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. (author). 9 figs

  4. Radiological characterization of nuclear plants under decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work a description of major problems encountered in qualitative and quantitative radiological characterization of nuclear plants for decommissioning and decontamination purpose is presented. Referring to several nuclear plant classes activation and contamination processes, direct and indirect radiological analysis and some italian significant experience are descripted

  5. Spent fuel disposal impact on plant decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regardless of the decommissioning option selected (DECON, SAFSTOR, or ENTOMB), a 10 CFR 50 license cannot be terminated until the spent fuel is either removed from the site or stored in a separately 10 CFR 72 licensed Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). Humboldt Bay is an example of a plant which has selected the SAFSTOR option. Its spent fuel is currently in wet storage in the plant's spent fuel pool. When it completes its dormant period and proceeds with dismantlement, it will have to dispose of its fuel or license an ISFSI. Shoreham is an example of a plant which has selected the DECON option. Fuel disposal is currently critical path for license termination. In the event an ISFSI is proposed to resolve the spent fuel removal issue, whether wet or dry, utilities need to properly determine the installation, maintenance, and decommissioning costs for such a facility. In considering alternatives for spent fuel removal, it is important for a utility to properly account for ISFSI decommissioning costs. A brief discussion is presented on one method for estimating ISFSI decommissioning costs

  6. Consideration of ISDC for Decommissioning Cost Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, W. H.; Park, S. K.; Choi, Y. D.; Kim, I. S.; Moon, J. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    In 2009, they decided to update the Yellow Book, and began to update it by analyzing user experiences. They found that several countries have adopted the proposed standardized cost structure for the production of cost estimates directly or for mapping national estimates onto a common structure. They also made conclusions that more detailed advice should be given on the use of the standardized structure and on the definition of cost items to avoid ambiguity. The revised cost structure, to be known as the International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC), was published in 2012. The standardized cost structure developed in the report may be used for estimating the costs of decommissioning of any type of nuclear facility. We analyzed this standardized cost structure (ISDC) and applied it to DECOMMIS which was developed by KAERI. The appropriate estimation system for domestic application was examined by comparing the estimation results. KAERI made WBS code in DECOMMIS and data obtained during decommissioning work of KRR2 and UCP. Recently the IAEA updated the decommissioning cost items and its structure by ISDC. The cost estimation items of the DECOMMIS were applied to ISDC structure. For applying, the ISDC code compared with WBS code of DECOMMIS as on text of the activity name from daily report basis. The mapping result of the ISDC items to WBS code of the DECOMMIS is much different. AS results of this study that it need the corresponding cost category which classified in accordance with the national standard price estimates.

  7. Virtual reality technology and nuclear decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During past years, an important activity at the Halden VR Centre (HVRC), Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) in Halden has been the development of virtual reality (VR) software for use in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. It is hoped that use of VR technology in the planning process may prove beneficial both with regard to minimizing workers' radiation exposure, as well as in helping to achieve the efficient use of human resources. VR can also be a valuable tool in the dismantling phase. In addition to this, VR provides the decommissioning project team with an effective medium in presentations to the public, as well as for communicating with relevant engineers and licensing authorities. The most extensive IFE VR decommissioning project is at present the VRdose project, conducted in co-operation with the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). VRdose will be used in the decommissioning of one of JNC's reactors, the Fugen Nuclear Power Station.The paper describes the present and planned versions of the VRdose system, but also briefly describes other related activities at HVRC. (author)

  8. Decontamination and decommissioning focus area. Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents details of the facility deactivation, decommissioning, and material disposition research for development of new technologies sponsored by the Department of Energy. Topics discussed include; occupational safety, radiation protection, decontamination, remote operated equipment, mixed waste processing, recycling contaminated metals, and business opportunities

  9. Decontamination and decommissioning of Shippingport commercial reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, J. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1989-11-01

    To a certain degree, the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Shippingport reactor was a joint venture with Duquesne Light Company. The structures that were to be decommissioned were to be removed to at least three feet below grade. Since the land had been leased from Duquesne Light, there was an agreement with them to return the land to them in a radiologically safe condition. The total enclosure volume for the steam and nuclear containment systems was about 1.3 million cubic feet, more than 80% of which was below ground. Engineering plans for the project were started in July of 1980 and the final environmental impact statement (EIS) was published in May of 1982. The plant itself was shut down in October of 1982 for end-of-life testing and defueling. The engineering services portion of the decommissioning plans was completed in September of 1983. DOE moved onto the site and took over from the Navy in September of 1984. Actual physical decommissioning began after about a year of preparation and was completed about 44 months later in July of 1989. This paper describes the main parts of D and D.

  10. Nuclear power plant decommissioning: an unresolved problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1984, the Critical Mass Energy Project asserted that at least 11 US reactors had gone through one-third of their operating lives without collecting any decommissioning funds and that nationwide only $600 million had been collected. This lack of financial planning prompted 10 states to require mandatory periodic deposits into external accounts: California, Colorado, Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Vermont, and Wisconsin. Setting aside decommissioning funds is essential in every country that uses nuclear power. Regardless of a nation's future energy plans, existing plants must eventually be scrapped. Just as today's cities would not be habitable without large fleets of garbage trucks and extensive landfills, the international nuclear industry is not viable without a sound decommissioning strategy. Thirty years after the first nuclear plant started producing electricity, such a strategy has yet to be formulated. More than 500 reactors, including those currently under construction, will have to be decommissioned. Preparing to safely retire these plants requires aggressive, well-funded research and development programs, policy makers willing to tackle unpleasant, long-term problems, and robust retirement accounts funded by today's utility customers

  11. Decommissioning of TRIGA Mark II type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dooseong; Jeong, Gyeonghwan; Moon, Jeikwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The first research reactor in Korea, KRR 1, is a TRIGA Mark II type with open pool and fixed core. Its power was 100 kWth at its construction and it was upgraded to 250 kWth. Its construction was started in 1957. The first criticality was reached in 1962 and it had been operated for 36,000 hours. The second reactor, KRR 2, is a TRIGA Mark III type with open pool and movable core. These reactors were shut down in 1995, and the decision was made to decommission both reactors. The aim of the decommissioning activities is to decommission the KRR 2 reactor and decontaminate the residual building structures and site, and to release them as unrestricted areas. The KRR 1 reactor was decided to be preserve as a historical monument. A project was launched for the decommissioning of these reactors in 1997, and approved by the regulatory body in 2000. A total budget for the project was 20.0 million US dollars. It was anticipated that this project would be completed and the site turned over to KEPCO by 2010. However, it was discovered that the pool water of the KRR 1 reactor was leaked into the environment in 2009. As a result, preservation of the KRR 1 reactor as a monument had to be reviewed, and it was decided to fully decommission the KRR 1 reactor. Dismantling of the KRR 1 reactor takes place from 2011 to 2014 with a budget of 3.25 million US dollars. The scope of the work includes licensing of the decommissioning plan change, removal of pool internals including the reactor core, removal of the thermal and thermalizing columns, removal of beam port tubes and the aluminum liner in the reactor tank, removal of the radioactive concrete (the entire concrete structure will not be demolished), sorting the radioactive waste (concrete and soil) and conditioning the radioactive waste for final disposal, and final statuses of the survey and free release of the site and building, and turning over the site to KEPCO. In this paper, the current status of the TRIGA Mark-II type reactor decommissioning projects was introduced.

  12. Governments' role in decommissioning nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many nuclear power plants will reach the end of their operating lives over the next 20 years; some may be life-extended, others may not. This development will precipitate enhanced industrial and regulatory activities in the area of decommissioning. We are also witnessing in many countries a significant shift in the role of government itself: new pressures on governments, such as enhanced attention on environmental impact/mitigation and strategies to implement market-oriented approaches in a variety of sectors, including the energy sector are driving the public policy agenda. The paper will examine the range of policy issues, drawing from recent NEA studies on decommissioning policies and the recent NEA study on Government and Nuclear Energy and, strategies and costs, and other current trends and developments in the nuclear industry and in the nuclear policy fields. The paper will reflect on issues to be addressed during the conference and draw conclusions on the appropriate role of government in this area. Decommissioning policy is very specific and focused: it is not a high level policy/political issue in most instances and rarely gets the same attention as the issue surrounding the future of nuclear energy itself and public concerns regarding safety, waste and economics. One reason why decommissioning does not get the same attention as for example disposal of spent nuclear fuel might be the fact that technology is available for decommissioning, while technology for disposal of spent nuclear fuel is under development. High profile or not, it will remain an important issue for governments and industry alike particularly because of the cost and long lead times involved. In some instances, governments are the owners of the facilities to be decommissioned. In addition, decommissioning factors into issues surrounding the economics of nuclear energy and the sustainability of the nuclear option. Based on results of the Tarragona Seminar (Spain, September 2-4, 2003) and the Rome Workshop, we conclude that, with respect to power production facilities, government policy should aim at securing funding, whatever system is practically chosen, so that the actual beneficiary from the power generated - and not the future taxpayer -pays for all the production costs, including future decommissioning. There are very good ethical reasons behind a system which ensures that the generations that consume this electricity do not leave such an economic burden to their grandchildren. This is also one of the principles that are expressed in the 1999 Joint Convention. The most practical way to ensure that such economic burdens do not crop up at a later stage is probably to create some sort of funding mechanism. Such funding can be organised in different ways according to different conditions in different countries. Generally speaking, to ensure an effective funding mechanism, there has to be national legislation on how such a mechanism should be constructed. Different systems with governmental institutions more or less involved are possible. But any funding system, aiming at providing economic resources for decommissioning in a foreseeable future should meet the following requirements. Stable legal framework: the legislation regarding funding should have high profile among legislators to ensure that political pressures do not lead to decisions to change the legislation in order to allow assets to be used for other urgent purposes. Legal rules must ensure that funds collected for this purpose cannot disappear as a consequence of bankruptcy of an owner of a nuclear facility that needs to be decommissioned. Calculations of future costs have to meet high accuracy standards. This means that appropriate discount factors will have to be applied to ensure that the time frames when costs will be incurred will be factored into the costing formulae. One possible way to achieve high accuracy is to require regular and frequent reviews of all calculations. It is essential that mechanisms are in place to ensure that the real value of assets in the fund guard agai

  13. 26 CFR 1.468A-5T - Nuclear decommissioning fund qualification requirements; prohibitions against self-dealing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Nuclear decommissioning fund qualification requirements...disqualification of nuclear decommissioning fund; termination of fund upon substantial completion of decommissioning (temporary)....

  14. European Nuclear Decommissioning Training Facility II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCK-CEN co-ordinates a project called European Nuclear Decommissioning Training Facility II (EUNDETRAF II) in the Sixth Framework Programme on Community activities in the field of research, technological development and demonstration for the period 2002 to 2006. This was a continuation of the FP5 project EUNDETRAF. EUNDETRAF II is a consortium of main European decommissioners, such as SCK-CEN, EWN (Energie Werke Nord, Greifswald Germany), Belgatom (Belgium), SOGIN Societa Gestione Impiantio Nucleari, Italy), Universitaet Hannover (Germany), RWE NUKEM (United Kingdom), DECOM Slovakia Slovakia), CEA Centre d'Energie Atomique, France), UKAEA (United Kingdom's Atomic Energy Agency, United Kingdom) and NRG (Nuclear Research and consultancy Group, Netherlands). The primary objective of this project is to bring together this vast skill base and experience; to consolidate it for easy assimilation and to transfer to future generations by organising a comprehensive training programme.Each training course has a one-week theoretical and a one-week practical component. The theoretical part is for a broader audience and consists of lectures covering all the main aspects of a decommissioning. The practical part of the course includes site visits and desk top solutions of anticipated decommissioning problems. Due to operational constraints and safety considerations, the number of participants to this part of the course is strictly limited. The partners intend to organise altogether two two-week EUNDETRAF II training courses over a period of three years. Another goal is to disseminate the existing theory as well as the practical know-how to personnel of the third countries. Finally it is important to bring together the principal decommissioning organisations undertaking various decommissioning activities. The project creates a forum for regular contacts to exchange information and experiences for mutual benefit of these organisations as well as to enhance skill base in Europe to strengthen the European position in the world

  15. Energia líquida no leite e desempenho de bezerros de vacas primíparas Aberdeen Angus / Milk net energy and performance of calves from Aberdeen Angus primiparous cows

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    J.S., Lemes; M.A., Pimentel; C.C., Brauner; J.C.F., Moraes.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available SciELO Spain | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese O estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a disponibilidade de energia líquida no leite de vacas primíparas Aberdeen Angus e sua relação com o desempenho ponderal dos bezerros. Foram utilizadas 47 vacas, criadas em condições extensivas, no município de Aceguá, RS, no período de setembro de 2005 a março de [...] 2006. A produção de leite foi avaliada pelo método pesagem do bezerro anterior e posterior à mamada, do nascimento à desmama (189 dias), em intervalos de 21 dias. Para análise dos resultados foram incluídos no modelo estatístico como efeitos fixos, o resultado do diagnóstico de gestação (G) e nível de produção de leite (NPL): NPLa Abstract in english The availability of net energy in the milk of Aberdeen Angus primiparous cows and his relationship with the calves performance was studied. Fourty seven cows, raised under a range condition, in Aceguá. RS county, were evaluated between September 2005 to April 2006. Milk production (PL) was estimated [...] by before and after suckle method, from birth to weaning (189days), every 21 days. Effects studied were pregnancy (G), and milk production level (NPL): NPLa

  16. Decommissioning in western Europe; Kaernkraftsavveckling i Vaesteuropa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundqvist, K. [Castor arbetslivskonsulter AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    This report gives an overview of the situation in Western Europe. The original aim was to focus on organisational and human issues with regard to nuclear reactor decommissioning, but very few articles were found. This is in sharp contrast to the substantial literature on technical issues. While most of the reports on decommissioning have a technical focus, several provide information on regulatory issues, strategies and 'state of the art'. The importance of the human and organizational perspective is however discovered, when reading between the lines of the technical publications, and especially when project managers summarize lessons learned. The results are to a large extent based on studies of articles and reports, mainly collected from the INIS database. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities started already in the sixties, but then mainly research and experimental facilities were concerned. Until now about 70 reactors have been shutdown world-wide. Over the years there have been plenty of conferences for exchanging experiences mostly about technical matters. Waste Management is a big issue. In the 2000s there will be a wave of decommissioning when an increasing amount of reactors will reach the end of their calculated lifetime (40 years, a figure now being challenged by both life-extension and pre-shutdown projects). Several reactors have been shut-down for economical reasons. Shutdown and decommissioning is however not identical. A long period of time can sometimes pass before an owner decides to decommission and dismantle a facility. The conditions will also differ depending on the strategy, 'immediate dismantling' or 'safe enclosure'. If immediate dismantling is chosen the site can reach 'green-field status' in less than ten years. 'Safe enclosure', however, seems to be the most common strategy. There are several pathways, but in general a safe store is constructed, enabling the active parts to remain in safe and waterproof conditions for a longer period of time (sometimes hundred years or more), prior to final demolition. Among the reasons for deferring the dismantling are lack of waste repositories and decreasing dose-rates for the workers. Of Europe's 218 commercial reactors in operation, the majority, 151, are located i the Western part. The biggest producers are France, United Kingdom and Germany, with 58, 35 and 20 reactors respectively. Until now mostly research- and pilot reactors have been shut-down. There are yet few experiences from decommissioning of large-scale commercial reactors. The following commercial reactors are undergoing decommissioning. (There are also a great amount of nuclear facilities of other types being decommissioned.) The three gas-cooled twin reactor plants of Berkeley, Trawsfynydd and Hunterston in UK. In Germany Gundremmingen, Lingen, Kahl and Wuergassen are being decommissioned. All of them are located in the Western part of the country. The biggest project is however the dismantling of the gigantic Greifswaldfacility situated on the coast of the Baltic see in former Eastern Germany. The plant has eight Russian built reactors of VVER-type. Like the rest of the former GDR-plants Greifswald was shutdown after the reunification in 1990. The strategy chosen is immediate dismantling. France is decommissioning seven reactors (Chooz A1, Chinon A1, A2, A3, St Laurent A1, A2 and Bugey 1.) The oldest, Chinon A1, closed down in 1973 and the youngest, Bugey 1, in 1994. Italy closed down all NPPs (altogether four) in 1987 after a referendum. The first reactor of the Netherlands was shutdown in 1997 mainly for economical reasons. The development of a free European electricity market will make it less profitable to run certain facilities. Vandelos 1 in Spain is undergoing decommissioning after a fire in the turbines in 1989. IAEA, OECD/NEA and EU are co-operating in the field of decommissioning. Much work is spent on harmonizing rules and preparing international guidelines. The international agencies now consider decommissioning of nuclear

  17. NMSS handbook for decommissioning fuel cycle and materials licensees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlando, D.A.; Hogg, R.C.; Ramsey, K.M. [and others

    1997-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission amended its regulations to set forth the technical and financial criteria for decommissioning licensed nuclear facilities. These regulations were further amended to establish additional recordkeeping requirements for decommissioning; to establish timeframes and schedules for the decommissioning; and to clarify that financial assurance requirements must be in place during operations and updated when licensed operations cease. Reviews of the Site Decommissioning Management Plan (SDMP) program found that, while the NRC staff was overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear facilities in a manner that was protective of public health and safety, progress in decommissioning many sites was slow. As a result NRC determined that formal written procedures should be developed to facilitate the timely decommissioning of licensed nuclear facilities. This handbook was developed to aid NRC staff in achieving this goal. It is intended to be used as a reference document to, and in conjunction with, NRC Inspection Manual Chapter (IMC) 2605, ``Decommissioning Inspection Program for Fuel Cycle and Materials Licensees.`` The policies and procedures discussed in this handbook should be used by NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at licensed fuel cycle and materials sites; formerly licensed sites for which the licenses were terminated; sites involving source, special nuclear, or byproduct material subject to NRC regulation for which a license was never issued; and sites in the NRC`s SDMP program. NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear reactor facilities subject to regulation under 10 CFR Part 50 are not required to use the procedures discussed in this handbook.

  18. NMSS handbook for decommissioning fuel cycle and materials licensees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission amended its regulations to set forth the technical and financial criteria for decommissioning licensed nuclear facilities. These regulations were further amended to establish additional recordkeeping requirements for decommissioning; to establish timeframes and schedules for the decommissioning; and to clarify that financial assurance requirements must be in place during operations and updated when licensed operations cease. Reviews of the Site Decommissioning Management Plan (SDMP) program found that, while the NRC staff was overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear facilities in a manner that was protective of public health and safety, progress in decommissioning many sites was slow. As a result NRC determined that formal written procedures should be developed to facilitate the timely decommissioning of licensed nuclear facilities. This handbook was developed to aid NRC staff in achieving this goal. It is intended to be used as a reference document to, and in conjunction with, NRC Inspection Manual Chapter (IMC) 2605, ''Decommissioning Inspection Program for Fuel Cycle and Materials Licensees.'' The policies and procedures discussed in this handbook should be used by NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at licensed fuel cycle and materials sites; formerly licensed sites for which the licenses were terminated; sites involving source, special nuclear, or byproduct material subject to NRC regulation for which a license was never issued; and sites in the NRC's SDMP program. NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear reactor facilities subject to regulation under 10 CFR Part 50 are not required to use the procedures discussed in this handbook

  19. On Decommissioning Costs of the Ranstad Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this study has been to extend the review of the future cost to decommission and dismantling the industrial area at the site of the old uranium mine at Ranstad in Sweden. The feedback of experience and actual costs from a decommissioning project in the United Kingdom (A26 in Springfields) has been used to help in the assessment of the reasonableness of the estimated costs for decommissioning of the old uranium mine in Ranstad. A quantitative (albeit subjective) statement about the accuracy of the Ranstad cost estimate has been developed. Also, the factors relevant to the allocation of costs between the Swedish state and the current owners of the old uranium mine site have been evaluated and presented. The study has developed the following main conclusions: - The importance of thorough characterization/radiological mapping to the selection of the optimum decommissioning approach (technique) has been reinforced very strongly. - Thorough characterization has the related consequence of being able to better define the costs of decommissioning, in terms of equipment needed, labour hours required and, importantly, the volumes of different categories of waste requiring different routes (and associated different unit costs) for ultimate disposition. - Uncertainties in the Ranstad decommissioning cost estimate nevertheless remain, in particular relating to the viability of the proposed approach to dismantling and decontaminating the acid proof bricks that line the pools in the Large Leaching Hall; a method that is acknowledged to be not proven. The outcome could have an impact on actual dismantling and decontamination costs, as well as on the costs of ultimate waste disposition. The KB2010 cost estimate report does not offer an alternative in the event that the base plan proves to be unfeasible. - On balance it would appear that the continued presence of RMA at the Ranstad site ultimately will provide a net cost benefit to the program. The extra costs that RMA operations may cause are assessed to be more than offset by the benefits of having a functioning RMA Leach Hall facility, as well as the historical benefits of general site management

  20. Nuclear submarine decommissioning. Radiation risk assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning of the ships and vessels with nuclear power installations is a problem of primary and worldwide importance. It is essential for both the naval fleet and the military industrial complex as a whole. Nuclear submarines decommissioning is accompanied by a number of questions concerning the development and performance of the safe technologies for managing radioactive equipment and nuclear waste from the vessels with the nuclear power facilities. Decommissioning of nuclear submarines including unloading of the spent fuel should take place at the operating ship yards and repairing plants that are usually situated close to the densely populated areas and living blocks. Decommissioning includes a series of the potentially dangerous operations with radioactive materials, e.g. fuel unloading, disposal of coolant, dismantling of the contaminated equipment, cutting out the reactor compartment, etc. As a result a great amount of highly radioactive liquid and solid wastes are formed including the cut-out reactor compartment and spent fuel that produce additional radioactive load on the local environment and population. Estimation of the radiation risk for the environment and population due to decommissioning becomes an actual and necessary question. Apart from this the process of decommissioning may cause accidents followed by complicated radiation situation with high dose rates and contamination of the environment. Analysis of the most probable scenarios of the acciof the most probable scenarios of the accident development and estimation of the expected radiation consequences should help to assess the risk rate for radiation impact on the environment and population as well as to develop an adequate environmental monitoring and to undertake measures for the accident localisation and liquidation of its consequences. A separate problem is management of the reactor compartment containing radioactive equipment of the steam producing installation and biological protection. Since there are no specialised facilities with an adequate equipment for decomposition of reactor compartments incorporating highly active equipment they need to be stored in special containers for a long period until radiation level decreases to the level safe for decomposing operations without special remote and protection equipment. Various storage techniques are discussed, e.g. in floating regime, burial in shallow waters, open ground, etc. (author)

  1. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference pressurized water reactor power station: Technical support for decommissioning matters related to preparation of the final decommissioning rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation of the final Decommissioning Rule by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff familiar with decommissioning matters. These efforts have included updating previous cost estimates developed during the series of studies on conceptually decommissioning reference licensed nuclear facilities for inclusion in the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (FGEIS) on decommissioning; documenting the cost updates; evaluating the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits on decommissioning; developing a revised scaling formula for estimating decommissioning costs for reactor plants different in size from the reference pressurized water reactor (PWR) described in the earlier study; defining a formula for adjusting current cost estimates to reflect future escalation in labor, materials, and waste disposal costs; and completing a study of recent PWR steam generator replacements to determine realistic estimates for time, costs and doses associated with steam generator removal during decommissioning. This report presents the results of recent PNL studies to provide supporting information in four areas concerning decommissioning of the reference PWR: updating the previous cost estimates to January 1986 dollars; assessing the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits; assessing the cost and dose impacts of recent steam generator replacements; and developing a scaling formula for plants different in size than the reference plant and an escalation formula for adjusting current cost estimates for future escalation

  2. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference pressurized water reactor power station: Technical support for decommissioning matters related to preparation of the final decommissioning rule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

    1988-07-01

    Preparation of the final Decommissioning Rule by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff familiar with decommissioning matters. These efforts have included updating previous cost estimates developed during the series of studies on conceptually decommissioning reference licensed nuclear facilities for inclusion in the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (FGEIS) on decommissioning; documenting the cost updates; evaluating the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits on decommissioning; developing a revised scaling formula for estimating decommissioning costs for reactor plants different in size from the reference pressurized water reactor (PWR) described in the earlier study; defining a formula for adjusting current cost estimates to reflect future escalation in labor, materials, and waste disposal costs; and completing a study of recent PWR steam generator replacements to determine realistic estimates for time, costs and doses associated with steam generator removal during decommissioning. This report presents the results of recent PNL studies to provide supporting information in four areas concerning decommissioning of the reference PWR: updating the previous cost estimates to January 1986 dollars; assessing the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits; assessing the cost and dose impacts of recent steam generator replacements; and developing a scaling formula for plants different in size than the reference plant and an escalation formula for adjusting current cost estimates for future escalation.

