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Sample records for bacteria geobacillus stearothermophilus

  1. Expression and Characterization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 Recombinant α-Amylase in Pichia pastoris

    Sivasangkary Gandhi; Abu Bakar Salleh; Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd Rahman; Thean Chor Leow; Siti Nurbaya Oslan

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 is a locally isolated thermophilic bacteria producing thermostable and thermoactive α-amylase. Increased production and commercialization of thermostable α-amylase strongly warrant the need of a suitable expression system. In this study, the gene encoding the thermostable α-amylase in G. stearothermophilus SR74 was amplified, sequenced, and subcloned into P. pastoris GS115 strain under the control of a methanol inducible promoter, alcohol oxidase (AOX). Met...

  2. Biosynthesis of omega-alicyclic fatty acids induced by cyclic precursors and change of membrane fluidity in thermophilic bacteria Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Meiothermus ruber

    Siřišťová, L.; Luhový, R.; Sigler, Karel; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 3 (2011), 423-429. ISSN 1431-0651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Thermophilic bacteria * Geobacillus * Meiothermus Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.941, year: 2011

  3. DECONTAMINATION ASSESSMENT OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS, BACILLUS SUBTILIS, AND GEOBACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS SPORES ON INDOOR SURFACTS USING A HYDROGEN PERIOXIDE GAS GENERATOR

    Aims: To evaluate the decontamination of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on indoor surface materials using hydrogen peroxide gas. Methods and Results: B. anthracis, B. subtilis, and G. Stearothermophilus spores were dried on seven...

  4. Quantitative assessment of the risk of microbial spoilage in foods. Prediction of non-stability at 55°C caused by Geobacillus stearothermophilus in canned green beans

    André, Stéphane; Albert, Isabelle; Carlin, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Microbial spoilage of canned foods by thermophilic and highly heat-resistant spore-forming bacteria, such as Geobacillus stearothermophilus, is a persistent problem in the food industry. An incubation test at 55 °C for 7 days, then validation of biological stability, is used as an indicator of compliance with good manufacturing practices. We propose a microbial risk assessment model predicting the percentage of non-stability due to G. stearothermophilus in canned green beans manufactured by a...

  5. Isolation of Lipase Gene of the Thermophilic Geobacillus stearothermophilus Strain-5

    M. Sifour

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In earlier study a new thermophilic strain Geobacillus stearothermophilus strain-5 producing thermostable lipase was isolated and identified based on 16S rRNA sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis revealed its closeness to geobacilli especially the thermophilic Geobacillus stearothermophilus with optimal growth and lipolytic enzyme activity at 60°C and pH 7.0. In this study thermostable lipase gene from this bacterium was isolated by PCR using degenerate primers. The DNA fragment coding for lipase gene was cloned in the pCR 4-TOPO plasmid and the ligation products were transformed into Escherichia coli XL1-blue cells. Partial sequencing of the gene was carried out (accession number DQ923401. Analysis by BLAST program showed some sequence similarity to that, of several lipase genes from thermophilic Geobacillus and Bacillus submitted to Genbank.

  6. Expression and Characterization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 Recombinant α-Amylase in Pichia pastoris.

    Gandhi, Sivasangkary; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Chor Leow, Thean; Oslan, Siti Nurbaya

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 is a locally isolated thermophilic bacteria producing thermostable and thermoactive α-amylase. Increased production and commercialization of thermostable α-amylase strongly warrant the need of a suitable expression system. In this study, the gene encoding the thermostable α-amylase in G. stearothermophilus SR74 was amplified, sequenced, and subcloned into P. pastoris GS115 strain under the control of a methanol inducible promoter, alcohol oxidase (AOX). Methanol induced recombinant expression and secretion of the protein resulted in high levels of extracellular amylase production. YPTM medium supplemented with methanol (1% v/v) was the best medium and once optimized, the maximum recombinant α-amylase SR74 achieved in shake flask was 28.6 U mL(-1) at 120 h after induction. The recombinant 59 kDa α-amylase SR74 was purified 1.9-fold using affinity chromatography with a product yield of 52.6% and a specific activity of 151.8 U mg(-1). The optimum pH of α-amylase SR74 was 7.0 and the enzyme was stable between pH 6.0-8.0. The purified enzyme was thermostable and thermoactive, exhibiting maximum activity at 65°C with a half-life (t₁/₂) of 88 min at 60°C. In conclusion, thermostable α-amylase SR74 from G. stearothermophilus SR74 would be beneficial for industrial applications, especially in liquefying saccrification. PMID:26090417

  7. Die another day: Fate of heat-treated Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 spores during storage under growth-preventing conditions.

    Mtimet, Narjes; Trunet, Clément; Mathot, Anne-Gabrielle; Venaille, Laurent; Leguérinel, Ivan; Coroller, Louis; Couvert, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores are recognized as one of the most wet-heat resistant among aerobic spore-forming bacteria and are responsible for 35% of canned food spoilage after incubation at 55 °C. The purpose of this study was to investigate and model the fate of heat-treated survivor spores of G. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 in growth-preventing environment. G. stearothermophilus spores were heat-treated at four different conditions to reach one or two decimal reductions. Heat-treated spores were stored in nutrient broth at different temperatures and pH under growth-preventing conditions. Spore survival during storage was evaluated by count plating over a period of months. Results reveal that G. stearothermophilus spores surviving heat treatment lose their viability during storage under growth-preventing conditions. Two different subpopulations were observed during non-thermal inactivation. They differed according to the level of their resistance to storage stress, and the proportion of each subpopulation can be modulated by heat treatment conditions. Finally, tolerance to storage stress under growth-preventing conditions increases at refrigerated temperature and neutral pH regardless of heat treatment conditions. Such results suggest that spore inactivation due to heat treatment could be completed by storage under growth-preventing conditions. PMID:26919821

  8. Isolation of Glucocardiolipins from Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a

    Schäffer, Christina; Beckedorf, Anke I.; Scheberl, Andrea; Zayni, Sonja; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna; Messner, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Glucose-substituted cardiolipins account for about 4 mol% of total phospholipid extracted from exponentially grown cells of Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a. Individual glucocardiolipin species exhibited differences in fatty acid substitution, with iso-C15:0 and anteiso-C17:0 prevailing. The compounds were purified to homogeneity by a novel protocol and precharacterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. PMID:12426359

  9. Kinetics of CO Recombination to the Heme in Geobacillus Stearothermophilus Nitric Oxide Synthase

    Whited, Charlotte A.; Warren, Jeffrey J.; Lavoie, Katherine D.; Winkler, Jay R.; Gray, Harry B.

    2012-01-01

    We report the kinetics of CO rebinding to the heme in His134Ser, Ile223Val and His134Ser/Ile223Ser mutants of Geobacillus stearothermophilus nitric oxide synthase (gsNOS). The amplitudes of the two observed kinetics phases, which are insensitive to CO concentration, depend on enzyme concentration. We suggest that two forms of gsNOS are in equilibrium under the conditions employed (6.127 M gsNOS with 20 or 100% CO atmosphere). The kinetics of CO rebinding to the heme do not depend on the ide...

  10. Development and application of Geobacillus stearothermophilus growth model for predicting spoilage of evaporated milk.

    Kakagianni, Myrsini; Gougouli, Maria; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2016-08-01

    The presence of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores in evaporated milk constitutes an important quality problem for the milk industry. This study was undertaken to provide an approach in modelling the effect of temperature on G. stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 growth and in predicting spoilage of evaporated milk. The growth of G. stearothermophilus was monitored in tryptone soy broth at isothermal conditions (35-67 °C). The data derived were used to model the effect of temperature on G. stearothermophilus growth with a cardinal type model. The cardinal values of the model for the maximum specific growth rate were Tmin = 33.76 °C, Tmax = 68.14 °C, Topt = 61.82 °C and μopt = 2.068/h. The growth of G. stearothermophilus was assessed in evaporated milk at Topt in order to adjust the model to milk. The efficiency of the model in predicting G. stearothermophilus growth at non-isothermal conditions was evaluated by comparing predictions with observed growth under dynamic conditions and the results showed a good performance of the model. The model was further used to predict the time-to-spoilage (tts) of evaporated milk. The spoilage of this product caused by acid coagulation when the pH approached a level around 5.2, eight generations after G. stearothermophilus reached the maximum population density (Nmax). Based on the above, the tts was predicted from the growth model as the sum of the time required for the microorganism to multiply from the initial to the maximum level ( [Formula: see text] ), plus the time required after the [Formula: see text] to complete eight generations. The observed tts was very close to the predicted one indicating that the model is able to describe satisfactorily the growth of G. stearothermophilus and to provide realistic predictions for evaporated milk spoilage. PMID:27052699

  11. Quantitative assessment of the risk of microbial spoilage in foods. Prediction of non-stability at 55 °C caused by Geobacillus stearothermophilus in canned green beans.

    Rigaux, Clémence; André, Stéphane; Albert, Isabelle; Carlin, Frédéric

    2014-02-01

    Microbial spoilage of canned foods by thermophilic and highly heat-resistant spore-forming bacteria, such as Geobacillus stearothermophilus, is a persistent problem in the food industry. An incubation test at 55 °C for 7 days, then validation of biological stability, is used as an indicator of compliance with good manufacturing practices. We propose a microbial risk assessment model predicting the percentage of non-stability due to G. stearothermophilus in canned green beans manufactured by a French company. The model accounts for initial microbial contaminations of fresh unprocessed green beans with G. stearothermophilus, cross-contaminations in the processing chain, inactivation processes and probability of survival and growth. The sterilization process is modeled by an equivalent heating time depending on sterilization value F₀ and on G. stearothermophilus resistance parameter z(T). Following the recommendations of international organizations, second order Monte-Carlo simulations are used, separately propagating uncertainty and variability on parameters. As a result of the model, the mean predicted non-stability rate is of 0.5%, with a 95% uncertainty interval of [0.1%; 1.2%], which is highly similar to data communicated by the French industry. A sensitivity analysis based on Sobol indices and some scenario tests underline the importance of cross-contamination at the blanching step, in addition to inactivation due to the sterilization process. PMID:24334097

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of WsaF, an essential rhamnosyltransferase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus

    The transfer of sugars is an important process in both biology and biotechnology; the first crystallization of a rhamnosyltransferase is reported. The β1,2-rhamnosyltransferase WsaF is involved in the biosynthesis of a polyrhamnan chain which is attached to the surface-layer protein from Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a. The enzyme belongs to the large retaining GT4 family. To date, no structure of a rhamnosyltransferase has been published. Recombinant purified native WsaF has been crystallized, resulting in crystals that belonged to space group P212121 with unit-cell parameters a = 50.5, b = 56.1, c = 276.8 Å and diffracted to 3.0 Å resolution. Selenomethionine-variant WsaF crystallized in space group P21 with unit-cell parameters a = 75.9, b = 75.5, c = 78.1 Å and diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution

  13. Keratinous waste decomposition and peptide production by keratinase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus AD-11.

    Gegeckas, Audrius; Gudiukaitė, Renata; Debski, Janusz; Citavicius, Donaldas

    2015-04-01

    A keratinolytic proteinase was cloned from thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus AD-11 and was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). Recombinant keratinolytic proteinase (RecGEOker) with an estimated molecular weight of 57 kDa was purified and keratinase activity was measured. RecGEOker showed optimal activity at pH 9 and 60 °C. Recombinant keratinolytic proteinase showed the highest substrate specificity toward keratin from wool > collagen > sodium caseinate > gelatin > and BSA in descending order. RecGEOker is applicable for efficient keratin waste biodegradation and can replace conventional non-biological hydrolysis processes. High-value small peptides obtained from enzymatic biodegradation by RecGEOker are suitable for industrial application in white and/or green biotechnology for use as major additives in various products. PMID:25625783

  14. Effects of humidity on sterilization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores with plasma-excited neutral gas

    Matsui, Kei; Ikenaga, Noriaki; Sakudo, Noriyuki

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the effects of relative humidity on the sterilization process using a plasma-excited neutral gas that uniformly sterilizes both the space and inner wall of the reactor chamber at atmospheric pressure. Only reactive neutral species such as plasma-excited gas molecules and radicals were separated from the plasma and sent to the reactor chamber for chemical sterilization. The plasma source gas is nitrogen mixed with 0.1% oxygen, and the relative humidity in the source gas is controlled by changing the mixing ratio of water vapor. The relative humidity near the sample in the reactor chamber is controlled by changing the sample temperature. As a result, the relative humidity near the sample should be kept in the range from 60 to 90% for the sterilization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores. When the relative humidity in the source gas increases from 30 to 90%, the sterilization effect is enhanced by the same degree.

  15. Partial purification and characterization of lipase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus AH22.

    Ekinci, Arife Pınar; Dinçer, Barbaros; Baltaş, Nimet; Adıgüzel, Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    The lipase was partially purified by ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration column chromatography, and was characterized from Geobacillus stearothermophilus AH22 strain. The lipase was purified 18.3-folds with 19.7% recovery. The lipase activity was determined by using p-nitrophenyl esters (C2-C12) as substrates. The Km values of the enzyme for these substrates were found as 0.16, 0.02, 0.19 and 0.55 mM, respectively, while Vmax values were 0.52, 1.03, 0.72 and 0.15 U mg(-1). The enzyme showed maximum activity at 50 °C and between pH 8.0 and 9.0. The enzyme was found to be quite stable at pH range of 4.0-10.0, and thermal stability between 50 and 60 °C. It was found that the best inhibitory effect of the enzyme activity was of Hg(2+). The inhibitory effect as orlistat, catechin, propyl paraben, p-coumaric acid, 3,4-dihydroxy hydro-cinnamic acid was examined. These results suggest that G. stearothermophilus AH22 lipase presents very suitable properties for industrial applications. PMID:25798692

  16. Physicochemical characterization of tensio-active produced by Geobacillus stearothermophilus isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil.

    Jara, Alícia M A T; Andrade, Rosileide F S; Campos-Takaki, Galba M

    2013-01-01

    Biosurfactants are surface-active agents of microbial origin, and have a property of lowering the interfacial tension between two liquids. They act on the interface and are amphiphathic molecules; in with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic portions are present in the same molecule. However, the economics of producing biosurfactant has limited its commercial applications, and the costs can be reduced using cheap substrates or industrial waste. The present study showed the biosurfactant production using corn steep liquor and palm oil as carbon and nitrogen sources for reduction the costs of production. The biosurfactant production by Geobacillus stearothermophilus UCP 986 was carried out using optimized culture medium constituted by palm oil (7.5%) and corn steep liquor (4.5%) using Bioflo fermentor, at temperature of 45°C, during 32 h and agitation of 300 rpm. The biosurfactant showed a reduction of the water surface tension of 72-31 mN/m and interfacial tension of 0.3 mN/m. The biosurfactant was obtained from the net metabolic liquid by acetone precipitation corresponding to the yield of 2.3g/L. The isolate biosurfactant showed a CMC of 2.5% and non-ionic profile. The best emulsification index (E(24)) obtained was 87% using motor oil burned. The biosurfactant solution (2.5%) used in oil spreading test increases the viscosity of engine burning oil of 149.2% and 138.2% to vegetable fat post-frying, respectively. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometer indicated at 29.52 min a molecular weight of 207 Da and eight peaks by FT-IR identified the chemical structure of the biosurfactant produced by G. stearothermophilus. PMID:23010035

  17. Purification and characterization of cloned alkaline protease gene of Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    Iqbal, Irfana; Aftab, Muhammad Nauman; Afzal, Mohammed; Ur-Rehman, Asad; Aftab, Saima; Zafar, Asma; Ud-Din, Zia; Khuharo, Ateeque Rahman; Iqbal, Jawad; Ul-Haq, Ikram

    2015-02-01

    Thermostable alkaline serine protease gene of Geobacillus stearothermophilus B-1172 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) using pET-22b(+), as an expression vector. The growth conditions were optimized for maximal production of the protease using variable fermentation parameters, i.e., pH, temperature, and addition of an inducer. Protease, thus produced, was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by ion exchange chromatography with 13.7-fold purification, with specific activity of 97.5 U mg(-1) , and a recovery of 23.6%. Molecular weight of the purified protease, 39 kDa, was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The enzyme was stable at 90 °C at pH 9. The enzyme activity was steady in the presence of EDTA indicating that the protease was not a metalloprotease. No significant change in the activity of protease after addition of various metal ions further strengthened this fact. However, an addition of 1% Triton X-100 or SDS surfactants constrained the enzyme specific activity to 34 and 19%, respectively. Among organic solvents, an addition of 1-butanol (20%) augmented the enzyme activity by 29% of the original activity. With casein as a substrate, the enzyme activity under optimized conditions was found to be 73.8 U mg(-1) . The effect of protease expression on the host cells growth was also studied and found to negatively affect E. coli cells to certain extent. Catalytic domains of serine proteases from eight important thermostable organisms were analyzed through WebLogo and found to be conserved in all serine protease sequences suggesting that protease of G. stearothermophilus could be beneficially used as a biocontrol agent and in many industries including detergent industry. PMID:25224381

  18. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Axe2, an acetylxylan esterase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus

    The serine acetylxylan esterase from G. stearothermophilus (Axe2) has been crystallized in the tetragonal space group I422. Complete diffraction data sets have been measured for the selenomethionine derivative (SAD data, 1.70 Å resolution) and the wild-type enzyme (1.85 Å resolution) to be used for a full three-dimensional structural analysis of the Axe2 protein. Acetylxylan esterases are part of the hemi-cellulolytic system of many microorganisms which utilize plant biomass for growth. Xylans, which are polymeric sugars that constitute a significant part of the plant biomass, are usually substituted with acetyl side groups attached at position 2 or 3 of the xylose backbone units. Acetylxylan esterases hydrolyse the ester linkages of the xylan acetyl groups and thus improve the ability of main-chain hydrolysing enzymes to break down the sugar backbone units. As such, these enzymes play an important part in the hemi-cellulolytic utilization system of many microorganisms that use plant biomass for growth. Interest in the biochemical characterization and structural analysis of these enzymes stems from their numerous potential biotechnological applications. An acetylxylan esterase (Axe2) of this type from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 has recently been cloned, overexpressed, purified, biochemically characterized and crystallized. One of the crystal forms obtained (RB1) belonged to the tetragonal space group I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 110.2, c = 213.1 Å. A full diffraction data set was collected to 1.85 Å resolution from flash-cooled crystals of the wild-type enzyme at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. A selenomethionine derivative of Axe2 has also been prepared and crystallized for single-wavelength anomalous diffraction experiments. The crystals of the selenomethionine-derivatized Axe2 appeared to be isomorphous to those of the wild-type enzyme and enabled the measurement of a full 1.85 Å resolution diffraction data set at the selenium absorption edge and a full 1.70 Å resolution data set at a remote wavelength. These data are currently being used for three-dimensional structure determination of the Axe2 protein

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Geobacillus stearothermophilus Strains 22 and 53, Isolated from the Garga Hot Spring in the Barguzin River Valley of the Russian Federation

    Rozanov, Aleksey S.; Logacheva, Maria D; Peltek, Sergey E

    2014-01-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus strains 22 and 53 were isolated from sediment samples isolated from the Garga hot spring (72°C) located in the valley of the river Barguzin (the Baikal region, Russian Federation) (54°19′3.72″N, 110°59′38.4″E).

  20. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a family 43 β-d-xylosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6

    The crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a β-d-xylosidase from G. stearothermophilus T-6, a family 43 glycoside hydrolase, is described. Native and catalytic inactive mutants of the enzymes were crystallized in two different space groups, orthorhombic P21212 and tetragonal P41212 (or the enantiomorphic space group P43212), using a sensitive cryoprotocol. The latter crystal form diffracted X-rays to a resolution of 2.2 Å. β-d-Xylosidases (EC 3.2.1.37) are hemicellulases that cleave single xylose units from the nonreducing end of xylooligomers. In this study, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a β-d-xylosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 (XynB3), a family 43 glycoside hydrolase, is described. XynB3 is a 535-amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 61 891 Da. Purified recombinant native and catalytic inactive mutant proteins were crystallized and cocrystallized with xylobiose in two different space groups, P21212 (unit-cell parameters a = 98.32, b = 99.36, c = 258.64 Å) and P41212 (or the enantiomorphic space group P43212; unit-cell parameters a = b = 140.15, c = 233.11 Å), depending on the detergent. Transferring crystals to cryoconditions required a very careful protocol. Orthorhombic crystals diffract to 2.5 Å and tetragonal crystals to 2.2 Å

  1. The structure of DinB from Geobacillus stearothermophilus: a representative of a unique four-helix-bundle superfamily

    The structure of DinB from G. stearothermophilus is described and compared with a number of recently reported structures of this unusual fold. Structural similarities are revealed that unite several distant protein families. The crystal structure of the dinB gene product from Geobacillus stearothermophilus (GsDinB) is reported at 2.5 Å resolution. The dinB gene is one of the DNA-damage-induced genes and the corresponding protein, DinB, is the founding member of a Pfam family with no known function. The protein contains a four-helix up–down–down–up bundle that has previously been described in the literature in three disparate proteins: the enzyme MDMPI (mycothiol-dependent maleylpyruvate isomerase), YfiT and TTHA0303, a member of a small DUF (domain of unknown function). However, a search of the DALI structural database revealed similarities to a further 11 new unpublished structures contributed by structural genomics centers. The sequences of these proteins are quite divergent and represent several Pfam families, yet their structures are quite similar and most (but not all) seem to have the ability to coordinate a metal ion using a conserved histidine-triad motif. The structural similarities of these diverse proteins suggest that a new Pfam clan encompassing the families that share this fold should be created. The proteins that share this fold exhibit four different quaternary structures: monomeric and three different dimeric forms

  2. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Abp, a GH27 β-l-arabinopyranosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus

    A GH27 arabinopyranosidase from G. stearothermophilus (Abp) has been crystallized in the primitive orthorhombic space group P212121. Full diffraction data sets have been measured for the wild-type enzyme and its D197A catalytic mutant to maximal resolutions of 2.28 and 2.30 Å, respectively, for use in a detailed three-dimensional structural analysis of the Abp protein. Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 is a thermophilic soil bacterium that possesses an extensive system for the utilization of hemicellulose. The bacterium produces a small number of endo-acting extracellular enzymes that cleave high-molecular-weight hemicellulolytic polymers into short decorated oligosaccharides, which are further hydrolysed into the respective sugar monomers by a battery of intracellular glycoside hydrolases. One of these intracellular processing enzymes is β-l-arabinopyranosidase (Abp), which is capable of removing β-l-arabinopyranose residues from naturally occurring arabino-polysaccharides. As arabino-polymers constitute a significant part of the hemicellulolytic content of plant biomass, their efficient enzymatic degradation presents an important challenge for many potential biotechnological applications. This aspect has led to an increasing interest in the biochemical characterization and structural analysis of this and related hemicellulases. Abp from G. stearothermophilus T-6 has recently been cloned, overexpressed, purified, biochemically characterized and crystallized in our laboratory, as part of its complete structure–function study. The best crystals obtained for this enzyme belonged to the primitive orthorhombic space group P212121, with average unit-cell parameters a = 107.7, b = 202.2, c = 287.3 Å. Full diffraction data sets to 2.3 Å resolution have been collected for both the wild-type enzyme and its D197A catalytic mutant from flash-cooled crystals at 100 K, using synchrotron radiation. These data are currently being used for a high-resolution three-dimensional structure determination of Abp

  3. How to Switch Off a Histidine Kinase: Crystal Structure of Geobacillus Stearothermophilus KinB with the Inhibitor Sda

    Bick, M.; Lamour, V; Rajashankar, K; Gordiyenko, Y; Robinson, C; Darst, S

    2009-01-01

    Entry to sporulation in bacilli is governed by a histidine kinase phosphorelay, a variation of the predominant signal transduction mechanism in prokaryotes. Sda directly inhibits sporulation histidine kinases in response to DNA damage and replication defects. We determined a 2.0-Angstroms-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the intact cytoplasmic catalytic core [comprising the dimerization and histidine phosphotransfer domain (DHp domain), connected to the ATP binding catalytic domain] of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus sporulation kinase KinB complexed with Sda. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal that Sda binds to the base of the DHp domain and prevents molecular transactions with the DHp domain to which it is bound by acting as a simple molecular barricade. Sda acts to sterically block communication between the catalytic domain and the DHp domain, which is required for autophosphorylation, as well as to sterically block communication between the response regulator Spo0F and the DHp domain, which is required for phosphotransfer and phosphatase activities.

