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Sample records for bacteria geobacillus stearothermophilus

  1. Biosynthesis of omega-alicyclic fatty acids induced by cyclic precursors and change of membrane fluidity in thermophilic bacteria Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Meiothermus ruber

    Siřišťová, L.; Luhový, R.; Sigler, Karel; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 3 (2011), 423-429. ISSN 1431-0651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Thermophilic bacteria * Geobacillus * Meiothermus Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.941, year: 2011

  2. Direct fermentation of potato starch and potato residues to lactic acid by Geobacillus stearothermophilus under non-sterile conditions

    Smerilli, Marina; Neureiter, Markus; Wurz, Stefan; Haas, Cornelia; Frühauf, Sabine; Fuchs, Werner

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lactic acid is an important biorefinery platform chemical. The use of thermophilic amylolytic microorganisms to produce lactic acid by fermentation constitutes an efficient strategy to reduce operating costs, including raw materials and sterilization costs. RESULTS A process for the thermophilic production of lactic acid by Geobacillus stearothermophilus directly from potato starch was characterized and optimized. Geobacillus stearothermophilus DSM 494 was selected out of 12 strain...

  3. Die another day: Fate of heat-treated Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 spores during storage under growth-preventing conditions.

    Mtimet, Narjes; Trunet, Clément; Mathot, Anne-Gabrielle; Venaille, Laurent; Leguérinel, Ivan; Coroller, Louis; Couvert, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores are recognized as one of the most wet-heat resistant among aerobic spore-forming bacteria and are responsible for 35% of canned food spoilage after incubation at 55 °C. The purpose of this study was to investigate and model the fate of heat-treated survivor spores of G. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 in growth-preventing environment. G. stearothermophilus spores were heat-treated at four different conditions to reach one or two decimal reductions. Heat-treated spores were stored in nutrient broth at different temperatures and pH under growth-preventing conditions. Spore survival during storage was evaluated by count plating over a period of months. Results reveal that G. stearothermophilus spores surviving heat treatment lose their viability during storage under growth-preventing conditions. Two different subpopulations were observed during non-thermal inactivation. They differed according to the level of their resistance to storage stress, and the proportion of each subpopulation can be modulated by heat treatment conditions. Finally, tolerance to storage stress under growth-preventing conditions increases at refrigerated temperature and neutral pH regardless of heat treatment conditions. Such results suggest that spore inactivation due to heat treatment could be completed by storage under growth-preventing conditions. PMID:26919821

  4. Properties of Geobacillus stearothermophilus levansucrase as potential biocatalyst for the synthesis of levan and fructooligosaccharides.

    Inthanavong, Lotthida; Tian, Feng; Khodadadi, Maryam; Karboune, Salwa

    2013-01-01

    The production of levansucrase (LS) by thermophilic Geobacillus stearothermophilus was investigated. LS production was more effective in the presence of sucrose (1%, w/v) than fructose, glucose, glycerol or raffinose. The results (Top 57°C; stable for 6 h at 47°C) indicate the high stability of the transfructosylation activity of G. stearothermophilus LS as compared with LSs from other microbial sources. Contrary to temperature, the pH had a significant effect on the selectivity of G. stearothermophilus LS-catalyzed reaction, favoring the transfructosylation reaction in the pH range of 6.0-6.5. The kinetic parameter study revealed that the catalytic efficiency of transfructosylation activity was higher as compared with the hydrolytic one. In addition to levan, G. stearothermophilus LS synthesized fructooligosaccharides in the presence of sucrose as the sole substrate. The results also demonstrated the wide acceptor specificity of G. stearothermophilus LS with maltose being the best fructosyl acceptor. This study is the first on the catalytic properties and the acceptor specificity of LS from G. stearothermophilus. PMID:23926090

  5. Development and application of Geobacillus stearothermophilus growth model for predicting spoilage of evaporated milk.

    Kakagianni, Myrsini; Gougouli, Maria; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2016-08-01

    The presence of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores in evaporated milk constitutes an important quality problem for the milk industry. This study was undertaken to provide an approach in modelling the effect of temperature on G. stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 growth and in predicting spoilage of evaporated milk. The growth of G. stearothermophilus was monitored in tryptone soy broth at isothermal conditions (35-67 °C). The data derived were used to model the effect of temperature on G. stearothermophilus growth with a cardinal type model. The cardinal values of the model for the maximum specific growth rate were Tmin = 33.76 °C, Tmax = 68.14 °C, Topt = 61.82 °C and μopt = 2.068/h. The growth of G. stearothermophilus was assessed in evaporated milk at Topt in order to adjust the model to milk. The efficiency of the model in predicting G. stearothermophilus growth at non-isothermal conditions was evaluated by comparing predictions with observed growth under dynamic conditions and the results showed a good performance of the model. The model was further used to predict the time-to-spoilage (tts) of evaporated milk. The spoilage of this product caused by acid coagulation when the pH approached a level around 5.2, eight generations after G. stearothermophilus reached the maximum population density (Nmax). Based on the above, the tts was predicted from the growth model as the sum of the time required for the microorganism to multiply from the initial to the maximum level ( [Formula: see text] ), plus the time required after the [Formula: see text] to complete eight generations. The observed tts was very close to the predicted one indicating that the model is able to describe satisfactorily the growth of G. stearothermophilus and to provide realistic predictions for evaporated milk spoilage. PMID:27052699

  6. Tryptophan Oxidative Metabolism Catalyzed by Geobacillus Stearothermophilus: A Thermophile Isolated from Kuwait Soil Contaminated with Petroleum Hydrocarbons

    Al-Hassan, Jassim M.; Samira Al-Awadi; Sosamma Oommen; Abdulaziz Alkhamis; Mohammad Afzal

    2011-01-01

    Tryptophan metabolism has been extensively studied in humans as well as in soil. Its metabolism takes place mainly through kynurenine pathway yielding hydroxylated, deaminated and many other products of physiological significance. However, tryptophan metabolism has not been studied in an isolated thermophilic bacterium. Geobacillus stearothermophilus is a local thermophile isolated from Kuwait desert soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. The bacterium grows well at 65 °C in 0.05 M ph...

  7. Purification and characterization of cloned alkaline protease gene of Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    Iqbal, Irfana; Aftab, Muhammad Nauman; Afzal, Mohammed; Ur-Rehman, Asad; Aftab, Saima; Zafar, Asma; Ud-Din, Zia; Khuharo, Ateeque Rahman; Iqbal, Jawad; Ul-Haq, Ikram

    2015-02-01

    Thermostable alkaline serine protease gene of Geobacillus stearothermophilus B-1172 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) using pET-22b(+), as an expression vector. The growth conditions were optimized for maximal production of the protease using variable fermentation parameters, i.e., pH, temperature, and addition of an inducer. Protease, thus produced, was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by ion exchange chromatography with 13.7-fold purification, with specific activity of 97.5 U mg(-1) , and a recovery of 23.6%. Molecular weight of the purified protease, 39 kDa, was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The enzyme was stable at 90 °C at pH 9. The enzyme activity was steady in the presence of EDTA indicating that the protease was not a metalloprotease. No significant change in the activity of protease after addition of various metal ions further strengthened this fact. However, an addition of 1% Triton X-100 or SDS surfactants constrained the enzyme specific activity to 34 and 19%, respectively. Among organic solvents, an addition of 1-butanol (20%) augmented the enzyme activity by 29% of the original activity. With casein as a substrate, the enzyme activity under optimized conditions was found to be 73.8 U mg(-1) . The effect of protease expression on the host cells growth was also studied and found to negatively affect E. coli cells to certain extent. Catalytic domains of serine proteases from eight important thermostable organisms were analyzed through WebLogo and found to be conserved in all serine protease sequences suggesting that protease of G. stearothermophilus could be beneficially used as a biocontrol agent and in many industries including detergent industry. PMID:25224381

  8. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Axe2, an acetylxylan esterase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus

    The serine acetylxylan esterase from G. stearothermophilus (Axe2) has been crystallized in the tetragonal space group I422. Complete diffraction data sets have been measured for the selenomethionine derivative (SAD data, 1.70 Å resolution) and the wild-type enzyme (1.85 Å resolution) to be used for a full three-dimensional structural analysis of the Axe2 protein. Acetylxylan esterases are part of the hemi-cellulolytic system of many microorganisms which utilize plant biomass for growth. Xylans, which are polymeric sugars that constitute a significant part of the plant biomass, are usually substituted with acetyl side groups attached at position 2 or 3 of the xylose backbone units. Acetylxylan esterases hydrolyse the ester linkages of the xylan acetyl groups and thus improve the ability of main-chain hydrolysing enzymes to break down the sugar backbone units. As such, these enzymes play an important part in the hemi-cellulolytic utilization system of many microorganisms that use plant biomass for growth. Interest in the biochemical characterization and structural analysis of these enzymes stems from their numerous potential biotechnological applications. An acetylxylan esterase (Axe2) of this type from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 has recently been cloned, overexpressed, purified, biochemically characterized and crystallized. One of the crystal forms obtained (RB1) belonged to the tetragonal space group I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 110.2, c = 213.1 Å. A full diffraction data set was collected to 1.85 Å resolution from flash-cooled crystals of the wild-type enzyme at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. A selenomethionine derivative of Axe2 has also been prepared and crystallized for single-wavelength anomalous diffraction experiments. The crystals of the selenomethionine-derivatized Axe2 appeared to be isomorphous to those of the wild-type enzyme and enabled the measurement of a full 1.85 Å resolution diffraction data set at the selenium

  9. Production of xylan degrading endo-1, 4-β-xylanase from thermophilic Geobacillus stearothermophilus KIBGE-IB29

    Zainab Bibi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Xylan degrading bacterial strain was isolated from soil and identified as Geobacillus stearothermophilus KIBGE-IB29 on the basis of morphological, biochemical and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Optimization of medium and culture conditions in submerged fermentation was investigated for maximum endo-1, 4-β-xylanase production. High yield of xylan degrading endo-1, 4-β-xylanase was achieved at 60 °C and pH-6.0 with 24 h of fermentation. Maximum enzyme was produced using 0.5% xylan as a carbon source, 0.5% peptone, 0.2% yeast extract and 0.1% meat extract as nitrogen sources. Di-potassium hydrogen phosphate (0.25%, calcium chloride (0.01%, potassium hydrogen phosphate (0.05% and ammonium sulfate (0.05% were also incorporated in the fermentation medium to enhance the enzyme production.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a family 43 β-d-xylosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6

    The crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a β-d-xylosidase from G. stearothermophilus T-6, a family 43 glycoside hydrolase, is described. Native and catalytic inactive mutants of the enzymes were crystallized in two different space groups, orthorhombic P21212 and tetragonal P41212 (or the enantiomorphic space group P43212), using a sensitive cryoprotocol. The latter crystal form diffracted X-rays to a resolution of 2.2 Å. β-d-Xylosidases (EC 3.2.1.37) are hemicellulases that cleave single xylose units from the nonreducing end of xylooligomers. In this study, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a β-d-xylosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 (XynB3), a family 43 glycoside hydrolase, is described. XynB3 is a 535-amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 61 891 Da. Purified recombinant native and catalytic inactive mutant proteins were crystallized and cocrystallized with xylobiose in two different space groups, P21212 (unit-cell parameters a = 98.32, b = 99.36, c = 258.64 Å) and P41212 (or the enantiomorphic space group P43212; unit-cell parameters a = b = 140.15, c = 233.11 Å), depending on the detergent. Transferring crystals to cryoconditions required a very careful protocol. Orthorhombic crystals diffract to 2.5 Å and tetragonal crystals to 2.2 Å

  11. The structure of DinB from Geobacillus stearothermophilus: a representative of a unique four-helix-bundle superfamily

    The structure of DinB from G. stearothermophilus is described and compared with a number of recently reported structures of this unusual fold. Structural similarities are revealed that unite several distant protein families. The crystal structure of the dinB gene product from Geobacillus stearothermophilus (GsDinB) is reported at 2.5 Å resolution. The dinB gene is one of the DNA-damage-induced genes and the corresponding protein, DinB, is the founding member of a Pfam family with no known function. The protein contains a four-helix up–down–down–up bundle that has previously been described in the literature in three disparate proteins: the enzyme MDMPI (mycothiol-dependent maleylpyruvate isomerase), YfiT and TTHA0303, a member of a small DUF (domain of unknown function). However, a search of the DALI structural database revealed similarities to a further 11 new unpublished structures contributed by structural genomics centers. The sequences of these proteins are quite divergent and represent several Pfam families, yet their structures are quite similar and most (but not all) seem to have the ability to coordinate a metal ion using a conserved histidine-triad motif. The structural similarities of these diverse proteins suggest that a new Pfam clan encompassing the families that share this fold should be created. The proteins that share this fold exhibit four different quaternary structures: monomeric and three different dimeric forms

  12. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Abp, a GH27 β-l-arabinopyranosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus

    A GH27 arabinopyranosidase from G. stearothermophilus (Abp) has been crystallized in the primitive orthorhombic space group P212121. Full diffraction data sets have been measured for the wild-type enzyme and its D197A catalytic mutant to maximal resolutions of 2.28 and 2.30 Å, respectively, for use in a detailed three-dimensional structural analysis of the Abp protein. Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 is a thermophilic soil bacterium that possesses an extensive system for the utilization of hemicellulose. The bacterium produces a small number of endo-acting extracellular enzymes that cleave high-molecular-weight hemicellulolytic polymers into short decorated oligosaccharides, which are further hydrolysed into the respective sugar monomers by a battery of intracellular glycoside hydrolases. One of these intracellular processing enzymes is β-l-arabinopyranosidase (Abp), which is capable of removing β-l-arabinopyranose residues from naturally occurring arabino-polysaccharides. As arabino-polymers constitute a significant part of the hemicellulolytic content of plant biomass, their efficient enzymatic degradation presents an important challenge for many potential biotechnological applications. This aspect has led to an increasing interest in the biochemical characterization and structural analysis of this and related hemicellulases. Abp from G. stearothermophilus T-6 has recently been cloned, overexpressed, purified, biochemically characterized and crystallized in our laboratory, as part of its complete structure–function study. The best crystals obtained for this enzyme belonged to the primitive orthorhombic space group P212121, with average unit-cell parameters a = 107.7, b = 202.2, c = 287.3 Å. Full diffraction data sets to 2.3 Å resolution have been collected for both the wild-type enzyme and its D197A catalytic mutant from flash-cooled crystals at 100 K, using synchrotron radiation. These data are currently being used for a high-resolution three

  13. Heat resistance of spore-forming microorganisms (Bacillus sporothermodurans, Bacillus subtilis and Geobacillus stearothermophilus) under isothermal and non-iiothermal conditions

    Gómez Jódar, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    [SPA]El principal género de microorganismos esporulados altamente resistentes al calor involucrados en el deterioro de alimentos es Bacillus. Este género causa problemas de no esterilidad en alimentos enlatados y reduce la vida comercial de muchos alimentos procesados. En este estudio se determinó la termorresistencia de Bacillus sporothermodurans IIC65, Bacillus subtilis IC9 y Geobacillus stearothermophilus T26 mediante un termorresistómetro Mastia (Conesa et al., 2009). Las determinaciones ...

  14. Structure-function relationships in Gan42B, an intracellular GH42 β-galactosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    Solomon, Hodaya V; Tabachnikov, Orly; Lansky, Shifra; Salama, Rachel; Feinberg, Hadar; Shoham, Yuval; Shoham, Gil

    2015-12-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 is a Gram-positive thermophilic soil bacterium that contains a battery of degrading enzymes for the utilization of plant cell-wall polysaccharides, including xylan, arabinan and galactan. A 9.4 kb gene cluster has recently been characterized in G. stearothermophilus that encodes a number of galactan-utilization elements. A key enzyme of this degradation system is Gan42B, an intracellular GH42 β-galactosidase capable of hydrolyzing short β-1,4-galactosaccharides into galactose units, making it of high potential for various biotechnological applications. The Gan42B monomer is made up of 686 amino acids, and based on sequence homology it was suggested that Glu323 is the catalytic nucleophile and Glu159 is the catalytic acid/base. In the current study, the detailed three-dimensional structure of wild-type Gan42B (at 2.45 Å resolution) and its catalytic mutant E323A (at 2.50 Å resolution), as determined by X-ray crystallography, are reported. These structures demonstrate that the three-dimensional structure of the Gan42B monomer generally correlates with the overall fold observed for GH42 proteins, consisting of three main domains: an N-terminal TIM-barrel domain, a smaller mixed α/β domain, and the smallest all-β domain at the C-terminus. The two catalytic residues are located in the TIM-barrel domain in a pocket-like active site such that their carboxylic functional groups are about 5.3 Å from each other, consistent with a retaining mechanism. The crystal structure demonstrates that Gan42B is a homotrimer, resembling a flowerpot in general shape, in which each monomer interacts with the other two to form a cone-shaped tunnel cavity in the centre. The cavity is ∼35 Å at the wide opening and ∼5 Å at the small opening and ∼40 Å in length. The active sites are situated at the interfaces between the monomers, so that every two neighbouring monomers participate in the formation of each of the three active

  15. A new family of carbohydrate esterases is represented by a GDSL hydrolase/acetylxylan esterase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    Alalouf, Onit; Balazs, Yael; Volkinshtein, Margarita; Grimpel, Yael; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval

    2011-12-01

    Acetylxylan esterases hydrolyze the ester linkages of acetyl groups at positions 2 and/or 3 of the xylose moieties in xylan and play an important role in enhancing the accessibility of xylanases to the xylan backbone. The hemicellulolytic system of the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 comprises a putative acetylxylan esterase gene, axe2. The gene product belongs to the GDSL hydrolase family and does not share sequence homology with any of the carbohydrate esterases in the CAZy Database. The axe2 gene is induced by xylose, and the purified gene product completely deacetylates xylobiose peracetate (fully acetylated) and hydrolyzes the synthetic substrates 2-naphthyl acetate, 4-nitrophenyl acetate, 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate, and phenyl acetate. The pH profiles for k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) suggest the existence of two ionizable groups affecting the binding of the substrate to the enzyme. Using NMR spectroscopy, the regioselectivity of Axe2 was directly determined with the aid of one-dimensional selective total correlation spectroscopy. Methyl 2,3,4-tri-O-acetyl-β-d-xylopyranoside was rapidly deacetylated at position 2 or at positions 3 and 4 to give either diacetyl or monoacetyl intermediates, respectively; methyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-β-d-glucopyranoside was initially deacetylated at position 6. In both cases, the complete hydrolysis of the intermediates occurred at a much slower rate, suggesting that the preferred substrate is the peracetate sugar form. Site-directed mutagenesis of Ser-15, His-194, and Asp-191 resulted in complete inactivation of the enzyme, consistent with their role as the catalytic triad. Overall, our results show that Axe2 is a serine acetylxylan esterase representing a new carbohydrate esterase family. PMID:21994937

  16. A two-component system regulates the expression of an ABC transporter for xylo-oligosaccharides in Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    Shulami, Smadar; Zaide, Galia; Zolotnitsky, Gennady; Langut, Yael; Feld, Geoff; Sonenshein, Abraham L; Shoham, Yuval

    2007-02-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 utilizes an extensive and highly regulated hemicellulolytic system. The genes comprising the xylanolytic system are clustered in a 39.7-kb chromosomal segment. This segment contains a 6-kb transcriptional unit (xynDCEFG) coding for a potential two-component system (xynDC) and an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport system (xynEFG). The xynD promoter region contains a 16-bp inverted repeat resembling the operator site for the xylose repressor, XylR. XylR was found to bind specifically to this sequence, and binding was efficiently prevented in vitro in the presence of xylose. The ABC transport system was shown to comprise an operon of three genes (xynEFG) that is transcribed from its own promoter. The nonphosphorylated fused response regulator, His6-XynC, bound to a 220-bp fragment corresponding to the xynE operator. DNase I footprinting analysis showed four protected zones that cover the -53 and the +34 regions and revealed direct repeat sequences of a GAAA-like motif. In vitro transcriptional assays and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that xynE transcription is activated 140-fold in the presence of 1.5 microM XynC. The His6-tagged sugar-binding lipoprotein (XynE) of the ABC transporter interacted with different xylosaccharides, as demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry. The change in the heat capacity of binding (DeltaCp) for XynE with xylotriose suggests a stacking interaction in the binding site that can be provided by a single Trp residue and a sugar moiety. Taken together, our data show that XynEFG constitutes an ABC transport system for xylo-oligosaccharides and that its transcription is negatively regulated by XylR and activated by the response regulator XynC, which is part of a two-component sensing system. PMID:17142383

  17. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of Xyn52B2, a GH52 β-D-xylosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T6.

    Dann, Roie; Lansky, Shifra; Lavid, Noa; Zehavi, Arie; Belakhov, Valery; Baasov, Timor; Dvir, Hay; Manjasetty, Babu; Belrhali, Hassan; Shoham, Yuval; Shoham, Gil

    2014-12-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus T6 is a thermophilic bacterium that possesses an extensive hemicellulolytic system, including over 40 specific genes that are dedicated to this purpose. For the utilization of xylan, the bacterium uses an extracellular xylanase which degrades xylan to decorated xylo-oligomers that are imported into the cell. These oligomers are hydrolyzed by side-chain-cleaving enzymes such as arabinofuranosidases, acetylesterases and a glucuronidase, and finally by an intracellular xylanase and a number of β-xylosidases. One of these β-xylosidases is Xyn52B2, a GH52 enzyme that has already proved to be useful for various glycosynthesis applications. In addition to its demonstrated glycosynthase properties, interest in the structural aspects of Xyn52B2 stems from its special glycoside hydrolase family, GH52, the structures and mechanisms of which are only starting to be resolved. Here, the cloning, overexpression, purification and crystallization of Xyn52B2 are reported. The most suitable crystal form that has been obtained belonged to the orthorhombic P212121 space group, with average unit-cell parameters a = 97.7, b = 119.1, c = 242.3 Å. Several X-ray diffraction data sets have been collected from flash-cooled crystals of this form, including the wild-type enzyme (3.70 Å resolution), the E335G catalytic mutant (2.95 Å resolution), a potential mercury derivative (2.15 Å resolution) and a selenomethionine derivative (3.90 Å resolution). These data are currently being used for detailed three-dimensional structure determination of the Xyn52B2 protein. PMID:25484225

  18. Calcium alginate matrix increases the stability and recycling capability of immobilized endo-β-1,4-xylanase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus KIBGE-IB29.

    Bibi, Zainab; Qader, Shah Ali Ul; Aman, Afsheen

    2015-07-01

    Exploration of microbial pool from extremely diversified ecosystem is significantly important for various industrial applications. Bacterial communities from extreme habitats including volcanic vents, hot springs, and industrial sectors are eagerly explored for the isolation of thermophiles. Geobacillus stearothermophilus KIBGE-IB29, isolated from blast furnace site of a steel processing industry, is capable of producing thermostable endo-β-1,4-xylanase. In the current study, this enzyme was immobilized within calcium alginate beads using entrapment technique. Amalgamation of sodium alginate (40.0 gL(-1)) and calcium chloride (0.4 M) was used for the formation of immobilized beads. It was observed that temperature (50 °C) and pH (7.0) optima of immobilized enzyme remained same, but enzyme-substrate reaction time increased from 5.0 to 30.0 min as compared to free enzyme. Diffusion limit of high molecular weight xylan (corncob) caused a decline in V max of immobilized enzyme from 4773 to 203.7 U min(-1), whereas K m value increased from 0.5074 to 0.5722 mg ml(-1) with reference to free enzyme. Immobilized endo-β-1,4-xylanase showed its stability even at high temperatures as compared to free enzyme and retained 18 and 9 % residual activity at 70 and 80 °C, respectively. Immobilized enzyme also exhibited sufficient recycling efficiency up to five reaction cycles which indicated that this enzyme can be a plausible candidate in paper and pulp industry. PMID:26001519

  19. EPR and ENDOR characterization of the reactive intermediates in the generation of NO by cryoreduced oxy-nitric oxide synthase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    Davydov, Roman; Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Lees, Nicholas S; Crane, Brian R; Hoffman, Brian M

    2009-10-14

    Cryoreduction EPR/ENDOR/step-annealing measurements with substrate complexes of oxy-gsNOS (3; gsNOS is nitric oxide synthase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus) confirm that Compound I (6) is the reactive heme species that carries out the gsNOS-catalyzed (Stage I) oxidation of L-arginine to N-hydroxy-L-arginine (NOHA), whereas the active species in the (Stage II) oxidation of NOHA to citrulline and HNO/NO(-) is the hydroperoxy-ferric form (5). When 3 is reduced by tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), instead of an externally supplied electron, the resulting BH4(+) radical oxidizes HNO/NO(-) to NO. In this report, radiolytic one-electron reduction of 3 and its complexes with Arg, Me-Arg, and NO(2)Arg was shown by EPR and (1)H and (14,15)N ENDOR spectroscopies to generate 5; in contrast, during cryoreduction of 3/NOHA, the peroxo-ferric-gsNOS intermediate (4/NOHA) was trapped. During annealing at 145 K, ENDOR shows that 5/Arg and 5/Me-Arg (but not 5/NO(2)Arg) generate a Stage I primary product species in which the OH group of the hydroxylated substrate is coordinated to Fe(III), characteristic of 6 as the active heme center. Analysis shows that hydroxylation of Arg and Me-Arg is quantitative. Annealing of 4/NOHA at 160 K converts it first to 5/NOHA and then to the Stage II primary enzymatic product. The latter contains Fe(III) coordinated by water, characteristic of 5 as the active heme center. It further contains quantitative amounts of citrulline and HNO/NO(-); the latter reacts with the ferriheme to form the NO-ferroheme upon further annealing. Stage I delivery of the first proton of catalysis to the (unobserved) 4 formed by cryoreduction of 3 involves a bound water that may convey a proton from L-Arg, while the second proton likely derives from the carboxyl side chain of Glu 248 or the heme carboxylates; the process also involves proton delivery by water(s). In the Stage II oxidation of NOHA, the proton that converts 4/NOHA to 5/NOHA likely is derived from NOHA itself, a

  20. Draft Genome Sequences of Seven Thermophilic Spore-Forming Bacteria Isolated from Foods That Produce Highly Heat-Resistant Spores, Comprising Geobacillus spp., Caldibacillus debilis, and Anoxybacillus flavithermus

    Berendsen, Erwin M.; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H. J.; Krawczyk, Antonina O.; de Jong, Anne; van Heel, Auke; Holsappel, Siger; Eijlander, Robyn T.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genomes of five strains of Geobacillus spp., one Caldibacillus debilis strain, and one draft genome of Anoxybacillus flavithermus, all thermophilic spore-forming Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:27151781

  1. Isolation of lipase producing thermophilic bacteria: optimization of production and reaction conditions for lipase from Geobacillus sp.

    Mehta, Akshita; Kumar, Rakesh; Gupta, Reena

    2012-12-01

    Lipases catalyze the hydrolysis and the synthesis of esters formed from glycerol and long chain fatty acids. Lipases occur widely in nature, but only microbial lipases are commercially significant. In the present study, thirty-two bacterial strains, isolated from soil sample of a hot spring were screened for lipase production. The strain TS-4, which gave maximum activity, was identified as Geobacillus sp. at MTCC, IMTECH, Chandigarh. The isolated lipase producing bacteria were grown on minimal salt medium containing olive oil. Maximal quantities of lipase were produced when 30 h old inoculum was used at 10% (v/v) in production medium and incubated in shaking conditions (150 rpm) for 72 h. The optimal temperature and pH for the bacterial growth and lipase production were found to be 60°C and 9.5, respectively. Maximal enzyme production resulted when mustard oil was used as carbon source and yeast extract as sole nitrogen source at a concentration of 1% (v/v) and 0.15% (w/v), respectively. The different optimized reaction parameters were temperature 65°C, pH 8.5, incubation time 10 min and substrate p-nitrophenyl palmitate. The Km and Vmax values of enzyme were found to be 14 mM and 17.86 μmol ml-1min-1, respectively, with p-nitrophenyl palmitate as substrate. All metal ions studied (1 mM) increased the lipase activity. PMID:23195552

  2. Genetic engineering of Geobacillus spp.

    Kananavičiūtė, Rūta; Čitavičius, Donaldas

    2015-04-01

    Members of the genus Geobacillus are thermophiles that are of great biotechnological importance, since they are sources of many thermostable enzymes. Because of their metabolic versatility, geobacilli can be used as whole-cell catalysts in processes such as bioconversion and bioremediation. The effective employment of Geobacillus spp. requires the development of reliable methods for genetic engineering of these bacteria. Currently, genetic manipulation tools and protocols are under rapid development. However, there are several convenient cloning vectors, some of which replicate autonomously, while others are suitable for the genetic modification of chromosomal genes. Gene expression systems are also intensively studied. Combining these tools together with proper techniques for DNA transfer, some Geobacillus strains were shown to be valuable producers of recombinant proteins and industrially important biochemicals, such as ethanol or isobutanol. This review encompasses the progress made in the genetic engineering of Geobacillus spp. and surveys the vectors and transformation methods that are available for this genus. PMID:25659824

  3. Comparative analysis of the Geobacillus hemicellulose utilization locus reveals a highly variable target for improved hemicellulolysis

    De Maayer, Pieter; Phillip J Brumm; Mead, David A; Don A Cowan

    2014-01-01

    Background Members of the thermophilic genus Geobacillus can grow at high temperatures and produce a battery of thermostable hemicellulose hydrolytic enzymes, making them ideal candidates for the bioconversion of biomass to value-added products. To date the molecular determinants for hemicellulose degradation and utilization have only been identified and partially characterized in one strain, namely Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6, where they are clustered in a single genetic locus. Result...

  4. Effect of mercaptoethylamine on DNA degradation in thermophilic bacteria Bac. stearothermophilus exposed to γ-, UV-radiation or methylnitrosourea

    The effect of mercaptoethylamine (MEA) on degradation of DNA in thermophilic bacteria Bac. stear. exposed to γ-, UV-rays or methylnitrosourea (MNU) was studied. Using centrifugation on alkaline and neutral sucrose gradients, it was shown that MEA inhibits the accumulation of breaks in the DNA of Bac. stear. It also lowers the level of DNA degradation in toluene-treated cells of Bac. stear. under the action of the intrinsic nuclease, reduces the activity of the endonuclease specific for apurinic DNA, as well as that of S1-nuclease and DNase-I in vitro. The inhibition in the accumulation of DNA breaks is assumed to be due to a decrease of the endonuclease activity in the cells of thermophilic bacteria. (orig.)

  5. A culture-dependent survey of thermophilic bacteria from hot springs in Xiamen area in China

    YANG Bo; OUYANG Jianping; AO Jingqun; CHEN Xinhua

    2009-01-01

    Microbes are believed to play important roles in ecosystem function in many environments. The hot springs of Xiamen Island are close to the Xiamen Sea, and may have some characteristics different from those of inland hot springs. Microbes living in the hot springs of Xiamen may have new characteristics. However, little is known about microbial communities of hot springs close to the Xiamen Sea. A cuhure-dependent survey of microbial population in the Xiamen hot springs was pcrformed by using an approach combining total cellular protein profile identification and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. A total of 328 isolates of bacteria were obtained from liquid and sediment samples from the Xiamen hot springs, including neutrophilie thermophilic bacteria and moderately thermophilic acidophiles. Neutrophilic thermophilic bacteria, which grow at a temperature range of 55-90℃ including Rhodothermus marinus (Strain 1) , Thermus thermophilus (Strain 2), Thermus thiopara (Strain 3) , Geobacillus stearothermophilus(Strain 4) , Geobacillus thermoleovorans (Strain 5) , and Pseudomonas pseudoal-caligenes (Strain 6), were recovered by 2216E plates. Moderately thermophilic acidophiles, which can grow at temperatures above 50℃ and a pH range of 1. 8-3.5 such as Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris (Strain 8) , Sul-fobacillus acidophilus (Strain 9), and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans (Strain 10), were isolated on selective solid medium containing sulfur and Fe2+. Among these strains, Rhodothermus marinus, Thermus thermophilus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus are not only thermophilcs, but also halophiles. One bacterium strain (Strain 6) shared 99% nucleotide sequence homology with Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes on the 16S rRNA gene se-quence, but was quite different from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes in biological characteristics, suggesting that it may represent a novel thermophilic species. Results indicated that various species of neutrophilic thermophiles and moderately thermophilic

  6. Crystallization and X-ray structure determination of a thermoalkalophilic lipase from Geobacillus SBS-4S

    Crystallization and the structure determination at 1.6 Å resolution of LIPSBS, a thermoalkalophilic lipase from Geobacillus strain SBS-4S, are described. The crystals belonged to orthorhombic space group P212121. A thermoalkalophilic lipase (LIPSBS) from the newly isolated Geobacillus strain SBS-4S which hydrolyzes a wide range of fatty acids has been characterized. In the present study, the crystallization of purified LIPSBS using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and its X-ray diffraction studies are described. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.13, b = 71.75, c = 126.26 Å. The structure was determined at 1.6 Å resolution by the molecular-replacement method using the lipase from G. stearothermophilus L1 as a model

  7. Antimicrobial Protein Candidates from the Thermophilic Geobacillus sp. Strain ZGt-1: Production, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics Analysis

    Alkhalili, Rawana N.; Bernfur, Katja; Dishisha, Tarek; Mamo, Gashaw; Schelin, Jenny; Canbäck, Björn; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2016-01-01

    A thermophilic bacterial strain, Geobacillus sp. ZGt-1, isolated from Zara hot spring in Jordan, was capable of inhibiting the growth of the thermophilic G. stearothermophilus and the mesophilic Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella typhimurium on a solid cultivation medium. Antibacterial activity was not observed when ZGt-1 was cultivated in a liquid medium; however, immobilization of the cells in agar beads that were subjected to sequential batch cultivation in the liquid medium at 60 °C showed increasing antibacterial activity up to 14 cycles. The antibacterial activity was lost on protease treatment of the culture supernatant. Concentration of the protein fraction by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis separation and analysis of the gel for antibacterial activity against G. stearothermophilus showed a distinct inhibition zone in 15–20 kDa range, suggesting that the active molecule(s) are resistant to denaturation by SDS. Mass spectrometric analysis of the protein bands around the active region resulted in identification of 22 proteins with molecular weight in the range of interest, three of which were new and are here proposed as potential antimicrobial protein candidates by in silico analysis of their amino acid sequences. Mass spectrometric analysis also indicated the presence of partial sequences of antimicrobial enzymes, amidase and dd-carboxypeptidase. PMID:27548162

  8. Antimicrobial Protein Candidates from the Thermophilic Geobacillus sp. Strain ZGt-1: Production, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics Analysis.

    Alkhalili, Rawana N; Bernfur, Katja; Dishisha, Tarek; Mamo, Gashaw; Schelin, Jenny; Canbäck, Björn; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2016-01-01

    A thermophilic bacterial strain, Geobacillus sp. ZGt-1, isolated from Zara hot spring in Jordan, was capable of inhibiting the growth of the thermophilic G. stearothermophilus and the mesophilic Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella typhimurium on a solid cultivation medium. Antibacterial activity was not observed when ZGt-1 was cultivated in a liquid medium; however, immobilization of the cells in agar beads that were subjected to sequential batch cultivation in the liquid medium at 60 °C showed increasing antibacterial activity up to 14 cycles. The antibacterial activity was lost on protease treatment of the culture supernatant. Concentration of the protein fraction by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis separation and analysis of the gel for antibacterial activity against G. stearothermophilus showed a distinct inhibition zone in 15-20 kDa range, suggesting that the active molecule(s) are resistant to denaturation by SDS. Mass spectrometric analysis of the protein bands around the active region resulted in identification of 22 proteins with molecular weight in the range of interest, three of which were new and are here proposed as potential antimicrobial protein candidates by in silico analysis of their amino acid sequences. Mass spectrometric analysis also indicated the presence of partial sequences of antimicrobial enzymes, amidase, and dd-carboxypeptidase. PMID:27548162

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacillus subterraneus Strain K, a Hydrocarbon-Oxidizing Thermophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Petroleum Reservoir in Kazakhstan

    Poltaraus, Andrey B.; Sokolova, Diyana S.; Grouzdev, Denis S.; Ivanov, Timophey M.; Malakho, Sophia G.; Korshunova, Alena V.; Tourova, Tatiyana P.

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Geobacillus subterraneus strain K, a thermophilic aerobic oil-oxidizing bacterium isolated from production water of the Uzen high-temperature oil field in Kazakhstan, is presented here. The genome is annotated for elucidation of the genomic and phenotypic diversity of thermophilic alkane-oxidizing bacteria. PMID:27491973

  10. Surface topography of the Bacillus stearothermophilus ribosome

    The surface topography of the intact 70S ribosome and free 30S and 50S subunits from Bacillus stearothermophilus strain 2,184 was investigated by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was employed to separate ribosomal proteins for analysis of their reactivity. Free 50S subunits incorporated about 18% more 125I than did 50S subunits derived from 70S ribosomes, whereas free 30S subunits and 30S subunits derived from 70S ribosomes incorporated similar amounts of 125I. Iodinated 70S ribosomes and subunits retained 62-78% of the protein synthesis activity of untreated particles and sedimentation profiles showed no gross conformational changes due to iodination. The proteins most reactive to enzymatic iodination were S4, S7, S10 and Sa of the small subunit and L2, L4, L5/9, L6 and L36 of the large subunit. Proteins S2, S3, S7, S13, Sa, L5/9, L10, L11 and L24/25 were labeled substantially more in the free subunits than in the 70S ribosome. Other proteins, including S5, S9, S12, S15/16, S18 and L36 were more extensively iodinated in the 70S ribosome than in the free subunits. The locations of tyrosine residues in some homologus ribosomal proteins from B. stearothermophilus and E. coli are compared. (orig.)

  11. Inactivation of chemical and heat-resistant spores of Bacillus and Geobacillus by nitrogen cold atmospheric plasma evokes distinct changes in morphology and integrity of spores.

    van Bokhorst-van de Veen, Hermien; Xie, Houyu; Esveld, Erik; Abee, Tjakko; Mastwijk, Hennie; Nierop Groot, Masja

    2015-02-01

    Bacterial spores are resistant to severe conditions and form a challenge to eradicate from food or food packaging material. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) treatment is receiving more attention as potential sterilization method at relatively mild conditions but the exact mechanism of inactivation is still not fully understood. In this study, the biocidal effect by nitrogen CAP was determined for chemical (hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide), physical (UV) and heat-resistant spores. The three different sporeformers used are Bacillus cereus a food-borne pathogen, and Bacillus atrophaeus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus that are used as biological indicators for validation of chemical sterilization and thermal processes, respectively. The different spores showed variation in their degree of inactivation by applied heat, hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, and UV treatments, whereas similar inactivation results were obtained with the different spores treated with nitrogen CAP. G. stearothermophilus spores displayed high resistance to heat, hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, while for UV treatment B. atrophaeus spores are most tolerant. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed distinct morphological changes for nitrogen CAP-treated B. cereus spores including etching effects and the appearance of rough spore surfaces, whereas morphology of spores treated with heat or disinfectants showed no such changes. Moreover, microscopy analysis revealed CAP-exposed B. cereus spores to turn phase grey conceivably because of water influx indicating damage of the spores, a phenomenon that was not observed for non-treated spores. In addition, data are supplied that exclude UV radiation as determinant of antimicrobial activity of nitrogen CAP. Overall, this study shows that nitrogen CAP treatment has a biocidal effect on selected Bacillus and Geobacillus spores associated with alterations in spore surface morphology and loss of spore integrity. PMID:25481059

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Geobacillus sp. Strains CAMR5420 and CAMR12739

    De Maayer, Pieter; Williamson, Carolyn E.; Vennard, Christopher T.; Danson, Michael J.; Don A Cowan

    2014-01-01

    Thermophilic Geobacillus spp. can efficiently hydrolyze hemicellulose polymers and are therefore of interest in biotechnological applications. Here we report the genome sequences of two hemicellulolytic strains, Geobacillus sp. CAMR12739 and CAMR5420.

  13. Preliminary Characterization of the Probiotic Properties of Candida Famata and Geobacillus Thermoleovorans

    A Bakhrouf

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Probiotics are live microbial feed supplements which beneficially affect the host animal by improving its intestinal microbial balance, producing metabolites which inhibit the colonization or growth of other microorganisms or by competing with them for resources such as nutrients or space. The aim of this study was to investigate the probiotic properties of Candida famata and Geobacillus thermoleovorans.Material and Methods: In this study, yeast and bacterial strains isolated from pure oil waste were identified using Api 50 CHB and Api Candida Systems and their probiotic properties were studied through antimicrobial activity, biofilm production, adherence assay and enzymatic characterization.Results and Conclusion: According to biochemical analyses, these strains corresponded to Geobacillus thermoleovorans and Candida famata. Antagonism assay results showed that the tested strains have an inhibitory effect against tested pathogenic bacteria. The yeast Candida famata was unable to produce biofilm on Congo Red Agar (CRA, while the bacterial strain was a slime producer. Adherence assays to abiotic surfaces revealed that the investigated strains were fairly adhesive to polystyrene with values ranging from 0.18 to 0.34 at 595 nm. The enzymatic characterization revealed that the tested strains expressed enzymes such as phosphatase alkaline, esterase lipase (C8, amylase, lipase, lecitenase and caseinase. The obtained results may allow the isolated strains to be considered as having the potential to be candidate probiotics.

  14. Influence of mea on dna breaks accumulation in bac. stearothermophilus exposed to γ- and UV-radiation and treated with nitrosomethylurea

    β-Mercaptoethylamine (MEA) decreased the accumulation of enzymatic single- and double-strand breaks in DNA of thermophilic bacteria exposed to γ- and UV- radiation and treated with N-nitroso-N-methylurea. The protective effect of MEA, as registered according to accumulation of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA of Bac. stearothermophilus immediately after irradiation and after 30 min postirradiation incubation, was similar

  15. Thermostable, Raw-Starch-Digesting Amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus

    Kim, Jaeyoung; Nanmori, Takashi; Shinke, Ryu

    1989-01-01

    An endospore-forming thermophilic bacterium, which produced amylase and was identified as Bacillus stearothermophilus, was isolated from soil. The amylase had an optimum temperature of 70°C and strongly degraded wheat starch granules (93%) and potato starch granules (80%) at 60°C.

  16. Culture Conditions for Production of Thermostable Amylase by Bacillus stearothermophilus

    Srivastava, R. A. K.; Baruah, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    Bacillus stearothermophilus grew better on complex and semisynthetic medium than on synthetic medium supplemented with amino acids. Amylase production on the complex medium containing beef extract or corn steep liquor was higher than on semisynthetic medium containing peptone (0.4%). The synthetic medium, however, did not provide a good yield of extracellular amylase. Among the carbohydrates which favored the production of amylase are, in order starch > dextrin > glycogen > cellobiose > malto...

  17. Effect of DNA damaging agents on Bac. stearothermophilus

    A thermophilic micro-organism Bac. stearothermophilus showes a high resistance to the effect of such DNA damaging agents as NMM, UV- and γ-radiation. Due to adaptation to high temperatures, at which intensive depurinization and depyrimidinization of DNA take place, thermophilic micro-organisms are suggested to acquire evolutionary a powerful system of repair of DNA damages, particularly, of apurine and apyrimidine sites

  18. Genetic map of the Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB36 chromosome

    Vallier, H.; Welker, N.E. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA))

    1990-02-01

    A circular genetic map of Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB36 was constructed by transduction with bacteriophage TP-42C and protoplast fusion. Sixty-four genes were tentatively assigned a cognate Bacillus subtilis gene based on growth response to intermediates or end products of metabolism, cross-feeding, accumulation of intermediates, or their relative order in a linkage group. Although the relative position of many genes on the Bacillus subtilis genetic map appears to be similar, some differences were detected. The tentative order of the genes in the Bacillus stearothermophilus aro region is aspB-aroBAFEC-tyra-hisH-(trp), whereas it is aspB-aroE-tyrA-hisH-(trp)-aroHBF in Bacillus subtilis. The aroA, aroC, and aroG genes in Bacillus subtilis are located in another region. The tentative order of genes in the trp operon of Bacillus stearothermophilus is trpFCDABE, whereas it is trpABFCDE in Bacillus subtilis.

  19. PRODUCTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ALKALOTHERMOSTABLE, ORGANIC SOLVENT TOLERANT AND SURFACTANT TOLERANT ESTERASE PRODUCED BY A THERMOPHILIC BACTERIUM GEOBACILLUS SP. AGP-04, ISOLATED FROM BAKRESHWAR HOT SPRING, INDIA

    Amit Ghati

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A thermophilic bacteria, Geobacillus sp. AGP-04, isolated from Surya Kund hot spring, Bakreshwar, West Bengal, India was studied in terms of capability of tributyrin hydrolysis and characterization of its thermostable esterase activity using p-nitrophenyl butyrate (PNPB as substrate. The extracellular crude preparation was characterized in terms of pH and temperature optima and stability, organic solvent tolerance capacity and stability, substrate specificity, surfactant tolerance capacity, kinetic parameters and activation/inhibition behavior towards some metal ions and chemicals. Tributyrin agar assay exhibited that Geobacillus sp. AGP-04 secretes an extracellular esterase. The Vmax and Km values of the esterase were found to be 5099 U/Land 103.5µM, respectively in the presence of PNPB as substrate. The optimum temperature and pH, for Geobacillus sp. AGP-04 esterase was 60oC and 8.0, respectively. Although the enzyme activity was not significantly altered by incubating crude extract solution at 20-70oC for 1 hour, the enzyme activity was fully lost at 90oC for same incubation period. The pH stability profile showed that original crude esterase activity is stable at a broad range (pH 5.0-10.0. Moreover, the enzyme was highly organic solvent and surfactant tolerant. The effect of some chemical on crude esterase activity indicated that Geobacillus sp. AGP-04 produce an esterase which contains a serine residue in active site and for its activity -SH groups are essential. Besides, enzyme production was highly induced if fermentation medium contain polysaccharides and oil as carbon source.

  20. The quorum-quenching lactonase from Geobacillus caldoxylosilyticus: purification, characterization, crystallization and crystallographic analysis.

    Bergonzi, Celine; Schwab, Michael; Elias, Mikael

    2016-09-01

    Lactonases are enzymes that are capable of hydrolyzing various lactones such as aliphatic lactones or acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), with the latter being used as chemical signaling molecules by numerous Gram-negative bacteria. Lactonases therefore have the ability to quench the chemical communication, also known as quorum sensing, of numerous bacteria, and in particular to inhibit behaviors that are regulated by this system, such as the expression of virulence factors or the production of biofilms. A novel representative from the metallo-β-lactamase superfamily, dubbed GcL, was isolated from the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus caldoxylosilyticus. Because of its thermophilic origin, GcL may constitute an interesting candidate for the development of biocontrol agents. Here, we show that GcL is a thermostable enzyme with a half-life at 75°C of 152.5 ± 10 min. Remarkably, it is also shown that GcL is among the most active lactonases characterized to date, with catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) against AHLs of greater than 10(6) M(-1) s(-1). The structure of GcL is expected to shed light on the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme and the molecular determinants for the substrate specificity in this class of lactonases. Here, the expression, purification, characterization, crystallization and X-ray diffraction data collection to 1.6 Å resolution of GcL are reported. PMID:27599858

  1. Purification and properties of deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Kaboev, O K; Luchkina, L A; Akhmedov, A T; Bekker, M L

    1981-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase I was purified from Bacillus stearothermophilus to 50 to 70% homogeneity. Its molecular weight was 76,000. The enzyme was insensitive to sulfhydryl blocking agents and showed maximal activity at 60 degrees C, pH 8 to 9, 0.25 M KCl, and 0.02 M MgSO4. The rate of heat inactivation of the deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase followed first-order kinetics with a half-life of 90 min at 60 degrees C; the addition of 0.05% bovine serum albumin protected the enzyme, which...

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of thermostable RNase HIII from Bacillus stearothermophilus

    Chon, Hyongi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Koga, Yuichi; Takano, Kazufumi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2005-01-01

    A thermostable ribonuclease HIII from B. stearothermophilus (Bst RNase HIII) was crystallized and preliminary crystallographic studies were performed. Plate-like overlapping polycrystals were grown by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 283 K.

  3. Structural genes encoding the thermophilic alpha-amylases of Bacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus licheniformis.

    Gray, G L; Mainzer, S E; Rey, M W; Lamsa, M H; Kindle, K L; Carmona, C; Requadt, C

    1986-01-01

    The genes encoding the thermostable alpha-amylases of Bacillus stearothermophilus and B. licheniformis were cloned in Escherichia coli, and their DNA sequences were determined. The coding and deduced polypeptide sequences are 59 and 62% homologous to each other, respectively. The B. stearothermophilus protein differs most significantly from that of B. licheniformis in that it possesses a 32-residue COOH-terminal tail. Transformation of E. coli with vectors containing either gene resulted in t...

  4. Effect of mea on DNA degradation in permeable irradiated Bac. stearothermophilus cells

    It was shown that DNA-degrading activity of permeable, intact and γ-irradiated cells of Bac. stearothermophilus decreased under the effect of β-mercaptoethylamine (MEA). MEA decreased also a DNAase activity, in a crude acellular extract of Bac. stearothermophilus, and activities of S1-nuclease and DNAase. I. The data obtained prompt an assumption that MEA has an inhibitory action on the activity of endonucleases irrespective of their substrate specificity

  5. A commensal symbiotic interrelationship for the growth of Symbiobacterium toebii with its partner bacterium, Geobacillus toebii

    Masui Ryoji

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symbiobacterium toebii is a commensal symbiotic thermophile that absolutely requires its partner bacterium Geobacillus toebii for growth. Despite development of an independent cultivation method using cell-free extracts, the growth of Symbiobacterium remains unknown due to our poor understanding of the symbiotic relationship with its partner bacterium. Here, we investigated the interrelationship between these two bacteria for growth of S. toebii using different cell-free extracts of G. toebii. Results Symbiobacterium toebii growth-supporting factors were constitutively produced through almost all growth phases and under different oxygen tensions in G. toebii, indicating that the factor may be essential components for growth of G. toebii as well as S. toebii. The growing conditions of G. toebii under different oxygen tension dramatically affected to the initial growth of S. toebii and the retarded lag phase was completely shortened by reducing agent, L-cysteine indicating an evidence of commensal interaction of microaerobic and anaerobic bacterium S. toebii with a facultative aerobic bacterium G. toebii. In addition, the growth curve of S. toebii showed a dependency on the protein concentration of cell-free extracts of G. toebii, demonstrating that the G. toebii-derived factors have nutrient-like characters but not quorum-sensing characters. Conclusions Not only the consistent existence of the factor in G. toebii during all growth stages and under different oxygen tensions but also the concentration dependency of the factor for proliferation and optimal growth of S. toebii, suggests that an important biosynthetic machinery lacks in S. toebii during evolution. The commensal symbiotic bacterium, S. toebii uptakes certain ubiquitous and essential compound for its growth from environment or neighboring bacteria that shares the equivalent compounds. Moreover, G. toebii grown under aerobic condition shortened the lag phase of S

  6. Geobacillus zalihae sp. nov., a thermophilic lipolytic bacterium isolated from palm oil mill effluent in Malaysia

    Salleh Abu

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thermophilic Bacillus strains of phylogenetic Bacillus rRNA group 5 were described as a new genus Geobacillus. Their geographical distribution included oilfields, hay compost, hydrothermal vent or soils. The members from the genus Geobacillus have a growth temperatures ranging from 35 to 78°C and contained iso-branched saturated fatty acids (iso-15:0, iso-16:0 and iso-17:0 as the major fatty acids. The members of Geobacillus have similarity in their 16S rRNA gene sequences (96.5–99.2%. Thermophiles harboring intrinsically stable enzymes are suitable for industrial applications. The quest for intrinsically thermostable lipases from thermophiles is a prominent task due to the laborious processes via genetic modification. Results Twenty-nine putative lipase producers were screened and isolated from palm oil mill effluent in Malaysia. Of these, isolate T1T was chosen for further study as relatively higher lipase activity was detected quantitatively. The crude T1 lipase showed high optimum temperature of 70°C and was also stable up to 60°C without significant loss of crude enzyme activity. Strain T1T was a Gram-positive, rod-shaped, endospore forming bacterium. On the basic of 16S rDNA analysis, strain T1T was shown to belong to the Bacillus rRNA group 5 related to Geobacillus thermoleovorans (DSM 5366T and Geobacillus kaustophilus (DSM 7263T. Chemotaxonomic data of cellular fatty acids supported the affiliation of strain T1T to the genus Geobacillus. The results of physiological and biochemical tests, DNA/DNA hybridization, RiboPrint analysis, the length of lipase gene and protein pattern allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain T1T from its validly published closest phylogenetic neighbors. Strain T1T therefore represents a novel species, for which the name Geobacillus zalihae sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain T1T (=DSM 18318T; NBRC 101842T. Conclusion Strain T1T was able to secrete extracellular

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Thermophilic Spore Formers Isolated from a Dairy-Processing Environment

    Caspers, Martien P. M.; Boekhorst, Jos; de Jong, Anne; Kort, Remco; Nierop Groot, Masja

    2016-01-01

    Spores of thermophilic spore-forming bacteria are a common cause of contamination in dairy products. Here, we report draft genome sequences of four thermophilic strains from a milk-processing plant or standard milk, namely, a Geobacillus thermoglucosidans isolate (TNO-09.023), Geobacillus stearothermophilus TNO-09.027, and two Anoxybacillus flavithermus isolates (TNO-09.014 and TNO-09.016). PMID:27516503

  8. Three novel halotolerant and thermophilic Geobacillus strains from shallow marine vents.

    Maugeri, Teresa L; Gugliandolo, Concetta; Caccamo, Daniela; Stackebrandt, Erko

    2002-10-01

    During a polyphasic taxonomic analysis performed on isolates from shallow marine hydrothermal vents of Eolian Islands (Italy), three thermophilic, halotolerant bacilli, designated as strain 1bw, strain 5-2 and strain 10-1, could not be affiliated to any described species. Physiological and biochemical characteristics, membrane lipids composition, mol % G+C content, and phylogenetic relationships determined on the basis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, placed these strains within the genus Geobacillus. The three strains were only moderately related to species of Geobacillus and their relatives, members of Saccharococcus. Determination of the relatedness among each other at a higher taxonomic level by DNA-DNA reassociation experiments demonstrated the three isolates to represent three different novel Geobacillus genomospecies. The taxonomic novelty of these three marine strains was substantiated by their physiological properties and by fatty acid patterns that did not match closely those of any Geobacillus type strain. These three novel strains could be of interest to biotechnology because of their ability to produce exopolysaccharides and to adhere on polystirene, characteristics undescribed so far for other Geobacillus species. They are also able to utilise hydrocarbons such as gas oil, kerosene and mineral lubricating oil. Strain 5-2 is tolerant to zinc. PMID:12421083

  9. The Geobacillus Pan-Genome: Implications for the Evolution of the Genus

    Bezuidt, Oliver K.; Pierneef, Rian; Gomri, Amin M.; Adesioye, Fiyin; Makhalanyane, Thulani P.; Kharroub, Karima; Cowan, Don A.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Geobacillus is comprised of a diverse group of spore-forming Gram-positive thermophilic bacterial species and is well known for both its ecological diversity and as a source of novel thermostable enzymes. Although the mechanisms underlying the thermophilicity of the organism and the thermostability of its macromolecules are reasonably well understood, relatively little is known of the evolutionary mechanisms, which underlie the structural and functional properties of members of this genus. In this study, we have compared 29 Geobacillus genomes, with a specific focus on the elements, which comprise the conserved core and flexible genomes. Based on comparisons of conserved core and flexible genomes, we present evidence of habitat delineation with specific Geobacillus genomes linked to specific niches. Our analysis revealed that Geobacillus and Anoxybacillus share a high proportion of genes. Moreover, the results strongly suggest that horizontal gene transfer is a major factor deriving the evolution of Geobacillus from Bacillus, with genetic contributions from other phylogenetically distant taxa. PMID:27252683

  10. 1H, 13C, and 15N backbone and side chain resonance assignments of thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus cyclophilin-A

    Holliday, Michael; Zhang, Fengli; Isern, Nancy G.; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.