  3. Law regulations on decommissioning of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concerning the decommissioning of reactors, the major provisions are discussed in the Electricity Enterprises Act and The Law for the Regulations of Nuclear Source Material, Nuclear Fuel Material and Reactors. Tokai Unit 1 in Tokai Power Station, Japan's first nuclear power plant, will be subject to the low regulations on reactor decommissioning about ten years hence. JPDR (Japan Power Demonstration Reactor) is being dismantled in the near future. Accoring to the Act the electricity enterprise must obtain the permission thereon from the Ministry for International Trade and Industry. According to the Low, the reactor owner must report thereon in advance to the competent Minister and the competent Minister may give orders concerning the necessary measures etc. (Mori, K.)

  4. System for remotely controlled decommissioning operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to analyse the possibilities of reducing radiation exposure during the decommissioning of nuclear facilities by employing remotely operated systems. All types of nuclear reactors and reprocessing plants that exist in the countries of the European Communities are included. In decommissioning tasks the main fields to be considered for remote control are monitoring by visual inspection and radiation or position measurement, decontamination of assemblies or work space, dismantling of metal or concrete structures and, possibly, treatment and transport of resulting debris. As a result of this study three general purpose robotic systems are proposed in conceptual design form. Most of the technology needed already exists but some further developments in hardware and computer software are suggested for greater efficiency. (U.K.)

  5. Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; C. Gentile; R. Parsells; K. Rule; R. Strykowsky; M. Viola

    2003-10-28

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D&D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D&D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget.

  6. Reactor decommissioning in a deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Deregulation of the electricity markets in North America and Western Europe has had many profound effects on the electric utilities and the nuclear industry. Deregulation has led to cost transparency, increased competition, and a drive by the utilities to reduce costs in order to maintain market share and margins. In the context of this more competitive and dynamic market having a clear picture of decommissioning liabilities and their successful discharge has a material impact on the financial performance of a utility. This paper will summarise BNFL Environmental Services' experience with regard to its experience in both the planning and implementation phases of a reactor decommissioning project. In particular it will demonstrate how commercial projects in crucial areas of strategy development, project implementation and site restoration, can be combined with an approach that is both commercial and innovative to reduce the risks to a utility. This paper sets out to demonstrate this viewpoint. (author)

  7. Decommissioning of the LURE Nuclear Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the goal of obtaining the decommissioning of the LURE nuclear facility, three of its accelerators were dismantled and another was modified to be below the thresh- old of 'Installation Nucleaire de Base' status. Operations were carried out with the strategy of mechanical dismantling with no cutting process. As the civil engineering radioactivity level was low, a great majority of it has been left in place with no process- ing, but compensatory measures have been taken for public and environmental protection. The overall result of these operations is a gain in both cost and operating time. They also contribute to a significant decrease in the risks, including radiological ones. The radiological impact after decommissioning remains acceptable. (authors)

  8. Approach to decommissioning at AECL's laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This series of slides presents: the Chalk River Laboratories (overview), the decommissioning organization (planning and operations), the waste management strategy (four steps: Characterization, Processing/Immobilization/Packaging, Storage, disposal), the integration of waste management and decommissioning, the free release criteria (status in Canada, AECL official criteria, AECL interim criteria, comparison to International Criteria, Release of Lands, Groundwater Monitoring, Approaches Under Consideration for Free Release, Actions) and the issues for discussion (What are the release standards? Do the same release standards apply to soil and the ground as apply to the buildings? Are release standards dose-based, or concentration based? Are there different release standards for different types of radionuclides? What are the standards for groundwater? Are surface contamination or volumetric standards used?)

  9. Practical technological benefits of SRE decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decommissioning of the Sodium Reactor Experiment is essentially complete. Contaminated materials, equipment, and soil were removed, decreasing the residual radioactivity to levels acceptable for future unrestricted use of the site. The fuel was removed and declad, tooling and techniques to support the decommissioning were developed, bulk sodium and residual sodium films were removed, coolant systems were dismantled, the reactor vessel was dissected, the interior surfaces of the facilities were decontaminated, and waste materials were packaged and shipped to burial sites. Radiation exposure to workers and the public was within the guidelines and as low as reasonably achievable. In performing the project, new decontamination techniques were tested, decontamination equipment was evaluated, and waste disposal methods were developed

  10. Decommissioning? Why not use a robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasks which may be accomplished by robots alone or in conjunction with human workers in decommissioning nuclear facilities include: routine surveillance in contaminated areas; radiation surveys and sampling; preparation of work area; decontamination of walls and floors; disassembly of contaminated equipment and piping; internal decontamination of piping and waste storage/processing tanks; sorting materials; removal of large activated/contaminated structures; asbestos removal and packaging; transport of waste from disassembly areas; tending waste processing equipment; waste packaging for storage. The status of the technology is briefly reviewed and examples of the use of robots in decommissioning work in the USA are described. Although the use of robots in this field is not extensive so far, that use is increasing and information on its costs and benefits are becoming available. (UK)

  11. Criteria development for DOE decommissioning operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project was initiated in the third quarter of FY 1979 to prepare guidance for DOE staff and contractors in the planning and implementation of decommissioning operations and in the certification of decommissioned DOE sites. A working draft of a radiological guide was prepared and forwarded for sponsor review in FY 1980. During 1981, the guide was completed and all comments were incorporated early in FY 1982. Although the Guide had been expected to be published in FY 1982, DOE management had not yet authorized its publication prior to the end of the fiscal year. The major effort in FY 1982 involved preparation of an assessment methodology and applying that methodology to assessing the inventory of chemical wastes and disposal sites on the Hanford Reservation

  12. Decommissioning of aqueous homogeneous critical facility (AHCF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous Homogeneous Critical Facility (AHCF), constructed to investigate the characteristics of a heavy water moderated homogeneous reactor, had been operated until 1966 since it was reached to the critical state in 1961. As it performed its mission, the license for the operation of the facility was revoked at December 25, 1962, and thereafter the facility has been mothballed safely. This critical facility was determined to remove and dismantle at this time in order to obtain some information for decommissioning of a nuclear power reactor and utilize the area thereof effectively. This paper describes the program and methods for this decommissioning work, the amount of wastes generated, treatment of nuclear fuel, removal of fuel handling facility, and radiation protection and safety during this work. (author)

  13. Health physics program for the Edgemont Uranium Mill decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is actively involved in decommissioning a uranium mill located near the town of Edgemont, South Dakota. The Edgemont Mill Decommissioning Project, which is unique in many respects, will involve dismantlement of the old inactive mill building and excavation and transportation of several million tons of uranium mill tailings to a permanent disposal site. To ensure that workers are adequately protected from radiation exposure during decommissioning operations, a health physics program appropriate for the decommissioning situation was developed. The Edgemont Mill Decommissioning Project Health Physics Manual (HPM) gives the programmatic requirements for worker radiation protection. The requirements of the HPM are implemented by means of detailed onsite operating procedures. The Edgemont project health physics program was developed using currently available regulations and guidance for an operating uranium mill with appropriate modifications for decommissioning. This paper discusses the development, implementation, and documentation of that program

  14. Estimation of nuclear facility decommissioning costs. Current status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is now common practice to prepare decommissioning plans and associated cost estimates for nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities even before the start of construction. Typically these plans and estimates are updated regularly during plant operation, in the transition period after shut down, and during decommissioning. Specific requirements on contents of the plan are usually set out in regulation, which has its basis in national legislation. Transparent, underpinned cost estimates have a number of important functions. They provide: a rationale for the chosen decommissioning strategy, a basis for assessing the cost-effectiveness of the decommissioning activities, and a basis for ensuring the necessary funds are available when needed to cover the actual cost of decommissioning. Practices for estimating decommissioning costs vary across countries and projects. Efforts are being made to improve cost comparability. (authors)

  15. Nuclear power plant decommissioning strategy in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introductory chapters describe the basic legal requirements imposed by current Czech legislation, in particular Act No. 18/1997 and Decree No. 196/1999, which were reflected in the preparation of the Strategy for the Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Plants Operated by the CEZ Utility. The principles adopted within the preparation of the strategy are outlined. Detailed information is provided about the adopted method of decommissioning of both the Dukovany and Temelin NPPs, as well as about the concept of radioactive waste management during the decommissioning process. In addition to the schedules for the decommissioning activities, information is presented about the amounts of radioactive waste planned for disposal in the repository located at the Dukovany site. The financial aspects of nuclear power plant decommissioning are outlined, including cost estimates and cost structures for the decommissioning of the Dukovany and Temelin NPPs. (author)

  16. Workshop 3: Retrospective Dosimetry and Decommissioning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serén, Tom; Fero, Arnold

    2009-08-01

    The workshop had 27 participants. There was an initial discussion of the current status and use of retrospective dosimetry techniques. There was a consensus that this had become a wide-spread and useful technique. The applications have ranged from the well known characterization of reactor vessel neutron exposure to the assessment of the age of metal specimens removed from reactor internals to concrete trepans from concrete shields in a decommissioning context...

  17. Decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1973, when the IAEA first introduced the subject of decontamination and decommissioning into its programme, twelve Agency reports reflecting the needs of the Member States on these topics have been published. These reports summarize the work done by various Technical Committees, Advisory Groups, and International Symposia. While the basic technology to accomplish decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) is fairly well developed, the Agency feels that a more rapid exchange of information and co-ordination of work are required to foster technology, reduce duplication of effort, and provide useful results for Member States planning D and D activities. Although the Agency's limited financial resources do not make possible direct support of every research work in this field, the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) creates a forum for outstanding workers from different Member States brought into closer contact with one another to provide for more effective interaction and, perhaps subsequently, closer collaboration. The first IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on decontamination and decommissioning was initiated in 1984. Nineteen experts from 11 Member States and two international organizations (CEC, OECD/NEA) took part in the three Research Co-ordination Meetings (RCM) during 1984-87. The final RCM took place in Pittsburgh, USA, in conjunction with the 1987 International Decommissioning Symposium (sponsored by the US DOE and organized in co-operation with the IAEA and OECD/NEA). The present document summarizes the salient features and achievements of the co-ordinated research work performed during the 1984-87 programme period. The document consists of two parts: Part 1, Summary of the three research co-ordination meetings and Part 2, Final submissions by participants on the research work performed during 1984-1987. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 7 reports presented. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. Experimental feedback on sodium loop decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to present experimental feedback on sodium loop dismantling techniques at the CEA (The French Atomic Energy Commission) and to offer recommendations for the decommissioning of Fast Reactor secondary sodium loops. This study is based on acquired CEA decommissioning experience which primarily concerns the following: the decommissioning of RAPSODIE (France's first Fast Reactor), the Phenix reactor secondary loop replacement, the sodium loop decommissioning carried out by the Laboratory of Sodium Technologies and Treatment, and several technical documents. This paper deals with the main results of this survey. First, a comparison of 8 pipe-cutting techniques is made, taking into account speed in cutting, reliability, dissemination, fire risk due to the presence of sodium, cutting depth, and different types of waste (empty pipes, sodium-filled pipes, tanks). This comparison has led us to recommend the use of an alternative saw or a chain saw rather than the use of the plasma torch or grinder. Different techniques are recommended depending on if they are on-site, initial cuttings or if they are to be carried out in a specially-designed facility referred to hereafter as 'the cutting building'. After the cutting stage, the sodium waste must be processed with water to become an ultimate stable waste. Four treatment processes are compared with different standards: speed, cost, low activity adaptability and 'large sodium quantity' adaptability. Recommende sodium quantity' adaptability. Recommendations are also made for reliable storage, and for the general dismantling system organization. Last, calculations are presented concerning a complete dismantling facility prototype capable of treating large amounts and volume of sodium wastes. (author)

  19. CEA experimental feedback on sodium loop decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to present experimental feedback on sodium loop dismantling techniques at the CEA (The French Atomic Energy Commission) and to offer recommendations for the decommissioning of Fast Reactor secondary sodium loops. This study is based on acquired CEA decommissioning experience which primarily concerns the following: the decommissioning of RAPSODIE (France's first Fast Reactor), the PHENIX reactor secondary loop replacement, the sodium loop decommissioning carried out by the Laboratory of Sodium Technologies and Treatment, and several technical documents. This paper deals with the main results of this survey. First, a comparison of 8 pipe-cutting techniques is made, taking into account speed in cutting, reliability, dissemination, fire risk due to the presence of sodium, cutting depth, and different types of waste (empty pipes, sodium-filled pipes, tanks...). This comparison has led us to recommend the use of an alternative saw or a chain saw rather than the use of the plasma torch or grinder. Different techniques are recommended depending on if they are on-site, initial cuttings or if they are to be carried out in a specially-designed facility referred to hereafter as 'the cutting building'. After the cutting stage, the sodium waste must be processed with water to become an ultimate stable waste. Four treatment processes are compared with different standards : speed, cost, low activity adaptability and 'large sodium quantity' adaptability. Recomlarge sodium quantity' adaptability. Recommendations are also made for reliable storage, and for the general dismantling system organization. Last, calculations are presented concerning a complete dismantling facility prototype capable of treating large amounts and volume of sodium wastes. (author)

  20. Decommissioning a tritium glove-box facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large glove-box facility for handling reactive metal tritides was decommissioned. Major sections of the glove box were decontaminated and disassembled for reuse at another tritium facility. To achieve the desired results, decontamnation required repeated washing, first with organic liquids, then with water and detergents. Worker protection was provided by simple ventilation combined with careful monitoring of the work areas and employees. Several innovative techniques are described

  1. 78 FR 38739 - Standard Format and Content for Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ...Content for Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report AGENCY: Nuclear...Content for Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report.'' This guide...submission of a post-shutdown decommissioning activities report...

  2. 77 FR 75198 - Standard Format and Content for Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ...Content for Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report AGENCY: Nuclear...Content for Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report.'' This guide...submission of a post-shutdown decommissioning activities report...

  3. 26 CFR 1.468A-0T - Nuclear decommissioning costs; table of contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Nuclear decommissioning costs; table of contents. 1...Taken § 1.468A-0T Nuclear decommissioning costs; table of contents. This...468A-9T. § 1.468A-1TNuclear decommissioning costs; general rules...

  4. 75 FR 54363 - BOEMRE Information Collection Activity: 1010-0142, Decommissioning Activities, Extension of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ...Collection Activity: 1010-0142, Decommissioning Activities, Extension of a Collection...regulations under 30 CFR 250, subpart Q, Decommissioning Activities, and related documents...Title: 30 CFR 250, subpart Q, Decommissioning Activities. OMB Control...

  5. 26 CFR 1.468A-1T - Nuclear decommissioning costs; general rules (temporary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Nuclear decommissioning costs; general rules (temporary...Taken § 1.468A-1T Nuclear decommissioning costs; general rules (temporary...method for taking into account nuclear decommissioning costs for Federal income tax...

  6. 77 FR 65910 - Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC., Hematite Decommissioning Project, Festus, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ...Electric Company, LLC., Hematite Decommissioning Project, Festus, Missouri AGENCY...monitoring systems at WEC Hematite Decommissioning Project (HDP) site in Missouri...authorizes the licensee to conduct decommissioning activities. The NRC's...

  7. 33 CFR 148.325 - How soon after port decommissioning must the licensee initiate removal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... false How soon after port decommissioning must the licensee initiate removal...325 How soon after port decommissioning must the licensee initiate removal? Within 2 years of port decommissioning, the licensee must...

  8. 15 CFR 946.5 - Change in operations-commissioning and decommissioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...Change in operations-commissioning and decommissioning. 946.5 Section 946.5 Commerce...in operations—commissioning and decommissioning. (a) Before commissioning...flight aviation rules. (c) Before decommissioning any NWS radar, the NWS shall...

  9. 30 CFR 285.1019 - What are the decommissioning requirements for an Alternate Use RUE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false What are the decommissioning requirements for an Alternate Use...Using Existing OCS Facilities Decommissioning An Alternate Use Rue § 285.1019 What are the decommissioning requirements for an Alternate...

  10. 30 CFR 285.906 - What must my decommissioning application include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must my decommissioning application include? 285.906 Section...FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Decommissioning Decommissioning Applications § 285.906 What must...

  11. 77 FR 16077 - License Amendment Request From Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, Hematite Decommissioning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ...Electric Company, LLC, Hematite Decommissioning Project AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...SNM-33 and is authorized to conduct decommissioning activities at the facility. The amendment...authorization for WEC to transfer decommissioning waste from the facility to...

  12. 30 CFR 285.905 - When must I submit my decommissioning application?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false When must I submit my decommissioning application? 285.905 Section 285...FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Decommissioning Decommissioning Applications § 285.905 When must I...

  13. 30 CFR 285.908 - What must I include in my decommissioning notice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false What must I include in my decommissioning notice? 285.908 Section 285.908...FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Decommissioning Decommissioning Applications § 285.908 What must I...

  14. 75 FR 72737 - Proposed Generic Communications Reporting for Decommissioning Funding Status Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-26

    ...Decommissioning Funding Status (DFS) reports to ensure...Decommissioning Funding Status Reports Addressees All...operating license or construction permit under Title 10...combined license, standard design certification, standard...2) regarding the status of decommissioning...

  15. Unrestricted re-use of decommissioned nuclear laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelissen, R.; Noynaert, L.; Harnie, S.; Marien, J.

    1996-09-18

    A decommissioning strategy was developed by the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN. In this strategy decommissioning works are limited to the radioactive parts of the nuclear installation. After obtaining an attestation for unrestricted reuse of the building after removal of all radioactivity, the building can be used for new industrial purposes outside the nuclear field. The decommissioning activities according to this strategy have been applied in four buildings. The results are described.

  16. The Relevance for the Nuclear Industry Decommissioning Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overall conclusions: • Large amounts of scrap metal from decommissioning presents a significant problem if reliance is placed on disposal; • Present-day technologies support decontamination of a large proportion of decommissioning steel to clearance levels; • Significant health, environmental and socio-economic benefits of recycling and reuse; • Conditional clearance options may satisfy the needs both of the metal recycling industry and of the decommissioning industry

  17. The Northern Ireland peace process and the impact of decommissioning

    OpenAIRE

    Chastelain, John

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the impact that the decommissioning of paramilitary arms has had, and continues to have, on the Northern Ireland peace process. It selects the beginning of the paramilitary group ceasefires in 1994 as the beginning of that pro-cess, and examines how decommissioning has affected progress in it up to the present date. It looks at the involvement of the Independent Body, the International Chairmen and the Independent International Commission on Decommissioning throughout the ...

  18. The environmental improvement of decommissioning uranium tailings impoundment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general remark is introduced on environmental improvement of decommissioning uranium tailings impoundments at home and abroad. The problems need to be solved on radiative protection, dam slope stabilization and flood control of the decommissioning impoundments are stated. Based on the experiences of foreign countries, the engineering measures used on the decommission are described separately. A detail statement on the test of reducing the radon release rate with earth cover and the calculation is given especially

  19. Operation and dismantling report 2004 for Danish Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the operations at Danish Decommissioning (DD) that are essential for the nuclear inspection authorities' assessment of safety related issues. The report presents an account of safety and of the work at DD, including the decommissioning projects in 2004 for the nuclear facilities. The radioactive waste treatment facility in operation is described, and inspection and maintenance reports of the nuclear facilities prepared for decommissioning are presented. (ln)

  20. Decommissioning the UT TRIGA reactor - Meeting technical and regulatory requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the most significant findings and features contained in the Decommissioning Plan which accompanied The University of Texas's termination of license application for its TRIGA reactor. Key topics which distinguish this plan from past research reactor decommission applications and which reflect the latest NRC regulatory requirements, are presented. This includes biological shield activation calculations, decommissioning tasks and schedule for the DECON alternative, collective dose equivalent, occupational health and environmental provisions, radioactive waste management, preliminary cost estimates and funding requirements. (author)

  1. Initial decommissioning planning for the Budapest research reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toth Gabor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Budapest Research Reactor is the first nuclear research facility in Hungary. The reactor is to remain in operation for at least another 13 years. At the same time, the development of a decommissioning plan is a mandatory requirement under national legislation. The present paper describes the current status of decommissioning planning which is aimed at a timely preparation for the forthcoming decommissioning of the reactor.

  2. Administrative requirements of financial securities to cover decommissioning operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper points out that the lack of experience in decommissioning of nuclear power plants is reflected by the absence of specific legislation regarding the economic, fiscal and accounting aspects of the process. The author suggests that a fund be created for decommissioning costs through contributions deriving from plant operation. The paper analyses the procedures to be followed and draws attention to the need for clear legislation on decommissioning. (NEA)

  3. Sedimentology of the Teekloof formation to the east of Aberdeen (C.P.) with reference to uranium mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An area to the immediate east of Aberdeen (C.P.), banded in the north by the Rooiberge and to the east by the Sundays River, has been sedimentologically studied. A notable feature of the sediments investigated, is the presence of linear zones of increased sandstone. Some of the sediments also showed an exessive volume of argillaceous rocks. The sandstones cropping out in the Aberdeen District may be classified as lithic arkoses. Due to the manner in which the detrital grains appear to 'float' in calcite, an expansive growth mechanism is envisaged. This implies early crystallization of calcite, and emplacement of uranium

  4. Radiation protection at decommissioning of ''hot cells''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of VKTA's assignments is the decommissioning of numerous old nuclear plants in the area of the Research Center Rossendorf. Here highly active liquids of many different nuclides (e. p. Cs-137, Sr-90, U- and Pu-isotopes) were handled to produce radiopharmaceuticals. Industrial sources were generated on the basis of highly active solids like Na, Co, Cs and Ir irradiated in a power reactor. According to this there are various forms of contamination in these former isotope production plants also referred to as ''hot cells''. Thus the requirements on the planning and work-accompanying radiation protection service were high when decommissioning these plants. Avoidance of incorporations had to be brought in line with minimization of outer exposition. This has been achieved by using graduated material and person sluices monitored small meshed in terms of radiation protection to allow fast reactions for person's protection and safety and also by applying remote controlled measuring systems as well as teleguided decommission machines in a huge scale. (orig.)