  4. Stability engineering of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus alcohol dehydrogenase and application for the synthesis of a polyamide 12 precursor.

    Kirmair, Ludwig; Seiler, Daniel Leonard; Skerra, Arne

    2015-12-01

    The thermostable NAD(+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus (BsADH) was exploited with regard to the biocatalytic synthesis of ?-oxo lauric acid methyl ester (OLAMe), a key intermediate for biobased polyamide 12 production, from the corresponding long-chain alcohol. Recombinant BsADH was produced in Escherichia coli as a homogeneous tetrameric enzyme and showed high activity towards the industrially relevant substrate ?-hydroxy lauric acid methyl ester (HLAMe) with K M=86?M and 44Umg(-1). The equilibrium constant for HLAMe oxidation to the aldehyde (OLAMe) with NAD(+) was determined as 2.16נ10(-3) from the kinetic parameters of the BsADH-catalyzed forward and reverse reactions. Since BsADH displayed limited stability under oxidizing conditions, the predominant oxidation-prone residue Cys257 was mutated to Leu based on sequence homology with related enzymes and computational simulation. This substitution resulted in an improved BsADH variant exhibiting prolonged stability and an elevated inactivation temperature. Semi-preparative biocatalysis at 60C using the stabilized enzyme, employing butyraldehyde for in situ cofactor regeneration with only catalytic amounts of NAD(+), yielded up to 23% conversion of HLAMe to OLAMe after 30min. In contrast to other oxidoreductases, no overoxidation to the dodecanoic diacid monomethyl ester was detected. Thus, the mutated BsADH offers a promising biocatalyst for the selective oxidation of fatty alcohols to yield intermediates for industrial polymer production. PMID:26329849

  5. A new family of carbohydrate esterases is represented by a GDSL hydrolase/acetylxylan esterase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    Alalouf, Onit; Balazs, Yael; Volkinshtein, Margarita; Grimpel, Yael; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval

    2011-12-01

    Acetylxylan esterases hydrolyze the ester linkages of acetyl groups at positions 2 and/or 3 of the xylose moieties in xylan and play an important role in enhancing the accessibility of xylanases to the xylan backbone. The hemicellulolytic system of the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 comprises a putative acetylxylan esterase gene, axe2. The gene product belongs to the GDSL hydrolase family and does not share sequence homology with any of the carbohydrate esterases in the CAZy Database. The axe2 gene is induced by xylose, and the purified gene product completely deacetylates xylobiose peracetate (fully acetylated) and hydrolyzes the synthetic substrates 2-naphthyl acetate, 4-nitrophenyl acetate, 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate, and phenyl acetate. The pH profiles for k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) suggest the existence of two ionizable groups affecting the binding of the substrate to the enzyme. Using NMR spectroscopy, the regioselectivity of Axe2 was directly determined with the aid of one-dimensional selective total correlation spectroscopy. Methyl 2,3,4-tri-O-acetyl-β-d-xylopyranoside was rapidly deacetylated at position 2 or at positions 3 and 4 to give either diacetyl or monoacetyl intermediates, respectively; methyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-β-d-glucopyranoside was initially deacetylated at position 6. In both cases, the complete hydrolysis of the intermediates occurred at a much slower rate, suggesting that the preferred substrate is the peracetate sugar form. Site-directed mutagenesis of Ser-15, His-194, and Asp-191 resulted in complete inactivation of the enzyme, consistent with their role as the catalytic triad. Overall, our results show that Axe2 is a serine acetylxylan esterase representing a new carbohydrate esterase family. PMID:21994937

  6. Strain Improvement of Bacillus coagulans and Geobacillus stearothermophilus for Enhanced Thermostable Cellulase Production and the Effect of Different Metal Ions on Cellulase Activity

    Vikas Sharma

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The current study was focused on the strain improvement of Bacillus coagulans and Geobacillus stearothermophilus for thermostable cellulase production with higher enzyme activity. For strain improvement UV radiations, NTG and Sodium azide were used as mutagenic agents.NTG was found to be best mutagenic agent among all in term of highest cellulase activity. Mutant strain C11 exhibited the highest cellulase specific activity at 45 U/mg followed by C15 (39 U/mg in case of B.coagulans while Mutant strain S18 exhibited thehighest cellulase specific activity at 69 U/mg followed by S12 (62 U/mg in case of G. stearothermophilus. Specific activity of cellulase was 92 U/mg in case of B.coagulans C11 and 118 U/mg in case of G. stearothermophilus S18. Ag+, Mg+, Se2+,Ca2+,Co2+,Mn2+,K+, Zn2+ ,Fe3+, Hg2+ and Cu2+ showed positive change in specific activity while Na+, Ni2+ negative change in specific activity of cellulase with respect to specific activity of cellulase in absence of any additive in case of B.coagulans C11 and Ag+, Mg+, Se2+,Co2+,Mn2+ andHg2+ showed positive change in specific activity, Na+, K+ showed no change in specific activity while Ca2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Fe3+ and Cu2+ showed negative change in specific activity of cellulase with respect to specific activity of cellulase in absence of any additive in case of G. stearothermophilus S18.

  7. Study of the influence of sporulation conditions on heat resistance of Geobacillus stearothermophilus used in the development of biological indicators for steam sterilization.

    Guizelini, Belquis P; Vandenberghe, Luciana P S; Sella, Sandra Regina B R; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2012-12-01

    Biological indicators are important tools in infection control via sterilization process monitoring. The use of a standardized spore crop with a well-defined heat resistance will guarantee the quality of a biological indicator. Ambient factors during sporulation can affect spore characteristics and properties, including heat resistance. The aim of this study is to evaluate the main sporulation factors responsible for heat resistance in Geobacillus stearothermophilus, a useful biological indicator for steam sterilization. A sequence of a three-step optimization of variables (initial pH, nutrient concentration, tryptone, peptone, beef extract, yeast extract, manganese sulfate, magnesium sulfate, calcium chloride and potassium phosphate) was carried out to screen those that have a significant influence on heat resistance of produced spores. The variable exerting greatest influence on G. stearothermophilus heat resistance during sporulation was found to be the initial pH. Lower nutrient concentration and alkaline pH around 8.5 tended to enhance decimal reduction time at 121 °C (D(121°C)). A central composite design enabled a fourfold enhancement in heat resistance, and the model obtained accurately describes positive pH and negative manganese sulfate concentration influence on spore heat resistance. PMID:22872104

  8. Calcium alginate matrix increases the stability and recycling capability of immobilized endo-?-1,4-xylanase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus KIBGE-IB29.

    Bibi, Zainab; Qader, Shah Ali Ul; Aman, Afsheen

    2015-07-01

    Exploration of microbial pool from extremely diversified ecosystem is significantly important for various industrial applications. Bacterial communities from extreme habitats including volcanic vents, hot springs, and industrial sectors are eagerly explored for the isolation of thermophiles. Geobacillus stearothermophilus KIBGE-IB29, isolated from blast furnace site of a steel processing industry, is capable of producing thermostable endo-?-1,4-xylanase. In the current study, this enzyme was immobilized within calcium alginate beads using entrapment technique. Amalgamation of sodium alginate (40.0 gL(-1)) and calcium chloride (0.4 M) was used for the formation of immobilized beads. It was observed that temperature (50 C) and pH (7.0) optima of immobilized enzyme remained same, but enzyme-substrate reaction time increased from 5.0 to 30.0 min as compared to free enzyme. Diffusion limit of high molecular weight xylan (corncob) caused a decline in V max of immobilized enzyme from 4773 to 203.7 U min(-1), whereas K m value increased from 0.5074 to 0.5722 mg ml(-1) with reference to free enzyme. Immobilized endo-?-1,4-xylanase showed its stability even at high temperatures as compared to free enzyme and retained 18 and 9 % residual activity at 70 and 80 C, respectively. Immobilized enzyme also exhibited sufficient recycling efficiency up to five reaction cycles which indicated that this enzyme can be a plausible candidate in paper and pulp industry. PMID:26001519

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of Seven Thermophilic Spore-Forming Bacteria Isolated from Foods That Produce Highly Heat-Resistant Spores, Comprising Geobacillus spp., Caldibacillus debilis, and Anoxybacillus flavithermus

    Berendsen, Erwin M.; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H. J.; Krawczyk, Antonina O.; de Jong, Anne; van Heel, Auke; Holsappel, Siger; Eijlander, Robyn T.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genomes of five strains of Geobacillus spp., one Caldibacillus debilis strain, and one draft genome of Anoxybacillus flavithermus, all thermophilic spore-forming Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:27151781

  10. HIV-1 Gag p17 presented as virus-like particles on the E2 scaffold from Geobacillus stearothermophilus induces sustained humoral and cellular immune responses in the absence of IFNγ production by CD4+ T cells

    We have constructed stable virus-like particles displaying the HIV-1 Gag(p17) protein as an N-terminal fusion with an engineered protein domain from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit E2. Mice immunized with the Gag(p17)-E2 60-mer scaffold particles mounted a strong and sustained antibody response. Antibodies directed to Gag(p17) were boosted significantly with additional immunizations, while anti-E2 responses reached a plateau. The isotype of the induced antibodies was biased towards IgG1, and the E2-primed CD4+ T cells did not secrete IFNγ. Using transgenic mouse model systems, we demonstrated that CD8+ T cells primed with E2 particles were able to exert lytic activity and produce IFNγ. These results show that the E2 scaffold represents a powerful vaccine delivery system for whole antigenic proteins or polyepitope engineered proteins, evoking antibody production and antigen specific CTL activity even in the absence of IFNγ-producing CD4+ T cells.

  11. Effect of mercaptoethylamine on DNA degradation in thermophilic bacteria Bac. stearothermophilus exposed to γ-, UV-radiation or methylnitrosourea

    The effect of mercaptoethylamine (MEA) on degradation of DNA in thermophilic bacteria Bac. stear. exposed to γ-, UV-rays or methylnitrosourea (MNU) was studied. Using centrifugation on alkaline and neutral sucrose gradients, it was shown that MEA inhibits the accumulation of breaks in the DNA of Bac. stear. It also lowers the level of DNA degradation in toluene-treated cells of Bac. stear. under the action of the intrinsic nuclease, reduces the activity of the endonuclease specific for apurinic DNA, as well as that of S1-nuclease and DNase-I in vitro. The inhibition in the accumulation of DNA breaks is assumed to be due to a decrease of the endonuclease activity in the cells of thermophilic bacteria. (orig.)

  12. Geobacillus sp., a thermophilic soil bacterium producing volatile antibiotics.

    Ren, Yuhao; Strobel, Gary; Sears, Joe; Park, Melina

    2010-07-01

    Geobacillus, a bacterial genus, is represented by over 25 species of Gram-positive isolates from various man-made and natural thermophilic areas around the world. An isolate of this genus (M-7) has been acquired from a thermal area near Yellowstone National Park, MT and partially characterized. The cells of this organism are globose (ca. 0.5 mu diameter), and they are covered in a matrix capsule which gives rise to elongate multicelled bacilliform structures (ranging from 3 to 12 mum) as seen by light and atomic force microscopy, respectively. The organism produces unique petal-shaped colonies (undulating margins) on nutrient agar, and it has an optimum pH of 7.0 and an optimum temperature range of 55-65 degrees C. The partial 16S rRNA sequence of this organism has 97% similarity with Geobacillus stearothermophilus, one of its closest relatives genetically. However, uniquely among all members of this genus, Geobacillus sp. (M-7) produces volatile organic substances (VOCs) that possess potent antibiotic activities. Some of the more notable components of the VOCs are benzaldehyde, acetic acid, butanal, 3-methyl-butanoic acid, 2-methyl-butanoic acid, propanoic acid, 2-methyl-, and benzeneacetaldehyde. An exposure of test organisms such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Botrytis cinerea, Verticillium dahliae, and Geotrichum candidum produced total inhibition of growth on a 48-h exposure to Geobacillus sp.(M-7) cells (ca.10(7)) and killing at a 72-h exposure at higher bacterial cell concentrations. A synthetic mixture of those available volatile compounds, at the ratios occurring in Geobacillus sp. (M-7), mimicked the bioactivity of this organism. PMID:20091406

  13. Crystallization and X-ray structure determination of a thermoalkalophilic lipase from Geobacillus SBS-4S

    Crystallization and the structure determination at 1.6 Å resolution of LIPSBS, a thermoalkalophilic lipase from Geobacillus strain SBS-4S, are described. The crystals belonged to orthorhombic space group P212121. A thermoalkalophilic lipase (LIPSBS) from the newly isolated Geobacillus strain SBS-4S which hydrolyzes a wide range of fatty acids has been characterized. In the present study, the crystallization of purified LIPSBS using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and its X-ray diffraction studies are described. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.13, b = 71.75, c = 126.26 Å. The structure was determined at 1.6 Å resolution by the molecular-replacement method using the lipase from G. stearothermophilus L1 as a model

  14. Reclassification of Geobacillus pallidus (Scholz et al. 1988) Banat et al. 2004 as Aeribacillus pallidus gen. nov., comb. nov.

    Miana-Galbis, David; Pinzn, Dora L; Lorn, J Gaspar; Manresa, Angels; Oliart-Ros, Rosa M

    2010-07-01

    Although Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus, two genera of thermophilic bacteria close to the genus Bacillus, have only been described recently, the number of species in these genera has increased rapidly. Four thermophilic, lipolytic strains (DR01, DR02, DR03 and DR04) isolated from a hot spring in Veracruz (Mexico), which could not be identified phenotypically, were subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Three strains were identified as belonging to the genus Anoxybacillus, but strain DR03 was identified as Geobacillus pallidus. This result led us to perform a phylogenetic analysis of the genera Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus based on 16S rRNA gene sequences from all the type strains of these genera. Phylogenetic trees showed three major clusters, Anoxybacillus-Geobacillus tepidamans, Geobacillus sensu stricto and Geobacillus pallidus, while the 16S rRNA gene sequences of G. pallidus (DR03 and the type strain) showed low similarity to sequences of Anoxybacillus (92.5-95.1 %) and Geobacillus (92.8-94.5 %) species, as well as to Bacillus subtilis (92.2-92.4 %). In addition, G. pallidus could be differentiated from Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus on the basis of DNA G+C content and fatty acid and polar lipid profiles. From these results, it is proposed that Geobacillus pallidus should be classified in a novel genus, for which we propose the name Aeribacillus, as Aeribacillus pallidus gen. nov., comb. nov. The type strain of Aeribacillus pallidus is H12(T) (=ATCC 51176(T) =DSM 3670(T) =LMG 19006(T)). PMID:19700455

  15. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MANNANOLYTIC THERMOPHILIC BACTERIA FROM PALM OIL SHELL AND THEIR MANNANASE ENZYME PRODUCTION PROPERTIES

    T RESNAWATI P URWADARIA

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A mannanolytic thermophilic bacterium (L-07 was isolated from palm oil shell after 2 days of enrichment in liquid medium supplemented with 1% palm kernel meal as mannan source. Sequence analysis of 16S-rRNA indicated that L-07 was similar (98% to Geobacillus stearothermophilus, a species of thermophilic aerobi c bacteria. We found that G. stearothermophilus L-07 produced extracellular ? -1,4-mannanases, but no ? -manosidase and ? -galactosidase activities. The growth of L-07 reached its maximum (3.0 x 106 cell/ml at 12-20 hours, while the highest ? -mannanase activity (0.52 U/ml was observed in culture medium after 36 hours of cultivation at 60oC. The medium containing locust bean gum was the best for producing extracellular ? -1,4-mannanases compared with kolang kaling , konjak , and palm kernel meal. SDS-PAGE and zymogram analysis demonstrated that crude mannanase complex of L-07 from locust bean gum containing medium comprised three active bands with molecular weight of 85, 73 and 50 kDa.

  16. PCR detection of thermophilic spore-forming bacteria involved in canned food spoilage.

    Prevost, S; Andre, S; Remize, F

    2010-12-01

    Thermophilic bacteria that form highly heat-resistant spores constitute an important group of spoilage bacteria of low-acid canned food. A PCR assay was developed in order to rapidly trace these bacteria. Three PCR primer pairs were designed from rRNA gene sequences. These primers were evaluated for the specificity and the sensitivity of detection. Two primer pairs allowed detection at the species level of Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Moorella thermoacetica/thermoautrophica. The other pair allowed group-specific detection of anaerobic thermophilic bacteria of the genera Thermoanaerobacterium, Thermoanaerobacter, Caldanerobium and Caldanaerobacter. After a single enrichment step, these PCR assays allowed the detection of 28 thermophiles from 34 cans of spoiled low-acid food. In addition, 13 ingredients were screened for the presence of these bacteria. This PCR assay serves as a detection method for strains able to spoil low-acid canned food treated at 55C. It will lead to better reactivity in the canning industry. Raw materials and ingredients might be qualified not only for quantitative spore contamination, but also for qualitative contamination by highly heat-resistant spores. PMID:20397018

  17. Toxic effects of tamoxifen on the growth and respiratory activity of Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Luxo, C; Jurado, A S; Custódio, J B; Madeira, V M

    2001-01-01

    The anticancer drug tamoxifen (TAM) is used as first line therapy in breast cancer. Although tamoxifen is usually considered an estrogen antagonist, several studies suggest alternative mechanisms of action. Bacillus stearothermophilus has been used as a model to clarify the antiproliferative action of tamoxifen putatively related with drug-membrane interaction. According to previous data, TAM induces perturbation of membrane structure along with impairment of bacterial growth. The aim of this work was to correlate the effects of TAM on growth of intact B. stearothermophilus with the respiratory activity of isolated protoplasts of this bacteria. TAM inhibits bacterial growth and oxygen consumption of protoplasts as a function of concentration. Effects on oxygen consumption depend on the substrate used: NADH, allowing to study the full respiratory chain and ascorbate-TMPD to probe the final oxidase segment. The interaction of TAM with the respiratory components occurs at a level preceding the cytochrome oxidase segment. PMID:11566553

  18. Contamination pathways of spore-forming bacteria in a vegetable cannery.

    Durand, Loïc; Planchon, Stella; Guinebretiere, Marie-Hélène; André, Stéphane; Carlin, Frédéric; Remize, Fabienne

    2015-06-01

    Spoilage of low-acid canned food during prolonged storage at high temperatures is caused by heat resistant thermophilic spores of strict or facultative bacteria. Here, we performed a bacterial survey over two consecutive years on the processing line of a French company manufacturing canned mixed green peas and carrots. In total, 341 samples were collected, including raw vegetables, green peas and carrots at different steps of processing, cover brine, and process environment samples. Thermophilic and highly-heat-resistant thermophilic spores growing anaerobically were counted. During vegetable preparation, anaerobic spore counts were significantly decreased, and tended to remain unchanged further downstream in the process. Large variation of spore levels in products immediately before the sterilization process could be explained by occasionally high spore levels on surfaces and in debris of vegetable combined with long residence times in conditions suitable for growth and sporulation. Vegetable processing was also associated with an increase in the prevalence of highly-heat-resistant species, probably due to cross-contamination of peas via blanching water. Geobacillus stearothermophilus M13-PCR genotypic profiling on 112 isolates determined 23 profile-types and confirmed process-driven cross-contamination. Taken together, these findings clarify the scheme of contamination pathway by thermophilic spore-forming bacteria in a vegetable cannery. PMID:25755080

  19. Heterologous expression, secretion and characterization of the Geobacillus thermoleovorans US105 type I pullulanase.

    Zouari Ayadi, Dorra; Ben Ali, Mamdouh; Jemli, Sonia; Ben Mabrouk, Sameh; Mezghani, Monia; Ben Messaoud, Ezzedine; Bejar, Samir

    2008-03-01

    Pullulanase type I of Geobacillus thermoleovorans US105 strain (PUL US105) was produced and secreted efficiently in the E. coli periplasmic or extracellular fraction using two different signal peptides. Hence, the open reading frame was connected downstream of the lipase A signal peptide of Bacillus subtilis strain leading to an efficient secretion of an active form enzyme on the periplasmic fraction. In addition, pul US105 was fused to the alpha-amylase signal sequence of the Bacillus stearothermophilus US100 strain. The monitoring of the pullulanase activity and Western blot analysis for this last construction showed that the most activity was found in the supernatant culture, proving the efficient secretion of this natively cytoplasmic enzyme as an active form. The PUL US105 was purified to homogeneity from the periplasmic fraction, using heat treatment, size exclusion, and anion-exchange chromatography. The native pullulanase has a molecular mass of 160 kDa and is composed of two identical subunits of 80 kDa each. It was independent for metallic ions for its activity, while its thermostability was obviously improved in presence of only 0.1 mM CaCl2. PMID:18183386

  20. Genetic map of the Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB36 chromosome.

    Vallier, H; Welker, N. E.

    1990-01-01

    A circular genetic map of Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB36 was constructed by transduction with bacteriophage TP-42C and protoplast fusion. Sixty-four genes were tentatively assigned a cognate Bacillus subtilis gene based on growth response to intermediates or end products of metabolism, cross-feeding, accumulation of intermediates, or their relative order in a linkage group. Although the relative position of many genes on the Bacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus subtilis genetic map app...

  1. Inactivation of chemical and heat-resistant spores of Bacillus and Geobacillus by nitrogen cold atmospheric plasma evokes distinct changes in morphology and integrity of spores.

    van Bokhorst-van de Veen, Hermien; Xie, Houyu; Esveld, Erik; Abee, Tjakko; Mastwijk, Hennie; Nierop Groot, Masja

    2015-02-01

    Bacterial spores are resistant to severe conditions and form a challenge to eradicate from food or food packaging material. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) treatment is receiving more attention as potential sterilization method at relatively mild conditions but the exact mechanism of inactivation is still not fully understood. In this study, the biocidal effect by nitrogen CAP was determined for chemical (hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide), physical (UV) and heat-resistant spores. The three different sporeformers used are Bacillus cereus a food-borne pathogen, and Bacillus atrophaeus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus that are used as biological indicators for validation of chemical sterilization and thermal processes, respectively. The different spores showed variation in their degree of inactivation by applied heat, hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, and UV treatments, whereas similar inactivation results were obtained with the different spores treated with nitrogen CAP. G. stearothermophilus spores displayed high resistance to heat, hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, while for UV treatment B. atrophaeus spores are most tolerant. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed distinct morphological changes for nitrogen CAP-treated B. cereus spores including etching effects and the appearance of rough spore surfaces, whereas morphology of spores treated with heat or disinfectants showed no such changes. Moreover, microscopy analysis revealed CAP-exposed B. cereus spores to turn phase grey conceivably because of water influx indicating damage of the spores, a phenomenon that was not observed for non-treated spores. In addition, data are supplied that exclude UV radiation as determinant of antimicrobial activity of nitrogen CAP. Overall, this study shows that nitrogen CAP treatment has a biocidal effect on selected Bacillus and Geobacillus spores associated with alterations in spore surface morphology and loss of spore integrity. PMID:25481059

  2. Identifying critical unrecognized sugar-protein interactions in GH10 xylanases from Geobacillus stearothermophilus using STD NMR.