    2014-04-01

    Cyclophilins catalyze the reversible peptidyl-prolyl isomerization of their substrates and are present across all kingdoms of life from humans to bacteria. Although numerous biological roles have now been discovered for cyclophilins, their function was initially ascribed to their chaperone-like activity in protein folding where they catalyze the often rate-limiting step of proline isomerization. This chaperone-like activity may be especially important under extreme conditions where cyclophilins are often over expressed, such as in tumors for human cyclophilins {Lee, 2010 #1167}, but also in organisms that thrive under extreme conditions, such as theromophilic bacteria. Moreover, the reversible nature of the peptidyl-prolyl isomerization reaction catalyzed by cyclophilins has allowed these enzymes to serve as model systems for probing the role of conformational changes during catalytic turnover {Eisenmesser, 2002 #20;Eisenmesser, 2005 #203}. Thus, we present here the resonance assignments of a thermophilic cyclophilin from Geobacillus kaustophilus derived from deep-sea sediment {Takami, 2004 #1384}. This thermophilic cyclophilin may now be studied at a variety of temperatures to provide insight into the comparative structure, dynamics, and catalytic mechanism of cyclophilins.

  11. Purification and Characterization of a Thermostable Lipase from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans IBRL-nra

    Anuradha Balan; Darah Ibrahim; Rashidah Abdul Rahim; Fatimah Azzahra Ahmad Rashid

    2012-01-01

    Thermostable lipase from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans IBRL-nra was purified and characterized. The production of thermostable lipase from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans IBRL-nra was carried out in a shake-flask system at 65°C in cultivation medium containing; glucose 1.0% (w/v); yeast extract 1.25% (w/v); NaCl 0.45% (w/v) olive oil 0.1% (v/v) with agitation of 200 rpm for 24 hours. The extracted extracellular crude thermostable lipase was purified to homogeneity by using ultrafiltration, ...

  12. Modification of rock/fluid and fluid/fluid interfaces during MEOR processes, using two biosurfactant producing strains of Bacillus stearothermophilus SUCPM#14 and Enterobacter cloacae: a mechanistic study.

    Sarafzadeh, Pegah; Zeinolabedini Hezave, Ali; Mohammadi, Sahar; Niazi, Ali; Ayatollahi, Shahab

    2014-05-01

    During any microbial enhanced oil recovery process, both cells and the metabolic products of bacteria govern the tertiary oil recovery efficiency. However, very accurate examination is needed to find the functionality of these tiny creatures at different reservoir conditions. In this regard, the effect of cell structure on ultimate microbial recovery efficiency which is the most dominant mechanism based on the microorganism types (gram-negative or gram-positive) was systematically investigated. At the first stage, possible different active mechanisms using Bacillus stearothermophilus SUCPM#14 strain were tested using specially designed injection protocol, in situ and ex situ core flooding experiments, interfacial tension, viscosity, pH and Amott wettability index measurements. At the second stage, comparing functionality of B. stearothermophilus SUCPM#14 (a gram-positive type) with the previously examined strain namely Enterobacter cloacae as a gram-negative type, proposed this hypothesis that the cell structure significantly affects the interfacial behaviors. New designed protocols were utilized to check the individual effects of cells, bioproducts and interaction of these together on the oil/water and also fluids/rock interfaces. The final results showed that the cells of B. stearothermophilus SUCPM#14 adhere more into the oil/water interface compared to E. cloacae and change its rheological properties; e.g. its elastic properties which affect the ultimate microbial oil recovery efficiency. Eventually, contradicting results revealed that biosurfactant produced by E. cloacae was able to considerably reduce the interfacial tension and alter the wettability of the rock (to neutral conditions) while biosurfactant produced by B. stearothermophilus SUCPM#14 was not very effective. PMID:24373916

  13. Bacillus stearothermophilus contains a plasmid-borne gene for alpha-amylase.

    Mielenz, J R

    1983-01-01

    The gene for thermostable alpha-amylase from the thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Each alpha-amylase-producing colony contained at least a 9.7-kilobase-pair (kb) chimeric plasmid composed of the vector pBR322 and a common 5.4-kb HindIII fragment of DNA. B. stearothermophilus contains four plasmids with sizes from 12 kb to over 108 kb. Restriction endonuclease analysis of these naturally occurring plasmids showed they also co...

  14. Genomic analysis of six new Geobacillus strains reveals highly conserved carbohydrate degradation architectures and strategies

    Phillip eBrumm

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work we report the whole genome sequences of six new Geobacillus xylanolytic strains along with the genomic analysis of their capability to degrade carbohydrates.. The six sequenced Geobacillus strains described here have a range of GC contents from 43.9% to 52.5% and clade with named Geobacillus species throughout the entire genus. We have identified a ~200 kb unique super-cluster in all six strains, containing five to eight distinct carbohydrate degradation clusters in a single genomic region, a feature not seen in other genera. The Geobacillus strains rely on a small number of secreted enzymes located within distinct clusters for carbohydrate utilization, in contrast to most biomass-degrading organisms which contain numerous secreted enzymes located randomly throughout the genomes. All six strains are able to utilize fructose, arabinose, xylose, mannitol, gluconate, xylan, and α-1,6-glucosides. The gene clusters for utilization of these seven substrates have identical organization and the individual proteins have a high percent identity to their homologs. The strains show significant differences in their ability to utilize inositol, sucrose, lactose, α-mannosides, α-1,4-glucosides and arabinan.

  15. Purification and characterization of thermostable beta-mannanase and alpha-galactosidase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Talbot, G; Sygusch, J

    1990-01-01

    Bacillus stearothermophilus secretes beta-mannanase and alpha-galactosidase enzymatic activities capable of hydrolyzing galactomannan substrates. Expression of the hemicellulase activities in the presence of locust bean gum was sequential, with mannanase activity preceding expression of alpha-galactosidase activity. The hemicellulase activities were purified to homogeneity by a combination of ammonium sulfate fractionation, gel filtration, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and ion-excha...

  16. The caa(3) terminal oxidase of Bacillus stearothermophilus - Transient spectroscopy of electron transfer and ligand binding

    Giuffre, A; DItri, E; Giannini, S; Brunori, M; UbbinkKok, T; Konings, WN; Antonini, G

    1996-01-01

    The thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus possesses a caa(3)-type terminal oxidase, which was previously purified (De Vrij, W., Heyne, R. I. HL, and Konings, W. N. (1989) Ear. J. Biochem. 178, 763-770). We have carried out extensive kinetic experiments on the purified enzyme by stopped-

  17. Polysaccharide-Degrading Thermophiles Generated by Heterologous Gene Expression in Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    Suzuki, Hirokazu; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Thermophiles have important advantages over mesophiles as host organisms for high-temperature bioprocesses, functional production of thermostable enzymes, and efficient expression of enzymatic activities in vivo. To capitalize on these advantages of thermophiles, we describe here a new inducible gene expression system in the thermophile Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426. Six promoter regions in the HTA426 genome were identified and analyzed for expression profiles using β-galactosidase reporter...

  18. Purification and characterization of alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from Bacillus stearothermophilus T-6.

    Gilead, S; Shoham, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Bacillus stearothermophilus T-6 produced an alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase when grown in the presence of L-arabinose, sugar beet arabinan, or oat spelt xylan. At the end of a fermentation, about 40% of the activity was extracellular, and enzyme activity in the cell-free supernatant could reach 25 U/ml. The enzymatic activity in the supernatant was concentrated against polyethylene glycol 20000, and the enzyme was purified eightfold by anion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatographies. ...

  19. Structure based protein engineering of Bacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase: toward a new substrate specificity

    Full text. Structural similarity is observed in all members of α-amylase family but different products are generated during hydrolysis of starch due to different affinities for intermediate dextrins. In order to understand the structural determinants for this property and to introduce different specificity to α-amylase of Bacillus stearothermophilus we intend to solve the three dimensional structure by X-ray crystallography of the native protein by using synchrotron radiation at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Protein was over expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallization experiments were carried out by using sparse matrix Crystal Screen and Crystal Screen II from Hampton Research (Laguna Hills, CA, USA). Several condition have produced crystals with some defined characteristic: MDP seems to be important to the crystallization: the preferential pH is around 7.5 with organic buffer (HEPES); organic solvent as 2-propanol seems to be also important for the crystallization. On those condition crystals appeared as cluster of needles or small crystals with high number of nucleation. New conditions are being prepared to improve the site and quality of crystals. Data collection of native of Bacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase will e done at Protein Crystallography Station at LNLS. Crystal structure of mutated α-amylase bu site direct mutagenesis of residues suggested by the native crystal structure will be obtained. Co-crystallization of Bacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase and oligosaccharide will be carried out to identify residues involved in the binding site to plan new mutation. In another series of mutation the putative binding site residues, once identified, will be mutated to residues observed in TAKA amylase to confer different specificity to α-amylase. Based on the available TAKA amylase structure, in the primary sequence homology and in the three dimensional model of Bacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase (using Bacillus

  20. Thermoadaptation trait revealed by the genome sequence of thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus

    Takami, Hideto; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Chee, Gab-Joo; Nishi, Shinro; Shimamura, Shigeru; Suzuki, Hiroko; Matsui, Satomi; Uchiyama, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    We present herein the first complete genome sequence of a thermophilic Bacillus-related species, Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426, which is composed of a 3.54 Mb chromosome and a 47.9 kb plasmid, along with a comparative analysis with five other mesophilic bacillar genomes. Upon orthologous grouping of the six bacillar sequenced genomes, it was found that 1257 common orthologous groups composed of 1308 genes (37%) are shared by all the bacilli, whereas 839 genes (24%) in the G.kaustophilus gen...

  1. Characterisation of Bacillus stearothermophilus PcrA helicase: evidence against an active rolling mechanism.

    Bird, L E; Brannigan, J A; Subramanya, H. S.; Wigley, D. B.

    1998-01-01

    PcrA from Bacillus stearothermophilus is a DNA helicase for which, despite the availability of a crystal structure, there is very little biochemical information. We show that the enzyme has a broad nucleotide specificity, even being able to hydrolyse ethenonucleotides, and is able to couple the hydrolysis to unwinding of DNA substrates. In common with the Escherichia coli helicases Rep and UvrD, PcrA is a 3'-5' helicase but at high protein concentrations it can also displace a substrate with ...

  2. Purification and characterization of a thermostable xylanase from Bacillus stearothermophilus T-6.

    Khasin, A; Alchanati, I; Shoham, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Bacillus stearothermophilus T-6 produces an extracellular xylanase that was shown to optimally bleach pulp at pH 9 and 65 degrees C. The enzyme was purified and concentrated in a single adsorption step onto a cation exchanger and is made of a single polypeptide with an apparent M(r) of 43,000 (determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis). Xylanase T-6 is an endoxylanase that completely degrades xylan to xylose and xylobiose. The pIs of the purified protein were 9 a...

  3. ATPase activity measurement of DNA replicative helicase from Bacillus stearothermophilus by malachite green method.

    Yang, Mu; Wang, Ganggang

    2016-09-15

    The DnaB helicase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (DnaBBst) was a model protein for studying the bacterial DNA replication. In this work, a non-radioactive method for measuring ATPase activity of DnaBBst helicase was described. The working parameters and conditions were optimized. Furthermore, this method was applied to investigate effects of DnaG primase, ssDNA and helicase loader protein (DnaI) on ATPase activity of DnaBBst. Our results showed this method was sensitive and efficient. Moreover, it is suitable for the investigation of functional interaction between DnaB and related factors. PMID:27372608

  4. Purification and Characterization of a Thermostable Lipase from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans IBRL-nra

    Anuradha Balan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermostable lipase from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans IBRL-nra was purified and characterized. The production of thermostable lipase from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans IBRL-nra was carried out in a shake-flask system at 65°C in cultivation medium containing; glucose 1.0% (w/v; yeast extract 1.25% (w/v; NaCl 0.45% (w/v olive oil 0.1% (v/v with agitation of 200 rpm for 24 hours. The extracted extracellular crude thermostable lipase was purified to homogeneity by using ultrafiltration, Heparin-affinity chromatography, and Sephadex G-100 gel-filtration chromatography by 34 times with a final yield of 9%. The molecular weight of the purified enzyme was estimated to be 30 kDa after SDS-PAGE analysis. The optimal temperature for thermostable lipase was 65°C and it retained its initial activity for 3 hours. Thermostable lipase activity was highest at pH 7.0 and stable for 16 hours at this pH at 65°C. Thermostable lipase showed elevated activity when pretreated with BaCl2, CaCl2, and KCl with 112%, 108%, and 106%, respectively. Lipase hydrolyzed tripalmitin (C16 and olive oil with optimal activity (100% compared to other substrates.

  5. Effect of ionization and nisin on the Bacillus strains and Salmonella Enteritidis inoculated Stearothermophilus

    The antimicrobial effect of nisin (at 1000UI/g), and irradiation (at 1, 3 and 5kGy), against the growth of Salmonella enteritidis (106 ufc/ml) and Bacillus Stearothermophilus (106 ufc/ml), inoculated in turkey salami, was studied during storage at 4 degree for 21 days. Treatment of turkey salami with nisin at 1000UI/g did not show any antimicrobial activity against S. Enteritidis with 6.7 pour cent and 0.8 pour cent of reduction after 0 and 21 days of storage respectively, and seems to be insufficient to inhibit B. Stearothermophilus with 23 pour cent and 21 pour cent of reduction after 0 and 21 days of storage respectively. Antimicrobial activities of irradiation were better and proportional to irradiation doses; it shows a reduction of 27 pour cent, 55 pour cent and 67 pour cent by D1, D2 and D3 respectively. The combination of nisin with irradiation at 5kGy showed stronger antimicrobial activities than those obtained by its combination with the first and the second irradiation dose.

  6. Characterization of a new bacillus stearothermophilus isolate: a highly thermostable [alpha]-amylase-producing strain

    Wind, R.D. (Agrotechnological Research Inst., Wageningen (Netherlands)); Buitelaar, R.M. (Agrotechnological Research Inst., Wageningen (Netherlands)); Eggink, G. (Agrotechnological Research Inst., Wageningen (Netherlands)); Huizing, H.J. (Agrotechnological Research Inst., Wageningen (Netherlands)); Dijkhuizen, L. (Dept. of Microbiology, Groningen Univ. (Netherlands))

    1994-04-01

    A novel strain of Bacillus stearothermophilus was isolated from samples of a potato-processing industry. Comapred to known [alpha]-amylases from other B. stearothermophilus strains, the isolate was found to produce a highly thermostable [alpha]-amylase. The half-time of inactivation of this [alpha]-amylase was 5.1 h at 80 C and 2.4 h at 90 C. The temperature optimum for activity of the [alpha]-amylase was 70 C; the pH optimum for activity was relatively low, in the range 5.5-6.0 [alpha]-Amylase synthesis was regulated by induction and repression mechanisms. An inverse relationship was found between growth rate and [alpha]-amylase production. Low starch concentrations and low growth temperatures were favourable for enzyme production by the organism. At the optimal temperature for growth, 65 C, the [alpha]-amylase was a growth-associated enzyme. The optimal temperature for [alpha]-amylase production, however, was 40 C, with [alpha]-amylase increasing from 3.9 units (U)/ml to 143 U/ml when lowering the growth temperature from 65 C to 40 C. Maximal [alpha]-amylase production in a batch fermentor run at 65 C was 102 U/ml, which was 26-fold higher than in erlenmeyer flasks at 65 C. The dissolved O[sub 2] concentration was found to be a critical factor in production of the [alpha]-amylase. (orig.)

  7. Overexpression and characterization of dimeric and tetrameric forms of recombinant serine hydroxymethyltransferase from Bacillus stearothermophilus

    Venkatakrishna R Jala; V Prakash; N Appaji Rao; H S Savithri

    2002-06-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT), a pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzyme catalyzes the interconversion of L-Ser and Gly using tetrahydrofolate as a substrate. The gene encoding for SHMT was amplified by PCR from genomic DNA of Bacillus stearothermophilus and the PCR product was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme was isolated as a mixture of dimer (90%) and tetramer (10%). This is the first report demonstrating the existence of SHMT as a dimer and tetramer in the same organism. The specific activities at 37°C of the dimeric and tetrameric forms were 6.7 U/mg and 4.1 U/mg, respectively. The purified dimer was extremely thermostable with a m of 85°C in the presence of PLP and L-Ser. The temperature optimum of the dimer was 80°C with a specific activity of 32.4 U/mg at this temperature. The enzyme catalyzed tetrahydrofolate-independent reactions at a slower rate compared to the tetrahydrofolate-dependent retro-aldol cleavage of L-Ser. The interaction with substrates and their analogues indicated that the orientation of PLP ring of B. stearothermophilus SHMT was probably different from sheep liver cytosolic recombinant SHMT (scSHMT).

  8. Thermophilic Geobacillus galactosidasius sp. nov. loaded γ-Fe2O3 magnetic nanoparticle for the preconcentrations of Pb and Cd.

    Özdemir, Sadin; Kilinç, Ersin; Okumuş, Veysi; Poli, Annarita; Nicolaus, Barbara; Romano, Ida

    2016-02-01

    Thermophilic bacteria, Geobacillus galactosidasius sp nov. was loaded on γ-Fe2O3 magnetic nanoparticle for the preconcentrations of Pb and Cd by solid phase extraction before ICP-OES. pH and flow rate of the solution, amounts of biosorbent and magnetic nanoparticle, volume of sample solution, effects of the possible interferic ions were investigated in details. Linear calibration curves were constructed in the concentration ranges of 1.0-60ngmL(-1) for Pb and Cd. The RSDs of the method were lower than 2.8% for Pb and 3.8% for Cd. Certified and standard reference samples of fortified water, wastewater, poplar leaves, and simulated fresh water were used to accurate the method. LOD values were found as 0.07 and 0.06ngmL(-1) respectively for Pb and Cd. The biosorption capacities were found as 34.3mgg(-1) for Pb and 37.1mgg(-1) for Cd. Pb and Cd concentrations in foods were determined. Surface microstructure was investigated by SEM-EDX. PMID:26679049

  9. Expression, purification, and characterization of a thermophilic neutral protease from Bacillus stearothermophilus in Bacillus subtilis

    2008-01-01

    The gene coding for a thermophilic neutral protease from Bacillus stearothermophilus was expressed in Bacillus subtilis DB104, under the control of the sacB gene promoter. This was followed by either the native signal peptide sequence of this protease or the signal peptide sequence of the sacB gene. The protease was purified 3.8-fold, with a specific activity of 16530 U mg-1. As analyzed by SDS-PAGE, the molecular mass of the expressed protease was about 35 kDa, and the optimal temperature and pH of the protease were 65℃ and 7.5, respectively. Moreover, it still had about 80% activity after 1 h reaction at 65 ℃ .

  10. Expression, purification, and characterization of a thermophilic neutral protease from Bacillus stearothermophilus in Bacillus subtilis

    2008-01-01

    The gene coding for a thermophilic neutral protease from Bacillus stearothermophilus was expressed in Bacillus subtilis DB104, under the control of the sacB gene promoter. This was followed by either the native signal peptide sequence of this protease or the signal peptide sequence of the sacB gene. The protease was purified 3.8-fold, with a specific activity of 16530 U mg-1. As analyzed by SDS-PAGE, the molecular mass of the expressed protease was about 35 kDa, and the optimal temperature and pH of the protease were 65℃ and 7.5, respectively. Moreover, it still had about 80% activity after 1 h reaction at 65℃.

  11. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of DHNA synthetase from Geobacillus kaustophilus

    DHNA synthetase from G. kaustophilus has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. The aerobic Gram-positive bacterium Geobacillus kaustophilus is a bacillus species that was isolated from deep-sea sediment from the Mariana Trench. 1,4-Dihydroxy-2-naphthoate (DHNA) synthetase plays a vital role in the biosynthesis of menaquinone (vitamin K2) in this bacterium. DHNA synthetase from Geobacillus kaustophilus was crystallized in the orthorhombic space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 77.01, b = 130.66, c = 131.69 Å. The crystal diffracted to a resolution of 2.2 Å. Preliminary studies and molecular-replacement calculations reveal the presence of three monomers in the asymmetric unit

  12. Thermoadaptation-Directed Enzyme Evolution in an Error-Prone Thermophile Derived from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    Suzuki, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Jyumpei; Wada, Keisuke; Furukawa, Megumi; Doi, Katsumi

    2014-01-01

    Thermostability is an important property of enzymes utilized for practical applications because it allows long-term storage and use as catalysts. In this study, we constructed an error-prone strain of the thermophile Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 and investigated thermoadaptation-directed enzyme evolution using the strain. A mutation frequency assay using the antibiotics rifampin and streptomycin revealed that G. kaustophilus had substantially higher mutability than Escherichia coli and Bac...

  13. Cloning and characterization of a new manganese superoxide dismutase from deep-sea thermophile Geobacillus sp. EPT3.

    Zhu, Yanbing; Wang, Guohong; Ni, Hui; Xiao, Anfeng; Cai, Huinong

    2014-04-01

    A new gene encoding a superoxide dismutase (SOD) was identified from a thermophile Geobacillus sp. EPT3 isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal field in east Pacific. The open reading frame of this gene encoded 437 amino acid residues. It was cloned, overexpressed in Escherichia coli (DE3), and the recombinant protein was purified to homogeneity. Geobacillus sp. EPT3 SOD was of the manganese-containing SOD type, as judged by the insensitivity of the recombinant enzyme to both KCN and H₂O₂, and the activity analysis of Fe or Mn reconstituted SODs by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The recombinant SOD was determined to be a homodimer with monomeric molecular mass of 59.0 kDa. In comparison with other Mn-SODs, the manganese-binding sites are conserved in the sequence (His260, His308, Asp392, His396). The recombinant enzyme had high thermostability at 50 °C. It retained 57 % residual activity after incubation at 90 °C for 1 h, which indicated that this SOD was thermostable. The enzyme also showed striking stability over a wide range of pH 5.0-11.0. At tested conditions, the recombinant SOD from Geobacillus sp. EPT3 showed a relatively good tolerance to some inhibitors, detergents, and denaturants, such as β-mercaptoethanol, dithiothreitol, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, Chaps, Triton X-100, urea, and guanidine hydrochloride. PMID:24242973

  14. Purification and properties of thermostable xylanase and beta-xylosidase produced by a newly isolated Bacillus stearothermophilus strain.

    Nanmori, T; Watanabe, T.; Shinke, R; Kohno, A; Kawamura, Y.

    1990-01-01

    We isolated a thermophilic bacterium that produces both xylanase and beta-xylosidase. Based on taxonomical research, this bacterium was identified as Bacillus stearothermophilus. Each extracellular enzyme was separated by hydrophobic chromatography by using a Toyopearl HW-65 column, followed by gel filtration with a Sephacryl S-200 column. Each enzyme in the culture was further purified to homogeneity (62-fold for xylanase and 72-fold for beta-xylosidase) by using a fast protein liquid chroma...

  15. EFFICACY OF EXTRACTS OF SIX MEDICINAL PLANTS OF INDIA AGAINST SOME PATHOGENIC BACTERIA

    Indranil Bhattacharjee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of the pathogenic multi-drug resistant bacteria (Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus niacini, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Geobacillus thermodenitrificans, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Paenibacillus koreensis, Paenibacillus larvae larvae, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas flourescens, Pseudomonas putida and Staphylocccus aureus was tested against aqueous, acetone and ethanol extracts of mature leaves of Mimosa pudica Linn. (Mimosaceae and Moringa oleifera Lam. (Moringaceae, stems of Michelia champaca Linn. (Magnoliaceae and Musa paradisiaca Linn.(Musaceae, roots of Momordica charantia Linn. (Cucurbitaceae and Murraya koenigii Linn. (Rutaceae by agar well diffusion method. Gatifloxacin was the most effective antibiotic against all the reference bacteria. Though all the extracts were found effective, the ethanol extract showed maximum inhibition against the test microorganisms followed by acetone and aqueous extract. Bacillus niacini is the most resistant bacteria and Klebsiella pneumoniae is the most sensitive bacteria against all the extracts used. MIC values of each bacterium were also determined

  16. Determination of thermobacteriological parameters and size of Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 spores

    Marcos Fraiha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine thermobacteriological parameters for B. stearothermophilus spores, they were diluted in a saline solution medium and in ground corn-soybean mix, distributed in TDT tube, and submitted to heat for a specific period of time. The D value (time to reduce 1 log cycle of microbial count under a certain temperature and z value (variation of temperature to cause 10-fold change in D value were estimated. To estimate their dimensions, the spores were visualized by using a scanning electron microscope. D121.1 ºC and z values for these spores, as determined in the saline solution, were 8.8 minutes and 12.8 ºC, respectively. D121,1 ºC and z values determined in the corn-soy mix were 14.2 minutes and 23.7 ºC, respectively. The micrographs indicated that the spores have homogeneous shape and size, with length and diameter of 2 and 1 µm, respectively. These results confirm that the spore is highly thermal-resistant, and it is a good biological indicator to evaluate the extrusion process as a feed sterilizer.

  17. Enhanced maltose production through mutagenesis of acceptor binding subsite +2 in Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase.

    Sun, Yecheng; Duan, Xuguo; Wang, Lei; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-10

    Maltogenic amylases are used to decrease the maltotriose content of high maltose syrups. However, due to the interplay between the hydrolysis and transglycosylation activities of maltogenic amylases, the maltotriose contents of these syrups are still greater than that necessary for pure maltose preparation. In this study, the maltogenic amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus was engineered to decrease its transglycosylation activity with the expectation that this would enhance maltose production. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate Trp 177 variants W177F, W177Y, W177L, W177N, and W177S. The transglycosylation activities of the mutant enzymes decreased as the hydrophilicity of the residue at position 177 increased. The mutant enzymes exhibited notable enhancements in maltose production, with a minimum of maltotriose contents of 0.2%, compared with 3.2% for the wild-type enzyme. Detailed characterization of the mutant enzymes suggests that the best of them, W177S, will deliver performance superior to that of the wild-type under industrial conditions. PMID:26597712

  18. Active site loop conformation regulates promiscuous activity in a lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426.

    Yu Zhang

    Full Text Available Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a "hot spot" in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity.

  19. Production of Thermoalkaliphilic Lipase from Geobacillus thermoleovorans DA2 and Application in Leather Industry.

    Abol Fotouh, Deyaa M; Bayoumi, Reda A; Hassan, Mohamed A

    2016-01-01

    Thermophilic and alkaliphilic lipases are meeting a growing global attention as their increased importance in several industrial fields. Over 23 bacterial strains, novel strain with high lipolytic activity was isolated from Southern Sinai, Egypt, and it was identified as Geobacillus thermoleovorans DA2 using 16S rRNA as well as morphological and biochemical features. The lipase was produced in presence of fatty restaurant wastes as an inducing substrate. The optimized conditions for lipase production were recorded to be temperature 60°C, pH 10, and incubation time for 48 hrs. Enzymatic production increased when the organism was grown in a medium containing galactose as carbon source and ammonium phosphate as nitrogen source at concentrations of 1 and 0.5% (w/v), respectively. Moreover, the optimum conditions for lipase production such as substrate concentration, inoculum size, and agitation rate were found to be 10% (w/v), 4% (v/v), and 120 rpm, respectively. The TA lipase with Triton X-100 had the best degreasing agent by lowering the total lipid content to 2.6% as compared to kerosene (7.5%) or the sole crude enzyme (8.9%). It can be concluded that the chemical leather process can be substituted with TA lipase for boosting the quality of leather and reducing the environmental hazards. PMID:26881066

  20. Isolation and characterization of N-acylhomoserine lactonase from the thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus caldoxylosilyticus YS-8.

    Seo, Myung-Ji; Lee, Beom-Seon; Pyun, Yu-Ryang; Park, Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Geobacillus caldoxylosilyticus YS-8, which was isolated from volcanic soil in Indonesia, was found to degrade various N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) with different lengths and acyl side-chain substitutions over a wide temperature range of 30-70 °C. The purified AHL-degrading enzyme showed a single band of 32 kDa, and its N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined to be ANVIKARPKLYVMDN, tentatively suggesting that the AHL-degrading enzyme was AHL lactonase. The AHL-degrading activity of the purified enzyme was maximized at pH 7.5 and 50 °C, and it retained about 50% of its activity even after a heat treatment at 60 °C for 3 h, exhibiting properties consistent with a thermostable enzyme. The mass spectrometric analysis demonstrated that the AHL-degrading enzyme catalyzed lactone ring opening of N-3-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone and N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone by hydrolyzing the lactones and working as an AHL lactonase. PMID:21897031

  1. Characteristics of thermostable amylopullulanase of Geobacillus thermoleovorans and its truncated variants.

    Nisha, M; Satyanarayana, T

    2015-05-01

    The far-UV CD spectroscopic analysis of the secondary structure in the temperature range between 30 and 90°C revealed a compact and thermally stable structure of C-terminal truncated amylopullulanase of Geobacillus thermoleovorans NP33 (gt-apuΔC) with a higher melting temperature [58°C] than G. thermoleovorans NP33 amylopullulanase (gt-apu) [50°C] and the N-terminal truncated amylopullulanase from G. thermoleovorans NP33 (gt-apuΔN) [55°C]. A significant decline in random coils in gt-apuΔC and gt-apuΔN suggested an improvement in conformational stability, and thus, an enhancement in their thermal stability. The improvement in the thermostability of gt-apuΔC was corroborated by the thermodynamic parameters for enzyme inactivation. The Trp fluorescence emission (335 nm) and the acrylamide quenching constant (22.69 M(-1)) of gt-apuΔC indicated that the C-terminal truncation increases the conformational stability of the protein with the deeply buried tryptophan residues. The 8-Anilino Naphthalene Sulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence experiments indicated the unfolding of gt-apu to expose its hydrophobic surface to a greater extent than the gt-apuΔC and gt-apuΔN. PMID:25748845

  2. Analysis of Metabolic Pathways and Fluxes in a Newly Discovered Thermophilic and Ethanol-Tolerant Geobacillus Strain

    Tang, Yinjie J.

    2009-01-01

    A recently discovered thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius M10EXG, ferments a range of C5 (e.g., xylose) and C6 sugars (e.g., glucose) and is tolerant to high ethanol concentrations (10percent, v/v). We have investigated the central metabolism of this bacterium using both in vitro enzyme assays and 13C-based flux analysis to provide insights into the physiological properties of this extremophile and explore its metabolism for bio-ethanol or other bioprocess applications. Ou...

  3. The S-layer from Bacillus stearothermophilus DSM 2358 functions as an adhesion site for a high-molecular-weight amylase.

    Egelseer, E; Schocher, I; Sára, M; Sleytr, U B

    1995-01-01

    The S-layer lattice from Bacillus stearothermophilus DSM 2358 completely covers the cell surface and exhibits oblique symmetry. During growth of B. stearothermophilus DSM 2358 on starch medium, three amylases with molecular weights of 58,000, 98,000, and 184,000 were secreted into the culture fluid, but only the high-molecular-weight enzyme was found to be cell associated. Studies of interactions between cell wall components and amylases revealed no affinity of the high-molecular-weight amyla...

  4. Structure of the fMet-tRNAfMet-binding domain of B.stearothermophilus initiation factor IF2

    Meunier, Sylvie; Spurio, Roberto; Czisch, Michael; Wechselberger, Rainer; Guenneugues, Marc; Gualerzi, Claudio O.; Boelens, Rolf

    2000-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the fMet-tRNAfMet -binding domain of translation initiation factor IF2 from Bacillus stearothermophilus has been determined by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Its structure consists of six antiparallel β-strands, connected via loops, and forms a closed β-barrel similar to domain II of elongation factors EF-Tu and EF-G, despite low sequence homology. Two structures of the ternary complexes of the EF-Tu⋅aminoacyl-tRNA⋅ GDP analogue have been reported and were used to propose and discuss the possible fMet-tRNAfMet-binding site of IF2. PMID:10775275

  5. Structure of the fMet-tRNAfMet-binding domain of B.stearothermophilus initiation factor IF2

    Meunier, Sylvie; Spurio, Roberto; Czisch, Michael; Wechselberger, Rainer; Guenneugues, Marc; GUALERZI, CLAUDIO O.; Boelens, Rolf

    2000-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the fMet-tRNAfMet -binding domain of translation initiation factor IF2 from Bacillus stearothermophilus has been determined by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Its structure consists of six antiparallel β-strands, connected via loops, and forms a closed β-barrel similar to domain II of elongation factors EF-Tu and EF-G, despite low sequence homology. Two structures of the ternary complexes of the EF-Tu⋅aminoacyl-tRNA⋅ GDP analogue have been reported and were ...

  6. Identification of novel thermostable taurine-pyruvate transaminase from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans for chiral amine synthesis.

    Chen, Yujie; Yi, Dong; Jiang, Shuiqin; Wei, Dongzhi

    2016-04-01

    ω-Transaminases (ω-TAs) are one of the most popular candidate enzymes in the biosynthesis of chiral amines. Determination of yet unidentified ω-TAs is important to broaden their potential for synthetic application. Taurine-pyruvate TA (TPTA, EC 2.6.1.77) is an ω-TA belonging to class III of TAs. In this study, we cloned a novel thermostable TPTA from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans (TPTAgth) and overexpressed it in Escherichia coli. The enzyme showed the highest activity at pH 9.0 and 65 °C, with remarkable thermostability and tolerance toward organic solvents. Its K M and v max values for taurine were 5.3 mM and 0.28 μmol s(-1) mg(-1), respectively. Determination of substrate tolerance indicated its broad donor and acceptor ranges for unnatural substrates. Notably, the enzyme showed relatively good activity toward ketoses, suggesting its potential for catalyzing the asymmetric synthesis of chiral amino alcohols. The active site of TPTAgth was identified by performing protein sequence alignment, three-dimensional structure simulation, and coenzyme pyridoxamine phosphate docking. The protein sequence and structure of TPTAgth were similar to those of TAs belonging to the 3N5M subfamily. Its active site was found to be its special large pocket and substrate tunnel. In addition, TPTAgth showed a unique mechanism of sulfonate/α-carboxylate recognition contributed by Arg163 and Gln160. We also determined the protein sequence fingerprint of TPTAs in the 3N5M subfamily, which involved Arg163 and Gln160 and seven additional residues from 413 to 419 and lacked Phe/Tyr22, Phe85, and Arg409. PMID:26577674

  7. CLONING, PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF HALOTOLERANT XYLANASE FROM Geobacillus Thermodenitrificans C5

    Muhammad Irfan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available High levels of extracellular xylanase activity (994.50 IU/ml produced by Geobacillus thermodenitrificans C5 originated gene was detected when it was expressed in E. coli BL21 host. Thermostable xylanase (GthC5Xyl was purified to homogeneity and showed a molecular mass of approximately 44 kDa according to SDS-PAGE. The specific activity of the purified GthC5Xyl was up to 1243.125IU/mg with a 9.89-fold purification. The activity of GthC5Xyl was stimulated by CoCl2, MnSO4, CuSO4, MnCl2 but was inhibited by FeSO4, Hg, CaSO4. GthC5Xyl showed resistant to SDS, Tween 20, Triton X-100, β- Mercaptoethanol, PMSF, DTT, NEM and DEPC, SDS, and EDTA. A greater affinity for oat spelt xylan was exhibited by GthC5Xyl with maximum enzymatic activity at 60°C and 6.0 pH. The activity portrayed by GthC5Xyl was found to be acellulytic with stability at high temperature (70°C-80°C and low pH (4.0 to 8.0. Xylobiose and xylopentose were the end products of proficient oat spelt xylanase hydrolysis by GthC5Xyl. High SDS resistance and broader stability of GthC5Xyl proves it to be worthy of impending application in numerous industrial processes especially textile, detergents and animal feed industry.

  8. Characterization of a thermostable raw-starch hydrolyzing α-amylase from deep-sea thermophile Geobacillus sp.

    Jiang, Tao; Cai, Menghao; Huang, Mengmeng; He, Hao; Lu, Jian; Zhou, Xiangshan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-10-01

    A deep-sea thermophile, Geobacillus sp. 4j, was identified to grow on starch and produce thermostable amylase. N-terminally truncated form of Geobacillus sp. 4j α-amylase (Gs4j-amyA) was fused at its N-terminal end with the signal peptide of outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of Escherichia coli. The enzyme was over-expressed in E. coli BL21 with a maximum extracellular production of 130U/ml in shake flask. The yield of the transformant increased 22-fold as compared with that of the wild strain. The recombinant enzyme purified to apparent homogeneity by metal-affinity chromatography, exhibited a molecular mass of 62kDa. It displayed the maximal activity at 60-65°C and pH 5.5. Its half-life (t1/2) at 80°C was 4.25h with a temperature deactivation energy of 166.3kJ/mol. Compared to three commonly used commercial α-amylases, the Gs4j-amyA exhibited similar thermostable performance to BLA but better than BAA and BSA. It also showed a universally efficient raw starch hydrolysis performance superior to commercial α-amylases at an acidic pH approaching nature of starch slurry. As a new acidic-resistant thermostable α-amylase, it has the potential to bypass the industrial gelatinization step in raw starch hydrolysis. PMID:26073094

  9. Fluorimetric Detection of a Bacillus stearothermophilus Spore-Bound Enzyme, α-d-Glucosidase, for Rapid Indication of Flash Sterilization Failure

    Vesley, Donald; Langholz, Ann C.; Rohlfing, Stephen R.; Foltz, William E.

    1992-01-01

    A biological indicator based on fluorimetric detection within 60 min of a Bacillus stearothermophilus spore-bound enzyme, α-d-glucosidase, has been developed. Results indicate that the enzyme survived slightly longer than spores observed after 24 h of incubation. The new system shows promise for evaluating flash sterilization cycles within 60 min compared with conventional 24-h systems.

  10. Transglycosylation reactions of Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase with acarbose and various acceptors

    It was observed that Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase cleaved the first glycosidic bond of acarbose to produce glucose and a pseudotrisaccharide (PTS) that was transferred to C-6 of the glucose to give an α-(1-6) glycosidic linkage and the formation of isoacarbose. The addition of a number of different carbohydrates to the digest gave transfer products in which PTS was primarily attached α-(1-6) to d-glucose, d-mannose, d-galactose, and methyl α-d-glucopyranoside. With d-fructopyranose and d-xylopyranose, PTS was linked α-(1-5) and α-(1-4), respectively. PTS was primarily transferred to C-6 of the nonreducing residue of maltose, cellobiose, lactose, and gentiobiose. Lesser amounts of α-(1-3) and/or α-(1-4) transfer products were also observed for these carbohydrate acceptors. The major transfer product to sucrose gave PTS linked α-(1-4) to the glucose residue. α,α-Trehalose gave two major products with PTS linked α-(1-6) and α-(1-4). Maltitol gave two major products with PTS linked α-(1-6) and α-(1-4) to the glucopyranose residue. Raffinose gave two major products with PTS linked α-(1-6) and α-(1-4) to the d-galactopyranose residue. Maltotriose gave two major products with PTS linked α-(1-6) and α-(1-4) to the nonreducing end glucopyranose residue. Xylitol gave PTS linked α-(1-5) as the major product and d-glucitol gave PTS linked α-(1-6) as the only product. The structures of the transfer products were determined using thin layer-chromatography, high-performance ion chromatography, enzyme hydrolysis, methylation analysis and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The best acceptor was gentiobiose, followed closely by maltose and cellobiose, and the weakest acceptor was d-glucitol. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  11. Methanotrophic bacteria.

    Hanson, R S; Hanson, T. E.

    1996-01-01

    Methane-utilizing bacteria (methanotrophs) are a diverse group of gram-negative bacteria that are related to other members of the Proteobacteria. These bacteria are classified into three groups based on the pathways used for assimilation of formaldehyde, the major source of cell carbon, and other physiological and morphological features. The type I and type X methanotrophs are found within the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria and employ the ribulose monophosphate pathway for formaldehy...

  12. Structure of the fMet-tRNA(fMet)-binding domain of B. stearothermophilus initiation factor IF2.

    Meunier, S; Spurio, R; Czisch, M; Wechselberger, R; Guenneugues, M; Gualerzi, C O; Boelens, R

    2000-04-17

    The three-dimensional structure of the fMet-tRNA(fMet) -binding domain of translation initiation factor IF2 from Bacillus stearothermophilus has been determined by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Its structure consists of six antiparallel beta-strands, connected via loops, and forms a closed beta-barrel similar to domain II of elongation factors EF-Tu and EF-G, despite low sequence homology. Two structures of the ternary complexes of the EF-Tu small middle dotaminoacyl-tRNA small middle dot GDP analogue have been reported and were used to propose and discuss the possible fMet-tRNA(fMet)-binding site of IF2. PMID:10775275

  13. Catalytic properties of maltogenic α-amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus immobilized onto poly(urethane urea) microparticles.

    Straksys, Antanas; Kochane, Tatjana; Budriene, Saulute

    2016-11-15

    The immobilization of maltogenic α-amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (BsMa) onto novel porous poly(urethane urea) (PUU) microparticles synthesized from poly(vinyl alcohol) and isophorone diisocyanate was performed by covalent attachment to free isocyanate groups from PUU microparticles, or by physical adsorption of enzyme onto the surface of the carrier. The influence of structure, surface area and porosity of microparticles on the catalytic properties of immobilized BsMa was evaluated. The highest efficiency of immobilization of BsMa was found to be 72%. Optimal activity of immobilized BsMa was found to have increased by 10°C compared with the native enzyme. Influence of concentration of sodium chloride on activity of immobilized BsMa was evaluated. High storage and thermal stability and reusability for starch hydrolysis of immobilized enzyme were obtained. Immobilized BsMa has a great potential for biotechnology. PMID:27283635

  14. Big bacteria

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria......, Thiomargarita namibiensis, with a diameter of 750 mum. All bacteria, including those that swim around in the environment, obtain their food molecules by molecular diffusion. Only the fastest and largest swimmers known, Thiovulum majus, are able to significantly increase their food supply by motility and by...... actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria, the...

  15. Anaerobic bacteria

    Brook I, Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 297. Stedman's Online ...

  16. Isolation and complete genome sequence of the thermophilic Geobacillus sp. 12AMOR1 from an Arctic deep-sea hydrothermal vent site.

    Wissuwa, Juliane; Stokke, Runar; Fedøy, Anita-Elin; Lian, Kjersti; Smalås, Arne Oskar; Steen, Ida Helene

    2016-01-01

    Members of the genus Geobacillus have been isolated from a wide variety of habitats worldwide and are the subject for targeted enzyme utilization in various industrial applications. Here we report the isolation and complete genome sequence of the thermophilic starch-degrading Geobacillus sp. 12AMOR1. The strain 12AMOR1 was isolated from deep-sea hot sediment at the Jan Mayen hydrothermal Vent Site. Geobacillus sp. 12AMOR1 consists of a 3,410,035 bp circular chromosome and a 32,689 bp plasmid with a G + C content of 52 % and 47 %, respectively. The genome comprises 3323 protein-coding genes, 88 tRNA species and 10 rRNA operons. The isolate grows on a suite of sugars, complex polysaccharides and proteinous carbon sources. Accordingly, a versatility of genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZy) and peptidases were identified in the genome. Expression, purification and characterization of an enzyme of the glycoside hydrolase family 13 revealed a starch-degrading capacity and high thermal stability with a melting temperature of 76.4 °C. Altogether, the data obtained point to a new isolate from a marine hydrothermal vent with a large bioprospecting potential. PMID:26913091

  17. [Isolation of endophytic bacteria in potato and test of antagonistic action to bacterial ring rot of potato].

    Cui, Lin; Sun, Zhen; Tian, Hong Xian; Wang, Li Qin; Xu, Huei Yuen; Sun, Fu Zai; Yuan, Jun

    2002-12-01

    In this study, two hundred and forty bacterial strains were isolated from inner tissue of potato tubers collected from DaTong, TaiYuan and Inner Mongolia Autonomous regions. On the basis of antagonistic examination in vitro, fifty and five bacteria strains were characterized for antagonistic bacteria to ring rot of potato. It was 22.9 percentage of all bacteria strains. The biggest radius of suppression circle was 13 mm. Nine strains were chosen for their suppression of bacterial ring rot, blackleg and dry rot of potato. These strains were bacteriologically ideatified. Strain 118 was Pseudomonas fluorescens biovar V. Strain 110 was Bacillus pumilus. Strain 085 was Bacillus stearothermophilus. Strain 069 was Erwinia herbicola. Strain 043 was Xanthomomas fragariae. Strain 116 was Curtobacterium. Strains A-10' and T3 were Bacillus. Strain H1-6 was Pseudomonas fluorescens. PMID:15346992

  18. Isolation and Characterization of Thermophilic Cellulase-Producing Bacteria from Empty Fruit Bunches-Palm Oil Mill Effluent Compost

    Azhari S. Baharuddin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problems statement: Lack of information on locally isolated cellulase-producing bacterium in thermophilic compost using a mixture of Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB and Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME as composting materials. Approach: The isolation of microbes from compost heap was conducted at day 7 of composting process where the mixture of composting materials consisted of 45.8% cellulose, 17.1% hemicellulose and 28.3% lignin content. The temperature, pH and moisture content of the composting pile at day 7 treatment were 58.3, 8.1 and 65.5°C, respectively. The morphological analysis of the isolated microbes was conducted using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM and Gram stain method. The congo red test was conducted in order to detect 1% CMC agar degradation activities. Total genomic DNAs were extracted from approximately 1.0 g of mixed compost and amplified by using PCR primers. The PCR product was sequent to identify the nearest relatives of 16S rRNA genes. The localization of bacteria chromosomes was determined by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH analysis. Results: Single isolated bacteria species was successfully isolated from Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB-Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME compost at thermophilic stage. Restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles of the DNAs coding for the 16S rRNAs with the phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolated bacteria from EFB-POME thermophilic compost gave the highest homology (99% with similarity to Geobacillus pallidus. The strain was spore forming bacteria and able to grow at 60°C with pH 7. Conclusion: Thermophilic bacteria strain, Geobacillus pallidus was successfully isolated from Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB and Palm Oil Mil Effluent (POME compost and characterized.

  19. A chimeric α-amylase engineered from Bacillus acidicola and Geobacillus thermoleovorans with improved thermostability and catalytic efficiency.

    Parashar, Deepak; Satyanarayana, T

    2016-04-01

    The α-amylase (Ba-amy) of Bacillus acidicola was fused with DNA fragments encoding partial N- and C-terminal region of thermostable α-amylase gene of Geobacillus thermoleovorans (Gt-amy). The chimeric enzyme (Ba-Gt-amy) expressed in Escherichia coli displays marked increase in catalytic efficiency [K cat: 4 × 10(4) s(-1) and K cat/K m: 5 × 10(4) mL(-1) mg(-1) s(-1)] and higher thermostability than Ba-amy. The melting temperature (T m) of Ba-Gt-amy (73.8 °C) is also higher than Ba-amy (62 °C), and the CD spectrum analysis revealed the stability of the former, despite minor alteration in secondary structure. Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic analysis suggests that the adsorption of Ba-Gt-amy onto raw starch is more favourable than Ba-amy. Ba-Gt-amy is thus a suitable biocatalyst for raw starch saccharification at sub-gelatinization temperatures because of its acid stability, thermostability and Ca(2+) independence, and better than the other known bacterial acidic α-amylases. PMID:26790418

  20. Improving the thermostability and enhancing the Ca(2+) binding of the maltohexaose-forming α-amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Li, Zhu; Duan, Xuguo; Wu, Jing

    2016-03-20

    The thermostability of the maltohexaose-forming α-amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (AmyMH) without added Ca(2+) was improved through structure-based rational design in this study. Through comparison of a homologous model structure of AmyMH with the crystal structure of the thermostable α-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis, Ser242, which located at the beginning of fourth α-helix of the central (β/α)8 barrel was selected for mutation to improve thermostability. In addition, an amide-containing side chain (Asn193) and a loop in domain B (ΔIG mutation), which have been proven to be important for thermostability in corresponding position of other α-amylases, were also investigated. Five mutants carrying the mutations ΔIG, N193F, S242A, ΔIG/N193F, and ΔIG/N193F/S242A were generated and their proteins characterized. The most thermostable mutant protein, ΔIG/N193F/S242A, exhibited a 26-fold improvement in half-life at 95°C compared to the wild-type enzyme without added Ca(2+). Mutant ΔIG/N193F/S242A also exhibited substantially better activity and stability in the presence of the chelator EDTA, demonstrating enhanced Ca(2+) binding. These results suggest that mutant ΔIG/N193F/S242A has potential for use in the industrial liquefaction of starch. PMID:26869314

  1. Rumen bacteria

    The rumen is the most extensively studied gut community and is characterized by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interactions. This complex, mixed microbial culture is comprised of prokaryote organisms including methane-producing archaebacteria, eukaryote organisms, such as ciliate and flagellate protozoa, anaerobic phycomycete fungi and bacteriophage. Bacteria are predominant (up to 1011 viable cells per g comprising 200 species) but a variety of ciliate protozoa occur widely (104-106/g distributed over 25 genera). The anaerobic fungi are also widely distributed (zoospore population densities of 102-104/g distributed over 5 genera). The occurrence of bacteriophage is well documented (107-109 particles/g). This section focuses primarily on the widely used methods for the cultivation and the enumeration of rumen microbes, especially bacteria, which grow under anaerobic conditions. Methods that can be used to measure hydrolytic enzymes (cellulases, xylanases, amylases and proteinases) are also described, along with cell harvesting and fractionation procedures. Brief reference is also made to fungi and protozoa, but detailed explanations for culturing and enumerating these microbes is presented in Chapters 2.4 and 2.5

  2. Analysis of Metabolic Pathways and Fluxes in a Newly Discovered Thermophilic and Ethanol-Tolerant Geobacillus Strain

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Sapra, Rajat; Joyner, Dominique; Hazen, Terry C.; Myers, Samuel; Reichmuth, David; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-01-20

    A recently discovered thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius M10EXG, ferments a range of C5 (e.g., xylose) and C6 sugars (e.g., glucose) and istolerant to high ethanol concentrations (10percent, v/v). We have investigated the central metabolism of this bacterium using both in vitro enzyme assays and 13C-based flux analysis to provide insights into the physiological properties of this extremophile and explore its metabolism for bio-ethanol or other bioprocess applications. Our findings show that glucose metabolism in G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG proceeds via glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the TCA cycle; the Entner?Doudoroff pathway and transhydrogenase activity were not detected. Anaplerotic reactions (including the glyoxylate shunt, pyruvate carboxylase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) were active, but fluxes through those pathways could not be accuratelydetermined using amino acid labeling. When growth conditions were switched from aerobic to micro-aerobic conditions, fluxes (based on a normalized glucose uptake rate of 100 units (g DCW)-1 h-1) through the TCA cycle and oxidative pentose phosphate pathway were reduced from 64+-3 to 25+-2 and from 30+-2 to 19+-2, respectively. The carbon flux under micro-aerobic growth was directed formate. Under fully anerobic conditions, G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG used a mixed acid fermentation process and exhibited a maximum ethanol yield of 0.38+-0.07 mol mol-1 glucose. In silico flux balance modeling demonstrates that lactate and acetate production from G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG reduces the maximum ethanol yieldby approximately threefold, thus indicating that both pathways should be modified to maximize ethanol production.