  5. The decommissioning of Berkeley Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the 13th July 1988, the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) announced that Berkeley Power Station was to cease generation after 27 years of valuable contribution to the electricity supply system of England and Wales. The station was built as part of the United Kingdom Government's 1955 Nuclear Power Programme. Along with its sister station at Bradwell in Essex, Berkeley was officially opened on 5th April 1963, becoming the first commercial nuclear power station in Britain. Studies on how nuclear stations will be decommissioned at the end of their useful lives have been carried out nationally and internationally for many years. Decommissioning work has been undertaken on some 80 reactors in the rest of the world, which for some has reached an advanced stage. In Britain, much experience is currently being gained from the dismantling of the Windscale Gas Cooled Reactor (WAGR). This paper presents a detailed account of the decommissioning activities undertaken at Berkeley to the present time and explains the future strategy. (author)

  6. Investment management for nuclear decommissioning trusts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to Nuclear Regulatory Commission estimates, and assuming a 4 percent annual inflation rate, minimum decommissioning requirements for a single reactor could total almost $350 million after 30 years. Consequently, reducing customer contributions to decommissioning funds is a potentially rewarding activity. In fact, improving the after-tax return earned on an NDT fund by as little as one percentage point can reduce customer contributions to the fund by 15% over its life. Unfortunately, many electric utilities are headed in the wrong direction and are unlikely to achieve satisfactory results. The main problem is the prevalence of the conventional wisdom, most of which has been appropriated from the area of pension fund management. This is an area which is familiar to most utility managements, but which has only superficial similarity to the issue of NDT investing. The differences are pronounced: NDTs, unlike pensions, are fully taxable at corporate income tax rates. In addition, NDT managers should be concerned with protecting the inflation-adjusted or real value of fund investments at a single, future decommissioning date. Pension managers, on the other hand, may be concerned with satisfying nominal contractual obligations spread over an extended future time horizon. In view of the large stakes involved in the management of NDTs, the authors summarize five key tenets of the conventional wisdom in this area and demonstrate where they feel they are in errorte where they feel they are in error

  7. Decommissioning of the Salaspils Research Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramenkovs Andris

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In May 1995, the Latvian government decided to shut down the Salaspils Research Reactor and to dispense with nuclear energy in the future. The reactor has been out of operation since July 1998. A conceptual study on the decommissioning of the Salaspils Research Reactor was drawn up by Noell-KRC-Energie- und Umwelttechnik GmbH in 1998-1999. On October 26th, 1999, the Latvian government decided to start the direct dismantling to “green-field” in 2001. The upgrading of the decommissioning and dismantling plan was carried out from 2003-2004, resulting in a change of the primary goal of decommissioning. Collecting and conditioning of “historical” radioactive wastes from different storages outside and inside the reactor hall became the primary goal. All radioactive materials (more than 96 tons were conditioned for disposal in concrete containers at the radioactive wastes depository “Radons” at the Baldone site. Protective and radiation measurement equipment of the personnel was upgraded significantly. All non-radioactive equipment and materials outside the reactor buildings were released for clearance and dismantled for reuse or conventional disposal. Contaminated materials from the reactor hall were collected and removed for clearance measurements on a weekly basis.

  8. Decommissioning project of commercial nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning project of commercial nuclear power plant in Japan was outlined. It is expected that the land, after the decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants, will serve as sites for new plants. Steps will be taken to reduce the amount of wastes generated and to recycle/reuse them. Wastes with a radioactivity concentration below the 'clearance level' need not be dealt with as radioactive material, and may be handled in the same way as conventional wastes. The Tokai-1 power station, a 166 MWe carbon dioxide cooled reactor which closed down in 1998, is being decommissioned and the first ten years as 'safe storage' to allow radioactivity to decay. Non-reactor grade components such as turbines were already removed, heat exchanger dismantling started and the reactor will be dismantled, the buildings demolished and the site left ready for reuse. All radioactive wastes will be classified as low-level wastes in three categories and will be buried under the ground. The total cost will be 88.5 billion yen -34.7 billion for dismantling and 53.8 billion for waste treatment including the graphite moderator. (T. Tanaka)

  9. Large transport packages for decommissioning waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main tasks performed during the period related to the influence of manufacture, transport and disposal on the design of such packages. It is deduced that decommissioning wastes will be transported under the IAEA Transport Regulations under either the Type B or Low Specific Activity (LSA) categories. If the LSA packages are self-shielded, reinforced concrete is the preferred material of construction. But the high cost of disposal implies that there is a strong reason to investigate the use of returnable shields for LSA packages and in such cases they are likely to be made of ferrous metal. Economic considerations favour the use of spheroidal graphite cast iron for this purpose. Transport operating hazards have been investigated using a mixture of desk studies, routes surveys and operations data from the railway organisations. Reference routes were chosen in the Federal Republic of Germany, France and the United Kingdom. This work has led to a description of ten accident scenarios and an evaluation of the associated accident probabilities. The effect of disposal on design of packages has been assessed in terms of the radiological impact of decommissioning wastes, an in addition corrosion and gas evolution have been examined. The inventory of radionuclides in a decommissioning waste package has low environmental impact. If metal clad reinforced concrete packages are to be used, the amount of gas evolution is such that a vent would need to be included in the design. Similar unclad packages would be sufficiently permeable to gases to prevent a pressure build-up. (author)

  10. Decommissioning U.K. power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strategy for decommissioning U.K. commercial nuclear power stations at the end of their operating lives has hitherto been based on early partial dismantling and clearance to green-field site after about 100 years. This strategy involves a considerable financial liability particularly in the early years following shutdown of the stations. In 1990 Nuclear Electric identified the potential for significantly reducing this liability by reviewing a range of alternative strategies for decommissioning. This review has now been completed by Nuclear Electric and this paper describes the background to it, the review itself and the conclusions. As a result Nuclear Electric are now proposing to adopt a new strategy, referred to as the ''Deferred Safestore strategy'' for all its gas-cooled power stations. This does not involve any significant active dismantling until about 135 years after shutdown, allowing radioactivity levels in the plant to decay to very low levels in-situ. Following defuelling, an initial care and maintenance phase of about 30 years occurs followed by construction of containments (Safestores) around all buildings containing active plant. The purpose of these is to protect the buildings and their contents from deterioration due to weathering for a further 100 years. Complete dismantling is carried out after that time. An alternative option at that time, with further considerable cost savings, could be In-situ decommissioning. (Author)ssioning. (Author)

  11. Lessons learned on stakeholder issues in decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issues of public concern during decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) are partly the same and partly different from those of the preceding phases (planning, construction and operation). While in the course of construction and operation the main challenges include meeting expectations of a higher quality of life, accommodating a growing population, mitigating construction nuisances, and assuring the safe operation of the facility, the main concerns in the D and D phase are decreasing employment rate, the eventual reduction of revenues for the municipality, the future use of the affected land and negative social impacts (e.g., out-migration). The decommissioning phase is characterised by heterogeneity of stakeholder interests and values, difficulties of reaching consensus or compromise, and difficulties in connection with the harmonization of energy production, environmental protection and sustainable socio-economic development considerations. Typically, there might also be tensions between local and regional decisions. As in other phases, the building of trust between stakeholder is crucial from the point of view of conflict management, and social lessons learnt from the siting and developments of nuclear facilities are widely applicable in the field of D and D as well. A review is presented of major lessons to be learnt from NEA activities in the field of decommissioning and stakeholder involvement. (author)

  12. Decommissioning Cost Estimating -The ''Price'' Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past 9 years UKAEA has developed a formalized approach to decommissioning cost estimating. The estimating methodology and computer-based application are known collectively as the PRICE system. At the heart of the system is a database (the knowledge base) which holds resource demand data on a comprehensive range of decommissioning activities. This data is used in conjunction with project specific information (the quantities of specific components) to produce decommissioning cost estimates. PRICE is a dynamic cost-estimating tool, which can satisfy both strategic planning and project management needs. With a relatively limited analysis a basic PRICE estimate can be produced and used for the purposes of strategic planning. This same estimate can be enhanced and improved, primarily by the improvement of detail, to support sanction expenditure proposals, and also as a tender assessment and project management tool. The paper will: describe the principles of the PRICE estimating system; report on the experiences of applying the system to a wide range of projects from contaminated car parks to nuclear reactors; provide information on the performance of the system in relation to historic estimates, tender bids, and outturn costs

  13. Automatized material and radioactivity flow control tool in decommissioning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation the automatized material and radioactivity flow control tool in decommissioning process is discussed. It is concluded that: computer simulation of the decommissioning process is one of the important attributes of computer code Omega; one of the basic tools of computer optimisation of decommissioning waste processing are the tools of integral material and radioactivity flow; all the calculated parameters of materials are stored in each point of calculation process and they can be viewed; computer code Omega represents opened modular system, which can be improved; improvement of the module of optimisation of decommissioning waste processing will be performed in the frame of improvement of material procedures and scenarios.

  14. Planning for safe decommissioning of research reactors in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egypt operates two Research Reactors: ETRR-1: Tank type, 2 MW power, 10% enrichment EK-10 fuel, and commissioned in 1960 and ETRR-2: Open pool type, 22 MW power, 20% enrichment plate type fuel and commissioned in 1997. A proposed decommissioning plan for each reactor will be presented. The established decommissioning plan includes facility characterization, procedures and radiological protection aspects. The safety assessment during the decommissioning identifies the actions that are necessary to ensure continuous safety during all phases of decommissioning. Protective measures should provide the necessary defense in depth. (author)

  15. Computer System Analysis for Decommissioning Management of Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear reactor decommissioning is a complex activity that should be planed and implemented carefully. A system based on computer need to be developed to support nuclear reactor decommissioning. Some computer systems have been studied for management of nuclear power reactor. Software system COSMARD and DEXUS that have been developed in Japan and IDMT in Italy used as models for analysis and discussion. Its can be concluded that a computer system for nuclear reactor decommissioning management is quite complex that involved some computer code for radioactive inventory database calculation, calculation module on the stages of decommissioning phase, and spatial data system development for virtual reality. (author)

  16. SGN's Dismantling and Decommissioning engineering, projects experience and capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Its experience in waste treatment, conditioning, storage and disposal, its cooperation with CEA and COGEMA Group in license agreements give SGN expertise in the decommissioning field. SGN's experience and background in all areas of nuclear facility decommissioning, such as chemical and mechanical cells, nuclear advanced reactors, reprocessing facilities result in fruitful references to the customers. The poster is presenting different achievements and projects with SGN's participation such as: - The decommissioning of Windscale Advanced Gas cooled Reactors (WAGR), in particular providing methodology and equipment to dismantle the Pressure and Insulation Vessel of the reactor. - The decommissioning plan of Ignalina (Lithuania) and Paldiski (Estonia), defining strategies, scenarios, necessary equipments and tools and choosing the best solutions to decommission the site under different influencing parameters such as cost, dose rate exposure, etc... - Th One Site Assistance Team (OSAT) at Chernobyl regarding the preparation works for the waste management and decommissioning of the plant. - The decommissioning of French nuclear facilities such as reprocessing (UP1) and reactor (EL4) plants. The important experience acquired during the facility management and during the first dismantling and decommissioning operations is an important factor for the smooth running of these techniques for the future. The challenge to come is to control all the operations, the choice of stratel all the operations, the choice of strategies, the waste management, the efficiency of tools and equipments, and to provide nuclear operators with a full range of proven techniques to optimise costs and minimize decommissioning personnel exposure. (Author)

  17. Decommissioning of civil nuclear facilities: a world review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This communication discusses the worldwide state of progress in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. In general the technology of decommissioning is straightforward, but although there are many examples of successful decommissioning projects the general progress is slow. The reasons for this are identified as primarily economic, but the lack of waste disposal facilities and the unnecessary personnel radiation doses that may be incurred by early decommissioning are also factors. Finally the redundant structures are relatively safe and stable and there is little technical incentive to dismantle them. The current delays are heavily influenced by political factors which may be subject to change. (author)

  18. Development of a decommissioning strategy for the MR research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bylkin, Boris; Gorlinsky, Yury; Kolyadin, Vyacheslav; Pavlenko, Vitaly [RRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Craig, David; Fecitt, Lorna [NUKEM Limited, Dounreay (United Kingdom); Harman, Neil; Jackson, Roger [Serco Technical and Assurance Services, Warrington (United Kingdom); Lobach, Yury [Inst. for Nuclear Research of NASU, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2010-03-15

    A description of the selected decommissioning strategy for the research reactor MR at the site of the Kurchatov Institute in Moscow is presented. The MR reactor hall is planned to be used as a temporary fuel store for the other research reactors on the site. On the basis of the site-specific conditions and over-all decommissioning goals, it was identified that phased immediate decommissioning is the preferable option. The current status of the reactor, expected final conditions and the sequence of decommissioning works are shown. (orig.)

  19. Development of a decommissioning strategy for the MR research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description of the selected decommissioning strategy for the research reactor MR at the site of the Kurchatov Institute in Moscow is presented. The MR reactor hall is planned to be used as a temporary fuel store for the other research reactors on the site. On the basis of the site-specific conditions and over-all decommissioning goals, it was identified that phased immediate decommissioning is the preferable option. The current status of the reactor, expected final conditions and the sequence of decommissioning works are shown. (orig.)

  20. Decommissioning wind energy projects: An economic and political analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wind energy is the fastest-growing segment of new electrical power capacity in the United States, with the potential for significant growth in the future. To facilitate such growth, a number of concerns between developers and landowners must be resolved, including assurance of wind turbine decommissioning at the end of their useful lives. Oklahoma legislators enlisted the authors to develop an economically-sound proposal to ensure developers complete their decommissioning obligations. Economic analysis of turbine decommissioning is complicated by a lack of operational experience, as few U.S. projects have been decommissioned. This leads to a lack of data regarding decommissioning costs. Politically, the negotiation leading to the finally-enacted solution juxtaposed economic theory against political pragmatism, leading to a different but hopefully sound solution. This article will provide background for the decommissioning issue, chronicle the development of the decommissioning component of the Oklahoma Wind Energy Act, and frame issues that remain for policymakers in regulating wind power development. - Highlights: ? Wind energy is the fastest-growing component of U.S. power generation. ? Decommissioning wind projects is policy concern for wind development. ? Little public information on wind turbine decommissioning costs exists. ? Oklahoma’s solution attempts to account for both costs and risks. ? Additional research is needed to create a more precise pold to create a more precise policy solution.

  1. Evaluation of uncertainties in model parameters for evaluating decommissioning project management data based on JPDR decommissioning experience data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to safely and efficiently implement decommissioning of nuclear installations, it is important to beforehand predict decommissioning project management data (PMD) such as manpower of dismantling equipments and radiation exposure dose to workers, and to develop a decommissioning plan based on the predicted results. The PMD prediction is made with PMD evaluation equations including model parameters, such as unit work activity coefficients, whose values are constructed by analyzing decommissioning experience data. Although model parameter values developed so far include uncertainties, little evaluation of the uncertainties and resulted uncertainties in predicted PMD has been made. However information on the uncertainties is valuable in flexibly studying and developing a decommissioning plan. We therefore studied and evaluated uncertainties in model parameters relating to manpower of dismantling equipments and external radiation exposure dose to workers by analyzing the JPDR decommissioning experience data. This report describes an evaluation method of the model parameter uncertainties and their evaluated results. (author)

  2. Decommissioning of six German fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decommissioning of six fuel cycle facilities from Siemens AG and Nukem Hanau GmbH located at Hanau and Karlstein, Germany, provides a unique platform of experience. Five fuel fabrication plants, which had supplied fuel for research and pilot reactors as well as to commercial nuclear power plants, are in various stages of decommissioning. The fuel processed in the relevant facility, had either been Thorium, low and high enriched Uranium or even Plutonium. A hot cell research complex complemented these fuel facilities, where post-irradiation examinations on all kind of fuel had been performed. Research on plutonium-bearing fuel started as early as in 1965 and since then about 9 000 kg, Plutonium has been processed. In the late sixties fuel fabrication commenced on a commercial basis under license agreement with US-based companies General Electric and Westinghouse. The pilot fuel fabrication plants of Nukem were mainly involved in the fabrication of fuel for research reactors, including of coated particles for spherical HTR fuel. Late Eighties, beginning Nineties, the facilities were shut, partly due to political reasons and cleaned out, and decommissioning started immediately thereafter. No advantage can be gained by mothballing fuel cycle facilities because of the long-lived fissile isotopes. More than 2 000 highly specialized engineers and workers as well as a similar number of employees in the supporting industries lost their job. In total more than EUR 1 billionheir job. In total more than EUR 1 billion will be spent for- obtaining 'green meadow' including disposition of radioactive waste in deep underground disposal. Except for the hot cell complex, where local dose rate could be as high as several hundreds of Sv/h the major challenge in decommissioning of nuclear fuel facilities, is the predominance of a-particle contamination rather than high radiation fields. All effort has to be focused on preventing a-particles leaking outside their foreseen containment and thus, reducing the risk of incorporation. To a lesser extent, special criticality precautions may be required also during the decommissioning phase. Another tricky item is the procedure of free release measurement. Free release applications of buildings, concrete rubble, metals and other material belonging to a nuclear facility has not only to step over high technological thresholds, but also over public acceptance hurdles. (author)

  3. Chemical decontamination for decommissioning (DFD) and DFDX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DFD is an acronym for the 'Decontamination for Decommissioning' process developed in 1996 by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The process was designed to remove radioactivity from the surfaces of metallic components to allow these components to be recycled or free-released for disposal as non-radioactive. DFD is a cyclic process consisting of fluoroboric acid, potassium permanganate and oxalic acid. The process continues to uniformly remove base metal once oxide dissolution is complete. The DFD process has been applied on numerous components, sub-systems and systems including the reactor systems at Big Rock Point and Maine Yankee in the United States, and the Jose Cabrera (Zorita) Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in Spain. The Big Rock Point site has been returned to Greenfield and at Maine Yankee the land under the license was reduced for an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). In the upcoming months in Zorita NPP in Spain will initiate dismantlement and decommissioning activities to return the site to a non-nuclear facility. The development of the EPRI DFD process has been an on-going evolution and much has been learned from its use in the past. It is effective in attaining very high decontamination factors; however, DFD also produces secondary waste in the form of ion exchange resins. This secondary waste generation adds to the decommissioning quota but this can be improved upon at a time when radioactive waste storage at nuclear facilities anive waste storage at nuclear facilities and waste disposal sites is limited. To reduce the amount of secondary waste, EPRI has developed the DFDX process. This new process is an enhancement to the DFD process and produces a smaller amount of metallic waste rather than resin waste; this reduction in volume being a factor of ten or greater. Electrochemical ion exchange cells are the heart of the DFDX system and contain electrodes and cation ion exchange resin. It has been used very successfully in small system applications and the next evolution is to design, build and implement a system for the chemical decontamination for decommissioning of larger reactor systems and components, and Full System Decontamination (FSD). The purpose of this paper is to provide a reference point for those planning future chemical decontaminations for plant decommissioning. It is based on actual experience from the work already performed to date and the planned development of the DFDX process. (author)

  4. Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) Decommissioning Project was initiated in 2009 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Removal Action with funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). This paper summarizes the history prior to 2009, the major D and D activities, and final end state of the facility at completion of decommissioning in June 2011. The HWCTR facility was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. In 2009 the $1.6 billion allocation from the ARRA to SRS for llion allocation from the ARRA to SRS for site footprint reduction at SRS reopened the doors to HWCTR - this time for final decommissioning. Alternative studies concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning was to remove the reactor vessel, both steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. The transfer coffin, originally above grade, was to be placed in the cavity vacated by the reactor vessel and the remaining below grade spaces would be grouted. Once all above equipment including the dome was removed, a concrete cover was to be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations.

  5. HEAVY WATER COMPONENTS TEST REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

    2011-10-13

    The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) Decommissioning Project was initiated in 2009 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Removal Action with funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). This paper summarizes the history prior to 2009, the major D&D activities, and final end state of the facility at completion of decommissioning in June 2011. The HWCTR facility was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. In 2009 the $1.6 billion allocation from the ARRA to SRS for site footprint reduction at SRS reopened the doors to HWCTR - this time for final decommissioning. Alternative studies concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning was to remove the reactor vessel, both steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. The transfer coffin, originally above grade, was to be placed in the cavity vacated by the reactor vessel and the remaining below grade spaces would be grouted. Once all above equipment including the dome was removed, a concrete cover was to be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations.

  6. Radiological characterisation and decommissioning in Denmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danish Decommissioning (DD) is currently decommissioning the last Danish research reactor (DR3) and the Hot Cell facility. The DR3 project will soon finish dismantling of the external parts of the reactor (January 2012). The approval for dismantling of neutron activated and tritium contaminated heavy water pumps and tubing was granted in December 2011. DD will begin the work on the inner parts as the tendering process for equipment will start in 2012. Hereafter the dismantling of the top of the reactor will begin using the obtained remote controlled equipment. The Hot Cell facility consists of 6 contaminated cells. The first cell have been opened and cleaned. Currently the work progresses by removing parts and hot spots from the other cells with the use of robotic equipment. Challenges, lack of conventional and radiological documentation, dose rates and contamination higher than expected and the confined space in the cells have delayed the project. No final repository exists in Denmark. Therefore no official Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) have been formulated. However the Danish authority (SIS) does require a description of the waste in the interim storage facility (Inventory). Furthermore radiological characterisation of key nuclides is needed during decommissioning and dismantling. The information gained from the characterisation helps in the planning phase prior to the dismantling and for inventory calculations for later use. DD performs the radiological characterisation via both non-destructive and destructive analysis on samples. The samples are measured with gamma spectroscopy using mathematical and geometrical analysis. Scaling factors are used for neutron activated waste (DR3) to determine the difficult-to-measure isotopes and pure beta emitters. The primary scaling isotope is Co-60. Waste from the Hot Cell facility is alpha contaminated and scaling procedures for determination of alpha contamination are currently used in the planning process. Scaling of alpha emitters will be incorporated into the inventory calculations. Due to the variable nature of the systems being decommissioned, the sampling procedures are based on ad hoc principles. The number of samples needed is determined by the conventional characterisation of the systems. For systems where conventional knowledge is limited, more samples are generally needed earlier in the decommissioning process. Otherwise sampling can take place prior to the packing of the containers for the interim storage facility. In this case less sampling is needed as few representative samples for each material from each system in the container are sufficient. (author)

  7. Carcass characteristics of small and medium-frame Aberdeen Angus young steers / Características da carcaça de novilhos super jovens Aberdeen Angus de biótipos pequeno e médio

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Miguelangelo Ziegler, Arboitte; Ivan Luis, Brondani; João, Restle; Leandro da Silva, Freitas; Lucas Braido, Pereira; Gilmar dos Santos, Cardoso.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se as características da carcaça de novilhos Aberdeen Angus super jovens de biótipos pequeno e médio, terminados em confinamento e abatidos com semelhante espessura de gordura subcutânea. A idade e o peso vivo médio de ingresso no confinamento foram de 298 dias e 202 kg. Os animais foram c [...] onfinados durante 158 dias, abatidos com espessura de gordura subcutânea média de 6,4 mm. A alimentação foi composta por silagem de sorgo e concentrado, na razão volumoso:concentrado de 60:40 na matéria seca, nos primeiros 63 dias e após, 50:50 até o abate. O biótipo foi calculado utilizando a fórmula B=-11,548 + (0,4878xh) - (0,0289xID) + (0,0000146xID²) + (0,0000759xhxID), em que h representou a altura e o ID idade em dias. Novilhos com biótipo médio apresentaram superioridade nos aspectos importantes de comercialização, como o peso de carcaça quente (p Abstract in english Carcass characteristics of small and medium-frame Aberdeen Angus young steers, finished in feedlot and slaughtered with similar subcutaneous fat thickness are evaluated. The average age and live weight at the start of feedlot were respectively 298 days and 202 kg. The steers were confined during 158 [...] days, and slaughtered with average subcutaneous fat thickness of 6.4 mm. The feed consisted of sorghum silage and concentrate at 60:40 ratio of dry matter during the first 63 days and 50:50 afterward. The frame was calculated by formula F =-11.548 + (0.4878xh) - (0.0289xID) + (0.0000146xID²)+(0.0000759xIDxh), where h is the height and ID the age, in days. Steers with medium frame showed superiority in important marketing aspects such as warm (p

  8. 78 FR 19540 - Dominion Energy Kewaunee, Inc., Kewaunee Power Station Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ...Kewaunee Power Station Post- Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...and availability of report...Power Station (KPS) Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report (PSDAR),...