    Balazs, Yael S; Lisitsin, Elina; Carmiel, Oshrat; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval; Schmidt, Asher

    2013-09-01

    (1)H solution NMR spectroscopy is used synergistically with 3D crystallographic structures to map experimentally significant hydrophobic interactions upon substrate binding in solution under thermodynamic equilibrium. Using saturation transfer difference spectroscopy (STD NMR), a comparison is made between wild-type xylanase XT6 and its acid/base catalytic mutant E159Q--a non-active, single-heteroatom alteration that has been previously utilized to measure binding thermodynamics across a series of xylooligosaccharide-xylanase complexes [Zolotnitsky et al. (2004) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101, 11275-11280). In this study, performing STD NMR of one substrate screens binding interactions to two proteins, avoiding many disadvantages inherent to the technique and clearly revealing subtle changes in binding induced upon mutation of the catalytic Glu. To visualize and compare the binding epitopes of xylobiose-xylanase complexes, a 'SASSY' plot (saturation difference transfer spectroscopy) is used. Two extraordinarily strong, but previously unrecognized, non-covalent interactions with H2-5 of xylobiose were observed in the wild-type enzyme but not in the E159Q mutant. Based on the crystal structure, these interactions were assigned to tryptophan residues at the -1 subsite. The mutant selectively binds only the β-xylobiose anomer. The (1)H solution NMR spectrum of a xylotriose-E159Q complex displays non-uniform broadening of the NMR signals. Differential broadening provides a unique subsite assignment tool based on structural knowledge of face-to-face stacking with a conserved tyrosine residue at the +1 subsite. The results obtained herein by substrate-observed NMR spectroscopy are discussed further in terms of methodological contributions and mechanistic understanding of substrate-binding adjustments upon a charge change in the E159Q construct. PMID:23863045

  3. How to Switch Off a Histidine Kinase: Crystal Structure of Geobacillus stearothermophilus KinB with the inhibitor Sda

    Bick, Matthew J.; Lamour, Valerie; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Gordiyenko, Yuliya; ROBINSON, CAROL V.; Darst, Seth A.

    2008-01-01

    Entry to sporulation in Bacilli is governed by a histidine kinase phosphorelay, a variation on the predominant signal transduction mechanism in prokaryotes. Sda directly inhibits sporulation histidine kinases in response to DNA damage and replication defects. We determined a 2.0 Å-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the intact cytoplasmic catalytic core (comprising the Dimerization and Histidine-phosphotransfer, or DHp, domain, connected to the ATP-binding Catalytic, or CA, domain) of the G...

  4. Thermostable, Raw-Starch-Digesting Amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus

    Kim, Jaeyoung; Nanmori, Takashi; Shinke, Ryu

    1989-01-01

    An endospore-forming thermophilic bacterium, which produced amylase and was identified as Bacillus stearothermophilus, was isolated from soil. The amylase had an optimum temperature of 70°C and strongly degraded wheat starch granules (93%) and potato starch granules (80%) at 60°C.

  5. Preliminary Characterization of the Probiotic Properties of Candida Famata and Geobacillus Thermoleovorans

    A Bakhrouf

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Probiotics are live microbial feed supplements which beneficially affect the host animal by improving its intestinal microbial balance, producing metabolites which inhibit the colonization or growth of other microorganisms or by competing with them for resources such as nutrients or space. The aim of this study was to investigate the probiotic properties of Candida famata and Geobacillus thermoleovorans.Material and Methods: In this study, yeast and bacterial strains isolated from pure oil waste were identified using Api 50 CHB and Api Candida Systems and their probiotic properties were studied through antimicrobial activity, biofilm production, adherence assay and enzymatic characterization.Results and Conclusion: According to biochemical analyses, these strains corresponded to Geobacillus thermoleovorans and Candida famata. Antagonism assay results showed that the tested strains have an inhibitory effect against tested pathogenic bacteria. The yeast Candida famata was unable to produce biofilm on Congo Red Agar (CRA, while the bacterial strain was a slime producer. Adherence assays to abiotic surfaces revealed that the investigated strains were fairly adhesive to polystyrene with values ranging from 0.18 to 0.34 at 595 nm. The enzymatic characterization revealed that the tested strains expressed enzymes such as phosphatase alkaline, esterase lipase (C8, amylase, lipase, lecitenase and caseinase. The obtained results may allow the isolated strains to be considered as having the potential to be candidate probiotics.

  6. Genome Sequence of a Thermophilic Bacillus, Geobacillus thermodenitrificans DSM465

    Yao, Nana; Ren, Yi; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Geobacillus thermodenitrificans NG80-2 encodes a LadA-mediated alkane degradation pathway, while G. thermodenitrificans DSM465 cannot utilize alkanes. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of G. thermodenitrificans DSM465, which may help reveal the genomic differences between these two strains in regards to the biodegradation of alkanes.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacillus thermopakistaniensis Strain MAS1

    Siddiqui, Masood Ahmed; Rashid, Naeem; Ayyampalayam, Saravanaraj; Whitman, William B.

    2014-01-01

    Geobacillus thermopakistaniensis strain MAS1 was isolated from a hot spring located in the Northern Areas of Pakistan. The draft genome sequence was 3.5 Mb and identified a number of genes of potential industrial importance, including genes encoding glycoside hydrolases, pullulanase, amylopullulanase, glycosidase, and alcohol dehydrogenases.

  8. Purification and properties of deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Kaboev, O K; Luchkina, L A; Akhmedov, A T; Bekker, M L

    1981-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase I was purified from Bacillus stearothermophilus to 50 to 70% homogeneity. Its molecular weight was 76,000. The enzyme was insensitive to sulfhydryl blocking agents and showed maximal activity at 60 degrees C, pH 8 to 9, 0.25 M KCl, and 0.02 M MgSO4. The rate of heat inactivation of the deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase followed first-order kinetics with a half-life of 90 min at 60 degrees C; the addition of 0.05% bovine serum albumin protected the enzyme, which...

  9. Genetic analysis of Bacillus stearothermophilus by protoplast fusion.

    Chen, Z F; Wojcik, S F; Welker, N E

    1986-01-01

    Efficient and reliable protoplasting, regeneration, and fusion techniques were established for the prototrophic strain Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB36. Auxotrophic mutants were isolated, and protoplast fusion was used to construct isogenic mutant strains and for chromosomal mapping. Markers were mapped using two-, three-, and four-factor crosses. The order of the markers was hom-1-thr-1-his-1-(gly-1 or gly-2)-pur-1-pur-2. These markers may be analogous to hom, thrA, hisA, glyC, and purA mar...

  10. Effect of Essential Oils on Germination and Growth of Some Pathogenic and Spoilage Spore-Forming Bacteria.

    Voundi, Stève Olugu; Nyegue, Maximilienne; Lazar, Iuliana; Raducanu, Dumitra; Ndoye, Florentine Foe; Marius, Stamate; Etoa, François-Xavier

    2015-06-01

    The use of essential oils as a food preservative has increased due to their capacity to inhibit vegetative growth of some bacteria. However, only limited data are available on their effect on bacterial spores. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of some essential oils on the growth and germination of three Bacillus species and Geobacillus stearothermophilus. Essential oils were chemically analyzed using gas chromatography and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. The minimal inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations of vegetative growth and spore germination were assessed using the macrodilution method. Germination inhibitory effect of treated spores with essential oils was evaluated on solid medium, while kinetic growth was followed using spectrophotometry in the presence of essential oils. Essential oil from Drypetes gossweileri mainly composed of benzyl isothiocyanate (86.7%) was the most potent, with minimal inhibitory concentrations ranging from 0.0048 to 0.0097 mg/mL on vegetative cells and 0.001 to 0.002 mg/mL on spore germination. Furthermore, essential oil from D. gossweileri reduced 50% of spore germination after treatment at 1.25 mg/mL, and its combination with other oils improved both bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities with additive or synergistic effects. Concerning the other essential oils, the minimal inhibitory concentration ranged from 5 to 0.63 mg/mL on vegetative growth and from 0.75 to 0.09 mg/mL on the germination of spores. Spectrophotometric evaluation showed an inhibitory effect of essential oils on both germination and outgrowth. From these results, it is concluded that some of the essential oils tested might be a valuable tool for bacteriological control in food industries. Therefore, further research regarding their use as food preservatives should be carried out. PMID:25884442

  11. Complete genome sequence of Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93, a novel biomass degrader isolated from obsidian hot spring in Yellowstone National Park.

    Brumm, Phillip J; Land, Miriam L; Mead, David A

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93 was one of several thermophilic organisms isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA under permit from the National Park Service. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences confirmed the classification of the strain as a G. thermoglucosidasius species. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2011 (CP002835). The genome of G. thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,893,306 bp and two circular plasmids of 80,849 and 19,638 bp and an average G + C content of 43.93 %. G. thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93 possesses a xylan degradation cluster not found in the other G. thermoglucosidasius sequenced strains. This cluster appears to be related to the xylan degradation cluster found in G. stearothermophilus. G. thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93 possesses two plasmids not found in the other two strains. One plasmid contains a novel gene cluster coding for proteins involved in proline degradation and metabolism, the other contains a collection of mostly hypothetical proteins. PMID:26442136

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Thermophilic Geobacillus sp. Strain Sah69, Isolated from Saharan Soil, Southeast Algeria

    Bezuidt, Oliver K. I.; Makhalanyane, Thulani P.; Gomri, Mohamed A.; Kharroub, Karima

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus spp. are potential sources of novel enzymes, such as those involved in the degradation of recalcitrant polymers. Here, we report a Geobacillus genome that may help reveal genomic differences between this strain and publicly available representatives of the same genus from diverse niches. PMID:26679578

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Thermophilic Geobacillus sp. Strain Sah69, Isolated from Saharan Soil, Southeast Algeria.

    Bezuidt, Oliver K I; Makhalanyane, Thulani P; Gomri, Mohamed A; Kharroub, Karima; Cowan, Don A

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus spp. are potential sources of novel enzymes, such as those involved in the degradation of recalcitrant polymers. Here, we report a Geobacillus genome that may help reveal genomic differences between this strain and publicly available representatives of the same genus from diverse niches. PMID:26679578

  14. PRODUCTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ALKALOTHERMOSTABLE, ORGANIC SOLVENT TOLERANT AND SURFACTANT TOLERANT ESTERASE PRODUCED BY A THERMOPHILIC BACTERIUM GEOBACILLUS SP. AGP-04, ISOLATED FROM BAKRESHWAR HOT SPRING, INDIA

    Amit Ghati

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A thermophilic bacteria, Geobacillus sp. AGP-04, isolated from Surya Kund hot spring, Bakreshwar, West Bengal, India was studied in terms of capability of tributyrin hydrolysis and characterization of its thermostable esterase activity using p-nitrophenyl butyrate (PNPB as substrate. The extracellular crude preparation was characterized in terms of pH and temperature optima and stability, organic solvent tolerance capacity and stability, substrate specificity, surfactant tolerance capacity, kinetic parameters and activation/inhibition behavior towards some metal ions and chemicals. Tributyrin agar assay exhibited that Geobacillus sp. AGP-04 secretes an extracellular esterase. The Vmax and Km values of the esterase were found to be 5099 U/Land 103.5µM, respectively in the presence of PNPB as substrate. The optimum temperature and pH, for Geobacillus sp. AGP-04 esterase was 60oC and 8.0, respectively. Although the enzyme activity was not significantly altered by incubating crude extract solution at 20-70oC for 1 hour, the enzyme activity was fully lost at 90oC for same incubation period. The pH stability profile showed that original crude esterase activity is stable at a broad range (pH 5.0-10.0. Moreover, the enzyme was highly organic solvent and surfactant tolerant. The effect of some chemical on crude esterase activity indicated that Geobacillus sp. AGP-04 produce an esterase which contains a serine residue in active site and for its activity -SH groups are essential. Besides, enzyme production was highly induced if fermentation medium contain polysaccharides and oil as carbon source.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of thermostable RNase HIII from Bacillus stearothermophilus

    A thermostable ribonuclease HIII from B. stearothermophilus (Bst RNase HIII) was crystallized and preliminary crystallographic studies were performed. Plate-like overlapping polycrystals were grown by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 283 K

  16. Structural genes encoding the thermophilic alpha-amylases of Bacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus licheniformis.

    Gray, G L; Mainzer, S E; Rey, M W; Lamsa, M H; Kindle, K L; Carmona, C; Requadt, C

    1986-01-01

    The genes encoding the thermostable alpha-amylases of Bacillus stearothermophilus and B. licheniformis were cloned in Escherichia coli, and their DNA sequences were determined. The coding and deduced polypeptide sequences are 59 and 62% homologous to each other, respectively. The B. stearothermophilus protein differs most significantly from that of B. licheniformis in that it possesses a 32-residue COOH-terminal tail. Transformation of E. coli with vectors containing either gene resulted in t...

  17. A commensal symbiotic interrelationship for the growth of Symbiobacterium toebii with its partner bacterium, Geobacillus toebii

    Masui Ryoji

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symbiobacterium toebii is a commensal symbiotic thermophile that absolutely requires its partner bacterium Geobacillus toebii for growth. Despite development of an independent cultivation method using cell-free extracts, the growth of Symbiobacterium remains unknown due to our poor understanding of the symbiotic relationship with its partner bacterium. Here, we investigated the interrelationship between these two bacteria for growth of S. toebii using different cell-free extracts of G. toebii. Results Symbiobacterium toebii growth-supporting factors were constitutively produced through almost all growth phases and under different oxygen tensions in G. toebii, indicating that the factor may be essential components for growth of G. toebii as well as S. toebii. The growing conditions of G. toebii under different oxygen tension dramatically affected to the initial growth of S. toebii and the retarded lag phase was completely shortened by reducing agent, L-cysteine indicating an evidence of commensal interaction of microaerobic and anaerobic bacterium S. toebii with a facultative aerobic bacterium G. toebii. In addition, the growth curve of S. toebii showed a dependency on the protein concentration of cell-free extracts of G. toebii, demonstrating that the G. toebii-derived factors have nutrient-like characters but not quorum-sensing characters. Conclusions Not only the consistent existence of the factor in G. toebii during all growth stages and under different oxygen tensions but also the concentration dependency of the factor for proliferation and optimal growth of S. toebii, suggests that an important biosynthetic machinery lacks in S. toebii during evolution. The commensal symbiotic bacterium, S. toebii uptakes certain ubiquitous and essential compound for its growth from environment or neighboring bacteria that shares the equivalent compounds. Moreover, G. toebii grown under aerobic condition shortened the lag phase of S. toebii under anaerobic and microaerobic conditions, suggests a possible commensal interaction that G. toebii scavengers ROS/RNS species and helps the initial growth of S. toebii.

  18. Geobacillus zalihae sp. nov., a thermophilic lipolytic bacterium isolated from palm oil mill effluent in Malaysia

    Salleh Abu

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thermophilic Bacillus strains of phylogenetic Bacillus rRNA group 5 were described as a new genus Geobacillus. Their geographical distribution included oilfields, hay compost, hydrothermal vent or soils. The members from the genus Geobacillus have a growth temperatures ranging from 35 to 78°C and contained iso-branched saturated fatty acids (iso-15:0, iso-16:0 and iso-17:0 as the major fatty acids. The members of Geobacillus have similarity in their 16S rRNA gene sequences (96.5–99.2%. Thermophiles harboring intrinsically stable enzymes are suitable for industrial applications. The quest for intrinsically thermostable lipases from thermophiles is a prominent task due to the laborious processes via genetic modification. Results Twenty-nine putative lipase producers were screened and isolated from palm oil mill effluent in Malaysia. Of these, isolate T1T was chosen for further study as relatively higher lipase activity was detected quantitatively. The crude T1 lipase showed high optimum temperature of 70°C and was also stable up to 60°C without significant loss of crude enzyme activity. Strain T1T was a Gram-positive, rod-shaped, endospore forming bacterium. On the basic of 16S rDNA analysis, strain T1T was shown to belong to the Bacillus rRNA group 5 related to Geobacillus thermoleovorans (DSM 5366T and Geobacillus kaustophilus (DSM 7263T. Chemotaxonomic data of cellular fatty acids supported the affiliation of strain T1T to the genus Geobacillus. The results of physiological and biochemical tests, DNA/DNA hybridization, RiboPrint analysis, the length of lipase gene and protein pattern allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain T1T from its validly published closest phylogenetic neighbors. Strain T1T therefore represents a novel species, for which the name Geobacillus zalihae sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain T1T (=DSM 18318T; NBRC 101842T. Conclusion Strain T1T was able to secrete extracellular thermostable lipase into culture medium. The strain T1T was identified as Geobacillus zalihae T1T as it differs from its type strains Geobacillus kaustophilus (DSM 7263T and Geobacillus thermoleovorans (DSM 5366T on some physiological studies, cellular fatty acids composition, RiboPrint analysis, length of lipase gene and protein profile.

  19. Bacillus stearothermophilus contains a plasmid-borne gene for alpha-amylase.

    Mielenz, J R

    1983-01-01

    The gene for thermostable alpha-amylase from the thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Each alpha-amylase-producing colony contained at least a 9.7-kilobase-pair (kb) chimeric plasmid composed of the vector pBR322 and a common 5.4-kb HindIII fragment of DNA. B. stearothermophilus contains four plasmids with sizes from 12 kb to over 108 kb. Restriction endonuclease analysis of these naturally occurring plasmids showed they also co...

  20. Complete genome sequences of Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52, a xylan-degrading strain isolated from obsidian hot spring in Yellowstone National Park

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren J.; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Chang, Yun-juan; Mead, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 was isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA under permit from the National Park Service. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2011 (CP002835). Based on 16S rRNA genes and average nucleotide identity, Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 and the related Geobacillus sp. Y412MC61 appear to be members of a new species of Geobacillus. The genome of Geobacillus sp. Y...

  1. A thiostrepton resistance gene and its mutants serve as selectable markers in Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426.

    Wada, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Jyumpei; Furukawa, Megumi; Doi, Katsumi; Ohshiro, Takashi; Suzuki, Hirokazu

    2016-02-01

    Effective utilization of microbes often requires complex genetic modification using multiple antibiotic resistance markers. Because a few markers have been used in Geobacillus spp., the present study was designed to identify a new marker for these thermophiles. We explored antibiotic resistance genes functional in Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 and identified a thiostrepton resistance gene (tsr) effective at 50C. The tsr gene was further used to generate the mutant tsr(H258Y) functional at 55C. Higher functional temperature of the mutant was attributable to the increase in thermostability of the gene product because recombinant protein produced from tsr(H258Y) was more thermostable than that from tsr. In fact, the tsr(H258Y) gene served as a selectable marker for plasmid transformation of G. kaustophilus. This new marker could facilitate complex genetic modification of G. kaustophilus and potentially other Geobacillus spp. PMID:26333661

  2. 1H, 13C, and 15N backbone and side chain resonance assignments of thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus cyclophilin-A

    Holliday, Michael; Zhang, Fengli; Isern, Nancy G.; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.

    2014-04-01

    Cyclophilins catalyze the reversible peptidyl-prolyl isomerization of their substrates and are present across all kingdoms of life from humans to bacteria. Although numerous biological roles have now been discovered for cyclophilins, their function was initially ascribed to their chaperone-like activity in protein folding where they catalyze the often rate-limiting step of proline isomerization. This chaperone-like activity may be especially important under extreme conditions where cyclophilins are often over expressed, such as in tumors for human cyclophilins {Lee, 2010 #1167}, but also in organisms that thrive under extreme conditions, such as theromophilic bacteria. Moreover, the reversible nature of the peptidyl-prolyl isomerization reaction catalyzed by cyclophilins has allowed these enzymes to serve as model systems for probing the role of conformational changes during catalytic turnover {Eisenmesser, 2002 #20;Eisenmesser, 2005 #203}. Thus, we present here the resonance assignments of a thermophilic cyclophilin from Geobacillus kaustophilus derived from deep-sea sediment {Takami, 2004 #1384}. This thermophilic cyclophilin may now be studied at a variety of temperatures to provide insight into the comparative structure, dynamics, and catalytic mechanism of cyclophilins.

  3. Isolation of uncultivated anaerobic thermophiles from compost by supplementing cell extract of Geobacillus toebii in enrichment culture medium.

    Bae, Jin-Woo; Rhee, Sung-Keun; Park, Ja Ryeong; Kim, Byung-Chun; Park, Yong-Ha

    2005-12-01

    Several researchers have reported that microorganisms can be cultivated only in the presence of other microorganisms. We suggest that a portion of uncultivated microorganisms might be cultivated in the presence of cellular components released from bacteria in their natural environments. In this study, the cell extract of Geobacillus toebii was used to enrich uncultivated thermophiles from compost. In the process of enrichment cultures, cell extract supplementation apparently changed the community composition. This change was monitored by PCR-DGGE targeting 16S rRNA gene. Five novel groups of microorganisms (similarity of 16S rRNA gene to the closest relative <96%) were specifically isolated from enrichment cultures by using cell extract-supplemented culture media. Their growth was found to be dependent on the addition of extract of G. toebii. Putting these findings together, we suggest that the extracts of bacteria could be one of the growth factors in the thermal ecosystem with a possibility of extending other ecological niches. PMID:16041476

  4. Toxic effects of tamoxifen on the growth and respiratory activity of Bacillus stearothermophilus

    Luxo, C; Jurado, A. S.; Custódio, J. B. A.; Madeira, V. M. C.

    2001-01-01

    The anticancer drug tamoxifen (TAM) is used as first line therapy in breast cancer. Although tamoxifen is usually considered an estrogen antagonist, several studies suggest alternative mechanisms of action. Bacillus stearothermophilus has been used as a model to clarify the antiproliferative action of tamoxifen putatively related with drug-membrane interaction. According to previous data, TAM induces perturbation of membrane structure along with impairment of bacterial growth. The aim of this...

  5. Effects of gamma- and UV-radiation on DNA synthesis in permeable cells of Bacillus stearothermophilus

    It was shown that the most of the DNA synthesis is repaired in permeable cells of Bacillus stearothermophilus not affected by injurious agents. γ-irradiation stimulates the reparative synthesis and degradation of DNA whereas UV-radiation decreases the activity of these processes. The reason for such an unusual response of thermophiles to irradiation lies perhaps in high temperatures at which the cells exist

  6. Influence of Bacillus Stearothermophilus generations in the production of its spores

    Heron Oliveira dos Santos Lima

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The validation of sterilization processes in food and pharmaceutical industries is a major tool for quality assurance, making the products safe, effective and reliable. Biological indicators, formed by spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus microorganisms considered at higher thermal resistance, are used to evaluate and monitor the physical parameters of a cycle of steam sterilization. In this way this study aimed to cultivate and characterize the microorganism Bacillus stearothermophilus generations, assessing the influence of these generations in the parameters of resistance, formation and concentration of its spores to be used in the production of biological indicators. The experiments were conducted cultivating the 1st, 2nd and 3rd generations of B. stearothermophilus in suitable culture media for sporulation, in Roux bottles, for a period of 15 days of incubation. During these 15 days, the sporulation process was evaluated by microscopy, according to Wirtz-Conklin's method, every 24 hours of incubation. The results showed that the generations do influence the sporulation process, indicating that the 3rd generation is the most suitable for the production of formed spores, in concentration and thermal resistance appropriate characteristics to the needs of a biological indicator to efficiently validate and monitor steam sterilization cycles.