  3. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the BseCI DNA methyltransferase from Bacillus stearothermophilus in complex with its cognate DNA

    The DNA methyltransferase M.BseCI from B. stearothermophilus was crystallized as a complex with its cognate DNA. Crystals belong to space group P6 and diffract to 2.5 Å resolution at a synchrotron source. The DNA methyltransferase M.BseCI from Bacillus stearothermophilus (EC 2.1.1.72), a 579-amino-acid enzyme, methylates the N6 atom of the 3′ adenine in the sequence 5′-ATCGAT-3′. M.BseCI was crystallized in complex with its cognate DNA. The crystals were found to belong to the hexagonal space group P6, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 87.0, c = 156.1 Å, β = 120.0° and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Two complete data sets were collected at wavelengths of 1.1 and 2.0 Å to 2.5 and 2.8 Å resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation at 100 K

  4. Back To Bacteria.

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores new research about bacteria. Discusses bacterial genomes, archaea, unusual environments, evolution, pathogens, bacterial movement, biofilms, bacteria in the body, and a bacterial obsession. Contains 29 references. (JRH)

  5. Higher-order structure in the 3'-terminal domain VI of the 23 S ribosomal RNAs from Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus

    Garrett, R A; Christensen, A; Douthwaite, S

    1984-01-01

    ribonuclease from Naja naja oxiana, and the relatively unstructured and accessible sequences were detected with the single-strand-specific ribonucleases A, T1 and T2. The data enabled the three secondary structural models, proposed for the E. coli 23 S RNAs, to be examined critically and it was concluded that......An experimental approach was used to determine, and compare, the higher-order structure within domain VI of the 23 S ribosomal RNAs from Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus. This domain, which encompasses approximately 300 nucleotides at the 3' end of the RNAs, consists of two large...... ribosomes of flowering plants. The structure of domain VI within the eubacterial RNAs was probed with chemical reagents in order to establish the degree of stacking and/or accessibility of each adenosine, cytidine and guanosine residue; the double-helical segments were localized with the cobra venom...

  6. Mechanistic Diversity in the RuBisCO Superfamily: The Enolase in the Methionine Salvage Pathway in Geobacillus kaustophilus

    D-Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), the most abundant enzyme, is the paradigm member of the recently recognized mechanistically diverse RuBisCO superfamily. The RuBisCO reaction is initiated by abstraction of the proton from C3 of the D-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate substrate by a carbamate oxygen of carboxylated Lys 201 (spinach enzyme). Heterofunctional homologues of RuBisCO found in species of Bacilli catalyze the tautomerization ('enolization') of 2,3-diketo-5-methylthiopentane 1-phosphate (DK-MTP 1-P) in the methionine salvage pathway in which 5-methylthio-D-ribose (MTR) derived from 5'-methylthioadenosine is converted to methionine (Ashida, H., Saito, Y., Kojima, C., Kobayashi, K., Ogasawara, N., and Yokota, A. (2003) A functional link between RuBisCO-like protein of Bacillus and photosynthetic RuBisCO, Science 302, 286-290]. The reaction catalyzed by this 'enolase' is accomplished by abstraction of a proton from C1 of the DK-MTP 1-P substrate to form the tautomerized product, a conjugated enol. Because the RuBisCO- and 'enolase'-catalyzed reactions differ in the regiochemistry of proton abstraction but are expected to share stabilization of an enolate anion intermediate by coordination to an active site Mg2+, we sought to establish structure-function relationships for the 'enolase' reaction so that the structural basis for the functional diversity could be established. We determined the stereochemical course of the reaction catalyzed by the 'enolases' from Bacillus subtilis and Geobacillus kaustophilus. Using stereospecifically deuterated samples of an alternate substrate derived from D-ribose (5-OH group instead of the 5-methylthio group in MTR) as well as of the natural DK-MTP 1-P substrate, we determined that the 'enolase'-catalyzed reaction involves abstraction of the 1-proS proton. We also determined the structure of the activated 'enolase' from G. kaustophilus (carboxylated on Lys 173) liganded with Mg2+ and 2,3-diketohexane 1

  7. Abiotic and microbiotic factors controlling biofilm formation by thermophilic sporeformers.

    Zhao, Yu; Caspers, Martien P M; Metselaar, Karin I; de Boer, Paulo; Roeselers, Guus; Moezelaar, Roy; Nierop Groot, Masja; Montijn, Roy C; Abee, Tjakko; Kort, Remco

    2013-09-01

    One of the major concerns in the production of dairy concentrates is the risk of contamination by heat-resistant spores from thermophilic bacteria. In order to acquire more insight in the composition of microbial communities occurring in the dairy concentrate industry, a bar-coded 16S amplicon sequencing analysis was carried out on milk, final products, and fouling samples taken from dairy concentrate production lines. The analysis of these samples revealed the presence of DNA from a broad range of bacterial taxa, including a majority of mesophiles and a minority of (thermophilic) spore-forming bacteria. Enrichments of fouling samples at 55°C showed the accumulation of predominantly Brevibacillus and Bacillus, whereas enrichments at 65°C led to the accumulation of Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus species. Bacterial population analysis of biofilms grown using fouling samples as an inoculum indicated that both Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus preferentially form biofilms on surfaces at air-liquid interfaces rather than on submerged surfaces. Three of the most potent biofilm-forming strains isolated from the dairy factory industrial samples, including Geobacillus thermoglucosidans, Geobacillus stearothermophilus, and Anoxybacillus flavithermus, have been characterized in detail with respect to their growth conditions and spore resistance. Strikingly, Geobacillus thermoglucosidans, which forms the most thermostable spores of these three species, is not able to grow in dairy intermediates as a pure culture but appears to be dependent for growth on other spoilage organisms present, probably as a result of their proteolytic activity. These results underscore the importance of abiotic and microbiotic factors in niche colonization in dairy factories, where the presence of thermophilic sporeformers can affect the quality of end products. PMID:23851093

  8. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1995-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  9. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds Posted April 2, 2014 Your ... hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health ...

  10. Bacteria and lignin degradation

    Jing LI; Hongli YUAN; Jinshui YANG

    2009-01-01

    Lignin is both the most abundant aromatic (phenolic) polymer and the second most abundant raw material.It is degraded and modified by bacteria in the natural world,and bacteria seem to play a leading role in decomposing lignin in aquatic ecosystems.Lignin-degrading bacteria approach the polymer by mechanisms such as tunneling,erosion,and cavitation.With the advantages of immense environmental adaptability and biochemical versatility,bacteria deserve to be studied for their ligninolytic potential.

  11. The prevalence and control of Bacillus and related spore-forming bacteria in the dairy industry

    Nidhi eGopal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Milk produced in udder cells is sterile but due to its high nutrient content, it can be a good growth substrate for contaminating bacteria. The quality of milk is monitored via somatic cell counts and total bacterial counts, with prescribed regulatory limits to ensure quality and safety. Bacterial contaminants can cause disease, or spoilage of milk and its secondary products. Aerobic spore-forming bacteria, such as those from the genera Sporosarcina, Paenisporosarcina, Brevibacillus, Paenibacillus, Geobacillus and Bacillus, are a particular concern in this regard as they are able to survive industrial pasteurisation and form biofilms within pipes and stainless steel equipment. These single or multiple-species biofilms become a reservoir of spoilage microorganisms and a cycle of contamination can be initiated. Indeed, previous studies have highlighted that these microorganisms are highly prevalent in dead ends, corners, cracks, crevices, gaskets, valves and the joints of stainless steel equipment used in the dairy manufacturing plants. Hence, adequate monitoring and control measures are essential to prevent spoilage and ensure consumer safety. Common controlling approaches include specific cleaning-in-place processes, chemical and biological biocides and other novel methods. In this review, we highlight the problems caused by these microorganisms, and discuss issues relating to their prevalence, monitoring thereof and control with respect to the dairy industry.

  12. Cellular viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultivated in association with contaminates bacteria of alcoholic fermentation

    The aim of this work was to study the influence of the bacteria Bacillus and Lactobacillus, as well as their metabolic products, in reduction of cellular viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, when in mixed culture of yeast and active and treated bacteria. Also was to evaluated an alternative medium (MCC) for the cultivation of bacteria and yeast, constituted of sugarcane juice diluted to 5 deg Brix and supplemented with yeast extract and peptone. The bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus plantarum were cultivated in association with yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain Y-904) for 72 h on 32 deg C, under agitation. The cellular viability, budding rate and population of S. cerevisiae, the total acidity, volatile acidity and pH of culture were determined from 0, 24, 48 e 72 h of mixed culture. Also were determined the initial and final of microorganism population across the pour plate method, in traditional culture medium (PCA for Bacillus, MRS-agar for Lactobacillus and YEPD-agar for yeast S. cerevisiae) and in medium constituted of sugarcane juice. The bacteria cultures were treated by heat sterilization (120 deg C for 20 minutes), antibacterial agent (Kamoran HJ in concentration 3,0 ppm) or irradiation (radiation gamma, with doses of 5,0 kGy for Lactobacillus and 15,0 kGy for Bacillus). The results of the present research showed that just the culture mediums more acids (with higher concentrations of total and volatile acidity, and smaller values of pH), contaminated with active bacteria L. fermentum and B. subtilis, caused reduction on yeast cellular viability. Except the bacteria B. subtilis treated with radiation, the others bacteria treated by different procedures (heat, radiation e antibacterial) did not cause reduction on yeast cellular viability and population, indicating that the isolated presence of the cellular metabolic of theses bacteria was not enough to reduce the

  13. Identification and characterisation of oil sludge degrading bacteria isolated from compost

    Ubani Onyedikachi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Compounds present in oil sludge such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are known to be cytotoxic, mutagenic and potentially carcinogenic. Microorganisms including bacteria and fungi have been reported to degrade oil sludge components to innocuous compounds such as carbon dioxide, water and salts. In the present study, we isolated different bacteria with PAH-degrading capabilities from compost prepared from oil sludge and animal manures. These bacteria were isolated on a mineral base medium and mineral salt agar plates. A total of 31 morphologically distinct isolates were carefully selected from 5 different compost treatments for identification using polymerase chain reaction (PCR of the 16S rRNA gene with specific primers (universal forward 16S-P1 PCR and reverse 16S-P2 PCR. The amplicons were sequenced and sequences were compared with the known nucleotides from the GenBank. The phylogenetic analyses of the isolates showed that they belong to 3 different clades; Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. These bacteria identified were closely related to the genera Bacillus, Arthrobacter, Staphylococcus, Brevibacterium, Variovorax, Paenibacillus, Ralstonia and Geobacillus. The results showed that Bacillus species were predominant in all composts. Based on the results of the degradation of the PAHs in the composts and results of previous studies on bacterial degradation of hydrocarbons in oil, the characteristics of these bacterial isolates suggests that they may be responsible for the breakdown of PAHs of different molecular weights in the composts. Thus, they may be potentially useful for bioremediation of oil sludge during compost bioremediation.

  14. Structure of the thermophilic l-Arabinose isomerase from Geobacillus kaustophilus reveals metal-mediated intersubunit interactions for activity and thermostability.

    Choi, Jin Myung; Lee, Yong-Jik; Cao, Thinh-Phat; Shin, Sun-Mi; Park, Min-Kyu; Lee, Han-Seung; di Luccio, Eric; Kim, Seong-Bo; Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Sung Haeng; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2016-04-15

    Thermophilic l-arabinose isomerase (AI), which catalyzes the interconversion of l-arabinose and l-ribulose, can be used to produce d-tagatose, a sugar substitute, from d-galactose. Unlike mesophilic AIs, thermophilic AIs are highly dependent on divalent metal ions for their catalytic activity and thermostability at elevated temperatures. However, the molecular basis underlying the substrate preferences and metal requirements of multimeric AIs remains unclear. Here we report the first crystal structure of the apo and holo forms of thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus AI (GKAI) in hexamer form. The structures, including those of GKAI in complex with l-arabitol, and biochemical analyses revealed not only how the substrate-binding site of GKAI is formed through displacement of residues at the intersubunit interface when it is bound to Mn(2+), but also revealed the water-mediated H-bonding networks that contribute to the structural integrity of GKAI during catalysis. These observations suggest metal-mediated isomerization reactions brought about by intersubunit interactions at elevated temperatures are responsible for the distinct active site features that promote the substrate specificity and thermostability of thermophilic AIs. PMID:26946941

  15. A putative Type IIS restriction endonuclease GeoICI from Geobacillus sp.--A robust, thermostable alternative to mezophilic prototype BbvI.

    Zebrowska, Joanna; Zolnierkiewicz, Olga; Skowron, Marta A; Zylicz-Stachula, Agnieszka; Jezewska-Frackowiak, Joanna; Skowron, Piotr M

    2016-03-01

    Screening of extreme environments in search for novel microorganisms may lead to the discovery of robust enzymes with either new substrate specificities or thermostable equivalents of those already found in mesophiles, better suited for biotechnology applications. Isolates from Iceland geysers' biofilms, exposed to a broad range of temperatures, from ambient to close to water boiling point, were analysed for the presence of DNA-interacting proteins, including restriction endonucleases (REases). GeoICI, a member of atypical Type IIS REases, is the most thermostable isoschizomer of the prototype BbvI, recognizing/cleaving 5'-GCAGC(N8/12)-3'DNA sequences. As opposed to the unstable prototype, which cleaves DNA at 30°C, GeoICI is highly active at elevated temperatures, up to 73°C and over a very wide salt concentration range. Recognition/cleavage sites were determined by: (i) digestion of plasmid and bacteriophage lambda DNA (Λ); (ii) cleavage of custom PCR substrates, (iii) run-off sequencing of GeoICI cleavage products and (iv) shotgun cloning and sequencing of Λ DNA fragmented with GeoICI. Geobacillus sp. genomic DNA was PCR-screened for the presence of other specialized REases-MTases and as a result, another putative REase- MTase, GeoICII, related to the Thermus sp. family of bifunctional REases-methyltransferases (MTases) was detected. PMID:26949085

  16. Improving production of hyperthermostable and high maltose-forming alpha-amylase by an extreme thermophile Geobacillus thermoleovorans using response surface methodology and its applications.

    Uma Maheswar Rao, J L; Satyanarayana, T

    2007-01-01

    By cultivating Geobacillus thermoleovorans in shake flasks containing cane molasses medium at 70 degrees C, the fermentation variables were optimized by 'one variable at a time' approach followed by response surface methodology (RSM). The statistical model was obtained by central composite design (CCD) using three variables (cane-molasses, urea and inoculum density). An overall 1.6- and 2.1-fold increase in enzyme production was achieved in the optimized medium in shake flasks and fermenter, respectively. The alpha-amylase titre increased significantly in cane-molasses medium (60 U ml(-1)) as compared to that in the synthetic medium (26 U ml(-1)). Thus the cost of enzyme produced in cane molasses medium (0.823 euros per million U) was much lower than that produced in the synthetic starch-yeast extract-tryptone medium (18.52 euros per million U). The shelf life of bread was improved by supplementing dough with alpha-amylase, and thus, the enzyme was found to be useful in preventing the staling of bread. Reducing sugars liberated from 20% and 30% raw pearl millet starch were fermented to ethanol; ethanol production levels attained were 35.40 and 28.0 g l(-1), respectively. PMID:16473003

  17. Characterization and multiple applications of a highly thermostable and Ca²⁺-independent amylopullulanase of the extreme thermophile Geobacillus thermoleovorans.

    Nisha, M; Satyanarayana, T

    2014-12-01

    The amylopullulanase of Geobacillus thermoleovorans NP33 (apu105) is Ca(2+)-independent with a molecular mass of 105 kDa and optimum activity at 80 °C and pH 7.0. The apu105 is extremely thermostable with T 1/2 of 7.8 h at 90 °C and hydrolyzes starch, pullulan, and malto-oligosaccharides, but not panose and cyclodextrins. The low K m values of apu105 (starch, pullulan, amylose, and amylopectin) indicates higher affinity of apu105 than others. The action of the enzyme on mixed substrates (starch and pullulan) confirmed the presence of only one active site for cleaving both α-1,4- and α-1,6- glycosidic linkages. The raw starches are efficiently hydrolyzed into glucose, maltose, and malto-oligosaccharides. Two-step starch saccharification involving pretreatment with apu105 followed by glucoamylase enhanced glucose yield. The supplementation of whole wheat dough with apu105 markedly enhanced the loaf volume, shelf-life, and the texture of bread. The enzyme is compatible with detergents and useful in desizing of cotton fabrics. PMID:25267353

  18. Characterization of recombinant amylopullulanase (gt-apu) and truncated amylopullulanase (gt-apuT) of the extreme thermophile Geobacillus thermoleovorans NP33 and their action in starch saccharification.

    Nisha, M; Satyanarayana, T

    2013-07-01

    A gene encoding amylopullulanase (gt-apu) of the extremely thermophilic Geobacillus thermoleovorans NP33 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene has an open reading frame of 4,965 bp that encodes a protein of 1,655 amino acids with molecular mass of 182 kDa. The six conserved regions, characteristic of GH13 family, have been detected in gt-apu. The recombinant enzyme has only one active site for α-amylase and pullulanase activities based on the enzyme kinetic analyses in a system that contains starch as well as pullulan as competing substrates and response to inhibitors. The end-product analysis confirmed that this is an endoacting enzyme. The specific enzyme activities for α-amylase and pullulanase of the truncated amylopullulanase (gt-apuT) are higher than gt-apu. Both enzymes exhibited similar temperature (60 °C) and pH (7.0) optima, although gt-apuT possessed a higher thermostability than gt-apu. The overall catalytic efficiency (K(cat)/K(m)) of gt-apuT is greater than that of gt-apu, with almost similar substrate specificities. The C-terminal region of gt-apu appeared to be non-essential, and furthermore, it negatively affects the substrate binding and stability of the enzyme. PMID:23132347

  19. A putative Type IIS restriction endonuclease GeoICI from Geobacillus sp. – A robust, thermostable alternative to mezophilic prototype BbvI

    Joanna Zebrowska; Olga Zołnierkiewicz; Marta A Skowron; Agnieszka Zylicz-Stachula; Joanna Jezewska-Frackowiak; Piotr M Skowron

    2016-03-01

    Screening of extreme environments in search for novel microorganisms may lead to the discovery of robust enzymes with either new substrate specificities or thermostable equivalents of those already found in mesophiles, better suited for biotechnology applications. Isolates from Iceland geysers’ biofilms, exposed to a broad range of temperatures, from ambient to close to water boiling point, were analysed for the presence of DNA-interacting proteins, including restriction endonucleases (REases). GeoICI, a member of atypical Type IIS REases, is the most thermostable isoschizomer of the prototype BbvI, recognizing/cleaving 5′-GCAGC(N8/12)-3′ DNA sequences. As opposed to the unstable prototype, which cleaves DNA at 30°C, GeoICI is highly active at elevated temperatures, up to 73°C and over a very wide salt concentration range. Recognition/cleavage sites were determined by: (i) digestion of plasmid and bacteriophage lambda DNA (λ); (ii) cleavage of custom PCR substrates, (iii) run-off sequencing of GeoICI cleavage products and (iv) shotgun cloning and sequencing of λ DNA fragmented with GeoICI. Geobacillus sp. genomic DNA was PCR-screened for the presence of other specialized REases-MTases and as a result, another putative REase-MTase, GeoICII, related to the Thermus sp. family of bifunctional REases-methyltransferases (MTases) was detected.

  20. C-Terminal proline-rich sequence broadens the optimal temperature and pH ranges of recombinant xylanase from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans C5.

    Irfan, Muhammad; Guler, Halil Ibrahim; Ozer, Aysegul; Sapmaz, Merve Tuncel; Belduz, Ali Osman; Hasan, Fariha; Shah, Aamer Ali

    2016-09-01

    Efficient utilization of hemicellulose entails high catalytic capacity containing xylanases. In this study, proline rich sequence was fused together with a C-terminal of xylanase gene from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans C5 and designated as GthC5ProXyl. Both GthC5Xyl and GthC5ProXyl were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 host in order to determine effect of this modification. The C-terminal oligopeptide had noteworthy effects and instantaneously extended the optimal temperature and pH ranges and progressed the specific activity of GthC5Xyl. Compared with GthC5Xyl, GthC5ProXyl revealed improved specific activity, a higher temperature (70°C versus 60°C) and pH (8 versus 6) optimum, with broad ranges of temperature and pH (60-80°C and 6.0-9.0 versus 40-60°C and 5.0-8.0, respectively). The modified enzyme retained more than 80% activity after incubating in xylan for 3h at 80°C as compared to wild -type with only 45% residual activity. Our study demonstrated that proper introduction of proline residues on C-terminal surface of xylanase family might be very effective in improvement of enzyme thermostability. Moreover, this study reveals an engineering strategy to improve the catalytic performance of enzymes. PMID:27444327

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a thermostable glycoside hydrolase family 43 β-xylosidase from Geobacillus thermoleovorans IT-08

    The β-xylosidase was crystallized using PEG 6000 as precipitant. 5% PEG 6000 yielded bipyramid-shaped tetragonal crystals diffracting to 1.55 Å resolution, and 13% PEG 6000 gave rectangular monoclinic crystals diffracting to 1.80 Å resolution. The main enzymes involved in xylan-backbone hydrolysis are endo-1,4-β-xylanase and β-xylosidase. β-Xylosidase converts the xylo-oligosaccharides produced by endo-1,4-β-xylanase into xylose monomers. The β-xylosidase from the thermophilic Geobacillus thermoleovorans IT-08, a member of glycoside hydrolase family 43, was crystallized at room temperature using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Two crystal forms were observed. Bipyramid-shaped crystals belonging to space group P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 62.53, c = 277.4 Å diffracted to 1.55 Å resolution. The rectangular crystals belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 57.94, b = 142.1, c = 153.9 Å, β = 90.5°, and diffracted to 1.80 Å resolution

  2. The role of N1 domain on the activity, stability, substrate specificity and raw starch binding of amylopullulanase of the extreme thermophile Geobacillus thermoleovorans.

    Nisha, M; Satyanarayana, T

    2015-07-01

    In order to understand the role of N1 domain (1-257 aa) in the amylopullulanase (gt-apu) of the extremely thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus thermoleovorans NP33, N1 deletion construct (gt-apuΔN) has been generated and expressed in Escherichia coli. The truncated amylopullulanase (gt-apuΔN) exhibits similar pH and temperature optima like gt-apu, but enhanced thermostability. The gt-apuΔN has greater hydrolytic action and specific activity on pullulan than gt-apu. The k cat (starch and pullulan) and K m (starch) values of gt-apuΔN increased, while K m (pullulan) decreased. The enzyme upon N1 deletion hydrolyzed maltotetraose as the smallest substrate in contrast to maltopentaose of gt-apu. The role of N1 domain of gt-apu in raw starch binding has been confirmed, for the first time, based on deletion and Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics. Furthermore, N1 domain appears to exert a negative influence on the thermostability of gt-apu because N1 truncation significantly improves thermostability. PMID:25573470

  3. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  4. Learning Chemistry from Bacteria

    Clardy, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Jon Clardy Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Harvard University All animals, including humans, originated and evolved on a planet already teeming with bacteria, and the two kingdoms of life have been competing and cooperating through their joint history. Although bacteria are most familiar as pathogens, some bacteria produce small molecules that are essential for the biology of animals and other eukaryotes. This lecture explores some of...

  5. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria

    Yurkov, Vladimir V.; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a relatively recently discovered bacterial group. Although taxonomically and phylogenetically heterogeneous, these bacteria share the following distinguishing features: the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into reaction center and light-harvesting complexes, low levels of the photosynthetic unit in cells, an abundance of carotenoids, a strong inhibition by light of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, and the inability to grow photosynt...

  6. Metallization of bacteria cells

    LI; Xiangfeng; (黎向锋); LI; Yaqin; (李雅芹); CAI; Jun; (蔡军); ZHANG; Deyuan; (张德远)

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria cells with different standard shapes are well suited for use as templates for the fabrication of magnetic and electrically conductive microstructures. In this paper, metallization of bacteria cells is demonstrated by an electroless deposition technique of nickel-phosphorus initiated by colloid palladium-tin catalyst on the surfaces of Citeromyces matritensis and Bacillus cereus. The activated and metallized bacteria cells have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). Results showed that both Citeromyces matritensis and Bacillus cereus had no deformation in shape after metallization; the metallized films deposited on the surfaces of bacteria cells are homogeneous in thickness and noncrystalline in phase structure. The kinetics of colloid palladium-tin solution and electroless plating on bacteria cells is discussed.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase PheB from Bacillus stearothermophilus BR219

    PheB, an extradiol-cleaving catecholic dioxygenase, was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 4000 as a precipitant. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic system, space group P212121, and diffracts to 2.3 Å resolution. Class II extradiol-cleaving catecholic dioxygenase, a key enzyme of aromatic compound degradation in bacteria, cleaves the aromatic ring of catechol by adding two O atoms. PheB is one of the class II extradiol-cleaving catecholic dioxygenases and shows a high substrate specificity for catechol derivatives, which have one aromatic ring. In order to reveal the mechanism of the substrate specificity of PheB, PheB has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 4000 as a precipitant. The space group of the obtained crystal was P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 65.5, b = 119.2, c = 158.7 Å. The crystal diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution

  8. Cellular viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultivated in association with contaminates bacteria of alcoholic fermentation;Viabilidade celular de Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultivada em associacao com bacterias contaminantes da fermentacao alcoolica

    Nobre, Thais de Paula

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the influence of the bacteria Bacillus and Lactobacillus, as well as their metabolic products, in reduction of cellular viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, when in mixed culture of yeast and active and treated bacteria. Also was to evaluated an alternative medium (MCC) for the cultivation of bacteria and yeast, constituted of sugarcane juice diluted to 5 deg Brix and supplemented with yeast extract and peptone. The bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus plantarum were cultivated in association with yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain Y-904) for 72 h on 32 deg C, under agitation. The cellular viability, budding rate and population of S. cerevisiae, the total acidity, volatile acidity and pH of culture were determined from 0, 24, 48 e 72 h of mixed culture. Also were determined the initial and final of microorganism population across the pour plate method, in traditional culture medium (PCA for Bacillus, MRS-agar for Lactobacillus and YEPD-agar for yeast S. cerevisiae) and in medium constituted of sugarcane juice. The bacteria cultures were treated by heat sterilization (120 deg C for 20 minutes), antibacterial agent (Kamoran HJ in concentration 3,0 ppm) or irradiation (radiation gamma, with doses of 5,0 kGy for Lactobacillus and 15,0 kGy for Bacillus). The results of the present research showed that just the culture mediums more acids (with higher concentrations of total and volatile acidity, and smaller values of pH), contaminated with active bacteria L. fermentum and B. subtilis, caused reduction on yeast cellular viability. Except the bacteria B. subtilis treated with radiation, the others bacteria treated by different procedures (heat, radiation e antibacterial) did not cause reduction on yeast cellular viability and population, indicating that the isolated presence of the cellular metabolic of theses bacteria was not enough to reduce the

  9. Improvement of Thermal Stability via Outer-Loop Ion Pair Interaction of Mutated T1 Lipase from Geobacillus zalihae Strain T1

    Mahiran Basri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutant D311E and K344R were constructed using site-directed mutagenesis to introduce an additional ion pair at the inter-loop and the intra-loop, respectively, to determine the effect of ion pairs on the stability of T1 lipase isolated from Geobacillus zalihae. A series of purification steps was applied, and the pure lipases of T1, D311E and K344R were obtained. The wild-type and mutant lipases were analyzed using circular dichroism. The Tm for T1 lipase, D311E lipase and K344R lipase were approximately 68.52 °C, 70.59 °C and 68.54 °C, respectively. Mutation at D311 increases the stability of T1 lipase and exhibited higher Tm as compared to the wild-type and K344R. Based on the above, D311E lipase was chosen for further study. D311E lipase was successfully crystallized using the sitting drop vapor diffusion method. The crystal was diffracted at 2.1 Å using an in-house X-ray beam and belonged to the monoclinic space group C2 with the unit cell parameters a = 117.32 Å, b = 81.16 Å and c = 100.14 Å. Structural analysis showed the existence of an additional ion pair around E311 in the structure of D311E. The additional ion pair in D311E may regulate the stability of this mutant lipase at high temperatures as predicted in silico and spectroscopically.

  10. Role of N-terminal extension of Bacillus stearothermophilus RNase H2 and C-terminal extension of Thermotoga maritima RNase H2.

    Permanasari, Etin-Diah; Angkawidjaja, Clement; Koga, Yuichi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2013-10-01

    Bacillus stearothermophilus RNase H2 (BstRNH2) and Thermotoga maritima RNase H2 (TmaRNH2) have N-terminal and C-terminal extensions, respectively, as compared with Aquifex aeolicus RNase H2 (AaeRNH2). To analyze the role of these extensions, BstRNH2 and TmaRNH2 without these extensions were constructed, and their biochemical properties were compared with those of their intact partners and AaeRNH2. The far-UV CD spectra of all proteins were similar, suggesting that the protein structure is not significantly altered by removal of these extensions. However, both the junction ribonuclease and RNase H activities of BstRNH2 and TmaRNH2, as well as their substrate-binding affinities, were considerably decreased by removal of these extensions. The stability of BstRNH2 and TmaRNH2 was also decreased by removal of these extensions. The activity, substrate binding affinity and stability of TmaRNH2 without the C-terminal 46 residues were partly restored by the attachment of the N-terminal extension of BstRNH2. These results suggest that the N-terminal extension of BstRNH2 functions as a substrate-binding domain and stabilizes the RNase H domain. Because the C-terminal extension of TmaRNH2 assumes a helix hairpin structure and does not make direct contact with the substrate, this extension is probably required to make the conformation of the substrate-binding site functional. AaeRNH2 showed comparable junction ribonuclease activity to those of BstRNH2 and TmaRNH2, and was more stable than these proteins, indicating that bacterial RNases H2 do not always require an N-terminal or C-terminal extension to increase activity, substrate-binding affinity, and/or stability. PMID:23937561

  11. Indicator For Pseudomonas Bacteria

    Margalit, Ruth

    1990-01-01

    Characteristic protein extracted and detected. Natural protein marker found in Pseudomonas bacteria. Azurin, protein containing copper readily extracted, purified, and used to prepare antibodies. Possible to develop simple, fast, and accurate test for marker carried out in doctor's office.

  12. Organization of genes for tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in gram--positive bacteria.

    Johansson, P; Hederstedt, L

    1999-03-01

    Clusters of genes encoding enzymes for tetrapyrrole biosynthesis were cloned from Bacillus sphaericus, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Brevibacillus brevis and Paenibacillus macerans. The sequences of all hemX genes found, and of a 6.3 kbp hem gene cluster from P. macerans, were determined. The structure of the hem gene clusters was compared to that of other Gram-positive bacteria. The Bacillus and Brevibacillus species have a conserved organization of the genes hemAXCDBL, required for biosynthesis of uroporphyrinogen III (UroIII) from glutamyl-tRNA. In P. macerans, the hem genes for UroIII synthesis are also closely linked but their organization is different: there is no hemX gene and the gene cluster also contains genes, cysG8 and cysG(A)-hemD, encoding the enzymes required for synthesis of sirohaem from UroIII. Bacillus subtilis contains genes for three proteins, NasF, YInD and YInF, with sequence similarity to Escherichia coli CysG, which is a multi-functional protein catalysing sirohaem synthesis from UroIII. It is shown that YInF is required for sirohaem synthesis and probably catalyses the precorrin-2 to sirohaem conversion. YInD probably catalyses precorrin-2 synthesis from UroIII and NasF seems to be specific for nitrite reduction. PMID:10217486

  13. Mobility of NH bonds in DNA-binding protein HU of shape Bacillus stearothermophilus from reduced spectral density mapping analysis at multiple NMR fields

    The dynamics of the backbone NH bonds of protein HU from Bacillus stearothermophilus (HUBst) have been characterized using measurements of cross-relaxation, longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates(RN(Hz↔Nz), RN(Nz) and RN(Nx,y)) at 11.7, 14.1 and 17.6 T. Linear regression of the values2RN(Nx,y)-RN(NZ) with the squared Larmor frequency ωN2 has revealed global exchange processes, which contributed on the order of 0.5-5.0 s-1to the transverse relaxation rate. Subsequently, the experimental valuesRN(Nx,y) were corrected for these exchange contributions. A reduced spectral density mapping procedure has been employed with the experimental relaxation rates and seven values of the spectral density function J(ω) have been extracted. These spectral densities have been fitted within the framework of the model-free approach. The densities agree well with an axially symmetric rotational diffusion tensor with a diffusion anisotropy D-parallel /D-perpendicular of 1.15, indicating that the flexible arms of HUBst do not significantly contribute to the rotational diffusion. The overall correlation time is 8.9 ± 0.6 ns/rad. The fast internal motions of most of the NH bonds in the core display order parameters ranging between 0.74 and 0.83 and internal correlation times between 1 and 20 ps. For the residues in the DNA-binding β-arms, an extended version of the model function has been used. The slow internal motions show correlation times of 1-2 ns. The concomitant order parameters (0.3-0.6) are lower than those observed on the fast time scale, indicating that the flexibility of the β-arms is mainly determined by the slower internal motions. A substantial decrease of the generalized order parameters in the β-arms starting at residues Arg55 and Ser74, opposite on both strands of the β-ribbon arms, has been explained as a 'hinge' motion. A comparison of the order parameters for free and DNA-bound protein has demonstrated that the slow hinge motions largely disappear when HU

  14. A modeling study by response surface methodology and artificial neural network on culture parameters optimization for thermostable lipase production from a newly isolated thermophilic Geobacillus sp. strain ARM

    Basri Mahiran

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thermostable bacterial lipases occupy a place of prominence among biocatalysts owing to their novel, multifold applications and resistance to high temperature and other operational conditions. The capability of lipases to catalyze a variety of novel reactions in both aqueous and nonaqueous media presents a fascinating field for research, creating interest to isolate novel lipase producers and optimize lipase production. The most important stages in a biological process are modeling and optimization to improve a system and increase the efficiency of the process without increasing the cost. Results Different production media were tested for lipase production by a newly isolated thermophilic Geobacillus sp. strain ARM (DSM 21496 = NCIMB 41583. The maximum production was obtained in the presence of peptone and yeast extract as organic nitrogen sources, olive oil as carbon source and lipase production inducer, sodium and calcium as metal ions, and gum arabic as emulsifier and lipase production inducer. The best models for optimization of culture parameters were achieved by multilayer full feedforward incremental back propagation network and modified response surface model using backward elimination, where the optimum condition was: growth temperature (52.3°C, medium volume (50 ml, inoculum size (1%, agitation rate (static condition, incubation period (24 h and initial pH (5.8. The experimental lipase activity was 0.47 Uml-1 at optimum condition (4.7-fold increase, which compared well to the maximum predicted values by ANN (0.47 Uml-1 and RSM (0.476 Uml-1, whereas R2 and AAD were determined as 0.989 and 0.059% for ANN, and 0.95 and 0.078% for RSM respectively. Conclusion Lipase production is the result of a synergistic combination of effective parameters interactions. These parameters are in equilibrium and the change of one parameter can be compensated by changes of other parameters to give the same results. Though both RSM and

  15. Oil eating bacteria

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The article discusses the unusual technology of using oil-eating bacteria to increase oil recovery. The background for the discovery that bacteria injection into the reservoirs may increase the oil recovery is the study of microbial action in breaking down oil pollution. About 20 per cent of the organisms living naturally in the sea can eat oil. But they need water to grow. In the absence of water, the bacteria produce enzymes to make the oil water soluble and allow them to extract nutrients from them. Oil does not vanish upon being eaten, but enzymes from the digestive process act as effective detergents to wash away the oil, which is then easier to recover.

  16. Immunity to intracellular bacteria

    Stefan H. E. Kaufmann; Follows, George A.; Martin E. Munik

    1992-01-01

    Immunity to intracellular bacteria including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacterium leprae, and Listeria monocytogenes depends on specific T cells. Evidence to be described suggests that CD4 (alpha/beta)T cells which interact with each other and with macrophages contribute to acquired resistence against as well as pathogenesis of intracellular bacterial infections.

  17. Immunity to intracellular bacteria

    Stefan H. E. Kaufmann

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunity to intracellular bacteria including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacterium leprae, and Listeria monocytogenes depends on specific T cells. Evidence to be described suggests that CD4 (alpha/betaT cells which interact with each other and with macrophages contribute to acquired resistence against as well as pathogenesis of intracellular bacterial infections.

  18. Can bacteria save the planet?

    Hunter, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria might just hold the key to preserving the environment for our great grandchildren. Philip Hunter explores some of the novel ways in which systems biology and biotechnology are harnessing bacteria to produce renewable energy and clean up pollution.

  19. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B.; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the fre...

  20. Manufacture of Probiotic Bacteria

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for many years as natural biopreservatives in fermented foods. A small group of LAB are also believed to have beneficial health effects on the host, so called probiotic bacteria. Probiotics have emerged from the niche industry from Asia into European and American markets. Functional foods are one of the fastest growing markets today, with estimated growth to 20 billion dollars worldwide by 2010 (GIA, 2008). The increasing demand for probiotics and the new food markets where probiotics are introduced, challenges the industry to produce high quantities of probiotic cultures in a viable and stable form. Dried concentrated probiotic cultures are the most convenient form for incorporation into functional foods, given the ease of storage, handling and transport, especially for shelf-stable functional products. This chapter will discuss various aspects of the challenges associated with the manufacturing of probiotic cultures.

  1. Exopolysaccharides from Marine Bacteria

    CHI Zhenming; FANG Yan

    2005-01-01

    Microbial polysaccharides represent a class of important products of growing interest for many sectors of industry. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in isolating new exopolysaccharides (EPSs)-producing bacteria from marine environments, particularly from various extreme marine environments. Many new marine microbial EPSs with novel chemical compositions, properties and structures have been found to have potential applications in fields such as adhesives,textiles, pharmaceuticals and medicine for anti-cancer, food additives, oil recovery and metal removal in mining and industrial waste treatments, etc This paper gives a brief summary of the information about the EPSs produced by marine bacteria,including their chemical compositions, properties and structures, together with their potential applications in industry.

  2. Lipoprotein sorting in bacteria.

    Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytoplasm and processed into mature forms on the cytoplasmic membrane. A lipid moiety attached to the N terminus anchors these proteins to the membrane surface. Many bacteria are predicted to express more than 100 lipoproteins, which play diverse functions on the cell surface. The Lol system, composed of five proteins, catalyzes the localization of Escherichia coli lipoproteins to the outer membrane. Some lipoproteins play vital roles in the sorting of other lipoproteins, lipopolysaccharides, and β-barrel proteins to the outer membrane. On the basis of results from biochemical, genetic, and structural studies, we discuss the biogenesis of lipoproteins in bacteria, their importance in cellular functions, and the molecular mechanisms underlying efficient sorting of hydrophobic lipoproteins to the outer membrane through the hydrophilic periplasm. PMID:21663440

  3. Bacteria, Phages and Septicemia

    Gaidelytė, Aušra; Vaara, Martti; Bamford, Dennis H.

    2007-01-01

    The use of phages is an attractive option to battle antibiotic resistant bacteria in certain bacterial infections, but the role of phage ecology in bacterial infections is obscure. Here we surveyed the phage ecology in septicemia, the most severe type of bacterial infection. We observed that the majority of the bacterial isolates from septicemia patients spontaneously secreted phages active against other isolates of the same bacterial strain, but not to the strain causing the disease. Such ph...

  4. Bacteria, food, and cancer

    Rooks, Michelle G.; Garrett, Wendy S.

    2011-01-01

    Gut microbes are essential components of the human organism—helping us metabolize food into energy, produce micronutrients, and shape our immune systems. Having a particular pattern of gut microbes is also increasingly being linked to medical conditions including obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, and diabetes. Recent studies now indicate that our resident intestinal bacteria may also play a critical role in determining one's risk of developing cancer, ranging from protection against cancer...

  5. Lethal Mutagenesis of Bacteria

    Bull, James J; Wilke, Claus O.

    2008-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis, the killing of a microbial pathogen with a chemical mutagen, is a potential broad-spectrum antiviral treatment. It operates by raising the genomic mutation rate to the point that the deleterious load causes the population to decline. Its use has been limited to RNA viruses because of their high intrinsic mutation rates. Microbes with DNA genomes, which include many viruses and bacteria, have not been considered for this type of treatment because their low intrinsic mutatio...

  6. Bacteria are not Lamarckian

    Danchin, Antoine

    2007-01-01

    Instructive influence of environment on heredity has been a debated topic for centuries. Darwin's identification of natural selection coupled to chance variation as the driving force for evolution, against a formal interpretation proposed by Lamarck, convinced most scientists that environment does not specifically instruct evolution in an oriented direction. This is true for multicellular organisms. In contrast, bacteria were long thought of as prone to receive oriented influences from their ...

  7. Denitrification by extremely halophilic bacteria

    Hochstein, L. I.; Tomlinson, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    Extremely halophilic bacteria were isolated from widely separated sites by anaerobic enrichment in the presence of nitrate. The anaerobic growth of several of these isolates was accompanied by the production of nitrite, nitrous oxide, and dinitrogen. These results are a direct confirmation of the existence of extremely halophilic denitrifying bacteria, and suggest that such bacteria may be common inhabitants of hypersaline environments.

  8. Pepsin homologues in bacteria

    Bateman Alex

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptidase family A1, to which pepsin belongs, had been assumed to be restricted to eukaryotes. The tertiary structure of pepsin shows two lobes with similar folds and it has been suggested that the gene has arisen from an ancient duplication and fusion event. The only sequence similarity between the lobes is restricted to the motif around the active site aspartate and a hydrophobic-hydrophobic-Gly motif. Together, these contribute to an essential structural feature known as a psi-loop. There is one such psi-loop in each lobe, and so each lobe presents an active Asp. The human immunodeficiency virus peptidase, retropepsin, from peptidase family A2 also has a similar fold but consists of one lobe only and has to dimerize to be active. All known members of family A1 show the bilobed structure, but it is unclear if the ancestor of family A1 was similar to an A2 peptidase, or if the ancestral retropepsin was derived from a half-pepsin gene. The presence of a pepsin homologue in a prokaryote might give insights into the evolution of the pepsin family. Results Homologues of the aspartic peptidase pepsin have been found in the completed genomic sequences from seven species of bacteria. The bacterial homologues, unlike those from eukaryotes, do not possess signal peptides, and would therefore be intracellular acting at neutral pH. The bacterial homologues have Thr218 replaced by Asp, a change which in renin has been shown to confer activity at neutral pH. No pepsin homologues could be detected in any archaean genome. Conclusion The peptidase family A1 is found in some species of bacteria as well as eukaryotes. The bacterial homologues fall into two groups, one from oceanic bacteria and one from plant symbionts. The bacterial homologues are all predicted to be intracellular proteins, unlike the eukaryotic enzymes. The bacterial homologues are bilobed like pepsin, implying that if no horizontal gene transfer has occurred the duplication

  9. Bacteria counting method based on polyaniline/bacteria thin film.

    Zhihua, Li; Xuetao, Hu; Jiyong, Shi; Xiaobo, Zou; Xiaowei, Huang; Xucheng, Zhou; Tahir, Haroon Elrasheid; Holmes, Mel; Povey, Malcolm

    2016-07-15

    A simple and rapid bacteria counting method based on polyaniline (PANI)/bacteria thin film was proposed. Since the negative effects of immobilized bacteria on the deposition of PANI on glass carbon electrode (GCE), PANI/bacteria thin films containing decreased amount of PANI would be obtained when increasing the bacteria concentration. The prepared PANI/bacteria film was characterized with cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique to provide quantitative index for the determination of the bacteria count, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was also performed to further investigate the difference in the PANI/bacteria films. Good linear relationship of the peak currents of the CVs and the log total count of bacteria (Bacillus subtilis) could be established using the equation Y=-30.413X+272.560 (R(2)=0.982) over the range of 5.3×10(4) to 5.3×10(8)CFUmL(-1), which also showed acceptable stability, reproducibility and switchable ability. The proposed method was feasible for simple and rapid counting of bacteria. PMID:26921555

  10. Beneficial bacteria inhibit cachexia.

    Varian, Bernard J; Goureshetti, Sravya; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Lakritz, Jessica R; Levkovich, Tatiana; Kwok, Caitlin; Teliousis, Konstantinos; Ibrahim, Yassin M; Mirabal, Sheyla; Erdman, Susan E

    2016-03-15

    Muscle wasting, known as cachexia, is a debilitating condition associated with chronic inflammation such as during cancer. Beneficial microbes have been shown to optimize systemic inflammatory tone during good health; however, interactions between microbes and host immunity in the context of cachexia are incompletely understood. Here we use mouse models to test roles for bacteria in muscle wasting syndromes. We find that feeding of a human commensal microbe, Lactobacillus reuteri, to mice is sufficient to lower systemic indices of inflammation and inhibit cachexia. Further, the microbial muscle-building phenomenon extends to normal aging as wild type animals exhibited increased growth hormone levels and up-regulation of transcription factor Forkhead Box N1 [FoxN1] associated with thymus gland retention and longevity. Interestingly, mice with a defective FoxN1 gene (athymic nude) fail to inhibit sarcopenia after L. reuteri therapy, indicating a FoxN1-mediated mechanism. In conclusion, symbiotic bacteria may serve to stimulate FoxN1 and thymic functions that regulate inflammation, offering possible alternatives for cachexia prevention and novel insights into roles for microbiota in mammalian ontogeny and phylogeny. PMID:26933816

  11. Lactic Acid Bacteria

    ToddKlaenhammer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are a diverse group of Gram-positive bacteria found in a vast array of environments including dairy products and the human gastrointestinal tract. In both niches, surface proteins play a crucial role in mediating interactions with the surrounding environment. The sortase enzyme is responsible for covalently coupling a subset of surface dependent proteins (SDPs to the cell wall of Gram-positive organisms through recognition of a conserved C-terminal LPXTG motif. Genomic sequencing of LAB and annotation has allowed for the identification of sortase and SDPs. Historically, sortase and SDPs were predominately investigated for their role in mediating pathogenesis. Identification of these proteins in LAB has shed light on their important roles in mediating nutrient acquisition through proteinase P as well as positive probiotic attributes including adhesion, mucus barrier function, and immune signaling. Furthermore, sortase expression signals in LAB have been exploited as a means to develop oral vaccines targeted to the gastrointestinal tract. In this review, we examine the collection of studies which evaluate sortase and SDPs in select species of dairy associated and health promoting LAB.

  12. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus;

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable...... bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures and...... marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary...

  13. Immunomodulatory properties of probiotic bacteria

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen

    2007-01-01

    Certain lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are part of the commensal intestinal flora and considered beneficial for health, as they compete with pathogens for adhesion sites in the intestine and ferment otherwise indigestible compounds. Another important property of these so-called probiotic bacteria is...... cytokines when stimulated with bacteria, and the cytokine pattern induced by specific bacteria resembled the pattern induced in MoDC, except for TNF-alpha and IL-6, which were induced in response to different bacteria in blood DC/monocytes and monocyte-derived DC. Autologous NK cells produced IFN-gamma when...... cultured with blood DC, monocytes and monocyte-derived DC and IL-12-inducing bacteria, whereas only DC induced IFN-gamma production in allogeneic T cells. In vitro-generated DC is a commonly used model of tissue DC, but they differ in certain aspects from intestinal DC, which are in direct contact with the...

  14. Making soy sauce from defatted soybean meal without the mejus process by submerged cultivation using thermophilic bacteria.

    Hur, Jeong Min; Park, Doo Hyun

    2015-08-01

    The diversity of thermophilic bacteria was not significantly altered while growing in a defatted soybean meal (DFSM) slurry at 60 °C for 10, 20, and 30 days. Five species of thermophilic bacteria, which belong to the genera Aeribacillus (temperature gradient gel electrophoresis [TGGE] band no. 1), Saccharococcus (TGGE band no. 2), Geobacillus (TGGE band no. 3), Bacillus (TGGE band no. 4), and Anoxybacillus (TGGE band no. 5), were detected in the fermenting DFSM slurry. The cell-free culture fluid obtained from the fermenting DFSM slurry on day 14 hydrolyzed starch and soy protein at 60 °C but not at 30 °C. Soy sauce (test soy sauce) was prepared from the fermented DFSM slurry after a 30 day cultivation at 60 °C and a 60 day ripening at 45 °C. Free amino acid (AA) and organic acid contents in the soy sauce increased in proportion to the fermentation period, whereas ammonium decreased proportionally. Mg and Ca contained in the soy sauce decreased proportionally during fermentation and were lower than those in the non-fermented DFSM extract (control). Spectral absorbance of soy sauce prepared from the fermented DFSM slurry was maximal at 430 nm and increased slightly in proportion to the fermentation period. The aroma and flavor of the test soy sauce were significantly different from those of traditional Korean soy sauce. Conclusively, soy sauce may be prepared directly from the fermented DFSM slurry without meju-preparing process and fermentation period may be a factor for control of soy sauce quality. PMID:26243923

  15. Interactions between Diatoms and Bacteria

    Amin, Shady A.; Parker, Micaela S.; Armbrust, E. Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Diatoms and bacteria have cooccurred in common habitats for hundreds of millions of years, thus fostering specific associations and interactions with global biogeochemical consequences. Diatoms are responsible for one-fifth of the photosynthesis on Earth, while bacteria remineralize a large portion of this fixed carbon in the oceans. Through their coexistence, diatoms and bacteria cycle nutrients between oxidized and reduced states, impacting bioavailability and ultimately feeding hi...

  16. Radiation-resistant asporogenic bacteria

    This paper reports the biological and ecological examinations on the radiation-resistant asporogenic bacteria (mainly concerning Micrococcus radiodurans). Radiation-resistant asporogenic bacteria were isolated from the irradiated areas of the natural world as well as from the general areas and from the Rn waters in the Misasa hot spring. The acquiring of the tolerance to radiation in bacteria was also examined. In addition, the future problems of microbiological treatment with irradiation were mentioned. (Tsukamoto, Y.)

  17. Bacteria, phages and septicemia.

    Ausra Gaidelyte

    Full Text Available The use of phages is an attractive option to battle antibiotic resistant bacteria in certain bacterial infections, but the role of phage ecology in bacterial infections is obscure. Here we surveyed the phage ecology in septicemia, the most severe type of bacterial infection. We observed that the majority of the bacterial isolates from septicemia patients spontaneously secreted phages active against other isolates of the same bacterial strain, but not to the strain causing the disease. Such phages were also detected in the initial blood cultures, indicating that phages are circulating in the blood at the onset of sepsis. The fact that most of the septicemic bacterial isolates carry functional prophages suggests an active role of phages in bacterial infections. Apparently, prophages present in sepsis-causing bacterial clones play a role in clonal selection during bacterial invasion.

  18. Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria

    Tyutikow, F.M. (All-Union Research Inst. for Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms, Moscow, USSR); Bespalova, I.A.; Rebentish, B.A.; Aleksandrushkina, N.N.; Krivisky, A.S.

    1980-10-01

    Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria have been found in 16 out of 88 studied samples (underground waters, pond water, soil, gas and oil installation waters, fermentor cultural fluids, bacterial paste, and rumen of cattle) taken in different geographic zones of the Soviet Union. Altogether, 23 phage strains were isolated. By fine structure, the phages were divided into two types (with very short or long noncontractile tails); by host range and serological properties, they fell into three types. All phages had guanine- and cytosine-rich double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid consisting of common nitrogen bases. By all of the above-mentioned properties, all phages within each of the groups were completely identical to one another, but differed from phages of other groups.