  9. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Aberdeen quadrangle, South Dakota. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the months of June through October, 1980, Aero Service Division Western Geophysical Company of America conducted an airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey over eleven (11) 20 x 10 NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 20 x 10 NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. This report discusses the results obtained over the Aberdeen, South Dakota map area. The final data are presented in four different forms: on magnetic tape; on microfiche; in graphic form as profiles and histograms; and in map form as anomaly maps, flight path maps, and computer printer maps

  10. Hydrogeologic data for the Canal Creek area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, April 1986-March 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveros, J.P.; Gernhardt, Patrice

    1989-01-01

    This report is a compilation of hydrologic and geologic data collected for the period April 1986 through March 1988 for the Canal Creek area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Geologic data include lithologic logs for 73 sites and geophysical logs for 71 sites. Hydrologic data consist of hydrographs and synoptic water level measurements. The hydrographs were taken from eight wells that were equipped with continuous water level recorders, and the synoptic water-level measurements were made four times during the study. Well-construction data also are included for 149 observation wells. (USGS)

  11. An apparatus for studying spallation neutrons in the Aberdeen Tunnel laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we describe the design, construction and performance of an apparatus installed in the Aberdeen Tunnel laboratory in Hong Kong for studying spallation neutrons induced by cosmic-ray muons under a vertical rock overburden of 611 m water equivalent (m.w.e.). The apparatus comprises six horizontal layers of plastic-scintillator hodoscopes for determining the direction and position of the incident cosmic-ray muons. Sandwiched between the hodoscope planes is a neutron detector filled with 650 kg of liquid scintillator doped with about 0.06% of Gadolinium by weight for improving the efficiency of detecting the spallation neutrons. Performance of the apparatus is also presented

  12. An apparatus for studying spallation neutrons in the Aberdeen Tunnel laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blyth, S.C. [Department of Electro-Optical Engineering, National United University, Miao-Li, Taiwan (China); Chan, Y.L.; Chen, X.C.; Chu, M.C. [Department of Physics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Hahn, R.L. [Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Ho, T.H.; Hsiung, Y.B. [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hu, B.Z. [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Kwan, K.K.; Kwok, M.W. [Department of Physics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Kwok, T., E-mail: goodtalent@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Lau, Y.P.; Lee, K.P.; Leung, J.K.C.; Leung, K.Y. [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Lin, G.L. [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.C. [Department of Physics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Luk, K.B. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Luk, W.H. [Department of Physics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Ngai, H.Y. [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); and others

    2013-09-21

    In this paper, we describe the design, construction and performance of an apparatus installed in the Aberdeen Tunnel laboratory in Hong Kong for studying spallation neutrons induced by cosmic-ray muons under a vertical rock overburden of 611 m water equivalent (m.w.e.). The apparatus comprises six horizontal layers of plastic-scintillator hodoscopes for determining the direction and position of the incident cosmic-ray muons. Sandwiched between the hodoscope planes is a neutron detector filled with 650 kg of liquid scintillator doped with about 0.06% of Gadolinium by weight for improving the efficiency of detecting the spallation neutrons. Performance of the apparatus is also presented.

  13. Decommissioning of nuclear power plants: policies, strategies and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As many nuclear power plants will reach the end of their lifetime during the next 20 years or so, decommissioning is an increasingly important topic for governments, regulators and industries. From a governmental viewpoint, particularly in a deregulated market, one essential aspect is to ensure that money for the decommissioning of nuclear installations will be available at the time it is needed, and that no 'stranded' liabilities will be left to be financed by the taxpayers rather than by the electricity consumers. For this reason, there is governmental interest in understanding decommissioning costs, and in periodically reviewing decommissioning cost estimates from nuclear installation owners. Robust cost estimates are key elements in designing and implementing a coherent and comprehensive national decommissioning policy including the legal and regulatory bases for the collection, saving and use of decommissioning funds. From the industry viewpoint, it is essential to assess and monitor decommissioning costs in order to develop a coherent decommissioning strategy that reflects national policy and assures worker and public safety, whilst also being cost effective. For these reasons, nuclear power plant owners are interested in understanding decommissioning costs as best as possible and in identifying major cost drivers, whether they be policy, strategy or 'physical' in nature. National policy considerations will guide the development of national regulations that are elopment of national regulations that are relevant for decommissioning activities. Following these policies and regulations, industrial managers responsible for decommissioning activities will develop strategies which best suit their needs, while appropriately meeting all government requirements. Decommissioning costs will be determined by technical and economic conditions, as well as by the strategy adopted. Against this backdrop, the study analyses the relationships among decommissioning policy as developed by governments, decommissioning strategies as proposed by industries, and resulting decommissioning costs. Major cost drivers, of policy, strategy and technical nature, are also discussed. The findings from the study are based on responses to a questionnaire sent to participating countries. It should be noted that not all responses were of the same level of detail, and it was felt that further detail in responses would have allowed more in depth comparisons in a more valid fashion. (author)

  14. Program change management during nuclear power plant decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning a nuclear power plant is a complex project. The project involves the coordination of several different departments and the management of changing plant conditions, programs, and regulations. As certain project Milestones are met, the evolution of such plant programs and regulations can help optimize project execution and cost. This paper will provide information about these Milestones and the plant departments and programs that change throughout a decommissioning project. The initial challenge in the decommissioning of a nuclear plant is the development of a definitive plan for such a complex project. EPRI has published several reports related to decommissioning planning. These earlier reports provided general guidance in formulating a Decommissioning Plan. This Change Management paper will draw from the experience gained in the last decade in decommissioning of nuclear plants. The paper discusses decommissioning in terms of a sequence of major Milestones. The plant programs, associated plans and actions, and staffing are discussed based upon experiences from the following power reactor facilities: Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant, Yankee Nuclear Power Station, and the Haddam Neck Plant. Significant lessons learned from other sites are also discussed as appropriate. Planning is a crucial ingredient of successful decommissioning projects. The development of a definitive Decommissioning Plan can result in considerable project savings. The decommissioning able project savings. The decommissioning plants in the U.S. have planned and executed their projects using different strategies based on their unique plant circumstances. However, experience has shown that similar project milestones and actions applied through all of these projects. This allows each plant to learn from the experiences of the preceding projects. As the plant transitions from an operating plant through decommissioning, the reduction and termination of defunct programs and regulations can help optimize all facets of decommissioning. This information, learned through trial in previous plants, can be incorporated into the decommissioning plan of future projects so that the benefits of optimization can be realized from the beginning of the projects. This process of the collection of information and lessons learned from plant experiences is an important function of the EPRI Decommissioning Program. (author)

  15. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a refernce boiling water reactor power station: Technical support for decommissioning matters related to preparation of the final decommissioning rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation of the final Decommissioning Rule by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff familiar with decommissioning matters. These efforts have included updating previous cost estimates developed during the series of studies of conceptually decommissioning reference licensed nuclear facilities for inclusion in the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (FGEIS) on decommissioning; documenting the cost updates; evaluating the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits on decommissioning; developing a revised scaling formula for estimating decommissioning costs for reactor plants different in size from the reference boiling water reactor (BWR) described in the earlier study; and defining a formula for adjusting current cost estimates to reflect future escalation in labor, materials, and waste disposal costs. This report presents the results of recent PNL studies to provide supporting information in three areas concerning decommissioning of the reference BWR: updating the previous cost estimates to January 1986 dollars; assessing the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits; and developing a scaling formula for plants different in size than the reference plant and an escalation formula for adjusting current cost estimates for future escalation

  16. Vandellos 1 NPP decommissioning feedback experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vandellos 1 Nuclear Power Plant (CNV1) is located on the Mediterranean coast in the province of Tarragona (Spain). The Plant is of the European Natural Uranium Graphite-Gas type. The thermal power of the plant amounts to 1,670 MWt, its electrical output being 500 Mwe. The Plant started-up commercial service in May 1972; its final shutdown, due to a fire in the turbines, occurred in October 1989, after 17 years of operation with an accumulated energy production of 55,647 GWh. The option of decommissioning accepted by the Ministry of Industry, consists of first removing the spent fuel and conditioning the operating radioactive wastes, and then undertaking dismantling of almost all the structures and components located outside the reactor vessel, except those ensuring confinement of the vessel itself and the safety and surveillance of the facility and site. No action will be taken with respect to the vessel, in which the reactor will remain confined without nuclear fuel and with its internal components intact until completion of the waiting (dormancy) period. The site itself will be kept under surveillance during dormancy phase, following partial clearance, the remaining installations being left within the new site perimeter in a situation of monitored confinement. Following the dormancy period, which will last some 30 years, total dismantling of the remaining installations will be undertaken, this implying subsequent complete clearance of the site. The project was se clearance of the site. The project was started in November of 1992, and the works on site began in 1998. The safe enclosure consists only in the reactor pressure vessel, which will be left on site. The activity content of the vessel is about 100 000 Ci, mostly Co 60. Part of the Stage 2 concept is the total static isolation of this vessel. The vessel has 1 700 penetrations, the pipes of which were cut, seal-welded and inspected. After five years of works in Vandellos 1 NPP decommissioning, ENRESA has an experience and knowledge, that is necessary to support in order to reuse and apply the model to others projects. This knowledge and experience are mostly in three areas: -Data Bases, -Basic Document and - Lessons Learned which are described. Lessons Learned are summarized in eleven conclusions: a) The dilemma about the difference between an installation in operation and a decommissioning works. A NPP in operation is an installation; a NPP in decommissioning process is an activity, this impact is fundamental from the documentary and controls points of view; b) The flexibility of the time schedule of the project. In opposition with a construction, the time schedule of a decommissioning project it possible to maintain with small delays due to the versatility of parallel tasks; c) The authorization procedure is one of the key points, before and during the process. As a new activity, decommissioning was born without specifics regulation; day by day all the actors realize that is necessary to reflect back together in order to define and establish new standards to regulate the decommissioning processes; d) The prevention of the risks on site is a topic not only related to the Protection Radiation, the conventional risks have more importance in the decommissioning tasks. The issue of the new regulation about it, impact directly in the executions of the works. The training and the information to the workers are the best corrective tool again the risks; e) Some performances or characteristics of the auxiliary systems must be taken in account in the procurement process for decommissioning, namely, the modularity, versatility of the auxiliary systems and the reuse as a way of reducing wastes and save row materials. The radiation protection is the subject concern during all the operations; Important issues of radioprotection as operational radiological history, the characterization of the materials and the environment to prevent the risk, and special care with the internal contamination of the body; g) The very big amount of material generated during the decommissioning

  17. Licensing requirements for decommissioning a monazite processing plant in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A monazite processing plant was shutdown after 12 years of operation. In order to decommission and decontaminate the plant facilities, the plant operator is required to apply for suitable classes of licence from Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB). This paper focuses mainly on the licensing requirements imposed on the licensee to decommission a monazite processing plant in Malaysia. (author)

  18. Decommissioning and material recycling. Radiation risk management issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodd, D.H.

    1996-09-01

    Once nuclear fuel cycle facilities have permanently stopped operations they have to be decommissioned. The decommissioning of a nuclear facility involves the surveillance and dismantling of the facility systems and buildings, the management of the materials resulting from the dismantling activities and the release of the site for further use. The management of radiation risks associated with these activities plays an important role in the decommissioning process. Existing legislation covers many aspects of the decommissioning process. However, in most countries with nuclear power programmes legislation with respect to decommissioning is incomplete. In particular this is true in the Netherlands, where government policy with respect to decommissioning is still in development. Therefore a study was performed to obtain an overview of the radiation risk management issues associated with decommissioning and the status of the relevant legislation. This report describes the results of that study. It is concluded that future work at the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation on decommissioning and radiation risk management issues should concentrate on surveillance and dismantling activities and on criteria for site release. (orig.).

  19. Evaluation of activation and decommissioning of the medical compact cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We decommission the medical compact cyclotron which produces positron-emitting radionuclide for clinical PET for about nine years in the Hyogo Institute for Aging Brain and Cognitive Disorders. This report describes the plan on decommissioning of the medical compact cyclotron, measurement of induced radioactivity, the prediction and practice for amount of radioactive wastes, the operation procedures for dismantlement, and so on. (author)

  20. Decontamination and decommissioning project for the nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. H.; Paik, S. T.; Park, S. W. (and others)

    2007-02-15

    The final goal of this project is to complete the decommissioning of the Korean Research Reactor no.1 and no. 2(KRR-1 and 2) and uranium conversion plant safely and successfully. The goal of this project in 2006 is to complete the decontamination of the inside reactor hall of the KRR-2 which will be operating as a temporary storage for the radioactive waste until the construction and operation of the national repository site. Also the decommissioning work of the KRR-1 and auxiliary facilities is being progress. As the compaction of decommissioning project is near at hand, a computer information system was developed for a systematically control and preserve a technical experience and decommissioning data for the future reuse. The nuclear facility decommissioning, which is the first challenge in Korea, is being closed to the final stages. We completed the decommissioning of all the bio-shielding concrete for KRR-2 in 2005 and carried out the decontamination and waste material grouping of the roof, wall and bottom of the reactor hall of the KRR-2. The decommissioning for nuclear facility were demanded the high technology, remote control equipment and radioactivity analysis. So developed equipment and experience will be applied at the decommissioning for new nuclear facility in the future.

  1. Decommissioning: Nuclear Power's Missing Link. Worldwatch Paper 69.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Cynthia

    The processes and associated dilemmas of nuclear power plant decommissioning are reviewed in this publication. Decommissioning involves the clearing up and disposal of a retired nuclear plant and its equipment of such a way as to safeguard the public from the dangers of radioactivity. Related problem areas are identified and include: (1) closure…

  2. Decommissioning of nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this safety guide is to provide guidelines for safe decommissioning of nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than nuclear reactors as per the regulatory requirements. It also provides guidance with respect to the management of radioactive waste arising during decommissioning of nuclear fuel cycle facilities

  3. Decommissioning considerations at a time of nuclear renaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At a time of renaissance in the nuclear power industry, when it is estimated that anywhere between 60 to 130 new power reactors may be built worldwide over the next 15 years, why should we focus on decommissioning? Yet it is precisely the time to examine what decommissioning considerations should be taken into account as the industry proceeds with developing final designs for new reactors and the construction on the new build begins. One of the lessons learned from decommissioning of existing reactors has been that decommissioning was not given much thought when these reactors were designed three or four decades ago. Even though decommissioning may be sixty years down the road from the time they go on line, eventually all reactors will be decommissioned. It is only prudent that new designs be optimized for eventual decommissioning, along with the other major considerations. The overall objective in this regard is that when the time comes for decommissioning, it can be completed in shorter time frames, with minimum generation of radioactive waste, and with better radiological safety. This will ensure that the tail end costs of the power reactors are manageable and that the public confidence in the nuclear power is sustained through the renaissance and beyond. (author)

  4. A review of decommissioning considerations for new reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At a time of 'nuclear renaissance' when the focus is on advanced reactor designs and construction, it is easy to overlook the decommissioning considerations because such a stage in the life of the new reactors will be some sixty years down the road. Yet, one of the lessons learned from major decommissioning projects has been that decommissioning was not given much thought when these reactors were designed three or four decades ago. Hence, the time to examine what decommissioning considerations should be taken into account is right from the design stage with regular updates of the decommissioning strategy and plans throughout the life cycle of the reactor. Designing D and D into the new reactor designs is necessary to ensure that the tail end costs of the nuclear power are manageable. Such considerations during the design stage will facilitate a more cost-effective, safe and timely decommissioning of the facility when a reactor is eventually retired. This paper examines the current regulatory and industry design guidance for the new reactors with respect to the decommissioning issues and provides a review of the design considerations that can help optimize the reactor designs for the eventual decommissioning. (authors)

  5. License Stewardship Approach to Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper explores both the conceptual approach to decommissioning commercial nuclear facilities using a license stewardship approach as well as the first commercial application of this approach. The license stewardship approach involves a decommissioning company taking control of a site and the 10 CFR 50 License in order to complete the work utilizing the established trust fund. In conclusion: The license stewardship approach is a novel way to approach the decommissioning of a retired nuclear power plant that offers several key advantages to all parties. For the owner and regulators, it provides assurance that the station will be decommissioned in a safe, timely manner. Ratepayers are assured that the work will be completed for the price they already have paid, with the decommissioning contractor assuming the financial risk of decommissioning. The contractor gains control of the assets and liabilities, the license, and the decommissioning fund. This enables the decommissioning contractor to control their work and eliminates redundant layers of management, while bringing more focus on achieving the desired end state - a restored site. (authors)

  6. Lessons learned from the decommissioning of NORM facility in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Malaysia Decommissioning of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) facility in Malaysia will run into unforeseeable complications and difficulties if there is no proper planning. The Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB) plays important role in guiding and assisting the operator/contractor in this NORM decommissioning project. A local Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) processing plant located in the northern region of peninsular Malaysia had ceased its operations and decided to decommission and remediate its site for the final release of the site. The remediated site is earmarked as an industrial site. During its operations, monazites are processed for rare earth elements such as cerium and lanthanum. It's plant capable of processing monazite to produce rare earth chloride and rare earth carbonate. The main by-product of monazite processing is the radioactive cake containing primarily thorium hydroxide. Operation of the monazite processing plant started in early eighties and terminated in early nineties. The decommissioning of the plant site started in late 2003 and completed its decommissioning and remediation works in early 2006. This paper described the lesson learned by Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) in conducting third party independent audit for the decommissioning of the NORM contaminated facility. By continuously reviewing the lessons learned, mistakes and/or inefficiencies in this plant decommissioning project, hopefully will result in a smoother, less costly and more productive future decommissioning works on NORM facilities in Malaysia. (author)

  7. The regulatory process for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this publication is to provide general guidance to Member States for regulating the decommissioning of nuclear facilities within the established nuclear regulatory framework. The Guide should also be useful to those responsible for, or interested in, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The Guide describes in general terms the process to be used in regulating decommissioning and the considerations to be applied in the development of decommissioning regulations and guides. It also delineates the responsibilities of the regulatory body and the licensee in decommissioning. The provisions of this Guide are intended to apply to all facilities within the nuclear fuel cycle and larger industrial installations using long lived radionuclides. For smaller installations, however, less extensive planning and less complex regulatory control systems should be acceptable. The Guide deals primarily with decommissioning after planned shutdown. Most provisions, however, are also applicable to decommissioning after an abnormal event, once cleanup operations have been terminated. The decommissioning planning in this case must take account of the abnormal event. 28 refs, 1 fig

  8. Manual for collecting management data concerning decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency), the decommissioning engineering system (DENESYS) has been developed to support examination of decommissioning plan aiming to use management data and experiences obtained through decommissioning of nuclear facilities effectively. In the development of the DENESYS, it is important efficiently to collect, and to analyze management data obtained from actual decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Then, collecting items of management data needed to examine decommissioning plan were extracted. And en efficient collecting method of the extracted collecting items was examined based on the JPDR (Japan Power Demonstration Reactor) decommissioning project. As a result, collecting items are work management data such as manpower and weight of components, waste management data such as weight and radioactivity in drums. These data would be collected by using daily work management report, waste record, and secondary record data in each JAEA site. In this report outline of collecting items and collecting method for decommissioning of nuclear facilities were described. And manual for collecting management data concerning decommissioning of nuclear facilities was introduced. (author)

  9. Decontamination and decommissioning experience at Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is presented of the experience obtained from decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1 located at the Idaho Nuclear Engineering Laboratory, Scottsville, Idaho. Included are the planning, preparation, and operations associated with the removal and processing of radioactively contaminated sodium-potassium eutectic alloy (NaK) and decontamination and decommissioning of the facility

  10. Decommissioning and material recycling. Radiation risk management issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Once nuclear fuel cycle facilities have permanently stopped operations they have to be decommissioned. The decommissioning of a nuclear facility involves the surveillance and dismantling of the facility systems and buildings, the management of the materials resulting from the dismantling activities and the release of the site for further use. The management of radiation risks associated with these activities plays an important role in the decommissioning process. Existing legislation covers many aspects of the decommissioning process. However, in most countries with nuclear power programmes legislation with respect to decommissioning is incomplete. In particular this is true in the Netherlands, where government policy with respect to decommissioning is still in development. Therefore a study was performed to obtain an overview of the radiation risk management issues associated with decommissioning and the status of the relevant legislation. This report describes the results of that study. It is concluded that future work at the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation on decommissioning and radiation risk management issues should concentrate on surveillance and dismantling activities and on criteria for site release. (orig.)

  11. Decontamination and decommissioning project for the nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The final goal of this project is to complete the decommissioning of the Korean Research Reactor no.1 and no. 2(KRR-1 and 2) and uranium conversion plant safely and successfully. The goal of this project in 2006 is to complete the decontamination of the inside reactor hall of the KRR-2 which will be operating as a temporary storage for the radioactive waste until the construction and operation of the national repository site. Also the decommissioning work of the KRR-1 and auxiliary facilities is being progress. As the compaction of decommissioning project is near at hand, a computer information system was developed for a systematically control and preserve a technical experience and decommissioning data for the future reuse. The nuclear facility decommissioning, which is the first challenge in Korea, is being closed to the final stages. We completed the decommissioning of all the bio-shielding concrete for KRR-2 in 2005 and carried out the decontamination and waste material grouping of the roof, wall and bottom of the reactor hall of the KRR-2. The decommissioning for nuclear facility were demanded the high technology, remote control equipment and radioactivity analysis. So developed equipment and experience will be applied at the decommissioning for new nuclear facility in the future

  12. FAMS DECOMMISSIONING END-STATE ALTERNATIVE EVALUATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Material Management (NMM) completed a comprehensive study at the request of the Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR) in 2004 (Reference 11.1). The study evaluated the feasibility of removal and/or mitigation of the Pu-238 source term in the F-Area Material Storage (FAMS) facility during on-going material storage operations. The study recommended different options to remove and/or mitigate the Pu-238 source term depending on its location within the facility. During April 2005, the Department of Energy (DOE) sent a letter of direction (LOD) to Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) directing WSRC to implement a new program direction that would enable an accelerated shutdown and decommissioning of FAMS (Reference 11.2). Further direction in the LOD stated that effective December 1, 2006 the facility will be transitioned to begin deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) activities. To implement the LOD, Site D and D (SDD) and DOE agreed the planning end-state would be demolition of the FAMS structure to the building slab. SDD developed the D and D strategy, preliminary cost and schedule, and issued the deactivation project plan in December 2005 (Reference 11.3). Due to concerns and questions regarding the FAMS planning end-state and in support of the project's Critical Decision 1, an alternative study was performed to evaluate the various decommissioning end-states and the methods by which those end-states are achieved. This report dose end-states are achieved. This report documents the results of the alternative evaluation which was performed in a structured decision-making process as outlined in the E7 Manual, Procedure 2.15, ''Alternative Studies'' (Reference 11.4)

  13. Decommissioning of Villa Aldama uranium extraction plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the particularities in the decommissioning process of the Villa Aldama Uranium and Molybdenum Extraction Plant, located in Chihuahua State, Mexico. This decommissioning was carried out by Fideicomiso de Fomento Minero (FIFOMI) in 1994, when release criteria and radioactive waste disposal regulations were not ready. The plant was operated from 1969 to 1971. Its decommissioning generated approximately 30 tons of contaminated equipment, because it was not possible to reduce the radioactive contamination to levels below the provisional limits established by the authority. There was also a large amount of Uranium ore (1,735 tons) and soil and tailings (65,000 tons) that had to be removed from the facility's site, due to the growing population of Villa Aldama. These wastes were moved to an area called Pena Blanca, located 47 km north from Villa Aldama. Pena Blanca is the site where the uranium mines that fed the Villa Aldama Plant are located, The contaminated equipment was disposed in one of the unexploited mines, the soil and tailings in an impoundment, and the ore in the exclusion area of the impoundment facility. The Villa Aldama facility building was decontaminated below the established limits for unrestricted use, but this was not precisely the case for the site's land where the ore and the tailings were deposited, because some small areas did not comply with the criteria for unrestricted use; therefore some actions were necessary, such as coverinme actions were necessary, such as covering the soil with a cap of inert material, and the establishment of conditions for the use of the land. The paper also describes the radiation protection management implemented during activities such as dismantling, decontamination and transport of the waste. (author)

  14. Ecological survey of M-Field, Edgewood Area Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downs, J.L.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Fitzner, R.E.; Rogers, L.E.