  7. Thermophilic Geobacillus galactosidasius sp. nov. loaded ?-Fe2O3 magnetic nanoparticle for the preconcentrations of Pb and Cd.

    zdemir, Sadin; K?l?n, Ersin; Okumu?, Veysi; Poli, Annarita; Nicolaus, Barbara; Romano, Ida

    2016-02-01

    Thermophilic bacteria, Geobacillus galactosidasius sp nov. was loaded on ?-Fe2O3 magnetic nanoparticle for the preconcentrations of Pb and Cd by solid phase extraction before ICP-OES. pH and flow rate of the solution, amounts of biosorbent and magnetic nanoparticle, volume of sample solution, effects of the possible interferic ions were investigated in details. Linear calibration curves were constructed in the concentration ranges of 1.0-60ngmL(-1) for Pb and Cd. The RSDs of the method were lower than 2.8% for Pb and 3.8% for Cd. Certified and standard reference samples of fortified water, wastewater, poplar leaves, and simulated fresh water were used to accurate the method. LOD values were found as 0.07 and 0.06ngmL(-1) respectively for Pb and Cd. The biosorption capacities were found as 34.3mgg(-1) for Pb and 37.1mgg(-1) for Cd. Pb and Cd concentrations in foods were determined. Surface microstructure was investigated by SEM-EDX. PMID:26679049

  8. Structure based protein engineering of Bacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase: toward a new substrate specificity

    Full text. Structural similarity is observed in all members of α-amylase family but different products are generated during hydrolysis of starch due to different affinities for intermediate dextrins. In order to understand the structural determinants for this property and to introduce different specificity to α-amylase of Bacillus stearothermophilus we intend to solve the three dimensional structure by X-ray crystallography of the native protein by using synchrotron radiation at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Protein was over expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallization experiments were carried out by using sparse matrix Crystal Screen and Crystal Screen II from Hampton Research (Laguna Hills, CA, USA). Several condition have produced crystals with some defined characteristic: MDP seems to be important to the crystallization: the preferential pH is around 7.5 with organic buffer (HEPES); organic solvent as 2-propanol seems to be also important for the crystallization. On those condition crystals appeared as cluster of needles or small crystals with high number of nucleation. New conditions are being prepared to improve the site and quality of crystals. Data collection of native of Bacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase will e done at Protein Crystallography Station at LNLS. Crystal structure of mutated α-amylase bu site direct mutagenesis of residues suggested by the native crystal structure will be obtained. Co-crystallization of Bacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase and oligosaccharide will be carried out to identify residues involved in the binding site to plan new mutation. In another series of mutation the putative binding site residues, once identified, will be mutated to residues observed in TAKA amylase to confer different specificity to α-amylase. Based on the available TAKA amylase structure, in the primary sequence homology and in the three dimensional model of Bacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase (using Bacillus licheniformis crystal structure as initial model) it seems that Bacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase binding site is more complex with and insertion of 40 residues. Therefore the three dimensional structure is crucial to understand the specificity of the substrate of this enzyme which will be used to drive the design of mutation to introduce new properties for industrial purpose. (author)

  9. Overexpression and characterization of dimeric and tetrameric forms of recombinant serine hydroxymethyltransferase from Bacillus stearothermophilus

    Venkatakrishna R Jala; V Prakash; N Appaji Rao; H S Savithri

    2002-06-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT), a pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzyme catalyzes the interconversion of L-Ser and Gly using tetrahydrofolate as a substrate. The gene encoding for SHMT was amplified by PCR from genomic DNA of Bacillus stearothermophilus and the PCR product was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme was isolated as a mixture of dimer (90%) and tetramer (10%). This is the first report demonstrating the existence of SHMT as a dimer and tetramer in the same organism. The specific activities at 37°C of the dimeric and tetrameric forms were 6.7 U/mg and 4.1 U/mg, respectively. The purified dimer was extremely thermostable with a m of 85°C in the presence of PLP and L-Ser. The temperature optimum of the dimer was 80°C with a specific activity of 32.4 U/mg at this temperature. The enzyme catalyzed tetrahydrofolate-independent reactions at a slower rate compared to the tetrahydrofolate-dependent retro-aldol cleavage of L-Ser. The interaction with substrates and their analogues indicated that the orientation of PLP ring of B. stearothermophilus SHMT was probably different from sheep liver cytosolic recombinant SHMT (scSHMT).

  10. Characterization of a new bacillus stearothermophilus isolate: a highly thermostable [alpha]-amylase-producing strain

    Wind, R.D. (Agrotechnological Research Inst., Wageningen (Netherlands)); Buitelaar, R.M. (Agrotechnological Research Inst., Wageningen (Netherlands)); Eggink, G. (Agrotechnological Research Inst., Wageningen (Netherlands)); Huizing, H.J. (Agrotechnological Research Inst., Wageningen (Netherlands)); Dijkhuizen, L. (Dept. of Microbiology, Groningen Univ. (Netherlands))

    1994-04-01

    A novel strain of Bacillus stearothermophilus was isolated from samples of a potato-processing industry. Comapred to known [alpha]-amylases from other B. stearothermophilus strains, the isolate was found to produce a highly thermostable [alpha]-amylase. The half-time of inactivation of this [alpha]-amylase was 5.1 h at 80 C and 2.4 h at 90 C. The temperature optimum for activity of the [alpha]-amylase was 70 C; the pH optimum for activity was relatively low, in the range 5.5-6.0 [alpha]-Amylase synthesis was regulated by induction and repression mechanisms. An inverse relationship was found between growth rate and [alpha]-amylase production. Low starch concentrations and low growth temperatures were favourable for enzyme production by the organism. At the optimal temperature for growth, 65 C, the [alpha]-amylase was a growth-associated enzyme. The optimal temperature for [alpha]-amylase production, however, was 40 C, with [alpha]-amylase increasing from 3.9 units (U)/ml to 143 U/ml when lowering the growth temperature from 65 C to 40 C. Maximal [alpha]-amylase production in a batch fermentor run at 65 C was 102 U/ml, which was 26-fold higher than in erlenmeyer flasks at 65 C. The dissolved O[sub 2] concentration was found to be a critical factor in production of the [alpha]-amylase. (orig.)

  11. Effect of ionization and nisin on the Bacillus strains and Salmonella Enteritidis inoculated Stearothermophilus

    The antimicrobial effect of nisin (at 1000UI/g), and irradiation (at 1, 3 and 5kGy), against the growth of Salmonella enteritidis (106 ufc/ml) and Bacillus Stearothermophilus (106 ufc/ml), inoculated in turkey salami, was studied during storage at 4 degree for 21 days. Treatment of turkey salami with nisin at 1000UI/g did not show any antimicrobial activity against S. Enteritidis with 6.7 pour cent and 0.8 pour cent of reduction after 0 and 21 days of storage respectively, and seems to be insufficient to inhibit B. Stearothermophilus with 23 pour cent and 21 pour cent of reduction after 0 and 21 days of storage respectively. Antimicrobial activities of irradiation were better and proportional to irradiation doses; it shows a reduction of 27 pour cent, 55 pour cent and 67 pour cent by D1, D2 and D3 respectively. The combination of nisin with irradiation at 5kGy showed stronger antimicrobial activities than those obtained by its combination with the first and the second irradiation dose.

  12. Characterisation of a new thermoalkaliphilic bacterium for the production of high-quality hemp fibres, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius strain PB94A.

    Valladares Jurez, A G; Dreyer, J; Gpel, P K; Koschke, N; Frank, D; Mrkl, H; Mller, R

    2009-06-01

    Novel thermophilic and alkaliphilic bacteria for the processing of bast fibres were isolated using hemp pectin as substrate. The strain PB94A, which showed the highest growth rate (micro = 0.5/h) was identified as Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius (DSM 21625). The strain grew optimally at 60 degrees C and pH 8.5. During growth on citrus pectin, the strain produced pectinolytic lyases, which were excreted into the medium. In contrast to the commercially available pectinase Bioprep 3000 L, the enzymes from G. thermoglucosidasius PB94A converted pectin isolated from hemp fibres. In addition to hemp pectin, the culture supernatant also degraded citrus, sugar beet and apple pectin and polygalacturonic acid. When hemp fibres were incubated with the cell-free fermentation broth of G. thermoglucosidasius PB94A, the fineness of the fibres increased. The strain did not produce any cellulases, which is important in order to avoid damaging the fibres during incubation. Therefore, these bacteria or their enzymes can be used to produce fine high-quality hemp fibres. PMID:19333594

  13. Kasugamycin resistant mutants of Bacillus stearothermophilus lacking the enzyme for the methylation of two adjacent adenosines in 16S ribosomal RNA.

    Van Buul, C P; Damm, J B; Van Knippenberg, P H

    1983-01-01

    Several mutants of B. stearothermophilus have been isolated that are resistant to the antibiotic kasugamycin. One of these is shown to lack dimethylation of two adjacent adenosines in the 16S ribosomal RNA. All mutants that were analyzed biochemically lack the enzyme that is able to methylate this site. Ribosomal sensitivity and resistance to kasugamycin in B. stearothermophilus is therefore, like in E. coli, closely connected with dimethylation of the adenosines. PMID:6575236

  14. Degradation of penicillin G to phenylacetylglycine by D-alanine carboxypeptidase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Hammarström, S; Strominger, J L

    1975-09-01

    D-Alanine carboxypeptidase from Bacillus stearothermophilus is a membrane-bound enzyme which is inhibited by covalent interaction with penicillin G. The penicilloyl enzyme spontaneously reactivates and simultaneously releases a penicillin G degradation product; 0.2 mumol of the latter was isolated after incubation of 4.2 mumol of [8-14C]penicillin G with 10 g of membrane protein. It was identified as phenylacetylglycine by chromatographic techniques, infrared spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. A mechanism for the degradation is proposed in which the remaining part of penicillin G would be released as 5,5-dimethyl-delta2-thiazoline-4-carboxylic acid. The implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:1059132

  15. Thermostable hemicellulases of a bacterium, Geobacillus sp. DC3, isolated from the former Homestake Gold Mine in Lead, South Dakota

    A thermophilic strain, Geobacillus sp. DC3, capable of producing hemicellulolytic enzymes was isolated from the 1.5-km depth of the former Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota. The DC3 strain expressed a high level of extracellular endoxylanase at 39.5 U/mg protein with additional hemicellulase...

  16. Genome Sequence of Geobacillus sp. Strain ZGt-1, an Antibacterial Peptide-Producing Bacterium from Hot Springs in Jordan

    Alkhalili, Rawana N.; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni; Canbäck, Björn

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the draft genome sequence of the firmicute Geobacillus sp. strain ZGt-1, an antibacterial peptide producer isolated from the Zara hot spring in Jordan. This study is the first report on genomic data from a thermophilic bacterial strain isolated in Jordan.

  17. Significant improvement of Geobacillus thermoleovorans CCR11 thermoalkalophilic lipase production using response surface methodology.

    Snchez-Otero, Mara Guadalupe; Ruiz-Lpez, Irving Israel; Avila-Nieto, David Eduardo; Oliart-Ros, Rosa Mara

    2011-10-01

    The medium optimization for the production of the Geobacillus thermoleovorans CCR11 thermoalkalophilic lipase was carried out in shake flask cultures using safflower high oleic oil. In the first step of optimization, a two level fractional factorial design allowed the identification of the concentration of nutrient broth and temperature as the main variables significantly affecting lipase production (P<0.05). In a second step, a D-optimal design was applied to determine the variables optimal values, defined as those yielding maximal lipase production in shaken flasks, thus demonstrating that the optimal concentration of nutrient broth was 3.8 g/l and the optimal culture temperature was 39.5C. The model was experimentally validated, yielding a lipase production of 2283.70 118.36 U/mL which represents a 6.7-fold increase in comparison to the non-optimized medium. PMID:21315194

  18. Crystal structure of the single-stranded RNA binding protein HutP from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans.

    Thiruselvam, Viswanathan; Sivaraman, Padavattan; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri; Ponnuswamy, Mondikalipudur Nanjappagounder

    2014-04-18

    RNA binding proteins control gene expression by the attenuation/antitermination mechanism. HutP is an RNA binding antitermination protein. It regulates the expression of hut operon when it binds with RNA by modulating the secondary structure of single-stranded hut mRNA. HutP necessitates the presence of l-histidine and divalent metal ion to bind with RNA. Herein, we report the crystal structures of ternary complex (HutP-l-histidine-Mg(2+)) and EDTA (0.5 M) treated ternary complex (HutP-l-histidine-Mg(2+)), solved at 1.9 Å and 2.5 Å resolutions, respectively, from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans. The addition of 0.5 M EDTA does not affect the overall metal-ion mediated ternary complex structure and however, the metal ions at the non-specific binding sites are chelated, as evidenced from the results of structural features. PMID:24650662

  19. Enhanced maltose production through mutagenesis of acceptor binding subsite +2 in Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase.

    Sun, Yecheng; Duan, Xuguo; Wang, Lei; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-10

    Maltogenic amylases are used to decrease the maltotriose content of high maltose syrups. However, due to the interplay between the hydrolysis and transglycosylation activities of maltogenic amylases, the maltotriose contents of these syrups are still greater than that necessary for pure maltose preparation. In this study, the maltogenic amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus was engineered to decrease its transglycosylation activity with the expectation that this would enhance maltose production. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate Trp 177 variants W177F, W177Y, W177L, W177N, and W177S. The transglycosylation activities of the mutant enzymes decreased as the hydrophilicity of the residue at position 177 increased. The mutant enzymes exhibited notable enhancements in maltose production, with a minimum of maltotriose contents of 0.2%, compared with 3.2% for the wild-type enzyme. Detailed characterization of the mutant enzymes suggests that the best of them, W177S, will deliver performance superior to that of the wild-type under industrial conditions. PMID:26597712

  20. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of DHNA synthetase from Geobacillus kaustophilus

    DHNA synthetase from G. kaustophilus has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. The aerobic Gram-positive bacterium Geobacillus kaustophilus is a bacillus species that was isolated from deep-sea sediment from the Mariana Trench. 1,4-Dihydroxy-2-naphthoate (DHNA) synthetase plays a vital role in the biosynthesis of menaquinone (vitamin K2) in this bacterium. DHNA synthetase from Geobacillus kaustophilus was crystallized in the orthorhombic space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 77.01, b = 130.66, c = 131.69 Å. The crystal diffracted to a resolution of 2.2 Å. Preliminary studies and molecular-replacement calculations reveal the presence of three monomers in the asymmetric unit

  1. (13)C metabolic flux analysis of the extremely thermophilic, fast growing, xylose-utilizing Geobacillus strain LC300.

    Cordova, Lauren T; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-01-01

    Thermophiles are increasingly used as versatile hosts in the biotechnology industry. One of the key advantages of thermophiles is the potential to achieve high rates of feedstock conversion at elevated temperatures. The recently isolated Geobacillus strain LC300 grows extremely fast on xylose, with a doubling time of less than 30min. In the accompanying paper, the genome of Geobacillus LC300 was sequenced and annotated. In this work, we have experimentally validated the metabolic network model using parallel (13)C-labeling experiments and applied (13)C-metabolic flux analysis to quantify precise metabolic fluxes. Specifically, the complete set of singly labeled xylose tracers, [1-(13)C], [2-(13)C], [3-(13)C], [4-(13)C], and [5-(13)C]xylose, was used for the first time. Isotopic labeling of biomass amino acids was measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Isotopic labeling of carbon dioxide in the off-gas was also measured by an on-line mass spectrometer. The (13)C-labeling data was then rigorously integrated for flux elucidation using the COMPLETE-MFA approach. The results provided important new insights into the metabolism of Geobacillus LC300, its efficient xylose utilization pathways, and the balance between carbon, redox and energy fluxes. The pentose phosphate pathway, glycolysis and TCA cycle were found to be highly active in Geobacillus LC300. The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway was also active and contributed significantly to NADPH production. No transhydrogenase activity was detected. Results from this work provide a solid foundation for future studies of this strain and its metabolic engineering and biotechnological applications. PMID:26100076

  2. The S-layer from Bacillus stearothermophilus DSM 2358 functions as an adhesion site for a high-molecular-weight amylase.

    Egelseer, E; Schocher, I; Sára, M; Sleytr, U B

    1995-01-01

    The S-layer lattice from Bacillus stearothermophilus DSM 2358 completely covers the cell surface and exhibits oblique symmetry. During growth of B. stearothermophilus DSM 2358 on starch medium, three amylases with molecular weights of 58,000, 98,000, and 184,000 were secreted into the culture fluid, but only the high-molecular-weight enzyme was found to be cell associated. Studies of interactions between cell wall components and amylases revealed no affinity of the high-molecular-weight amyla...

  3. Thermostable, alkaline and detergent-tolerant lipase from a newly isolated thermophilic Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Ben Bacha, Abir; Moubayed, Nadine M S; Abid, Islam

    2015-04-01

    Lipases are the enzymes of choice for laundry detergent industries, owing to their triglyceride removing ability from the soiled fabric, which eventually reduces the usage of phosphate-based chemical cleansers in the detergent formulation. In this study, a novel thermo-alkaline lipase-producing strain identified as Bacillus stearothermophilus was isolated from the soil samples of olive oil mill. Enhanced lipase production was observed at 55 degrees C, pH 11 and after 48 h of incubation. Among the substrates tested, xylose (a carbon source), peptone (a nitrogen source) and olive oil at a concentration of 1% were suitable substrates for enhancing lipase production. MgSO4 and Tween-80 were suitable substrates for maximizing lipase production. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity by a single CM-Sephadex column chromatography and revealed molecular mass of 67 kDa. The enzyme (BL1) was active over a wide range of pH from 9.0 to 13.0, with an optimum at pH 11.0, exhibited maximal activity at 55 degreesC and retained more than 70% of its activity after incubation at 70 degrees C or pH 13 for 0.5 h or 24 h, respectively. The enzyme hydrolyzed both short and long-chain triacylglycerols at comparable rates. BL1 was studied in a preliminary evaluation for use in detergent formulation solutions. This novel lipase showed extreme stability towards non-ionic and anionic surfactants after pre-incubation for 1 h at 40 degrees C, and good stability towards oxidizing agents. Additionally, the enzyme showed excellent stability and compatibility with various commercial detergents, suggesting its potential as an additive in detergent formulations. PMID:26118130

  4. Complete genome sequences of Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52, a xylan-degrading strain isolated from obsidian hot spring in Yellowstone National Park.

    Brumm, Phillip; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren J; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Chang, Yun-Juan; Mead, David A

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 was isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA under permit from the National Park Service. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2011 (CP002835). Based on 16S rRNA genes and average nucleotide identity, Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 and the related Geobacillus sp. Y412MC61 appear to be members of a new species of Geobacillus. The genome of Geobacillus sp. Y412MC52 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,628,883 bp, an average G + C content of 52 % and one circular plasmid of 45,057 bp and an average G + C content of 45 %. Y412MC52 possesses arabinan, arabinoglucuronoxylan, and aromatic acid degradation clusters for degradation of hemicellulose from biomass. Transport and utilization clusters are also present for other carbohydrates including starch, cellobiose, and α- and β-galactooligosaccharides. PMID:26500717

  5. Thermophilic fermentation of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol by a novel Geobacillus strain

    Xiao Zijun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetoin and 2,3-butanediol are two important biorefinery platform chemicals. They are currently fermented below 40C using mesophilic strains, but the processes often suffer from bacterial contamination. Results This work reports the isolation and identification of a novel aerobic Geobacillus strain XT15 capable of producing both of these chemicals under elevated temperatures, thus reducing the risk of bacterial contamination. The optimum growth temperature was found to be between 45 and 55C and the medium initial pH to be 8.0. In addition to glucose, galactose, mannitol, arabionose, and xylose were all acceptable substrates, enabling the potential use of cellulosic biomass as the feedstock. XT15 preferred organic nitrogen sources including corn steep liquor powder, a cheap by-product from corn wet-milling. At 55C, 7.7?g/L of acetoin and 14.5?g/L of 2,3-butanediol could be obtained using corn steep liquor powder as a nitrogen source. Thirteen volatile products from the cultivation broth of XT15 were identified by gas chromatographymass spectrometry. Acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, and their derivatives including a novel metabolite 2,3-dihydroxy-3-methylheptan-4-one, accounted for a total of about 96% of all the volatile products. In contrast, organic acids and other products were minor by-products. ?-Acetolactate decarboxylase and acetoin:2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol oxidoreductase in XT15, the two key enzymes in acetoin metabolic pathway, were found to be both moderately thermophilic with the identical optimum temperature of 45C. Conclusions Geobacillus sp. XT15 is the first naturally occurring thermophile excreting acetoin and/or 2,3-butanediol. This work has demonstrated the attractive prospect of developing it as an industrial strain in the thermophilic fermentation of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol with improved anti-contamination performance. The novel metabolites and enzymes identified in XT15 also indicated its strong promise as a precious biological resource. Thermophilic fermentation also offers great prospect for improving its yields and efficiencies. This remains a core aim for future work.

  6. Higher-order structure in the 3'-terminal domain VI of the 23 S ribosomal RNAs from Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus

    Garrett, R A; Christensen, A; Douthwaite, S

    1984-01-01

    An experimental approach was used to determine, and compare, the higher-order structure within domain VI of the 23 S ribosomal RNAs from Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus. This domain, which encompasses approximately 300 nucleotides at the 3' end of the RNAs, consists of two large ...