  19. A thermostable transketolase evolved for aliphatic aldehyde acceptors.

    Yi, Dong; Saravanan, Thangavelu; Devamani, Titu; Charmantray, Franck; Hecquet, Laurence; Fessner, Wolf-Dieter

    2015-01-11

    Directed evolution of the thermostable transketolase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus based on a pH-based colorimetric screening of smart libraries yielded several mutants with up to 16-fold higher activity for aliphatic aldehydes and high enantioselectivity (>95% ee) in the asymmetric carboligation step. PMID:25415647

  20. Beer spoilage bacteria and hop resistance

    Sakamoto, K; Konings, WN

    2003-01-01

    For brewing industry, beer spoilage bacteria have been problematic for centuries. They include some lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus lindneri and Pediococcus damnosus, and some Gram-negative bacteria such as Pectinatus cerevisiiphilus, Pectinatus frisingensis and Mega

  1. Sampling bacteria with a laser

    Schwarzwälder, Kordula; Rutschmann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Water quality is a topic of high interest and it's getting more and more important due to climate change and the implementation of European Water Framework Directive (WFD). One point of interest here is the inflow of bacteria into a river caused by combined sewer overflows which lead untreated wastewater including bacteria directly into a river. These bacteria remain in the river for a certain time, they settle down and can be remobilised again. In our study we want to investigate these processes of sedimentation and resuspension and use the results for the development of a software module coupled with the software Flow3D. Thereby we should be able to simulate and therefore predict the water quality influenced by combined sewer overflows. Hence we need to get information about the bacteria transport and fate. We need to know about the size of the bacteria or of the bacteria clumps and the size of the particles the bacteria are attached to. The agglomerates lead to different characteristics and velocities of settlement. The timespan during this bacteria can be detected in the bulk phase depends on many factors like the intensity of UV light, turbidity of the water, the temperature of the water, if there are grazers and a lot more. The size, density and composition of the agglomerates is just a part of all these influencing factors, but it is extremely difficult to differ between the other effects if we have no information about the simple sedimentation in default of these basic information. However we have a big problem getting the data. The chaining between bacteria or bacteria and particles is not too strong, so filtering the water to get a sieving curve may destroy these connections. We did some experiments similar to PIV (particle image velocimetry) measurements and evaluated the pictures with a macro written for the software ImageJ. Doing so we were able to get the concentration of bacteria in the water and collect information about the size of the bacteria. We

  2. Screening of aspartate dehydrogenase of bacteria

    Fukuda, Shoko; Okamura, Tokumitsu; Yasumasa, Izumi; Takeno, Tomomi; Ohsugi, Masahiro

    2001-01-01

    Fifty-two strains of bacteria cultured under aerobic conditions and 12 strains of bacteria cultured under anaerobic conditions demonstrated high activity staining of aspartate dehydrogenase with NAD^+. Four strains of bacteria cultured under aerobic conditions and 7 strains of bacteria cultured under anaerobic conditions demonstrated high activity staining of aspartate dehydrogenase with NADP^+. Seven strains of bacteria cultured under aerobic conditions and 4 strains of bacteria cultured und...

  3. Sewage-pollution indicator bacteria

    Ramaiah, N.; Rodrigues, V.; Alwares, E.; Rodrigues, C.; Baksh, R.; Jayan, S.; Mohandass, C.

    increased. It is only recently that sewage from major cities like Panaji, Goa, India is treated before disposing into the estuary. It is therefore of interest to determine what the levels of pollution indicator bacteria due to sewage disposal...

  4. Thymidine kinase diversity in bacteria

    Sandrini, Michael; Clausen, A.R.; Munch-Petersen, B.;

    2006-01-01

    Thymidine kinases (TKs) appear to be almost ubiquitous and are found in nearly all prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and several viruses. They are the key enzymes in thymidine salvage and activation of several anti-cancer and antiviral drugs. We show that bacterial TKs can be subdivided into 2 groups. The...... TKs from Gram-positive bacteria are more closely related to the eukaryotic TK1 enzymes than are TKs from Gram-negative bacteria....

  5. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: PROBIOTIC APPLICATIONS

    NEENA GARG

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a heterotrophic Gram-positive bacteria which under goes lactic acid fermentations and leads to production of lactic acid as an end product. LAB includes Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus which are grouped together in the family lactobacillaceae. LAB shows numerous antimicrobial activities due to production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds such as organic acids, bacteriocins, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide and reutrin. LA...

  6. Adherention ability of intestinal bacteria

    Morgensternová, Tereza

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that provide positive health benefits. Bacteria of the genus Bifidobacterium belong to this group. These bacteria have to meet a number of criteria so that they could be considered for probiotic. These include the ability to survive, grow, and be metabolically active in the gastrointestinal tract of the recipient. Probiotics protect the intestinal mucus from the adhesion of pathogenic organisms. The aim of this thesis was to test the ability of different ...

  7. Thymidine kinase diversity in bacteria

    Sandrini, Michael; Clausen, A.R.; Munch-Petersen, B.; Piskur, Jure

    Thymidine kinases (TKs) appear to be almost ubiquitous and are found in nearly all prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and several viruses. They are the key enzymes in thymidine salvage and activation of several anti-cancer and antiviral drugs. We show that bacterial TKs can be subdivided into 2 groups. The...... TKs from Gram-positive bacteria are more closely related to the eukaryotic TK1 enzymes than are TKs from Gram-negative bacteria....

  8. A comparative effect of 3 disinfectants on heterotrophic bacteria, iron bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    2006-01-01

    The disinfection effect of chlorine dioxide, chlorine and their mixture on heterotrophic bacteria, iron bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria in circulating cooling water was studied. The results of the test indicated that high purity chlorine dioxide was the most effective biocide in the 3 disinfectants, and with a dosage of 0.5mg/L, chlorine dioxide could obtain perfect effect. High purity chloride dioxide could have the excellent effect with the pH value of 6 to 10, and could keep it within 72 h. Chlorine and their mixture couldn't reach the effect of chlorine dioxide.

  9. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments.

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-09-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures and electric fields indicated electron transfer between vertically separated anodic and cathodic half-reactions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed the presence of Desulfobulbaceae filaments. In addition, in situ measurements of oxygen, pH, and electric potential distributions in the waterlogged banks of Giber Å demonstrated the presence of distant electric redox coupling in naturally occurring freshwater sediment. At the same site, filamentous Desulfobulbaceae with cable bacterium morphology were found to be present. Their 16S rRNA gene sequence placed them as a distinct sister group to the known marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary origin of the cable phenotype within Desulfobulbaceae with subsequent diversification into a freshwater and a marine lineage. PMID:26116678

  10. Bioreporter bacteria for landmine detection

    Burlage, R.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Youngblood, T. [Frisby Technologies, Aiken, SC (United States); Lamothe, D. [American Technologies, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States). Ordnance/Explosives Environmental Services Div.

    1998-04-01

    Landmines (and other UXO) gradually leak explosive chemicals into the soil at significant concentrations. Bacteria, which have adapted to scavenge low concentrations of nutrients, can detect these explosive chemicals. Uptake of these chemicals results in the triggering of specific bacterial genes. The authors have created genetically recombinant bioreporter bacteria that detect small concentrations of energetic chemicals. These bacteria are genetically engineered to produce a bioluminescent signal when they contact specific explosives. A gene for a brightly fluorescent compound can be substituted for increased sensitivity. By finding the fluorescent bacteria, you find the landmine. Detection might be accomplished using stand-off illumination of the minefield and GPS technology, which would result in greatly reduced risk to the deminers. Bioreporter technology has been proven at the laboratory scale, and will be tested under field conditions in the near future. They have created a bacterial strain that detects sub-micromolar concentrations of o- and p-nitrotoluene. Related bacterial strains were produced using standard laboratory protocols, and bioreporters of dinitrotoluene and trinitrotoluene were produced, screening for activity with the explosive compounds. Response time is dependent on the growth rate of the bacteria. Although frill signal production may require several hours, the bacteria can be applied over vast areas and scanned quickly, producing an equivalent detection speed that is very fast. This technology may be applicable to other needs, such as locating buried explosives at military and ordnance/explosive manufacturing facilities.

  11. Isolation and Identification of Concrete Environment Bacteria

    Irwan, J. M.; Anneza, L. H.; Othman, N.; Husnul, T.; Alshalif, A. F.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the isolation and molecular method for bacteria identification through PCR and DNA sequencing. Identification of the bacteria species is required in order to fully utilize the bacterium capability for precipitation of calcium carbonate in concrete. This process is to enable the addition of suitable catalyst according to the bacterium enzymatic pathway that is known through the bacteria species used. The objective of this study is to isolate, enriched and identify the bacteria species. The bacteria in this study was isolated from fresh urine and acid mine drainage water, Kota Tinggi, Johor. Enrichment of the isolated bacteria was conducted to ensure the bacteria survivability in concrete. The identification of bacteria species was done through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and rRDNA sequencing. The isolation and enrichment of the bacteria was done successfully. Whereas, the results for bacteria identification showed that the isolated bacteria strains are Bacillus sp and Enterococus faecalis.

  12. The Cyclic Antibacterial Peptide Enterocin AS-48: Isolation, Mode of Action, and Possible Food Applications

    María José Grande Burgos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Enterocin AS-48 is a circular bacteriocin produced by Enterococcus. It contains a 70 amino acid-residue chain circularized by a head-to-tail peptide bond. The conformation of enterocin AS-48 is arranged into five alpha-helices with a compact globular structure. Enterocin AS-48 has a wide inhibitory spectrum on Gram-positive bacteria. Sensitivity of Gram-negative bacteria increases in combination with outer-membrane permeabilizing treatments. Eukaryotic cells are bacteriocin-resistant. This cationic peptide inserts into bacterial membranes and causes membrane permeabilization, leading ultimately to cell death. Microarray analysis revealed sets of up-regulated and down-regulated genes in Bacillus cereus cells treated with sublethal bacteriocin concentration. Enterocin AS-48 can be purified in two steps or prepared as lyophilized powder from cultures in whey-based substrates. The potential applications of enterocin AS-48 as a food biopreservative have been corroborated against foodborne pathogens and/or toxigenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica and spoilage bacteria (Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris, Bacillus spp., Paenibacillus spp., Geobacillus stearothermophilus, Brochothrix thermosphacta, Staphylococcus carnosus, Lactobacillus sakei and other spoilage lactic acid bacteria. The efficacy of enterocin AS-48 in food systems increases greatly in combination with chemical preservatives, essential oils, phenolic compounds, and physico-chemical treatments such as sublethal heat, high-intensity pulsed-electric fields or high hydrostatic pressure.

  13. IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIA IN LATEX PAINTS

    Rojas, J.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacteria are prokaryote organisms with a high capacity to colonize many types of habits. This research was developed with the object to identify extremophiles bacteria presents in latex paint. The bacteria were cultivated in culture mediums TSA, Blood Agar, Mc Conkey and finally the biochemical proof API-NF® for bacteria's isolation and identification, respectively. Characterization showed bacterial profile of Pasteurella sp. Hypothesis that could be found extremophiles bacteria in latex paint were demonstrated.

  14. Electron transport chains of lactic acid bacteria

    Brooijmans, R.J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are generally considered facultative anaerobic obligate fermentative bacteria. They are unable to synthesize heme. Some lactic acid bacteria are unable to form menaquinone as well. Both these components are cofactors of respiratory (electron transport) chains of prokaryotic bacteria. Lactococcus lactis, and several other lactic acid bacteria, however respond to the addition of heme in aerobic growth conditions. This response includes increased biomass and robustness. In t...

  15. Chitin Degradation In Marine Bacteria

    Paulsen, Sara; Machado, Henrique; Gram, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Chitin is the most abundant polymer in the marine environment and the second most abundant in nature. Chitin does not accumulate on the ocean floor, because of microbial breakdown. Chitin degrading bacteria could have potential in the utilization of chitin as a renewable carbon and...... nitrogen source in the fermentation industry.Methods: Here, whole genome sequenced marine bacteria were screened for chitin degradation using phenotypic and in silico analyses.Results: The in silico analyses revealed the presence of three to nine chitinases in each strain, however the number of chitinases...... chitin regulatory system.Conclusions: This study has provided insight into the ecology of chitin degradation in marine bacteria. It also served as a basis for choosing a more efficient chitin degrading production strain e.g. for the use of chitin waste for large-scale fermentations....

  16. Methylotrophic bacteria in sustainable agriculture.

    Kumar, Manish; Tomar, Rajesh Singh; Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby

    2016-07-01

    Excessive use of chemical fertilizers to increase production from available land has resulted in deterioration of soil quality. To prevent further soil deterioration, the use of methylotrophic bacteria that have the ability to colonize different habitats, including soil, sediment, water, and both epiphytes and endophytes as host plants, has been suggested for sustainable agriculture. Methylotrophic bacteria are known to play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycle in soil ecosystems, ultimately fortifying plants and sustaining agriculture. Methylotrophs also improve air quality by using volatile organic compounds such as dichloromethane, formaldehyde, methanol, and formic acid. Additionally, methylotrophs are involved in phosphorous, nitrogen, and carbon cycling and can help reduce global warming. In this review, different aspects of the interaction between methylotrophs and host plants are discussed, including the role of methylotrophs in phosphorus acquisition, nitrogen fixation, phytohormone production, iron chelation, and plant growth promotion, and co-inoculation of these bacteria as biofertilizers for viable agriculture practices. PMID:27263015

  17. Parotitis due to anaerobic bacteria.

    Matlow, A; Korentager, R; Keystone, E; Bohnen, J

    1988-01-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus remains the pathogen most commonly implicated in acute suppurative parotitis, the pathogenic role of gram-negative facultative anaerobic bacteria and strict anaerobic organisms in this disease is becoming increasingly recognized. This report describes a case of parotitis due to Bacteroides disiens in an elderly woman with Sjögren's syndrome. Literature reports on seven additional cases of suppurative parotitis due to anaerobic bacteria are reviewed. Initial therapy of acute suppurative parotitis should include coverage for S. aureus and, in a very ill patient, coverage of gram-negative facultative organisms with antibiotics such as cloxacillin and an aminoglycoside. A failure to respond clinically to such a regimen or isolation of anaerobic bacteria should lead to the consideration of the addition of clindamycin or penicillin. PMID:3287567

  18. Programmed survival of soil bacteria

    Jensen, Lars Bogø; Molin, Søren; Sternberg, Claus;

    Biological containment systems have been developed for Pseudomonas putida and related soil bacteria. The systems are based on combinations of lethal genes and regulated gene expression. Two types of killing function have been employed: 1) A membrane protein interfering with the membrane potential...

  19. Role of Bacteria in Oncogenesis

    Chang, Alicia H; Parsonnet, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Although scientific knowledge in viral oncology has exploded in the 20th century, the role of bacteria as mediators of oncogenesis has been less well elucidated. Understanding bacterial carcinogenesis has become increasingly important as a possible means of cancer prevention. This review summarizes clinical, epidemiological, and experimental evidence as well as possible mechanisms of bacterial induction of or protection from malignancy.

  20. Engineering robust lactic acid bacteria

    Bron, P.A.; Bokhorst-van de Veen, van H.; Wels, M.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2011-01-01

    For centuries, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been industrially exploited as starter cultures in the fermentation of foods and feeds for their spoilage-preventing and flavor-enhancing characteristics. More recently, the health-promoting effects of LAB on the consumer have been widely acknowledged,

  1. Fuzzy species among recombinogenic bacteria

    Fraser Christophe

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is a matter of ongoing debate whether a universal species concept is possible for bacteria. Indeed, it is not clear whether closely related isolates of bacteria typically form discrete genotypic clusters that can be assigned as species. The most challenging test of whether species can be clearly delineated is provided by analysis of large populations of closely-related, highly recombinogenic, bacteria that colonise the same body site. We have used concatenated sequences of seven house-keeping loci from 770 strains of 11 named Neisseria species, and phylogenetic trees, to investigate whether genotypic clusters can be resolved among these recombinogenic bacteria and, if so, the extent to which they correspond to named species. Results Alleles at individual loci were widely distributed among the named species but this distorting effect of recombination was largely buffered by using concatenated sequences, which resolved clusters corresponding to the three species most numerous in the sample, N. meningitidis, N. lactamica and N. gonorrhoeae. A few isolates arose from the branch that separated N. meningitidis from N. lactamica leading us to describe these species as 'fuzzy'. Conclusion A multilocus approach using large samples of closely related isolates delineates species even in the highly recombinogenic human Neisseria where individual loci are inadequate for the task. This approach should be applied by taxonomists to large samples of other groups of closely-related bacteria, and especially to those where species delineation has historically been difficult, to determine whether genotypic clusters can be delineated, and to guide the definition of species.

  2. Physico-chemical factors and bacteria in fish ponds

    Jun, X.; Xiuzheng, F.; Tongbing, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of pond water and mud samples show that nitrifying bacteria (including ammonifying bacteria, nitrite bacteria, nitrobacteria and denitrifying bacteria) are in general closely correlated with various physico-chemical factors, ammonifying bacteria are mainly correlated with dissolved oxygen; denitrifying bacteria are inversely correlated with phosphorus; nitrite bacteria are closely correlated with nitrites, nitrobacteria are inversely correlated with ammoniac nitrogen. The nitrifying ...

  3. Smokeless Tobacco May Contain Potentially Harmful Bacteria

    ... 160769.html Smokeless Tobacco May Contain Potentially Harmful Bacteria Infections, diarrhea and vomiting are possible consequences, FDA ... products can harbor several species of potentially harmful bacteria, researchers warn. Two types in particular -- Bacillus licheniformis ...

  4. Killer Pigments in Bacteria: An Ecological Nightmare.

    Benathen, Isaiah A.; Saccardi, Marion

    2000-01-01

    Describes an alternative to teaching ecology by using bacteria to test competitor survival. Students observe a time-dependent selective killing of other unrelated bacteria by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. (SAH)

  5. Re-engineering bacteria for ethanol production

    Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W; Zhou, Shengde; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-05-06

    The invention provides recombinant bacteria, which comprise a full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes. Expression of the full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes causes the recombinant bacteria to produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product when grown in mineral salts medium, without the addition of complex nutrients. Methods for producing the recombinant bacteria and methods for producing ethanol using the recombinant bacteria are also disclosed.

  6. IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIA IN LATEX PAINTS

    Rojas, J

    2008-01-01

    The bacteria are prokaryote organisms with a high capacity to colonize many types of habits. This research was developed with the object to identify extremophiles bacteria presents in latex paint. The bacteria were cultivated in culture mediums TSA, Blood Agar, Mc Conkey and finally the biochemical proof API-NF® for bacteria's isolation and identification, respectively. Characterization showed bacterial profile of Pasteurella sp. Hypothesis that could be found extremophiles bac...

  7. Genetics of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Zagorec, Monique; Anba-Mondoloni, Jamila; Coq, Anne-Marie Crutz-Le; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    Many meat (or fish) products, obtained by the fermentation of meat originating from various animals by the flora that naturally contaminates it, are part of the human diet since millenaries. Historically, the use of bacteria as starters for the fermentation of meat, to produce dry sausages, was thus performed empirically through the endogenous micro-biota, then, by a volunteer addition of starters, often performed by back-slopping, without knowing precisely the microbial species involved. It is only since about 50 years that well defined bacterial cultures have been used as starters for the fermentation of dry sausages. Nowadays, the indigenous micro-biota of fermented meat products is well identified, and the literature is rich of reports on the identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) present in many traditional fermented products from various geographical origin, obtained without the addition of commercial starters (See Talon, Leroy, & Lebert, 2007, and references therein).

  8. Aggregation Patterns in Stressed Bacteria

    Tsimring, L S; Aranson, I S; Ben-Jacob, E; Cohen, I; Shochet, O; Tsimring, Lev; Levine, Herbert; Aranson, Igor; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Cohen, Inon; Shochet, Ofer

    1995-01-01

    We study the formation of spot patterns seen in a variety of bacterial species when the bacteria are subjected to oxidative stress due to hazardous byproducts of respiration. Our approach consists of coupling the cell density field to a chemoattractant concentration as well as to nutrient and waste fields. The latter serves as a triggering field for emission of chemoattractant. Important elements in the proposed model include the propagation of a front of motile bacteria radially outward form an initial site, a Turing instability of the uniformly dense state and a reduction of motility for cells sufficiently far behind the front. The wide variety of patterns seen in the experiments is explained as being due the variation of the details of the initiation of the chemoattractant emission as well as the transition to a non-motile phase.

  9. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: PROBIOTIC APPLICATIONS

    NEENA GARG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB is a heterotrophic Gram-positive bacteria which under goes lactic acid fermentations and leads to production of lactic acid as an end product. LAB includes Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus which are grouped together in the family lactobacillaceae. LAB shows numerous antimicrobial activities due to production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds such as organic acids, bacteriocins, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide and reutrin. LAB are used as starter culture, consortium members and bioprotective agents in food industry that improve food quality, safety and shelf life. A variety of probiotic LAB species are available including Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. bulgaricus, L. lactis, L. plantarum, L. rhamnosus, L. reuteri, L. fermentum, Bifidobacterium longum, B. breve, B. bifidum, B. esselnsis, B. lactis, B. infantis that are currently recommended for development of functional food products with health-promoting capacities.

  10. Dissipative Shocks behind Bacteria Gliding

    Virga, Epifanio G

    2014-01-01

    Gliding is a means of locomotion on rigid substrates utilized by a number of bacteria includingmyxobacteria and cyanobacteria. One of the hypotheses advanced to explain this motility mechanism hinges on the role played by the slime filaments continuously extruded from gliding bacteria. This paper solves in full a non-linear mechanical theory that treats as dissipative shocks both the point where the extruded slime filament comes in contact with the substrate, called the filament's foot, and the pore on the bacterium outer surface from where the filament is ejected. We prove that kinematic compatibility for shock propagation requires that the bacterium uniform gliding velocity (relative to the substrate) and the slime ejecting velocity (relative to the bacterium) must be equal, a coincidence that seems to have already been observed.

  11. Box-shaped halophilic bacteria.

    Javor, B; Requadt, C; Stoeckenius, W

    1982-01-01

    Three morphologically similar strains of halophilic, box-shaped procaryotes have been isolated from brines collected in the Sinai, Baja California (Mexico), and southern California (United States). Although the isolates in their morphology resemble Walsby's square bacteria, which are a dominant morphological type in the Red Sea and Baja California brines, they are probably not identical to them. The cells show the general characteristics of extreme halophiles and archaebacteria. They contain ...

  12. Folate Production by Probiotic Bacteria

    Stefano Raimondi; Alberto Amaretti; Maddalena Rossi

    2011-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria, mostly belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, confer a number of health benefits to the host, including vitamin production. With the aim to produce folate-enriched fermented products and/or develop probiotic supplements that accomplish folate biosynthesis in vivo within the colon, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli have been extensively studied for their capability to produce this vitamin. On the basis of physiological studies and genome analysis, wild-typ...

  13. Magnetotactic Bacteria from Extreme Environments

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Dennis A. Bazylinski

    2013-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) represent a diverse collection of motile prokaryotes that biomineralize intracellular, membrane-bounded, tens-of-nanometer-sized crystals of a magnetic mineral called magnetosomes. Magnetosome minerals consist of either magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) and cause cells to align along the Earth’s geomagnetic field lines as they swim, a trait called magnetotaxis. MTB are known to mainly inhabit the oxic–anoxic interface (OAI) in water columns or sediments of aqu...

  14. Bacteria interfere with A-actinomycetemcomitans colonization

    Teughels, Wim; Haake, S. Kinder; Sliepen, Isabelle; Pauwels, Martine; Van Eldere, Johan; Cassiman, Jean-Jacques; Quirynen, Marc

    2007-01-01

    It is known that beneficial bacteria can suppress the emergence of pathogenic bacteria, particularly in the gastrointestinal tract. This study examined the potential for a similar suppression of Aggregatibacter (formerly Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans colonization of epithelial cells, due to its potential relevance in periodontal diseases. Seven presumed beneficial bacteria were examined for their ability to interfere, exclude, or displace A. actinomycetemcomitans from epithelial cells...

  15. Laser-Based Identification of Pathogenic Bacteria

    Rehse, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous in our world. From our homes, to our work environment, to our own bodies, bacteria are the omnipresent although often unobserved companions to human life. Physicists are typically untroubled professionally by the presence of these bacteria, as their study usually falls safely outside the realm of our typical domain. In the…

  16. Magnetotactic bacteria at the geomagnetic equator

    Magnetotatic bacteria are observed in freshwater and marine sediments of Fortaleza, Brazil, situated close to the geomagnetic equator. Both South-seeking and North-seeking bacteria are present in roughly equal numbers in the same samples. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that the vertical component of the geomagnetic field selects the predominant polarity type among magnetotactic bacteria in natural environments. (Author)

  17. Drosophila lifespan enhancement by exogenous bacteria

    Brummel, Ted; Ching, Alisa; Seroude, Laurent; Simon, Anne F.; Benzer, Seymour

    2004-01-01

    We researched the lifespan of Drosophila under axenic conditions compared with customary procedure. The experiments revealed that the presence of bacteria during the first week of adult life can enhance lifespan, despite unchanged food intake. Later in life, the presence of bacteria can reduce lifespan. Certain long-lived mutants react in different ways, indicating an interplay between bacteria and longevity-enhancing genes.

  18. Potential role of bacteria packaging by protozoa in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria

    Alix M Denoncourt; Paquet, Valérie E.; Charette, Steve J.

    2014-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria live in close association with protozoa. These unicellular eukaryotic microorganisms are ubiquitous in various environments. A number of protozoa such as amoebae and ciliates ingest pathogenic bacteria, package them usually in membrane structures, and then release them into the environment. Packaged bacteria are more resistant to various stresses and are more apt to survive than free bacteria. New evidence indicates that protozoa and not bacteria control the packaging...

  19. Effect of pH on Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum DSM 571 growth, spore heat resistance and recovery.

    Mtimet, Narjes; Guégan, Stéphanie; Durand, Lucile; Mathot, Anne-Gabrielle; Venaille, Laurent; Leguérinel, Ivan; Coroller, Louis; Couvert, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Thermophilic spore-forming bacteria are potential contaminants in several industrial sectors involving high temperatures (40-65 °C) in the manufacturing process. Among those thermophilic spore-forming bacteria, Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum, called "the swelling canned food spoiler", has generated interest over the last decade in the food sector. The aim of this study was to investigate and to model pH effect on growth, heat resistance and recovery abilities after a heat-treatment of T. thermosaccharolyticum DSM 571. Growth and sporulation were conducted on reinforced clostridium media and liver broth respectively. The highest spore heat resistances and the greatest recovery ability after a heat-treatment were obtained at pH condition allowing maximal growth rate. Growth and sporulation boundaries were estimated, then models using growth limits as main parameters were extended to describe and quantify the effect of pH on recovery of injured spores after a heat-treatment. So, cardinal values were used as a single set of parameters to describe growth, sporulation and recovery abilities. Besides, this work suggests that T. thermosaccharolyticum preserve its ability for germination and outgrowth after a heat-treatment at a low pH where other high resistant spore-forming bacteria like Geobacillus stearothermophilus are unable to grow. PMID:26742617

  20. Bacteria and vampirism in cinema.

    Castel, O; Bourry, A; Thévenot, S; Burucoa, C

    2013-09-01

    A vampire is a non-dead and non-alive chimerical creature, which, according to various folklores and popular superstitions, feeds on blood of the living to draw vital force. Vampires do not reproduce by copulation, but by bite. Vampirism is thus similar to a contagious disease contracted by intravascular inoculation with a suspected microbial origin. In several vampire films, two real bacteria were staged, better integrated than others in popular imagination: Yersinia pestis and Treponema pallidum. Bacillus vampiris was created for science-fiction. These films are attempts to better define humans through one of their greatest fears: infectious disease. PMID:23916557

  1. Turning Bacteria Suspensions into Superfluids

    López, Héctor Matías; Gachelin, Jérémie; Douarche, Carine; Auradou, Harold; Clément, Eric

    2015-07-01

    The rheological response under simple shear of an active suspension of Escherichia coli is determined in a large range of shear rates and concentrations. The effective viscosity and the time scales characterizing the bacterial organization under shear are obtained. In the dilute regime, we bring evidence for a low-shear Newtonian plateau characterized by a shear viscosity decreasing with concentration. In the semidilute regime, for particularly active bacteria, the suspension displays a "superfluidlike" transition where the viscous resistance to shear vanishes, thus showing that, macroscopically, the activity of pusher swimmers organized by shear is able to fully overcome the dissipative effects due to viscous loss.

  2. Thermophilic spore-forming bacteria isolated from spoiled canned food and their heat resistance. Results of a French ten-year survey.

    André, S; Zuber, F; Remize, F

    2013-07-15

    Thermal processing of Low Acid Canned Foods (LACF), which are safe and shelf-stable at ambient temperature for several years, results in heat inactivation of all vegetative microorganisms and the partial or total inactivation of spores. Good Manufacturing Hygienic Practices include stability tests for managing the pathogen risk related to surviving mesophilic bacterial spores. LACF are also often submitted to additional incubation conditions, typically 55 °C for 7 days, to monitor spoilage by thermophiles. In this study we identified the bacterial species responsible for non-stability after prolonged at 55 °C of incubation of LACF from 455 samples collected from 122 French canneries over 10 years. Bacteria were identified by microsequencing or a recent developed tool for group-specific PCR detection (SporeTraQ™). A single species was identified for 93% of examined samples. Three genera were responsible for more than 80% of all non-stability cases: mostly Moorella (36%) and Geobacillus (35%), and less frequently Thermoanaerobacterium (10%). The other most frequent bacterial genera identified were Bacillus, Thermoanaerobacter, Caldanaerobius, Anoxybacillus, Paenibacillus and Clostridium. Species frequency was dependent on food category, i.e. vegetables, ready-made meals containing meat, seafood or other recipes, products containing fatty duck, and related to the intensity of the thermal treatment applied in these food categories. The spore heat resistance parameters (D or δ and z values) from 36 strains isolated in this study were determined. Taken together, our results single out the species most suitable for use as indicators for thermal process settings. This extensively-documented survey of the species that cause non-stability at 55 °C in LACF will help canneries to improve the management of microbial contamination. PMID:23728430

  3. DMTB: the magnetotactic bacteria database

    Pan, Y.; Lin, W.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are of interest in biogeomagnetism, rock magnetism, microbiology, biomineralization, and advanced magnetic materials because of their ability to synthesize highly ordered intracellular nano-sized magnetic minerals, magnetite or greigite. Great strides for MTB studies have been made in the past few decades. More than 600 articles concerning MTB have been published. These rapidly growing data are stimulating cross disciplinary studies in such field as biogeomagnetism. We have compiled the first online database for MTB, i.e., Database of Magnestotactic Bacteria (DMTB, http://database.biomnsl.com). It contains useful information of 16S rRNA gene sequences, oligonucleotides, and magnetic properties of MTB, and corresponding ecological metadata of sampling sites. The 16S rRNA gene sequences are collected from the GenBank database, while all other data are collected from the scientific literature. Rock magnetic properties for both uncultivated and cultivated MTB species are also included. In the DMTB database, data are accessible through four main interfaces: Site Sort, Phylo Sort, Oligonucleotides, and Magnetic Properties. References in each entry serve as links to specific pages within public databases. The online comprehensive DMTB will provide a very useful data resource for researchers from various disciplines, e.g., microbiology, rock magnetism and paleomagnetism, biogeomagnetism, magnetic material sciences and others.

  4. Sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Dahl, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are characterized by oxidizing various inorganic sulfur compounds for use as electron donors in carbon dioxide fixation during anoxygenic photosynthetic growth. These bacteria are divided into the purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and the green sulfur bacteria (GSB). They...... utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate and sometimes also ferrous iron and hydrogen as electron donors. This review focuses on the dissimilatory and assimilatory metabolism of inorganic sulfur compounds in these bacteria and also briefly discusses these metabolisms in...... other types of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. The biochemistry and genetics of sulfur compound oxidation in PSB and GSB are described in detail. A variety of enzymes catalyzing sulfur oxidation reactions have been isolated from GSB and PSB (especially Allochromatium vinosum, a representative of the...

  5. Transformation of gram positive bacteria by sonoporation

    Yang, Yunfeng; Li, Yongchao

    2014-03-11

    The present invention provides a sonoporation-based method that can be universally applied for delivery of compounds into Gram positive bacteria. Gram positive bacteria which can be transformed by sonoporation include, for example, Bacillus, Streptococcus, Acetobacterium, and Clostridium. Compounds which can be delivered into Gram positive bacteria via sonoporation include nucleic acids (DNA or RNA), proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, viruses, small organic and inorganic molecules, and nano-particles.

  6. Mortality of fecal bacteria in seawater.

    Garcia-Lara, J.; Menon, P.; Servais, P; Billen, G.

    1991-01-01

    We propose a method for determining the mortality rate for allochthonous bacteria released in aquatic environments without interference due to the loss of culturability in specific culture media. This method consists of following the disappearance of radioactivity from the trichloroacetic acid-insoluble fraction in water samples to which [3H]thymidine-prelabeled allochthonous bacteria have been added. In coastal seawater, we found that the actual rate of disappearance of fecal bacteria was 1 ...

  7. Utilization of xylooligosaccharides by selected ruminal bacteria.

    Cotta, M A

    1993-01-01

    The ability of ruminal bacteria to utilize xylooligosaccharides was examined. Xylooligosaccharides were prepared by partially hydrolyzing oat spelt xylan in phosphoric acid. This substrate solution was added (0.2%, wt/vol) to a complex medium containing yeast extract and Trypticase that was inoculated with individual species of ruminal bacteria, and growth and utilization were monitored over time. All of the xylanolytic bacteria examined were able to utilize this oligosaccharide mixture as a ...

  8. QUANTATITIVE PCR ASSAY FOR MARINE BACTERIA

    Brunk, Clifford F.

    2003-01-01

    Monitoring the bacterial flora in coastal marine waters by conventional techniques has been difficult as most of the bacteria do not readily grow on culture plates and their morphologies are virtually identical in the microscope. Molecular techniques, particularly characterizing bacteria using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of their small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) genes, has dramatically improved the ability to identify bacteria from environmental samples. Identificatio...

  9. Selection-Driven Gene Loss in Bacteria

    Koskiniemi, Sanna; Sun, Song; Berg, Otto; Andersson, Dan I.

    2012-01-01

    Gene loss by deletion is a common evolutionary process in bacteria, as exemplified by bacteria with small genomes that have evolved from bacteria with larger genomes by reductive processes. The driving force(s) for genome reduction remains unclear, and here we examined the hypothesis that gene loss is selected because carriage of superfluous genes confers a fitness cost to the bacterium. In the bacterium Salmonella enterica, we measured deletion rates at 11 chromosomal positions and the fitne...

  10. Pathogenic bacteria and timing of laying

    Moller, Anders P.; Soler, Juan J; Nielsen, J T; Galván, Ismael

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria constitute a serious threat to viability of many organisms. Because growth of most bacteria is favored by humid and warm environmental conditions, earlier reproducers in seasonal environments should suffer less from the negative consequences of pathogenic bacteria. These relationships, and the effects on reproductive success, should be particularly prominent in predators because they are frequently exposed to pathogenic microorganisms from sick prey. Here, we presented and...

  11. Bacteria cell properties and grain size impact on bacteria transport and deposition in porous media.

    Bai, Hongjuan; Cochet, Nelly; Pauss, André; Lamy, Edvina

    2016-03-01

    The simultaneous role of bacteria cell properties and porous media grain size on bacteria transport and deposition behavior was investigated in this study. Transport column experiments and numerical HYDRUS-1D simulations of three bacteria with different cell properties (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Rhodococcus rhodochrous) were carried out on two sandy media with different grain sizes, under saturated steady state flow conditions. Each bacterium was characterized by cell size and shape, cell motility, electrophoretic mobility, zeta potential, hydrophobicity and potential of interaction with the sand surface. Cell characteristics affected bacteria transport behavior in the fine sand, but similar bacteria breakthroughs and retardation factors observed in the coarse sand, indicated that bacteria transport was more depended on grain size than on bacteria cell properties. Retention decreased with increasing hydrophobicity and increased with increasing electrophoretic mobility of bacteria for both sand. The increasing sand grain size resulted in a decrease of bacteria retention, except for the motile E. coli, indicating that retention of this strain was more dependent on cell motility than on the sand grain size. Bacteria deposition coefficients obtained from numerical simulations of the retention profiles indicated that straining was an important mechanism affecting bacteria deposition of E. coli and Klebsiella sp., in the fine sand, but the attachment had the same importance as straining for R. rhodochrous. The results obtained in the coarse sand did not permit to discriminate the predominant mechanism of bacteria deposition and the relative implication of bacteria cell properties of this process. PMID:26705829

  12. Quorum sensing in gram-negative bacteria

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.J.; Høiby, N.; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria can communicate with each other by means of signal molecules to coordinate the behavior of the entire community, and the mechanism is referred to as quorum sensing (QS). Signal systems enable bacteria to sense the size of their densities by monitoring the concentration of the signal...... molecules. Among Gram-negative bacteria N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL)-dependent quorum sensing systems are particularly widespread. These systems are used to coordinate expression of phenotypes that are fundamental to the interaction of bacteria with each other and with their environment and...

  13. In vitro susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria.

    Washington, J A

    1979-01-01

    In vitro susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria should be limited to isolates from persistent or recurrent infections that have been treated adequately and appropriately with antimicrobial agents and, in reference centers, to collections of isolates in order to monitor alterations in susceptibility of species to various antimicrobial agents. An agar dilution reference method is being evaluated currently; however, practicality limits sporadic testing of single isolates to disk elution or broth dilution techniques. No single disk diffusion method has yet been found to be acceptable for testing anaerobic bacteria, and the results obtained with standardized procedures for aerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria are not applicable to anaerobic bacteria. PMID:288163

  14. Cell Size Regulation in Bacteria

    Amir, Ariel

    2014-05-01

    Various bacteria such as the canonical gram negative Escherichia coli or the well-studied gram positive Bacillus subtilis divide symmetrically after they approximately double their volume. Their size at division is not constant, but is typically distributed over a narrow range. Here, we propose an analytically tractable model for cell size control, and calculate the cell size and interdivision time distributions, as well as the correlations between these variables. We suggest ways of extracting the model parameters from experimental data, and show that existing data for E. coli supports partial size control, and a particular explanation: a cell attempts to add a constant volume from the time of initiation of DNA replication to the next initiation event. This hypothesis accounts for the experimentally observed correlations between mother and daughter cells as well as the exponential dependence of size on growth rate.

  15. Single Bacteria as Turing Machines

    Bos, Julia; Zang, Qiucen; Vyawahare, Saurabh; Austin, Robert

    2014-03-01

    In Allan Turing's famous 1950 paper on Computing Machinery and Intelligence, he started with the provocative statement: ``I propose to consider the question, `Can machines think?' This should begin with definitions of the meaning of the terms `machine' and `think'.'' In our own work on exploring the way that organisms respond to stress and evolve, it seems at times as if they come to remarkably fast solutions to problems, indicating some sort of very clever computational machinery. I'll discuss how it would appear that bacteria can indeed create a form of a Turing Machine, the first example of a computer, and how they might use this algorithm to do rapid evolution to solve a genomics problem.

  16. Sterol synthesis in diverse bacteria

    Jeremy H Wei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sterols are essential components of eukaryotic cells whose biosynthesis and function has been studied extensively. Sterols are also recognized as the diagenetic precursors of steranes preserved in sedimentary rocks where they can function as geological proxies for eukaryotic organisms and/or aerobic metabolisms and environments. However, production of these lipids is not restricted to the eukaryotic domain as a few bacterial species also synthesize sterols. Phylogenomic studies have identified genes encoding homologs of sterol biosynthesis proteins in the genomes of several additional species, indicating that sterol production may be more widespread in the bacterial domain than previously thought. Although the occurrence of sterol synthesis genes in a genome indicates the potential for sterol production, it provides neither conclusive evidence of sterol synthesis nor information about the composition and abundance of basic and modified sterols that are actually being produced. Here, we coupled bioinformatics with lipid analyses to investigate the scope of bacterial sterol production. We identified oxidosqualene cyclase (Osc, which catalyzes the initial cyclization of oxidosqualene to the basic sterol structure, in 34 bacterial genomes from 5 phyla (Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia and in 176 metagenomes. Our data indicate that bacterial sterol synthesis likely occurs in diverse organisms and environments and also provides evidence that there are as yet uncultured groups of bacterial sterol producers. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial and eukaryotic Osc sequences confirmed a complex evolutionary history of sterol synthesis in this domain. Finally, we characterized the lipids produced by Osc-containing bacteria and found that we could generally predict the ability to synthesize sterols. However, predicting the final modified sterol based on our current knowledge of sterol synthesis was difficult

  17. Progress in Research of Bacteria Fertilizer Strengthening Resistance of Plants

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria fertilizer is used most widely among all kinds of microbial fertilizers. We summarize the research headway of bacteria fertilizer. It mainly focuses on bacteria fertilizer improving the stress resistance of plant. Then we can offer basis to research and exploit bacteria fertilizer. These bacteria include azotobacter, photosynthetic bacteria, Bacillus mucilaginosus siliceous, phosphorus bacteria, plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria(PGPR), effective microorganism(EM).

  18. Sponge-associated bacteria: general overview and special aspects of bacteria associated with Halichondria panicea.

    Imhoff, J F; Stöhr, R

    2003-01-01

    Increasing evidence is accumulating that highlights the important role of bacteria in bacteria-sponge associations. It appears to be equally important to analyse the specific association of bacteria with sponges, to realise the biological function of biologically active substances produced by sponge-associated bacteria, and to consider the relationship between bacteria and sponges in the search for new pharmaceutical products. In this chapter the current knowledge on bacteria-sponge associations is briefly reviewed. Results are summarised that were obtained by three major methodological approaches: (1) classical microscope observations, (2) investigations attempting to characterise sponge-associated bacteria by describing pure culture isolates, and (3) the rapidly growing evidence from genetic analyses of sponge-associated bacteria. Special emphasis is given to the evidence of possible symbiotic interactions between bacteria and sponges and to the synthesis of natural products by bacteria isolated from or associated with marine sponges. Case studies including morphological and genetic studies together with results from pure culture studies have been performed with bacteria from the sponges Rhodopaloeides odorabile, Aplysina cavernicola, and Halichondria panicea. In addition, new results on bacteria associated with Halichondria panicea are also presented. PMID:15825639

  19. Rapid methods for detection of bacteria

    Corfitzen, Charlotte B.; Andersen, B.Ø.; Miller, M.; Ursin, C.; Arvin, Erik; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    Traditional methods for detection of bacteria in drinking water e.g. Heterotrophic Plate Counts (HPC) or Most Probable Number (MNP) take 48-72 hours to give the result. New rapid methods for detection of bacteria are needed to protect the consumers against contaminations. Two rapid methods...

  20. Lactic Acid Bacteria in the Gut

    Stolaki, M.; Vos, de W.M.; Kleerebezem, M.; Zoetendal, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    From all bacterial groups, the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are probably the group of bacteria that is most associated with human lifestyle. The term LAB mainly refers to the ability of these organisms to convert sugars to lactic acid. The LAB comprise non-sporing, aerotolerant, coccus or rod-shaped,

  1. Sabine Kacunko. Bacteria, Art and other Bagatelles

    Kacunko, Slavko

    This book appears on the occasion of the project INVINCIBLE – a Big Bacteria project for Colosseum, Rome (17.–19.09.2015), which is being granted UNESCO-patronage in the context of the International Year of Light and Light-Based Technologies 2015. With Sabine Kacunko’s bacteria art in mind, alleged...

  2. Rapid methods for detection of bacteria

    Corfitzen, Charlotte B.; Andersen, B.Ø.; Miller, M.;

    2006-01-01

    Traditional methods for detection of bacteria in drinking water e.g. Heterotrophic Plate Counts (HPC) or Most Probable Number (MNP) take 48-72 hours to give the result. New rapid methods for detection of bacteria are needed to protect the consumers against contaminations. Two rapid methods...

  3. Metabolismo de isoflavonas por bacterias intestinales

    Delgado, Susana; Guadamuro, Lucía; Flórez García, Ana Belén; Mayo Pérez, Baltasar

    2014-01-01

    Trabajo presentado en la 8ª Reunión de la Red Temática BAL (Red Española de Bacterias Lácticas), "Participación de las Bacterias Lácticas en la Salud Humana y en la Calidad Alimentaria", celebrada en San Adrián (Navarra) el 25 de junio de 2014.

  4. Bacteria dispersal by hitchhiking on zooplankton

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Dziallas, Claudia; Leunert, Franziska;

    2010-01-01

    impenetrable for bacteria in both upward and downward directions (conveyor-belt hypothesis). The strength of our experiments is to permit quantitative estimation of transport and release of associated bacteria: vertical migration of Daphnia magna yielded an average dispersal rate of 1.3 x 10(5) x cells x...

  5. Research Advances in Bacteria-based Microrobot.

    Liang, Yao-Jie; Sun, Jun-Zhong

    2016-08-01

    The concept of bacteria-based microrobot has been well recognized. It has shown great advantages and potentials for the early diagnosis and early treatment of malignant tumor and in reducing chemotherapy toxicities. In this article we review the concept,structure,and potential clinical applications of bacteria-based microrobot. PMID:27594160

  6. Comparative genomics of the lactic acid bacteria

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria are associated with various plant and animal niches and play a key role in the production of fermented foods and beverages. We report nine genome sequences representing the phylogenetic and functional diversity of these bacteria. The small genomes of lactic acid bacter...

  7. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  8. Mimicking Seawater For Culturing Marine Bacteria

    Rygaard, Anita Mac; Sonnenschein, Eva; Gram, Lone;

    2015-01-01

    Only about 1% of marine bacteria have been brought into culture using traditional techniques. The purpose of this study was to investigate if mimicking the natural bacterial environment can increase culturability.We used marine substrates containing defined algal polymers or gellan gum as...... solidifying agents, and enumerated bacteria from seawater and algal exudates. We tested if culturability could be influenced by addition of quorum sensing signals (AHLs). All plates were incubated at 15°C. Bacterial counts (CFU/g) from algal exudates from brown algae were highest on media containing algal...... polymers. In general, bacteria isolated from algal exudates preferred more rich media than bacteria isolated from seawater. Overall, culturability ranged from 0.01 to 0.8% as compared to total cell count. Substitution of agar with gellan gum increased the culturability of seawater bacteria approximately...

  9. Coryneform bacteria associated with canine otitis externa

    Aalbæk, Bent; Bemis, David A.; Schjærff, Mette;

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the occurrence of coryneform bacteria in canine otitis externa. A combined case series and case-control study was carried out to improve the current knowledge on frequency and clinical significance of coryneform bacteria in samples from canine otitis externa. A total...... of 16 cases of otitis externa with involvement of coryneform bacteria were recorded at two referral veterinary hospitals in Denmark and the US, respectively. Coryneform bacteria were identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Corynebacterium auriscanis was the most common coryneform species (10...... cases). Small colony variants of this species were also observed. Other coryneform isolates were identified as Corynebacterium amycolatum (3 cases), Corynebacterium freneyi (2 cases) and an Arcanobacterium-like species (1 case). The coryneform bacteria were in all cases isolated together with other...

  10. Chryseobacterium indologenes, novel mannanase-producing bacteria

    Surachai Rattanasuk

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mannanase is a mannan degrading enzyme which is produced by microorganisms, including bacteria. This enzyme can be used in many industrial processes as well as for improving the quality of animal feeds. The aim of the present study was toscreen and characterize the mannanase-producing bacteria. Two genera of bacteria were isolated from Thai soil samples,fermented coconut, and fertilizer. Screening was carried out on agar plates containing mannan stained with iodine solution.The bacteria were identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequence, biochemical test and morphology, respectively. The mannanase activity was determined by zymogram and DNS method. Two strains of bacteria with mannanase activity were identified as Bacillus and Chryseobacterium. This is the first report of mannanase-producing Chryseobacterium.

  11. HYDROCARBON-DEGRADING BACTERIA AND SURFACTANT ACTIVITY

    Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Grazyna A. Plaza, G; jacek Wypych, j

    2006-08-15

    Fate of benzene ethylbenzene toluene xylenes (BTEX) compounds through biodegradation was investigated using two different bacteria, Ralstonia picketti (BP-20) and Alcaligenes piechaudii (CZOR L-1B). These bacteria were isolated from extremely polluted petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. PCR and Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) were used to identify the isolates. Biodegradation was measured using each organism individually and in combination. Both bacteria were shown to degrade each of the BTEX compounds. Alcaligenes piechaudii biodegraded BTEXs more efficiently while mixed with BP-20 and individually. Biosurfactant production was observed by culture techniques. In addition 3-hydroxy fatty acids, important in biosurfactant production, was observed by FAME analysis. In the all experiments toluene and m+p- xylenes were better growth substrates for both bacteria than the other BTEX compounds. In addition, the test results indicate that the bacteria could contribute to bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX) pollution increase biodegradation through the action by biosurfactants.

  12. Therapeutic Properties of Probiotic Bacteria

    Nathanon Trachoo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of its long history, public consciousness of probiotics has shifted dramatically in recent years. This is due to a number of factors, including an increased concern about the potential generation of antibiotic resistant bacterial strains due to widespread antibacterial use, and also to the spreading realization that one`s health can be, not simply maintained, but actually improved with proper nutrition. Combined, these factors have stimulated a surge in probiotic research in the past decade, resulting in increasingly refined studies. Indeed, after Elie Metchnikov first printed his work suggesting a positive correlation between human longevity and the consumption of fermented milk, information on probiotics is leaving the realm of the anecdotal as recent, double-blind, placebo controlled randomized tests support beneficial probiotic activity. Concurrently, more is being learned about their activities in vivo. While much work remains to be done before a detailed understanding of probiotics can be achieved, there is mounting evidence that probiotics, when used in proper conditions, may indeed have prophylactic or preventative effects on a broad array of human and animal diseases. This article briefly surveys probiotic history and discusses recent research with a special emphasis on lactic acid bacteria probiotics. Finally, it discusses the inherent difficulties of their study and suggestions for standards for future work.

  13. Mycelial bacteria of saline soils

    Zvyagintsev, D. G.; Zenova, G. M.; Oborotov, G. V.

    2008-10-01

    The actinomycetal complexes of saline soils comprise the representatives of the Streptomyces and Micromonospora genera, the number of which are hundreds and thousands of CFU/g soil. Complexes of mycelial bacteria in saline soils are poorer in terms of number (by 1-3 orders of magnitude) and taxonomic composition than the complexes of the zonal soil types. A specific feature of the actinomycetal complexes of saline soils is the predominance of halophilic, alkaliphilic, and haloalkaliphilic streptomycetes that well grow at pH 8-9 and concentrations of NaCl close to 5%. Actinomycetes in saline soils grow actively, and the length of their mycelium reaches 140 m in 1 gram of soil. The haloalkaliphilic streptomycetes grow fast and inhibit the formation of spores at pH 9 and high concentrations of salts (Na2SO4 and MgCl2, 5%) as compared to their behavior on a neutral medium with a salt concentration of 0.02%. They are characterized by the maximal radial growth rate of colonies on an alkaline medium with 5% NaCl.

  14. Comparative cytotoxicity of periodontal bacteria

    The direct cytotoxicity of sonic extracts (SE) from nine periodontal bacteria for human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) was compared. Equivalent dosages (in terms of protein concentration) of SE were used to challenge HGF cultures. The cytotoxic potential of each SE was assessed by its ability to (1) inhibit HGF proliferation, as measured by direct cell counts; (2) inhibit 3H-thymidine incorporation in HGF cultures; or (3) cause morphological alterations of the cells in challenged cultures. The highest concentration (500 micrograms SE protein/ml) of any of the SEs used to challenge the cells was found to be markedly inhibitory to the HGFs by all three of the criteria of cytotoxicity. At the lowest dosage tested (50 micrograms SE protein/ml); only SE from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides gingivalis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum caused a significant effect (greater than 90% inhibition or overt morphological abnormalities) in the HGFs as determined by any of the criteria employed. SE from Capnocytophaga sputigena, Eikenella corrodens, or Wolinella recta also inhibited cell proliferation and thymidine incorporation at this dosage; however, the degree of inhibition (5-50%) was consistently, clearly less than that of the first group of three organisms named above. The SE of the three other organisms tested (Actinomyces odontolyticus, Bacteroides intermedius, and Streptococcus sanguis) had little or no effect (0-10% inhibition) at this concentration. The data suggest that the outcome of the interaction between bacterial components and normal resident cells of the periodontium is, at least in part, a function of the bacterial species

  15. H2 from hot bacteria

    This paper reports that a surprisingly large number of bacteria either oxidize or evolve molecular hydrogen (H2) in their natural environments. In such organisms, the reversible activation of H2 is catalyzed by an enzyme turned hydrogenase that can cause electrons provided by an electron donor with protons to evolve H2. The enzyme may oxidize H2 in the presence of a suitable electron acceptor. Hydrogenase will also catalyze an isotope exchange reaction between deuterium (D2) or tritium (T2) gas and water. Few enzymes have as many potential biotechnological applications as hydrogenase. H2 is a versatile and efficient energy carrier, considered the fuel of the future by some, and is an important intermediate in a variety of chemical and petrochemical processes. Hydrogenase has also been proposed to replace platinum in H/D and H/T separations in the nuclear power industry and to activate H2 for electrode-based processes. Indeed, H2 is considered one of the most abundant substrates for the future chemical synthesis industry and the enzyme-catalyzed production of organic chemicals from H2 and CO2 has been described. a complete understanding of how hydrogenases catalyze the reversible activation of H2 might therefore have farreaching consequences in both applied and basic research

  16. Potential role of bacteria packaging by protozoa in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria

    Alix M Denoncourt

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Many pathogenic bacteria live in close association with protozoa. These unicellular eukaryotic microorganisms are ubiquitous in various environments. A number of protozoa such as amoebae and ciliates ingest pathogenic bacteria, package them usually in membrane structures, and then release them into the environment. Packaged bacteria are more resistant to various stresses and are more apt to survive than free bacteria. New evidence indicates that protozoa and not bacteria control the packaging process. It is possible that packaging is more common than suspected and may play a major role in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria. To confirm the role of packaging in the propagation of infections, it is vital that the molecular mechanisms governing the packaging of bacteria by protozoa be identified as well as elements related to the ecology of this process in order to determine whether packaging acts as a Trojan Horse.