    1991-12-01

    An ecological survey was conducted on M-Field, at the Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. M-Field is used routinely to test army smokes and obscurants, including brass flakes, carbon fibers, and fog oils. The field has been used for testing purposes for the past 40 years, but little documented history is available. Under current environmental regulations, the test field must be assessed periodically to document the presence or potential use of the area by threatened and endangered species. The M-Field area is approximately 370 acres and is part of the US Army`s Edgewood Area at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, Maryland. The grass-covered field is primarily lowlands with elevations from about 1.0 to 8 m above sea level, and several buildings and structures are present on the field. The ecological assessment of M-Field was conducted in three stages, beginning with a preliminary site visit in May to assess sampling requirements. Two field site visits were made June 3--7, and August 12--15, 1991, to identify the biota existing on the site. Data were gathered on vegetation, small mammals, invertebrates, birds, large mammals, amphibians, and reptiles.

  15. Ecological survey of M-Field, Edgewood Area Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downs, J.L.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Fitzner, R.E.; Rogers, L.E.

    1991-12-01

    An ecological survey was conducted on M-Field, at the Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. M-Field is used routinely to test army smokes and obscurants, including brass flakes, carbon fibers, and fog oils. The field has been used for testing purposes for the past 40 years, but little documented history is available. Under current environmental regulations, the test field must be assessed periodically to document the presence or potential use of the area by threatened and endangered species. The M-Field area is approximately 370 acres and is part of the US Army's Edgewood Area at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, Maryland. The grass-covered field is primarily lowlands with elevations from about 1.0 to 8 m above sea level, and several buildings and structures are present on the field. The ecological assessment of M-Field was conducted in three stages, beginning with a preliminary site visit in May to assess sampling requirements. Two field site visits were made June 3--7, and August 12--15, 1991, to identify the biota existing on the site. Data were gathered on vegetation, small mammals, invertebrates, birds, large mammals, amphibians, and reptiles.

  16. Guidelines for producing commercial nuclear power plant decommissioning cost estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the study were: 1. To develop guidelines to facilitate estimating the cost of nuclear power plant decommissioning alternatives on a plant-specific basis and to facilitate comparing estimates made by others. The guidelines are expressed in a form that could be readily adapted by technical specialists from individual utilities or by other users; 2. To enhance the industry's credibility with decision-makers at the state and federal levels during rate/regulatory processes involving decommissioning costs. This is accomplished by providing a detailed, systematic breakdown of how decommissioning cost estimates are prepared; 3. To increase the validity, realism and accuracy of site-specific decommissioning cost estimates. This is accomplished by pulling together the experiences and practices of several nuclear utilities and consultants in conducting past decommissioning cost estimates

  17. Investigations on decommissioning of nuclear facilities (phase 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Informations on recent developments with the decommissioning of nuclear facilities including planning and actual experiences are collected and evaluated. The progress in the field of decommissioning techniques and their remote application are studied. The application of existing decommissioning concepts for LWR on HTR is discussed together with necessary modifications. As a contribution to the assessment of the radiological consequences of the recycling of ferrous metals arising during decommissioning a statistical model is developed, which takes adequately into account the wide variety of possible recycling pathways. On this basis, the distribution of individual doses of members of the general public is calculated. Finally, a rough estimate of the risk of decommissioned nuclear facilities is provided. (orig./HP)

  18. Comparing nuclear decommissioning in the UK and France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we will compare the decommissioning policies in the UK and France. Both countries have a long nuclear history and decommissioning has taken place since the 1960. However, the proposed decommissioning of Magnox and AGR sites in the UK and of UNGG sites in France brings decommissioning efforts to a new level. Whilst we explore in detail the approaches and methodologies adopted in each country we remain sensitive to the effects that political and economic history play in shaping the policy response. In this paper we draw upon interviews conducted with a range of key stakeholders including: national regulators, companies involved in decommissioning, local politicians and community representatives. We also analyse key academic and non academic literature. (authors)

  19. Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor (WAGR) decommissioning project overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current BNFL reactor decommissioning projects are presented. The projects concern power reactor sites at Berkely, Trawsfynydd, Hunterstone, Bradwell, Hinkley Point; UKAEA Windscale Pile 1; Research reactors within UK Scottish Universities at East Kilbride and ICI (both complete); WAGR. The BNFL environmental role include contract management; effective dismantling strategy development; implementation and operation; sentencing, encapsulation and transportation of waste. In addition for the own sites it includes strategy development; baseline decommissioning planning; site management and regulator interface. The project objectives for the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (WAGR) are 1) Safe and efficient decommissioning; 2) Building of good relationships with customer; 3) Completion of reactor decommissioning in 2005. The completed WAGR decommissioning campaigns are: Operational Waste; Hot Box; Loop Tubes; Neutron Shield; Graphite Core and Restrain System; Thermal Shield. The current campaign is Lower Structures and the remaining are: Pressure vessel and Insulation; Thermal Columns and Outer Vault Membrane. An overview of each campaign is presented

  20. Apollo decommissioning project, Apollo, Pennsylvania. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In November, 1991 Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) received a grant to partially fund the decommissioning of the former Apollo Nuclear Fuel Facility. The decommissioning was performed in accordance with a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approved decommissioning plan. This report summarizes the decommissioning of the Apollo Nuclear Fuel Facility and the radiological surveying of the site to demonstrate that these decommissioning activities were effective in reducing residual activity well below NRC's criteria for release for unrestricted use. The Apollo Nuclear Fuel Facility was utilized by the Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) and B and W for nuclear research and production under Atomic Energy Commission and Department of Energy (DOE) contracts during 20 plus years of nuclear fuel manufacturing operations

  1. Project and feedback experience on nuclear facility decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This series of 6 short articles presents the feedback experience that has been drawn from various nuclear facility dismantling and presents 3 decommissioning projects: first, the WAGR project that is the UK demonstration project for power reactor decommissioning (a review of the tools used to dismantle the reactor core); secondly, the dismantling project of the Bugey-1 UNGG reactor for which the dismantling works of the reactor internals is planned to be done underwater; and thirdly, the decommissioning project of the MR reactor in the Kurchatov Institute. The feedback experience described concerns nuclear facilities in Spain (Vandellos-1 and the CIEMAT research center), in Belgium (the Eurochemic reprocessing plant), and in France (the decommissioning of nuclear premises inside the Fontenay-aux-roses Cea center and the decommissioning of the UP1 spent fuel reprocessing plant at the Marcoule site). (A.C.)

  2. Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities: Training and Human Resource Considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the cornerstones of the success of nuclear facility decommissioning is the adequate competence of personnel involved in decommissioning activities. The purpose of this publication is to provide methodological guidance for, and specific examples of good practices in training as an integral part of human resource management for the personnel performing decommissioning activities. The use of the systematic methodology and techniques described in this publication may be tailored and applied to the development of training for all types of nuclear facilities undergoing decommissioning. Examples of good practices in other aspects of human resources, such as knowledge preservation, management of the workforce and improvement of human performance, are also covered. The information contained in this publication, and the examples provided in the appendices and enclosed CD-ROM, are representative of the experience of decommissioning of a wide variety of nuclear facilities.

  3. Decommissioning of surplus facilities at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) National SFMP, administered by the Richland Operations Office. This program was established to provide for the management of certain DOE surplus radioactively contaminated facilities from the end of their operating life until final facility disposition is completed. As part of this program, the ORNL SFMP oversees some 75 facilities, ranging in complexity from abandoned waste storage tanks to large experimental reactors. This paper describes the scope of the ORNL program and outlines the decommissioning activities currently underway, including a brief description of the decontamination techniques being utilized. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Decontamination and decommissioning techniques for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of soil decontamination process and the liquid decontamination waste treatment technology are investigation of organic acid as a decontamination agent, investigation of the liquid waste purification process and identification of recycling the decontamination agents. Participation on IAEA CRP meeting are preparation of IAEA technical report on 'studies on decommissioning of TRIGA reactors and site restoration technologies' and exchange the research result, technology, experience and safety regulation of the research reactor D and D of USA, Great Britain, Canada, Belgium, Italy, India and so forth

  5. Allocation of Decommissioning and Waste Liabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work demonstrates that there are a number of methods available for cost allocation, the pros and cons of which are examined. The study investigates potential proportional and incremental methods in some depth. A recommendation in principle to use the latter methodology is given. It is concluded that a 'fair assumption' is that the potential allocation of costs for 'the RMA Leaching Hall' probably is small, in relation to the total costs, and estimated to be not more than about 175 kSEK, plus any costs associated with decommissioning/ disposal of a number of small pieces of equipment added by the current operator

  6. Feedback experience from the decommissioning of Spanish nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spain has accumulated significant experience in the field of decommissioning of nuclear and radioactive facilities. Relevant projects include the remediation of uranium mills and mines, the decommissioning of research reactors and nuclear research facilities and the decommissioning of gas-graphite nuclear power plants. The decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Spain is undertaken by ENRESA, who is also responsible for the management of radioactive wastes. The two most notable projects are the decommissioning of the Vandellos I nuclear power plant and the decommissioning of the CIEMAT nuclear research centre. The Vandellos I power plant was decommissioned in about five years to what is known as level 2. During this period, the reactor vessel was confined, most plant systems and components were dismantled, the facility was prepared for a period of latency and a large part of the site was restored for subsequent release. In 2005 the facility entered into the phase of dormancy, with minimum operating requirements. Only surveillance and maintenance activities are performed, among which special mention should be made to the five-year check of the leak tightness of the reactor vessel. After the dormancy period (25 - 30 years), level 3 of decommissioning will be initiated including the total dismantling of the remaining parts of the plant and the release of the whole site for subsequent uses. The decommissioning of the CIEMAT Research Centre includes the dismantling ofesearch Centre includes the dismantling of obsolete facilities such as the research reactor JEN-1, a pilot reprocessing plant, a fuel fabrication facility, a conditioning plant for liquid and a liquid waste storage facility which were shutdown in the early eighties. Dismantling works have started in 2006 and will be completed by 2009. On the basis of the experience gained in the above mentioned sites, this paper describes the approaches adopted by ENRESA for large decommissioning projects. (author)

  7. U.S. experience with organizational issues during decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report provides information from a variety of sources, including interviews with US NRC management and staff, interviews and discussions with former employees of a decommissioned plant, discussions with subject matter experts, and relevant published documents. The NRC has modified its rule regarding decommissioning requirements. Two key reasons for these modifications are that plants have been decommissioning early and for economic reasons instead of at the end of their license period and, a desire for a more efficient rule that would more effectively use NRC staff. NRC management and staff expressed the opinion that resource requirements for the regulatory have been higher than anticipated. Key observations about decommissioning included that: The regulator faces new challenges to regulatory authority and performance during decommissioning. The public concern over decommissioning activities can be very high. There are changes in the types of safety concerns during decommissioning. It is important to balance planning and the review of plans with verification of activities. There are important changes in the organizational context at the plant during decommissioning. Retention of key staff is important. In particular, the organizational memory about the plant that is in the staff should not be lost. Six key areas of risk during decommissioning are fuel storage, potential accidents that could cause an offsite release, inappropriate release of contaminated material, radiation protection of workers, industrial accidents, and shipment of hazardous materials. Deconstruction of one unit while a co-located unit is still operating could create risks with regard to shared systems, specific risks of dismantling activities and coordination and management. Experience with co-located units at one site in the US was that there was a lack of attention to the decommissioning plant

  8. U.S. experience with organizational issues during decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, N.E. [MPD Consulting, Kirkland, WA (United States); Harty, R. [Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The report provides information from a variety of sources, including interviews with US NRC management and staff, interviews and discussions with former employees of a decommissioned plant, discussions with subject matter experts, and relevant published documents. The NRC has modified its rule regarding decommissioning requirements. Two key reasons for these modifications are that plants have been decommissioning early and for economic reasons instead of at the end of their license period and, a desire for a more efficient rule that would more effectively use NRC staff. NRC management and staff expressed the opinion that resource requirements for the regulatory have been higher than anticipated. Key observations about decommissioning included that: The regulator faces new challenges to regulatory authority and performance during decommissioning. The public concern over decommissioning activities can be very high. There are changes in the types of safety concerns during decommissioning. It is important to balance planning and the review of plans with verification of activities. There are important changes in the organizational context at the plant during decommissioning. Retention of key staff is important. In particular, the organizational memory about the plant that is in the staff should not be lost. Six key areas of risk during decommissioning are fuel storage, potential accidents that could cause an offsite release, inappropriate release of contaminated material, radiation protection of workers, industrial accidents, and shipment of hazardous materials. Deconstruction of one unit while a co-located unit is still operating could create risks with regard to shared systems, specific risks of dismantling activities and coordination and management. Experience with co-located units at one site in the US was that there was a lack of attention to the decommissioning plant.

  9. Demonstration of safety of decommissioning of facilities using radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text:The development of nuclear industry worldwide in the recent years has particular impact on the approach of operators, regulators and interested parties to the implementation of the final phases (decommissioning) of all facilities that use radioactive material (from nuclear power plants, fuel fabrication facilities, research reactors to small research or medical laboratories). Decommissioning is becoming an increasingly important activity for two main reasons - termination of the practice in a safe manner with the view to use the facility or the site for other purposes, or termination of the practice and reuse the facility or site for new built nuclear facilities. The latter is of special relevance to multi-facility sites where for example new nuclear power plants and envisaged. However, limited countries have the adequate legal and regulatory framework, and experience necessary for decommissioning. In order to respond to this challenge of the nuclear industry and assist Member States in the adequate planning, conduct and termination of decommissioning of wide range of facilities, over the last decade the IAEA has implemented and initiated several projects in this field. One of the main focuses of this assistance to operators, regulators and specialists involved in decommissioning is the evaluation and demonstration of safety of decommissioning. This importance of these Agency activities was also highlighted in the International Action Plan on Decommissioning, during the second Joint Convention meeting in 2006 and the International Conference on Lessons Learned from Decommissioning in Athens in 2006. The IAEA has been providing technical support to its Member States in this field through several mechanisms: (1) the establishment of a framework of safety standards on decommissioning and development of a supporting technical documents; (2) the establishment of an international peer review mechanism for decommissioning; (3) the technical cooperation projects at national and regional level (e.g. Europe); (4) the international projects such as DeSa (Evaluation and Demonstration of Safety during Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities) and its planned follow-up, R2D2P and Iraq project; as well as (5) through training and education of specialists working in the field of decommissioning and (6) facilitation of the exchange of knowledge and experience between all Member States (e.g. Athens conference in 2006, International decommissioning forum, Annual forum for operators and regulators in decommissioning). The ongoing cooperation with Member States shows that the areas of specific interest for the Member States remain the following: the relevant safety criteria and safety assessment methodology to be applied to decommissioning; application of the graded approach in the development and review of safety assessments or decommissioning plans; evolution of the decommissioning plan and the supporting arguments through the decommissioning project. This paper presents a summary of the recent IAEA activities and projects on demonstration of safety during decommissioning and the lessons learned to date. (author)

  10. Decommissioning and decontamination studies for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Envisaging the diverse needs of the nuclear industry with respect to decontamination and decommissioning, an organised Research and Development programme was undertaken in India. Under the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme, studies were initiated on different areas of Decontamination and Decommissioning. These studies comprised of chemical and electrochemical processes for decontamination. This report summarises the results obtained during different studies carried out in these areas. Laboratory studies on dissolution of magnetite/nickel ferrite powders and oxide films deposited on metal specimens resulted in identifying suitable dilute chemical formulations based on EDTA, oxalic acid, citric acid, ascorbic acid, etc. Studies on the behaviour of ion exchange resins indicated that it is possible to effectively remove the activity with simultaneous regeneration of the formulation chemicals by the cation exchange resins and complete elimination of all the organic acids on mixed bed resins. Study on compatibility of the formulations with the different materials of construction is also reported. Electrochemical parameters have been established for electropolishing of stainless steel components in an electrobath. Creation of a decontamination data base and its usefulness is also reported. (author). 4 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  11. Pre-decommissioning radiological characterization of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decommissioning of the BR3 (Belgian Reactor 3) approaches its final phase, in which the building structures are being decontaminated and either denuclearized for possible reuse or demolished. Apart from the presence of naturally occurring radionuclides in building materials, other radionuclides might be present due to contamination or activation. The overall process of the BR3 building structure D and D (Decontamination and Decommissioning) consists of the following steps: - make a complete inventory and preliminary categorize all elements based on historical data; characterize and determine the contamination or activation depth; - determine the decontamination method; - perform the decontamination and clean up; - a possible intermediate characterization followed by an additional decontamination step; and characterize for clearance. A good knowledge of the contamination and activation depth (second step) is fundamental in view of cost minimization. Currently, the method commonly used for the determination of the depth is based on core drilling and destructive analysis. Recently, we have introduced a complementary non destructive assay based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy. Field tests at BR3, both for contamination and activation, showed promising results. (authors)

  12. Preparing a decommissioning cost and technology study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning planning requires a systematic approach to determine costs, radiation exposure, waste disposal, manpower requirements, dismantling and decontamination procedures, personnel protection, and schedules. The basic document of decommissioning planning is the cost and technology study prepared for the specific site. It is important that this study yield results that are complete and comprehensive. This is accomplished by utilizing a methodology known as the Work Package concept which accounts for all significant cost factors and technical activities. The Work Package Concept divides all labor and materials into specific increments which are basically suitable for all power plants and produces summaries of the major results. This paper describes the major study outputs, the work package format and function, and the type of input criteria which must be collected prior to the commencement of the study. It is concluded that correct formating is essential to the complete and consistent processing of large and varied amounts of data and that details and input criteria are crucial to assure adequate sensitivity and reliable results. 7 tables

  13. Green Vinca - Vinca Institute nuclear decommissioning program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current conditions related to the nuclear and radiation safety in the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro are the result of the previous nuclear programs in the former Yugoslavia and strong economic crisis during the previous decade. These conditions have to be improved as soon as possible. The process of establishment and initialisation of the Vinca Institute Nuclear Decommissioning (VIND) Program, known also as the 'Green Vinca' Program supported by the Government of the Republic Serbia, is described in this paper. It is supposed to solve all problems related to the accumulated spent nuclear fuel, radioactive waste and decommissioning of RA research reactor. Particularly, materials associated to the RA reactor facility and radioactive wastes from the research, industrial, medical and other applications, generated in the previous period, which are stored in the Vinca Institute, are supposed to be proper repackaged and removed from the Vinca site to some other disposal site, to be decided yet. Beside that, a research and development program in the modern nuclear technologies is proposed with the aim to preserve experts, manpower and to establish a solid ground for new researchers in field of nuclear research and development. (author)

  14. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-09-01

    The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies.

  15. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Ferguson, S.D.; Fielden, J.M.; Schumann, P.L.

    1989-09-01

    The 576 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the tenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title work, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords.

  16. Human factors planning for nuclear plant decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new opportunity is arising for the application of human factors principles in the nuclear industry related to plant decommissioning. This paper describes the application of human factors in the planning for the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP). As a systematic basis to assure proper preparation for the SSDP, the Management Oversight and Risk Tree (MORT) techniques were utilized to form the basis for a readiness model. The core ingredients of readiness -- property, people, and procedures -- were utilized to develop a readiness tree. Other applications of human factors techniques on the SSDP have included a task analysis to establish the training program for operations personnel, a procedures validation program, and a computer based configuration control system. Future applications at SSDP will include risk analysis for selected evolutions and the use of human factors methods for enhanced maintenance effectiveness to contribute to the reduction of radiation exposure. The results of the SSDP will be reported to the industry through a technology transfer program. It is expected that human factors planning will contribute to the safe and effective completion of the project

  17. Stakeholder involvement in the decommissioning of Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) was established in the 1950's to pioneer the development of nuclear energy within the UK. Today its primary mission is to decommission UK's former nuclear research sites and restore its environment in a way that is safe and secure, environmentally friendly, value for money and publicly Acceptable. UKAEA Dounreay celebrated its 50 birthday in 2005, having pioneered the development of fast reactor technology since 1955. Today the site is now leading the way in decommissioning. The Dounreay nuclear site licence covers an area of approximately 140 acres and includes 3 reactors: the Dounreay Material Test Reactor (DMTR), the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR), and the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR). In addition there are 180 facilities on site which have supported the fast reactor programme, including a fuel reprocessing capability, laboratories and administration buildings. The reactors are now all in advanced stages of decommissioning. In October 2000 the Dounreay Site Restoration Plan (DSRP) was published to provide a framework for the site's restoration. The plan's objective was to reduce the site's hazards progressively by decontaminating and dismantling the plant, equipment and facilities, remediating contaminated ground and treating and packaging waste so it is suitable for long term storage or disposal. Whilst hailed as the most detailed plan integrating some 1500 activities and spanning 60 years it was criticised for having no stakeholder involvement. In response to this criticism, UKAEA developed a process for public participation over the following 2 years and launched its stakeholder engagement programme in October 2002. In order to provide a larger platform for the engagement process an advertisement was placed in the Scottish media inviting people to register as stakeholders in the Dounreay Site Restoration Plan. The stakeholder list now total over 1000. In October 2002 UKAEA launched their commitment to public participation by the publication of Public Participation Newsletter No 1. The newsletter outlined the progress expected at the site over the coming years and described the criteria and methodology used for involving stakeholders. The process adopted was a two-stage process: Stakeholder panels (internal and external) and Summary paper for wider distribution (to all registered stakeholders, posted on the web site with an electronic questionnaire if participants wish to respond electronically, and distributed to local libraries). The Dounreay Bulletin is the main vehicle for promoting and updating specific issues for the site and for publishing the results of the consultation. It is issued to all staff and registered stakeholders on a fortnightly basis and highlights the main activities of the site. In 2004 UKAEA announced a new decommissioning plan providing more details on its approach to decommissioning, accelerating the programme from 2060 to 2036 and providing important savings from the previous programme. However UKAEA recognises that it needs to retain support from its local community and stakeholders if it is to achieve its acceleration goals. In addition, UKAEA is about to embark on a big consultation about how to deal with radioactive particles in the marine environment and has taken on board the need to get stakeholders involved at the earliest opportunity

  18. The transition from operation to decommissioning in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transition phase between plant operation and decommissioning is a critical one. In this period, a number of technical and organizational changes are needed in order to adjust the plant to the new objectives and requirements. Significant savings can be realized by initiating decommissioning planning, in a systematic fashion, prior to permanent shutdown. In Spain, the nuclear operators and the national agency responsible for radioactive waste management and decommissioning, ENRESA, have reached an agreement to co-ordinate efforts to ensure a gradual transition process and to minimize the loss of resources. I would like to refer in this very short presentation to the arrangements that have been established to manage this transition phase in an efficient way. The operator is generally responsible for maintaining the necessary records of the plant and its operation, for removing the spent fuel from the pools to a safe storage and for conditioning all operational waste. ENRESA is responsible for preparing all necessary plans for decommissioning and spent fuel/waste management, and for implementing the decommissioning activities. The planning of decommissioning activities should start five years before the expected shutdown date. An early strategic plan should be developed, identifying different viable decommissioning options.This plan should describe the selected decommissioning strategy and should provide the rationale for this choice and a time-schedule of decommissio choice and a time-schedule of decommissioning activities.The plan should also include the options for the transfer of the spent fuel to a safe interim storage location, prior to the start of the decommissioning works, and a cost estimate to complete decommissioning according to the strategy and schedule chosen. ENRESA is responsible for developing this plan, in co-operation with the operator, which should provide the plant radiological data and the inventories of spent fuel and operational waste.The strategic plan will be presented to the regulator for review and the regulator should agree that the strategy proposed will result in safe activities and an acceptable end state. Once the strategic plan is approved, detailed decommissioning plans should be prepared, including an environmental impact assessment. These detailed licensing documents will contain information on the systems and parts of the plant to be decommissioned, the methods to be used and the safety analyses for the tasks to be performed, the amounts of residual materials and radionuclide content, the management of waste and materials, and other issues such as the competence and organization of the staff, emergency planning, control of discharges and effluents and quality assurance. These documents should be completed in a period of three years and should be ready by the expected shutdown date of the plant. The final shutdown of a nuclear facility requires formal notification to the regulatory body, which will establish the conditions to be met prior to decommissioning. Decommissioning plans will be revised, if necessary, following the above conditions, and will be submitted for regulatory consent to begin the decommissioning activities. Regarding operational wastes, the objective is to have them conditioned by the operator by the permanent shutdown date. In order to achieve this goal, studies on the approval of the conditioning methods to be performed by ENRESA will be initiated five years before the expected shutdown date. A key safety question concerns the plans for the spent fuel.The preferred option is the transportation off-site after a cooling period to a centralized storage site. Yet another possibility is for the fuel to be stored at a separate facility on the site. The spent fuel management plan will be prepared by ENRESA and will be submitted to the regulator jointly with the decommissioning plans, i.e. a year before the expected shutdown of the plant. Decommissioning works are planned to start about three years after permanent shutdown. During this period, the operator is still respo