  7. Crystal structures and ligand binding of PurM proteins from Thermus thermophilus and Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    Kanagawa, Mayumi; Baba, Seiki; Watanabe, Yuzo; Nakagawa, Noriko; Ebihara, Akio; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Sampei, Gen-Ichi; Kawai, Gota

    2016-03-01

    Crystal structures of 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) synthetase, also known as PurM, from Thermus thermophilus (Tt) and Geobacillus kaustophilus (Gk) were determined. For TtPurM, the maximum resolution was 2.2 and the space group was P21212 with four dimers in an asymmetric unit. For GkPurM, the maximum resolution was 2.2 and the space group was P21212 with one monomer in asymmetric unit. The biological unit is dimer for both TtPurM and GkPurM and the dimer structures were similar to previously determined structures of PurM in general. For TtPurM, ?50 residues at the amino terminal were disordered in the crystal structure whereas, for GkPurM, the corresponding region covered the ATP-binding site forming an ? helix in part, suggesting that the N-terminal region of PurM changes its conformation upon binding of ligands. FGAM binding site was predicted by the docking simulation followed by the MD simulation based on the SO4 (2-) binding site found in the crystal structure of TtPurM. PMID:26515187

  8. Gene cloning, expression, and characterization of the Geobacillus Thermoleovorans CCR11 thermoalkaliphilic lipase.

    Quintana-Castro, Rodolfo; Daz, Pilar; Valerio-Alfaro, Gerardo; Garca, Hugo S; Oliart-Ros, Rosamara

    2009-05-01

    The gene for a Geobacillus thermoleovorans CCR11 thermostable lipase was recovered by PCR and cloned. Four genetic constructions were designed and successfully expressed in E. coli: (i) the lipase structural gene (lipCCR11) in the PinPoint Xa vector; (ii) the lipase structural gene (lipACCR11) in the pET-28a(+) vector; (iii) the lipase structural gene minus the signal peptide (lipMatCCR11) in the pET-3b vector; and (iv) the lipase structural gene plus its own promoter (lipProCCR11) in the pGEM-T cloning vector. The lipase gene sequence analysis showed an open reading frame of 1,212 nucleotides coding for a mature lipase of 382 residues (40 kDa) plus a 22 residues signal peptide. Expression under T7 and T7lac promoter resulted in a 40- and 36-fold increase in lipolytic activity with respect to the original strain lipase. All recombinant lipases showed an optimal activity at pH 9.0, but variations were found in the temperature for maximum activity and the substrate specificity among them and when compared with the parental strain lipase, especially in the recombinant lipases that contained fusion tags. Therefore, it is important to find the appropriate expression system able to attain a high concentration of the recombinant lipase without compromising the proper folding of the protein. PMID:19107605

  9. Characteristics of thermostable amylopullulanase of Geobacillus thermoleovorans and its truncated variants.

    Nisha, M; Satyanarayana, T

    2015-05-01

    The far-UV CD spectroscopic analysis of the secondary structure in the temperature range between 30 and 90°C revealed a compact and thermally stable structure of C-terminal truncated amylopullulanase of Geobacillus thermoleovorans NP33 (gt-apuΔC) with a higher melting temperature [58°C] than G. thermoleovorans NP33 amylopullulanase (gt-apu) [50°C] and the N-terminal truncated amylopullulanase from G. thermoleovorans NP33 (gt-apuΔN) [55°C]. A significant decline in random coils in gt-apuΔC and gt-apuΔN suggested an improvement in conformational stability, and thus, an enhancement in their thermal stability. The improvement in the thermostability of gt-apuΔC was corroborated by the thermodynamic parameters for enzyme inactivation. The Trp fluorescence emission (335 nm) and the acrylamide quenching constant (22.69 M(-1)) of gt-apuΔC indicated that the C-terminal truncation increases the conformational stability of the protein with the deeply buried tryptophan residues. The 8-Anilino Naphthalene Sulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence experiments indicated the unfolding of gt-apu to expose its hydrophobic surface to a greater extent than the gt-apuΔC and gt-apuΔN. PMID:25748845

  10. Production of Thermoalkaliphilic Lipase from Geobacillus thermoleovorans DA2 and Application in Leather Industry.

    Abol Fotouh, Deyaa M; Bayoumi, Reda A; Hassan, Mohamed A

    2016-01-01

    Thermophilic and alkaliphilic lipases are meeting a growing global attention as their increased importance in several industrial fields. Over 23 bacterial strains, novel strain with high lipolytic activity was isolated from Southern Sinai, Egypt, and it was identified as Geobacillus thermoleovorans DA2 using 16S rRNA as well as morphological and biochemical features. The lipase was produced in presence of fatty restaurant wastes as an inducing substrate. The optimized conditions for lipase production were recorded to be temperature 60°C, pH 10, and incubation time for 48 hrs. Enzymatic production increased when the organism was grown in a medium containing galactose as carbon source and ammonium phosphate as nitrogen source at concentrations of 1 and 0.5% (w/v), respectively. Moreover, the optimum conditions for lipase production such as substrate concentration, inoculum size, and agitation rate were found to be 10% (w/v), 4% (v/v), and 120 rpm, respectively. The TA lipase with Triton X-100 had the best degreasing agent by lowering the total lipid content to 2.6% as compared to kerosene (7.5%) or the sole crude enzyme (8.9%). It can be concluded that the chemical leather process can be substituted with TA lipase for boosting the quality of leather and reducing the environmental hazards. PMID:26881066

  11. Production, Partial Characterization and Cloning of Thermostable α-amylase of a Thermophile Geobacillus thermoleovorans YN

    Mahmoud M. Berekaa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In a molecular screening program to select a potent thermostable amylase from a previously isolated thermophiles, a locally isolated, thermophilic lipase-producing Geobacillus thermoleovorans YN (accession number AF385083, was shown to secrete a thermostable α-amylase constitutively. The optimal enzyme activity was measured at 75°C, where 90% of the activity was retained at 80°C after one hour of incubation. A catabolite repression due to the addition of glucose to the basal salt medium was demonstrated, while 4 folds increase in volumetric production was achieved in LB and starch-supplemented basal salt media and presented in SDS-PAGE and zymogram. A blunt end PCR fragment (2146 bp was amplified from genomic DNA using a designed set of primers and ligated to Bluescript —II KS(+ vector, transformed to E. coli DH5-α competent cells by electroporation and screened on LB-agar plates induced with IPTG. Nucleotide sequencing of selected clone revealed two ORFs, the first was (GTG with a molecular size 1649 nucleotides encoding 549aa residues of a predicted molecular weight 62.592 kD and the second (ATG with a molecular size 1613 nucleotides encoding 537aa residues of a predicted molecular weight 61.04 kD.

  12. Transglycosylation reactions of Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase with acarbose and various acceptors

    It was observed that Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase cleaved the first glycosidic bond of acarbose to produce glucose and a pseudotrisaccharide (PTS) that was transferred to C-6 of the glucose to give an α-(1-6) glycosidic linkage and the formation of isoacarbose. The addition of a number of different carbohydrates to the digest gave transfer products in which PTS was primarily attached α-(1-6) to d-glucose, d-mannose, d-galactose, and methyl α-d-glucopyranoside. With d-fructopyranose and d-xylopyranose, PTS was linked α-(1-5) and α-(1-4), respectively. PTS was primarily transferred to C-6 of the nonreducing residue of maltose, cellobiose, lactose, and gentiobiose. Lesser amounts of α-(1-3) and/or α-(1-4) transfer products were also observed for these carbohydrate acceptors. The major transfer product to sucrose gave PTS linked α-(1-4) to the glucose residue. α,α-Trehalose gave two major products with PTS linked α-(1-6) and α-(1-4). Maltitol gave two major products with PTS linked α-(1-6) and α-(1-4) to the glucopyranose residue. Raffinose gave two major products with PTS linked α-(1-6) and α-(1-4) to the d-galactopyranose residue. Maltotriose gave two major products with PTS linked α-(1-6) and α-(1-4) to the nonreducing end glucopyranose residue. Xylitol gave PTS linked α-(1-5) as the major product and d-glucitol gave PTS linked α-(1-6) as the only product. The structures of the transfer products were determined using thin layer-chromatography, high-performance ion chromatography, enzyme hydrolysis, methylation analysis and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The best acceptor was gentiobiose, followed closely by maltose and cellobiose, and the weakest acceptor was d-glucitol. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  13. Transglycosylation reactions of Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase with acarbose and various acceptors

    Hwa Park, K.; Jeong Kim, M.; Seob Lee, H.; Kim, D. [Department of Food Science and Technology and Research Center for New Bio-Materials in Agriculture, Seoul National University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Soo Han, N.; Robyt, J.F. [Laboratory for Carbohydrate Chemistry and Enzymology, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States)

    1998-12-15

    It was observed that Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase cleaved the first glycosidic bond of acarbose to produce glucose and a pseudotrisaccharide (PTS) that was transferred to C-6 of the glucose to give an {alpha}-(1-6) glycosidic linkage and the formation of isoacarbose. The addition of a number of different carbohydrates to the digest gave transfer products in which PTS was primarily attached {alpha}-(1-6) to d-glucose, d-mannose, d-galactose, and methyl {alpha}-d-glucopyranoside. With d-fructopyranose and d-xylopyranose, PTS was linked {alpha}-(1-5) and {alpha}-(1-4), respectively. PTS was primarily transferred to C-6 of the nonreducing residue of maltose, cellobiose, lactose, and gentiobiose. Lesser amounts of {alpha}-(1-3) and/or {alpha}-(1-4) transfer products were also observed for these carbohydrate acceptors. The major transfer product to sucrose gave PTS linked {alpha}-(1-4) to the glucose residue. {alpha},{alpha}-Trehalose gave two major products with PTS linked {alpha}-(1-6) and {alpha}-(1-4). Maltitol gave two major products with PTS linked {alpha}-(1-6) and {alpha}-(1-4) to the glucopyranose residue. Raffinose gave two major products with PTS linked {alpha}-(1-6) and {alpha}-(1-4) to the d-galactopyranose residue. Maltotriose gave two major products with PTS linked {alpha}-(1-6) and {alpha}-(1-4) to the nonreducing end glucopyranose residue. Xylitol gave PTS linked {alpha}-(1-5) as the major product and d-glucitol gave PTS linked {alpha}-(1-6) as the only product. The structures of the transfer products were determined using thin layer-chromatography, high-performance ion chromatography, enzyme hydrolysis, methylation analysis and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. The best acceptor was gentiobiose, followed closely by maltose and cellobiose, and the weakest acceptor was d-glucitol. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  14. EFFICACY OF EXTRACTS OF SIX MEDICINAL PLANTS OF INDIA AGAINST SOME PATHOGENIC BACTERIA

    Indranil Bhattacharjee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of the pathogenic multi-drug resistant bacteria (Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus niacini, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Geobacillus thermodenitrificans, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Paenibacillus koreensis, Paenibacillus larvae larvae, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas flourescens, Pseudomonas putida and Staphylocccus aureus was tested against aqueous, acetone and ethanol extracts of mature leaves of Mimosa pudica Linn. (Mimosaceae and Moringa oleifera Lam. (Moringaceae, stems of Michelia champaca Linn. (Magnoliaceae and Musa paradisiaca Linn.(Musaceae, roots of Momordica charantia Linn. (Cucurbitaceae and Murraya koenigii Linn. (Rutaceae by agar well diffusion method. Gatifloxacin was the most effective antibiotic against all the reference bacteria. Though all the extracts were found effective, the ethanol extract showed maximum inhibition against the test microorganisms followed by acetone and aqueous extract. Bacillus niacini is the most resistant bacteria and Klebsiella pneumoniae is the most sensitive bacteria against all the extracts used. MIC values of each bacterium were also determined

  15. Identification of novel thermostable taurine-pyruvate transaminase from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans for chiral amine synthesis.

    Chen, Yujie; Yi, Dong; Jiang, Shuiqin; Wei, Dongzhi

    2016-04-01

    ω-Transaminases (ω-TAs) are one of the most popular candidate enzymes in the biosynthesis of chiral amines. Determination of yet unidentified ω-TAs is important to broaden their potential for synthetic application. Taurine-pyruvate TA (TPTA, EC 2.6.1.77) is an ω-TA belonging to class III of TAs. In this study, we cloned a novel thermostable TPTA from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans (TPTAgth) and overexpressed it in Escherichia coli. The enzyme showed the highest activity at pH 9.0 and 65 °C, with remarkable thermostability and tolerance toward organic solvents. Its K M and v max values for taurine were 5.3 mM and 0.28 μmol s(-1) mg(-1), respectively. Determination of substrate tolerance indicated its broad donor and acceptor ranges for unnatural substrates. Notably, the enzyme showed relatively good activity toward ketoses, suggesting its potential for catalyzing the asymmetric synthesis of chiral amino alcohols. The active site of TPTAgth was identified by performing protein sequence alignment, three-dimensional structure simulation, and coenzyme pyridoxamine phosphate docking. The protein sequence and structure of TPTAgth were similar to those of TAs belonging to the 3N5M subfamily. Its active site was found to be its special large pocket and substrate tunnel. In addition, TPTAgth showed a unique mechanism of sulfonate/α-carboxylate recognition contributed by Arg163 and Gln160. We also determined the protein sequence fingerprint of TPTAs in the 3N5M subfamily, which involved Arg163 and Gln160 and seven additional residues from 413 to 419 and lacked Phe/Tyr22, Phe85, and Arg409. PMID:26577674

  16. Conformational and thermodynamic effects of naturally occurring base methylations in a ribosomal RNA hairpin of Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Heus, H A; Formenoy, L J; Van Knippenberg, P H

    1990-03-10

    The 3'-terminal colicin fragments of 16S ribosomal RNA were isolated from Bacillus stearothermophilus and from its kasugamycin-resistant (ksgA) derivative lacking N6-dimethylation of the two adjacent adenosines in a hairpin loop. The fragment from the ksgA strain still contains a naturally occurring N2-methylguanosine in the loop. An RNA molecule resembling the B. stearothermophilus colicin fragment but without modified nucleosides was synthesized in vitro using a DNA template and bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Proton-NMR spectra of the RNAs were recorded at 500 MHz. The imino-proton resonances of base-paired G and U residues could be assigned on the basis of previous NMR studies of the colicin fragment of Escherichia coli and by a combination of methylation-induced shifts and thermal melting of base pairs. The assignments were partly confirmed by NOE measurements. Adenosine dimethylation in the loop has a distinct conformational effect on the base pairs adjoining the loop. The thermal denaturation melting curve of the enzymatically synthesized RNA fragment was also determined and the transition midpoint (tm) was found to be 73 degrees C at 15 mM Na+. A comparison with previously determined thermodynamic parameters for various colicin fragments demonstrates that base methylations in the loop lead to a relatively strong destabilization of the hairpin helix. In terms of free energy the positive contribution of the methylations are in the order of the deletion of one base pair from the stem. Other data show that recently published free-energy parameters do not apply for certain RNA hairpins. PMID:1690648

  17. Characterization of a thermostable raw-starch hydrolyzing α-amylase from deep-sea thermophile Geobacillus sp.

    Jiang, Tao; Cai, Menghao; Huang, Mengmeng; He, Hao; Lu, Jian; Zhou, Xiangshan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-10-01

    A deep-sea thermophile, Geobacillus sp. 4j, was identified to grow on starch and produce thermostable amylase. N-terminally truncated form of Geobacillus sp. 4j α-amylase (Gs4j-amyA) was fused at its N-terminal end with the signal peptide of outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of Escherichia coli. The enzyme was over-expressed in E. coli BL21 with a maximum extracellular production of 130U/ml in shake flask. The yield of the transformant increased 22-fold as compared with that of the wild strain. The recombinant enzyme purified to apparent homogeneity by metal-affinity chromatography, exhibited a molecular mass of 62kDa. It displayed the maximal activity at 60-65°C and pH 5.5. Its half-life (t1/2) at 80°C was 4.25h with a temperature deactivation energy of 166.3kJ/mol. Compared to three commonly used commercial α-amylases, the Gs4j-amyA exhibited similar thermostable performance to BLA but better than BAA and BSA. It also showed a universally efficient raw starch hydrolysis performance superior to commercial α-amylases at an acidic pH approaching nature of starch slurry. As a new acidic-resistant thermostable α-amylase, it has the potential to bypass the industrial gelatinization step in raw starch hydrolysis. PMID:26073094

  18. Methanotrophic bacteria.

    Hanson, R. S.; Hanson, T E

    1996-01-01

    Methane-utilizing bacteria (methanotrophs) are a diverse group of gram-negative bacteria that are related to other members of the Proteobacteria. These bacteria are classified into three groups based on the pathways used for assimilation of formaldehyde, the major source of cell carbon, and other physiological and morphological features. The type I and type X methanotrophs are found within the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria and employ the ribulose monophosphate pathway for formaldehy...

  19. Improving the thermostability and enhancing the Ca(2+) binding of the maltohexaose-forming α-amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Li, Zhu; Duan, Xuguo; Wu, Jing

    2016-03-20

    The thermostability of the maltohexaose-forming α-amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (AmyMH) without added Ca(2+) was improved through structure-based rational design in this study. Through comparison of a homologous model structure of AmyMH with the crystal structure of the thermostable α-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis, Ser242, which located at the beginning of fourth α-helix of the central (β/α)8 barrel was selected for mutation to improve thermostability. In addition, an amide-containing side chain (Asn193) and a loop in domain B (ΔIG mutation), which have been proven to be important for thermostability in corresponding position of other α-amylases, were also investigated. Five mutants carrying the mutations ΔIG, N193F, S242A, ΔIG/N193F, and ΔIG/N193F/S242A were generated and their proteins characterized. The most thermostable mutant protein, ΔIG/N193F/S242A, exhibited a 26-fold improvement in half-life at 95°C compared to the wild-type enzyme without added Ca(2+). Mutant ΔIG/N193F/S242A also exhibited substantially better activity and stability in the presence of the chelator EDTA, demonstrating enhanced Ca(2+) binding. These results suggest that mutant ΔIG/N193F/S242A has potential for use in the industrial liquefaction of starch. PMID:26869314

  20. Combined impact of Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic alpha-amylase and surfactants on starch pasting and gelation properties.

    Van Steertegem, Bénédicte; Pareyt, Bram; Brijs, Kristof; Delcour, Jan A

    2013-08-15

    In baking applications involving starch gelatinisation, surfactants such as sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL) and monoacylglycerols (MAG) and Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic alpha-amylase (BStA) can be used jointly. We here showed that SSL but not MAG delays wheat starch hydrolysis by BStA. The effects were explained in terms of different degrees of adsorption of the surfactants on the starch granule surface, retarded and/or decreased water uptake and delayed availability of gelatinised starch for hydrolysis by BStA. Additional experiments with waxy maize starch led to the conclusion that SSL impacts swelling power and carbohydrate leaching more by covering the starch granule surface than by forming amylose-lipid complexes. SSL postponed starch hydrolysis by BStA, but this did not influence subsequent starch gelation. Finally, when adding SSL or MAG on top of BStA to starch suspensions, the effect of the surfactants on gel strength predominated over that of BStA. PMID:23561216

  1. Modification of ascorbic acid using transglycosylation activity of Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase to enhance its oxidative stability.

    Bae, Hee-Kyung; Lee, Soo-Bok; Park, Cheon-Seok; Shim, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Hye-Young; Kim, Myo-Jeong; Baek, Jin-Sook; Roh, Hoe-Jin; Choi, Jin-Hwan; Choe, Eun-Ok; Ahn, Dong-Uk; Park, Kwan-Hwa

    2002-05-22

    Ascorbic acid (1), a natural antioxidant, was modified by employing transglycosylation activity of Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase with maltotriose and acarbose as donor molecules to enhance its oxidative stability. The transglycosylation reaction with maltotriose as donor created mono- and di-glycosyl transfer products with an alpha-(1,6)-glycosidic linkage. In addition, two acarviosine-glucosyl transfer products were generated when transglycosylation was performed with acarbose as a donor. All transfer products were observed by TLC and HPLC, and purified by Q-sepharose anion exchange and Biogel P-2 gel permeation chromatographies. LC/MS and (13)C NMR analyses revealed that the structures of the transfer products were 6-O-alpha-D-glucosyl- (2) and 6-O-alpha-D-maltosyl-ascorbic acids (3) in the reaction of maltotriose, and 6-O-alpha-acarviosine-D-glucosyl- (4) and 2-O-alpha-acarviosine-D-glucosyl ascorbic acids (5) in the reaction of acarbose. The stability of the transglycosylated ascorbic acid derivatives was greatly enhanced against oxidation by Cu(2+) ion and ascorbate oxidase. Among them, compound 3 proved to be the most stable against in vitro oxidation. The antioxidant effects of glycosyl-derivatives of ascorbic acid on the lipid oxidation in cooked chicken breast meat patties indicated that they had antioxidant activities similar to that of ascorbic acid. It is suggested that the transglycosylated ascorbic acids can possibly be applied as effective antioxidants with improved stability in food, cosmetic, and other applications. PMID:12010003

  2. [The suitability of commercial bioindicators with spores of B. stearothermophilus for the testing of formaldehyde gas sterilizers].

    Mecke, P; Christiansen, B; Pirk, A

    1991-09-01

    Commercially available biological indicators with spores of B. stearothermophilus were investigated by the Hygiene-Institutes of Kiel and Lubeck. The objective was to find out if those indicators to which sheep blood was added subsequently correspond to the formaldehyde resistance required by. DIN 58948, part 14 (DIN 58948, part 13). Both working groups determined unanimously that the indicators of one producer showed a resistance too low compared to the remaining biological indicators showing a much higher resistance than required. Even biological indicators manufactured strictly in accordance to the testing standard were more resistant than demanded. This also corresponded to the commercially available untreated spores. On the other hand, practice showed that the biological indicators investigated within this study can be easily killed by formaldehyde sterilizers if they respond to the technical standard. In order to realize the testing of these sterilizers with indicators of a generally accepted resistance we propose either to demand for an equivalently higher formaldehyde resistance or to set up a killing period for the spore resistance from 150 to 240 min until experimentally important data are available. Concerning the blood containing indicators the results of both working groups differed considerably within the limits of formaldehyde efficiency whereas this was not the case with untested commercially available spores. As the addition of thinned blood did not cause an increase in resistance we recommend, in the interest of standardized investigative conditions, not to use it. PMID:1953931

  3. Genotyping of Present-Day and Historical Geobacillus Species Isolates from Milk Powders by High-Resolution Melt Analysis of Multiple Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Loci

    Seale, R. Brent; Dhakal, Rajat; Chauhan, Kanika; Craven, Heather M.; Deeth, Hilton C.; Pillidge, Christopher J.; Powell, Ian B.; Mark S. Turner

    2012-01-01

    Spores of thermophilic Geobacillus species are a common contaminant of milk powder worldwide due to their ability to form biofilms within processing plants. Genotyping methods can provide information regarding the source and monitoring of contamination. A new genotyping method was developed based on multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) in conjunction with high-resolution melt analysis (MLV-HRMA) and compared to the currently used method, randomized amplified polymor...

  4. Complete genome sequence of Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93, a novel biomass degrader isolated from obsidian hot spring in Yellowstone National Park

    Brumm, Phillip J; Land, Miriam L; Mead, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius C56-YS93 was one of several thermophilic organisms isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA under permit from the National Park Service. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences confirmed the classification of the strain as a G. thermoglucosidasius species. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2011 (CP002835). The genome of G. thermoglucosidasius C56...

  5. Isolation and complete genome sequence of the thermophilic Geobacillus sp. 12AMOR1 from an Arctic deep-sea hydrothermal vent site.

    Wissuwa, Juliane; Stokke, Runar; Fedøy, Anita-Elin; Lian, Kjersti; Smalås, Arne Oskar; Steen, Ida Helene

    2016-01-01

    Members of the genus Geobacillus have been isolated from a wide variety of habitats worldwide and are the subject for targeted enzyme utilization in various industrial applications. Here we report the isolation and complete genome sequence of the thermophilic starch-degrading Geobacillus sp. 12AMOR1. The strain 12AMOR1 was isolated from deep-sea hot sediment at the Jan Mayen hydrothermal Vent Site. Geobacillus sp. 12AMOR1 consists of a 3,410,035 bp circular chromosome and a 32,689 bp plasmid with a G + C content of 52 % and 47 %, respectively. The genome comprises 3323 protein-coding genes, 88 tRNA species and 10 rRNA operons. The isolate grows on a suite of sugars, complex polysaccharides and proteinous carbon sources. Accordingly, a versatility of genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZy) and peptidases were identified in the genome. Expression, purification and characterization of an enzyme of the glycoside hydrolase family 13 revealed a starch-degrading capacity and high thermal stability with a melting temperature of 76.4 °C. Altogether, the data obtained point to a new isolate from a marine hydrothermal vent with a large bioprospecting potential. PMID:26913091

  6. The S-Layer Proteins of Two Bacillus stearothermophilus Wild-Type Strains Are Bound via Their N-Terminal Region to a Secondary Cell Wall Polymer of Identical Chemical Composition

    Egelseer, Eva Maria; Leitner, Karl; Jarosch, Marina; Hotzy, Christoph; Zayni, Sonja; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit

    1998-01-01

    Two Bacillus stearothermophilus wild-type strains were investigated regarding a common recognition and binding mechanism between the S-layer protein and the underlying cell envelope layer. The S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 has a molecular weight of 130,000 and assembles into a hexagonally ordered lattice. The S-layer from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 shows oblique lattice symmetry and is composed of subunits with a molecular weight of 122,000. Immunoblotting, peptide mapping, N-terminal sequencing of the whole S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 and of proteolytic cleavage fragments, and comparison with the S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 revealed that the two S-layer proteins have identical N-terminal regions but no other extended structurally homologous domains. In contrast to the heterogeneity observed for the S-layer proteins, the secondary cell wall polymer isolated from peptidoglycan-containing sacculi of the different strains showed identical chemical compositions and comparable molecular weights. The S-layer proteins could bind and recrystallize into the appropriate lattice type on native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi from both organisms but not on those extracted with hydrofluoric acid, leading to peptidoglycan of the A1γ chemotype. Affinity studies showed that only proteolytic cleavage fragments possessing the complete N terminus of the mature S-layer proteins recognized native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi as binding sites or could associate with the isolated secondary cell wall polymer, while proteolytic cleavage fragments missing the N-terminal region remained unbound. From the results obtained in this study, it can be concluded that S-layer proteins from B. stearothermophilus wild-type strains possess an identical N-terminal region which is responsible for anchoring the S-layer subunits to a secondary cell wall polymer of identical chemical composition. PMID:9515918

  7. Big bacteria

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria......, Thiomargarita namibiensis, with a diameter of 750 mum. All bacteria, including those that swim around in the environment, obtain their food molecules by molecular diffusion. Only the fastest and largest swimmers known, Thiovulum majus, are able to significantly increase their food supply by motility and by...... actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria, the...