  17. Bacteria classification using Cyranose 320 electronic nose

    Gardner Julian W

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An electronic nose (e-nose, the Cyrano Sciences' Cyranose 320, comprising an array of thirty-two polymer carbon black composite sensors has been used to identify six species of bacteria responsible for eye infections when present at a range of concentrations in saline solutions. Readings were taken from the headspace of the samples by manually introducing the portable e-nose system into a sterile glass containing a fixed volume of bacteria in suspension. Gathered data were a very complex mixture of different chemical compounds. Method Linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA method was able to classify four classes of bacteria out of six classes though in reality other two classes were not better evident from PCA analysis and we got 74% classification accuracy from PCA. An innovative data clustering approach was investigated for these bacteria data by combining the 3-dimensional scatter plot, Fuzzy C Means (FCM and Self Organizing Map (SOM network. Using these three data clustering algorithms simultaneously better 'classification' of six eye bacteria classes were represented. Then three supervised classifiers, namely Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP, Probabilistic Neural network (PNN and Radial basis function network (RBF, were used to classify the six bacteria classes. Results A [6 × 1] SOM network gave 96% accuracy for bacteria classification which was best accuracy. A comparative evaluation of the classifiers was conducted for this application. The best results suggest that we are able to predict six classes of bacteria with up to 98% accuracy with the application of the RBF network. Conclusion This type of bacteria data analysis and feature extraction is very difficult. But we can conclude that this combined use of three nonlinear methods can solve the feature extraction problem with very complex data and enhance the performance of Cyranose 320.

  18. Antibacterial activity of aquatic gliding bacteria.

    Sangnoi, Yutthapong; Anantapong, Theerasak; Kanjana-Opas, Akkharawit

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to screen and isolate strains of freshwater aquatic gliding bacteria, and to investigate their antibacterial activity against seven common pathogenic bacteria. Submerged specimens were collected and isolated for aquatic gliding bacteria using four different isolation media (DW, MA, SAP2, and Vy/2). Gliding bacteria identification was performed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Crude extracts were obtained by methanol extraction. Antibacterial activity against seven pathogenic bacteria was examined by agar-well diffusion assay. Five strains of aquatic gliding bacteria including RPD001, RPD008, RPD018, RPD027 and RPD049 were isolated. Each submerged biofilm and plastic specimen provided two isolates of gliding bacteria, whereas plant debris gave only one isolate. Two strains of gliding bacteria were obtained from each DW and Vy/2 isolation medium, while one strain was obtained from the SAP2 medium. Gliding bacteria strains RPD001, RPD008 and RPD018 were identified as Flavobacterium anhuiense with 96, 82 and 96 % similarity, respectively. Strains RPD049 and RPD027 were identified as F. johnsoniae and Lysobacter brunescens, respectively, with similarity equal to 96 %. Only crude extract obtained from RPD001 inhibited growth of Listeria monocytogenes (MIC 150 µg/ml), Staphylococcus aureus (MIC 75 µg/ml) and Vibrio cholerae (MIC 300 µg/ml), but showed weak inhibitory effect on Salmonella typhimurium (MIC > 300 µg/ml). Gliding bacterium strain RPD008 should be considered to a novel genus separate from Flavobacterium due to its low similarity value. Crude extract produced by RPD001 showed potential for development as a broad antibiotic agent. PMID:26885469

  19. Stop the Spread of Superbugs: Help Fight Drug Resistant Bacteria

    ... the Spread of Superbugs Help Fight Drug-Resistant Bacteria For nearly a century, bacteria-fighting drugs known as antibiotics have helped to control and destroy many of the harmful bacteria that can make us sick. But in recent ...

  20. Birefringence Determination of Magnetic Moments of Magnetotactic Bacteria

    Rosenblatt, Charles; de Araujo, F. Flavio Torres; Frankel, Richard B.

    1982-01-01

    A birefringence technique is used to determine the average magnetic moments of magnetotactic bacteria in culture. Differences in are noted between live and dead bacteria, as well as between normal density and high density samples of live bacteria.

  1. Folate Production by Probiotic Bacteria

    Stefano Raimondi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Probiotic bacteria, mostly belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, confer a number of health benefits to the host, including vitamin production. With the aim to produce folate-enriched fermented products and/or develop probiotic supplements that accomplish folate biosynthesis in vivo within the colon, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli have been extensively studied for their capability to produce this vitamin. On the basis of physiological studies and genome analysis, wild-type lactobacilli cannot synthesize folate, generally require it for growth, and provide a negative contribution to folate levels in fermented dairy products. Lactobacillus plantarum constitutes an exception among lactobacilli, since it is capable of folate production in presence of para-aminobenzoic acid (pABA and deserves to be used in animal trials to validate its ability to produce the vitamin in vivo. On the other hand, several folate-producing strains have been selected within the genus Bifidobacterium, with a great variability in the extent of vitamin released in the medium. Most of them belong to the species B. adolescentis and B. pseudocatenulatum, but few folate producing strains are found in the other species as well. Rats fed a probiotic formulation of folate-producing bifidobacteria exhibited increased plasma folate level, confirming that the vitamin is produced in vivo and absorbed. In a human trial, the same supplement raised folate concentration in feces. The use of folate-producing probiotic strains can be regarded as a new perspective in the specific use of probiotics. They could more efficiently confer protection against inflammation and cancer, both exerting the beneficial effects of probiotics and preventing the folate deficiency that is associated with premalignant changes in the colonic epithelia.

  2. Magnetotactic Bacteria from Extreme Environments

    Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Lefèvre, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) represent a diverse collection of motile prokaryotes that biomineralize intracellular, membrane-bounded, tens-of-nanometer-sized crystals of a magnetic mineral called magnetosomes. Magnetosome minerals consist of either magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) and cause cells to align along the Earth’s geomagnetic field lines as they swim, a trait called magnetotaxis. MTB are known to mainly inhabit the oxic–anoxic interface (OAI) in water columns or sediments of aquatic habitats and it is currently thought that magnetosomes function as a means of making chemotaxis more efficient in locating and maintaining an optimal position for growth and survival at the OAI. Known cultured and uncultured MTB are phylogenetically associated with the Alpha-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria classes of the phylum Proteobacteria, the Nitrospirae phylum and the candidate division OP3, part of the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae (PVC) bacterial superphylum. MTB are generally thought to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments as they are cosmopolitan in distribution and have been found in every continent although for years MTB were thought to be restricted to habitats with pH values near neutral and at ambient temperature. Recently, however, moderate thermophilic and alkaliphilic MTB have been described including: an uncultured, moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacterium present in hot springs in northern Nevada with a probable upper growth limit of about 63 °C; and several strains of obligately alkaliphilic MTB isolated in pure culture from different aquatic habitats in California, including the hypersaline, extremely alkaline Mono Lake, with an optimal growth pH of >9.0. PMID:25369742

  3. Magnetotactic Bacteria from Extreme Environments

    Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Lefère, Christopher T.

    2013-03-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) represent a diverse collection of motile prokaryotes that biomineralize intracellular, membrane-bounded, tens-of-nanometer-sized crystals of a magnetic mineral called magnetosomes. Magnetosome minerals consist of either magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) and cause cells to align along the Earth's geomagnetic field lines as they swim, a trait called magnetotaxis. MTB are known to mainly inhabit the oxic-anoxic interface (OAI) in water columns or sediments of aquatic habitats and it is currently thought that magnetosomes function as a means of making chemotaxis more efficient in locating and maintaining an optimal position for growth and survival at the OAI. Known cultured and uncultured MTB are phylogenetically associated with the Alpha-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria classes of the phylum Proteobacteria, the Nitrospirae phylum and the candidate division OP3, part of the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae (PVC) bacterial superphylum. MTB are generally thought to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments as they are cosmopolitan in distribution and have been found in every continent although for years MTB were thought to be restricted to habitats with pH values near neutral and at ambient temperature. Recently, however, moderate thermophilic and alkaliphilic MTB have been described including: an uncultured, moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacterium present in hot springs in northern Nevada with a probable upper growth limit of about 63 °C; and several strains of obligately alkaliphilic MTB isolated in pure culture from different aquatic habitats in California, including the hypersaline, extremely alkaline Mono Lake, with an optimal growth pH of >9.0.

  4. Magnetotactic Bacteria from Extreme Environments

    Christopher T. Lefèvre

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB represent a diverse collection of motile prokaryotes that biomineralize intracellular, membrane-bounded, tens-of-nanometer-sized crystals of a magnetic mineral called magnetosomes. Magnetosome minerals consist of either magnetite (Fe3O4 or greigite (Fe3S4 and cause cells to align along the Earth’s geomagnetic field lines as they swim, a trait called magnetotaxis. MTB are known to mainly inhabit the oxic–anoxic interface (OAI in water columns or sediments of aquatic habitats and it is currently thought that magnetosomes function as a means of making chemotaxis more efficient in locating and maintaining an optimal position for growth and survival at the OAI. Known cultured and uncultured MTB are phylogenetically associated with the Alpha-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria classes of the phylum Proteobacteria, the Nitrospirae phylum and the candidate division OP3, part of the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae (PVC bacterial superphylum. MTB are generally thought to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments as they are cosmopolitan in distribution and have been found in every continent although for years MTB were thought to be restricted to habitats with pH values near neutral and at ambient temperature. Recently, however, moderate thermophilic and alkaliphilic MTB have been described including: an uncultured, moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacterium present in hot springs in northern Nevada with a probable upper growth limit of about 63 °C; and several strains of obligately alkaliphilic MTB isolated in pure culture from different aquatic habitats in California, including the hypersaline, extremely alkaline Mono Lake, with an optimal growth pH of >9.0.

  5. Effects of thermoradiation on bacteria

    A 60Co source was used to determine the effects of thermoradiation on Achromobacter aquamarinus, Staphylococcus aureus, and vegetative and spore cells of Bacillus subtilis var. globigii. The rate of inactivation of these cultures, except vegetative-cell populations of B. subtilis, was exponential and in direct proportion to temperature. The D10 (dose that inactivates 90 percent of the microbial population) value for A. aquamarinus was 8.0 Krad at 25 degrees C and 4.9 Krad at 35 degrees C. For S. aureus, D10 was 9.8 and 5.3 Krad at 35 and 45 degrees C, respectively. Vegetative cells of B. subtilis demonstrated a rapid initial inactivation followed by a steady but decreased exponential rate. The D10 at 25 degrees C was 10.3 Krad, but at 35 and 45 degrees C this value was 6.2 and 3.8 Krad, respectively. Between 0 and 95 Krad, survival curves for B. subtilis spores at 75 degrees C showed slight inactivation, increasing in rat at and above 85 degrees C. The D10 values for spores at 85 and 90 degrees C were 129 and 92 Krad, respectively. Significant synergism between heat and irradiation was noted at 35 degrees C for A. aquamarinus and 45 degrees C for S. aureus. The presence of 0.1 mM cysteine in suspending media afforded protection to both cultures at these critical temperatures. On the other hand, cysteine sensitized B. subtilis spores at radiation doses greater than 100 Krad. The combined effect of heat and irradiation was more destructive to bacteria than either method alone

  6. Clustering of Marine Bacteria in Seawater Enrichments

    Mitchell, J.G.; Pearson, L; Dillon, S.

    1996-01-01

    Seawater enrichments of marine bacteria clustered in 20- to 50-(mu)m-wide bands near air-water interfaces. The cells within the band travelled at up to 212 (mu)m s(sup-1) and at an average speed of 163 (mu)m s(sup-1). Mean cell speeds peaked mid-run at 187 (mu)m s(sup-1). At the end of the run, bacteria reversed direction rather than randomly reorienting. The duration of the stops during reversal was estimated at 18 ms, six to seven times shorter than that found in enteric bacteria. Cells hun...

  7. The Microworld of Marine-Bacteria

    JØRGENSEN, BB

    1995-01-01

    Microsensor studies show that the marine environment in the size scale of bacteria is physically and chemically very different from the macroenvironment. The microbial world of the sediment-water interface is thus dominated by water viscosity and steep diffusion gradients. Because of the diverse...... metabolism types, bacteria in the mostly anoxic sea floor play an important role in the major element cycles of the ocean. The communities of giant, filamentous sulfur bacteria that live in the deep-sea hydrothermal vents or along the Pacific coast of South America are presented here as examples....

  8. Acidophilic, Heterotrophic Bacteria of Acidic Mine Waters

    Wichlacz, Paul L.; Unz, Richard F.

    1981-01-01

    Obligately acidophilic, heterotrophic bacteria were isolated both from enrichment cultures developed with acidic mine water and from natural mine drainage. The bacteria were grouped by the ability to utilize a number of organic acids as sole carbon sources. None of the strains were capable of chemolithotrophic growth on inorganic reduced iron and sulfur compounds. All bacteria were rod shaped, gram negative, nonencapsulated, motile, capable of growth at pH 2.6 but not at pH 6.0, catalase and ...

  9. Analytical strategy for the detection of antibiotic residues in sheep and goat’s milk

    M. Carmen Beltrán; Rafael L. Althaus; Ana Molina; M. Isabel Berruga; M. Pilar Molina

    2015-01-01

    The use of antibiotics to treat mastitis and other infectious diseases in dairy sheep and goats is a widespread practice nowadays that can, when not properly applied, result in the contamination of the milk supply. Spanish legislation establishes the control of the presence of antibiotic residues in sheep and goat’s milk using screening methods that detect, at least, beta-lactam drugs. Microbial inhibitor tests using Geobacillus stearothermophilus var. calidolactis and specific receptor-bindi...

  10. Performance of a new microbial test for quinolone residues in muscle

    Sanz, David; Mata, Luis; Condón, Santiago; Sanz García, María Angeles; Razquín, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Concerns regarding the presence of drug residues in foods include allergic reactions, toxicity, technological problems in fermented products and the development of antibiotic resistance in human pathogens. The analysis of antimicrobial residues in foods is generally carried out, in a first step, through microbiological screening tests. These tests commonly use Geobacillus stearothermophilus as target specie but show a low ability to detect quinolones. The goal of our s...

  11. Validation of a wide spectrum microbiological tube test, the EXPLORER test, for the detection of antimicrobials in muscle from different animal species

    Gaudin, Valerie; Hedou, Celine; Verdon, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Abstract EXPLORERa is a simple and fast new kit for detection of inhibitory substances in raw meat. The test, a 96-well microtiter plate, is based on the inhibition of microbial growth (Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores). The Explorera test was validated in accordance with the decision 2002/657/EC (EC 2002). Specificity, detection capabilities for 5 compounds from major antimicrobials families and robustness were studied. Specificity of the test was tested with 4 differe...

  12. Effect of Dielectric and Liquid on Plasma Sterilization Using Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma

    Mastanaiah, Navya; Johnson, Judith A.; Roy, Subrata

    2013-01-01

    Plasma sterilization offers a faster, less toxic and versatile alternative to conventional sterilization methods. Using a relatively small, low temperature, atmospheric, dielectric barrier discharge surface plasma generator, we achieved ≥6 log reduction in concentration of vegetative bacterial and yeast cells within 4 minutes and ≥6 log reduction of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores within 20 minutes. Plasma sterilization is influenced by a wide variety of factors. Two factors studied in ...

  13. Quorum sensing in Gram-negative bacteria

    WU Hong; SONG Zhijun; Niels HФIBY; Michael GIVSKOV

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria can communicate with each other by means of signal molecules to coordinate the behavior of the entire community,and the mechanism is referred to as quorum sensing (QS).Signal systems enable bacteria to sense the size of their densities by monitoring the concentration of the signal molecules.Among Gram-negative bacteria N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL)-dependent quorum sensing systems are particularly widespread.These systems are used to coordinate expression of phenotypes that are fundamental to the interaction of bacteria with each other and with their environment and particularly higher organisms,covering a variety of functions ranging from pathogenic to symbiotic interactions.The detailed knowledge of these bacterial communication systems has opened completely new perspectives for controlling undesired microbial activities.

  14. Comparative genomics of the lactic acid bacteria

    Makarova, K.; Slesarev, A.; Wolf, Y.; Sorokin, A.; Mirkin, B.; Koonin, E.; Pavlov, A.; Pavlova, N.; Karamychev, V.; Polouchine, N.; Shakhova, V.; Grigoriev, I.; Lou, Y.; Rokhsar, D.; Lucas, S.; Huang, K.; Goodstein, D. M.; Hawkins, T.; Plengvidhya, V.; Welker, D.; Hughes, J.; Goh, Y.; Benson, A.; Baldwin, K.; Lee, J. -H.; Diaz-Muniz, I.; Dosti, B.; Smeianov, V; Wechter, W.; Barabote, R.; Lorca, G.; Altermann, E.; Barrangou, R.; Ganesan, B.; Xie, Y.; Rawsthorne, H.; Tamir, D.; Parker, C.; Breidt, F.; Broadbent, J.; Hutkins, R.; O' Sullivan, D.; Steele, J.; Unlu, G.; Saier, M.; Klaenhammer, T.; Richardson, P.; Kozyavkin, S.; Weimer, B.; Mills, D.

    2006-06-01

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria are associated with various plant and animal niches and play a key role in the production of fermented foods and beverages. We report nine genome sequences representing the phylogenetic and functional diversity of these bacteria. The small genomes of lactic acid bacteria encode a broad repertoire of transporters for efficient carbon and nitrogen acquisition from the nutritionally rich environments they inhabit and reflect a limited range of biosynthetic capabilities that indicate both prototrophic and auxotrophic strains. Phylogenetic analyses, comparison of gene content across the group, and reconstruction of ancestral gene sets indicate a combination of extensive gene loss and key gene acquisitions via horizontal gene transfer during the coevolution of lactic acid bacteria with their habitats.

  15. DECONTAMINATION OF HEAVY METALS WITH BACTERIA

    OBJECTIVES: To discover, improve, understand the mechanisms and use naturally occurring bacteria to decontiminate in situ heavy metals from the soils, sediments and waters to protect human health and the environment. ABSTRACT: Our laboratory (Vesper et al. ...

  16. Distribution of phytopathogenic bacteria in infested seeds

    Populations of phytopathogenic bacteria representing five host-pathogen combinations were assessed to determine if there was a mathematical relationship common across seedborne bacterial diseases. Bacterial populations were estimated from naturally-infested seeds of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), peppe...

  17. Protection of probiotic bacteria in synbiotic matrices

    Probiotics, like Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus reuteri, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, when encapsulated with prebiotic fibers such as fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS), inulin (I) and pectic-oligosaccharides (POS), formed a synbiotic matrix system that protected the bacteria ...

  18. Effect of leukocyte hydrolases on bacteria

    Leukocyte extracts, trypsin, and lysozyme are all capable of releasing the bulk of the LPS from S. typhi, S. typhimurium, and E. coli. Bacteria which have been killed by heat, ultraviolet irradiation, or by a variety of metabolic inhibitors and antibiotics which affect protein, DNA, RNA, and cell wall synthesis no longer yield soluble LPS following treatment with the releasing agents. On the other hand, bacteria which are resistant to certain of the antibiotics yield nearly the full amount of soluble LPS following treatment, suggesting that certain heatabile endogenous metabolic pathways collaborate with the releasing agents in the release of LPS from the bacteria. It is suggested that some of the beneficial effects of antibiotics on infections with gram-negative bacteria may be the prevention of massive release of endotoxin by leukocyte enzymes in inflammatory sites

  19. Electrical Cable Bacteria Save Marine Life

    Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Animals at the bottomof the sea survive oxygen depletion surprisingly often, and a new study identifies cable bacteria in the sediment as the saviors. The bacterial electrical activity creates an iron ‘carpet’, trapping toxic hydrogen sulfide.......Animals at the bottomof the sea survive oxygen depletion surprisingly often, and a new study identifies cable bacteria in the sediment as the saviors. The bacterial electrical activity creates an iron ‘carpet’, trapping toxic hydrogen sulfide....

  20. Ecology: Electrical Cable Bacteria Save Marine Life

    Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Animals at the bottom of the sea survive oxygen depletion surprisingly often, and a new study identifies cable bacteria in the sediment as the saviors. The bacterial electrical activity creates an iron 'carpet', trapping toxic hydrogen sulfide.......Animals at the bottom of the sea survive oxygen depletion surprisingly often, and a new study identifies cable bacteria in the sediment as the saviors. The bacterial electrical activity creates an iron 'carpet', trapping toxic hydrogen sulfide....

  1. Microgravity effects on pathogenicity of bacteria

    Wang, Ya-Juan; Liu, Chang-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Microgravity is one of the important environmental conditions during spaceflight. A series of studies have shown that many kinds of bacteria could be detected in space station and space shuttle. Space environment or simulated microgravity may throw a certain influence on those opportunistic pathogens and lead to some changes on their virulence, biofilm formation and drug tolerance. The mechanism of bacteria response to space environment or simulated microgravity has not been defined. However,...

  2. Interactions between ectomycorrhizal associations and bacteria

    Marupakula, Srisailam

    2016-01-01

    Boreal forest podzol soils have vertically stratified horizons with different physico-chemical characteristics and high microbial diversity. Ectomycorrhizal fungi play key roles in accessing nutrients from both organic and mineral substrates. The role of associated bacteria in these processes is still poorly understood. The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to improve understanding of the distribution, diversity and community structure of fungi and bacteria on roots and in soil ...

  3. Magnetization processes in magnetotactic bacteria systems

    Polyakova, T.; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 293, - (2005), s. 365-370. ISSN 0304-8853. [International Conference on Scientific and Clinical Aplications of Magnetic Carriers. Lyon, 20.05.04-22.05.04] Grant ostatní: MCF: Nanomag-Lab(XE) N 2004-003177 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetotactic bacteria * magnetization process * chemotaxis * bacteria * magnetosomes * chain formation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.985, year: 2005

  4. Bacteria in goat meat: Biological danger

    Ivanović S.; Pavlović I.; Žujović M.; Tomić Z.; Memiši N.

    2011-01-01

    In the world, especially in China, India, Pаkistаn and Nigeria goat meat represents an important foodstuff in nutrition of people. Goat meat is being increasingly consumed in Serbia owing to its distinctive taste and desirable chemical composition. As many other types of meat, goat meat can be the source of pathogenic bacteria. Bacteria can find their way into meat of healthy goats or goats with no clinical symptoms premortally (infection) or postmortally (...

  5. Study of Lactobacillus as Probiotic Bacteria

    J. Nowroozi; Mirzaii, M; M. Norouzi

    2004-01-01

    Because of inhibitory effect, selected probiotic lactobacilli may be used as biological preservative, so, the aim of this study was to present some data on lactobacillus as probiotic bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from sausage. Each isolate of lactobacillus species was identified by biochemical tests and comparing their sugar fermentation pattern. Antibacterial activities were done by an agar spot, well diffusion and blank disk method. Enzyme sensitivity of supernatant fluid and...

  6. How Bacteria Turn Fiber into Food

    Martens, Eric C.; Lowe, Elisabeth C.; Chiang, Herbert; Nicholas A Pudlo; Wu, Meng; McNulty, Nathan P.; Abbott, D Wade; Henrissat, Bernard; Gilbert, Harry J.; Bolam, David N.; Jeffrey I Gordon

    2011-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria inhabiting the human gut have evolved under intense pressure to utilize complex carbohydrates, primarily plant cell wall glycans in our diets. These polysaccharides are not digested by human enzymes, but are processed to absorbable short chain fatty acids by gut bacteria. The Bacteroidetes, one of two dominant bacterial phyla in the adult gut, possess broad glycan-degrading abilities. These species use a series of membrane protein complexes, termed Sus-like systems, for cat...

  7. Bacteria under SOS evolve anticancer phenotypes

    Weitao Tao; Dallo Shatha F

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The anticancer drugs, such as DNA replication inhibitors, stimulate bacterial adhesion and induce the bacterial SOS response. As a variety of bacterial mutants can be generated during SOS, novel phenotypes are likely to be selected under the drug pressure. Presentation of the hypothesis Bacteria growing with cancer cells in the presence of the replication inhibitors undergo the SOS response and evolve advantageous phenotypes for the bacteria to invade the cancer cells in o...

  8. Characterization of (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria

    Wolterink, A.F.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    Some bacteria can use (per)chlorateas terminal electron acceptor for growth. These bacteria convert perchlorate via chlorate and chlorite into chloride and molecular oxygen. Oxygen formation in microbial respiration is unique. In this study two chlorate-reducing strains belonging to the species Pseudomonas chloritidismutans and a (per)chlorate-reducing strain Dechloromonas hortensis were isolated. The characterization of the chlorate-reducing strain AW-1, which was isolated from a bioreactor ...

  9. Quorum sensing mechanism in lactic acid bacteria

    Hatice Yılmaz - Yıldıran

    2015-04-01

    and detection occurs as a consecution it is hard to understand their QS mechanism. In this review, connection between QS mechanism and some characteristics of lactic acid bacteria are evaluated such as concordance with its host, inhibition of pathogen development and colonization in gastrointestinal system, bacteriocin production, acid and bile resistance, adhesion to epithelium cells. Understanding QS mechanism of lactic acid bacteria will be useful to design metabiotics which is defined as novel probiotics.

  10. Quorum sensing mechanism in lactic acid bacteria

    Hatice Yılmaz - Yıldıran; Aynur Gül Karahan; Gülden Başyiğit - Kılıç

    2015-01-01

    For a long time, microorganisms were considered as just multiplying, finding nutrients and living by themselves organisms. But that belief changed 50 years ago along with the discovery of bacteria communication with each other and environment by microbiologists. The language used in the communication consists of signal molecules and these molecules are generally called 'auto inducer'. Bacteria are capable of measuring density of these molecules and by this way they are able to detect amoun...

  11. Molecular Evolution of Threonine Dehydratase in Bacteria

    Yu, Xuefei; Li, Ye; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Threonine dehydratase converts L-threonine to 2-ketobutyrate. Several threonine dehydratases exist in bacteria, but their origins and evolutionary pathway are unknown. Here we analyzed all the available threonine dehydratases in bacteria and proposed an evolutionary pathway leading to the genes encoding three different threonine dehydratases CTD, BTD1 and BTD2. The ancestral threonine dehydratase might contain only a catalytic domain, but one or two ACT-like subdomains were fused during the e...

  12. Keratinolytic activity of cutaneous and oral bacteria.

    Mikx, F H; De Jong, M H

    1987-01-01

    A test was developed to measure the keratinolytic activity of cutaneous and oral bacteria. Keratin, labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, was used in a phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) with 1 mM dithiothreitol. The degradation of keratin was estimated by measuring the fluorescence of the degradation products in the supernatant of the reaction mixtures in a luminescence spectrometer. Several oral and cutaneous bacteria were investigated: Bacteroides gingivalis, Bacteroides intermedius, Treponema d...

  13. Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria

    Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria have lagged behind similar studies in aerobes. However, the current interest in biotechnology, the involvement of anaerobes in disease and the emergence of antibioticresistant strains have focused attention on the genetics of anaerobes. This article reviews molecular genetic studies in Bacteroides spp., Clostridium spp. and methanogens. Certain genetic systems in some anaerobes differ from those in aerobes and illustrate the genetic diversity among bacteria

  14. Distribution of coliform bacteria in waste water

    Dau Lal Bohra; Vikas Modasiya; Chandan Kumar Bahura

    2012-01-01

    Biological activity of water can be apparently judged by the colonization of bacteria (microbes). In order to find out the extent of pollution and the relationship between inorganic matters and microbiota, a quantitative and qualitative analysis of bacteria in various types of sewage waters, namely sewage water by the residential colonies (group I), industrial waste water (group II), sewage treatment hub (group III), unorganized collected waste water (group IV) and old residential waste colle...

  15. Horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and animals

    Dunning Hotopp, Julie C.

    2011-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is increasingly described between bacteria and animals. Such transfers that are vertically inherited have the potential to influence the evolution of animals. One classic example is the transfer of DNA from mitochondria and chloroplasts to the nucleus after the acquisition of these organelles by eukaryotes. Even today, many of the described instances of bacteria to animal transfer occur as part of intimate relationships like those of endosymbionts and their invertebra...

  16. Study of Lactobacillus as Probiotic Bacteria

    J Nowroozi

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of inhibitory effect, selected probiotic lactobacilli may be used as biological preservative, so, the aim of this study was to present some data on lactobacillus as probiotic bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from sausage. Each isolate of lactobacillus species was identified by biochemical tests and comparing their sugar fermentation pattern. Antibacterial activities were done by an agar spot, well diffusion and blank disk method. Enzyme sensitivity of supernatant fluid and concentrated cell free culture after treatment with α-amylase, lysozyme and trypsin was determined. The isolated bacteria were Lacto. plantarum, Lacto delbruekii, Lacto. acidophilus, Lacto. brevis. The isolated bacteria had strong activity against indicator strains. The antibacterial activity was stable at 100ºC for 10 min and at 56ºC for 30 min, but activity was lost after autoclaving. The maximum production of plantaricin was obtained at 25 - 30ºC at pH 6.5. Because, lactobacilli that used to process sausage fermentation are producing antimicrobial activity with heat stability bacteriocin, so, these bacteria may be considered to be a healthy probiotic diet. Lactobacilli originally isolated from meat products are the best condidates as probiotic bacteria to improve the microbiological safety of these foods.

  17. How methylglyoxal kills bacteria: An ultrastructural study.

    Rabie, Erika; Serem, June Cheptoo; Oberholzer, Hester Magdalena; Gaspar, Anabella Regina Marques; Bester, Megan Jean

    2016-01-01

    Antibacterial activity of honey is due to the presence of methylglyoxal (MGO), H2O2, bee defensin as well as polyphenols. High MGO levels in manuka honey are the main source of antibacterial activity. Manuka honey has been reported to reduce the swarming and swimming motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa due to de-flagellation. Due to the complexity of honey it is unknown if this effect is directly due to MGO. In this ultrastructural investigation the effects of MGO on the morphology of bacteria and specifically the structure of fimbriae and flagella were investigated. MGO effectively inhibited Gram positive (Bacillus subtilis; MIC 0.8 mM and Staphylococcus aureus; MIC 1.2 mM) and Gram negative (P. aeruginosa; MIC 1.0 mM and Escherichia coli; MIC 1.2 mM) bacteria growth. The ultrastructural effects of 0.5, 1.0 and 2 mM MGO on B. substilis and E. coli morphology was then evaluated. At 0.5 mM MGO, bacteria structure was unaltered. For both bacteria at 1 mM MGO fewer fimbriae were present and the flagella were less or absent. Identified structures appeared stunted and fragile. At 2 mM MGO fimbriae and flagella were absent while the bacteria were rounded with shrinkage and loss of membrane integrity. Antibacterial MGO causes alterations in the structure of bacterial fimbriae and flagella which would limit bacteria adherence and motility. PMID:26986806

  18. Peptide conversations in Gram-positive bacteria.

    Monnet, Véronique; Juillard, Vincent; Gardan, Rozenn

    2016-05-01

    Within Gram-positive bacteria, the expression of target genes is controlled at the population level via signaling peptides, also known as pheromones. Pheromones control a wide range of functions, including competence, virulence, and others that remain unknown. Until now, their role in bacterial gene regulation has probably been underestimated; indeed, bacteria are able to produce, by ribosomal synthesis or surface protein degradation, an extraordinary variety of peptides which are released outside bacteria and among which, some are pheromones that mediate cell-to-cell communication. The review aims at giving an updated overview of these peptide-dependant communication pathways. More specifically, it follows the whole peptide circuit from the peptide production and secretion in the extracellular medium to its interaction with sensors at bacterial surface or re-import into the bacteria where it plays its regulation role. In recent years, as we have accumulated more knowledge about these systems, it has become apparent that they are more complex than they first appeared. For this reason, more research on peptide-dependant pathways is needed to develop new strategies for controlling functions of interest in Gram-positive bacteria. In particular, such research could lead to alternatives to the use of antibiotics against pathogenic bacteria. In perspective, the review identifies new research questions that emerge in this field and that have to be addressed. PMID:25198780

  19. Molecular probe technology detects bacteria without culture

    Hyman Richard W

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our ultimate goal is to detect the entire human microbiome, in health and in disease, in a single reaction tube, and employing only commercially available reagents. To that end, we adapted molecular inversion probes to detect bacteria using solely a massively multiplex molecular technology. This molecular probe technology does not require growth of the bacteria in culture. Rather, the molecular probe technology requires only a sequence of forty sequential bases unique to the genome of the bacterium of interest. In this communication, we report the first results of employing our molecular probes to detect bacteria in clinical samples. Results While the assay on Affymetrix GenFlex Tag16K arrays allows the multiplexing of the detection of the bacteria in each clinical sample, one Affymetrix GenFlex Tag16K array must be used for each clinical sample. To multiplex the clinical samples, we introduce a second, independent assay for the molecular probes employing Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection. By adding one unique oligonucleotide barcode for each clinical sample, we combine the samples after processing, but before sequencing, and sequence them together. Conclusions Overall, we have employed 192 molecular probes representing 40 bacteria to detect the bacteria in twenty-one vaginal swabs as assessed by the Affymetrix GenFlex Tag16K assay and fourteen of those by the Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection assay. The correlations among the assays were excellent.

  20. Competition for hydrogen by human faecal bacteria: evidence for the predominance of methane producing bacteria.

    Strocchi, A; Furne, J K; Ellis, C J; Levitt, M D

    1991-01-01

    Studies of sludge have shown that some species of sulphate reducing bacteria outcompete methane producing bacteria for the common substrate H2. A similar competition may exist in human faeces where the methane (CH4) producing status of an individual depends on the faecal concentration of sulphate reducing bacteria. To determine if non-methanogenic faeces outcompete CH4 producing faeces for H2, aliquots of each type of faeces were incubated alone or mixed together, with or without addition of ...

  1. Antioxidant activity of Sphaerococcus coronopifolius associated bacteria

    Nádia Fino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Associated bacteria living on macroalgae surfaces are an interesting source of new secondary metabolites with biological activities. The aim of this study was the isolation and identification of epiphytic bacteria from the marine algae Sphaerococcus coronopifolius and the evaluation of the antioxidant activity of the bacteria extracts. The identification of epiphytic bacteria was determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacteria extracts were obtained with methanol and dichloromethane (1:1 extraction. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by quantification of total phenolic content (TPC, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity and oxygen radical absorbent capacity (ORAC. The extracts with higher antioxidant activity were tested on MCF-7 and HepG-2 cell lines in oxidative stress conditions induced by H2O2 at 0.2 mM and 0.5 mM, respectively. In total were isolated 21 Sphaerococcus coronopifolius associated bacteria and identified as Vibrio sp. (28.57%, Shewanella sp. (23.81%, Pseudoalteromonas sp. (19.05%, Bacillus sp. (9.52% and Halomonas sp. (9.52%. Two (9.52% of them presented less than 90% Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST match. The epiphytic bacteria with the most antioxidant potential evaluated by ORAC and DPPH methods were Sp2, Sp12, Sp23, Sp25 and Sp27. The strain Sp4 show high antioxidant activity in all antioxidant methods (ORAC, DPPH and TPC. In oxidative stress conditions on MCF-7 cell line, the extracts of bacteria (1mg.ml-1: 24hours Sp4 (16.15%, Sp25 (17.95% and Sp27 (10.65% prevented the cell death induced by H2O2. In the HepG-2 cell line was the extracts of Sp2 (9.01%, Sp4 (11.21%, Sp12 (7.20% and Sp23 (8.81% bacteria that high prevented the oxidative stress condition induced by H2O2. In conclusion, the Sphaerococcus coronopifolius associated bacteria can be an interesting and excellent source of marine natural compounds with antioxidant activity.

  2. Magnetosome chain superstructure in uncultured magnetotactic bacteria

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce magnetosomes, which are magnetic particles enveloped by biological membranes, in a highly controlled mineralization process. Magnetosomes are used to navigate in magnetic fields by a phenomenon called magnetotaxis. Two levels of organization and control are recognized in magnetosomes. First, magnetotactic bacteria create a spatially distinct environment within vesicles defined by their membranes. In the vesicles, the bacteria control the size, composition and purity of the mineral content of the magnetic particles. Unique crystal morphologies are produced in magnetosomes as a consequence of this bacterial control. Second, magnetotactic bacteria organize the magnetosomes in chains within the cell body. It has been shown in a particular case that the chains are positioned within the cell body in specific locations defined by filamentous cytoskeleton elements. Here, we describe an additional level of organization of the magnetosome chains in uncultured magnetotactic cocci found in marine and freshwater sediments. Electron microscopy analysis of the magnetosome chains using a goniometer showed that the magnetic crystals in both types of bacteria are not oriented at random along the crystal chain. Instead, the magnetosomes have specific orientations relative to the other magnetosomes in the chain. Each crystal is rotated either 60°, 180° or 300° relative to their neighbors along the chain axis, causing the overlapping of the (1 1 1) and (1-bar 1-bar 1-bar) capping faces of neighboring crystals. We suggest that genetic determinants that are not present or active in bacteria with magnetosomes randomly rotated within a chain must be present in bacteria that organize magnetosomes so precisely. This particular organization may also be used as an indicative biosignature of magnetosomes in the study of magnetofossils in the cases where this symmetry is observed

  3. Nutritional Interdependence Among Rumen Bacteria During Cellulose Digestion In Vitro

    Miura, Hideki; HORIGUCHI, Masaaki; Ogimoto, Keiji; MATSUMOTO, Tatsuro

    1983-01-01

    A study has been made of the promoting effect of starch on cellulose digestion by mixed rumen bacteria in a cellulose-urea medium. Starch supplementation of the medium promoted the growth of bacteria that required neither amino acids (AA) nor branched-chain fatty acids (BrFA). The growth of these bacteria was followed by the growth of AA-dependent bacteria, AA- or BrFA-dependent bacteria, BrFA-producing bacteria, and finally, BrFA-dependent cellulolytic bacteria. Population changes of these b...

  4. Method of Detecting Coliform Bacteria and Escherichia Coli Bacteria from Reflected Light

    Vincent, Robert (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting coliform bacteria in water from reflected light and a method of detecting Eschericha Coli bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  5. Bacteria and plutonium in marine environments

    Microbes are important in geochemical cycling of many elements. Recent reports emphasize biogenous particulates and bacterial exometabolites as controlling oceanic distribution of plutonium. Bacteria perform oxidation/reduction reactions on metals such as mercury, nickel, lead, copper, and cadmium. Redox transformations or uptake of Pu by marine bacteria may well proceed by similar mechanisms. Profiles of water samples and sediment cores were obtained along the continental shelf off Nova Scotia and in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Profiles of water samples, and sediment cores were obtained. Epifluorescent microscopy was used to view bacteria (from water or sediment) after concentration on membrane filters and staining with acridine orange. Radiochemical analyses measured Pu in sediments and water samples. Studies of 237Pu uptake used a strain of Leucothrix mucor isolated from a macroalga. Enumeration shows bacteria to range 104 to 105 cells/ml in seawater or 107 to 108 cells/gram of sediment. These numbers are related to the levels and distrbution of Pu in the samples. In cultures of L. mucor amended with Pu atom concentrations approximating those present in open ocean environments, bacterial cells concentrated 237Pu slower and to lower levels than did clay minerals, glass beads, or phytoplankton. These data further clarify the role of marine bacteria in Pu biogeochemistry

  6. Molecular analysis of deep subsurface bacteria

    Deep sediments samples from site C10a, in Appleton, and sites, P24, P28, and P29, at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina were studied to determine their microbial community composition, DNA homology and mol %G+C. Different geological formations with great variability in hydrogeological parameters were found across the depth profile. Phenotypic identification of deep subsurface bacteria underestimated the bacterial diversity at the three SRS sites, since bacteria with the same phenotype have different DNA composition and less than 70% DNA homology. Total DNA hybridization and mol %G+C analysis of deep sediment bacterial isolates suggested that each formation is comprised of different microbial communities. Depositional environment was more important than site and geological formation on the DNA relatedness between deep subsurface bacteria, since more 70% of bacteria with 20% or more of DNA homology came from the same depositional environments. Based on phenotypic and genotypic tests Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp.-like bacteria were identified in 85 million years old sediments. This suggests that these microbial communities might have been adapted during a long period of time to the environmental conditions of the deep subsurface

  7. Fossil bacteria in Xuanlong iron ore deposits of Hebei Province

    DAI Yongding; SONG Haiming; SHEN Jiying

    2004-01-01

    Discovered in Early Proterozoic Xuanlong iron ore deposits are six genera of fossil iron bacteria, i. e. sphere (coenobium of) rod-shaped (monomer) Naumanniella, ellipsoid elliptical Ochrobium, sphere spherical Siderocapsa and chain spherical Siderococcus, chain rod-shaped Leptothrix and Lieskeella, and six genera of fossil blue bacteria, namely sphere spherical Gloeocapsa, Synechocystis and Globobacter, chain spherical Anabaena and Nostoc, and constrictive septate tubular Nodularia. The biomineralized monomers and coenobia of the two categories of bacteria, together with hematite plates made up the bacteria pelletal, bacteria silky,bacteria fibrous and clasty bacteria pelletal textural lamina. The bacteria pelletal laminae combined with other bacteria laminae to make up oncolite, stromatolite and laminate. The precipitation of iron oxide was accelerated due to iron and blue bacteria cohabiting on microbial film or mat. The Xuanlong iron ore deposits are microbial binding ore deposits of ocean source.

  8. Inhibition of seafood-borne bacteria in cooked mackerel (Rastrelliger kanagurta) fish meat by lactic acid bacteria

    Kanappan, S.; G. Gopikrishna

    2008-01-01

    Antagonistic activity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) namely Streptococcus faecalis, Pediococcus cerevisiae and Lactobacillus casei was tested against seafood-borne bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens and Listeria monocytogenes. Three lactic acid bacteria such as Streptococcus faecalis, Lactobacillus casei and Pediococcus cerevisiae were coated on cooked mackerel meat, individually and in combination against fish-borne bacteria. S. ...

  9. Using Fluorescent Viruses for Detecting Bacteria in Water

    Tabacco, Mary Beth; Qian, Xiaohua; Russo, Jaimie A.

    2009-01-01

    A method of detecting water-borne pathogenic bacteria is based partly on established molecular-recognition and fluorescent-labeling concepts, according to which bacteria of a species of interest are labeled with fluorescent reporter molecules and the bacteria can then be detected by fluorescence spectroscopy. The novelty of the present method lies in the use of bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) to deliver the fluorescent reporter molecules to the bacteria of the species of interest.

  10. Applications of Magnetosomes Synthesized by Magnetotactic Bacteria in Medicine

    EdouardAlphandéry

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria belong to a group of bacteria that synthesize iron oxide nanoparticles covered by biological material that are called magnetosomes. These bacteria use the magnetosomes as a compass to navigate in the direction of the earth’s magnetic field. This compass helps the bacteria to find the optimum conditions for their growth and survival. Here, we review several medical applications of magnetotactic bacteria and magnetosomes, such as those in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI),...

  11. Bacteriocins From Lactic Acid Bacteria: Interest For Food Products Biopreservation

    Dortu, C.; Thonart, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria: interest for food products biopreservation. Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria are low molecular weight antimicrobial peptides. They have inhibitory activity against the bacteria that are closed related to the producer strains and a narrow inhibitory spectrum. Nevertheless, most of them have activity against some food-born pathogenic bacteria as Listeria monocytogenes. The application of bacteriocins or bacteriocin producing lactic acid bacteria in ...

  12. Quantification and Qualification of Bacteria Trapped in Chewed Gum

    Wessel, Stefan W.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Morando, David; Slomp, Anje M.; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Maitra, Amarnath; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and remove them from the oral cavity. To test this hypothesis, we developed two methods to quantify numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum. In the first method, known numbers of bacteria were finger-...

  13. All ecosystems potentially host electrogenic bacteria.

    Chabert, Nicolas; Amin Ali, Oulfat; Achouak, Wafa

    2015-12-01

    Instead of requiring metal catalysts, MFCs utilize bacteria that oxidize organic matter and either transfer electrons to the anode or take electrons from the cathode. These devices are thus based on a wide microbial diversity that can convert a large array of organic matter components into sustainable and renewable energy. A wide variety of explored environments were found to host electrogenic bacteria, including extreme environments. In the present review, we describe how different ecosystems host electrogenic bacteria, as well as the physicochemical, electrochemical and biological parameters that control the currents from MFCs. We also report how using new molecular techniques allowed characterization of electrochemical biofilms and identification of potentially new electrogenic species. Finally we discuss these findings in the context of future research directions. PMID:26298511

  14. Urban ants and transportation of nosocomial bacteria.

    Rodovalho, Cynara M; Santos, Ana L; Marcolino, Marcus T; Bonetti, Ana M; Brandeburgo, Malcon A M

    2007-01-01

    Many ant species displaying synanthropic behavior that have successfully dispersed in urban areas can cause problems in hospitals by acting as bacterial vectors. In this study, we encountered bacteria on ants collected at the Universidade Federal de Uberlândia hospital, in the campus and at households nearby. The ants were identified as Tapinoma melanocephalum (Fabricius) and Camponotus vittatus (Forel) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and the bacterial strains found here belong to the group of the coagulase-positive staphylococcus, coagulase-negative staphylococcus and gram negative bacilli, including antimicrobial drug-resistant strains. An investigation of the bacteria found in the ants and in the environment revealed that some ants carried non-isolated bacteria from the same environment and with high levels of resistance, evidencing the transmission potential of these insects. PMID:17710329

  15. Biodegradation of Complex Bacteria on Phenolic Derivatives in River Water

    GUANG-HUA LU; CHAO WANG; ZHE SUN

    2009-01-01

    Objective To isolate, incubate, and identify 4-chlorophenol-degrading complex bacteria, determine the tolerance of these bacteria to phenolic derivatives and study their synergetic metabolism as well as the aboriginal microbes and co-metabolic degradation of mixed chlorophenols in river water. Methods Microbial community of complex bacteria was identified by plate culture observation techniques and Gram stain method. Bacterial growth inhibition test was used to determine the tolerance of complex bacteria to toxicants. Biodegradability of phenolic derivatives was determined by adding 4-chlorophenol-degrading bacteria in river water. Results The complex bacteria were identified as Mycopiana, Alcaligenes, Pseudvmonas, and Flavobacterium. The domesticated complex bacteria were more tolerant to phenolic derivatives than the aboriginal bacteria from Qinhuai River. The biodegradability of chlorophenols, dihydroxybenzenes and nitrophenols under various aquatic conditions was determined and compared. The complex bacteria exhibited a higher metabolic efficiency on chemicals than the aboriginal microbes, and the final removal rate of phenolic derivatives was increased at least by 55% when the complex bacteria were added into river water. The metabolic relationship between dominant mixed bacteria and river bacteria was studied. Conclusion The complex bacteria domesticated by 4-chlorophenol can grow and be metabolized to take other chlorophenols, dihydroxybenzenes and nitrophenols as the sole carbon and energy source. There is a synergetic metabolism of most compounds between the aboriginal microbes in river water and the domesticated complex bacteria. 4-chlorophenol-degrading bacteria can co-metabolize various chlorophenols in river water.

  16. Modulating immune responses with probiotic bacteria.

    Matsuzaki, T; Chin, J

    2000-02-01

    For many years, probiotic bacteria have been known to confer health benefits to the consumer. One possible mechanism for this may be the ability of probiotic bacteria to modulate immune responses. Oral administration of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS) has been found to enhance innate immunity by stimulating the activity of splenic NK cells. Oral feeding with killed LcS was able to stimulate the production of Th1 cytokines, resulting in repressed production of IgE antibodies against Ovalbumin in experimental mice. The ability to switch mucosal immune responses towards Th1 with probiotic bacteria provides a strategy for treatment of allergic disorders. Growth of Meth A tumour cells in the lungs was also inhibited by intrapleural injection of LcS. Oral administration of other probiotic bacteria, such as Streptococcus thermophilus (St), Lactobacillus fermentum (Lf) and yeast (Y), elicited different immune responses. Mice that were prefed yeast or Lf followed by feeding with ovalbumin (OVA) responded better to vaccination with OVA than mice not given either probiotic or OVA or mice that had been prefed only OVA. However, antibody responses were significantly suppressed in response to vaccination with OVA in mice that had been prefed yeast followed by yeast and OVA as well as mice prefed Lf followed by Lf and OVA. Prefeeding St followed by OVA feeding enhanced cellular immune responses against ovalbumin. In contrast, mice prefed St followed by St + OVA were hyporesponsive against OVA. While antigen feeding alone appears to prime for an immune response, cofeeding antigen with probiotic bacteria can suppress both antibody and cellular immune responses and may provide an efficacious protocol to attenuate autoimmune diseases, such as experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, by jointly dosing with myelin basic protein and probiotic bacteria. PMID:10651931

  17. Bacteria Provide Cleanup of Oil Spills, Wastewater

    2010-01-01

    Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Marshall Space Flight Center, Micro-Bac International Inc., of Round Rock, Texas, developed a phototrophic cell for water purification in space. Inside the cell: millions of photosynthetic bacteria. Micro-Bac proceeded to commercialize the bacterial formulation it developed for the SBIR project. The formulation is now used for the remediation of wastewater systems and waste from livestock farms and food manufacturers. Strains of the SBIR-derived bacteria also feature in microbial solutions that treat environmentally damaging oil spills, such as that resulting from the catastrophic 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico.

  18. Bacteria-Triggered Release of Antimicrobial Agents

    Komnatnyy, Vitaly V.; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim;

    2014-01-01

    Medical devices employed in healthcare practice are often susceptible to microbial contamination. Pathogenic bacteria may attach themselves to device surfaces of catheters or implants by formation of chemically complex biofilms, which may be the direct cause of device failure. Extracellular...... material is demonstrated by the bacteria‐triggered release of antibiotics to control bacterial populations and signaling molecules to modulate quorum sensing. The self‐regulating system provides the basis for the development of device‐relevant polymeric materials, which only release antibiotics in...... dependency of the titer of bacteria surrounding the medical device....

  19. Degradation of monomethylhydrazine by two soil bacteria

    It has been reported that three heterotrophic soil bacteria had the capacity to degrade hydrazine. One of these organisms, Achromobacter sp., degraded hydrazine to N2 gas. Furthermore, it was reported that monomethylhydrazine (MMH) in Arredondo fine sand was mineralized to CO2, and that such degradation is microbial. However, microorganisms that degrade MMH have not been reported. MMH and hydrazine are chemically similar to one another. Therefore, this study was initiated to test the capacity of the two hydrazine-degrading bacteria, Achromobacter sp. and Pseudomonas sp., to degrade MMH

  20. Bacterial biofilms. Bacteria Quorum sensing in biofilms

    E. S. Vorobey

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Data on biofilms, their structure and properties, peculiarities of formation and interaction between microorganisms in the film are presented. Information on discovery and study of biofilms, importance of biofilms in the medical and clinical microbiology are offered. The data allow to interpret biofilm as a form of existence of human normal microflora. For the exchange of information within the biofilm between the individual cells of the same or different species bacteria use the signal molecules of the Quorum sensing system. Coordination of bacterial cells activity in the biofilms gives them significant advantages: in the biofilms bacteria are protected from the influence of the host protective factors and the antibacterial drugs.

  1. Functional Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea

    Blow, M. J.; Deutschbauer, A. M.; Hoover, C. A.; Lamson, J.; Lamson, J.; Price, M. N.; Waters, J.; Wetmore, K. M.; Bristow, J.; Arkin, A. P.

    2013-03-20

    Bacteria and Archaea exhibit a huge diversity of metabolic capabilities with fundamental importance in the environment, and potential applications in biotechnology. However, the genetic bases of these capabilities remain unclear due largely to an absence of technologies that link DNA sequence to molecular function. To address this challenge, we are developing a pipeline for high throughput annotation of gene function using mutagenesis, growth assays and DNA sequencing. By applying this pipeline to annotate gene function in 50 diverse microbes we hope to discover thousands of new gene functions and produce a proof of principle `Functional Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea?.

  2. Added value of experts' knowledge to improve a quantitative microbial exposure assessment model--Application to aseptic-UHT food products.