  19. BN-350 nuclear power plant. Regulatory aspects of decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The BN-350 reactor is a fast breeder reactor using liquid sodium as a coolant [1]. This reactor was commissioned in 1973 and operated for its design life of 20 years. Thereafter, it was operated on the basis of annual licenses, and the final shutdown was initially planned in 2003. In 1999, however, the Government of the Republic of Kazakhstan adopted Decree on the Decommissioning of BN-350 Reactor. This Decree establishes the conception of the reactor plant decommissioning. The conception envisages three stages of decommissioning. The first stage of decommissioning aims at putting the installation into a state of long term safe enclosure. The main goal is an achievement of nuclear-and radiation-safe condition and industrial safety level. The completion criteria for the stage are as follows: spent fuel is removed and placed in long term storage; radioactive liquid metal coolant is drained from the reactor and processed; liquid and solid radioactive wastes are reprocessed and long-term stored; systems and equipment, that are decommissioned at the moment of reactor safe store, are disassembled; radiation monitoring of the reactor building and environment is provided. The completion criteria of the second stage are as follows: 50 years is up; a decision about beginning of works by realization of dismantling and burial design is accepted. The goal of the third stage is partial or total dismantling of equipment, buildings and structure and burial. Since the decision on the decommissioning of BN-350 Reactor Facility was accepted before end of scheduled service life (2003), to this moment 'The Decommissioning Plan' (which in Kazakhstan is called 'Design of BN-350 reactor Decommission') was not worked out. For realization of the Governmental Decree and for determination of activities by the reactor safety provision and for preparation of its decommission for the period till Design approval the following documents were developed: 1. Special Technical Requirements 'General Provisions on Development of the Project on BN-350 Reactor Plant Decommissioning'; 2. Special Technical Conditions 'For Designing of the BN-350 Reactor Facility Decommissioning Project'; 3. Plan of priority measures for BN-350 reactor decommissioning. The documents 1 and 2 were prepared jointly by BN-350, technical institutes, KAEC and various other Kazakhstan Governmental agencies and departments, and they set out: stages in the development of the specifications for the Plan; applicable laws and regulations, and the procedure to follow if the regulations do not cover particular situations or issues; responsibilities of various organizations in the production, agreement and approval process; a recommended detailed list of contents for the Decommissioning Plan (Project); external factors, existing design and planning works which the Plan must take into account; other basic information which needs to be included into the Plan documentation. As the shutdown reactor continues to remain a source of nuclear and radioactive hazard, one have to take measures on putting the reactor to safe status, and thus 'Plan of priority measures for BN-350 reactor decommissioning' was developed. It includes following activities: measures on BN-350 decommissioning Project development; measures on provision of the reactor safety during transition period; measures on sodium drainage and utilization; measures on spent fuel disposal for a long term storage. KAEC was authorized to provide coordination of BN-350 decommissioning work. For example, some duties of KAEC in the Decommissioning Project are as follows: supervision of Project implementation by licensing and engagement of state licensed institutions only for decommissioning works; consideration, approval and authorization of technical documentation of enterprises and institutions implementing the Project within its competency. During the development and implementation of the Project all participants must act according to the laws and regulations valid in the Republic of Kazakhstan and to IAEA recommendations. In a case of

  20. Decommissioning of radioactive facilities in Cuba. Experiences from some projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radioactive materials and radiation sources are widely used in Cuba in medicine, industry and research. There are, in total, near 200 radioactive facilities around the country. For different reasons some of these facilities had reached to the end of their useful life and consequently they required decommissioning. The paper describes the actions taken for decommissioning of four radioactive facilities. Two laboratories, in which non-sealed radioactive sources for research purposes were used, as well as two industrial facilities that used sealed radioactive sources for industrial radiography and level detection respectively. The strategy for decommissioning included first the removal of disused sealed sources and radioactive waste. After that, a detailed radiological evaluation was carried out in each facility: dose rate and surface contamination measurements, analysis of relevant samples. Appropriate criteria for the release of the facilities from regulatory control were selected in accordance with national legislation and the further use of the installations. The results of radiological characterization demonstrated that neither decontamination nor dismantling activities were required in these cases for the release of the facilities from regulatory control. Based on the experience gained during the decommissioning of these laboratories and industrial facilities, recommendations for improving the decommissioning strategy for other radioactive facilities in the country are given. An important issued is related with the initial decommissioning planning, which have not been developed yet for all radioactive facilities in operation in Cuba at present. Another important conclusion is that immediate decommissioning is in most cases the best option for small facilities. (author)

  1. DECOMMISSIONING OF A CAESIUM-137 SEALED SOURCE PRODUCTION FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, A.; Abbott, H.

    2003-02-27

    Amersham owns a former Caesium-137 sealed source production facility. They commissioned RWE NUKEM to carry out an Option Study to determine a strategy for the management of this facility and then the subsequent decommissioning of it. The decommissioning was carried out in two sequential phases. Firstly robotic decommissioning followed by a phase of manual decommissioning. This paper describes the remote equipment designed built and operated, the robotic and manual decommissioning operations performed, the Safety Management arrangements and summarizes the lessons learned. Using the equipment described the facility was dismantled and decontaminated robotically. Some 2300kg of Intermediate Level Waste containing in the order of 4000Ci were removed robotically from the facility. Ambient dose rates were reduced from 100's of R per hour {gamma} to 100's of mR per hour {gamma}. The Telerobotic System was then removed to allow man access to complete the decommissioning. Manual decommissioning reduced ambient dose rates further to less than 1mR per hour {gamma} and loose contamination levels to less than 0.25Bq/cm2. This allowed access to the facility without respiratory protection.

  2. Procedures and Practices - Challenges for Decommissioning Management and Teamwork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mental and practical approach to a decommissioning project is often not the same at all levels of an organization. Studies indicate that the early establishment of a decommissioning mindset throughout an organization is an important and frequently overlooked process. It is not enough to establish procedures, if practices and mental approaches are overlooked; and for decommissioning projects that are more often than not dominated by one of a kind problem solving, procedure design is challenging, and new requirements are put on communication. Our research considers stakeholder involvement in these processes in the wider sense of the term; however the main stakeholders in focus are regulators and the work force that will perform or lead the tasks related to decommissioning. Issues here treated include: Decommissioning mindset and the manifestation of mindset issues in decommissioning projects, including challenges and prospective solutions; trust building and trust breaking factors in communication and collaboration relevant to transition and decommissioning; new technologies for collaboration and communication and how these may impair or empower participants - experiences from several domains. This paper is based on work done in collaboration with the OECD NEA Halden Reactor Project. (author)

  3. The French decommissioning program: a stakeholder point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In January 2001, EDF owner of 56 plants in operation and 9 plants in decommissioning stage decided to accelerate the decommissioning of its first nine nuclear generation units in order to achieve final decommissioning in 25 years' time. An engineering center dedicated to decommissioning, radwaste management and environment was set up to implement this strategy. Four years after its creation, the first lessons learned in the fields of organization, project and program management can now be described. During the 4 years that have elapsed since the creation of CIDEN in 2001 to implement EDF's new decommissioning strategy, its organization has constantly improved to ensure success of its decommissioning projects. The aim has been to build an efficient organization with clearly defined roles for the key players. Simultaneously, the Program Management activities have received increasing consideration and specific mechanisms have been implemented to bring financing and licensing flexibility to the program. The continuous improvement of its organization and the development of new project or program management methodologies is a constant preoccupation of EDF. Its aim is to successfully implement its decommissioning strategy, one of the key issues for guaranteeing the future of a safe economic and environment friendly nuclear energy in France

  4. Decommissioning Plan of the Musashi Reactor and Its Progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Musashi Reactor is a TRIGA-II, tank-type research reactor, as shown in Table 1. The reactor had been operated at maximum thermal power level of 100 kW since first critical, January 30, 1963. Reactor operation was shut down due to small leakage of water from the reactor tank on December 21,1989. After shutdown, investigation of the causes, making plan of repair and discussions on restart or decommissioning had been done. Finally, decision of decommissioning was made in May, 2003. The initial plan of the decommissioning was submitted to the competent authority in January, 2004. Now, the reactor is under decommissioning. The plan of decommissioning and its progress are described. In conclusion: considering the status of undertaking plan of the waste disposal facility for the low level radioactive waste from research reactors, the phased decommissioning was selected for the Musashi Reactor. First phase of the decommissioning activities including the actions of permanent shutdown and delivering the spent nuclear fuels to US DOE was completed

  5. When a plant shuts down: The psychology of decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the next decade, 10 to 25 nuclear plants in the United States may be taken off line. Many will have reached the end of their 40-year life cycles, but others will be retired because the cost of operating them has begun to outweigh their economic benefit. Such was the case at Fort St. Vrain, the first decommissioning of a US commercial plant under new Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. Two major problems associated with decommissioning plants have been obvious: (1) the technical challenges and costs of decommissioning, and (2) the cost of maintaining and finally decommissioning a plant after a safe storage (SAFSTOR) period of approximately 60 years. What has received little attention is the challenge that affects not only the people who make a plant work, but the quality of the solutions to these problems: how to maintain effective organizational performance during the process of downsizing and decommissioning and/or SAFSTOR. The quality of technical solutions for closing a plant, as well as how successfully the decommissioning process is held within or below budget, will depend largely on how effectively the nuclear organization functions as a social unit. Technical and people issues are bound together. The difficulty is how to operate a plant effectively when plant personnel have no sense of long-term security. As the nuclear power industry matures and the pace for closing operating plants accelerates, the time has come to prepare for the widespre time has come to prepare for the widespread decommissioning of plants. The industry would be well served by conducting a selective, industry-wide evaluation of plants to assess its overall readiness for the decommissioning process. A decommissioning is not likely to be trouble free, but with a healthy appreciation for the human side of the process, it will undoubtedly go more smoothly than if approached as a matter of dismantling a machine

  6. Estimation of the Decommissioning Waste Arising for a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Korea, Kori Unit 1(Pressurized Water Reactor, 587MW) began the first life extension operation since 2008 and Wolsong Unit 1(Canadian Deuterium Uranium Reactor, 679MW) has waited for the admission of life extension after license expiration since November 2012. However, after Fukushima Daichi nuclear power plant accident happened March 2011, the public support for the nuclear power plant life extension has been faded. This is reason why the preparation of nuclear power plant decommissioning is significant in this time. When it comes to the decommissioning cost estimation, the waste treatment and disposal possess about 17% ? 43% in the total decommissioning expense. Hence, the accurate analysis of the decommissioning cost has the immense influence on the determination of decommissioning strategy in later. Namely, as the fundamental investigation of the decommissioning outlay, the approach to the expected waste weight estimation is worth of study. In this study, the arising of waste weight during the decommissioning of Kori Unit 1 was estimated with some documents listed in the reference. Finally, the total expected waste amount during the Kori Unit 1 decommissioning is about 49,139 tons. Among them, assumed radioactive waste material is 1,915,214 kg(869 tons). Based on IAEA standard, these wastes are divided in HLW, ILW, LLW, VLLW and EW respectively. Future plan is to assess the radioactivity of primary side components and dose rate distribution of Kori Unit 1 using MCNP and ORIGEN-2 codes. This action will be helpful to design the reasonable decommissioning scenario in the future 4 session

  7. Nuclear Decommissioning: from Case-Studies to a Proposed Typology of Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Pelleterat Borde, Melchior; Martin, Christophe; Guarnieri, Franck

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a typology of risks which may be faced by operators in the transition to nuclear decommissioning. It is based on an analysis of the literature on nuclear decommissioning, both past and present, and a recent study of a nuclear power station. It first part outlines decommissioning definitions and current decommissioning strategies in broad terms. The second part focuses on decommissioning contexts in three different installations. Although the technological and environmental...

  8. Design features facilitating the decommissioning of advanced gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the advanced gas-cooled reactors is discussed as is the proposed decommissioning plan for delayed decommissioning. The special features which assist in decommissioning are presented. As a result of the study a catalogue of design features which will facilitate decommissioning is given. In addition to the catalogue of design features, the radioactive inventory 10 years after shutdown and 100 years after shutdown has been calculated. From this a provisional operator dose from activities associated with decommissioning has been assessed

  9. Nuclear power plant decommissioning: state-of-the-art review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief orientation to the state-of-the-art of nuclear power plant decommissioning discusses the related areas of experience, tools and techniques, and planning. There have been 68 nuclear reactor decommissionings to date, including 9 power plants, some of which were mothballed. The picture suggests that the term art may be misapplied since decommissioning is now more of a mature commercial industrial than a research and development endeavor. It also suggests that the nuclear industry has shown foresight by preparing for it before a crisis situation developed. Some of this has already influenced operators of coal power plants, especially where hazardous materials may be involved. 33 references, 1 table

  10. Decommissioning and cutting methods in the nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Up till today, almost 100 nuclear power plants have been shut down worldwide after an operational lifetime of approximately 30 years. All those nuclear sites have been scheduled to be decommissioned. The term 'decommissioning' may be defined as being the step following the permanent closure of an industrial site, either nuclear or not, to ensure ongoing safety and progressively improve the quality of the local environment. Therefore decommissioning starts immediately further to a final and permanent closure while targeting to leaving a clear site where the facility had once stood

  11. Decommissioning of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance to regulatory bodies and operating organizations on planning and provision for the safe management of the decommissioning of non-reactor nuclear fuel cycle facilities. While the basic safety considerations for the decommissioning of nuclear fuel cycle facilities are similar to those for nuclear power plants, there are important differences, notably in the design and operating parameters for the facilities, the type of radioactive material and the support systems available. It is the objective of this Safety Guide to provide guidance for the shutdown and eventual decommissioning of such facilities, their individual characteristics being taken into account

  12. Decommissioning technology of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on experience obtained through construction and maintenance of various nuclear facilities including a pressurized water type nuclear power plant (PWR), Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has continued technical development for the decommissioning technology of commercial nuclear power plants for years. As technology which is needed for decommissioning, there are system engineering and radioactive materials evaluation technology in a planning phase, decontamination / dismantling technology and waste treatment and waste measuring technology in a decommissioning phase. This report presents the outline of each technology of MHI. (author)

  13. Decontamination and Decommissioned Small Nuclear AIP Hybrid Systems Submarines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangya Liu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Being equipped with small reactor AIP is the trend of conventional submarine power in 21st century as well as a real power revolution in conventional submarine. Thus, the quantity of small reactor AIP Submarines is on the increase, and its decommissioning and decontamination will also become a significant international issue. However, decommissioning the small reactor AIP submarines is not only a problem that appears beyond the lifetime of the small reactor nuclear devices, but the problem involving the entire process of design, construction, running and closure. In the paper, the problem is explored based on the conception and the feasible decommissioning and decontamination means are supplied to choose from.

  14. Relative evaluation on decommissioning accident scenarios of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ? This paper suggests relative importance on accident scenarios during decommissioning of nuclear facilities. ? The importance of scenarios can be performed by using AHP and Sugeno fuzzy method. ? The AHP and Sugeno fuzzy method guarantee reliability of the importance evaluation. -- Abstract: This paper suggests the evaluation method of relative importance on accident scenarios during decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The evaluation method consists of AHP method and Sugeno fuzzy integral method. This method will guarantee the reliability of relative importance evaluation for decommissioning accident scenarios.

  15. A study on the decommissioning of research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the result of study on decommissioning, discussion has made and data have been collected about experiences, plannings, and techniques for decommissioning through visit to GA and JAERI. GA supplied our Research Reactor No. 1 and No. 2, and JAERI made a memorial museum after dicommissioning of JRR-1 and is dismentling JPDR now. Also many kinds of documents are collected and arranged such as documents related to TRIGA reactor dicommissioning, 30 kinds of documents including decommissioning plan, technical criteria and related regulatory, and 1,200 kinds of facility description data. (Author)

  16. R and D for decommissioning in the European Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1979, the European Community (EC) has been conducting three successive R and D programmes in the field of decommissioning of nuclear installations with the main objective of reinforcing the scientific and technical basis of decommissioning with a view to strengthening the safety and protection aspects. The current programme covers: six R and D projects concerning building integrity, decontamination, dismantling, treatment of waste materials, remote-controlled manipulator systems, estimation of radioactive wastes; identification of guidelines related to application of ALARA principle on decommissioning, and the technical elements of a Community policy; testing of new techniques in practice, particularly in the four pilot dismantling projects. (R.P.) 2 figs.; 3 tabs

  17. Evaluation of the decommissioning costs of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an owner of nuclear installations, the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN has to set up and to submit to the authorities decommissioning plans describing its nuclear installations. These plans contain a physical and radiological inventory, a description of the decommissioning works and techniques to be used, as well as a description of the management of the radioactive materials, the selected strategy, and an estimate of the costs. A data-processing system for the evaluation of the decommissioning costs of nuclear installations has been set-up. The progress in this field for 1995 is given

  18. Decontamination and Decommissioning at Small Nuclear Facilities: Facilitating the Submission of Decommissioning Funding Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the efforts of the Washington State Department of Health to ensure that small nuclear facilities have the tools each needs to submit Decommissioning Funding Plans. These Plans are required by both the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and in some states - in the case of Washington state, the Washington State Department of Health is the regulator of radioactive materials. Unfortunately, the guidance documents provided by the U.S. NRC pertain to large nuclear facilities, such as nuclear fuel fabrication plants, not the small nuclear laboratory nor small nuclear laundry that may also be required to submit such Plans. These small facilities are required to submit Decommissioning Funding Plans by dint of their nuclear materials inventory, but have only a small staff, such as a Radiation Safety Officer and few authorized users. The Washington State Department of Health and Attenuation Environmental Company have been working on certain tools, such as templates and spreadsheets, that are intended to assist these small nuclear facilities prepare compliant Decommissioning Funding Plans with a minimum of experience and effort. (authors)

  19. Constructing Predictive Estimates for Worker Exposure to Radioactivity During Decommissioning: Analysis of Completed Decommissioning Projects - Master Thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dettmers, Dana Lee; Eide, Steven Arvid

    2002-10-01

    An analysis of completed decommissioning projects is used to construct predictive estimates for worker exposure to radioactivity during decommissioning activities. The preferred organizational method for the completed decommissioning project data is to divide the data by type of facility, whether decommissioning was performed on part of the facility or the complete facility, and the level of radiation within the facility prior to decommissioning (low, medium, or high). Additional data analysis shows that there is not a downward trend in worker exposure data over time. Also, the use of a standard estimate for worker exposure to radioactivity may be a best estimate for low complete storage, high partial storage, and medium reactor facilities; a conservative estimate for some low level of facility radiation facilities (reactor complete, research complete, pits/ponds, other), medium partial process facilities, and high complete research facilities; and an underestimate for the remaining facilities. Limited data are available to compare different decommissioning alternatives, so the available data are reported and no conclusions can been drawn. It is recommended that all DOE sites and the NRC use a similar method to document worker hours, worker exposure to radiation (person-rem), and standard industrial accidents, injuries, and deaths for all completed decommissioning activities.

  20. Organization and management for decommissioning of large nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For nuclear facilities, decommissioning is the final phase in the life-cycle after siting, design, construction, commissioning and operation. It is a complex process involving operations such as detailed surveys, decontamination and dismantling of plant equipment and facilities, demolition of buildings and structures, and management of resulting waste and other materials, whilst taking into account aspects of health and safety of the operating personnel and the general public, and protection of the environment. Careful planning and management is essential to ensure that decommissioning is accomplished in a safe and cost effective manner. Guidance on organizational aspects may lead to better decision making, reductions in time and resources, lower doses to the workers and reduced impact on public health and the environment. The objective of this report is to provide information and guidance on the organization and management aspects for the decommissioning of large nuclear facilities which will be useful for licensees responsible for discharging these responsibilities. The information contained in the report may also be useful to policy makers, regulatory bodies and other organizations interested in the planning and management of decommissioning. In this report, the term 'decommissioning' refers to those actions that are taken at the end of the useful life of a nuclear facility in withdrawing it from service with adequate regard for the health and safety of workers andd for the health and safety of workers and members of the public and for the protection of the environment. The term 'large nuclear facilities' involves nuclear power plants, large nuclear research reactors and other fuel cycle facilities such as reprocessing plants, fuel conversion, fabrication and enrichment plants, as well as spent fuel storage and waste management plants. Information on the planning and management for decommissioning of smaller research reactors or other small nuclear facilities can be found elsewhere. The report covers organizational aspects of decommissioning and describes factors relevant to the planning and management of a decommissioning project. It identifies the general issues to be addressed and provides an overview of organizational activities necessary to manage a decommissioning project in a safe, timely and cost effective manner. There are a number of facilities that present special cases and include those which have undergone a major accident as well as uranium mines and mills and radioactive waste repositories. These facilities are not dealt with in this report. This report is structured as follows. Section 1 contains background information, objectives and scope of the document. In Section 2 considerations important for decommissioning management are discussed which could affect the organization. Section 3 deals with the management for active phases of decommissioning and provides a discussion on the organization of the decommissioning management team. Section 4 gives an overview of the decommissioning planning and approval process. Section 5 provides information on quality assurance issues relevant to decommissioning. Management of decommissioning wastes is briefly discussed in Section 6. Responsibilities and qualifications of the decommissioning management team are dealt with in Section 7. Conclusions and recommendations are given in Section 8. The report is supplemented with references, Appendix I giving details on recent experience on data management, a glossary, and national annexes, some of which indicate how the principles set out in the main report are to be utilized in different countries, and some of which are real examples of arrangements used in decommissioning projects. A list of drafting and reviewing bodies is also included

  1. Decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Shippingport reactor was originally designed as a pressurized water reactor and operated for approximately 10 years in that mode. Later, in 1967 it was converted to a light water breeder reactor and continued its operation until 1985, when the reactor was shut down. However, the decommissioning planning for Shippingport was begun in 1979. Detailed engineering and planning was undertaken to look at alternatives for disposal of the reactor vessel, the overall detailed estimated costs, the exposure to the workers and the waste volume generated and to prepare activity specifications for performance of the work. The program scope and component removal are detailed. The scarification of contaminated concrete, building demolition, special tools and equipment needed and work performance data are described. The successful removal of the primary system components and piping has been completed. (author)