  8. A chimeric α-amylase engineered from Bacillus acidicola and Geobacillus thermoleovorans with improved thermostability and catalytic efficiency.

    Parashar, Deepak; Satyanarayana, T

    2016-04-01

    The α-amylase (Ba-amy) of Bacillus acidicola was fused with DNA fragments encoding partial N- and C-terminal region of thermostable α-amylase gene of Geobacillus thermoleovorans (Gt-amy). The chimeric enzyme (Ba-Gt-amy) expressed in Escherichia coli displays marked increase in catalytic efficiency [K cat: 4 × 10(4) s(-1) and K cat/K m: 5 × 10(4) mL(-1) mg(-1) s(-1)] and higher thermostability than Ba-amy. The melting temperature (T m) of Ba-Gt-amy (73.8 °C) is also higher than Ba-amy (62 °C), and the CD spectrum analysis revealed the stability of the former, despite minor alteration in secondary structure. Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic analysis suggests that the adsorption of Ba-Gt-amy onto raw starch is more favourable than Ba-amy. Ba-Gt-amy is thus a suitable biocatalyst for raw starch saccharification at sub-gelatinization temperatures because of its acid stability, thermostability and Ca(2+) independence, and better than the other known bacterial acidic α-amylases. PMID:26790418

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Novel Denitrifying Bacterium Geobacillus sp. SG-01 Strain from Wood Chips Composted with Swine Manure.

    Yang, Seung-Hak; Cho, Jin-Kook; Lee, Soon-Youl; Abanto, Oliver D; Kim, Soo-Ki; Ghosh, Chiranjit; Lim, Joung-Soo; Hwang, Seong-Gu

    2013-11-01

    Nitrate contamination in ground and surface water is an increasingly serious environmental problem and only a few bacterial strains have been identified that have the ability to remove nitrogen pollutants from wastewater under thermophilic conditions. We therefore isolated thermophilic facultative bacterial strains from wood chips that had been composted with swine manure under aerated high temperature conditions so as to identify strains with denitrifying ability. Nine different colonies were screened and 3 long rod-shaped bacterial strains designated as SG-01, SG-02, and SG-03 were selected. The strain SG-01 could be differentiated from SG-02 and SG-03 on the basis of the method that it used for sugar utilization. The 16S rRNA genes of this strain also had high sequence similarity with Geobacillus thermodenitrificans 465(T) (99.6%). The optimal growth temperatures (55C), pH values (pH 7.0), and NaCl concentrations (1%) required for the growth of strain SG-01 were established. This strain reduced 1.18 mM nitrate and 1.45 mM nitrite in LB broth after 48 h of incubation. These results suggest that the G. thermodenitrificans SG-01 strain may be useful in the removal of nitrates and nitrites from wastewater generated as a result of livestock farming. PMID:25049754

  10. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the BseCI DNA methyltransferase from Bacillus stearothermophilus in complex with its cognate DNA

    The DNA methyltransferase M.BseCI from B. stearothermophilus was crystallized as a complex with its cognate DNA. Crystals belong to space group P6 and diffract to 2.5 Å resolution at a synchrotron source. The DNA methyltransferase M.BseCI from Bacillus stearothermophilus (EC 2.1.1.72), a 579-amino-acid enzyme, methylates the N6 atom of the 3′ adenine in the sequence 5′-ATCGAT-3′. M.BseCI was crystallized in complex with its cognate DNA. The crystals were found to belong to the hexagonal space group P6, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 87.0, c = 156.1 Å, β = 120.0° and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Two complete data sets were collected at wavelengths of 1.1 and 2.0 Å to 2.5 and 2.8 Å resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation at 100 K

  11. Immobilization in the presence of Triton X-100: modifications in activity and thermostability of Geobacillus thermoleovorans CCR11 lipase.

    Snchez-Otero, M Guadalupe; Valerio-Alfaro, Gerardo; Garca-Galindo, Hugo S; Oliart-Ros, Rosa Mara

    2008-12-01

    A partially purified lipase produced by the thermophile Geobacillus thermoleovorans CCR11 was immobilized by adsorption on porous polypropylene (Accurel EP-100) in the presence and absence of 0.1% Triton X-100. Lipase production was induced in a 2.5% high oleic safflower oil medium and the enzyme was partially purified by diafiltration (co. 500,000 Da). Immobilization conditions were established at 25 degrees C, pH 6, and a protein concentration of 0.9 mg/mL in the presence and absence of 0.1% Triton X-100. Immobilization increased enzyme thermostability but there was no change in neither the optimum pH nor in pH resistance irrelevant to the presence of the detergent during immobilization. Immobilization with or without Triton X-100 allowed the reuse of the lipase preparation for 11 and 8 cycles, respectively. There was a significant difference between residual activity of immobilized and soluble enzyme after 36 days of storage at 4 degrees C (P < 0.05). With respect to chain length specificity, the immobilized lipase showed less activity over short chain esters than the soluble lipase. The immobilized lipase showed good resistance to desorption with phosphate buffer and NaCl; minor loses with detergents were observed (less than 50% with Triton X-100 and Tween-80), but activity was completely lost with SDS. Immobilization of G. thermoleovorans CCR11 lipase in porous polypropylene is a simple and easy method to obtain a biocatalyst with increased stability, improved performance, with the possibility for re-use, and therefore an interesting potential use in commercial conditions. PMID:18704528

  12. Analysis of Metabolic Pathways and Fluxes in a Newly Discovered Thermophilic and Ethanol-Tolerant Geobacillus Strain

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Sapra, Rajat; Joyner, Dominique; Hazen, Terry C.; Myers, Samuel; Reichmuth, David; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-01-20

    A recently discovered thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius M10EXG, ferments a range of C5 (e.g., xylose) and C6 sugars (e.g., glucose) and istolerant to high ethanol concentrations (10percent, v/v). We have investigated the central metabolism of this bacterium using both in vitro enzyme assays and 13C-based flux analysis to provide insights into the physiological properties of this extremophile and explore its metabolism for bio-ethanol or other bioprocess applications. Our findings show that glucose metabolism in G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG proceeds via glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the TCA cycle; the Entner?Doudoroff pathway and transhydrogenase activity were not detected. Anaplerotic reactions (including the glyoxylate shunt, pyruvate carboxylase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) were active, but fluxes through those pathways could not be accuratelydetermined using amino acid labeling. When growth conditions were switched from aerobic to micro-aerobic conditions, fluxes (based on a normalized glucose uptake rate of 100 units (g DCW)-1 h-1) through the TCA cycle and oxidative pentose phosphate pathway were reduced from 64+-3 to 25+-2 and from 30+-2 to 19+-2, respectively. The carbon flux under micro-aerobic growth was directed formate. Under fully anerobic conditions, G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG used a mixed acid fermentation process and exhibited a maximum ethanol yield of 0.38+-0.07 mol mol-1 glucose. In silico flux balance modeling demonstrates that lactate and acetate production from G. thermoglucosidasius M10EXG reduces the maximum ethanol yieldby approximately threefold, thus indicating that both pathways should be modified to maximize ethanol production.

  13. Rumen bacteria

    The rumen is the most extensively studied gut community and is characterized by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interactions. This complex, mixed microbial culture is comprised of prokaryote organisms including methane-producing archaebacteria, eukaryote organisms, such as ciliate and flagellate protozoa, anaerobic phycomycete fungi and bacteriophage. Bacteria are predominant (up to 1011 viable cells per g comprising 200 species) but a variety of ciliate protozoa occur widely (104-106/g distributed over 25 genera). The anaerobic fungi are also widely distributed (zoospore population densities of 102-104/g distributed over 5 genera). The occurrence of bacteriophage is well documented (107-109 particles/g). This section focuses primarily on the widely used methods for the cultivation and the enumeration of rumen microbes, especially bacteria, which grow under anaerobic conditions. Methods that can be used to measure hydrolytic enzymes (cellulases, xylanases, amylases and proteinases) are also described, along with cell harvesting and fractionation procedures. Brief reference is also made to fungi and protozoa, but detailed explanations for culturing and enumerating these microbes is presented in Chapters 2.4 and 2.5

  14. Abiotic and microbiotic factors controlling biofilm formation by thermophilic sporeformers.

    Zhao, Yu; Caspers, Martien P M; Metselaar, Karin I; de Boer, Paulo; Roeselers, Guus; Moezelaar, Roy; Nierop Groot, Masja; Montijn, Roy C; Abee, Tjakko; Kort, Remco

    2013-09-01

    One of the major concerns in the production of dairy concentrates is the risk of contamination by heat-resistant spores from thermophilic bacteria. In order to acquire more insight in the composition of microbial communities occurring in the dairy concentrate industry, a bar-coded 16S amplicon sequencing analysis was carried out on milk, final products, and fouling samples taken from dairy concentrate production lines. The analysis of these samples revealed the presence of DNA from a broad range of bacterial taxa, including a majority of mesophiles and a minority of (thermophilic) spore-forming bacteria. Enrichments of fouling samples at 55°C showed the accumulation of predominantly Brevibacillus and Bacillus, whereas enrichments at 65°C led to the accumulation of Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus species. Bacterial population analysis of biofilms grown using fouling samples as an inoculum indicated that both Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus preferentially form biofilms on surfaces at air-liquid interfaces rather than on submerged surfaces. Three of the most potent biofilm-forming strains isolated from the dairy factory industrial samples, including Geobacillus thermoglucosidans, Geobacillus stearothermophilus, and Anoxybacillus flavithermus, have been characterized in detail with respect to their growth conditions and spore resistance. Strikingly, Geobacillus thermoglucosidans, which forms the most thermostable spores of these three species, is not able to grow in dairy intermediates as a pure culture but appears to be dependent for growth on other spoilage organisms present, probably as a result of their proteolytic activity. These results underscore the importance of abiotic and microbiotic factors in niche colonization in dairy factories, where the presence of thermophilic sporeformers can affect the quality of end products. PMID:23851093

  15. Enzymatic reactions and synthesis of n-butyl caproate: esterification, transesterification and aminolysis using a recombinant lipase from Geobacillus thermoleovorans CCR11.

    Snchez-Otero, M Guadalupe; Quintana-Castro, Rodolfo; Mora-Gonzlez, Paola C; Mrquez-Molina, Ofelia; Valerio-Alfaro, Gerardo; Oliart-Ros, Rosamara

    2010-09-01

    The recombinant lipase LipMatCCR11 from the thermophilic strain Geobacillus thermoleovorans CCR11 was applied in the synthesis of n-butyl caproate via transesterification in hexane and xylene. The short chain flavour ester was obtained by alcoholysis from ethyl caproate and n-butyl alcohol and acidolysis from n-butyl butyrate and caproic acid. This enzyme was also used in the condensation reaction from caproic acid and n-butanol. The conversion percentages at equilibrium (Xe) were similar to those obtained with Candida antarctica lipase fraction B (CAL-B) in the same reaction conditions, while lower conversion velocities (k) were attained. LipMatCCR11 reached high conversion percentages in either hexane or xylene as organic media (> 63%); the enzyme was also able to catalyze the aminolysis reaction of ethyl caproate with benzyl amine in hexane obtaining a conversion percentage > 62%. PMID:20718292

  16. Mechanistic Diversity in the RuBisCO Superfamily: The Enolase in the Methionine Salvage Pathway in Geobacillus kaustophilus

    D-Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), the most abundant enzyme, is the paradigm member of the recently recognized mechanistically diverse RuBisCO superfamily. The RuBisCO reaction is initiated by abstraction of the proton from C3 of the D-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate substrate by a carbamate oxygen of carboxylated Lys 201 (spinach enzyme). Heterofunctional homologues of RuBisCO found in species of Bacilli catalyze the tautomerization ('enolization') of 2,3-diketo-5-methylthiopentane 1-phosphate (DK-MTP 1-P) in the methionine salvage pathway in which 5-methylthio-D-ribose (MTR) derived from 5'-methylthioadenosine is converted to methionine (Ashida, H., Saito, Y., Kojima, C., Kobayashi, K., Ogasawara, N., and Yokota, A. (2003) A functional link between RuBisCO-like protein of Bacillus and photosynthetic RuBisCO, Science 302, 286-290]. The reaction catalyzed by this 'enolase' is accomplished by abstraction of a proton from C1 of the DK-MTP 1-P substrate to form the tautomerized product, a conjugated enol. Because the RuBisCO- and 'enolase'-catalyzed reactions differ in the regiochemistry of proton abstraction but are expected to share stabilization of an enolate anion intermediate by coordination to an active site Mg2+, we sought to establish structure-function relationships for the 'enolase' reaction so that the structural basis for the functional diversity could be established. We determined the stereochemical course of the reaction catalyzed by the 'enolases' from Bacillus subtilis and Geobacillus kaustophilus. Using stereospecifically deuterated samples of an alternate substrate derived from D-ribose (5-OH group instead of the 5-methylthio group in MTR) as well as of the natural DK-MTP 1-P substrate, we determined that the 'enolase'-catalyzed reaction involves abstraction of the 1-proS proton. We also determined the structure of the activated 'enolase' from G. kaustophilus (carboxylated on Lys 173) liganded with Mg2+ and 2,3-diketohexane 1-phosphate, a stable alternate substrate. The stereospecificity of proton abstraction restricts the location of the general base to the N-terminal α+ β domain instead of the C-terminal (β/α)8-barrel domain that contains the carboxylated Lys 173. Lys 98 in the N-terminal domain, conserved in all 'enolases', is positioned to abstract the 1-proS proton. Consistent with this proposed function, the K98A mutant of the G. kaustophilus 'enolase' is unable to catalyze the 'enolase' reaction. Thus, we conclude that this functionally divergent member of the RuBisCO superfamily uses the same structural strategy as RuBisCO for stabilizing the enolate anion intermediate, i.e., coordination to an essential Mg2+, but the proton abstraction is catalyzed by a different general base

  17. Back To Bacteria.

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores new research about bacteria. Discusses bacterial genomes, archaea, unusual environments, evolution, pathogens, bacterial movement, biofilms, bacteria in the body, and a bacterial obsession. Contains 29 references. (JRH)

  18. Cellular viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultivated in association with contaminates bacteria of alcoholic fermentation

    The aim of this work was to study the influence of the bacteria Bacillus and Lactobacillus, as well as their metabolic products, in reduction of cellular viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, when in mixed culture of yeast and active and treated bacteria. Also was to evaluated an alternative medium (MCC) for the cultivation of bacteria and yeast, constituted of sugarcane juice diluted to 5 deg Brix and supplemented with yeast extract and peptone. The bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus plantarum were cultivated in association with yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain Y-904) for 72 h on 32 deg C, under agitation. The cellular viability, budding rate and population of S. cerevisiae, the total acidity, volatile acidity and pH of culture were determined from 0, 24, 48 e 72 h of mixed culture. Also were determined the initial and final of microorganism population across the pour plate method, in traditional culture medium (PCA for Bacillus, MRS-agar for Lactobacillus and YEPD-agar for yeast S. cerevisiae) and in medium constituted of sugarcane juice. The bacteria cultures were treated by heat sterilization (120 deg C for 20 minutes), antibacterial agent (Kamoran HJ in concentration 3,0 ppm) or irradiation (radiation gamma, with doses of 5,0 kGy for Lactobacillus and 15,0 kGy for Bacillus). The results of the present research showed that just the culture mediums more acids (with higher concentrations of total and volatile acidity, and smaller values of pH), contaminated with active bacteria L. fermentum and B. subtilis, caused reduction on yeast cellular viability. Except the bacteria B. subtilis treated with radiation, the others bacteria treated by different procedures (heat, radiation e antibacterial) did not cause reduction on yeast cellular viability and population, indicating that the isolated presence of the cellular metabolic of theses bacteria was not enough to reduce the percentage of the yeast live cells and a density population. For all microorganisms, the counts obtained with the cultivation medium constituted of sugarcane juice were similar obtained in traditional mediums, probably because the alternative medium simulate the composition of sugarcane must, that the bacteria were isolated in industrial process of ethanol yield. However, the culture medium constituted of sugarcane juice could be replacing traditional culture mediums of yeast and bacteria tested in this work. (author)

  19. Stereospecific production of the herbicide phosphinothricin (glufosinate): purification of aspartate transaminase from Bacillus stearothermophilus, cloning of the corresponding gene, aspC, and application in a coupled transaminase process.

    Bartsch, K; Schneider, R.; Schulz, A.

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized an aspartate transaminase (glutamate:oxalacetate transaminase, EC 2.6.1.1) from the thermophilic microorganism Bacillus stearothermophilus. The purified enzyme has a molecular mass of 40.5 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel analysis, a temperature optimum of 95 degrees C, and a pH optimum of 8.0. The corresponding gene, aspC, was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant glutamate:oxalacetate transaminase protein was used in immobilized fo...

  20. Identification of Two Binding Domains, One for Peptidoglycan and Another for a Secondary Cell Wall Polymer, on the N-Terminal Part of the S-Layer Protein SbsB from Bacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2

    Sára, Margit; Egelseer, Eva M.; Dekitsch, Christine; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    1998-01-01

    First studies on the structure-function relationship of the S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p2 revealed the coexistence of two binding domains on its N-terminal part, one for peptidoglycan and another for a secondary cell wall polymer (SCWP). The peptidoglycan binding domain is located between amino acids 1 to 138 of the mature S-layer protein comprising a typical S-layer homologous domain. The SCWP binding domain lies between amino acids 240 to 331 and possesses a high serine plus glycine content. PMID:9852032

  1. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase PheB from Bacillus stearothermophilus BR219

    PheB, an extradiol-cleaving catecholic dioxygenase, was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 4000 as a precipitant. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic system, space group P212121, and diffracts to 2.3 Å resolution. Class II extradiol-cleaving catecholic dioxygenase, a key enzyme of aromatic compound degradation in bacteria, cleaves the aromatic ring of catechol by adding two O atoms. PheB is one of the class II extradiol-cleaving catecholic dioxygenases and shows a high substrate specificity for catechol derivatives, which have one aromatic ring. In order to reveal the mechanism of the substrate specificity of PheB, PheB has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 4000 as a precipitant. The space group of the obtained crystal was P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 65.5, b = 119.2, c = 158.7 Å. The crystal diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution

  2. Identificacin de genes codificantes de enzimas de inters industrial en una cepa de bacteria termoflica aislada de aguas termanles de Salta (Argentina

    Navas, L.E.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Se aislaron dos bacterias termoflicas a partir de aguas termales de la provincia de Salta, Argentina. Estudios filogenticos permitieron caracterizar los aislamientos como pertenecientes a los gneros Thermus y Geobacillus. Se determin la secuencia nucleotdica parcial del genoma de Thermus sp. 2.9 con un equipo de secuenciacin masiva de ADN de tecnologa Roche 454. Se generaron 215.557 lecturas que proveen una cobertura aproximada de 40 veces el tamao del genoma. Se realiz un anlisis preliminar de las secuencias obtenidas para la identificacin de regiones codificantes. Mediante el mismo se identificaron y caracterizaron genes que codifican enzimas utilizadas en procesos de transformacin de alimentos y relacionadas con la degradacin de polmeros, tales como xilanasas, proteasas, esterasas, lipasas, catalasas y galactosidasas. Este primer paso indica que este microorganismo es un potencial productor de enzimas termoflicas que podran ser aplicadas en la industria alimentaria.

  3. Indigenous cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic bacteria enhanced rapid co-composting of lignocellulose oil palm empty fruit bunch with palm oil mill effluent anaerobic sludge.

    Zainudin, Mohd Huzairi Mohd; Hassan, Mohd Ali; Tokura, Mitsunori; Shirai, Yoshihito

    2013-11-01

    The composting of lignocellulosic oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) with continuous addition of palm oil mill (POME) anaerobic sludge which contained nutrients and indigenous microbes was studied. In comparison to the conventional OPEFB composting which took 60-90 days, the rapid composting in this study can be completed in 40 days with final C/N ratio of 12.4 and nitrogen (2.5%), phosphorus (1.4%), and potassium (2.8%), respectively. Twenty-seven cellulolytic bacterial strains of which 23 strains were closely related to Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus firmus, Thermobifida fusca, Thermomonospora spp., Cellulomonas sp., Ureibacillus thermosphaericus, Paenibacillus barengoltzii, Paenibacillus campinasensis, Geobacillus thermodenitrificans, Pseudoxanthomonas byssovorax which were known as lignocellulose degrading bacteria and commonly involved in lignocellulose degradation. Four isolated strains related to Exiguobacterium acetylicum and Rhizobium sp., with cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic activities. The rapid composting period achieved in this study can thus be attributed to the naturally occurring cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic strains identified. PMID:24012093

  4. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds Posted April 2, 2014 Your ... hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health ...

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a thermostable glycoside hydrolase family 43 β-xylosidase from Geobacillus thermoleovorans IT-08

    The β-xylosidase was crystallized using PEG 6000 as precipitant. 5% PEG 6000 yielded bipyramid-shaped tetragonal crystals diffracting to 1.55 Å resolution, and 13% PEG 6000 gave rectangular monoclinic crystals diffracting to 1.80 Å resolution. The main enzymes involved in xylan-backbone hydrolysis are endo-1,4-β-xylanase and β-xylosidase. β-Xylosidase converts the xylo-oligosaccharides produced by endo-1,4-β-xylanase into xylose monomers. The β-xylosidase from the thermophilic Geobacillus thermoleovorans IT-08, a member of glycoside hydrolase family 43, was crystallized at room temperature using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Two crystal forms were observed. Bipyramid-shaped crystals belonging to space group P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 62.53, c = 277.4 Å diffracted to 1.55 Å resolution. The rectangular crystals belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 57.94, b = 142.1, c = 153.9 Å, β = 90.5°, and diffracted to 1.80 Å resolution

  6. Improving production of hyperthermostable and high maltose-forming alpha-amylase by an extreme thermophile Geobacillus thermoleovorans using response surface methodology and its applications.

    Uma Maheswar Rao, J L; Satyanarayana, T

    2007-01-01

    By cultivating Geobacillus thermoleovorans in shake flasks containing cane molasses medium at 70 degrees C, the fermentation variables were optimized by 'one variable at a time' approach followed by response surface methodology (RSM). The statistical model was obtained by central composite design (CCD) using three variables (cane-molasses, urea and inoculum density). An overall 1.6- and 2.1-fold increase in enzyme production was achieved in the optimized medium in shake flasks and fermenter, respectively. The alpha-amylase titre increased significantly in cane-molasses medium (60 U ml(-1)) as compared to that in the synthetic medium (26 U ml(-1)). Thus the cost of enzyme produced in cane molasses medium (0.823 euros per million U) was much lower than that produced in the synthetic starch-yeast extract-tryptone medium (18.52 euros per million U). The shelf life of bread was improved by supplementing dough with alpha-amylase, and thus, the enzyme was found to be useful in preventing the staling of bread. Reducing sugars liberated from 20% and 30% raw pearl millet starch were fermented to ethanol; ethanol production levels attained were 35.40 and 28.0 g l(-1), respectively. PMID:16473003

  7. Gene Cloning and Characterization of the Geobacillus thermoleovorans CCR11 Carboxylesterase CaesCCR11, a New Member of Family XV.