    Pujol, Laure; Johnson, Nicholas Brian; Magras, Catherine; Albert, Isabelle; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2015-10-15

    In a previous study, a quantitative microbial exposure assessment (QMEA) model applied to an aseptic-UHT food process was developed [Pujol, L., Albert, I., Magras, C., Johnson, N. B., Membré, J. M. Probabilistic exposure assessment model to estimate aseptic UHT product failure rate. 2015 International Journal of Food Microbiology. 192, 124-141]. It quantified Sterility Failure Rate (SFR) associated with Bacillus cereus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus per process module (nine modules in total from raw material reception to end-product storage). Previously, the probabilistic model inputs were set by experts (using knowledge and in-house data). However, only the variability dimension was taken into account. The model was then improved using expert elicitation knowledge in two ways. First, the model was refined by adding the uncertainty dimension to the probabilistic inputs, enabling to set a second order Monte Carlo analysis. The eight following inputs, and their impact on SFR, are presented in detail in this present study: D-value for each bacteria of interest (B. cereus and G. stearothermophilus) associated with the inactivation model for the UHT treatment step, i.e., two inputs; log reduction (decimal reduction) number associated with the inactivation model for the packaging sterilization step for each bacterium and each part of the packaging (product container and sealing component), i.e., four inputs; and bacterial spore air load of the aseptic tank and the filler cabinet rooms, i.e., two inputs. Second, the model was improved by leveraging expert knowledge to develop further the existing model. The proportion of bacteria in the product which settled on surface of pipes (between the UHT treatment and the aseptic tank on one hand, and between the aseptic tank and the filler cabinet on the other hand) leading to a possible biofilm formation for each bacterium, was better characterized. It was modeled as a function of the hygienic design level of the aseptic

  3. Bacteria in crude oil survived autoclaving and stimulated differentially by exogenous bacteria.

    Gong, Xiao-Cui; Liu, Ze-Shen; Guo, Peng; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Chen, Jian; Wang, Xing-Biao; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Chun-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Autoclaving of crude oil is often used to evaluate the hydrocarbon-degrading abilities of bacteria. This may be potentially useful for bioaugmentation and microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). However, it is not entirely clear if "endogenous" bacteria (e.g., spores) in/on crude oil survive the autoclaving process, or influence subsequent evaluation of the hydrocarbon-degradation abilities of the "exogenous" bacterial strains. To test this, we inoculated autoclaved crude oil medium with six exogenous bacterial strains (three Dietzia strains, two Acinetobacter strains, and one Pseudomonas strain). The survival of the spore-forming Bacillus and Paenibacillus and the non-spore-forming mesophilic Pseudomonas, Dietzia, Alcaligenes, and Microbacterium was detected using a 16S rRNA gene clone library and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis. However, neither bacteria nor bacterial activity was detected in three controls consisting of non-inoculated autoclaved crude oil medium. These results suggest that detection of endogenous bacteria was stimulated by the six inoculated strains. In addition, inoculation with Acinetobacter spp. stimulated detection of Bacillus, while inoculation with Dietzia spp. and Pseudomonas sp. stimulated the detection of more Pseudomonas. In contrast, similar exogenous bacteria stimulated similar endogenous bacteria at the genus level. Based on these results, special emphasis should be applied to evaluate the influence of bacteria capable of surviving autoclaving on the hydrocarbon-degrading abilities of exogenous bacteria, in particular, with regard to bioaugmentation and MEOR. Bioaugmentation and MEOR technologies could then be developed to more accurately direct the growth of specific endogenous bacteria that may then improve the efficiency of treatment or recovery of crude oil. PMID:23028421

  4. Bacteria in crude oil survived autoclaving and stimulated differentially by exogenous bacteria.

    Xiao-Cui Gong

    Full Text Available Autoclaving of crude oil is often used to evaluate the hydrocarbon-degrading abilities of bacteria. This may be potentially useful for bioaugmentation and microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR. However, it is not entirely clear if "endogenous" bacteria (e.g., spores in/on crude oil survive the autoclaving process, or influence subsequent evaluation of the hydrocarbon-degradation abilities of the "exogenous" bacterial strains. To test this, we inoculated autoclaved crude oil medium with six exogenous bacterial strains (three Dietzia strains, two Acinetobacter strains, and one Pseudomonas strain. The survival of the spore-forming Bacillus and Paenibacillus and the non-spore-forming mesophilic Pseudomonas, Dietzia, Alcaligenes, and Microbacterium was detected using a 16S rRNA gene clone library and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP analysis. However, neither bacteria nor bacterial activity was detected in three controls consisting of non-inoculated autoclaved crude oil medium. These results suggest that detection of endogenous bacteria was stimulated by the six inoculated strains. In addition, inoculation with Acinetobacter spp. stimulated detection of Bacillus, while inoculation with Dietzia spp. and Pseudomonas sp. stimulated the detection of more Pseudomonas. In contrast, similar exogenous bacteria stimulated similar endogenous bacteria at the genus level. Based on these results, special emphasis should be applied to evaluate the influence of bacteria capable of surviving autoclaving on the hydrocarbon-degrading abilities of exogenous bacteria, in particular, with regard to bioaugmentation and MEOR. Bioaugmentation and MEOR technologies could then be developed to more accurately direct the growth of specific endogenous bacteria that may then improve the efficiency of treatment or recovery of crude oil.

  5. Heterotrophic bacteria in drinking water distribution system: a review.

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat

    2012-10-01

    The microbiological quality of drinking water in municipal water distribution systems (WDS) depends on several factors. Free residual chlorine and/or chloramines are typically used to minimize bacterial recontamination and/or regrowth in WDS. Despite such preventive measures, regrowth of heterotrophic (HPC) and opportunistic bacteria in bulk water and biofilms has yet to be controlled completely. No approach has shown complete success in eliminating biofilms or HPC bacteria from bulk water and pipe surfaces. Biofilms can provide shelter for pathogenic bacteria and protect these bacteria from disinfectants. Some HPC bacteria may be associated with aesthetic and non-life threatening diseases. Research to date has achieved important success in understanding occurrence and regrowth of bacteria in bulk water and biofilms in WDS. To achieve comprehensive understanding and to provide efficient control against bacteria regrowth, future research on bacteria regrowth dynamics and their implications is warranted. In this study, a review was performed on the literature published in this area. The findings and limitations of these papers are summarized. Occurrences of bacteria in WDS, factors affecting bacteria regrowth in bulk water and biofilms, bacteria control strategies, sources of nutrients, human health risks from bacterial exposure, modelling of bacteria regrowth and methods of bacteria sampling and detection and quantification are investigated. Advances to date are noted, and future research needs are identified. Finally, research directions are proposed to effectively control HPC and opportunistic bacteria in bulk water and biofilms in WDS. PMID:22076103

  6. Antimicrobial resistant bacteria in the food chain

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    Antimicrobials are used for treatment and prevention of disease in food animals and as feed additives for growth promotion. All uses lead to the development of resistant bacteria, some of which are pathogenic to humans. Current main concerns are with resistance in Salmonella and Campylobacter to...

  7. Radiographic markers - A reservoir for bacteria?

    Tugwell, Jenna, E-mail: jenna.tugwell@googlemail.co [Department of Radiology, Ysbyty Gwynedd Hospital, Bangor, North Wales (United Kingdom); Maddison, Adele [Nuffield Health, Shrewsbury Hospital (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Introduction: Amongst the most frequently handled objects in the radiology department are radiographic markers. They are personal accessories used with every patient, and are kept in the radiographers pockets when not utilised. Upon enquiry it was discovered that many radiographers disregarded the potential of these accessories to become a vector for cross-contamination thus never or rarely clean them. The aims of this study were therefore to identify if radiographic markers are a reservoir for bacteria and to establish an effective cleaning method for decontaminating them. Methodology: 25 radiographers/student radiographers were selected for this study. Swabbing of their markers prior and post cleaning took place. The microbiology laboratory subsequently analyzed the results by quantifying and identifying the bacteria present. The participants also completed a closed questionnaire regarding their markers (e.g. frequency of cleaning and type of marker) to help specify the results gained from the swabbing procedure. Results: From the sample swabbed, 92% were contaminated with various organisms including Staphylococcus and Bacillus species, the amount of bacteria present ranged from 0 to >50 CFU. There were no significant differences between disinfectant wipes and alcohol gel in decontaminating the markers. Both successfully reduced their bacterial load, with 80% of the markers post cleaning having 0 CFU. Conclusion: The results indicated that radiographic markers can become highly contaminated with various organisms thus serve as a reservoir for bacteria. In addition, the markers need to be cleaned on a regular basis, with either disinfectant wipes or alcohol gel to reduce their bacterial load.

  8. Genetics of proteinases of lactic acid bacteria

    Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerhardus

    1988-01-01

    Because it is essential for good growth with concomitant rapid acid production, and for the production of flavorous peptides and amino acids, the proteolytic ability of lactic acid bacteria is of crucial importance for reliable dairy product quality. In view of this importance, considerable research

  9. Control of indigenous pathogenic bacteria in seafood

    Huss, Hans Henrik

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria indigenous to the aquatic and general environment are listed. Their distribution in nature, prevalence in seafood and the possibilities for growth of these organisms in various types of products are outlined These data, combined with what is known regarding the epidemiology...

  10. Filamentous bacteria transport electrons over centimetre distances

    Pfeffer, Christian; Larsen, Steffen; Song, Jie;

    2012-01-01

    across centimetre-wide zones. Here we present evidence that the native conductors are long, filamentous bacteria. They abounded in sediment zones with electric currents and along their length they contained strings with distinct properties in accordance with a function as electron transporters. Living...

  11. Bacteria in ice may record climate change

    2009-01-01

    @@ To many people, bacteria and climate change are like chalk and cheese: the srnallest creature versus one of the biggest phenomena on Earth. Not really.Scientists with the CAS Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research (ITP) and coworkers recently reported that small bugs deposited in ice and snow might tell how our climate has been changing.

  12. [Innovative treatments for multidrug-resistant bacteria].

    Pierre, Tattevin; Aurélien, Lorleac'h; Matthieu, Revest

    2014-03-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria has accelerated sharply in the last decade. According to the World Health Organization they are responsible for an estimated 25 000 deaths in Europe each year. In addition, few new antibiotics are under development, raising the spectrum of a return to the "pre-antibiotic era". Non antibiotic antibacterial agents have recently attracted renewed interest. The most promising candidates are: i) phages (bacteria-infecting viruses) have been widely used in Eastern European countries since the 1930s but come up against logistic and regulatory obstacles due to the evolutionary nature of these biologic agents, while convincing clinical data are lacking; ii) bacteriocines are smallantibacterialpeptidesproducedby numerous bacteria; some have a rapid bactericidal effect, good tolerability, and a limited impact on the commensal flora; however, clinical use of bacteriocines is complicated by their fragility, poor penetration, and substantial risk of resistance selection ; iii) antisense oligonucleo tides act by inactivating genes through specific interaction with a complementary DNA or RNA fragment, potentially allowing specific inhibition of selected bacterial virulence factors. However, this therapeutic class may be more suitable for viral or genetic diseases than for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections, owing to the difficulty of delivering them inside bacteria. PMID:26427289

  13. Collective Sensing-Capacity of Bacteria Populations

    Einolghozati, Arash; Fekri, Faramarz

    2012-01-01

    The design of biological networks using bacteria as the basic elements of the network is initially motivated by a phenomenon called quorum sensing. Through quorum sensing, each bacterium performs sensing the medium and communicating it to others via molecular communication. As a result, bacteria can orchestrate and act collectively and perform tasks impossible otherwise. In this paper, we consider a population of bacteria as a single node in a network. In our version of biological communication networks, such a node would communicate with one another via molecular signals. As a first step toward such networks, this paper focuses on the study of the transfer of information to the population (i.e., the node) by stimulating it with a concentration of special type of a molecules signal. These molecules trigger a chain of processes inside each bacteria that results in a final output in the form of light or fluorescence. Each stage in the process adds noise to the signal carried to the next stage. Our objective is ...

  14. DISTRIBUTION OF PLASMIDS IN GROUNDWATER BACTERIA

    Bacteria isolated from groundwater aquifer core materials of pristine aquifers at Lula and Pickett, Oklahoma, and from a site with a history of aromatic hydrocarbon contamination and natural renovation located at Conroe, Texas, were screened for the presence of plasmid Deoxyribon...

  15. Radiographic markers - A reservoir for bacteria?

    Introduction: Amongst the most frequently handled objects in the radiology department are radiographic markers. They are personal accessories used with every patient, and are kept in the radiographers pockets when not utilised. Upon enquiry it was discovered that many radiographers disregarded the potential of these accessories to become a vector for cross-contamination thus never or rarely clean them. The aims of this study were therefore to identify if radiographic markers are a reservoir for bacteria and to establish an effective cleaning method for decontaminating them. Methodology: 25 radiographers/student radiographers were selected for this study. Swabbing of their markers prior and post cleaning took place. The microbiology laboratory subsequently analyzed the results by quantifying and identifying the bacteria present. The participants also completed a closed questionnaire regarding their markers (e.g. frequency of cleaning and type of marker) to help specify the results gained from the swabbing procedure. Results: From the sample swabbed, 92% were contaminated with various organisms including Staphylococcus and Bacillus species, the amount of bacteria present ranged from 0 to >50 CFU. There were no significant differences between disinfectant wipes and alcohol gel in decontaminating the markers. Both successfully reduced their bacterial load, with 80% of the markers post cleaning having 0 CFU. Conclusion: The results indicated that radiographic markers can become highly contaminated with various organisms thus serve as a reservoir for bacteria. In addition, the markers need to be cleaned on a regular basis, with either disinfectant wipes or alcohol gel to reduce their bacterial load.

  16. The effects of bacteria on crystalline rock

    Many reactions involving inorganic minerals at water-rock interfaces have now been recognized to be bacterially mediated; these reactions could have a significant effect in the excavation of vaults for toxic and radioactive waste disposal. To investigate the role that bacteria play in the natural aqueous environment of crystalline rock the microbial growth factors of nutrition, energy and environment are described. Microbial activity has been investigated in Atomic Energy of Canada's Underground Research Laboratory (URL), situated in the Archean granitic Lac du Bonnet Batholith, Winnipeg, Manitoba. Faults, initiated in the Early Proterozoic, and later-formed fractures, provide ground-water pathways. Planktonic bacteria, free-swimming in the groundwater, have been observed in over 100 underground borehole samples. The number of bacteria varied from 103 to 105 mL-1 and appeared to decrease with depth and with increased salinity of the water. However, in the natural environment of deep (100-500 m) crystalline rocks, where nutrition is limited, formation of biofilms by sessile bacteria is a successful survival strategy. Natural biofilms at the URL and biofilms grown in bioreactors have been studied. The biofilms can accumulate different elements, depending upon the local environment. Precipitates of iron have been found in all the biofilms studied, where they are either passively accumulated or utilized as an energy source. Within the biofilm active and extensive biogeochemical immobilization of dissolved elements is controlled by distinct bacterial activities which are sufficiently discrete for hematite and siderite to be precipitated in close proximity

  17. Bioluminescent bacteria: lux genes as environmental biosensors

    Nunes-Halldorson Vânia da Silva; Duran Norma Letícia

    2003-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria are widespread in natural environments. Over the years, many researchers have been studying the physiology, biochemistry and genetic control of bacterial bioluminescence. These discoveries have revolutionized the area of Environmental Microbiology through the use of luminescent genes as biosensors for environmental studies. This paper will review the chronology of scientific discoveries on bacterial bioluminescence and the current applications of bioluminescence in env...

  18. DETOXIFICATION BY MAGNETOTACTIC BACTERIA IN SEDIMENTS

    The ability of certain bacteria to take up iron in the environment and biosynthesis magnetic materials such as magnetite (Fe3O4) and greigite (Fe3S4) has been recognized (Blakemore, 1982; Bazylinski and Frankel, 2000). Two different mechanisms, biologically induced mineralizat...

  19. Serpins in unicellular Eukarya, Archaea, and Bacteria:

    Roberts, T.H.; Hejgaard, Jørn; Saunders, N.F.W; Cavicchiolo, R.; Curmi, P.M.G

    2004-01-01

    , where serpins were found in only 4 of 13 genera, and Bacteria, in only 9 of 56 genera. The serpins from unicellular organisms appear to be phylogenetically distinct from all of the clades of higher eukaryotic serpins. Most of the sequences from unicellular organisms have the characteristics of...

  20. Molecular evolution in bacteria: cell division

    Trevors J.T.

    1998-01-01

    Molecular evolution in bacteria is examined with an emphasis on the self-assembly of cells capable of primitive division and growth during early molecular evolution. Also, the possibility that some type of encapsulation structure preceeded biochemical pathways and the assembly of genetic material is examined. These aspects will be considered from an evolutionary perspective.

  1. Emerging Plant Pathogenic Bacteria and Global Warming

    Several bacteria, previously classified as non-fluorescent, oxidase positive pseudomonads, Ralstonia, Acidovorax, and Burkholdria have emerged as serious problems world-wide. Perhaps the most destructive is R. solanacearum (RS), a soilborne pathogen with a very wide host range. RS race 3, biovar 2...

  2. Discovering lactic acid bacteria by genomics

    Klaenhammer, T; Altermann, E; Arigoni, F; Bolotin, A; Breidt, F; Broadbent, J; Cano, R; Chaillou, S; Deutscher, J; Gasson, M; van de Guchte, M; Guzzo, J; Hartke, A; Hawkins, T; Hols, P; Hutkins, R; Kleerebezem, M; Kok, J; Kuipers, O; Maguin, E; McKay, L; Mills, D; Nauta, A; Overbeek, R; Pel, H; Pridmore, D; Saier, M; van Sinderen, D; Sorokin, A; Steele, J; O'Sullivan, D; de Vos, W; Weimer, B; Zagorec, M; Siezen, R

    2002-01-01

    This review summarizes a collection of lactic acid bacteria that are now undergoing genomic sequencing and analysis. Summaries are presented on twenty different species, with each overview discussing the organisms fundamental and practical significance, environmental habitat, and its role in ferment

  3. Drug efflux proteins in multidrug resistant bacteria

    vanVeen, HW; Konings, WN

    1997-01-01

    Bacteria contain an array of transport proteins in their cytoplasmic membrane. Many of these proteins play an important role in conferring resistance to toxic compounds. The multidrug efflux systems encountered in prokaryotic cells are very similar to those observed in eukaryotic cells. Therefore, a

  4. Identification of bacteria using mass spectrometry techniques

    Krásný, Lukáš; Hynek, R.; Hochel, I.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 353, NOV 2013 (2013), s. 67-79. ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP503/10/0664 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Mass spectrometry * Bacteria * Identification Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.227, year: 2013

  5. Chitinolytic bacteria of the mammal digestive tract

    Šimůnek, Jiří; Hodrová, Blanka; Bartoňová, H.; Kopečný, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2001), s. 76-78. ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/00/0984; GA AV ČR KSK5052113 Keywords : chitinolytic bacteria Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.776, year: 2001

  6. Comparative activity of ciprofloxacin against anaerobic bacteria.

    Sutter, V L; Kwok, Y Y; Bulkacz, J

    1985-01-01

    The in vitro activity of ciprofloxacin was assessed against 362 strains of anaerobic bacteria and compared with that of cefoxitin, clindamycin, metronidazole, and mezlocillin. Only 31% of the strains tested were susceptible to ciprofloxacin. The other agents were active against most of the strains tested.

  7. Probiotic Bacteria May Become Dormant during Storage

    Lahtinen, Sampo J.; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ouwehand, Arthur C; Reinikainen, Johanna P.; Salminen, Seppo J.

    2005-01-01

    The determination of bacterial viability in probiotic products is of economic, technological, and clinical significance. We compared four methods to enumerate three Bifidobacterium strains in fermented oat products during storage. A subpopulation of nonculturable cells retained a functional cell membrane typical of viable cells, indicating that probiotic bacteria become dormant during storage.

  8. Freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria.

    Fonseca, Fernanda; Cenard, Stéphanie; Passot, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are of great importance for the food and biotechnology industry. They are widely used as starters for manufacturing food (e.g., yogurt, cheese, fermented meats, and vegetables) and probiotic products, as well as for green chemistry applications. Freeze-drying or lyophilization is a convenient method for preservation of bacteria. By reducing water activity to values below 0.2, it allows long-term storage and low-cost distribution at suprazero temperatures, while minimizing losses in viability and functionality. Stabilization of bacteria via freeze-drying starts with the addition of a protectant solution to the bacterial suspension. Freeze-drying includes three steps, namely, (1) freezing of the concentrated and protected cell suspension, (2) primary drying to remove ice by sublimation, and (3) secondary drying to remove unfrozen water by desorption. In this chapter we describe a method for freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria at a pilot scale, thus allowing control of the process parameters for maximal survival and functionality recovery. PMID:25428024

  9. The interaction of bacteria and metal surfaces

    This review discusses different examples for the interaction of bacteria and metal surfaces based on work reported previously by various authors and work performed by the author with colleagues at other institutions and with his graduate students at CEEL. Traditionally it has been assumed that the interaction of bacteria with metal surfaces always causes increased corrosion rates ('microbiologically influenced corrosion' (MIC)). However, more recently it has been observed that many bacteria can reduce corrosion rates of different metals and alloys in many corrosive environments. For example, it has been found that certain strains of Shewanella can prevent pitting of Al 2024 in artificial seawater, tarnishing of brass and rusting of mild steel. It has been observed that corrosion started again when the biofilm was killed by adding antibiotics. The mechanism of corrosion protection seems to be different for different bacteria since it has been found that the corrosion potential Ecorr became more negative in the presence of Shewanella ana and algae, but more positive in the presence of Bacillus subtilis. These findings have been used in an initial study of the bacterial battery in which Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was added to a cell containing Al 2024 and Cu in a growth medium. It was found that the power output of this cell continuously increased with time. In the microbial fuel cell (MFC) bacteria oxidize the fuel and transfer electrons directly to the anode. In initial studies EIS has been used to characterize the anode, cathode and membrane properties for different operating conditions of a MFC that contained Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Cell voltage (V)-current density (i) curves were obtained using potentiodynamic sweeps. The current output of a MFC has been monitored for different experimental conditions

  10. Label-Free Applications of SERS for Bacteria Analysis

    Zhou, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    In the first part, we report on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for living bacteria detection in drinking water by employing a synthesis of silver nanoparticles coating the cell wall of bacteria (Bacteria@AgNPs). In the second part of this thesis, we present a label-free SERS detection of bacteria on microarray at single cell level. In the third part of this thesis, we successfully counted live and dead bacteria with Bacteria@AgNPs method by SERS mapping technique.

  11. Antibacterial activity of silver-killed bacteria: the "zombies" effect

    Wakshlak, Racheli Ben-Knaz; Pedahzur, Rami; Avnir, David

    2015-04-01

    We report a previously unrecognized mechanism for the prolonged action of biocidal agents, which we denote as the zombies effect: biocidally-killed bacteria are capable of killing living bacteria. The concept is demonstrated by first killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 with silver nitrate and then challenging, with the dead bacteria, a viable culture of the same bacterium: Efficient antibacterial activity of the killed bacteria is observed. A mechanism is suggested in terms of the action of the dead bacteria as a reservoir of silver, which, due to Le-Chatelier's principle, is re-targeted to the living bacteria. Langmuirian behavior, as well as deviations from it, support the proposed mechanism.

  12. Bacteria in Crude Oil Survived Autoclaving and Stimulated Differentially by Exogenous Bacteria

    Gong, Xiao-Cui; Liu, Ze-Shen; Guo, Peng; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Chen, Jian; Wang, Xing-Biao; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Chun-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Autoclaving of crude oil is often used to evaluate the hydrocarbon-degrading abilities of bacteria. This may be potentially useful for bioaugmentation and microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). However, it is not entirely clear if “endogenous” bacteria (e.g., spores) in/on crude oil survive the autoclaving process, or influence subsequent evaluation of the hydrocarbon-degradation abilities of the “exogenous” bacterial strains. To test this, we inoculated autoclaved crude oil medium with six ...

  13. Lactic acid bacteria from fresh fruit and vegetables as biocontrol agents of phytopathogenic bacteria and fungi

    Trias Mansilla, Rosalia; Bañeras Vives, Lluís; Montesinos Seguí, Emilio; Badosa Romañó, Esther

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from fresh fruits and vegetables as biocontrol agents against the phytopathogenic and spoilage bacteria and fungi, Xanthomonas campestris, Erwinia carotovora, Penicillium expansum, Monilinia laxa, and Botrytis cinerea. The antagonistic activity of 496 LAB strains was tested in vitro and all tested microorganisms except P. expansum were inhibited by at least one isolate. The 496 isolates were also analyzed for the inhibit...

  14. Spray drying of dairy bacteria: New opportunities to improve the viability of bacteria powders

    Dolivet, Anne; Mejean, Serge; Hervé, C.; Jeantet, Romain

    2013-01-01

    The most frequently used technique for dehydration of dairy bacteria is freeze drying. Of the other possible preservation techniques used in the dairy industry to produce large amounts of dairy ingredients at commercially viable processing costs, spray drying is one of the main processing tools and the cost is 10 times lower than that of freeze drying. In this work, some examples are presented for different species of dairy bacteria with respect to spray-drying processes (as an alternative ap...

  15. Assessment of the Levels of Airborne Bacteria, Gram-Negative Bacteria, and Fungi in Hospital Lobbies

    Dong-Uk Park; Jeong-Kwan Yeom; Won Jae Lee; Kyeong-Min Lee

    2013-01-01

    Aims: We assessed the levels of airborne bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria (GNB), and fungi in six hospital lobbies, and investigated the environmental and hospital characteristics that affected the airborne microorganism levels. Methods: An Andersen single-stage sampler equipped with appropriate nutrition plate agar was used to collect the samples. The three types of microorganisms were repeatedly collected at a fixed location in each hospital (assumed to be representative of the entire hospi...

  16. Bacteria Experiment May Point Way to Slow Zika's Spread

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158661.html Bacteria Experiment May Point Way to Slow Zika's Spread ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Experiments in mosquitoes suggest that bacteria may help curb the spread of the Zika ...

  17. Smoking Triggers Big Changes in Mouth Bacteria, Study Finds

    ... 158024.html Smoking Triggers Big Changes in Mouth Bacteria, Study Finds But quitting eventually returns levels to ... research also found that the proper mix of bacteria in the mouth is restored if people quit ...

  18. Environmental pollution detection and bioremediation by marine bacteria

    Ramaiah, N.; De, J.; Iyer, S.R.

    Microorganisms, in particular bacteria, play far more important ecological roles in natural environments than their small sizes would suggest. The environment for bacteria is everything that surrounds and sustains them including air, plant, animal...

  19. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Detected in Sewage Spill

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160031.html Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Detected in Sewage Spill 'People need to be ... News) -- Sewer line breaks can release antibiotic-resistant bacteria that pose a public health threat, a new ...

  20. Gut Bacteria May Hold Clues to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159905.html Gut Bacteria May Hold Clues to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Intestinal ... doctors -- may be influenced by a person's intestinal bacteria -- sometimes called gut microbiome, new research finds. "Patients ...

  1. Molecular and chemical dialogues in bacteria-protozoa interactions

    Song, Chunxu; Mazzola, M.; Cheng, Xu; Oetjen, Janina; Alexandrov, Theodore; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Watrous, Jeramie; van der Voort, Menno; Raaijmakers, Jos

    2015-01-01

    Protozoan predation of bacteria can significantly affect soil microbial community composition and ecosystem functioning. Bacteria possess diverse defense strategies to resist or evade protozoan predation. For soil-dwelling Pseudomonas species, several secondary metabolites were proposed to provide p

  2. Bacteria Experiment May Point Way to Slow Zika's Spread

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158661.html Bacteria Experiment May Point Way to Slow Zika's Spread Infecting ... 4, 2016 WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Experiments in mosquitoes suggest that bacteria may help curb ...

  3. Interactions between Paramyxoviruses and Bacteria: Implications for Pathogenesis and Intervention

    D.T. Nguyen (Tien)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Globally, respiratory tract diseases caused by bacteria and viruses are an important burden of disease. Respiratory bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis and Staphylococcus aureus) can colonize the upper respiratory tract. The

  4. Frequency of Resistance and Susceptible Bacteria Isolated from Houseflies

    B Davari

    2010-12-01

    Conclusion: Houseflies collected from hospitals and slaughterhouse may be involved in the spread of drug resistant bacteria and may increase the potential of human exposure to drug resistant bacteria.

  5. Oh What a Tangled Biofilm Web Bacteria Weave

    ... Inside Life Science > Oh What a Tangled Biofilm Web Bacteria Weave Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Oh What a Tangled Biofilm Web Bacteria Weave By Elia Ben-Ari Posted May ...

  6. Phylogenetic analysis and development of probes for differentiating methylotrophic bacteria.

    Brusseau, G A; Bulygina, E S; Hanson, R S

    1994-01-01

    Fifteen small-subunit rRNAs from methylotrophic bacteria have been sequenced. Comparisons of these sequences with 22 previously published sequences further defined the phylogenetic relationships among these bacteria and illustrated the agreement between phylogeny and physiological characteristics of the bacteria. Phylogenetic trees were constructed with 16S rRNA sequences from methylotrophic bacteria and representative organisms from subdivisions within the class Proteobacteria on the basis o...

  7. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF MEDICINAL PLANTS AGAINST DIFFERENT STRAINS OF BACTERIA

    Alexander Vatľák; Adriana Kolesárová; Nenad Vukovič; Katarína Rovná; Jana Petrová; Viktória Vimmerová; Lukáš Hleba; Martin Mellen; Miroslava Kačániová

    2014-01-01

    In this study, methanolic extracts of Tilia cordata Mill. and Aesculus hippocastanum which had been described in herbal books, were screened for their antimicrobial activity against gramnegative and grampositive bacteria. The following strains of bacteria for antimicrobial activity were used gramnegative bacteria: Escherichia coli CCM 3988, Listeria ivanovii CCM 5884, Listeria innocua CCM 4030, Pseudomonas aeruginosa CCM 1960, Serratia rubidaea CCM 4684 and grampositive bacteria: Brochothrix ...

  8. New Insight on the Response of Bacteria to Fluoride

    Breaker, R R

    2012-01-01

    Fluoride has been used for decades to prevent caries and it is well established that this anion can inhibit the growth of bacteria. However, the precise effects that fluoride has on bacteria and the mechanisms that bacteria use to overcome fluoride toxicity have largely remained unexplored. Recently, my laboratory reported the discovery of biological systems that bacteria use to sense fluoride and reduce fluoride toxicity. These sensors and their associated genes are very widespread in biolog...

  9. Control of Fusarium Wilt of Chili With Chitinolytic Bacteria

    DWI SURYANTO; SITI PATONAH; ERMAN MUNIR

    2010-01-01

    Biological control of plant disease using antagonistic microorganism has been obtaining much attention and implemented for decades. One of the potential microorganisms used in this strategy is chitinolytic bacteria. Utilization of this bacteria ranges from cell life, enzymes, genes, or other metabolites. In this study, we examined the ability of chitinolytic bacteria as a biocontrol agent of Fusarium wilt of red chili (Capsicum annuum L.) seedlings. The ability of chitinolytic bacteria to sup...

  10. Probiotic bacteria in prevention and treatment of diarrhea

    Jasmina Havranek; Šimun Zamberlin; Iva Dolenčić Špehar; Tamara Prtilo; Milna Tudor; Dubravka Samaržija

    2009-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria have beneficial effects in prevention and treatment of different diseases. The results of preventive and therapeutic effect of probiotic bacteria on diarrhea during last ten years are shown in this paper. The greatest preventive and therapeutic effect of probiotic bacteria was identified for acute diarrhea in children caused by rotaviruses. Significant, but slightly lower effect of probiotic bacteria was proved for antibiotic associated diarrhea. Positive effect in preventi...

  11. [RAPD analysis of plant pathogenic coryneform bacteria].

    Yin, Yan-Ni; Chen, Yong-Fang; Li, Shi-Mo; Guo, Jian-Hua

    2005-12-01

    RAPD analysis was used for the taxonomy of plant pathogenic coryneform bacteria, especially for the classification of two new pathogens (Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens pv. basellae pv. nov. and Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens pv. beticola pv. nov.). 20 random primers were screened from 50 ones to detect polymorphism among the total strains used. 80.4% were polymorphic bands among the 225 ones produced. The results of pairwise similarity and UPGMA cluster analysis suggest that the two new pathovars of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris var. saccharifera) and malabar spinach (Basella rubra) are genetically close related with Curtobacterium flacumfaciens, and the minimal similarity coefficient is 0.6511. According to the RAPD analysis and previous research, some newly made taxonomic changes of the plant pathogenic coryneform bacteria are discussed. PMID:16496687

  12. Ancient bacteria show evidence of DNA repair

    Johnson, Sarah Stewart; Hebsgaard, Martin B; Christensen, Torben R;

    2007-01-01

    geological timescales. There has been no direct evidence in ancient microbes for the most likely mechanism, active DNA repair, or for the metabolic activity necessary to sustain it. In this paper, we couple PCR and enzymatic treatment of DNA with direct respiration measurements to investigate long...... this long-term survival is closely tied to cellular metabolic activity and DNA repair that over time proves to be superior to dormancy as a mechanism in sustaining bacteria viability.......-term survival of bacteria sealed in frozen conditions for up to one million years. Our results show evidence of bacterial survival in samples up to half a million years in age, making this the oldest independently authenticated DNA to date obtained from viable cells. Additionally, we find strong evidence that...

  13. Resistant bacteria in stem cell transplant recipients

    Nucci Marcio

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections account for most infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. While early mortality reduced dramatically with the introduction of the concept of empirical antibiotic therapy in neutropenic patients, no effect of prophylaxis on the mortality was observed in many studies. On the other hand, antibiotic prophylaxis has resulted in the emergence of resistance among bacteria. In addition, the choice of the antibiotic regimen for empirical therapy and the practices of antibiotic therapy during neutropenia may result in a significant shift in the pattern of bacterial infections. The use of quinolones and vancomycin as prophylaxis, and of carbapenems and vancomycin in the empirical antibiotic therapy, are associated with the appearance of resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Therefore, hematologists must be aware of the impact of these practices on the emergence of infections due to multi-resistant pathogens, since these infections may be associated with increased mortality.

  14. Horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and animals.

    Dunning Hotopp, Julie C

    2011-04-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is increasingly described between bacteria and animals. Such transfers that are vertically inherited have the potential to influence the evolution of animals. One classic example is the transfer of DNA from mitochondria and chloroplasts to the nucleus after the acquisition of these organelles by eukaryotes. Even today, many of the described instances of bacteria-to-animal transfer occur as part of intimate relationships such as those of endosymbionts and their invertebrate hosts, particularly insects and nematodes, while numerous transfers are also found in asexual animals. Both of these observations are consistent with modern evolutionary theory, in particular the serial endosymbiotic theory and Muller's ratchet. Although it is tempting to suggest that these particular lifestyles promote horizontal gene transfer, it is difficult to ascertain given the nonrandom sampling of animal genome sequencing projects and the lack of a systematic analysis of animal genomes for such transfers. PMID:21334091

  15. Quorum sensing in plant-pathogenic bacteria.

    Von Bodman, Susanne B; Bauer, W Dietz; Coplin, David L

    2003-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) allows bacteria to assess their local population density and/or physical confinement via the secretion and detection of small, diffusible signal molecules. This review describes how phytopathogenic bacteria have incorporated QS mechanisms into complex regulatory cascades that control genes for pathogenicity and colonization of host surfaces. Traits regulated by QS include the production of extracellular polysaccharides, degradative enzymes, antibiotics, siderophores, and pigments, as well as Hrp protein secretion, Ti plasmid transfer, motility, biofilm formation, and epiphytic fitness. Since QS regulatory systems are often required for pathogenesis, interference with QS signaling may offer a means of controlling bacterial diseases of plants. Several bacterial pathogens of plants that have been intensively studied and have revealed information of both fundamental and practical importance are reviewed here: Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Pantoea stewartii, Erwinia carotovora, Ralstonia solanacearum, Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Xanthomonas campestris. PMID:12730390

  16. Bacteria, some permanent tenants Space Station

    Vacuum cleaners to operate the vacuum or rags with ethanol they are the products of cleaning of the astronauts. Is there tight spaces fully sterilized? It seems not, even in the Space Station International (ISS). When it comes to bacteria, they are able to travel more than 400 kilometers housed in costumes, bodies and interior of the astronauts themselves and settle in a enclosed space where-unlike in a cleanroom 'terrestre- the air is not recycled. A NASA study has found an abundance of bacteria 'opportunists' which, although harmless on Earth, they might derivasen cause infections in inflammations or skin irritations. Not forgetting those fungi that could damage or affect the infrastructure equipment space. (Author)

  17. The Chemical Ecology of Predatory Soil Bacteria.

    Findlay, Brandon L

    2016-06-17

    The study of natural products is entering a renaissance, driven by the discovery that the majority of bacterial secondary metabolites are not produced under standard laboratory conditions. Understanding the ecological role of natural products is key to efficiently directing our screening efforts, and to ensuring that each screen efficiently captures the full biosynthetic repertoire of the producing organisms. Myxobacteria represent one of the most common and diverse groups of bacteria, with roughly 2500 strains publically available. Fed largely through predation, the myxobacteria have developed a large repertoire of natural products that target other microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi. Many of these interactions can be observed in predation assays, providing direct evidence for environmental interactions. With a focus on Myxococcus xanthus, this review will highlight how recent advances in myxobacteria are revealing the chemical ecology of bacterial natural products. PMID:27035738

  18. Emerging roles of RNA modifications in bacteria.

    Marbaniang, Carmelita Nora; Vogel, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    RNA modifications are known to abound in stable tRNA and rRNA, where they cluster around functionally important regions. However, RNA-seq based techniques profiling entire transcriptomes are now uncovering an abundance of modified ribonucleotides in mRNAs and noncoding RNAs, too. While most of the recent progress in understanding the regulatory influence of these new RNA modifications stems from eukaryotes, there is growing evidence in bacteria for modified nucleotides beyond the stable RNA species, including modifications of small regulatory RNAs. Given their small genome size, good genetic tractability, and ample knowledge of modification enzymes, bacteria offer excellent model systems to decipher cellular functions of RNA modifications in many diverse physiological contexts. This review highlights how new global approaches combining classic analysis with new sequencing techniques may usher in an era of bacterial epitranscriptomics. PMID:26803287

  19. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in environmental technology.

    Pokorna, Dana; Zabranska, Jana

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is widely known as the most undesirable component of biogas that caused not only serious sensoric and toxic problems, but also corrosion of concrete and steel structures. Many agricultural and industrial waste used in biogas production, may contain a large amount of substances that serve as direct precursors to the formation of sulfide sulfur-sources of hydrogen sulfide in the biogas. Biological desulfurization methods are currently promoted to abiotic methods because they are less expensive and do not produce undesirable materials which must be disposed of. The final products of oxidation of sulfides are no longer hazardous. Biological removal of sulfide from a liquid or gaseous phase is based on the activity of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. They need an oxidizing agent such as an acceptor of electrons released during the oxidation of sulfides-atmospheric oxygen or oxidized forms of nitrogen. Different genera of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and their technological application are discussed. PMID:25701621

  20. Hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria: from bioremediation to bioenergy feedstock

    Carvalho, Ana Rita Castro

    2015-01-01

    Tese de Doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica. Bacterial storage lipids are being considered as viable alternative feedstocks for industrial and biotechnological applications, compared to conventional ones. The production of these bacterial compounds can be obtained from different carbon sources, including inexpensive and recalcitrant wastes. This thesis explores the potential of using hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria to obtain lipid reserve substances from hydrocarbon-based wastes, p...

  1. Food preservation using antifungal lactic acid bacteria

    Crowley, Sarah Catherine Mary

    2013-01-01

    Fungal spoilage of food and feed prevails as a major problem for the food industry. The use antifungal-producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB) may represent a safer, natural alternative to the use of chemical preservatives in foods. A large scale screen was undertaken to identify a variety of LAB with antifungal properties from plant, animal and human sources. A total of 6,720 LAB colonies were isolated and screened for antifungal activity against the indicator Penicillium expansum. 94 broad-spe...

  2. RNA-Seq for Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

    Kimbrel, Jeffrey A.; Yanming Di; Cumbie, Jason S.; Chang, Jeff H.

    2011-01-01

    The throughput and single-base resolution of RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) have contributed to a dramatic change in transcriptomic-based inquiries and resulted in many new insights into the complexities of bacterial transcriptomes. RNA-Seq could contribute to similar advances in our understanding of plant pathogenic bacteria but it is still a technology under development with limitations and unknowns that need to be considered. Here, we review some new developments for RNA-Seq and highlight recent...

  3. Plague Bacteria Target Immune Cells During Infection

    Marketon, Melanie M.; DePaolo, R. William; DeBord, Kristin L.; Jabri, Bana; Schneewind, Olaf

    2005-01-01

    The plague is caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. Plague bacteria are thought to inject effector Yop proteins into host cells via the type III pathway. The identity of the host cells targeted for injection during plague infection is unknown. We found, using Yop β-lactamase hybrids and fluorescent staining of live cells from plague-infected animals, that Y. pestis selected immune cells for injection. In vivo, dendritic cells, macrophages, and neutrophils were injected most frequently, whe...

  4. Study of fatty acid-bacteria interactions

    Complete text of publication follows. During our work we investigated fatty acid-bacteria interactions. The antibacterial property of fatty acids was reported by several authors. Despite of them there is not reassuring explanation about the mechanism of the antibacterial activity of these compounds. An effect can considerably change in case of different structured fatty acids. Our earlier studies conduct that small changes in the structures can modify changes in their behavior towards bacteria. The stearic acid does not cause any antibacterial effects during the first few hours of the investigation, may even help the bacterial growth. However, linolic acid (C18:2) shows a strong antibacterial effect during the first hours. After 24 hours this effect wears out and the bacteria have adapted to the stress. We studied the antibacterial activity using direct bioautography. This method has the advantage to allow examining lipophilic compounds. The linoleic acid decomposes in time under different physiological conditions creating numerous oxidized molecules. This may be the reason of its antimicrobial effect. For studying this phenomenon we used infrared and mass spectroscopic methods. We applied infrared spectroscopy for indicating any changes in the spectra of the fatty acids after the interaction of fatty acids with bacteria. So we are able to deduct on what could happen during these process. We paid great attention towards the changes of double bonds, on methylation and demethylation processes. Using mass spectroscopy we searched for oxidized products that may play important role in this process. These studies are only part of our more widespreading investigations, dealing with the antimicrobial properties of fatty acids.

  5. Bacterial biofilms. Bacteria Quorum sensing in biofilms

    E. S. Vorobey; O. S. Voronkova; A. I. Vinnikov

    2012-01-01

    Data on biofilms, their structure and properties, peculiarities of formation and interaction between microorganisms in the film are presented. Information on discovery and study of biofilms, importance of biofilms in the medical and clinical microbiology are offered. The data allow to interpret biofilm as a form of existence of human normal microflora. For the exchange of information within the biofilm between the individual cells of the same or different species bacteria use the signal molec...

  6. Separation and Purification of Bacteria from Soil

    Bakken, Lars R.

    1985-01-01

    Bacteria were released and separated from soil by a simple blending-centrifugation procedure. The percent yield of bacterial cells (microscopic counts) in the supernatants varied over a wide range depending on the soil type. The superantants contained large amounts of noncellular organic material and clay particles. Further purification of the bacterial cells was obtained by centrifugation in density gradients, whereby the clay particles and part of the organic materials sedimented. A large p...

  7. Revolutionizing membrane protein overexpression in bacteria

    Schlegel, Susan; Klepsch, Mirjam; Gialama, Dimitra; Wickström, David; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; De Gier, Jan‐Willem

    2010-01-01

    Summary The bacterium Escherichia coli is the most widely used expression host for overexpression trials of membrane proteins. Usually, different strains, culture conditions and expression regimes are screened for to identify the optimal overexpression strategy. However, yields are often not satisfactory, especially for eukaryotic membrane proteins. This has initiated a revolution of membrane protein overexpression in bacteria. Recent studies have shown that it is feasible to (i) engineer or ...

  8. Metabolic Flexibility of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    Plugge, Caroline M.; Zhang, Weiwen; Scholten, Johannes C. M.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRB) are a very diverse group of anaerobic bacteria that are omnipresent in nature and play an imperative role in the global cycling of carbon and sulfur. In anoxic marine sediments sulfate reduction accounts for up to 50% of the entire organic mineralization in coastal and shelf ecosystems where sulfate diffuses several meters deep into the sediment. As a consequence, SRB would be expected in the sulfate-containing upper sediment layers, whereas me...

  9. Electromagnetic low-frequency fields and bacteria

    Foltýn, D.; Čermáková, E.; Kolářová, M.; Bartušek, Karel

    Košice : RVS VLA Košice, 2002 - (Džunda, M.; Brůnová, B.), s. 133 - 137 ISBN 80-7166-034-5. [New trends of development in aviation. Košice (SK), 01.09.2002] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : low-frequency fields * bacteria Staphylococcus aureus * low-frequency ELM fields Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  10. Biology of Moderately Halophilic Aerobic Bacteria

    Nieto Gutiérrez, Joaquín José; Ventosa Ucero, Antonio; Oren, Aharon

    1998-01-01

    The moderately halophilic heterotrophic aerobic bacteria form a diverse group of microorganisms. The property of halophilism is widespread within the bacterial domain. Bacterial halophiles are abundant in environments such as salt lakes, saline soils, and salted food products. Most species keep their intracellular ionic concentrations at low levels while synthesizing or accumulating organic solutes to provide osmotic equilibrium of the cytoplasm with the surrounding medium. Complex mechanisms...

  11. Bioactive Compounds from Marine Bacteria and Fungi

    Debbab, Abdessamad; Aly, Amal H.; Lin, Wen H.; Proksch, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Summary Marine bacteria and fungi are of considerable importance as new promising sources of a huge number of biologically active products. Some of these marine species live in a stressful habitat, under cold, lightless and high pressure conditions. Surprisingly, a large number of species with high diversity survive under such conditions and produce fascinating and structurally complex natural products. Up till now, only a small number of microorganisms have been investigated for bioactive me...

  12. Ferric Iron Reduction by Acidophilic Heterotrophic Bacteria

    Johnson, D. Barrie; McGinness, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    Fifty mesophilic and five moderately thermophilic strains of acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria were tested for the ability to reduce ferric iron in liquid and solid media under aerobic conditions; about 40% of the mesophiles (but none of the moderate thermophiles) displayed at least some capacity to reduce iron. Both rates and extents of ferric iron reduction were highly strain dependent. No acidophilic heterotroph reduced nitrate or sulfate, and (limited) reduction of manganese(IV) was note...

  13. Tumour targeting with systemically administered bacteria.

    Morrissey, David

    2012-01-31

    Challenges for oncology practitioners and researchers include specific treatment and detection of tumours. The ideal anti-cancer therapy would selectively eradicate tumour cells, whilst minimising side effects to normal tissue. Bacteria have emerged as biological gene vectors with natural tumour specificity, capable of homing to tumours and replicating locally to high levels when systemically administered. This property enables targeting of both the primary tumour and secondary metastases. In the case of invasive pathogenic species, this targeting strategy can be used to deliver genes intracellularly for tumour cell expression, while non-invasive species transformed with plasmids suitable for bacterial expression of heterologous genes can secrete therapeutic proteins locally within the tumour environment (cell therapy approach). Many bacterial genera have been demonstrated to localise to and replicate to high levels within tumour tissue when intravenously (IV) administered in rodent models and reporter gene tagging of bacteria has permitted real-time visualisation of this phenomenon. Live imaging of tumour colonising bacteria also presents diagnostic potential for this approach. The nature of tumour selective bacterial colonisation appears to be tumour origin- and bacterial species- independent. While originally a correlation was drawn between anaerobic bacterial colonisation and the hypoxic nature of solid tumours, it is recently becoming apparent that other elements of the unique microenvironment within solid tumours, including aberrant neovasculature and local immune suppression, may be responsible. Here, we consider the pre-clinical data supporting the use of bacteria as a tumour-targeting tool, recent advances in the area, and future work required to develop it into a beneficial clinical tool.

  14. Quorum Sensing in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    BOŞGELMEZ-TINAZ, Gülgün

    2003-01-01

    It has become increasingly and widely recognised that bacteria do not live as isolated entities but instead exist as communities that exploit elaborate systems of intercellular communication to facilitate their adaptation to changing environmental conditions. A well-characterised example of such intercellular communication is quorum sensing. Quorum sensing depends on the production of diffusible signal molecules termed autoinducers or pheromones, which enable a bacterium to monitor its own ce...

  15. Bacteria Foraging Algorithm in Antenna Design

    Biswa Binayak Mangaraj; Manas Ranjan Jena; Saumendra Kumar Mohanty

    2016-01-01

    A simple design procedure to realize an optimum antenna using bacteria foraging algorithm (BFA) is proposed in this paper. The first antenna considered is imaginary. This antenna is optimized using the BFA along with a suitable fitness function formulated by considering some performance parameters and their best values. To justify the optimum design approach, one 12-element Yagi-Uda antenna is considered for an experiment. The optimized result of this antenna obtained using the optimization a...

  16. Evolution of transcriptional regulatory circuits in bacteria

    Perez, J. Christian; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2009-01-01

    Related organisms typically respond to a given cue by altering the level or activity of orthologous transcription factors, which, paradoxically, often regulate expression of distinct gene sets. Although promoter rewiring of shared genes is primarily responsible for regulatory differences among related eukaryotic species, in bacteria, species-specific genes are often controlled by ancestral transcription factors and regulatory circuit evolution has been further shaped by horizontal gene transf...

  17. Mutation, Selection and Genetic Interactions in Bacteria

    Gordo, I.; Sousa, A.

    2010-01-01

    Mutation is the ultimate source of genetic variation. The rate at whichnew mutations typically occurs, their effects on fitness and the strength and type of genetic interactions between different mutations are key for understanding the evolution of any population. Estimates of these parameters in organisms such as bacteria will have a profound impact on our understanding of their biology, diversity, rate of speciation and in our health. Experimental evolution with bact...

  18. Experimental evolution with bacteria in complex environments

    Hall, Alex R.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments with microbes are a powerful tool for addressing general questions in evolutionary ecology. Microbial evolution is also interesting in its own right, and often clinically relevant. I have used experimental evolution of bacteria (Pseudomonas spp.) in controlled laboratory environments to investigate the role of environmental heterogeneity in the evolution of phenotypic diversity. Some of my results provide insight on general processes, while others are specific to ba...

  19. Cold atmospheric plasma decontamination against nosocomial bacteria

    Klämpfl , Tobias Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Nosocomial pathogens are a considerable public threat. In order to limit their spread, cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) was investigated as new alternative to common decontamination strategies. During my work I developed a Surface micro-discharge (SMD) electrode system, characterized the CAP generated at ambient air conditions, studied its decontaminating behavior against nosocomial bacteria such as Clostridium difficile endospores and revealed factors influencing the decontamination. All in all...

  20. [Phylogenetic analysis of bacteria of extreme ecosystems].

    Romanovskaia, V A; Parfenova, V V; Bel'kova, N L; Sukhanova, E V; Gladka, G V; Tashireva, A A

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of aerobic chemoorganotrophic bacteria of the two extreme regions (Dead Sea and West Antarctic) was performed on the basis of the nucleotide sequences of the 16S rRNA gene. Thermotolerant and halotolerant spore-forming bacteria 7t1 and 7t3 of terrestrial ecosystems Dead Sea identified as Bacillus licheniformis and B. subtilis subsp. subtilis, respectively. Taking into account remote location of thermotolerant strain 6t1 from closely related strains in the cluster Staphylococcus, 6t1 strain can be regarded as Staphylococcus sp. In terrestrial ecosystems, Galindez Island (Antarctic) detected taxonomically diverse psychrotolerant bacteria. From ornithogenic soil were isolated Micrococcus luteus O-1 and Microbacterium trichothecenolyticum O-3. Strains 4r5, 5r5 and 40r5, isolated from grass and lichens, can be referred to the genus Frondihabitans. These strains are taxonomically and ecologically isolated and on the tree diagram form the joint cluster with three isolates Frondihabitans sp., isolated from the lichen Austrian Alps, and psychrotolerant associated with plants F. cladoniiphilus CafT13(T). Isolates from black lichen in the different stationary observation points on the south side of a vertical cliff identified as: Rhodococcus fascians 181n3, Sporosarcina aquimarina O-7, Staphylococcus sp. 0-10. From orange biofilm of fouling on top of the vertical cliff isolated Arthrobacter sp. 28r5g1, from the moss-- Serratia sp. 6r1g. According to the results, Frondihabitans strains most frequently encountered among chemoorganotrophic aerobic bacteria in the Antarctic phytocenoses. PMID:25007437

  1. Cellulose biosynthesis and function in bacteria.

    Ross, P; Mayer, R; Benziman, M

    1991-01-01

    The current model of cellulose biogenesis in plants, as well as bacteria, holds that the membranous cellulose synthase complex polymerizes glucose moieties from UDP-Glc into beta-1,4-glucan chains which give rise to rigid crystalline fibrils upon extrusion at the outer surface of the cell. The distinct arrangement and degree of association of the polymerizing enzyme units presumably govern extracellular chain assembly in addition to the pattern and width of cellulose fibril deposition. Most e...

  2. The growth of bacteria on organic compounds in drinking water

    Kooy, van der D.