  2. Remote control: Decommissioning RTGs [radioisotope theromelectric generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several hundred radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are deployed along the Russian Federation's Arctic coast to power remote lighthouses and navigation beacons. Similar RTGs were also used as power sources in other remote locations in the Russian Federation and elsewhere in the former Soviet Union. All Russian RTG's have out-lived their lifespan and are in need of decommissioning. The RTGs typically contain one or more radionuclide heat sources (RHS) each with an activity of thousands of TBq of strontium-90. This means that they are Category 1 sources as defined in the IAEA international 'Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources'. According to the Federal Atomic Energy Agency of the Russian Federation (Rosatom), there are 651 RTGs at various locations in the Russian Federation which are subject to decommissioning or replacement with alternative sources of energy. The Norwegian Government has played a significant role in international efforts, fully cooperating with Russian authorities to safely decommission RTGs and provide alternative power sources. Norway has actively supported improvement of nuclear safety and security in northwest Russia for more then ten years. Over this period, the Norwegian Government has spent approximately $150 million on a variety of industrial projects, including specific improvements in radioactive waste treatment and storage, physical security, and infrastructure support. The national authority, the Norw support. The national authority, the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA), takes an active part advising the Government regarding prioritization and quality assurance of all these activities. In addition, the Plan of Action places great emphasis on adequate regulatory supervision. Accordingly, the NRPA programme includes a variety of regulatory support projects. These are designed to assist the Russian authorities in ensuring that work is properly carried out within the framework of Russian law, taking into account international standards and recommendations from bodies such as the IAEA. The regulatory cooperation between NRPA and various Russian regulatory bodies is critical in maintaining an effective and efficient regulatory process. The Norwegian Government has been operating an industrial project to support decommissioning of RTGs in northwest Russia since 1997. Since project initiation, more than 60 RTGs have been removed from lighthouses on the Kola Peninsula. They are being replaced with solar panels and nickel-cadmium battery packs. As part of this project, inspection and preparatory work took place before the RTGs were transferred by helicopter, boat and road to a temporary storage point at ATP 'Atomflot' near Murmansk. The RTGs were then transported via road and rail to the dismantling point in the Moscow Region, where the heat sources (RHS) were removed. The RHS were then transported by road and rail to FSUE PA 'Mayak', where they are stored pending final disposal. NRPA has provided support to regulators in the Russian Federation. The general goal of regulatory support is to help Russian bodies develop guidelines and requirements for planning, licensing and implementing industry projects. The NRPA's main partner in the RTG Regulatory Support Project (RSP) is the Nuclear, Industrial and Environmental Regulatory Authority of the Russian Federation (Rost-echnadzor). In order to provide the most relevant international inputs to Russian regulators, the NRPA involves regulators and technical support organizations from other countries, including France, Sweden and the UK. Topics like assessing the threats, defining tasks, closing gaps, application and enforcement are discussed. One lesson is clear: regulatory support is a vital adjunct to carrying out such industrial projects so that the whole process is safe and efficient for everyone involved

  3. Remote methods for decontamination and decommissioning operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three methods for the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities are described along with operational experience associated with each method. Each method described in some way reduces radiation exposure to the operating personnel involved. Electrochemical decontamination of process tanks is described using an in-situ method. Descriptions of two processes, electropolishing and cerium redox decontamination, are listed. A method of essentially smokeless cutting of process piping using a plasma-arc cutting torch is described. In one technique, piping is cut remotely from a distance using a specially modified torch holder. In another technique, cutting is done with master-slave manipulators inside a hot cell. Finally, a method for remote cutting and scarification of contaminated concrete is described. This system, which utilizes high-pressure water jets, is coupled to a cutting head or rotating scarification head. The system is suited for cutting contaminated concrete for removal or removing a thin layer in a controlled manner for decontamination

  4. Decommissioning support system, using RFID and USN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RFID and USN are key technology in the ubiquitous computing systems. Actual physical environmental information can be used to remote control systems and management using various sensor technology and wireless network. These are used to managing physical distribution systems, complex monitoring environments such as fire detecting and various environments in the field of u-healthcare. Recently, decontamination and dismantling for nuclear plant have increasing interest after Fucushima nuclear accident. In this paper, a decommissioning support system is suggested for an effective management and control of work efficiency and of worker's status. This system makes effective real-time monitoring worker's location, work status and radiation exposure and effective response for worker's safety and emergency situation

  5. Decommissioning support system, using RFID and USN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, W. H.; Park, S. K.; Choi, Y. D.; Lee, K. I.; Moon, J. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    RFID and USN are key technology in the ubiquitous computing systems. Actual physical environmental information can be used to remote control systems and management using various sensor technology and wireless network. These are used to managing physical distribution systems, complex monitoring environments such as fire detecting and various environments in the field of u-healthcare. Recently, decontamination and dismantling for nuclear plant have increasing interest after Fucushima nuclear accident. In this paper, a decommissioning support system is suggested for an effective management and control of work efficiency and of worker's status. This system makes effective real-time monitoring worker's location, work status and radiation exposure and effective response for worker's safety and emergency situation

  6. Development of plasma jet torch for decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Plasma jet torch to cut both metal and non metal has been developed, as the cutting technique for the decommissioning of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. 'The plasma fluid analysis code' was developed to make clear the physical behavior of plasma fluid to influence the electromagnetic field, material constant of neuter gas, flow rate and fluid velocity, shape of torch nozzle such as. This code is applied for the design of smaller size plasma jet torch which has high endurance and cutting ability. The plasma fluid was analyzed by this code to investigate the influence of nozzle shape on the plasma. The most suitable nozzle shape of plasma jet torch was designed as the results of numerical analysis. The plasma jet torch of which practicality was confirmed by experiment was made according to this design. The cutting ability and endurance of this plasma jet torch were enough. (author)

  7. Large packages for reactor decommissioning waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out jointly by the Atomic Energy Establishment at Winfrith (now called the Winfrith Technology Centre), Windscale Laboratory and Ove Arup and Partners. The work involved the investigation of the design of large transport containers for intermediate level reactor decommissioning waste, ie waste which requires shielding, and is aimed at European requirements (ie for both LWR and gas cooled reactors). It proposes a design methodology for such containers covering the whole lifetime of a waste disposal package. The design methodology presented takes account of various relevant constraints. Both large self shielded and returnable shielded concepts were developed. The work was generic, rather than specific; the results obtained, and the lessons learned, remain to be applied in practice

  8. Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2008-07-15

    The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Articles and reports in this issue include: D and D technical paper summaries; The role of nuclear power in turbulent times, by Tom Chrisopher, AREVA, NP, Inc.; Enthusiastic about new technologies, by Jack Fuller, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; It's important to be good citizens, by Steve Rus, Black and Veatch Corporation; Creating Jobs in the U.S., by Guy E. Chardon, ALSTOM Power; and, and, An enviroment and a community champion, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The Industry Innovations article is titled Best of the best TIP achievement 2008, by Edward Conaway, STP Nuclear Operating Company.

  9. Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Articles and reports in this issue include: D and D technical paper summaries; The role of nuclear power in turbulent times, by Tom Chrisopher, AREVA, NP, Inc.; Enthusiastic about new technologies, by Jack Fuller, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; It's important to be good citizens, by Steve Rus, Black and Veatch Corporation; Creating Jobs in the U.S., by Guy E. Chardon, ALSTOM Power; and, and, An enviroment and a community champion, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The Industry Innovations article is titled Best of the best TIP achievement 2008, by Edward Conaway, STP Nuclear Operating Company

  10. Dismantling and decommissioning, experience of commercial PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regarding the relatively youthness of FRAMATOME PWR's in operation none of these reactor needs to be decommissioned before 1992. However feasibility studies have been carried out by FRAMATOME for an on site entombment of active components and heavy equipments. In the past, partial dismantling of the reactor internals of the CHOOZ reactor: PWR of 320 MWe and a complete removal of the thermal shield protecting the reactor vessel were conducted successfully. After repair, the reactor power output has been upgraded of 10 % and the reactor operates satisfactorily since 1970. More recently the discovery of scarce defects affecting centering pins of control guide tube located in the upper reactor internals of 900 MWe plants has initiated the construction of several Hot stand equipments for the systematic replacement of these centering pins

  11. Uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most challenging issues facing the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management is the cleanup of the three gaseous diffusion plants. In October 1992, Congress passed the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and established the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund to accomplish this task. This mission is being undertaken in an environmentally and financially responsible way by: devising cost-effective technical solutions; producing realistic life-cycle cost estimates, based on practical assumptions and thorough analysis; generating coherent long-term plans which are based on risk assessments, land use, and input from stakeholders; and, showing near-term progress in the cleanup of the gaseous diffusion facilities at Oak Ridge

  12. Update on Jose Cabrera NPP decommissioning - 59322

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ENRESA is the National Spanish Agency responsible of the dismantling of Nuclear Facilities, previous Transfer of ownership of the facility from the Utility to ENRESA. On April 30, 2006, Jose Cabrera Nuclear Power Plant (Fig. 1) was definitively shutdown, and two years later, on April 30, 2008, ENRESA requested the transfer of the ownership of the Plant from the Ministry along with the corresponding authorization for performance of the Dismantling and Decommissioning Plan. On February 1, 2010, ENRESA was authorized to initiate the dismantling of Jose Cabrera NPP, once the spent fuel has been stored on-site at a dry storage facility (ISFSI). Currently, preparatory activities are underway, including the modification of systems and auxiliary facilities for waste and material management. Main challenges of the project include the removal of major components (vessel, steam generator, pressurizer, main pump and primary loop), and the use of large containers (CE-2b) to reduce segmentation of activated parts. (authors)

  13. Decommissioning of the Risoe hot cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concise descriptions of actions taken in relation to the decommissioning of the hot cell facility at Risoe National Laboratory are presented. The removal of fissile material, of large contaminated equipment from the concrete cell line and a separate shielded storage facility, and the removal of large contaminated facilities such as out cell parts of a tube transport system between a concrete cell and a lead shielded steel box and a remotely operated Reichert Telatom microscope housed in a lead shielded glove box is described in addition to the initial mapping of radiation levels related to the decontamination of concrete cells. The dose commitment of 17.7 mSv was ascribed to 12 persons in the 2nd half of 1991. The work resulting in these doses was mainly handling of waste together with the frogman entrances in order to repair the in-cell crane and power manipulator. The overall time schedule for the project still appears to be applicable. (AB)

  14. Decontamination experiments for stainless steel decommissioned components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the factors which influence the decontamination conditions using the steps of CONAP process. This four phases process (alkaline pre-treatment , an oxidation phase with potassium permanganate in acid environment, a dissolution phase using a complexing agent, a rinsing phase) has been used for decontamination to recycle the stainless steel 304 L and 403 m. The attraction of this process results from the following reasons: - the volume of radioactive sludge is low comparatively with the original volume of the solutions; - the separation of the activity from the solution is very effective; - time of exposure is reduced; - it is not necessary to process the solution through evaporators. During decommissioning decontamination is used to reduce radiation field by removing some of the fission and activation products contained in deposits and oxide films to minimize the radiation exposure of the personnel and public. In this context, this hard decontamination yields the materials at a radioactivity level fulfilling the repository requirements. (authors)

  15. Strategy for decommissioning of NPP's in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to German Atomic Law, two different strategies are possible, i.e. direct dismantling and safe enclosure before dismantling. Both approaches have their advantages and disadvantages. Taking into account the site and plant specific conditions the optimal strategy can be evaluated. Both approaches have been applied in Germany in the past. The German Atomic Law and the Radiation Protection Ordinance (June 2002) were adapted recently (July 2002). Additionally, the life operation time of the German NPP's was fixed in a new law (April 2002): Orderly Termination of the Commercial Production of Nuclear Electricity. These issues have made it necessary for the power utilities to review the strategies applied. As long as the final disposal in Germany is still an open issue, the construction of local Interim Stores is necessary to be able to dismantle a NPP. The basic strategies are not excluding each other and it seems clear today, that the optimal approach is a combination of these strategies, e.g. dismantling of all auxiliary systems and leaving activated parts for a longer SE period. Within this approach the advantages of both basic strategies have been integrated in one. The EWN GmbH has developed such integrated but still different approaches for the decommissioning projects of the Kernkraftwerke Greifswald (KGR) and the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) Juelich. It can be stated that the decommissioning of a NPP does not present technical issues of concern,s not present technical issues of concern, but is more a project management issue, although surrounded by sometime intricate political and juridical boundary conditions. A major strategy change is to be expected only when final disposal capacities are available in the future. (authors)

  16. Lessons learnt from Ignalina NPP decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) is located in Lithuania, 130 km north of Vilnius, and consists of two 1500 MWe RBMK type units, commissioned respectively in December 1983 and August 1987. On the 1. of May 2004, the Republic of Lithuania became a member of the European Union. With the protocol on the Ignalina Nuclear Power in Lithuania which is annexed to the Accession Treaty, the Contracting Parties have agreed: - On Lithuanian side, to commit closure of unit 1 of INPP before 2005 and of Unit 2 by 31 December 2009; - On European Union side, to provide adequate additional Community assistance to the efforts of Lithuania to decommission INPP. The paper is divided in two parts. The first part describes how, starting from this agreement, the project was launched and organized, what is its present status and which activities are planned to reach the final ambitious objective of a green field. To give a global picture, the content of the different projects that were defined and the licensing process will also be presented. In the second part, the paper will focus on the lessons learnt. It will explain the difficulties encountered to define the decommissioning strategy, considering both immediate or differed dismantling options and why the first option was finally selected. The paper will mention other challenges and problems that the different actors of the project faced and how they were managed and solved. The paper will be written by representatives of the Ignalie written by representatives of the Ignalina NPP and of the Project Management Unit. (author)

  17. Safety aspects related to decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objectives of decommissioning are the protection of workers, people and environment against the radiological and non-radiological hazards resulted from the shut-down of a nuclear facility. The decommissioning of a nuclear facility became a problem of great interest in Romania too because of the development of nuclear industry and especially of the WWR-S Research reactor of the Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering , a reactor of Russian design, operated from 1958. The paper presents and evaluate the safety principles related to the decommissioning activity of nuclear facility and the practical problems which must be taken into account to implement these principles. This study also introduces the licensing process for decommissioning applied all over the world and offers some proposals to implement it in Romania. (author). 1 fig.,9 refs

  18. Decommissioning of DR 2. Experiences learnt from the completion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes experiences gathered from the decommissioning of DR 2. The experiences encompasses planning and management of the project, methods of accomplishment, and various materials categories. Additionally, the report describes the experience with specific tools used in the project

  19. Decommissioning of the Wuergassen nuclear power plant, a commercial challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to the inspection results which detected cracks in the core shroud, economic aspects have induced PreussenElektra to opt for decommissioning and dismantling of the Wuergassen reactor. As this shutdown of the nuclear power plant is not a planned shutdown, costs arising in addition to the original decommissioning framework studies have to be assessed, especially the expenditure for the adjusted plant manpower requirements, and the additional operating and phase-out costs. Experience has shown that the decommissioning of a nuclear power plants does not pose problems in terms of safety or technology, but still is a commercial challenge. Expense forecasts have to be adjusted in response to the unplanned shutdown. PreussenElektra therefore has set up a modified project and operating structure. The analysis and evaluation of the first decommissioning phase will show whether the cost assessment approaches are in agreement with reality. (orig.)

  20. Decommissioning the UHTREX Reactor Facility at Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, M.; Elder, J.

    1992-08-01

    The Ultra-High Temperature Reactor Experiment (UHTREX) facility was constructed in the late 1960s to advance high-temperature and gas-cooled reactor technology. The 3-MW reactor was graphite moderated and helium cooled and used 93% enriched uranium as its fuel. The reactor was run for approximately one year and was shut down in February 1970. The decommissioning of the facility involved removing the reactor and its associated components. This document details planning for the decommissioning operations which included characterizing the facility, estimating the costs of decommissioning, preparing environmental documentation, establishing a system to track costs and work progress, and preplanning to correct health and safety concerns in the facility. Work to decommission the facility began in 1988 and was completed in September 1990 at a cost of $2.9 million. The facility was released to Department of Energy for other uses in its Los Alamos program.

  1. Experimental Boiling Water Reactor decontamination and decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author begins by discussing the problems encountered during decontamination and decommissioning. Next, he discusses waste packaging and recycling. His last topic of lessons learned is subdivided into prevention and early detection, recovery issues, management issues, and noteworthy practices

  2. Lessons Learned from the NASA Plum Brook Reactor Facility Decommissioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    NASA has been conducting decommissioning activities at its PBRF for the last decade. As a result of all this work there have been several lessons learned both good and bad. This paper presents some of the more exportable lessons.

  3. Developing Integrated Decommissioning Information Management System (IDIMS) of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Taiwan, the Taiwan Research Reactor (TRR) was shut down in January 1988, and a few nuclear facilities were accompanied to stop operation within Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER). For public health and safety reasons, INER dismantled step by step its expired nuclear facilities. Integrated Decommissioning Information Management System (IDIMS) was developed to ensure safety of dismantling and to record all activity data during the decommissioning project. These recorded activity data range from data of planning, licensing, post-operation to those of radioactive waste management and storage. In addition, IDIMS was expected to preserve decommissioning knowledge using information technology from practical data and problem solving. It also is anticipated that IDIMS will be an important knowledge repository and design base for decommissioning projects of nuclear power plants in Taiwan. (author)

  4. Decommissioning a nuclear power plant: the tax effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tax treatment of decommissioning costs is as important a consideration as construction costs. The principles also apply to offshore operations and pipeline systems having a negative salvage value. Estimates place the cost at somewhere between 15 and 100% of construction costs, depending on how the decommissioning is done. It is essential to find an accurate way to project decommissioning costs and to decide how they should be reported for tax purposes. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) does not plan to apply Section 167, which deals with negative net salvage. Utility customers will ultimately provide the funds, but current IRS rulings count these funds as ordinary income and do not allow matching the additional revenue with decommissioning expenses

  5. Decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities: a literature search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    is bibliography includes 429 unclassified references to the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The references are arranged in chronological order and cover the period from 1944 through 1974. Subject and author indexes are e provided. (U.S.)

  6. Decommissioning of the ICI TRIGA Mark I reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry, D.R.; England, M.R.; Ward, A. [BNFL, Sellafield (United Kingdom); Green, D. [ICI Chemical Polymers Ltd, Billingham (United Kingdom)

    2000-07-01

    This paper considers the fuel removal, transportation and subsequent decommissioning of the ICI TRIGA Mark I Reactor at Billingham, UK. BNFL Waste Management and Decommissioning carried out this work on behalf of ICI. The decommissioning methodology was considered in the four stages to be described, namely Preparatory Works, Reactor Defueling, Intermediate Level Waste Removal and Low Level Waste Removal. This paper describes the principal methodologies involved in the defueling of the reactor and subsequent decommissioning operations, highlighting in particular the design and safety case methodologies used in order to achieve a solution which was completed without incident or accident and resulted in a cumulative radiation dose to personnel of only 1.57 mSv. (author)

  7. Decommissioning of Swedish nuclear power reactors. Technology and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main topics discussed are planning, technology and costs of decommissioning nuclear power reactors. Oskarshamn-3 (BWR) and Ringhals-4 (PWR) have been used as reference reactors. 29 refs, figs, tabs

  8. The AHP Approach for Selecting a Decommissioning Scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of decommissioning scenarios is critical to the successful development and execution of a decommissioning project. This paper presents the logical method that is the analytic hierarchy process for selecting a decommissioning scenario. The AHP provides a structure on decision-making processes where there are a limited numbers of choices but each as a number of attributes. In this study, the AHP model to evaluate decommissioning scenarios reflecting quantitative and qualitative considerations is presented. This AHP model is implemented for the two candidate scenarios of the thermal column in KRR-1 to find the better scenario. The weightings of each criteria and subcriteria and the quantitative figures about both scenarios were obtained

  9. The Decommissioning of the Trino Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brusa, L.; DeSantis, R.; Nurden, P. L.; Walkden, P.; Watson, B.

    2002-02-27

    Following a referendum in Italy in 1987, the four Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) owned and operated by the state utility ENEL were closed. After closing the NPPs, ENEL selected a ''safestore'' decommissioning strategy; anticipating a safestore period of some 40-50 years. This approach was consistent with the funds collected during plant operation, and was reinforced by the lack of both a waste repository and a set of national free release limits for contaminated materials in Italy. During 1999, twin decisions were made to privatize ENEL and to transform the nuclear division into a separate subsidiary of the ENEL group. This group was renamed Sogin and during the following year, ownership of the company was transferred to the Italian Treasury. On formation, Sogin was asked by the Italian government to review the national decommissioning strategy. The objective of the review was to move from a safestore strategy to a prompt decommissioning strategy, with the target of releasing all of the nuclear sites by 2020. It was recognized that this target was conditional upon the availability of a national LLW repository together with interim stores for both spent fuel and HLW by 2009. The government also agreed that additional costs caused by the acceleration of the decommissioning program would be considered as stranded costs. These costs will be recovered by a levy on the kWh price of electricity, a process established and controlled by the Regulator of the Italian energy sector. Building on the successful collaboration to develop a prompt decommissioning strategy for the Latina Magnox reactor (1), BNFL and Sogin agreed to collaborate on an in depth study for the prompt decommissioning of the Sogin PWR at Trino. BNFL is currently decommissioning six NPPs and is at an advanced stage of planning for two further units, having completed a full and rigorous exercise to develop Baseline Decommissioning Plans (BDP's) for these stations. The BDP exercise utilizes the full range of BNFL decommissioning experience and knowledge to develop a strategy, methodology and cost for the decommissioning of NPPs. Over the past year, a prompt decommissioning strategy for Trino has been developed. The strategy has been based on the principles of minimizing waste products that require long term storage, maximizing 'free release' materials and utilizing existing and regulatory approved technologies.

  10. The Decommissioning of the Trino Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following a referendum in Italy in 1987, the four Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) owned and operated by the state utility ENEL were closed. After closing the NPPs, ENEL selected a ''safestore'' decommissioning strategy; anticipating a safestore period of some 40-50 years. This approach was consistent with the funds collected during plant operation, and was reinforced by the lack of both a waste repository and a set of national free release limits for contaminated materials in Italy. During 1999, twin decisions were made to privatize ENEL and to transform the nuclear division into a separate subsidiary of the ENEL group. This group was renamed Sogin and during the following year, ownership of the company was transferred to the Italian Treasury. On formation, Sogin was asked by the Italian government to review the national decommissioning strategy. The objective of the review was to move from a safestore strategy to a prompt decommissioning strategy, with the target of releasing all of the nuclear sites by 2020. It was recognized that this target was conditional upon the availability of a national LLW repository together with interim stores for both spent fuel and HLW by 2009. The government also agreed that additional costs caused by the acceleration of the decommissioning program would be considered as stranded costs. These costs will be recovered by a levy on the kWh price of electricity, a process established and controlled by the Regulator of the Italian energy sector.he Regulator of the Italian energy sector. Building on the successful collaboration to develop a prompt decommissioning strategy for the Latina Magnox reactor (1), BNFL and Sogin agreed to collaborate on an in depth study for the prompt decommissioning of the Sogin PWR at Trino. BNFL is currently decommissioning six NPPs and is at an advanced stage of planning for two further units, having completed a full and rigorous exercise to develop Baseline Decommissioning Plans (BDP's) for these stations. The BDP exercise utilizes the full range of BNFL decommissioning experience and knowledge to develop a strategy, methodology and cost for the decommissioning of NPPs. Over the past year, a prompt decommissioning strategy for Trino has been developed. The strategy has been based on the principles of minimizing waste products that require long term storage, maximizing 'free release' materials and utilizing existing and regulatory approved technologies

  11. Full System Decontamination (FSD) prior to Decommissioning - 59189

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination prior to decommissioning and dismantling is an internationally accepted approach. Not only does it provide for minimization of personnel dose exposure but also maximization of the material volume available for free release. Since easier dismantling techniques in lower dose areas can be applied, the licensing process is facilitated and the scheduling and budgeting effort is more reliable. The most internationally accepted approach for decontamination prior to decommissioning projects is the Full System Decontamination (FSD). FSD is defined as the chemical decontamination of the primary cooling circuit, in conjunction with the main auxiliary systems. AREVA has long-term experience with Full System Decontamination for return to service of operating nuclear power plants as well as for decommissioning after shutdown. Since 1976, AREVA has performed over 500 decontamination applications and from 1986 on, decontaminations prior to decommissioning projects which comprise virtually all nuclear power plant (NPP) designs and plant conditions: - NPP designs: HPWR, PWR, and BWR by AREVA, Westinghouse, ABB and GE; - Decontaminations performed shortly after final shutdown or several years later, and even after re-opening safe enclosure; - High alpha inventory and or low gamma/alpha ratio; - Main coolant chemistry (e.g. with and without Zn injection during operation). Fifteen decontaminations prior to decommissioning projects have been performed successfully to date. have been performed successfully to date. The lessons learned of each project were consequently implemented for the next project. AREVA NP has developed a fully comprehensive approach for decontamination based on the CORDR (Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination) Family, applied using the in-house designed decontamination equipment AMDAR (Automatic Modular Decontamination Appliance). The Decontamination Concept for Decommissioning (DCD) will be outlined in this paper. Based on highlights of previous FSDs performed prior to decommissioning the AREVA concept for FSD and DCD will be outlined: - Application window; - Decontamination area; - Waste considerations; - Positive results for subsequent decommissioning and dismantling activities. (authors)

  12. Communications programme for the RA nuclear reactor decommission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the decommissioning of the RA research nuclear reactor at the VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, an adequate number of radiation and contamination surveys should be conduced to assure radiological safety of the workers, the public and the environment. Public would like to know more about the nuclear and radiological safety. The communications programme defines the ways to informing the public, its representatives and the information media about the health and safety aspects of the activities during the RA nuclear reactor decommission. (author)

  13. Decommissioning of the Loviisa NPP; Loviisan ydinvoimalaitoksen kaeytoestaepoisto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallonen, I.; Eurajoki, T.; Mayer, E. [IVO Power Engineering Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    Imatran Voima Oy has revised the decommissioning plan for the Loviisa Nuclear Power Plant (Loviisa 1 and Loviisa 2) by the end of the year 1998. The thermal power of the power plant has been increased to 2x1500 MW{sub th}, and the life time has been designed to be extended to 45 years in the decommissioning plan. The decommissioning of the power plant is designed to begin in 2022 and it will be finished in 2048. The plan is based on immediate dismantlement (i.e. DECON) after the shut down of the power plant. Experienced plant personnel will still be available to lead the decommissioning work. Only the radioactive plant systems, components and structures will be dismantled and disposed of. Decommissioning wastes will be disposed into the underground disposal tunnels situating at the site in the depth of about 110 m. These tunnels are already partly ready for power plant wastes. The big and heavy reactor components, e.g. pressure vessels and steam generators, will be disposed of as such, without cutting them into smaller parts. This saves time and radiation doses. The total volume of decommissioning wastes is 14 800 m{sup 3}, when packed in boxes. The manpower needed for decommissioning is about 2 800 manyears. The collective radiation dose for personnel is estimated to be about 9.2 manSv. The cost estimate of the decommissioning is about 1 117 million FIM. The spent fuel will be stored at the plant for 20 years after the shut down of the power plant. After that it will be transported from the site to the encapsulation plant for final disposal. (orig.) 15 refs.