    Espinosa-Luna, Graciela; Sánchez-Otero, María Guadalupe; Quintana-Castro, Rodolfo; Matus-Toledo, Rodrigo Eloir; Oliart-Ros, Rosa María

    2016-01-01

    A gene encoding a carboxylesterase produced by Geobacillus thermoleovoras CCR11 was cloned in the pET-3b cloning vector, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). Gene sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 750 bp that encodes a polypeptide of 250 amino acid residues (27.3 kDa) named CaesCCR11. The enzyme showed its maximum activity at 50 °C and pH 5-8, with preference for C4 substrates, confirming its esterase nature. It displayed good resistance to temperature, pH, and the presence of organic solvents and detergents, that makes this enzyme biotechnologically applicable in the industries such as fine and oleo-chemicals, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, organic synthesis, biodiesel production, detergents, and food industries. A 3D model of CaesCCR11 was predicted using the Bacillus sp. monoacyl glycerol lipase bMGL H-257 structure as template (PBD code 3RM3, 99 % residue identity with CaesCCR11). Based on its canonical α/β hydrolase fold composed of 7 β-strands and 6 α-helices, the α/β architecture of the cap domain, the GLSTG pentapeptide, and the formation of distinctive salt bridges, we are proposing CaesCCR11 as a new member of family XV of lipolytic enzymes. PMID:26603441

  8. The role of N1 domain on the activity, stability, substrate specificity and raw starch binding of amylopullulanase of the extreme thermophile Geobacillus thermoleovorans.

    Nisha, M; Satyanarayana, T

    2015-07-01

    In order to understand the role of N1 domain (1-257 aa) in the amylopullulanase (gt-apu) of the extremely thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus thermoleovorans NP33, N1 deletion construct (gt-apuΔN) has been generated and expressed in Escherichia coli. The truncated amylopullulanase (gt-apuΔN) exhibits similar pH and temperature optima like gt-apu, but enhanced thermostability. The gt-apuΔN has greater hydrolytic action and specific activity on pullulan than gt-apu. The k cat (starch and pullulan) and K m (starch) values of gt-apuΔN increased, while K m (pullulan) decreased. The enzyme upon N1 deletion hydrolyzed maltotetraose as the smallest substrate in contrast to maltopentaose of gt-apu. The role of N1 domain of gt-apu in raw starch binding has been confirmed, for the first time, based on deletion and Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics. Furthermore, N1 domain appears to exert a negative influence on the thermostability of gt-apu because N1 truncation significantly improves thermostability. PMID:25573470

  9. Characterization of recombinant amylopullulanase (gt-apu) and truncated amylopullulanase (gt-apuT) of the extreme thermophile Geobacillus thermoleovorans NP33 and their action in starch saccharification.

    Nisha, M; Satyanarayana, T

    2013-07-01

    A gene encoding amylopullulanase (gt-apu) of the extremely thermophilic Geobacillus thermoleovorans NP33 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene has an open reading frame of 4,965 bp that encodes a protein of 1,655 amino acids with molecular mass of 182 kDa. The six conserved regions, characteristic of GH13 family, have been detected in gt-apu. The recombinant enzyme has only one active site for α-amylase and pullulanase activities based on the enzyme kinetic analyses in a system that contains starch as well as pullulan as competing substrates and response to inhibitors. The end-product analysis confirmed that this is an endoacting enzyme. The specific enzyme activities for α-amylase and pullulanase of the truncated amylopullulanase (gt-apuT) are higher than gt-apu. Both enzymes exhibited similar temperature (60 °C) and pH (7.0) optima, although gt-apuT possessed a higher thermostability than gt-apu. The overall catalytic efficiency (K(cat)/K(m)) of gt-apuT is greater than that of gt-apu, with almost similar substrate specificities. The C-terminal region of gt-apu appeared to be non-essential, and furthermore, it negatively affects the substrate binding and stability of the enzyme. PMID:23132347

  10. Identificacin de genes codificantes de enzimas de inters industrial en una cepa de bacteria termoflica aislada de aguas termales de Salta (Argentina)

    L.E, Navas; A.F, Amado; I, Fuxan; R.O, Zandomeni.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Se aislaron dos bacterias termoflicas a partir de aguas termales de la provincia de Salta, Argentina. Estudios filogenticos permitieron caracterizar los aislamientos como pertenecientes a los gneros Thermus y Geobacillus. Se determin la secuencia nucleotdica parcial del genoma de Thermus sp. 2. [...] 9 con un equipo de secuenciacin masiva de ADN de tecnologa Roche 454. Se generaron 215.557 lecturas que proveen una cobertura aproximada de 40 veces el tamao del genoma. Se realiz un anlisis preliminar de las secuencias obtenidas para la identificacin de regiones codificantes. Mediante el mismo se identificaron y caracterizaron genes que codifican enzimas utilizadas en procesos de transformacin de alimentos y relacionadas con la degradacin de polmeros, tales como xilanasas, proteasas, esterasas, lipasas, catalasas y galactosidasas. Este primer paso indica que este microorganismo es un potencial productor de enzimas termoflicas que podran ser aplicadas en la industria alimentaria. Abstract in english Two thermophilic bacteria were isolated from a hot spring in Salta, northwest Argentina. Phylogenic analysis indicates that the isolates belong to the Thermus and Geobacillus genera. We have undertaken the DNA sequencing of the complete genome from the isolate Thermus sp. 2.9 using Roche 454 technol [...] ogy. Two hundred and fifteen thousand readings were obtained providing approximately 40 fold coverage of the genome. A first round of analysis of the contigs was made to identify proteins coded in the genome. We report the identification and characterization of several genes coding for enzymes related to the degradation of polymers such as xylanases, proteases, esterases, lipases, catalase and galactosidases. These enzymes may be useful in processes to transform commodities from agriculture and valuable tools in the food industry.

  11. [Isolation of functional bacteria guided by PCR-DGGE technology from high temperature petroleum reservoirs].

    Wang, Jun; Ma, Ting; Liu, Jing; Liu, Qing-kun; Zhao, Ling-xia; Liang, Feng-lai; Liu, Ru-lin

    2008-02-01

    It is a brand-new method to isolate functional bacteria from high temperature petroleum reservoirs according to the sequence information obtained from PCR-DGGE patterns. Three-set primers of 16S rDNA high variable region, V3, V8, V9, were compared. The results showed that more microbial diversity information could be obtained from the PCR product of V9 region. Sequence analysis indicated that the dominant bacteria in the petroleum reservoir had high sequence similarity with bacteria from alpha, beta, gamma-Proteobacterias and Bacilli from the GenBank database. According to the sequences information, multi-cultivation technology including enrichment cultivation, special cultivation and direct cultivation methods were employed, and finally, five strains (three strains by traditional methods) were isolated from oil-water samples. Among them, three thermophilic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, which belonged to Bacillus sp., Geobacillus sp. and Petrobacter sp., respectively, could grow well under 55 degrees C in obligate anaerobic condition. The crude oil could be utilized by these strains with the degradation rate of 56.5%, 70.01% and 31.78% respectively along with the viscosity reduction rate of 40%, 54.55% and 29.09%, meanwhile the solidify points of crude oil were reduced by 3.7, 5.2 and 3.1 degrees C. Therefore, the combination of sequence information from PCR-DGGE and altering cultivation conditions is an available novel method to isolate more functional microorganisms which could be utilized for microbial enhanced oil recovery. PMID:18613521

  12. P but not R-axis interface is involved in cooperative binding of NAD on tetrameric phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Roitel, Olivier; Vachette, Patrice; Azza, Said; Branlant, Guy

    2003-03-01

    Homotetrameric phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from Bacillus stearothermophilus can be described as a dimer of dimers with three non-equivalent P, R, and Q interfaces. In our previous study, negative cooperativity in NAD binding to wild-type GAPDH was interpreted according to the induced-fit model in terms of two independent dimers with two interacting binding sites in each dimer. Two dimeric mutant GAPDHs, i.e. Y46G/S48G and D186G/E276G, were shown to exhibit positive cooperativity in NAD binding. Based on the molecular modeling of the substitutions and the fact that the most extensive inter-subunit interactions are formed across the P-axis interface of the tetramer, it was postulated that both dimeric mutant GAPDHs were of O-P type. Therefore, the P-axis interface was assumed to play a major role in causing cooperativity in NAD binding.Here, two other mutant GAPDHs, Y46G/R52G and D282G, have been studied. Using small angle X-ray scattering, the dimeric form of the D282G mutant GAPDH is shown to be of O-R type whereas both dimeric mutant GAPDHs Y46G/R52G and Y46G/S48G are of O-P type. Similarly to dimeric Y46G/S48G mutant GAPDH, the dimeric Y46G/R52G mutant GAPDH exhibits positive cooperativity in NAD binding. On the other hand, no significant cooperativity in NAD binding to the dimeric form of the D282G mutant GAPDH is observed, whereas its tetrameric counterpart exhibits negative cooperativity, similarly to the wild-type enzyme. Altogether, the results support the view that the P-axis interface is essential in causing cooperativity in NAD binding by transmitting the structural information induced upon cofactor binding from one subunit to the other one within O-P/Q-R dimers in contrast to the R-axis interface, which does not transmit structural information within O-R/Q-P dimers. The absence of activity of O-P and O-R dimer GAPDHs is the consequence of a pertubation of the conformation of the active site, at least of the nicotinamide subsite, as evidenced by the absence of an ion pair between catalytic residues C149 and H176 and the greater accessibility of C149 to a thiol kinetic probe. PMID:12595262

  13. Influence of the Secondary Cell Wall Polymer on the Reassembly, Recrystallization, and Stability Properties of the S-Layer Protein from Bacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2

    Sára, Margit; Dekitsch, Christine; Mayer, Harald F.; Egelseer, Eva M.; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    1998-01-01

    The high-molecular-weight secondary cell wall polymer (SCWP) from Bacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2 is mainly composed of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) and is involved in anchoring the S-layer protein via its N-terminal region to the rigid cell wall layer. In addition to this binding function, the SCWP was found to inhibit the formation of self-assembly products during dialysis of the guanidine hydrochloride (GHCl)-extracted S-layer protein. The degree of assembly (DA; percent assembled from total S-layer protein) that could be achieved strongly depended on the amount of SCWP added to the GHCl-extracted S-layer protein and decreased from 90 to 10% when the concentration of the SCWP was increased from 10 to 120 μg/mg of S-layer protein. The SCWP kept the S-layer protein in the water-soluble state and favored its recrystallization on solid supports such as poly-l-lysine-coated electron microscopy grids. Derived from the orientation of the base vectors of the oblique S-layer lattice, the subunits had bound with their charge-neutral outer face, leaving the N-terminal region with the polymer binding domain exposed to the ambient environment. From cell wall fragments about half of the S-layer protein could be extracted with 1 M GlcNAc, indicating that the linkage type between the S-layer protein and the SCWP could be related to that of the lectin-polysaccharide type. Interestingly, GlcNAc had an effect on the in vitro self-assembly and recrystallization properties of the S-layer protein that was similar to that of the isolated SCWP. The SCWP generally enhanced the stability of the S-layer protein against endoproteinase Glu-C attack and specifically protected a potential cleavage site in position 138 of the mature S-layer protein. PMID:9696762

  14. Darwin y las bacterias Darwin and bacteria

    Walter Ledermann D

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Con motivo de cumplirse 200 años del natalicio de Darwin y 150 desde la publicación de El Origen de las Especies, se revisa su obra buscando alguna mención de las bacterias, a las cuales el gran naturalista parece, o bien no haber conocido, algo muy difícil en un momento en que causaban sensación en el mundo científico, o bien haber ignorado deliberadamente, porque no encontraba para ellas lugar en su teoría de la evolución. Las bacterias, por su parte, afectaron malamente su vida familiar, falleciendo uno de sus hijos de escarlatina y su hija favorita, Arme, de una tuberculosis agravada por el mismo mal que mató a su hermano. El propio Darwin, desde el regreso del Beagle afectado por una enfermedad crónica hasta ahora no dilucidada, podría haber sufrido de la enfermedad de Chagas, cuyo agente etiológico, si bien no es una bacteria, tiene un similar nivel en la escala evolutiva.As in 2009 the scientific world celebrates two hundreds years from the birthday of Charles Darwin and one hundred and fifty from the publication of The Origin of Species, an analysis of his complete work is performed, looking for any mention of bacteria. But it seems that the great naturahst never took knowledge about its existence, something rather improbable in a time when the discovery of bacteria shook the medical world, or he deliberately ignored them, not finding a place for such microscopic beings into his theory of evolution. But the bacteria badly affected his familiar life, killing scarlet fever one of his children and worsening to death the evolution of tuberculosis of his favourite Annie. Darwin himself could suffer the sickness of Chagas, whose etiological agent has a similar level to bacteria in the scale of evolution.

  15. Cellular viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultivated in association with contaminates bacteria of alcoholic fermentation;Viabilidade celular de Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultivada em associacao com bacterias contaminantes da fermentacao alcoolica

    Nobre, Thais de Paula

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the influence of the bacteria Bacillus and Lactobacillus, as well as their metabolic products, in reduction of cellular viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, when in mixed culture of yeast and active and treated bacteria. Also was to evaluated an alternative medium (MCC) for the cultivation of bacteria and yeast, constituted of sugarcane juice diluted to 5 deg Brix and supplemented with yeast extract and peptone. The bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus plantarum were cultivated in association with yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain Y-904) for 72 h on 32 deg C, under agitation. The cellular viability, budding rate and population of S. cerevisiae, the total acidity, volatile acidity and pH of culture were determined from 0, 24, 48 e 72 h of mixed culture. Also were determined the initial and final of microorganism population across the pour plate method, in traditional culture medium (PCA for Bacillus, MRS-agar for Lactobacillus and YEPD-agar for yeast S. cerevisiae) and in medium constituted of sugarcane juice. The bacteria cultures were treated by heat sterilization (120 deg C for 20 minutes), antibacterial agent (Kamoran HJ in concentration 3,0 ppm) or irradiation (radiation gamma, with doses of 5,0 kGy for Lactobacillus and 15,0 kGy for Bacillus). The results of the present research showed that just the culture mediums more acids (with higher concentrations of total and volatile acidity, and smaller values of pH), contaminated with active bacteria L. fermentum and B. subtilis, caused reduction on yeast cellular viability. Except the bacteria B. subtilis treated with radiation, the others bacteria treated by different procedures (heat, radiation e antibacterial) did not cause reduction on yeast cellular viability and population, indicating that the isolated presence of the cellular metabolic of theses bacteria was not enough to reduce the percentage of the yeast live cells and a density population. For all microorganisms, the counts obtained with the cultivation medium constituted of sugarcane juice were similar obtained in traditional mediums, probably because the alternative medium simulate the composition of sugarcane must, that the bacteria were isolated in industrial process of ethanol yield. However, the culture medium constituted of sugarcane juice could be replacing traditional culture mediums of yeast and bacteria tested in this work. (author)

  16. Improvement of Thermal Stability via Outer-Loop Ion Pair Interaction of Mutated T1 Lipase from Geobacillus zalihae Strain T1

    Mahiran Basri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutant D311E and K344R were constructed using site-directed mutagenesis to introduce an additional ion pair at the inter-loop and the intra-loop, respectively, to determine the effect of ion pairs on the stability of T1 lipase isolated from Geobacillus zalihae. A series of purification steps was applied, and the pure lipases of T1, D311E and K344R were obtained. The wild-type and mutant lipases were analyzed using circular dichroism. The Tm for T1 lipase, D311E lipase and K344R lipase were approximately 68.52 °C, 70.59 °C and 68.54 °C, respectively. Mutation at D311 increases the stability of T1 lipase and exhibited higher Tm as compared to the wild-type and K344R. Based on the above, D311E lipase was chosen for further study. D311E lipase was successfully crystallized using the sitting drop vapor diffusion method. The crystal was diffracted at 2.1 Å using an in-house X-ray beam and belonged to the monoclinic space group C2 with the unit cell parameters a = 117.32 Å, b = 81.16 Å and c = 100.14 Å. Structural analysis showed the existence of an additional ion pair around E311 in the structure of D311E. The additional ion pair in D311E may regulate the stability of this mutant lipase at high temperatures as predicted in silico and spectroscopically.

  17. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the ATP-binding subunit of an ABC transporter from Geobacillus kaustophilus

    An ABC transporter from G. kaustophilus has been crystallized in space group I222. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.60 Å resolution. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, also known as traffic ATPases, form a large family of integral membrane proteins responsible for the translocation of a variety of chemically diverse substrates across the lipid bilayers of cellular membranes of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes by the hydrolysis of ATP. The ATP-binding subunit of an ABC transporter from Geobacillus kaustophilus, a homodimeric enzyme, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Crystals were obtained using the microbatch-under-oil method at 291 K. X-ray diffraction data to 1.6 Å resolution were collected on SPring-8 beamline BL26B1. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.94, b = 78.63, c = 112.96 Å. Assuming the presence of a dimer in the asymmetric unit gave a crystal volume per protein weight (VM) of 2.32 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 47%; this was consistent with the results of a dynamic light-scattering experiment, which showed a dimeric state of the protein in solution. Molecular-replacement trials using the crystal structure of HisP from the Salmonella typhimurium ATP-binding subunit of an ABC transporter as a search model did not provide a satisfactory solution, indicating that the two ATP-binding subunits of ABC transporters have substantially different structures

  18. Learning Chemistry from Bacteria

    Clardy, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Jon Clardy Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Harvard University All animals, including humans, originated and evolved on a planet already teeming with bacteria, and the two kingdoms of life have been competing and cooperating through their joint history. Although bacteria are most familiar as pathogens, some bacteria produce small molecules that are essential for the biology of animals and other eukaryotes. This lecture explores some of...

  19. Species Numbers in Bacteria

    Dykhuizen, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    A modified biological species definition (BSD), i.e., that bacteria exchange genes within a species, but not usually between species, is shown to apply to bacteria. The formal definition of bacterial species, which is more conservative than the modified BSD, is framed in terms of DNA hybridization. From this I estimate there are a million species of bacteria in 30 grams of rich forest topsoil and propose that there will be at least a billion species worldwide.

  20. Chemical communication among bacteria

    Taga, Michiko E; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2003-01-01

    Cellcell communication in bacteria is accomplished through the exchange of chemical signal molecules called autoinducers. This process, called quorum sensing, allows bacteria to monitor their environment for the presence of other bacteria and to respond to fluctuations in the number and/or species present by altering particular behaviors. Most quorum-sensing systems are species- or group-specific, which presumably prevents confusion in mixed-species environments. However, some quorum-sensing...

  1. Multidrug Resistance in Bacteria

    Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Large amounts of antibiotics used for human therapy, as well as for farm animals and even for fish in aquaculture, resulted in the selection of pathogenic bacteria resistant to multiple drugs. Multidrug resistance in bacteria may be generated by one of two mechanisms. First, these bacteria may accumulate multiple genes, each coding for resistance to a single drug, within a single cell. This accumulation occurs typically on resistance (R) plasmids. Second, multidrug resistance may also occur b...

  2. Interspecies communication in bacteria

    Federle, Michael J.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2003-01-01

    Until recently, bacteria were considered to live rather asocial, reclusive lives. New research shows that, in fact, bacteria have elaborate chemical signaling systems that enable them to communicate within and between species. One signal, termed AI-2, appears to be universal and facilitates interspecies communication. Many processes, including virulence factor production, biofilm formation, and motility, are controlled by AI-2. Strategies that interfere with communication in bacteria are bein...

  3. Phylogenomics of Oceanic Bacteria

    Viklund, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this thesis has been the phylogenomics and evolution of the Alphaproteobacteria. This is a very diverse group which encompasses bacteria from intraceullar parasites, such as the Rickettsiales, to freeliving bacteria such as the most abundant bacteria on earth, the SAR11. The genome sizes of the Alphaproteobacteria range between 1 Mb and 10 Mb. This group is also connected to the origin of the mitochondria. Several studies have placed the SAR11 clade together with the Rickettsiale...

  4. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  5. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria

    Yurkov, Vladimir V.; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a relatively recently discovered bacterial group. Although taxonomically and phylogenetically heterogeneous, these bacteria share the following distinguishing features: the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into reaction center and light-harvesting complexes, low levels of the photosynthetic unit in cells, an abundance of carotenoids, a strong inhibition by light of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, and the inability to grow photosynt...

  6. Making soy sauce from defatted soybean meal without the mejus process by submerged cultivation using thermophilic bacteria.

    Hur, Jeong Min; Park, Doo Hyun

    2015-08-01

    The diversity of thermophilic bacteria was not significantly altered while growing in a defatted soybean meal (DFSM) slurry at 60C for 10, 20, and 30days. Five species of thermophilic bacteria, which belong to the genera Aeribacillus (temperature gradient gel electrophoresis [TGGE] band no. 1), Saccharococcus (TGGE band no. 2), Geobacillus (TGGE band no. 3), Bacillus (TGGE band no. 4), and Anoxybacillus (TGGE band no. 5), were detected in the fermenting DFSM slurry. The cell-free culture fluid obtained from the fermenting DFSM slurry on day 14 hydrolyzed starch and soy protein at 60C but not at 30C. Soy sauce (test soy sauce) was prepared from the fermented DFSM slurry after a 30day cultivation at 60C and a 60day ripening at 45C. Free amino acid (AA) and organic acid contents in the soy sauce increased in proportion to the fermentation period, whereas ammonium decreased proportionally. Mg and Ca contained in the soy sauce decreased proportionally during fermentation and were lower than those in the non-fermented DFSM extract (control). Spectral absorbance of soy sauce prepared from the fermented DFSM slurry was maximal at 430nm and increased slightly in proportion to the fermentation period. The aroma and flavor of the test soy sauce were significantly different from those of traditional Korean soy sauce. Conclusively, soy sauce may be prepared directly from the fermented DFSM slurry without meju-preparing process and fermentation period may be a factor for control of soy sauce quality. PMID:26243923

  7. Inactivation of biofilm bacteria.

    LeChevallier, M. W.; Cawthon, C D; Lee, R. G.

    1988-01-01

    The current project was developed to examine inactivation of biofilm bacteria and to characterize the interaction of biocides with pipe surfaces. Unattached bacteria were quite susceptible to the variety of disinfectants tested. Viable bacterial counts were reduced 99% by exposure to 0.08 mg of hypochlorous acid (pH 7.0) per liter (1 to 2 degrees C) for 1 min. For monochloramine, 94 mg/liter was required to kill 99% of the bacteria within 1 min. These results were consistent with those found ...

  8. A modeling study by response surface methodology and artificial neural network on culture parameters optimization for thermostable lipase production from a newly isolated thermophilic Geobacillus sp. strain ARM

    Basri Mahiran

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thermostable bacterial lipases occupy a place of prominence among biocatalysts owing to their novel, multifold applications and resistance to high temperature and other operational conditions. The capability of lipases to catalyze a variety of novel reactions in both aqueous and nonaqueous media presents a fascinating field for research, creating interest to isolate novel lipase producers and optimize lipase production. The most important stages in a biological process are modeling and optimization to improve a system and increase the efficiency of the process without increasing the cost. Results Different production media were tested for lipase production by a newly isolated thermophilic Geobacillus sp. strain ARM (DSM 21496 = NCIMB 41583. The maximum production was obtained in the presence of peptone and yeast extract as organic nitrogen sources, olive oil as carbon source and lipase production inducer, sodium and calcium as metal ions, and gum arabic as emulsifier and lipase production inducer. The best models for optimization of culture parameters were achieved by multilayer full feedforward incremental back propagation network and modified response surface model using backward elimination, where the optimum condition was: growth temperature (52.3°C, medium volume (50 ml, inoculum size (1%, agitation rate (static condition, incubation period (24 h and initial pH (5.8. The experimental lipase activity was 0.47 Uml-1 at optimum condition (4.7-fold increase, which compared well to the maximum predicted values by ANN (0.47 Uml-1 and RSM (0.476 Uml-1, whereas R2 and AAD were determined as 0.989 and 0.059% for ANN, and 0.95 and 0.078% for RSM respectively. Conclusion Lipase production is the result of a synergistic combination of effective parameters interactions. These parameters are in equilibrium and the change of one parameter can be compensated by changes of other parameters to give the same results. Though both RSM and ANN models provided good quality predictions in this study, yet the ANN showed a clear superiority over RSM for both data fitting and estimation capabilities. On the other hand, ANN has the disadvantage of requiring large amounts of training data in comparison with RSM. This problem was solved by using statistical experimental design, to reduce the number of experiments.