    1984-01-01

    Growth ("regrowth") of bacteria In drinking water distribution systems results in a deterioration of the water quality. Regrowth of chemoheterotrophic bacteria depends on the presence of organic. compounds that serve as a nutrient source for these bacteria. A batch-culture technique was developed to

  3. Calculations of magnetic susceptibility of magnetoactic bacteria culture

    Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Yurchenko, Vitaliy; Kamysa, Y.; Chelombetskaya, M.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 234, - (2001), s. 575-583. ISSN 0304-8853 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : magnetotactic bacteria * magnetic susceptibility of magnetotactic bacteria * magnetic moment of magnetotactic bacteria Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.329, year: 2001

  4. Quantification and Qualification of Bacteria Trapped in Chewed Gum

    Wessel, Stefan W.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Morando, David; Slomp, Anje M.; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Maitra, Amarnath; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and r

  5. TMDLs (Total Maximum Daily Loads) for Bacteria Impairments

    Benham, Brian Leslie, 1960-; Zeckoski, Sara C.

    2009-01-01

    When the concentration of bacteria exceeds the state-specified water-quality criteria, the water is deemed to have a bacteria or pathogen impairment. This publication explains how bacteria impairments are determined and how this relates to the TMDL process.

  6. Metabolism in bacteria at low temperature: A recent report

    Dipanwita Sengupta; Madhab K Chattopadhyay

    2013-06-01

    The adaptability of bacteria to extreme cold environments has been demonstrated from time to time by various investigators. Metabolic activity of bacteria at subzero temperatures is also evidenced. Recent studies indicate that bacteria continue both catabolic and anabolic activities at subzero temperatures. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  7. IDENTIFICATION OF INDUSTRIALLY IMPORTANT LACTIC ACID BACTERIA IN FOODSTUFFS

    Prosekov, A.; Babich, O.; Bespomestnykh, K.

    2013-01-01

    Universal genus-specific primers for comparative analysis of two aligned 16S rRNA gene nucleotide sequences of lactic acid bacteria were constructed. The method to identify lactic acid bacteria and a comprehensive plan for their genus and species identification may be used to characterize isolated strains of the Lactobacillus genus bacteria and in quality control of foodstuffs enriched with Lactobacillus.

  8. Bacteria as transporters of phosphorus through soil

    Glæsner, N.; Bælum, Jacob; Jacobsen, C. S.;

    2016-01-01

    The transport of phosphorus (P) from agricultural land has led to the eutrophication of surface waters worldwide, especially in areas with intensive animal production. In this research, we investigated the role of bacteria in the leaching of P through three agricultural soils with different......RNA genes cell−1. Leaching of bacteria was in the range of 2.5–4.5 × 105 cells ml−1 prior to application of slurry to the three soil textures. After slurry application, leaching increased to 1.1 × 106 cells ml−1 in the loamy sand, 4.9 × 106 cells ml−1 in the sandy loam and 5.0 × 106 cells ml−1 in the loam....... Based on the reported P content of soil bacteria, 0.3–1.8% of the total P leached was present in the bacterial biomass when no slurry was applied, whereas slurry application increased the leaching of P from the bacterial biomass to 3−7.9% of total P leached. Bacterial leaching was related to the...

  9. Diversity and ecology of oxalotrophic bacteria.

    Hervé, Vincent; Junier, Thomas; Bindschedler, Saskia; Verrecchia, Eric; Junier, Pilar

    2016-02-01

    Oxalate is present in environments as diverse as soils or gastrointestinal tracts. This organic acid can be found as free acid or forming metal salts (e.g. calcium, magnesium). Oxalotrophy, the ability to use oxalate as carbon and energy sources, is mainly the result of bacterial catabolism, which can be either aerobic or anaerobic. Although some oxalotrophic bacterial strains are commonly used as probiotics, little is known about the diversity and ecology of this functional group. This review aims at exploring the taxonomic distribution and the phylogenetic diversity of oxalotrophic bacteria across biomes. In silico analyses were conducted using the two key enzymes involved in oxalotrophy: formyl-coenzyme A (CoA) transferase (EC 2.8.3.16) and oxalyl-CoA decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.8), encoded by the frc and oxc genes, respectively. Our analyses revealed that oxalate-degrading bacteria are restricted to three phyla, namely Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria and originated from terrestrial, aquatic and clinical environments. Diversity analyses at the protein level suggest that total Oxc diversity is more constrained than Frc diversity and that bacterial oxalotrophic diversity is not yet fully described. Finally, the contribution of oxalotrophic bacteria to ecosystem functioning as well as to the carbon cycle is discussed. PMID:26748805

  10. Bacteria-powered battery on paper.

    Fraiwan, Arwa; Choi, Seokheun

    2014-12-21

    Paper-based devices have recently emerged as simple and low-cost paradigms for fluid manipulation and analytical/clinical testing. However, there are significant challenges in developing paper-based devices at the system level, which contain integrated paper-based power sources. Here, we report a microfabricated paper-based bacteria-powered battery that is capable of generating power from microbial metabolism. The battery on paper showed a very short start-up time relative to conventional microbial fuel cells (MFCs); paper substrates eliminated the time traditional MFCs required to accumulate and acclimate bacteria on the anode. Only four batteries connected in series provided desired values of current and potential to power an LED for more than 30 minutes. The battery featured (i) a low-cost paper-based proton exchange membrane directly patterned on commercially available parchment paper and (ii) paper reservoirs for holding the anolyte and the catholyte for an extended period of time. Based on this concept, we also demonstrate the use of paper-based test platforms for the rapid characterization of electricity-generating bacteria. This paper-based microbial screening tool does not require external pumps/tubings and represents the most rapid test platform (<50 min) compared with the time needed by using traditional screening tools (up to 103 days) and even recently proposed MEMS arrays (< 2 days). PMID:25363848

  11. Anhydrobiosis in bacteria: From physiology to applications

    Armando Hernández García

    2011-12-01

    Anhydrobiosis is a phenomenon related to the partial or total desiccation of living organisms, keeping their vital functions after rehydration. The desiccated state in prokaryotes has been widely studied, mainly due to the broad spectrum of the anhydrobiosis applications. In this review, we present the basic theoretical concepts related to anhydrobiosis, focusing on bacterial species. An update about desiccation tolerance in bacteria is given; and the general mechanisms of desiccation tolerance and desiccation damage are described. In addition, we show how the study of anhydrobiosis in prokaryotes has established the theoretical and practical basis for the development of the drying technologies. With regard to the desiccation tolerance in bacteria, although many mechanisms remain undiscovered at the molecular level, important research about the physiology of the anhydrobiotic state and its applications has been performed, and here we provide the most recent information about this subject. On the other hand, the most widely used drying technologies and their particular applications in several fields are described (e.g. medicine, agriculture and food industry). Finally, topics on the stability of desiccated bacterial cells are treated, concluding with the necessity of focusing the research on the mathematical modelling of the desiccated state in bacteria.

  12. Bioleaching of marmatite using moderately thermophilic bacteria

    ZHOU Hong-bo; LIU Fei-fei; ZOU Ying-qin; ZENG Xiao-xi; QIU Guan-zhou

    2008-01-01

    The process of bioleaching marmatite using moderately thermophilic bacteria was studied by comparing marmatite leaching performance of mesophiles and moderate thermophiles and valuating the effect of venting capacity as well as pulp density on marmatite leaching performance of moderate thermophiles. The results show that moderate thermophiles have more advantages over mesophilies in bioleaching marmatite at 45℃ and the pulp density of 50g/L, and the zinc extraction efficiency reaches 93.1% in 20d. Aeration agitation can improve the transfer of O2 and CO2 in solution and promote the growth of bacteria and therefore, enhance the leaching efficiency. Under the venting levels of 50, 200 and 800mL/min, the zinc extraction efficiencies by moderate thermophiles are 57.8%, 92.5% and 96.0%, respectively. With the increase of pulp density, the total leaching amount of valuable metals increases, however, the extraction efficiency decreases due to many reasons, such as increasing shear force leading to poorly growth condition for bacteria, etc. The zinc extraction decreases remarkably to 58.9% while the pulp density mounts up 20%.

  13. Distribution of coliform bacteria in waste water

    Dau Lal Bohra

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Biological activity of water can be apparently judged by the colonization of bacteria (microbes. In order to find out the extent of pollution and the relationship between inorganic matters and microbiota, a quantitative and qualitative analysis of bacteria in various types of sewage waters, namely sewage water by the residential colonies (group I, industrial waste water (group II, sewage treatment hub (group III, unorganized collected waste water (group IV and old residential waste collection center (group V, of Bikaner city (Rajasthan, India was carried out from February, 2010 to May, 2010. Water samples were taken from surface only owing to low depth and investigated for various abiotic factors (viz. transparency, pH, carbonate, bicarbonate, total alkalinity, total hardness, salinity, chloride, calcium, magnesium, sulphate, nitrate, silica, and inorganic phosphorous and biotic factors (viz. number and diversity of bacteria. The domestic sewage water causes major water borne diseases basing upon Total Bacterial Count (TBC and coliform Count (CC. The coliform count in the present study ranged from 2.5 to 5.12 MPN/mL. Comparision of microbial population in sewage water from all different Groups was done and the higher values of TBC and CC were recorded only in Sewage treatement hub (Group III.

  14. Bacteria associated with Amblyomma cajennense tick eggs.

    Machado-Ferreira, Erik; Vizzoni, Vinicius Figueiredo; Piesman, Joseph; Gazeta, Gilberto Salles; Soares, Carlos Augusto Gomes

    2015-12-01

    Ticks represent a large group of pathogen vectors that blood feed on a diversity of hosts. In the Americas, the Ixodidae ticks Amblyomma cajennense are responsible for severe impact on livestock and public health. In the present work, we present the isolation and molecular identification of a group of culturable bacteria associated with A. cajennense eggs from females sampled in distinct geographical sites in southeastern Brazil. Additional comparative analysis of the culturable bacteria from Anocentor nitens, Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Ixodes scapularis tick eggs were also performed. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses identified 17 different bacterial types identified as Serratia marcescens, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Enterobacter spp., Micrococcus luteus, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus spp., distributed in 12 phylogroups. Staphylococcus spp., especially S. sciuri, was the most prevalent bacteria associated with A. cajennense eggs, occurring in 65% of the samples and also frequently observed infecting A. nitens eggs. S. maltophilia, S. marcescens and B. cereus occurred infecting eggs derived from specific sampling sites, but in all cases rising almost as pure cultures from infected A. cajennense eggs. The potential role of these bacterial associations is discussed and they possibly represent new targets for biological control strategies of ticks and tick borne diseases. PMID:26537602

  15. Soil bacteria for remediation of polluted soils

    Springael, D.; Bastiaens, L.; Carpels, M.; Mergaey, M.; Diels, L.

    1996-09-18

    Soil bacteria, specifically adapted to contaminated soils, may be used for the remediation of polluted soils. The Flemish research institute VITO has established a collection of bacteria, which were isolated from contaminated areas. This collection includes microbacteria degrading mineral oils (Pseudomonas sp., Acinetobacter sp. and others), microbacteria degrading polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (genera Sphingomonas and Mycobacterium), microbacteria degrading polychlorobiphenyls (genus Ralstonia and strains related to beta-Proteobacteria), and metal resistant bacteria with plasmid borne resistances to Cd, Zn, Ni, Co, Cu, Hg, and Cr. Bench-scale reactors were developed to investigate the industrial feasibility of bioremediation. Batch Stirred Tank Reactors were used to evaluate the efficiency of oil degraders. Soils, contaminated with non-ferrous metals, were treated using a Bacterial Metal Slurry Reactor. It was found that the reduction of the Cd concentration may vary strongly from sample to sample: reduction factors vary from 95 to 50%. Is was shown that Cd contained in metallic sinter and biologically unavailable Cd could not be removed.

  16. The analysis of bacteria strains and sensitivity of bacteria to antibiotics in acute obstructive cholangitis with suppuration

    顾彬

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the changes of bacteria stains in acute obstructive cholangitis with suppuration(AOSC) and sensitivity of different bacteria strains to antibiotics in recent decade. Methods The data of bacterial

  17. Bacteria-Targeting Nanoparticles for Managing Infections

    Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar Filip

    Bacterial infections continue to be a significant concern particularly in healthcare settings and in the developing world. Current challenges include the increasing spread of drug resistant (DR) organisms, the side effects of antibiotic therapy, the negative consequences of clearing the commensal bacterial flora, and difficulties in developing prophylactic vaccines. This thesis was an investigation of the potential of a class of polymeric nanoparticles (NP) to contribute to the management of bacterial infections. More specifically, steps were taken towards using these NPs (1) to achieve greater spatiotemporal control over drug therapy by more targeted antibiotic delivery to bacteria, and (2) to develop a prophylactic vaccine formulation against the common bacterial sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by Chlamydia trachomatis. In the first part, we synthesized polymeric NPs containing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-block-poly(L-histidine)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PLH-PEG). We show that these NPs are able to bind to bacteria under model acidic infection conditions and are able to encapsulate and deliver vancomycin to inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria in vitro. Further work showed that the PLGA-PLH-PEG-based NPs demonstrated the potential for competition for binding bacteria at a site of infection from soluble protein and model phagocytic and tissue-resident cells in a NP composition dependent manner. The NPs demonstrated low toxicity in vitro, were well tolerated by mice in vivo, and circulated in the blood on timescales comparable to control PLGA-PEG NPs. In the second part, we used PLGA-PLH-PEG-based NPs to design a prophylactic vaccine against the obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis, the most common cause of bacterial STD in the world. Currently, no vaccines against this pathogen are approved for use in humans. We first formulated NPs encapsulating the TLR7 agonist R848 conjugated to poly(lactic acid) (R848-PLA

  18. Bacteria-Mineral Interactions on the Surfaces of Metal-Resistant Bacteria

    The extraordinary ability of indigenous microorganisms, like metal-resistant bacteria, for biotransformation of toxic compounds is of considerable interest for the emerging area of environmental bioremediation. However, the underlying mechanisms by which metal-resistant bacteria transform toxic compounds are currently unknown and await elucidation. The project's objective was to study stress-induced responses of metal-resistant bacteria to environmental changes and chemical stimulants. This project involved a multi-institutional collaboration of our LLNL group with the group of Dr. H.-Y. Holman (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). In this project, we have utilized metal-resistant bacteria Arthrobacter oxydans as a model bacterial system. We have utilized atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize for the first time at the nanometer scale formation of stress-induced structures on bacterial surfaces in response to Cr (VI) exposure. We have demonstrated that structure, assembly, and composition of these stress-induced structures are dependent on Cr (VI) concentrations. Our AFM observations of the appearance and development of stress-induced layers on the surfaces of Arthrobacter oxydans bacteria exposed to Cr (VI) were confirmed by Dr. Holman's biochemical, electron microscopy, and synchrotron infrared spectromicroscopy studies. In general, in vitro imaging of live microbial and cellular systems represents one of the most challenging issues in application of AFM. Various approaches for immobilization of bacteria on the substrate for in vitro imaging were tested in this project. Imaging of live bacteria was achieved, however further optimization of experimental methods are needed for high-resolution visualization of the cellular environmental structural dynamics by AFM. This project enhanced the current insight into molecular architecture, structural and environmental variability of bacterial systems. The project partially funded research for two book chapters (1

  19. Assessment of the Levels of Airborne Bacteria, Gram-Negative Bacteria, and Fungi in Hospital Lobbies

    Dong-Uk Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: We assessed the levels of airborne bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria (GNB, and fungi in six hospital lobbies, and investigated the environmental and hospital characteristics that affected the airborne microorganism levels. Methods: An Andersen single-stage sampler equipped with appropriate nutrition plate agar was used to collect the samples. The three types of microorganisms were repeatedly collected at a fixed location in each hospital (assumed to be representative of the entire hospital lobby from 08:00 through 24:00, with a sampling time of less than 5 min. Temperature and relative humidity were simultaneously monitored. Results: Multiple regression analysis was used to identify the major factors affecting microorganism levels. The average levels of bacteria (7.2 × 102 CFU/m3, GNB (1.7 × 10 CFU/m3, and fungi (7.7 × 10 CFU/m3 indicated that all hospital lobbies were generally contaminated. Season was the only factor that significantly affected the levels of all microorganisms (p < 0.0001, where contamination was the highest during the summer, significantly higher than during the winter. Other significant factors varied by microorganism, as follows: airborne bacteria (number of people in the lobby, sampling time, GNB (scale of hospital, and fungi (humidity and air temperature. Conclusions: Hospital lobby air was generally contaminated with microorganisms, including bacteria, GNB, and fungi. Environmental factors that may significantly influence the airborne concentrations of these agents should be managed to minimize airborne levels.

  20. Isolation of radiation-resistant bacteria without exposure to irradiation

    Resistance to desiccation was utilized in the selection of highly radiation-resistant asporogenous bacteria from nonirradiated sources. A bacterial suspension in phosphate buffer was dried in a thin film at 250C and 33% relative humidity. Storage under these conditions for 15 days or more reduced the number of radiation-sensitive bacteria. Further selection for radiation-resistant bacteria was obtained by irradiation of bacteria on velveteen in the replication process, therby avoiding the toxic effect of irradiated media. The similarity of radiation resistance and identifying characteristics in irradiated and non-irradiated isolates should allay some concerns that highly radiation-resistance bacteria have been permanently altered by radiation selection

  1. Root Associated Bacteria – Friends or Enemies? A Review

    Gabriela Mihalache

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant roots, due to their exudates, represent important ecological niches for bacteria, which can influence the plant growth by their both beneficial and deleterious effects. The positive effects of bacteria interaction with the plants roots consist in facilitating the nutrient uptake (N, P, producing phytohormones, enhancing their resistance to biotic and abiotic factors such as pathogenic fungi and bacteria, extreme temperatures, heavy metals, salinity. Regarding the harmful effects of bacteria on plants growth, production of phytotoxins, competition for nutrients or inducing diseases or even plants death represents examples of mechanisms by which bacteria can affect in a negative manner the growth of the plants.

  2. Hessian fly-associated bacteria: transmission, essentiality, and composition.

    Raman Bansal

    Full Text Available Plant-feeding insects have been recently found to use microbes to manipulate host plant physiology and morphology. Gall midges are one of the largest groups of insects that manipulate host plants extensively. Hessian fly (HF, Mayetiola destructor is an important pest of wheat and a model system for studying gall midges. To examine the role of bacteria in parasitism, a systematic analysis of bacteria associated with HF was performed for the first time. Diverse bacteria were found in different developmental HF stages. Fluorescent in situ hybridization detected a bacteriocyte-like structure in developing eggs. Bacterial DNA was also detected in eggs by PCR using primers targeted to different bacterial groups. These results indicated that HF hosted different types of bacteria that were maternally transmitted to the next generation. Eliminating bacteria from the insect with antibiotics resulted in high mortality of HF larvae, indicating that symbiotic bacteria are essential for the insect to survive on wheat seedlings. A preliminary survey identified various types of bacteria associated with different HF stages, including the genera Enterobacter, Pantoea, Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Ochrobactrum, Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, Nitrosomonas, Arcanobacterium, Microbacterium, Paenibacillus, and Klebsiella. Similar bacteria were also found specifically in HF-infested susceptible wheat, suggesting that HF larvae had either transmitted bacteria into plant tissue or brought secondary infection of bacteria to the wheat host. The bacteria associated with wheat seedlings may play an essential role in the wheat-HF interaction.

  3. Design and application of the method for isolating magnetotactic bacteria

    XIAO Zhijie; LIAN Bin; CHEN Jun; H. Henry Teng

    2007-01-01

    A simple apparatus was designed to effectively isolate magnetotactic bacteria from soils or sediments based on their magnetotaxis. Through a series of processes including sample incubation, MTB harvesting, isolation, purification and identification, several strains of bacteria were isolated from the samples successfully. By Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Energy-Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDXA), these bacteria were certificated to be magnetotactic bacteria. The phylogenetic relationship between the isolated magnetic strains and some known magnetotactic bacteria was inferred by the construction of phylogenetic tree based on 16SrDNA sequences. This apparatus has been proven to have the advantages of being inexpensive, simple to assemble, easy to perform and highly efficient to isolate novel magnetotactic bacteria. The research indicated that the combined approach of harvesting MTB by home-made apparatus and the method of plate colony isolation could purify and isolate magnetotactic bacteria effectively.

  4. Computational Challenges in Characterization of Bacteria and Bacteria-Host Interactions Based on Genomic Data

    Chao Zhang; Guo-lu Zheng; Shun-Fu Xu; Dong Xu

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid development of next-generation sequencing technologies,bacterial identification becomes a very important and essential step in processing genomic data,especially for metagenomic data.Many computational methods have been developed and some of them are widely used to address the problems in bacterial identification.In this article we review the algorithms of these methods,discuss their drawbacks,and propose future computational methods that use genomic data to characterize bacteria.In addition,we tackle two specific computational problems in bacterial identification,namely,the detection of host-specific bacteria and the detection of disease-associated bacteria,by offering potential solutions as a starting point for those who are interested in the area.

  5. Bacteria-bacteria interactions within the microbiota of the ancestral metazoan Hydra contribute to fungal resistance.

    Fraune, Sebastian; Anton-Erxleben, Friederike; Augustin, René; Franzenburg, Sören; Knop, Mirjam; Schröder, Katja; Willoweit-Ohl, Doris; Bosch, Thomas C G

    2015-07-01

    Epithelial surfaces of most animals are colonized by diverse microbial communities. Although it is generally agreed that commensal bacteria can serve beneficial functions, the processes involved are poorly understood. Here we report that in the basal metazoan Hydra, ectodermal epithelial cells are covered with a multilayered glycocalyx that provides a habitat for a distinctive microbial community. Removing this epithelial microbiota results in lethal infection by the filamentous fungus Fusarium sp. Restoring the complex microbiota in gnotobiotic polyps prevents pathogen infection. Although mono-associations with distinct members of the microbiota fail to provide full protection, additive and synergistic interactions of commensal bacteria are contributing to full fungal resistance. Our results highlight the importance of resident microbiota diversity as a protective factor against pathogen infections. Besides revealing insights into the in vivo function of commensal microbes in Hydra, our findings indicate that interactions among commensal bacteria are essential to inhibit pathogen infection. PMID:25514534

  6. Clay-Bacteria Systems and Biofilm Production

    Steiner, J.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Steiner, N.; Rudolph, E.; Gottlieb, P.

    2007-12-01

    Soil clots and the aerosol transport of bacteria and spores are promoted by the formation of biofilms (bacteria cells in an extracellular polymeric matrix). Biofilms protect microorganisms by promoting adhesion to both organic and inorganic surfaces. Time series experiments on bacteria-clay suspensions demonstrate that biofilm growth is catalyzed by the presence of hectorite in minimal growth media for the studied species: Gram negatives (Pseudomonas syringae and Escherichia coli,) and Gram positives (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis). Soil organisms (P. syringae, B. subtilis) and organisms found in the human population (E. coli, S. aureus) are both used to demonstrate the general applicability of clay involvement. Fluorescent images of the biofilms are acquired by staining with propidium iodide, a component of the BacLightTM Live/Dead bacterial viability staining kit (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR). The evolving polysaccharide-rich biofilm reacts with the clay interlayer site causing a complex substitution of the two-water hectorite interlayer with polysaccharide. The result is often a three-peak composite of the (001) x-ray diffraction maxima resulting from polysaccharide-expanded clays and an organic-driven contraction of a subset of the clays in the reaction medium. X-ray diffractograms reveal that the expanded set creates a broad maximum with clay subsets at 1.84 nm and 1.41 nm interlayer spacings as approximated by a least squares double Lorentzian fit, and a smaller shoulder at larger 2q, deriving from a contraction of the interlayer spacing. Washing with chlorox removes organic material from the contracted clay and creates a 1-water hectorite single peak in place of the double peak. The clay response can be used as an indirect indicator of biofilm in an environmental system.

  7. Do foliar endophytic bacteria fix nitrogen?

    Kueppers, L. M.; Moyes, A. B.; Frank, C.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Carper, D.; Vandehey, N.; O'Neil, J.; Dekas, A.

    2015-12-01

    Endophytic microorganisms - bacteria and fungi that live inside healthy plant tissue - are a relatively unexplored source of functional diversity in natural ecosystems. Prior to modern sequencing technology, detecting uncultured endophytic bacteria and assessing their putative functions was challenging. However, recent work has revealed a remarkable diversity of as yet non-culturable endophytic taxa and is beginning to identify functional roles within plant microbiomes. We recently examined bacterial communities in the foliage of a long-lived, high-elevation conifer species, limber pine (Pinus flexilis), and discovered a community strongly dominated by acetic acid bacteria (Acetobacteraceae), with several taxa closely related to known nitrogen fixers. Given limber pine's status as a pioneer species that is able to grow in low fertility soils, we hypothesized that this bacterial community has a potential functional role in fixing atmospheric nitrogen, providing a source of this limiting nutrient to the host tree. We used the radioisotope 13N2 to confirm that N2 rapidly diffuses into pine needles, where it could potentially be fixed. With an acetylene reduction assay we confirmed nitrogenase enzyme activity inside excised twigs 4 times over a growing season, and estimate potential rates of N2 fixation at 0.1 nmol N2 g needle-1 hr-1. Scaled to the stand level, this N input could be on the order of ~20 mg N m-2 d-1 over a growing season. While these rates are low, the long lifespan of individual trees (~1000 years) makes them biologically meaningful. Still, measured rates of acetylene reduction and bulk 15N2 incorporation are quite variable in space and time. Much work remains to better characterize the plant-microbial interactions in this system, including the rates of nitrogen fixation and their variability over the growing season, across edaphic conditions, among host species, and through plant development; and to determine which community members are responsible

  8. Are Bacteria more dangerous in space?

    With a mission to Mars and a permanent base on the moon as the ultimate dream, space travel is continually pushing back the frontiers. But long space missions present great challenges for science, for example in the field of microbiology. Together with the European Space Agency (ESA), SCK-CEN is studying the effects of space travel conditions on the behaviour of bacteria. In 2009 the SCK-CEN experts completed four innovative research projects at the cutting edge of microbiology, radiation sciences and space travel.

  9. The Origin And Spread Of Airborne Bacteria

    Henderson-Begg, S. K.; Moffett, B. F.

    2009-12-01

    The presence of bacteria in clouds may affect their radiation and precipitation properties as some species are able to catalyse the freezing of water at high temperatures (-2C to -10C). Where cloud-borne bacteria originate and the distances they are able to travel in the air remains a mystery. In this study we have attempted to address these issues by comparing metagenomic DNA sequences from air samples with those from other environmental sources. Air samples were collected on 1 July 2009 from a hill top at Thursley Nature Reserve in Surrey, United Kingdom, a rural site, 31 miles from the nearest stretch of coastline, and on 6 July 2009 from the top of a six storey building in Stratford on the East end of London, 38 miles from the nearest coastal area. Samples were collected using the Karcher DS5500 vacuum into a liquid filled collection vessel at an air flow rate of 3.3 m3 min-1 over a 4 hour period. Samples were then concentrated and the bacterial content was investigated by PCR, cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. During the collection period on 1 July the Royston Weather Station in the South East of England recorded wind speed of 1.9 miles/hour in an Easterly direction, with no cloud cover, relative humidity of 74% and atmospheric pressure of 1021.6 mB. On 6 July wind speed was 9.8 miles/hour in a South Westerly direction, there was light cloud cover, relative humidity was 73.8% and atmospheric pressure was 1002.8 mB. Twenty cloned 16S PCR products from each air sample were sequenced. The species identification of each clone is shown in Table 1. The diversity of bacteria found at both sites was similar, with Stenotrophomona and Pedobacteria species dominating both samples. When the DNA sequences were blasted against the environmental samples database, all sequences were found to display greatest homology to metagenomic DNA from marine sources. This may suggest that the most numerous bacteria in air samples originate in the oceans. Taking account of the

  10. Bacteriophage Infection of Model Metal Reducing Bacteria

    Weber, K. A.; Bender, K. S.; Gandhi, K.; Coates, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Microbially-mediated metal reduction plays a significant role controlling contaminant mobility in aqueous, soil, and sedimentary environments. From among environmentally relevant microorganisms mediating metal reduction, Geobacter spp. have been identified as predominant metal-reducing bacteria under acetate- oxidizing conditions. Due to the significance of these bacteria in environmental systems, it is necessary to understand factors influencing their metabolic physiology. Examination of the annotated finished genome sequence of G. sulfurreducens PCA, G. uraniumreducens Rf4, G. metallireduceans GS-15 as well as a draft genome sequence of Geobacter sp. FRC-32 have identified gene sequences of putative bacteriophage origin. Presence of these sequences indicates that these bacteria are susceptible to phage infection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer sets designed tested for the presence of 12 of 25 annotated phage-like sequences in G. sulfurreducens PCA and 9 of 17 phage-like sequences in FRC- 32. The following genes were successfully amplified in G. sulfurreducens PCA: prophage type transcription regulator, phage-induced endonuclease, phage tail sheath, 2 phage tail proteins, phage protein D, phage base plate protein, phage-related DNA polymerase, integrase, phage transcriptional regulator, and Cro-like transcription regulator. Nine of the following sequences were present in FRC-32: 4 separate phage- related proteins, phage-related tail component, viron core protein, phage Mu protein, phage base plate, and phage tail sheath. In addition to the bioinformatics evidence, incubation of G. sulfurreducens PCA with 1 μg mL-1 mytomycin C (mutagen stimulating prophage induction) during mid-log phase resulted in significant cell lysis relative to cultures that remained unamended. Cell lysis was concurrent with an increase in viral like particles enumerated using epifluorescent microscopy. In addition, samples collected following this lytic event (~44hours) were

  11. Heterotrophic bacteria associated with Varroa destructor mite

    Vanikova, Slavomira; Noskova, Alzbeta; Pristas, Peter; Judova, Jana; Javorsky, Peter

    2015-01-01

    International audience Varroa bee hive attack is a serious and common problem in bee keeping. In our work, an ecto-microflora of Varroa destructor mites was characterised as a potential source of bacterial bee diseases. Using a cultivation approach, a variable population of bacteria was isolated from the body surface of Varroa mites with frequency of about 150 cfu per mite individual. Nine studied isolates were classified to four genera and six species by a combination of matrix-assisted l...

  12. Electroactive biofilms of sulphate reducing bacteria

    Biofilms formed from a pure strain of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans 27774 on stainless steel and graphite polarised surfaces were studied. The polarisation conditions applied were -0.4 V vs. SCE for different times. A cathodic current related with the biofilms growth was observed with a maximum intensity of -270 mA m-2 that remained stable for several days using graphite electrodes. These sulphate reducing bacteria biofilms present electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen and oxygen reduction reactions. Electrode polarisation has a selective effect on the catalytic activity. The biofilms were also observed by scanning electronic microscopy revealing the formation of homogeneous films on the surfaces

  13. Bacteria: prospective savior in battle against cancer.

    Nair, Neha; Kasai, Tomonari; Seno, Masaharu

    2014-11-01

    Conventional anticancer therapies such as chemotherapy are losing their sheen in the battle against cancer. Therefore, strategies for treatment of cancer need to be constantly modified to fulfill the growing demands of alternative therapies. Several viral and non-viral vectors have been exploited for anticancer gene therapy. But over the years bacteria have been proven to be an important candidate for successful evasion of cancer. They serve as invaluable source of tumor-specific anticancer genes, toxins, polysaccharides for synthesis of nanodrugs and gene-delivery vectors. The current review assesses the role of important bacterial groups in different spheres of anti-cancer research. PMID:25368227

  14. Application of Pulsed Electric Field on Bacteria

    Kadlec, Tomáš; Babický, Václav; Člupek, Martin; Vrbová, M.

    Prague: Czech Technical University in Prague, 2011 - (Pospíšilová, M.; Vrbová, M.; Macháň, R.), s. 161-164 ISBN 978-80-01-04915-0. [Instruments and Methods for Biology and Medicine 2011. Kladno (CZ), 02.06.2011-02.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00430802; GA ČR(CZ) GD104/09/H080 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Pulsed Electric Field * Bacteria Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  15. Turning bacteria suspensions into a "superfluid"

    López, Héctor Matías; Douarche, Carine; Auradou, Harold; Clément, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The rheological response under simple shear of an active suspension of Escherichia coli is determined in a large range of shear rates and concentrations. The effective viscosity and the time scales characterizing the bacterial organization under shear are obtained. In the dilute regime, we bring evidences for a low shear Newtonian plateau characterized by a shear viscosity decreasing with concentration. In the semi-dilute regime, for particularly active bacteria, the suspension display a "super-fluid" like transition where the viscous resistance to shear vanishes, thus showing that macroscopically, the activity of pusher swimmers organized by shear, is able to fully overcome the dissipative effects due to viscous loss.

  16. The talking language in some major Gram-negative bacteria.

    Banerjee, Goutam; Ray, Arun Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Cell-cell interaction or quorum sensing (QS) is a vital biochemical/physiological process in bacteria that is required for various physiological functions, including nutrient uptake, competence development, biofilm formation, sporulation, as well as for toxin secretion. In natural environment, bacteria live in close association with other bacteria and interaction among them is crucial for survival. The QS-regulated gene expression in bacteria is a cell density-dependent process and the initiation process depends on the threshold level of the signaling molecule, N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL). The present review summarizes the QS signal and its respective circuit in Gram-negative bacteria. Most of the human pathogens belong to Gram-negative group, and only a few of them cause disease through QS system. Thus, inhibition of pathogenic bacteria is important. Use of antibiotics creates a selective pressure (antibiotics act as natural selection factor to promote one group of bacteria over another group) for emerging multidrug-resistant bacteria and will not be suitable for long-term use. The alternative process of inhibition of QS in bacteria using different natural and synthetic molecules is called quorum quenching. However, in the long run, QS inhibitors or blockers may also develop resistance, but obviously it will solve some sort of problems. In this review, we also have stated the mode of action of quorum-quenching molecule. The understanding of QS network in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria will help us to solve many health-related problems in future. PMID:27062655

  17. The effect of lactic acid bacteria on cocoa bean fermentation.

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2015-07-16

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao L.) are the raw material for chocolate production. Fermentation of cocoa pulp by microorganisms is crucial for developing chocolate flavor precursors. Yeasts conduct an alcoholic fermentation within the bean pulp that is essential for the production of good quality beans, giving typical chocolate characters. However, the roles of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria in contributing to the quality of cocoa bean and chocolate are not fully understood. Using controlled laboratory fermentations, this study investigated the contribution of lactic acid bacteria to cocoa bean fermentation. Cocoa beans were fermented under conditions where the growth of lactic acid bacteria was restricted by the use of nisin and lysozyme. The resultant microbial ecology, chemistry and chocolate quality of beans from these fermentations were compared with those of indigenous (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in control fermentations. In fermentations with the presence of nisin and lysozyme, the same species of yeasts and acetic acid bacteria grew but the growth of lactic acid bacteria was prevented or restricted. These beans underwent characteristic alcoholic fermentation where the utilization of sugars and the production of ethanol, organic acids and volatile compounds in the bean pulp and nibs were similar for beans fermented in the presence of lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid was produced during both fermentations but more so when lactic acid bacteria grew. Beans fermented in the presence or absence of lactic acid bacteria were fully fermented, had similar shell weights and gave acceptable chocolates with no differences

  18. Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria

    Wise, Arlene A.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2007-12-04

    Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria. A biosensor can be created by placing a reporter gene under control of an inducible promoter. The reporter gene produces a signal when a cognate transcriptional activator senses the inducing chemical. Creation of bacterial biosensors is currently restricted by limited knowledge of the genetic systems of bacteria that catabolize xenobiotics. By using mutagenic PCR to change the chemical specificity of the Pseudomonas species CF600 DmpR protein, the potential for engineering novel biosensors for detection of phenols has been demonstrated. DmpR, a well-characterized transcriptional activator of the P. CF600's dmp operon mediates growth on simple phenols. Transcription from Po, the promoter heading the dmp operon, is activated when the sensor domain of DmpR interacts with phenol and mono-substituted phenols. By altering the sensor domain of the DmpR, a group of DmpR derivatives that activate transcription of a Po-lacZ fusion in response to eight of the EPA's eleven priority pollutant phenols has been created. The assays and the sensor domain mutations that alter the chemical specificity of DmpR is described.

  19. Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria and Skin Health.

    Jeong, Ji Hye; Lee, Chang Y; Chung, Dae Kyun

    2016-10-25

    Human skin is the first defense barrier against the external environment, especially microbial pathogens and physical stimulation. Many studies on skin health with Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been published for many years, including prevention of skin disease and improvement of skin conditions. LAB, a major group of gram-positive bacteria, are known to be beneficial to human health by acting as probiotics. Recent studies have shown that LAB and their extracts have beneficial effects on maintenance and improvement of skin health. Oral administration of Lactobacillus delbrueckii inhibits the development of atopic disease. In addition, LAB and LAB extracts are known to have beneficial effects on intestinal diseases, with Lactobacillus plantarum having been shown to attenuate IL-10 deficient colitis. In addition to intestinal health, L. plantarum also has beneficial effects on skin. pLTA, which is lipoteichoic acid isolated from L. plantarum, has anti-photoaging effects on human skin cells by regulating the expression matrix meralloprotionase-1 (MMP-1) expression. While several studies have proposed a relationship between diseases of the skin and small intestines, there are currently no published reviews of the effects of LAB for skin health through regulation of intestinal conditions and the immune system. In this review, we discuss recent findings on the effects of LAB on skin health and its potential applications in beauty foods. PMID:26287529

  20. Starvation-survival of subsurface bacteria

    The ability of four subsurface isolates to survive starvation was examined and the results were compared to survival curves obtained for Escherichia coli B and Serratia marcescens. To examine the starvation-survival phenomenon further, several experimental parameters including nutritional history, initial cell density, growth phase, temperature of growth and starvation, and aeration. Nutritional history, initial cell density, and growth phases of the cells had some effect on the ability of these bacteria to survive whereas temperature and limited aeration had no effect under the conditions tested. No conditions were found where E. coli B or Serratia marcescens died rapidly or where less than 10% of the original cell number of viable cells remained. Because the apparent survival of these bacteria may be due to cryptic growth, cross-feeding experiments with 14C-labeled cells and unlabeled cells were carried out with E. coli B and Pseudomonas Lula V. Leaked extracellular 14C-compounds were not used for growth or maintenance energy, and were not taken up by either bacterium. Cryptic growth did not occur; the cells were truly starving under the experimental conditions used

  1. Insects as alternative hosts for phytopathogenic bacteria.

    Nadarasah, Geetanchaly; Stavrinides, John

    2011-05-01

    Phytopathogens have evolved specialized pathogenicity determinants that enable them to colonize their specific plant hosts and cause disease, but their intimate associations with plants also predispose them to frequent encounters with herbivorous insects, providing these phytopathogens with ample opportunity to colonize and eventually evolve alternative associations with insects. Decades of research have revealed that these associations have resulted in the formation of bacterial-vector relationships, in which the insect mediates dissemination of the plant pathogen. Emerging research, however, has highlighted the ability of plant pathogenic bacteria to use insects as alternative hosts, exploiting them as they would their primary plant host. The identification of specific bacterial genetic determinants that mediate the interaction between bacterium and insect suggests that these interactions are not incidental, but have likely arisen following the repeated association of microorganisms with particular insects over evolutionary time. This review will address the biology and ecology of phytopathogenic bacteria that interact with insects, including the traditional role of insects as vectors, as well as the newly emerging paradigm of insects serving as alternative primary hosts. Also discussed is one case where an insect serves as both host and vector, which may represent a transitionary stage in the evolution of insect-phytopathogen associations. PMID:21251027

  2. Magnetotactic bacteria and magnetosomes - Scope and challenges.

    Jacob, Jobin John; Suthindhiran, K

    2016-11-01

    Geomagnetism aided navigation has been demonstrated by certain organisms which allows them to identify a particular location using magnetic field. This attractive technique to recognize the course was earlier exhibited in numerous animals, for example, birds, insects, reptiles, fishes and mammals. Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are one of the best examples for magnetoreception among microorganisms as the magnetic mineral functions as an internal magnet and aid the microbe to move towards the water columns in an oxic-anoxic interface (OAI). The ability of MTB to biomineralize the magnetic particles (magnetosomes) into uniform nano-sized, highly crystalline structure with uniform magnetic properties has made the bacteria an important topic of research. The superior properties of magnetosomes over chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles made it an attractive candidate for potential applications in microbiology, biophysics, biochemistry, nanotechnology and biomedicine. In this review article, the scope of MTB, magnetosomes and its challenges in research and industrial application have been discussed in brief. This article mainly focuses on the application based on the magnetotactic behaviour of MTB and magnetosomes in different areas of modern science. PMID:27524094

  3. Inoculation of sugarcane with diazotrophic bacteria

    Nivaldo Schultz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The sugarcane industry, a strategic crop in Brazil, requires technological improvements in production efficiency to increase the crop energy balance. Among the various currently studied alternatives, inoculation with diazotrophic bacteria proved to be a technology with great potential. In this context, the efficiency of a mixture of bacterial inoculant was evaluated with regard to the agronomic performance and N nutrition of sugarcane. The experiment was carried out on an experimental field of Embrapa Agrobiologia, in Seropédica, Rio de Janeiro, using a randomized block, 2 × 3 factorial design (two varieties and three treatments with four replications, totaling 24 plots. The varieties RB867515 and RB72454 were tested in treatments consisting of: inoculation with diazotrophic bacteria, N-fertilized control with 120 kg ha-1 N and absolute control (no inoculation and no N fertilizer. The inoculum was composed of five strains of five diazotrophic species. The yield, dry matter accumulation, total N in the shoot dry matter and the contribution of N by biological fixation were evaluated, using the natural 15N abundance in non-inoculated sugarcane as reference. The bacterial inoculant increased the stalk yield of variety RB72454 similarly to fertilization with 120 kg ha-1 N in the harvests of plant-cane and first ratoon crops, however the contribution of biological N fixation was unchanged by inoculation, indicating that the benefits of the inoculant in sugarcane may have resulted from plant growth promotion.

  4. Bioactivation of Phytoestrogens: Intestinal Bacteria and Health.

    Landete, J M; Arqués, J; Medina, M; Gaya, P; de Las Rivas, B; Muñoz, R

    2016-08-17

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenols similar to human estrogens found in plants or derived from plant precursors. Phytoestrogens are found in high concentration in soya, flaxseed and other seeds, fruits, vegetables, cereals, tea, chocolate, etc. They comprise several classes of chemical compounds (stilbenes, coumestans, isoflavones, ellagitannins, and lignans) which are structurally similar to endogenous estrogens but which can have both estrogenic and antiestrogenic effects. Although epidemiological and experimental evidence indicates that intake of phytoestrogens in foods may be protective against certain chronic diseases, discrepancies have been observed between in vivo and in vitro experiments. The microbial transformations have not been reported so far in stilbenes and coumestans. However, isoflavones, ellagitanins, and lignans are metabolized by intestinal bacteria to produce equol, urolithins, and enterolignans, respectively. Equol, urolithin, and enterolignans are more bioavailable, and have more estrogenic/antiestrogenic and antioxidant activity than their precursors. Moreover, equol, urolithins and enterolignans have anti-inflammatory effects and induce antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities. The transformation of isoflavones, ellagitanins, and lignans by intestinal microbiota is essential to be protective against certain chronic diseases, as cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and menopausal symptoms. Bioavailability, bioactivity, and health effects of dietary phytoestrogens are strongly determined by the intestinal bacteria of each individual. PMID:25848676

  5. Metabolism of polychlorinated biphenyls by marine bacteria

    There have been no reports of laboratory studies of PCB metabolism by marine organisms. A few workers have analyzed marine animals for products of PCB metabolism. A search for hydroxylated PCBs in marine fish proved inconclusive. Phenolic metabolites of PCBs have been identified in seals and guillemot. PCBs that had been hydroxylated and excreted by marine organisms would most likely be found in the sediments, so in our laboratory we conducted a search for these compounds in marine sediments. Two kilograms of organic-rich surface sediment from Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, were extracted. The phenolic fraction was isolated and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Neither wide mass scans nor selected mass searches produced any evidence of hydroxylated PCB derivatives. It was felt that if any marine organisms were capable of metabolism of PCBs, some marine bacteria should have that capability. Thus a series of laboratory experiments was conducted to test this possibility. Reported here is the finding of PCB metabolism by marine bacteria in batch culture

  6. Sulphur bacteria mediated formation of Palaeoproterozoic phosphorites

    Joosu, Lauri; Lepland, Aivo; Kirsimäe, Kalle

    2014-05-01

    Modern phosphorite formation is typically associated with high productivity in upwelling areas where apatite (Ca-phosphate) precipitation is mediated by sulphur oxidising bacteria [1]. They inhabit the oxic/anoxic interface within the upper few centimetres of sediment column, accumulating phosphate in their cells under oxic conditions and releasing it rapidly when conditions become anoxic. Sulphur bacteria are known to live in close association with a consortium of anaerobic methane oxidising archaea and syntrophic sulphate-reducing bacteria. Paleoproterozoic, c. 2.0 Ga Zaonega Formation in Karelia, Russia contains several P-rich intervals in the upper part of 1500 m thick succession of organic-rich sedimentary rocks interlayered with mafic tuffs and lavas. Apatite in these P-rich intervals forms impure laminae, lenses and round-oval nodules which diameters typically range from 300 to 1000 μm. Individual apatite particles in P-rich laminae and nodules commonly occur as cylinders that are 1-8 μm long and have diameters of 0.5-4 μm. Cross-sections of best preserved cylindrical apatite particles reveal a thin outer rim whereas the internal parts consist of small anhedral elongated crystallites, intergrown with carbonaceous material. During recrystallization the outer rim thickens towards interior and cylinders may attain hexagonal crystal habit, but their size and shape remains largely unchanged [2]. The sizes of Zaonega nodules are similar to giant sulphide-oxidising bacteria known from modern and ancient settings [3, 4]. Individual apatite cylinders and aggregates have shapes and sizes similar to the methanotrophic archaea that inhabit microbial mats in modern seep/vent areas where they operate in close associations with sulphur-oxidising microbial communities [5]. Seep/vent influence during the Zaonega phosphogenesis is indicated by variable, though positive Eu anomaly, expected in magmatically active sedimentary environment experiencing several lava flows

  7. Gating mechanosensitive channels in bacteria with an atomic force microscope

    Garces, Renata; Miller, Samantha; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Third Institute of Physics Team; School of Medical Sciences Collaboration

    The regulation of growth and integrity of bacteria is critically linked to mechanical stress. Bacteria typically maintain a high difference of osmotic pressure (turgor pressure) with respect to the environment. This pressure difference (on the order of 1 atm) is supported by the cell envelope, a composite of lipid membranes and a rigid cell wall. Turgor pressure is controlled by the ratio of osmolytes inside and outside bacteria and thus, can abruptly increase upon osmotic downshock. For structural integrity bacteria rely on the mechanical stability of the cell wall and on the action of mechanosensitive (MS) channels: membrane proteins that release solutes in response to stress in the cell envelope. We here present experimental data on MS channels gating. We activate channels by indenting living bacteria with the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM). We compare responses of wild-type and mutant bacteria in which some or all MS channels have been eliminated.

  8. Fluctuations of Bacteria-laden Microbeads in a Liquid

    Kara, Vural; Lissandrello, Charles; O'Connor, Joan; Romero Rodriguez, Jose Alberto; Li, Le; Ekinci, Kamil

    2015-11-01

    The motion of bacteria adhered on surfaces may lead to powerful approaches for novel diagnostic tests. Examples were recently shown using microcantilevers on which bacteria were adhered using surface chemistry. In these experiments, the presence of bacteria led to an increase in the fluctuations of the microcantilevers in the frequency range 1-100 Hz. After administering antibiotics, the fluctuations returned to their control value. Here, we build on these studies by monitoring the fluctuations of micro-beads with bacteria adhered on their surfaces. We coat the micro-beads with Poly D Lysine (PDL) in order to attach Escherichia coli. We measure the fluctuations of the beads in motility buffer media using an optical microscope with and without bacteria. We calculate the diffusion coefficients from the mean square displacements (MSD) and correlate these with the presence of bacteria on the beads. These studies lay the foundation for the development of a rapid antibiotic susceptibility test based on bacterial activity.

  9. Bacteria in Cancer Therapy: Renaissance of an Old Concept

    Sebastian Felgner; Dino Kocijancic; Michael Frahm; Siegfried Weiss

    2016-01-01

    The rising incidence of cancer cases worldwide generates an urgent need of novel treatment options. Applying bacteria may represent a valuable therapeutic variant that is intensively investigated nowadays. Interestingly, the idea to apply bacteria wittingly or unwittingly dates back to ancient times and was revived in the 19th century mainly by the pioneer William Coley. This review summarizes and compares the results of the past 150 years in bacteria mediated tumor therapy from preclinical t...

  10. Susceptibility and resistance of ruminal bacteria to antimicrobial feed additives.

    Nagaraja, T. G.; Taylor, M.B.

    1987-01-01

    Susceptibility and resistance of ruminal bacterial species to avoparcin, narasin, salinomycin, thiopeptin, tylosin, virginiamycin, and two new ionophore antibiotics, RO22-6924/004 and RO21-6447/009, were determined. Generally, antimicrobial compounds were inhibitory to gram-positive bacteria and those bacteria that have gram-positive-like cell wall structure. MICs ranged from 0.09 to 24.0 micrograms/ml. Gram-negative bacteria were resistant at the highest concentration tested (48.0 micrograms...

  11. Hessian Fly-Associated Bacteria: Transmission, Essentiality, and Composition.

    Bansal, Raman; Hulbert, Scot; Schemerhorn, Brandi; Reese, John C.; Whitworth, R Jeff; Stuart, Jeffrey J.; Chen, Ming-Shun

    2011-01-01

    Plant-feeding insects have been recently found to use microbes to manipulate host plant physiology and morphology. Gall midges are one of the largest groups of insects that manipulate host plants extensively. Hessian fly (HF, Mayetiola destructor) is an important pest of wheat and a model system for studying gall midges. To examine the role of bacteria in parasitism, a systematic analysis of bacteria associated with HF was performed for the first time. Diverse bacteria were found in different...

  12. A Microfluidic Platform for Profiling Biomechanical Properties of Bacteria

    Sun, Xuanhao; Weinlandt, William D; Patel, Harsh; WU, Mingming; Hernandez, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to resist mechanical forces is necessary for the survival and division of bacteria and has traditionally been probed using specialized, low-throughput techniques such as atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers. Here we demonstrate a microfluidic technique to profile the stiffness of individual bacteria and populations of bacteria. The approach is similar to micropipette aspiration used to characterize the biomechanical performance of eukaryotic cells. However, the small size ...

  13. The Sorption of Hydrophobic Organic Chemicals to Bacteria

    Lunsman, Tamara

    2004-01-01

    The toxicity and time-dependent sorption of three hydrophobic organic chemicals to Rhodococcus rhodochrous bacteria were investigated. In experiments, environmentally relevant concentrations of pentachlorophenol (PCP), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and dichlorobiphenyl (DPCB) were applied to living (both growing and non-growing) bacteria as well as to dead bacteria. For PCP (an ionizing chemical), bacterial growth decreased and death increased as the PCP concentration increased. In sorption exp...

  14. Prevalence of Tetracycline Resistance Genes in Oral Bacteria

    Villedieu, A.; Diaz-Torres, M. L.; Hunt, N; McNab, R; Spratt, D. A.; Wilson, M.; Mullany, P.

    2003-01-01

    Tetracycline is a broad-spectrum antibiotic used in humans, animals, and aquaculture; therefore, many bacteria from different ecosystems are exposed to this antibiotic. In order to determine the genetic basis for resistance to tetracycline in bacteria from the oral cavity, saliva and dental plaque samples were obtained from 20 healthy adults who had not taken antibiotics during the previous 3 months. The samples were screened for the presence of bacteria resistant to tetracycline, and the tet...

  15. Distribution and Identification of Luminous Bacteria from the Sargasso Sea

    Orndorff, S. A.; Colwell, R R

    1980-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri and Lucibacterium harveyi constituted 75 of the 83 luminous bacteria isolated from Sargasso Sea surface waters. Photobacterium leiognathi and Photobacterium phosphoreum constituted the remainder of the isolates. Luminescent bacteria were recovered at concentrations of 1 to 63 cells per 100 ml from water samples collected at depths of 160 to 320 m. Two water samples collected at the thermocline yielded larger numbers of viable, aerobic heterotrophic and luminous bacteria. Lumin...

  16. Interspecific interactions of heterotrophic bacteria during chitin degradation

    Jagmann, Nina

    2012-01-01

    In their natural habitats, bacteria live in multi-species microbial communities and are, thus, constantly interacting with bacteria of other phylogenetic groups. In order to prevail in these interspecific interactions, such as the competition for nutrients, bacteria have developed numerous strategies. During the degradation of polymers such interspecific interactions are likely to occur, because degradation starts as an extracellular process. In one possible interaction scenario, investor bac...