  14. Decontamination and Decommissioned Small Nuclear AIP Hybrid Systems Submarines

    OpenAIRE

    Guangya Liu; Daping Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Being equipped with small reactor AIP is the trend of conventional submarine power in 21st century as well as a real power revolution in conventional submarine. Thus, the quantity of small reactor AIP Submarines is on the increase, and its decommissioning and decontamination will also become a significant international issue. However, decommissioning the small reactor AIP submarines is not only a problem that appears beyond the lifetime of the small reactor nuclear devices, but the probl...

  15. Some noticeable issues of decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author describes ten important issues related to decommissioning of nuclear facilities, such as (1) Decommissioning classification; (2) Plan and options; (3) Optimal decontamination techniques; (4) Source term investigation; (5) Safe and reliable cutting and dismantling techniques; (6) Waste minimization; (7) Safety and security; (8) Training; (9) Waste treatment and disposal; (10) Formulation of standards and guides, etc. Some comments and suggestions are presented based on Chinese practices

  16. Technical and economic aspects of nuclear power plant decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plants may be decommissioned by one of three primary methods, namely, mothballing, entombing, or dismantling or by using combinations such as mothballing or entombing for a period of time followed by dismantling. Mothballing or entombing both result in an end-product which require surveillance and maintenance for a significant period of time to ensure protection of public health and safety. This paper discusses costs for each of the decommissioning methods, including factors that will influence the method selected as well as the total costs. Decommissioning costs have been estimated for a 1100 MW(e) light water reactor within one year after shutdown following forty years of operation. The basic economic parameters for each decommissioning method were developed using unit cost factors based on known costs of previously decommissioned reactors. Decommissioning cost estimates range from less than four million dollars for mothballing to about forty million dollars for complete dismantling. Estimated cost of entombment is about ten million dollars. Subsequent annual cost of surveillance and maintenance for a reactor facility using the mothballing or entombment method could be as high as $200,000. Although some tooling development will be needed for the removal of the highly activated reactor vessel segments and internals, technology is currently available and has been demonstrated on prior decommissionings, e.g., the BONUS and HALLUM reactor entombments and the Elk River Reactor complete dismantling. Costs associated with decommissioning are significant; however, allowance for them either as a one-time construction period sinking fund or annual depreciation type operating allowance will have little impact on either construction or operating costs

  17. Nuclear Decommissioning and Organisational Reliability: Involving Subcontractors in Collective Action

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Christophe; Guarnieri, Franck

    2013-01-01

    The concept of organisational reliability is at the heart of the safety of at-risk systems. Many studies have been conducted in the nuclear industry; all emphasise the study of plants in normal, daily operation or during shutdowns. However, decommissioning, whether ongoing or planned, places a sharp focus on the question. This is because, on the one hand operating companies make significant changes to their organisation to meet the challenges and requirements of decommissioning, on the other ...

  18. Economical aspects of the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the German Atomic Law, nuclear power plants require licensing. The license covers the construction, operation and decommissioning of a nuclear power plant. The obligation of decommissioning causes a cost burden which influences the costs of operation. These expenses create a variable liability which has to be provided for by establishing a liability reserve. Because of its high monetary value this liability reserve in time obtains an increasing importance for the accounting policy. (orig.)

  19. IAEA/CRP for decommissioning techniques for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following were studied through the project entitled 'IAEA/CRP for decommissioning techniques for research reactors 1. Decontamination technology development for TRIGA radioactive soil waste - Electrokinetic soil decontamination experimental results and its mathematical simulation 2. The 2nd IAEA/CRP for decommissioning techniques for research reactors - Meeting results and program 3. Hosting the 2001 IAEA/RCA D and D training course for research reactors and small nuclear facilities

  20. Asbestos removal: Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project: Topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This topical report is a synopsis of the asbestos insulation removal performed at the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP). The information is provided, as a part of the Technology Transfer Program, to document the removal of asbestos insulation at a nuclear power station decommissioning project. The report covers the scope of work, regulations, engineering decisions, removal methods, lessons learned, and summaries from the detailed data base including manhours, asbestos removal volumes, radiation exposures, and asbestos airborne concentrations. 5 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs

  1. The 'old and the new' of decommissioning Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dounreay site is situated on the north coast of Scotland, mainland United Kingdom, and since the 1950s it has been instrumental in fast breeder research and fuel reprocessing plant development. The work programme on the site has changed, and is now one of safe decommissioning and site restoration. Previous papers have discussed and reviewed progress during the very early stages of the decommissioning programme and this paper provides an update on the work programme from a primarily radiation protection perspective. This paper discusses progress in decommissioning the Dounreay site and the adoption of 'tried and tested', as well as innovative techniques to achieve this decommissioning safely. This includes detailed discussion of the radiation protection aspects of decommissioning, and the consideration and implementation of various radiological protection controls within varying decommissioning environments, such as: a) Remote operations; b) Robotics; c) Shielding; d) Remote readout dosimetry (during personnel entry into elevated dose rate areas). The change from an operational to a decommissioning work programme at Dounreay, created a requirement to modify the type and variety of radiological personal protective equipment (PPE) available. The selection of appropriate PPE, utilised following exhaustion of the hierarchy of controls, to remove the residual radiological risk to personnel is discussed within the paper. The benefit of developing this PPE, as well as other controls, in collaboration with the operatives performing the work, is clearly obvious. The paper concludes with a review of the relative merits and success of the decommissioning techniques that have been adopted, from a radiological protection perspective, together with a summary of lessons learnt. (author)

  2. The 'old and the new' of decommissioning Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dounreay site is situated on the north coast of Scotland, mainland United Kingdom, and since the 1950s it has been instrumental in fast breeder research and fuel reprocessing plant development. The work programme on the site has changed, and is now one of safe decommissioning and site restoration. Previous papers have discussed and reviewed progress during the very early stages of the decommissioning programme and this paper provides an update on the work programme from a primarily radiation protection perspective. This paper discusses progress in decommissioning the Dounreay site and the adoption of 'tried and tested', as well as innovative techniques to achieve this decommissioning safely. This includes detailed discussion of the radiation protection aspects of decommissioning, and the consideration and implementation of various radiological protection controls within varying decommissioning environments, such as: Remote operations; Robotics; Shielding; Remote readout dosimetry (during personnel entry into elevated dose rate areas). The change from an operational to a decommissioning work programme at Dounreay, created a requirement to modify the type and variety of radiological personal protective equipment (PPE) available. The selection of appropriate PPE, utilised following exhaustion of the hierarchy of controls, to remove the residual radiological risk to personnel is discussed within the paper. The benefit of developing this PPE, as well as other controls,oping this PPE, as well as other controls, in collaboration with the operatives performing the work, is clearly obvious. The paper concludes with a review of the relative merits and success of the decommissioning techniques that have been adopted, from a radiological protection perspective, together with a summary of lessons learnt. (author)

  3. Optimization of costs versus radiation exposures in decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The estimated worth of decommissioning optimization planning during each phase of the reactor's life cycle is dependent on many variables. The major variables are tabulated and relatively ranked. For each phase, optimization qualitative values (i.e., cost, safety, maintainability, ALARA, and decommissioning considerations) are estimated and ranked according to their short-term and long-term potential benefits. These estimates depend on the quality of the input data, interpretation of that data, and engineering judgment. Once identified and ranked, these considerations form an integral part of the information data base from which estimates, decisions, and alternatives are derived. The optimization of costs and the amount of occupational radiation exposure reductions are strongly interrelated during decommissioning. Realizing that building the necessary infrastructure for decommissioning will take time is an important first step in any decommissioning plan. In addition, the following conclusions are established to achieve optimization of costs and reduced occupational radiation exposures: the assignment of cost versus man-rem is item-specific and sensitive to the expertise of many interrelated disciplines; a commitment to long-term decommissioning planning by management will provide the conditions needed to achieve optimization; and, to be most effective, costs and exposure reduction are sensitive to the nearness of the decommissioning operation. For a new plant, it is sioning operation. For a new plant, it is best to start at the beginning of the cycle, update continually, consider innovations, and realize full potential and benefits of this concept. For an older plant, the life cycle methodology permits a comprehensive review of the plant history and the formulation of an orderly decommissioning program based on planning, organization, and effort

  4. Radionuclide inventory calculation of reactor internal components for decommissioning purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MCNPX code was used to calculate the title radionuclide inventory for VVER-440/V230 shielding assemblies. The results were compared to calculations performed worldwide for similar reactors (Kola, Loviisa). The data for the first 10 refuelings after shielding assembly installation were processed. The most significant radionuclides with respect to radioactivity during reactor component decommissioning include 55Fe (within the decade), 60Co (10 - 50 years), and 63Ni (during the entire decommissioning process). (orig.)

  5. Approach to long- term regalement of nuclear energy installation decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report we make an accent on because the rules of nuclear installation decommissioning should provide controllability with compounded operations not one generations of the performers. The strategy should take into account problems of the economic completion, environment and standards of health, script of decommissioning and its execution, and so on. These strategies are bound with the social conditions, with accent on work with the low level wastes

  6. Implementation of stage-3 decommissioning of the Triton Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: An extensive decommissioning program has been launched by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), including decommissioning of nuclear facilities related to the front-end and the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, and experimental reactors. This program includes the stage-3 decommissioning of the Triton facility, comprising two piles, Triton and Nereide, and a hot cell, located at the Fontenay-aux-Roses research centre. This facility was built in the late 1950s, primarily for R and D activities related to neutron physics studies, and radiological shielding experiments. As of 1982, stage-2 decommissioning started, was achieved in 1986 and since that date, no work has been done in the facility. This paper describes the extensive studies carried out to acquire a better knowledge of the facility radiological status, in order to set up dismantling scenarios and to reduce generated radioactive waste quantities. An overview of the selected dismantling scenario is provided, followed by the conclusions of the safety assessment studies, taking into account a number of significant non-radiological hazards. The paper also describes the preliminary dismantling operations performed in 2002 on concrete structures and decontamination of the hot cell walls. Significant experience feedback drawn up from these works is provided. Finally, is presented the ongoing work to be performed in the next eighteen months, until the final dismantling and decommissioning of Triton facmantling and decommissioning of Triton facility

  7. Decontamination and Decommissioning Experience at a Sellafield Uranium Purification Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Built in the 1950's, this plant was originally designed to purify depleted uranyl nitrate solution arising from reprocessing operations at the Primary Separation and Head End Plant (Fig. 1). The facility was used for various purposes throughout its life cycle such as research, development and trial based processes. Test rigs were operated in the building from the 1970's until 1984 to support development of the process and equipment now used at Sellafield's Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP). The extensive decommissioning program for this facility began over 15 years ago. Many challenges have been overcome throughout this program such as decommissioning the four main process cells, which were very highly alpha contaminated. The cells contained vessels and pipeline systems that were contaminated to such levels that workers had to use pressurized suits to enter the cells. Since decommissioning at Sellafield was in its infancy, this project has trialed various decontamination/decommissioning methods and techniques in order to progress the project, and this has provided valuable learning for other decommissioning projects. The project has included characterization, decontamination, dismantling, waste handling, and is now ready for demolition during late 2005, early 2006. This will be the first major facility within the historic Separation Area at Sellafield to be demolished down to base slab level. The lessons learnt from this project will directly benefit numerous ds project will directly benefit numerous decommissioning projects as the cleanup at Sellafield continues. (authors)

  8. Decommissioning experience from the experimental breeder reactor-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    University of Chicago as Operator of Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) under contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The U.S. Government retains for itself, and others acting on its behalf, a paid-up nonexclusive, irrevocable worldwide license in said article to reproduce, prepare derivative works, distribute copies to the public, and perform publicly and display publicly, by or on behalf of the Government. Consistent with the intent of this International Atomic Energy Agency technical meeting, decommissioning operating experience and contributions to the preparation for the Coordinated Research Project from Experimental Breeder Reactor-II activities will be discussed. This paper reviews aspects of the decommissioning activities of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, makes recommendations for future decommissioning activities and reactor system designs and discusses relevant areas of potential research and development. These activities were performed safely, effectively, efficiently and on schedule. Of primary interest are those recommendations stemming from the lessons learned in performing the decommissioning activities. Goals have been suggested for future reactor designs and current decommissioning activities. Finally, the decommissioning experience from the EBR-II has resulted in discussion of relevant Coordinated Research Program topics

  9. BCD: a wiki-based decommissioning knowledge management tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge management allows decommissioning stakeholders to take advantage of past experience (in terms of efficiency, quality, safety, cost, etc.), avoid repeating previous errors, and identify good ideas and practices. It is usually broken down into three processes: collecting information, supplementing and enriching it, and making it available to all decommissioning stakeholders. The CEA has been collecting and centralizing data for many years: the first qualitative assessment of operational experience began in 1991. However, the documents collected were not always relevant for this assessment and, for lack of enrichment and distribution, were generally not used to a significant extent. In order to take advantage of the existing and future body of knowledge and to share this knowledge among decommissioning stakeholders, the CEA decommissioning review unit decided to develop an intranet site known as BCD (from the French acronym for Central Decommissioning Database) using the same wiki technology as the collaborative web encyclopedia, Wikipedia. The objective of BCD is to develop a decommissioning encyclopedia comprising definitions and terminology, the regulatory framework, the lessons of experience with technical or contractual projects, guidelines, statements of results, etc. This article describes BCD and its potential, together with the results observed to date and its prospects for future development. (authors)

  10. Final generic environmental impact statement on decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This final generic environmental impact statement was prepared as part of the requirement for considering changes in regulations on decommissioning of commercial nuclear facilities. Consideration is given to the decommissioning of pressurized water reactors, boiling water reactors, research and test reactors, fuel reprocessing plants (FRPs) (currently, use of FRPs in the commercial sector is not being considered), small mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants, uranium hexafluoride conversion plants, uranium fuel fabrication plants, independent spent fuel storage installations, and non-fuel-cycle facilities for handling byproduct, source and special nuclear materials. Decommissioning has many positive environmental impacts such as the return of possibly valuable land to the public domain and the elimination of potential problems associated with increased numbers of radioactively contaminated facilities with a minimal use of resources. Major adverse impacts are shown to be routine occupational radiation doses and the commitment of nominally small amounts of land to radioactive waste disposal. Other impacts, including public radiation doses, are minor. Mitigation of potential health, safety, and environmental impacts requires more specific and detailed regulatory guidance than is currently available. Recommendations are made as to regulatory decommissioning particulars including such aspects as decommissioning alternatives, appropriate preliminary planning requirements at the time of commissioning, final planning requirements prior to termination of facility operations, assurance of funding for decommissioning, environmental review requirements. 26 refs., 7 figs., 68 tabs

  11. 2010 Status of Uranium Conversion Plant Decommissioning Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Uranium Conversion Plant (UCP) was used to manufacture 100 tons of UO2. This paper introduced briefly decommissioning activities in the first half year of 2010. powder for the Wolsong-1 CANDU reactor. The conversion plant has been shut down and minimally maintained for the prevention of a contamination by a deterioration of the equipment. The conversion plant has building area of 2916 m2 and two main conversion processes. ADU (Ammonium Di-Uranate) and AUC (Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate) process are installed in the backside and the front side of the building, respectively. Conversion plant has two lagoons, which is to store all wastes generated from the plant operation. Sludge wastes stored 150m3 and 100m3 in Lagoon 1 and 2, respectively. Main compounds of sludge are ammonium nitrate, sodium nitrate, calcium nitrate, and calcium carbonate. In 2000, the decommissioning of the plant was finally decided upon and a decommissioning program was launched to complete by 2010. In the middle of 2004, decommissioning program obtained the approval of regulatory body and decommissioning activities started. The scope of the project includes the removal of all equipment and the release of the building for re-use. The project is scheduled to be completed at the end of 2010 with a total budget of 10.9 billion This paper introduced briefly decommissioning activities in the first half year of 2010

  12. Regulations and financing for decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to survey the French legislation concerning the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and the method of financing for it. There is no clause in French regulations, which states any specific criterion or licensing procedure for the proper decommissioning. The legal problems in this domain are treated within the general regulation system on atomic energy. The decommissioning of nuclear facilities is carried out in accordance with the licensing procedure for constructing nuclear facilities or the permission procedure for operating them, according to the ''Decree on nuclear installations, 1963''. The works for the final shut-down and decommissioning are regarded as the modification to the safety report or the general operation instructions, and new permit is required. In the case that the radioactivity of substances after decommissioning is above the criteria of the Decree, 1963, the new license is required. In the case of below the criteria, the facilities are governed by the ''Act on installations classified for environmental protection, 1976''. The ''Decree on general radiation protection, 1966'', the ''Decree on radiation protection of workers in nuclear installations, 1975'', the ''Ministerial order on transport of dangerous materials, 1945'', and two ministerial orders on radioactive effluent discharge, 1974, are applied to the decommissioning works. (Kako, I.)

  13. Report of expert committee on nuclear reactor decommissioning countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a report of the titled committee dated March 16, 1982, submitted to the chairman of atomic energy commission of Japan. The contents are roughly divided into two parts: the fundamental philosophy on the decommissioning of nuclear reactors and the promotion of measures for reactor decommissioning. In the former, the importance of decommissioning measures, the necessity and the present status of decommissioning large scale power reactors when those will stop operation are described, because the dismantling of nuclear facilities performed in the past includes only those for small scale research reactors. The decommissioning of nuclear reactors is classified into the following three: (1) moth-balling, (2) in-place entombment, and (3) the removal of radioactive components and dismantling. The fundamental policy for these stages has been established. For the promotion of decommissioning measures, the improvement of dismantling and associated techniques, the securing of safety, and the establishment of financial measures are reported. In addition, nuclear waste countermeasures and the consolidation of various systems are needed. The measures will be promoted by sectioning the period into Phase 1 (first hafl of 1980's), Phase 2 (secondhalf of 1980's) and Phase 3 (first half of 1990's) to be prepared for the expected permanent termination of power reactor operation to be started in the second half of 1990's. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  14. All-cause mortality in the Aberdeen 1921 birth cohort: Effects of socio-demographic, physical and cognitive factors

    OpenAIRE

    Whalley Lawrence J; Deary Ian J; Starr John M

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Childhood intelligence predicts mortality throughout most of the life span. However, it is unknown whether its effect persists into advanced old age. Methods The Aberdeen Birth Cohort born in 1921 (n = 354) and that had an IQ test as part of the national Scottish Mental Survey of 1932 were seen in 1997 at age 76 years when childhood and adult socio-environmental, medical and cognitive data were collected. Participants were followed until May 2007 and vital status determine...

  15. The unit cost factors and calculation methods for decommissioning - Cost estimation of nuclear research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The uncertainties of decommissioning costs increase high due to several conditions. Decommissioning cost estimation depends on the complexity of nuclear installations, its site-specific physical and radiological inventories. Therefore, the decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities must be estimated in accordance with the detailed sub-tasks and resources by the tasks of decommissioning activities. By selecting the classified activities and resources, costs are calculated by the items and then the total costs of all decommissioning activities are reshuffled to match with its usage and objectives. And the decommissioning cost of nuclear research facilities is calculated by applying a unit cost factor method on which classification of decommissioning works fitted with the features and specifications of decommissioning objects and establishment of composition factors are based. Decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities are composed of labor cost, equipment and materials cost. Of these three categorical costs, the calculation of labor costs are very important because decommissioning activities mainly depend on labor force. Labor costs in decommissioning activities are calculated on the basis of working time consumed in decommissioning objects and works. The working times are figured out of unit cost factors and work difficulty factors. Finally, labor costs are figured out by using theselabor costs are figured out by using these factors as parameters of calculation. The accuracy of decommissioning cost estimation results is much higher compared to the real decommissioning works. (authors)

  16. 30 CFR 285.517 - How will MMS determine the amounts of the supplemental and decommissioning financial assurance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...the amounts of the supplemental and decommissioning financial assurance requirements associated...the amounts of the supplemental and decommissioning financial assurance requirements associated...the amounts of the SAP, COP, and decommissioning financial assurance...

  17. 30 CFR 285.913 - What happens if I fail to comply with my approved decommissioning application?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...if I fail to comply with my approved decommissioning application? 285.913 Section...FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Decommissioning Compliance with An Approved Decommissioning Application § 285.913 What...

  18. 30 CFR 285.1018 - Who is responsible for decommissioning an OCS facility subject to an Alternate Use RUE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...false Who is responsible for decommissioning an OCS facility subject to an...Using Existing OCS Facilities Decommissioning An Alternate Use Rue § 285.1018 Who is responsible for decommissioning an OCS facility subject to...

  19. 77 FR 58591 - Report on Waste Burial Charges: Changes in Decommissioning Waste Disposal Costs at Low-Level...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ...Charges: Changes in Decommissioning Waste Disposal Costs at Low-Level Waste Burial...Charges: Changes in Decommissioning Waste Disposal Costs at Low-Level Waste Burial...Charges: Changes in Decommissioning Waste Disposal Costs at Low-Level Waste...

  20. Development of a Preliminary Decommissioning Plan Following the International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC) of Nuclear Installations - 13361

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC) of Nuclear Installations, published by OECD/NEA, IAEA and EC is intended to provide a uniform list of cost items for decommissioning projects and provides a standard format that permits international cost estimates to be compared. Candesco and DECOM have used the ISDC format along with two costing codes, OMEGA and ISDCEX, developed from the ISDC by DECOM, in three projects: the development of a preliminary decommissioning plan for a multi-unit CANDU nuclear power station, updating the preliminary decommissioning cost estimates for a prototype CANDU nuclear power station and benchmarking the cost estimates for CANDU against the cost estimates for other reactor types. It was found that the ISDC format provides a well defined and transparent basis for decommissioning planning and cost estimating that assists in identifying gaps and weaknesses and facilitates the benchmarking against international experience. The use of the ISDC can also help build stakeholder confidence in the reliability of the plans and estimates and the adequacy of decommissioning funding. (authors)