  17. Isolation and identification of marine fish tumour (odontoma) associated bacteria

    Ramalingam Vijayakumar; Kuzhanthaivel Raja; Vijayapoopathi Singaravel; Ayyaru Gopalakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify fish tumour associated bacteria. Methods: The marine fish Sphyraena jello with odontoma was collected from in Tamil Nadu (Southeast India), and tumour associated bacteria were isolated. Then the isolated bacteria were identified based on molecular characters. Results: A total of 4 different bacterial species were isolated from tumour tissue. The bacterial species were Bacillus sp., Pontibacter sp., Burkholderia sp. and Macrococcus sp., and the se...

  18. The identification and biogeochemical interpretation of fossil magnetotactic bacteria

    Kopp, Robert E.; Kirschvink, Joseph L

    2008-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria, which most commonly live within the oxic-anoxic transition zone (OATZ) of aquatic environments, produce intracellular crystals of magnetic minerals, specifically magnetite or greigite. The crystals cause the bacteria to orient themselves passively with respect to the geomagnetic field and thereby facilitate the bacteria’s search for optimal conditions within the sharp chemical gradients of the OATZ. The bacteria may also gain energy from the redox cycling of their ...

  19. Emergence of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase (KPC)-Producing Bacteria

    Arnold, Ryan S.; Thom, Kerri A.; Sharma, Saarika; Phillips, Michael; Johnson, J. Kristie; Morgan, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing bacteria are a group of emerging highly drug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli causing infections associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Once confined to outbreaks in the northeastern United States (US), they have spread throughout the US and most of the world. KPCs are an important mechanism of resistance for an increasingly wide range of Gram-negative bacteria and are no longer limited to K pneumoniae. KPC-producing bacteria ar...

  20. The Role of Anaerobic Bacteria in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease.

    Murray, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent bacterial infections in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) are the primary cause for morbidity and mortality in CF. Advancements in second generation sequencing and evolution of the lung microbiome has prompted greater interest in other bacteria present in the lung. Anaerobic bacteria have been one of the most common bacteria found on molecular sequencing, their cause and role is as of yet unknown. In our project, we recruited 450 patients prospectively and followed them at both stable and exacer...

  1. Functional genomics of lactic acid bacteria: from food to health

    Douillard, F.P.; Vos, de, W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Genome analysis using next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the characterization of lactic acid bacteria and complete genomes of all major groups are now available. Comparative genomics has provided new insights into the natural and laboratory evolution of lactic acid bacteria and their environmental interactions. Moreover, functional genomics approaches have been used to understand the response of lactic acid bacteria to their environment. The results have been instrumen...

  2. Exploration of the core metabolism of symbiotic bacteria

    Klein Cecilia Coimbra; Cottret Ludovic; Kielbassa Janice; Charles Hubert; Gautier Christian; Ribeiro de Vasconcelos Ana Tereza; Lacroix Vincent; Sagot Marie-France

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background A large number of genome-scale metabolic networks is now available for many organisms, mostly bacteria. Previous works on minimal gene sets, when analysing host-dependent bacteria, found small common sets of metabolic genes. When such analyses are restricted to bacteria with similar lifestyles, larger portions of metabolism are expected to be shared and their composition is worth investigating. Here we report a comparative analysis of the small molecule metabolism of symbi...

  3. Quantification and qualification of bacteria trapped in chewed gum.

    Stefan W Wessel

    Full Text Available Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and remove them from the oral cavity. To test this hypothesis, we developed two methods to quantify numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum. In the first method, known numbers of bacteria were finger-chewed into gum and chewed gums were molded to standard dimensions, sonicated and plated to determine numbers of colony-forming-units incorporated, yielding calibration curves of colony-forming-units retrieved versus finger-chewed in. In a second method, calibration curves were created by finger-chewing known numbers of bacteria into gum and subsequently dissolving the gum in a mixture of chloroform and tris-ethylenediaminetetraacetic-acid (TE-buffer. The TE-buffer was analyzed using quantitative Polymerase-Chain-Reaction (qPCR, yielding calibration curves of total numbers of bacteria versus finger-chewed in. Next, five volunteers were requested to chew gum up to 10 min after which numbers of colony-forming-units and total numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum were determined using the above methods. The qPCR method, involving both dead and live bacteria yielded higher numbers of retrieved bacteria than plating, involving only viable bacteria. Numbers of trapped bacteria were maximal during initial chewing after which a slow decrease over time up to 10 min was observed. Around 10(8 bacteria were detected per gum piece depending on the method and gum considered. The number of species trapped in chewed gum increased with chewing time. Trapped bacteria were clearly visualized in chewed gum using scanning-electron-microscopy. Summarizing, using novel methods to quantify and qualify oral bacteria trapped in chewed gum, the hypothesis is confirmed that chewing

  4. Predatory bacteria are nontoxic to the rabbit ocular surface

    Romanowski, Eric G.; Stella, Nicholas A.; Brothers, Kimberly M.; Yates, Kathleen A.; Funderburgh, Martha L.; Funderburgh, James L.; Gupta, Shilpi; Dharani, Sonal; Kadouri, Daniel E.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.

    2016-01-01

    Given the increasing emergence of antimicrobial resistant microbes and the near absent development of new antibiotic classes, innovative new therapeutic approaches to address this global problem are necessary. The use of predatory bacteria, bacteria that prey upon other bacteria, is gaining interest as an “out of the box” therapeutic treatment for multidrug resistant pathogenic bacterial infections. Before a new antimicrobial agent is used to treat infections, it must be tested for safety. The goal of this study was to test the tolerability of bacteria on the ocular surface using in vitro and in vivo models. Predatory bacteria Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus and Micavibrio aeruginosavorus were found to be non-toxic to human corneal stromal keratocytes in vitro; however, they did induce production of the proinflammatory chemokine IL-8 but not IL-1β. Predatory bacteria did not induce inflammation on the ocular surface of rabbit eyes, with and without corneal epithelial abrasions. Unlike a standard of care antibiotic vancomycin, predatory bacteria did not inhibit corneal epithelial wound healing or increase clinical inflammatory signs in vivo. Together these data support the safety of predatory bacteria on the ocular surface, but future studies are warranted regarding the use predatory bacteria in deeper tissues of the eye. PMID:27527833

  5. Genetically engineered acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria by bacteriophage transduction

    Ward, T.E.; Bruhn, D.F.; Bulmer, D.F.

    1989-05-10

    A bacteriophage capable of infecting acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria and processes for genetically engineering acidophilic bacteria for biomining or sulfur removal from coal are disclosed. The bacteriophage is capable of growth in cells existing at pH at or below 3.0. Lytic forms of the phage introduced into areas experiencing acid drainage kill the bacteria causing such drainage. Lysogenic forms of the phage having genes for selective removal of metallic or nonmetallic elements can be introduced into acidophilic bacteria to effect removal of the desired element from ore or coal. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Liquid-nitrogen cryopreservation of three kinds of autotrophicbioleaching bacteria

    WU Xue-ling; XIN Xiao-hong; JIANG Ying; LIANG Ren-xing; YUAN Peng; FANG Cheng-xiang

    2008-01-01

    Three kinds of autotrophic bioleaching bacteria strains,including mesophilic and acidophilic ferrous ion-oxidizing bacteria Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A.ferrooxidans),mesophilic and acidophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans (A.thiooxidans),and moderately thermophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria Acidianus brierleyi,were cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen and their ferrous ion- or sulfur-oxidizing activities were investigated and compared with the original ones.The results revealed that ferrous ion/sulfur oxidation activities of the strains were almost equal before and after cryopreservation.Glycerin was used as cryoprotective agent.In conclusion,liquid-nitrogen cryopreservation is a simple and effective method for autotrophic bioleaching microorganisms.

  7. Quantification and qualification of bacteria trapped in chewed gum.

    Wessel, Stefan W; van der Mei, Henny C; Morando, David; Slomp, Anje M; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Maitra, Amarnath; Busscher, Henk J

    2015-01-01

    Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and remove them from the oral cavity. To test this hypothesis, we developed two methods to quantify numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum. In the first method, known numbers of bacteria were finger-chewed into gum and chewed gums were molded to standard dimensions, sonicated and plated to determine numbers of colony-forming-units incorporated, yielding calibration curves of colony-forming-units retrieved versus finger-chewed in. In a second method, calibration curves were created by finger-chewing known numbers of bacteria into gum and subsequently dissolving the gum in a mixture of chloroform and tris-ethylenediaminetetraacetic-acid (TE)-buffer. The TE-buffer was analyzed using quantitative Polymerase-Chain-Reaction (qPCR), yielding calibration curves of total numbers of bacteria versus finger-chewed in. Next, five volunteers were requested to chew gum up to 10 min after which numbers of colony-forming-units and total numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum were determined using the above methods. The qPCR method, involving both dead and live bacteria yielded higher numbers of retrieved bacteria than plating, involving only viable bacteria. Numbers of trapped bacteria were maximal during initial chewing after which a slow decrease over time up to 10 min was observed. Around 10(8) bacteria were detected per gum piece depending on the method and gum considered. The number of species trapped in chewed gum increased with chewing time. Trapped bacteria were clearly visualized in chewed gum using scanning-electron-microscopy. Summarizing, using novel methods to quantify and qualify oral bacteria trapped in chewed gum, the hypothesis is confirmed that chewing of gum can trap

  8. Isolation and identification of marine fish tumour (odontoma) associated bacteria

    Ramalingam Vijayakumar; Kuzhanthaivel Raja; Vijayapoopathi Singaravel; Ayyaru Gopalakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify fish tumour associated bacteria. Methods: The marine fish Sphyraena jello with odontoma was collected from in Tamil Nadu (Southeast India), and tumour associated bacteria were isolated. Then the isolated bacteria were identified based on molecular characters. Results: A total of 4 different bacterial species were isolated from tumour tissue. The bacterial species were Bacillus sp., Pontibacter sp., Burkholderia sp. and Macrococcus sp., and the sequences were submitted in DNA Data Bank of Japan with accession numbers of AB859240, AB859241, AB859242 and AB859243 respectively. Conclusions: Four different bacterial species were isolated from Sphyraena jello, but the role of bacteria within tumour needs to be further investigated.

  9. [Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria].

    García-Sánchez, José E; García-Sánchez, Enrique; García-García, María Inmaculada

    2014-02-01

    The anaerobic bacteria resistance to antibiotics is increasing, and even has appeared against the most active of those, like metronidazol and carbapenems. This fact forces to make and periodical sensibility tests -at least in the most aggressive and virulent species, in cases that they are isolated from life locations and in the absence of therapeutic response- to check the local sensibility and to establish suitable empiric therapies, all based on multicentric studies carried out in order to this or well to check the activity of new antibiotics. For the laboratory routine, the easiest sensibility method is the E-test/MIC evaluator. Another alternative is microdilution, that's only normalized for Bacteroides. There are preliminary facts that allow the use of disc diffusion method in some species of Bacteroides and Clostridium. For the temporal and multicentric studies, the procedure is dilution in agar plate, the reference method. PMID:24630580

  10. Physical mode of bacteria and virus coevolution

    Han, Pu; Niestemski, Liang; Deem, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Single-cell hosts such as bacteria or archaea possess an adaptive, heritable immune system that protects them from viral invasion. This system, known as the CRISPR-Cas system, allows the host to recognize and incorporate short foreign DNA or RNA sequences from viruses or plasmids. The sequences form what are called ``spacers'' in the CRISPR. Spacers in the CRISPR loci provide a record of the host and predator coevolution history. We develop a physical model to study the dynamics of this coevolution due to immune pressure. Hosts and viruses reproduce, die, and evolve due to viral infection pressure, host immune pressure, and mutation. We will discuss the differing effects of point mutation and recombination on CRISPR evolution. We will also discuss the effect of different spacer deletion mechanisms. We will describe population structure of hosts and viruses, how spacer diversity depends on position within CRISPR, and match of the CRISPR spacers to the virus population.

  11. Physics of Bacteria During Osmotic Shock

    Price, Jordan; Klug, William

    Bacteria combat hypoosmotic shocks by opening mechanosensitive ion channels located within the inner membrane. These channels are believed to act as ``emergency release valves,'' reducing transient pressure during the shock by regulating solute and water flux. Recent experiments have shown that cell survivability depends strongly on channel populations and the rate of osmotic shock. However, the understanding of the physical mechanisms behind osmotic protection remains unclear. We investigate how channel deletions, variations in shock rate, and cell envelope mechanics affect survivability by constructing theoretical elasticity and transport models. We find that reducing the number of channels and applying faster shocks significantly increases the time-dependent stress of the cell membrane and wall. This result provides insight into physical mechanisms that govern cell failure, including membrane rupture and wall fracture.

  12. Degradation of multiwall carbon nanotubes by bacteria

    Understanding the environmental transformation of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is important to their life cycle assessment and potential environmental impacts. We report that a bacterial community is capable of degrading 14C-labeled MWCNTs into 14CO2 in the presence of an external carbon source via co-metabolism. Multiple intermediate products were detected, and genotypic characterization revealed three possible microbial degraders: Burkholderia kururiensis, Delftia acidovorans, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. This result suggests that microbe/MWCNTs interaction may impact the long-term fate of MWCNTs. Highlights: •Mineralization of MWCNTs by a bacterial community was observed. •The mineralization required an external carbon source. •Multiple intermediate products were identified in the MWCNT degrading culture. •Three bacterial species were found likely responsible for MWCNT degradation. -- The 14C-labeled multiwall carbon nanotubes can be degraded to 14CO2 and other byproducts by a bacteria community under natural conditions

  13. Magnetotactic bacteria. Promising biosorbents for heavy metals

    Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Yanzong; Ding, Xiaohui; Liu, Yan; Shen, Fei; Zhang, Xiaohong; Deng, Shihuai; Xiao, Hong; Yang, Gang; Peng, Hong [Sichuan Agricultural Univ., Chengdu (China). Provincial Key Lab. of Agricultural Environmental Engineering

    2012-09-15

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB), which can orient and migrate along a magnetic line of force due to intracellular nanosized magnetosomes, have been a subject of research in the medical field, in dating environmental changes, and in environmental remediation. This paper reviews the recent development of MTB as biosorbents for heavy metals. Ultrastructures and taxis of MTB are investigated. Adsorptions in systems of unitary and binary ions are highlighted, as well as adsorption conditions (temperature, pH value, biomass concentration, and pretreatments). The separation and desorption of MTB in magnetic separators are also discussed. A green method to produce metal nanoparticles is provided, and an energy-efficient way to recover precious metals is put forward during biosorption. (orig.)

  14. Dynamics of swimming bacteria at complex interfaces

    Lopez, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Flagellated bacteria exploiting helical propulsion are known to swim along circular trajectories near surfaces. Fluid dynamics predicts this circular motion to be clockwise (CW) above a rigid surface (when viewed from inside the fluid) and counter-clockwise (CCW) below a free surface. Recent experimental investigations showed that complex physicochemical processes at the nearby surface could lead to a change in the direction of rotation, both at solid surfaces absorbing slip-inducing polymers and interfaces covered with surfactants. Motivated by these results, we use a far-field hydrodynamic model to predict the kinematics of swimming near three types of interfaces: clean fluid-fluid interface, slipping rigid wall, and a fluid interface covered by incompressible surfactants. Representing the helical swimmer by a superposition of hydrodynamic singularities, we first show that in all cases the surfaces reorient the swimmer parallel to the surface and attract it, both of which are a consequence of the Stokes dip...

  15. Two-dimensional swimming behavior of bacteria

    Li, Ye; Zhai, He; Sanchez, Sandra; Kearns, Daniel; Wu, Yilin

    Many bacteria swim by flagella motility which is essential for bacterial dispersal, chemotaxis, and pathogenesis. Here we combined single-cell tracking, theoretical analysis, and computational modeling to investigate two-dimensional swimming behavior of a well-characterized flagellated bacterium Bacillus subtilis at the single-cell level. We quantified the 2D motion pattern of B. subtilis in confined space and studied how cells interact with each other. Our findings shed light on bacterial colonization in confined environments, and will serve as the ground for building more accurate models to understand bacterial collective motion. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail: ylwu@phy.cuhk.edu.hk.

  16. Magnetotactic bacteria, magnetosomes and their application.

    Yan, Lei; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Peng; Liu, Hetao; Yin, Huanhuan; Li, Hongyu

    2012-10-12

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a diverse group of microorganisms with the ability to orient and migrate along geomagnetic field lines. This unique feat is based on specific intracellular organelles, the magnetosomes, which, in most MTB, comprise nanometer-sized, membrane bound crystals of magnetic iron minerals and organized into chains via a dedicated cytoskeleton. Because of the special properties of the magnetosomes, MTB are of great interest for paleomagnetism, environmental magnetism, biomarkers in rocks, magnetic materials and biomineralization in organisms, and bacterial magnetites have been exploited for a variety of applications in modern biological and medical sciences. In this paper, we describe general characteristics of MTB and their magnetic mineral inclusions, but focus mainly on the magnetosome formation and the magnetisms of MTB and bacterial magnetosomes, as well as on the significances and applications of MTB and their intracellular magnetic mineral crystals. PMID:22579104

  17. Streptomyces bacteria as potential probiotics in aquaculture

    Tan Loh eTeng Hern

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In response to the increased seafood demand from the ever-going human population, aquaculture has become the fastest growing animal food-producing sector. However, the indiscriminate use of antibiotics as a biological control agents for fish pathogens has led to the emergence of antibiotic resistance bacteria. Probiotics are defined as living microbial supplement that exert beneficial effects on hosts as well as improvement of environmental parameters. Probiotics have been proven to be effective in improving the growth, survival and health status of the aquatic livestock. This review aims to highlight the genus Streptomyces can be a good candidate for probiotics in aquaculture. Studies showed that the feed supplemented with Streptomyces could protect fish and shrimp from pathogens as well as increase the growth of the aquatic organisms. Furthermore, the limitations of Streptomyces as probiotics in aquaculture is also highlighted and solutions are discussed to these limitations.

  18. Bacteria,inflammation,and colon cancer

    Liying Yang; Zhiheng Pei

    2006-01-01

    Our relationship with the colonic bacterial flora has long been viewed as benign,but recent studies suggest that this symbiosis has risks as well as benefits.This relationship requires that the host not only provide a supportive environment for the symbiotic bacteria,but also actively maintain intact mechanisms for properly managing the physiologic stresses that are closely associated with the symbiont's essential survival functions.Failure to do so breaches the hostsymbiont contract,and can result in serious effects on the health of the host.Recent investigations that employ several knockout mouse models reveal the consequences of genetic deficiency in the host regarding these mechanisms,and the latent,pro-inflammatory,tumorigenic nature of normal bacterial flora.Further study of the interactions between normal bacterial flora and hosts could shed light on the etiologies and pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases and related cancers,with implications for human health.

  19. Control of indigenous pathogenic bacteria in seafood

    Huss, Hans Henrik

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria indigenous to the aquatic and general environment are listed. Their distribution in nature, prevalence in seafood and the possibilities for growth of these organisms in various types of products are outlined These data, combined with what is known regarding the epidemiology...... order to prevent growth and toxin production by Clostridium botulinum when products are stored at abuse temperature, it is recommended that additional barriers to growth are included in lightly preserved (e.g. cold smoked salmon) and low-heat treated (e.g REPFEDS) products. It is finally pointed out...... of disease, are used to place the various seafood products in risk categories and to identify areas of concern. It is concluded that the presence of pathogens in molluscs and the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in lightly preserved fish products are hazards which are presently not under control. In...

  20. Uptake of plutonium by immobilized bacteria

    The use of plastic-immobilized bacteria as a system for the concentration of plutonium from aqueous media is investigated. Previous research is reviewed quantifying free cell bacterial concentration of plutonium from solution or suspension. Our research indicates that the species Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be induced to attach firmly to a polymer substrate, while retaining its ability to concentrate plutonium. Melt-blown, filamentous polypropylene is shown to foster cell embedment and uptake capabilities surpassing various other substrates. Oxygen plasma treatment, used to enhance polypropylene wettability, is found to increase the rate of cell embedment significantly. Both embedment and uptake phenomena are found to be dependent upon cell viability. Potential applications for the cell/polymer system are discussed

  1. Magnetotactic bacteria: nanodrivers of the future.

    Mathuriya, Abhilasha Singh

    2016-10-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) represent a heterogeneous group of Gram-negative aquatic prokaryotes with a broad range of morphological types, including vibrioid, coccoid, rod and spirillum. MTBs possess the virtuosity to passively align and actively swim along the magnetic field. Magnetosomes are the trademark nano-ranged intracellular structures of MTB, which comprise magnetic iron-bearing inorganic crystals enveloped by an organic membrane, and are dedicated organelles for their magnetotactic lifestyle. Magnetosomes endue high and even dispersion in aqueous solutions compared with artificial magnetites, claiming them as paragon nanomaterials. MTB and magnetosomes offer high technological potential in modern science, technology and medicines. This review focuses on the applicability of MTB and magnetosomes in various areas of modern benefits. PMID:26287367

  2. Bacteria and bioremediation of marine oil spills

    Virtually all marine ecosystems harbor indigenous hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. These hydrocarbon degraders comprise less than one percent of the bacterial community in unpolluted environments, but generally increase to one to ten percent following petroleum contamination. Various hydrocarbons are degraded by these microorganisms at different rates, so there is an evolution in the residual hydrocarbon mixture, and some hydrocarbons and asphaltic petroleum hydrocarbons remain undegraded. Fortunately, these persistent petroleum pollutants are, for the most part, insoluble or are bound to solids; hence they are not biologically available and therefore not toxic to marine organisms. Carbon dioxide, water, and cellular biomass produced by the microorganisms from the degradable hydrocarbons may be consumed by detrital feeders and comprise the end products of the natural biological degradation process. Bioremediation attempts to accelerate the natural hydrocarbon degradation rates by overcoming factors that limit bacterial hydrocarbon degrading activities

  3. Magnetotactic bacteria: promising biosorbents for heavy metals.

    Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Yanzong; Ding, Xiaohui; Liu, Yan; Shen, Fei; Zhang, Xiaohong; Deng, Shihuai; Xiao, Hong; Yang, Gang; Peng, Hong

    2012-09-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB), which can orient and migrate along a magnetic line of force due to intracellular nanosized magnetosomes, have been a subject of research in the medical field, in dating environmental changes, and in environmental remediation. This paper reviews the recent development of MTB as biosorbents for heavy metals. Ultrastructures and taxis of MTB are investigated. Adsorptions in systems of unitary and binary ions are highlighted, as well as adsorption conditions (temperature, pH value, biomass concentration, and pretreatments). The separation and desorption of MTB in magnetic separators are also discussed. A green method to produce metal nanoparticles is provided, and an energy-efficient way to recover precious metals is put forward during biosorption. PMID:22763846

  4. Variations of culturable thermophilic microbe numbers and bacterial communities during the thermophilic phase of composting.

    Li, Rong; Li, Linzhi; Huang, Rong; Sun, Yifei; Mei, Xinlan; Shen, Biao; Shen, Qirong

    2014-06-01

    Composting is a process of stabilizing organic wastes through the degradation of biodegradable components by microbial communities under controlled conditions. In the present study, genera and species diversities, amylohydrolysis, protein and cellulose degradation abilities of culturable bacteria in the thermophilic phase of composting of cattle manure with plant ash and rice bran were investigated. The number of culturable thermophilic bacteria and actinomyces decreased with the increasing temperature. At the initiation and end of the thermophilic phase, genera and specie diversities and number of bacteria possessing degradation abilities were higher than during the middle phase. During the thermophilic composting phase, Bacillus, Geobacillus and Ureibacillus were the dominant genera, and Geobacillus thermodenitrificans was the dominant species. In later thermophilic phases, Geobacillus toebii and Ureibacillus terrenus were dominant. Bacillus, at the initiation, and Ureibacillus and Geobacillus, at the later phase, contributed the multiple degradation abilities. These data will facilitate the control of composting in the future. PMID:24415499

  5. Stress Physiology of Lactic Acid Bacteria.

    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Alegría, Ángel; Bron, Peter A; de Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Lemos, José A; Linares, Daniel M; Ross, Paul; Stanton, Catherine; Turroni, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Varmanen, Pekka; Ventura, Marco; Zúñiga, Manuel; Tsakalidou, Effie; Kok, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are important starter, commensal, or pathogenic microorganisms. The stress physiology of LAB has been studied in depth for over 2 decades, fueled mostly by the technological implications of LAB robustness in the food industry. Survival of probiotic LAB in the host and the potential relatedness of LAB virulence to their stress resilience have intensified interest in the field. Thus, a wealth of information concerning stress responses exists today for strains as diverse as starter (e.g., Lactococcus lactis), probiotic (e.g., several Lactobacillus spp.), and pathogenic (e.g., Enterococcus and Streptococcus spp.) LAB. Here we present the state of the art for LAB stress behavior. We describe the multitude of stresses that LAB are confronted with, and we present the experimental context used to study the stress responses of LAB, focusing on adaptation, habituation, and cross-protection as well as on self-induced multistress resistance in stationary phase, biofilms, and dormancy. We also consider stress responses at the population and single-cell levels. Subsequently, we concentrate on the stress defense mechanisms that have been reported to date, grouping them according to their direct participation in preserving cell energy, defending macromolecules, and protecting the cell envelope. Stress-induced responses of probiotic LAB and commensal/pathogenic LAB are highlighted separately due to the complexity of the peculiar multistress conditions to which these bacteria are subjected in their hosts. Induction of prophages under environmental stresses is then discussed. Finally, we present systems-based strategies to characterize the "stressome" of LAB and to engineer new food-related and probiotic LAB with improved stress tolerance. PMID:27466284

  6. Virulence Plasmids of Spore-Forming Bacteria.

    Adams, Vicki; Li, Jihong; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Uzal, Francisco A; Moore, Robert J; McClane, Bruce A; Rood, Julian I

    2014-12-01

    Plasmid-encoded virulence factors are important in the pathogenesis of diseases caused by spore-forming bacteria. Unlike many other bacteria, the most common virulence factors encoded by plasmids in Clostridium and Bacillus species are protein toxins. Clostridium perfringens causes several histotoxic and enterotoxin diseases in both humans and animals and produces a broad range of toxins, including many pore-forming toxins such as C. perfringens enterotoxin, epsilon-toxin, beta-toxin, and NetB. Genetic studies have led to the determination of the role of these toxins in disease pathogenesis. The genes for these toxins are generally carried on large conjugative plasmids that have common core replication, maintenance, and conjugation regions. There is considerable functional information available about the unique tcp conjugation locus carried by these plasmids, but less is known about plasmid maintenance. The latter is intriguing because many C. perfringens isolates stably maintain up to four different, but closely related, toxin plasmids. Toxin genes may also be plasmid-encoded in the neurotoxic clostridia. The tetanus toxin gene is located on a plasmid in Clostridium tetani, but the botulinum toxin genes may be chromosomal, plasmid-determined, or located on bacteriophages in Clostridium botulinum. In Bacillus anthracis it is well established that virulence is plasmid determined, with anthrax toxin genes located on pXO1 and capsule genes on a separate plasmid, pXO2. Orthologs of these plasmids are also found in other members of the Bacillus cereus group such as B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. In B. thuringiensis these plasmids may carry genes encoding one or more insecticidal toxins. PMID:26104459

  7. Enumeration of petroleum hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria

    In-situ biological treatment is one among a number of emerging technologies that may be applied to the remediation of contaminated soils and groundwater. In 1985, a surface spill of 1,500 gallons of dielectric transformer oil at the Sandia National Laboratories (HERMES II facility) resulted in contamination of soil up to depths of 160 feet. The extent of contamination and site characteristics favored the application of in-situ bioremediation as a potential remedial technology. The purpose of this research was to enumerate indigenous microbial populations capable of degrading petroleum hydrocarbons. Microbial enumeration and characterization methods suitably adapted for hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria were used as an indicator of the presence of viable microbial consortia in excavated oil samples with hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations ranging from 300 to 26,850 ppm. Microbial activity was quantified by direct and streak plating soil samples on silica gel media. Effects of toxicity and temperature were studied using batch cultures of hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria (selectively isolated in an enrichment medium), at temperatures of 20 and 35 C. It was concluded from this study that it is possible to isolate native microorganisms from contaminated soils from depths of 60 to 160 feet, and with oil concentration ranging from 300 to 26,850 ppm. About 62% of the microorganisms isolated form the contaminated soil were capable of using contaminant oil as a substrate for growth and metabolism under aerobic conditions. Growth rates were observed to be 50% higher for the highest contaminant concentration at 20 C. Resistance to toxicity to contaminant oil was also observed to be greater at 20 C than at 35 C

  8. Oxygen sensing strategies in mammals and bacteria.

    Taabazuing, Cornelius Y; Hangasky, John A; Knapp, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    The ability to sense and adapt to changes in pO2 is crucial for basic metabolism in most organisms, leading to elaborate pathways for sensing hypoxia (low pO2). This review focuses on the mechanisms utilized by mammals and bacteria to sense hypoxia. While responses to acute hypoxia in mammalian tissues lead to altered vascular tension, the molecular mechanism of signal transduction is not well understood. In contrast, chronic hypoxia evokes cellular responses that lead to transcriptional changes mediated by the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF), which is directly controlled by post-translational hydroxylation of HIF by the non-heme Fe(II)/αKG-dependent enzymes FIH and PHD2. Research on PHD2 and FIH is focused on developing inhibitors and understanding the links between HIF binding and the O2 reaction in these enzymes. Sulfur speciation is a putative mechanism for acute O2-sensing, with special focus on the role of H2S. This sulfur-centered model is discussed, as are some of the directions for further refinement of this model. In contrast to mammals, bacterial O2-sensing relies on protein cofactors that either bind O2 or oxidatively decompose. The sensing modality for bacterial O2-sensors is either via altered DNA binding affinity of the sensory protein, or else due to the actions of a two-component signaling cascade. Emerging data suggests that proteins containing a hemerythrin-domain, such as FBXL5, may serve to connect iron sensing to O2-sensing in both bacteria and humans. As specific molecular machinery becomes identified, these hypoxia sensing pathways present therapeutic targets for diseases including ischemia, cancer, or bacterial infection. PMID:24468676

  9. Evidence that mycoplasmas, gram-negative bacteria, and certain gram-positive bacteria share a similar protein antigen.

    Sasaki, T.

    1991-01-01

    It was demonstrated that mycoplasmas, gram-negative bacteria, and certain gram-positive bacteria share a similar protein antigen with a molecular weight ranging from 42,000 to 48,000. Western blotting (immunoblotting) with an antibody specific to a 43-kDa membrane protein of Mycoplasma fermentans showed the existence of this protein antigen in all Mycoplasma spp. tested (14 species), Acholeplasma laidlawii (1 strain), and gram-negative bacteria (8 species) but only in Staphylococcus aureus of...

  10. Identification of Bacteria and the Effect on Compressive Strength of Concrete

    Anneza L. H.; Irwan J. M.; Othman N.; Alshalif A. Faisal

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the species of bacteria used in this study as well as the effect of the bacteria on compressive strength of bioconcrete. Bioconcrete is not only more environmentally friendly but it is easy to procure. The objective of this research is to identify the ureolytic bacteria and sulphate reduction bacteria that have been isolated and further use the bacteria in concrete to determine the effect of bacteria on compressive strength. Identification of bacteria is conducted through ...

  11. Distribution characteristics of marine bacteria in the China seas

    Cong MA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the main species of marine bacteria and their distribution characteristics in China seas. Methods Seawater samples were obtained from sea water about one meter below the sea level along the navigation course, and then the bacteria therein were enriched, cultured, identified and tested for drug sensitivity. Results A total of 528 seawater samples were collected from four seas of China, and 759 marine bacteria in 145 species were isolated. The isolates were mainly Vibro, Enterobacteriaceae, Nonfermenter, Fungi, Pasteurella, Gram positive cocci, Eikenella corrodens and Anaerobic bacteria. Vibrio accounted for 52.9% of the 759 strains of marine bacteria, among which Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio fluvialis and Vibrio parahaemolyticus accounted for 75%. There was no significant difference in the quantity of Vibrio alginolyticus, Escherichia coli and Vibrio parahaemolyticus between the 4 sea areas (P=0.071. Chi-square test showed that significant differences existed in the distribution of seven species of marine bacteria among the 4 China seas (P=0.0004. The Gram-positive cocci were isolated more often in Bohai than from other seas; Eikenella corrodens were detected mostly in Yellow Sea; Vibrio were the predominant bacteria in East China sea, up to 70.8%; more Fungi were found in South China sea. The main features of specific bacteria isolated from the four sea areas was higher number of species with less quantity. From North to South, Enterococcus faecalis, Flavobacterium, Vibrio carchariae and C. famata were found to constitute the highest number. Conclusions In China seas, Vibrios are the dominant bacteria, and the numbers of Anaerobic bacteria and Gram-positive cocci are extremely low. There is a significant difference in the distribution of marine bacteria among 4 China seas.

  12. Determination of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria and Nitrate Oxidizing Bacteria in Wastewater and Bioreactors

    Francis, Somilez Asya

    2014-01-01

    The process of water purification has many different physical, chemical, and biological processes. One part of the biological process is the task of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Both play critical roles in the treatment of wastewater by oxidizing toxic compounds. The broad term is nitrification, a naturally occurring process that is carried out by AOB and NOB by using oxidation to convert ammonia to nitrite and nitrite to nitrate. To monitor this biological activity, bacterial staining was performed on wastewater contained in inoculum tanks and biofilm samples from bioreactors. Using microscopy and qPCR, the purpose of this experiment was to determine if the population of AOB and NOB in wastewater and membrane bioreactors changed depending on temperature and hibernation conditions to determine the optimal parameters for AOB/NOB culture to effectively clean wastewater.

  13. Bacteria, some permanent tenants Space Station; Bacteria, unos inquilinos permanentes de la estacion espacial

    Diaz, B.

    2015-07-01

    Vacuum cleaners to operate the vacuum or rags with ethanol they are the products of cleaning of the astronauts. Is there tight spaces fully sterilized? It seems not, even in the Space Station International (ISS). When it comes to bacteria, they are able to travel more than 400 kilometers housed in costumes, bodies and interior of the astronauts themselves and settle in a enclosed space where-unlike in a {sup c}leanroom 'terrestre- the air is not recycled. A NASA study has found an abundance of bacteria 'opportunists' which, although harmless on Earth, they might derivasen cause infections in inflammations or skin irritations. Not forgetting those fungi that could damage or affect the infrastructure equipment space. (Author)

  14. Spatial scales of interactions among bacteria and between bacteria and the leaf surface.

    Esser, Daniel S; Leveau, Johan H J; Meyer, Katrin M; Wiegand, Kerstin

    2015-03-01

    Microbial life on plant leaves is characterized by a multitude of interactions between leaf colonizers and their environment. While the existence of many of these interactions has been confirmed, their spatial scale or reach often remained unknown. In this study, we applied spatial point pattern analysis to 244 distribution patterns of Pantoea agglomerans and Pseudomonas syringae on bean leaves. The results showed that bacterial colonizers of leaves interact with their environment at different spatial scales. Interactions among bacteria were often confined to small spatial scales up to 5-20 μm, compared to interactions between bacteria and leaf surface structures such as trichomes which could be observed in excess of 100 μm. Spatial point-pattern analyses prove a comprehensive tool to determine the different spatial scales of bacterial interactions on plant leaves and will help microbiologists to better understand the interplay between these interactions. PMID:25764562

  15. Evidence for Detachment of Indigenous Bacteria from Aquifer Sediment in Response to Arrival of Injected Bacteria

    Johnson, W P; Zhang, P.; Gardner, P. M.; Fuller, M E; DeFlaun, M. F.

    2001-01-01

    Two bacterial strains isolated from the aquifer underlying Oyster, Va., were recently injected into the aquifer and monitored using ferrographic capture, a high-resolution immunomagnetic technique. Injected cells were enumerated on the basis of a vital fluorescence stain, whereas total cell numbers (stained target cells plus unstained target and antigenically similar indigenous bacteria) were identified by cell outlines emanating from fluorophore-conjugated antibodies to the two target strain...

  16. Lactic acid bacteria from fresh fruit and vegetables as biocontrol agents of phytopathogenic bacteria and fungi.

    Trias, Rosalia; Bañeras, Lluís; Montesinos, Emilio; Badosa, Esther

    2008-12-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from fresh fruits and vegetables as biocontrol agents against the phytopathogenic and spoilage bacteria and fungi, Xanthomonas campestris, Erwinia carotovora, Penicillium expansum, Monilinia laxa, and Botrytis cinerea. The antagonistic activity of 496 LAB strains was tested in vitro and all tested microorganisms except P. expansum were inhibited by at least one isolate. The 496 isolates were also analyzed for the inhibition of P. expansum infection in wounds of Golden Delicious apples. Four strains (TC97, AC318, TM319, and FF441) reduced the fungal rot diameter of the apples by 20%; only Weissella cibaria strain TM128 decreased infection levels by 50%. Cell-free supernatants of selected antagonistic bacteria were studied to determine the nature of the antimicrobial compounds produced. Organic acids were the preferred mediators of inhibition but hydrogen peroxide was also detected when strains BC48, TM128, PM141 and FF441 were tested against E. carotovora. While previous reports of antifungal activity by LAB are scarce, our results support the potential of LAB as biocontrol agents against postharvest rot. PMID:19204894

  17. Mechanistic modeling of biocorrosion caused by biofilms of sulfate reducing bacteria and acid producing bacteria.

    Xu, Dake; Li, Yingchao; Gu, Tingyue

    2016-08-01

    Biocorrosion is also known as microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Most anaerobic MIC cases can be classified into two major types. Type I MIC involves non-oxygen oxidants such as sulfate and nitrate that require biocatalysis for their reduction in the cytoplasm of microbes such as sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and nitrate reducing bacteria (NRB). This means that the extracellular electrons from the oxidation of metal such as iron must be transported across cell walls into the cytoplasm. Type II MIC involves oxidants such as protons that are secreted by microbes such as acid producing bacteria (APB). The biofilms in this case supply the locally high concentrations of oxidants that are corrosive without biocatalysis. This work describes a mechanistic model that is based on the biocatalytic cathodic sulfate reduction (BCSR) theory. The model utilizes charge transfer and mass transfer concepts to describe the SRB biocorrosion process. The model also includes a mechanism to describe APB attack based on the local acidic pH at a pit bottom. A pitting prediction software package has been created based on the mechanisms. It predicts long-term pitting rates and worst-case scenarios after calibration using SRB short-term pit depth data. Various parameters can be investigated through computer simulation. PMID:27071053

  18. Acetic acid bacteria: A group of bacteria with versatile biotechnological applications.

    Saichana, Natsaran; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Adachi, Osao; Frébort, Ivo; Frebortova, Jitka

    2015-11-01

    Acetic acid bacteria are gram-negative obligate aerobic bacteria assigned to the family Acetobacteraceae of Alphaproteobacteria. They are members of the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Acidomonas, Asaia, Kozakia, Swaminathania, Saccharibacter, Neoasaia, Granulibacter, Tanticharoenia, Ameyamaea, Neokomagataea, and Komagataeibacter. Many strains of Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter have been known to possess high acetic acid fermentation ability as well as the acetic acid and ethanol resistance, which are considered to be useful features for industrial production of acetic acid and vinegar, the commercial product. On the other hand, Gluconobacter strains have the ability to perform oxidative fermentation of various sugars, sugar alcohols, and sugar acids leading to the formation of several valuable products. Thermotolerant strains of acetic acid bacteria were isolated in order to serve as the new strains of choice for industrial fermentations, in which the cooling costs for maintaining optimum growth and production temperature in the fermentation vessels could be significantly reduced. Genetic modifications by adaptation and genetic engineering were also applied to improve their properties, such as productivity and heat resistance. PMID:25485864

  19. Bioactive proteins against pathogenic and spoilage bacteria

    Mahmoud Z. Sitohy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is likely that both human nutrition and the nutrition of livestock are benefited by the presence of bioactive proteins within their respective diet regimes. Bioactive proteins have been defined as specific protein fragments that positively impact bodily functions or conditions and may, ultimately, influence overall human health. The ingestion of bioactive proteins may have an effect on the major body systems—namely, the cardiovascular, digestive, immune and nervous systems. According to their functional properties, bioactive proteins may be classified as antimicrobial, antithrombotic, antihypertensive, opioid, immune-modulatory, mineral binding and anti-oxidative. There are many examples of biologically active food proteins and active peptides that can be obtained from various food protein sources. They have a physiological significance beyond the pure nutritional requirements; in other wordsthey have the acquisition of nitrogen for normal growth and maintenance. Objective: This study aims to specify and characterize the extent and mode of action of bioactive proteins in their native form, (glycinin, glycinin basic sub-unit and β-conglycinin against specific main pathogens (Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. We will be using standard media while identifying the main constituents responsible for this action. Methods: Glycinin, basic sub-unit and β-conglycinin were isolated from soybean protein and tested for their antimicrobial action against pathogenic and spoilage bacteria, They were thencompared to the properties of penicillin. Methylated soybean protein and also methylated chickpea protein (MSP and MCP, with isoelectric points around pI 8, were prepared by esterifying. 83 % of their free carboxyl groups and their interactions with Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were examined. Results: The three divisions of cationic proteins exhibited antibacterial

  20. Gram-positive bacteria persisting in the food production environment

    Knøchel, Susanne; Harmsen, Morten; Knudsen, Bettina;

    2008-01-01

    Many gram-positive bacteria are able to form aggregates or biofilms and resist external stress factors and some gram-positive pathogenic bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus may persist in the food production environment for extended periods. Most research has focussed on the...

  1. Intestinal irony: how probiotic bacteria outcompete bad bugs.

    Weiss, Guenter

    2013-07-17

    In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Deriu et al. present a mechanistic explanation underlying the benefits of certain probiotic bacteria. Intestinal bacteria compete for the essential nutrient iron, leading to replacement of pathogenic Salmonella by the probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle, which is better equipped with iron acquisition systems, and resolution of infectious colitis. PMID:23870306

  2. Effect of tourmaline on denitrification characteristics of hydrogenotrophic bacteria.

    Wang, Wei; Jiang, Hongyan; Zhu, Guangquan; Song, Xueying; Liu, Xingyu; Qiao, Ya

    2016-03-01

    To improve the denitrification characteristics of anaerobic denitrifying bacteria and obviate the disadvantage of use of explosive hydrogen gas, tourmaline, a polar mineral, was added to the hydrogenotrophic denitrification system in this study. Microbial reduction of nitrate in the presence of tourmaline was evaluated to assess the promotion effect of tourmaline on nitrate biodegradation. The experiment results demonstrated that tourmaline speeded up the cultivation process of bacteria from 65 to 36 days. After domestication of the bacteria, nitrate (50 mg NO3 (-)-N L(-1)) was completely removed within 3 days in the combined tourmaline-bacteria system, and the generated nitrite was also removed within 8 days. The reduction rate in this system is higher relative to that in the bacteria system alone. Efficient removal of nitrate by tourmaline-supported anaerobic bacteria (without external hydrogen input) indicated that tourmaline might act as the sole hydrogen donor to sustain autotrophic denitrification. Besides the production of hydrogen, the promoted activity of anaerobic denitrifying bacteria might be caused by the change of water properties, e.g., the pH of aqueous solutions was altered to about 8.0 and the oxidation-reduction potential decreased by 62 % in the tourmaline system. The distinctive effects of tourmaline on bacteria were related to its electric properties. PMID:26545889

  3. Methanotrophic Bacteria and Facilitated Transport of Pollutants in Aquifer Material

    Jenkins, Michael B.; Chen, Jyh-Herng; Kadner, Debra J.; Lion, Leonard W.

    1994-01-01

    In situ stimulation of methanotrophic bacteria has been considered as a methodology for aquifer remediation. Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons such as trichloroethylene are fortuitously oxidized by the methane monooxygenase produced by methanotrophic bacteria. Experimental results are presented that indicate that both colloidal suspensions containing methanotrophic cells and the soluble extracellular polymers produced by methanotrophic cells have the potential to enhance the transport and re...

  4. Using Genomics to Deliver Natural Products from Symbiotic Bacteria

    Clardy, Jon C.

    2005-01-01

    The availability of some natural products with promising anticancer activity has been limited because they are synthesized by symbiotic bacteria associated with specific animals. Recent research has identified the clusters of bacterial genes responsible for their synthesis, so that the molecules can be synthesized in alternative, easily cultured bacteria.

  5. Nitrogen acquisition in Agave tequilana from degradation of endophytic bacteria.

    Beltran-Garcia, Miguel J; White, James F; Prado, Fernanda M; Prieto, Katia R; Yamaguchi, Lydia F; Torres, Monica S; Kato, Massuo J; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Plants form symbiotic associations with endophytic bacteria within tissues of leaves, stems, and roots. It is unclear whether or how plants obtain nitrogen from these endophytic bacteria. Here we present evidence showing nitrogen flow from endophytic bacteria to plants in a process that appears to involve oxidative degradation of bacteria. In our experiments we employed Agave tequilana and its seed-transmitted endophyte Bacillus tequilensis to elucidate organic nitrogen transfer from (15)N-labeled bacteria to plants. Bacillus tequilensis cells grown in a minimal medium with (15)NH4Cl as the nitrogen source were watered onto plants growing in sand. We traced incorporation of (15)N into tryptophan, deoxynucleosides and pheophytin derived from chlorophyll a. Probes for hydrogen peroxide show its presence during degradation of bacteria in plant tissues, supporting involvement of reactive oxygen in the degradation process. In another experiment to assess nitrogen absorbed as a result of endophytic colonization of plants we demonstrated that endophytic bacteria potentially transfer more nitrogen to plants and stimulate greater biomass in plants than heat-killed bacteria that do not colonize plants but instead degrade in the soil. Findings presented here support the hypothesis that some plants under nutrient limitation may degrade and obtain nitrogen from endophytic microbes. PMID:25374146

  6. Iron/clay interaction in presence of bacteria

    A water percolation cell has been designed to assess the impact of bacteria on the interaction between clay and iron. It has been shown that at the interface between argillite and bulk iron, the presence of bacteria has led to local corrosion made of iron sulphide and pitting. (A.C.)

  7. High-throughput antibody microarray for bacteria and toxins

    Ingestion of pathogenic bacteria in foods often results in illnesses that are of worldwide concern. Hence, our research efforts have focused on developing screening tests capable of multiplexed detection of foodborne bacteria and associated toxins. In this study, we describe the combination of a s...

  8. Unusual rise in mercury-resistant bacteria in coastal environs

    Ramaiah, N.; De, J.

    A sharp rise in mercury-resistant bacteria (MRB) capable of tolerating very high concentration of Hg was observed over the last 3-4 years in the coastal environs of India. While none or negligible colony-forming units (CFU) of bacteria were counted...

  9. Use of thermophilic bacteria for bioremediation of petroleum contaminants

    Several strains of thermophilic bacteria were isolated from the environment of the United Arab Emirates. These bacteria show extraordinary resistance to heat and have their maximum growth rate around 60--80 C. This article investigates the potential of using these facultative bacteria for both in situ and ex situ bioremediation of petroleum contaminants. In a series of batch experiments, bacterial growth was observed using a computer image analyzer following a recently developed technique. These experiments showed clearly that the growth rate is enhanced in the presence of crude oil. This is coupled with a rapid degradation of the crude oil. These bacteria were found to be ideal for breaking down long-chain organic molecules at a temperature of 40 C, which is the typical ambient temperature of the Persian Gulf region. The same strains of bacteria are also capable of surviving in the presence of the saline environment that can prevail in both sea water and reservoir connate water. This observation prompted further investigation into the applicability of the bacteria in microbial enhanced oil recovery. In the United Arab Emirates, the reservoirs are typically at a temperature of around 85 C. Finally, the performance of the bacteria is tested in a newly developed bioreactor that uses continuous aeration through a transverse slotted pipe. This reactor also uses mixing without damaging the filamentous bacteria. In this process, the mechanisms of bioremediation are identified

  10. Cholesterol lipids and cholesterol-containing lipid rafts in bacteria.

    Huang, Zhen; London, Erwin

    2016-09-01

    Sterols are important components of eukaryotic membranes, but rare in bacteria. Some bacteria obtain sterols from their host or environment. In some cases, these sterols form membrane domains analogous the lipid rafts proposed to exist in eukaryotic membranes. This review describes the properties and roles of sterols in Borrelia and Helicobacter. PMID:26964703

  11. Production of Value-added Products by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a group of facultative anaerobic, catalase negative, nonmotile and nonsporeforming–Gram positive bacteria. Most LAB utilize high energy C sources including monomer sugars to produce energy to maintain cellular structure and function. This anaerobic fermentation proce...

  12. BIOTECHNOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS OF PURPLE NON SULPHUR PHOTOTROPHIC BACTERIA: A MINIREVIEW

    Ramchander Merugu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria play in vital role in the production of variety of products, including certain plastics and enzymes used in detergents, textiles and pharmaceutical industries. Production of chemicals using bacteria and other microorganisms is not only economical sustainable but also ecofriendly. Modern biotechnology entails the use of cell fusion, bioinformatics, genetic engineering, structure based molecular design and hybridoma technology.

  13. Decontamination of airborne bacteria in meat processing plants

    Air has been established as a source of bacterial contamination in meat processing facilities. Airborne bacteria may affect product shelf life, and have food safety implications. The effectiveness of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating AirOcare equipment on the reduction of airborne bacteria in...

  14. Fermentation of Fructooligosaccharides by Lactic Acid Bacteria and Bifidobacteria†

    Kaplan, Handan; Hutkins, Robert W.

    2000-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria were screened of their ability to ferment fructooligosaccharides (FOS) on MRS agar. Of 28 strains of lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria examined, 12 of 16 Lactobacillus strains and 7 of 8 Bifidobacterium strains fermented FOS. Only strains that gave a positive reaction by the agar method reached high cell densities in broth containing FOS.

  15. Survival and transport of faecal bacteria in agricultural soils

    Bech, Tina Bundgaard

    Today, there is yearly applied 34 million tonnes of animal waste to arable land in Denmark. This waste may contain pathogenic zoonotic bacteria and/or antibiotic resistant bacteria, and when applied to arable land there is a risk of contaminating groundwater, surface water, feeding animals or fresh...

  16. Proteorhodopsin lateral gene transfer between marine planktonic Bacteria and Archaea

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Martinez, Asuncion; Mincer, Tracy J;

    2006-01-01

    Planktonic Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya reside and compete in the ocean's photic zone under the pervasive influence of light. Bacteria in this environment were recently shown to contain photoproteins called proteorhodopsins, thought to contribute to cellular energy metabolism by catalysing light...

  17. Functional genomics of lactic acid bacteria: from food to health

    Douillard, F.P.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Genome analysis using next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the characterization of lactic acid bacteria and complete genomes of all major groups are now available. Comparative genomics has provided new insights into the natural and laboratory evolution of lactic acid bacteria a

  18. Bacteria in Cancer Therapy: Renaissance of an Old Concept.

    Felgner, Sebastian; Kocijancic, Dino; Frahm, Michael; Weiss, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    The rising incidence of cancer cases worldwide generates an urgent need of novel treatment options. Applying bacteria may represent a valuable therapeutic variant that is intensively investigated nowadays. Interestingly, the idea to apply bacteria wittingly or unwittingly dates back to ancient times and was revived in the 19th century mainly by the pioneer William Coley. This review summarizes and compares the results of the past 150 years in bacteria mediated tumor therapy from preclinical to clinical studies. Lessons we have learned from the past provide a solid foundation on which to base future efforts. In this regard, several perspectives are discussed by which bacteria in addition to their intrinsic antitumor effect can be used as vector systems that shuttle therapeutic compounds into the tumor. Strategic solutions like these provide a sound and more apt exploitation of bacteria that may overcome limitations of conventional therapies. PMID:27051423

  19. Lactic Acid Bacteria Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    antigen presenting cells and T-cells. Bacteria translocating across the gastrointestinal mucosa are presumed to gain access to NK cell compartments, as consumption of certain strains of lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxic activity. On-going research in our lab aims at...... describing strain-dependent effects of lactic acid bacteria on regulatory functions of NK-cells. Here, we have investigated how human gut flora-derived non-pathogenic lactic acid bacteria affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human peripheral blood NK cells upon...... bacterial stimulation. Methods: CD3-CD56+ NK cells were isolated from buffy coats by negative isolation using a lineage specific antibody cocktail and magnetic beads binding the labelling antibodies on non-NK cells. NK cells were incubated either with 10 microg/ml UV-inactivated lactic acid bacteria or 10...

  20. Monitoring Ubiquitin-Coated Bacteria via Confocal Microscopy.

    Lork, Marie; Delvaeye, Mieke; Gonçalves, Amanda; Van Hamme, Evelien; Beyaert, Rudi

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella is a gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that is capable of infecting a variety of hosts. Inside host cells, most Salmonella bacteria reside and replicate within Salmonella-containing vacuoles. They use virulence proteins to manipulate the host cell machinery for their own benefit and hijack the host cytoskeleton to travel toward the perinuclear area. However, a fraction of bacteria escapes into the cytosol where they get decorated with a dense layer of polyubiquitin, which labels the bacteria for clearance by autophagy. More specifically, autophagy receptor proteins recognize the ubiquitinated bacteria and deliver them to autophagosomes, which subsequently fuse to lysosomes. Here, we describe methods used to infect HeLa cells with Salmonella bacteria and to detect their ubiquitination via immunofluorescence and laser scanning confocal microscopy. PMID:27613040