  9. Indicator For Pseudomonas Bacteria

    Margalit, Ruth

    1990-01-01

    Characteristic protein extracted and detected. Natural protein marker found in Pseudomonas bacteria. Azurin, protein containing copper readily extracted, purified, and used to prepare antibodies. Possible to develop simple, fast, and accurate test for marker carried out in doctor's office.

  10. Extracellular communication in bacteria

    Chhabra, S.R.; Philipp, B.; Eberl, L.; Givskov, Michael Christian; Williams, P.; Camara, M.

    molecules, in different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria they control pathogenicity, secondary metabolite production, biofilm differentiation, DNA transfer and bioluminescence. The development of biosensors for the detection of these signal molecules has greatly facilitated their subsequent chemical...

  11. Bacteria-surface interactions

    Tuson, Hannah H.; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of bacteria with surfaces has important implications in a range of areas, including bioenergy, biofouling, biofilm formation, and the infection of plants and animals. Many of the interactions of bacteria with surfaces produce changes in the expression of genes that influence cell morphology and behavior, including genes essential for motility and surface attachment. Despite the attention that these phenotypes have garnered, the bacterial systems used for sensing an...

  12. Oil eating bacteria

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The article discusses the unusual technology of using oil-eating bacteria to increase oil recovery. The background for the discovery that bacteria injection into the reservoirs may increase the oil recovery is the study of microbial action in breaking down oil pollution. About 20 per cent of the organisms living naturally in the sea can eat oil. But they need water to grow. In the absence of water, the bacteria produce enzymes to make the oil water soluble and allow them to extract nutrients from them. Oil does not vanish upon being eaten, but enzymes from the digestive process act as effective detergents to wash away the oil, which is then easier to recover.

  13. Immunity to intracellular bacteria

    Stefan H. E. Kaufmann; Follows, George A.; Martin E. Munik

    1992-01-01

    Immunity to intracellular bacteria including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacterium leprae, and Listeria monocytogenes depends on specific T cells. Evidence to be described suggests that CD4 (alpha/beta)T cells which interact with each other and with macrophages contribute to acquired resistence against as well as pathogenesis of intracellular bacterial infections.

  14. Immunity to intracellular bacteria

    Stefan H. E. Kaufmann

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunity to intracellular bacteria including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacterium leprae, and Listeria monocytogenes depends on specific T cells. Evidence to be described suggests that CD4 (alpha/betaT cells which interact with each other and with macrophages contribute to acquired resistence against as well as pathogenesis of intracellular bacterial infections.

  15. Communication among oral bacteria.

    Kolenbrander, Paul E; Andersen, Roxanna N; Blehert, David S; Egland, Paul G; Foster, Jamie S; Palmer, Robert J

    2002-09-01

    Human oral bacteria interact with their environment by attaching to surfaces and establishing mixed-species communities. As each bacterial cell attaches, it forms a new surface to which other cells can adhere. Adherence and community development are spatiotemporal; such order requires communication. The discovery of soluble signals, such as autoinducer-2, that may be exchanged within multispecies communities to convey information between organisms has emerged as a new research direction. Direct-contact signals, such as adhesins and receptors, that elicit changes in gene expression after cell-cell contact and biofilm growth are also an active research area. Considering that the majority of oral bacteria are organized in dense three-dimensional biofilms on teeth, confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled probes provide valuable approaches for investigating the architecture of these organized communities in situ. Oral biofilms are readily accessible to microbiologists and are excellent model systems for studies of microbial communication. One attractive model system is a saliva-coated flowcell with oral bacterial biofilms growing on saliva as the sole nutrient source; an intergeneric mutualism is discussed. Several oral bacterial species are amenable to genetic manipulation for molecular characterization of communication both among bacteria and between bacteria and the host. A successful search for genes critical for mixed-species community organization will be accomplished only when it is conducted with mixed-species communities. PMID:12209001

  16. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  17. Networking Opportunities for Bacteria

    Dwyer, Daniel J.; Kohanski, Michael A; James J Collins

    2008-01-01

    In this post-genomic era, our capacity to explore biological networks and predict network architectures has been greatly expanded, accelerating interest in systems biology. Here, we highlight recent systems biology studies in bacteria, consider the challenges ahead, and suggest opportunities for future studies in bacterial models.

  18. Water-related environments: a multistep procedure to assess the diversity and enzymatic properties of cultivable bacteria.

    Grivalsk, Tom; Bu?kov, Maria; Pukrov, Andrea; Krakov, Lucia; Pangallo, Domenico

    2016-03-01

    Studying the culturable portion of environmental bacterial populations is valuable for understanding the ecology, for discovering taxonomically interesting isolates and for exploiting their enzymatic abilities. In this study, diverse water-related samples, iced water (3C) from river, the sediment (29C) and water (55C) of a hot-spring, were investigated by two cultivation strategies, Dry and novel Wet approach. The isolates were clustered by fluorescent internal transcribed spacer PCR and identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. Several bacterial groups were also sub-typed through the application of Random Amplified Microsatellite Polymorphisms method. A broad enzymatic screening of all bacterial isolates was performed in order to assess the proteolytic, cellulolytic, lipolytic, esterolytic, amylolytic properties, as well as catalase and peroxidase activities. The Wet cultivation demonstrated to be suitable for the isolation of potential new species belonging to genera Massilia, Algoriphagus, Rheinheimera and Pandoraea. Valuable microbial resources with extensive enzymatic activities were recognized among the psychrophilic (Pantoea brenneri and Serratia sp.), mesophilic (Pandoraea, Massilia, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Bacillus and Aeromonas) and thermophilic bacteria (Aeribacullus pallidus and Geobacillus kaustophilus). The experimental strategy developed in this study includes simple investigation tools able to reveal the genetic and enzymatic peculiarities of isolated microorganisms. It can be applied to different kinds of aquatic samples and extreme environments similar to those described in this study. PMID:26873553

  19. Can bacteria save the planet?

    Hunter, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria might just hold the key to preserving the environment for our great grandchildren. Philip Hunter explores some of the novel ways in which systems biology and biotechnology are harnessing bacteria to produce renewable energy and clean up pollution.

  20. Enzyme-induced covalent modification of methionyl-tRNA synthetase from Bacillus stearothermophilus by methionyl-adenylate: identification of the labeled amino acid residues by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry.

    Hountondji, C; Beauvallet, C; Pernollet, J C; Blanquet, S

    2000-10-01

    Methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS) from Bacillus stearothermophilus was shown to undergo covalent methionylation by a donor methionyl-adenylate, the mixed carboxylic-phosphoric acid anhydride synthesized by the enzyme itself. Covalent reaction of methionyl-adenylate with the synthetase or other proteins proceeds through the formation of an isopeptide bond between the carboxylate of the amino acid and the epsilon-NH2 group of lysyl residues. The stoichiometries of labeling, as followed by TCA precipitation, were 2.2 +/- 0.1 and 4.3 +/- 0.1 mol of [14C]Met incorporated by 1 mol of the monomeric MS534 and the native dimeric species of B. stearo methionyl-tRNA synthetase, respectively. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry designated lysines-261, -295, -301 and -528 (or -534) of truncated methionyl-tRNA synthetase as the target residues for covalent binding of methionine. By analogy with the 3D structure of the monomeric M547 species of E. coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase, lysines-261, -295, and -301 would be located in the catalytic crevice of the thermostable enzyme where methionine activation and transfer take place. It is proposed that, once activated by ATP, most of the methionine molecules react with the closest reactive lysyl residues. PMID:11233169

  1. Exopolysaccharides from marine bacteria

    Chi, Zhenming; Fang, Yan

    2005-01-01

    Microbial polysaccharides represent a class of important products of growing interest for many sectors of industry. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in isolating new exopolysaccharides (EPSs)-producing bacteria from marine environments, particularly from various extreme marine environments. Many new marine microbial EPSs with novel chemical compositions, properties and structures have been found to have potential applications in fields such as adhesives, textiles, Pharmaceuticals and medicine for anti-cancer, food additives, oil recovery and metal removal in mining and industrial waste treatments, etc This paper gives a brief summary of the information about the EPSs produced by marine bacteria, including their chemical compositions, properties and structures, together with their potential applications in industry.

  2. Individuality in bacteria.

    Davidson, Carla J; Surette, Michael G

    2008-01-01

    While traditionally microbiologists have examined bacterial behavior averaged over large populations, increasingly we are becoming aware that bacterial populations can be composed of phenotypically diverse individuals generated by a variety of mechanisms. Though the results of different mechanisms, the phenomena of bistability, persistence, variation in chemotactic response, and phase and antigenic variation are all strategies to develop population-level diversity. The understanding of individuality in bacteria requires an appreciation of their environmental and ecological context, and thus evolutionary theory regarding adaptations to time-variable environments is becoming more applicable to these problems. In particular, the application of game and information theory to bacterial individuality has addressed some interesting problems of bacterial behavior. In this review we discuss the mechanisms of generating population-level variability, and the application of evolutionary theory to problems of individuality in bacteria. PMID:18652543

  3. Lipoprotein sorting in bacteria.

    Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytoplasm and processed into mature forms on the cytoplasmic membrane. A lipid moiety attached to the N terminus anchors these proteins to the membrane surface. Many bacteria are predicted to express more than 100 lipoproteins, which play diverse functions on the cell surface. The Lol system, composed of five proteins, catalyzes the localization of Escherichia coli lipoproteins to the outer membrane. Some lipoproteins play vital roles in the sorting of other lipoproteins, lipopolysaccharides, and ?-barrel proteins to the outer membrane. On the basis of results from biochemical, genetic, and structural studies, we discuss the biogenesis of lipoproteins in bacteria, their importance in cellular functions, and the molecular mechanisms underlying efficient sorting of hydrophobic lipoproteins to the outer membrane through the hydrophilic periplasm. PMID:21663440

  4. Manufacture of Probiotic Bacteria

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for many years as natural biopreservatives in fermented foods. A small group of LAB are also believed to have beneficial health effects on the host, so called probiotic bacteria. Probiotics have emerged from the niche industry from Asia into European and American markets. Functional foods are one of the fastest growing markets today, with estimated growth to 20 billion dollars worldwide by 2010 (GIA, 2008). The increasing demand for probiotics and the new food markets where probiotics are introduced, challenges the industry to produce high quantities of probiotic cultures in a viable and stable form. Dried concentrated probiotic cultures are the most convenient form for incorporation into functional foods, given the ease of storage, handling and transport, especially for shelf-stable functional products. This chapter will discuss various aspects of the challenges associated with the manufacturing of probiotic cultures.

  5. Bacteria, Phages and Septicemia

    Gaidelytė, Aušra; Vaara, Martti; Bamford, Dennis H

    2007-01-01

    The use of phages is an attractive option to battle antibiotic resistant bacteria in certain bacterial infections, but the role of phage ecology in bacterial infections is obscure. Here we surveyed the phage ecology in septicemia, the most severe type of bacterial infection. We observed that the majority of the bacterial isolates from septicemia patients spontaneously secreted phages active against other isolates of the same bacterial strain, but not to the strain causing the disease. Such ph...

  6. Communication among Oral Bacteria

    Kolenbrander, Paul E.; Andersen, Roxanna N.; Blehert, David S.; Egland, Paul G.; Jamie S. Foster; Palmer, Robert J

    2002-01-01

    Human oral bacteria interact with their environment by attaching to surfaces and establishing mixed-species communities. As each bacterial cell attaches, it forms a new surface to which other cells can adhere. Adherence and community development are spatiotemporal; such order requires communication. The discovery of soluble signals, such as autoinducer-2, that may be exchanged within multispecies communities to convey information between organisms has emerged as a new research direction. Dire...

  7. Bacteria, food, and cancer

    Rooks, Michelle G.; Garrett, Wendy S.

    2011-01-01

    Gut microbes are essential components of the human organism—helping us metabolize food into energy, produce micronutrients, and shape our immune systems. Having a particular pattern of gut microbes is also increasingly being linked to medical conditions including obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, and diabetes. Recent studies now indicate that our resident intestinal bacteria may also play a critical role in determining one's risk of developing cancer, ranging from protection against cancer...

  8. Surface layers of bacteria.

    Beveridge, T. J.; Graham, L.L.

    1991-01-01

    Since bacteria are so small, microscopy has traditionally been used to study them as individual cells. To this end, electron microscopy has been a most powerful tool for studying bacterial surfaces; the viewing of macromolecular arrangements of some surfaces is now possible. This review compares older conventional electron-microscopic methods with new cryotechniques currently available and the results each has produced. Emphasis is not placed on the methodology but, rather, on the importance ...

  9. Lethal Mutagenesis of Bacteria

    Bull, James J; Wilke, Claus O.

    2008-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis, the killing of a microbial pathogen with a chemical mutagen, is a potential broad-spectrum antiviral treatment. It operates by raising the genomic mutation rate to the point that the deleterious load causes the population to decline. Its use has been limited to RNA viruses because of their high intrinsic mutation rates. Microbes with DNA genomes, which include many viruses and bacteria, have not been considered for this type of treatment because their low intrinsic mutatio...

  10. Can entropy save bacteria?

    Jun, Suckjoon

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a physical biology approach to understanding organization and segregation of bacterial chromosomes. The author uses a "piston" analogy for bacterial chromosomes in a cell, which leads to a phase diagram for the organization of two athermal chains confined in a closed geometry characterized by two length scales (length and width). When applied to rod-shaped bacteria such as Escherichia coli, this phase diagram predicts that, despite strong confinement, duplicated chromoso...

  11. Regulatory RNAs in Bacteria

    Waters, Lauren S; Storz, Gisela

    2009-01-01

    RNA regulators in bacteria are a heterogenous group of molecules that act by various mechanisms to modulate a wide range of physiological responses. One class comprises riboswitches, which are parts of the mRNAs they regulate. These leader sequences fold into structures amenable to conformational changes upon the binding of small molecules. Riboswitches thus sense and respond to the availability of various nutrients in the cell. Other small transcripts bind to proteins, among them global regu...

  12. RNA localization in bacteria

    Keiler, Kenneth C.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria localize proteins and DNA regions to specific subcellular sites, and several recent publications show that RNAs are localized within the cell as well. Localization of tmRNA and some mRNAs indicates that RNAs can be sequestered at specific sites by RNA binding proteins, or can be trapped at the location where they are transcribed. Although the functions for RNA localization are not yet completely understood, it appears that one function for RNA localization is to regulate RNA abundanc...

  13. Bacteria colonizing paper machines

    Ekman, Jaakko

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria growing in paper machines can cause several problems. Biofilms detaching from paper machine surfaces may lead to holes and spots in the end product or even break the paper web leading to expensive delays in production. Heat stable endospores will remain viable through the drying section of paper machine, increasing the microbial contamination of paper and board. Of the bacterial species regularly found in the end products, Bacillus cereus is the only one classified as a pathogen. Cer...

  14. Bacteria are not Lamarckian

    Danchin, Antoine

    2007-01-01

    Instructive influence of environment on heredity has been a debated topic for centuries. Darwin's identification of natural selection coupled to chance variation as the driving force for evolution, against a formal interpretation proposed by Lamarck, convinced most scientists that environment does not specifically instruct evolution in an oriented direction. This is true for multicellular organisms. In contrast, bacteria were long thought of as prone to receive oriented influences from their ...

  15. Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria.

    Tyutikov, F M; Bespalova, I A; Rebentish, B A; Aleksandrushkina, N N; Krivisky, A S

    1980-01-01

    Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria have been found in 16 out of 88 studied samples (underground waters, pond water, soil, gas and oil installation waters, fermentor cultural fluids, bacterial paste, and rumen of cattle) taken in different geographic zones of the Soviet Union. Altogether, 23 phage strains were isolated: 10 strains that specifically lysed only Methylosinus sporium strains, 2 strains that each lysed 1 of 5 Methylosinus trichosporium strains studied, and 11 strains that ly...

  16. Cytokinesis in Bacteria

    Errington, Jeffery; Daniel, Richard A.; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2003-01-01

    Work on two diverse rod-shaped bacteria, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, has defined a set of about 10 conserved proteins that are important for cell division in a wide range of eubacteria. These proteins are directed to the division site by the combination of two negative regulatory systems. Nucleoid occlusion is a poorly understood mechanism whereby the nucleoid prevents division in the cylindrical part of the cell, until chromosome segregation has occurred near midcell. The Min pro...

  17. Growing Unculturable Bacteria

    Stewart, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    The bacteria that can be grown in the laboratory are only a small fraction of the total diversity that exists in nature. At all levels of bacterial phylogeny, uncultured clades that do not grow on standard media are playing critical roles in cycling carbon, nitrogen, and other elements, synthesizing novel natural products, and impacting the surrounding organisms and environment. While molecular techniques, such as metagenomic sequencing, can provide some information independent of our ability...

  18. Denitrification by extremely halophilic bacteria

    Hochstein, L. I.; Tomlinson, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    Extremely halophilic bacteria were isolated from widely separated sites by anaerobic enrichment in the presence of nitrate. The anaerobic growth of several of these isolates was accompanied by the production of nitrite, nitrous oxide, and dinitrogen. These results are a direct confirmation of the existence of extremely halophilic denitrifying bacteria, and suggest that such bacteria may be common inhabitants of hypersaline environments.

  19. Sterilization of single-use helical stone baskets: an experimental study

    Cely Barreto da Silva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To experimentally evaluate the efficacy of a standard sterilization protocol employed during reuse of disposable helical stone baskets. Methods: Study performed on 20 helical stone baskets: 10 were used in the initial validation process, contaminated with Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and imprinted on Meller-Hinton media; 10 catheters were contaminated with Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953, processed, inoculated in TSB and incubated in a water bath at a temperature of 55C. Bacterial growth was evaluated after 1, 3, 5 and 7 days. After sterilization, stone baskets were also opened and closed 40 times to check for functional problems. All plastic and basket parts were carefully checked for damages. Results: After the 72-hour incubation period, there was growth of E. coli ATCC 25922 in 100% of imprints. After the sterilization process and up to 7 days incubation period on a blood agar plate, there was no growth of G. stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 or any other bacteria. There were no functional problems or damage to baskets after the sterilization process. Conclusion: The ethylene oxide system is efficacious and safe for sterilization of disposable helical stone baskets. However, further clinical studies are required and should provide more safety information.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of two thermostable ?-galactosidases from glycoside hydrolase family 36

    Foucault, M.; Watzlawick, H.; Mattes, R.; Haser, R; Gouet, P

    2006-01-01

    The ?-galactosidases AgaA, AgaB and AgaA A355E mutant from Geobacillus stearothermophilus have been overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Crystals of AgaB and AgaA A355E have been obtained by the vapour-diffusion method and synchrotron data have been collected to 2.0 and 2.8? resolution, respectively.

  1. A thermostable transketolase evolved for aliphatic aldehyde acceptors.

    Yi, Dong; Saravanan, Thangavelu; Devamani, Titu; Charmantray, Franck; Hecquet, Laurence; Fessner, Wolf-Dieter

    2015-01-11

    Directed evolution of the thermostable transketolase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus based on a pH-based colorimetric screening of smart libraries yielded several mutants with up to 16-fold higher activity for aliphatic aldehydes and high enantioselectivity (>95% ee) in the asymmetric carboligation step. PMID:25415647

  2. Pepsin homologues in bacteria

    Bateman Alex

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptidase family A1, to which pepsin belongs, had been assumed to be restricted to eukaryotes. The tertiary structure of pepsin shows two lobes with similar folds and it has been suggested that the gene has arisen from an ancient duplication and fusion event. The only sequence similarity between the lobes is restricted to the motif around the active site aspartate and a hydrophobic-hydrophobic-Gly motif. Together, these contribute to an essential structural feature known as a psi-loop. There is one such psi-loop in each lobe, and so each lobe presents an active Asp. The human immunodeficiency virus peptidase, retropepsin, from peptidase family A2 also has a similar fold but consists of one lobe only and has to dimerize to be active. All known members of family A1 show the bilobed structure, but it is unclear if the ancestor of family A1 was similar to an A2 peptidase, or if the ancestral retropepsin was derived from a half-pepsin gene. The presence of a pepsin homologue in a prokaryote might give insights into the evolution of the pepsin family. Results Homologues of the aspartic peptidase pepsin have been found in the completed genomic sequences from seven species of bacteria. The bacterial homologues, unlike those from eukaryotes, do not possess signal peptides, and would therefore be intracellular acting at neutral pH. The bacterial homologues have Thr218 replaced by Asp, a change which in renin has been shown to confer activity at neutral pH. No pepsin homologues could be detected in any archaean genome. Conclusion The peptidase family A1 is found in some species of bacteria as well as eukaryotes. The bacterial homologues fall into two groups, one from oceanic bacteria and one from plant symbionts. The bacterial homologues are all predicted to be intracellular proteins, unlike the eukaryotic enzymes. The bacterial homologues are bilobed like pepsin, implying that if no horizontal gene transfer has occurred the duplication and fusion event might be very ancient indeed, preceding the divergence of bacteria and eukaryotes. It is unclear whether all the bacterial homologues are derived from horizontal gene transfer, but those from the plant symbionts probably are. The homologues from oceanic bacteria are most closely related to memapsins (or BACE-1 and BACE-2, but are so divergent that they are close to the root of the phylogenetic tree and to the division of the A1 family into two subfamilies.

  3. Bacteria counting method based on polyaniline/bacteria thin film.

    Zhihua, Li; Xuetao, Hu; Jiyong, Shi; Xiaobo, Zou; Xiaowei, Huang; Xucheng, Zhou; Tahir, Haroon Elrasheid; Holmes, Mel; Povey, Malcolm

    2016-07-15

    A simple and rapid bacteria counting method based on polyaniline (PANI)/bacteria thin film was proposed. Since the negative effects of immobilized bacteria on the deposition of PANI on glass carbon electrode (GCE), PANI/bacteria thin films containing decreased amount of PANI would be obtained when increasing the bacteria concentration. The prepared PANI/bacteria film was characterized with cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique to provide quantitative index for the determination of the bacteria count, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was also performed to further investigate the difference in the PANI/bacteria films. Good linear relationship of the peak currents of the CVs and the log total count of bacteria (Bacillus subtilis) could be established using the equation Y=-30.413X+272.560 (R(2)=0.982) over the range of 5.3×10(4) to 5.3×10(8)CFUmL(-1), which also showed acceptable stability, reproducibility and switchable ability. The proposed method was feasible for simple and rapid counting of bacteria. PMID:26921555

  4. Bacteria in Solitary Confinement

    Mullineaux, Conrad W.

    2014-01-01

    Even in clonal bacterial cultures, individual bacteria can show substantial stochastic variation, leading to pitfalls in the interpretation of data derived from millions of cells in a culture. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, as part of their study on osmoadaptation in a cyanobacterium, Nanatani et al. describe employing an ingenious microfluidic device that gently cages individual cells (J Bacteriol 197:676687, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02276-14). The device is a welco...

  5. Programmed Death in Bacteria

    Lewis, Kim

    2000-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in bacteria plays an important role in developmental processes, such as lysis of the mother cell during sporulation of Bacillus subtilis and lysis of vegetative cells in fruiting body formation of Myxococcus xanthus. The signal transduction pathway leading to autolysis of the mother cell includes the terminal sporulation sigma factor E?K, which induces the synthesis of autolysins CwlC and CwlH. An activator of autolysin in this and other PCD processes is yet to be ...

  6. Lactic Acid Bacteria

    ToddKlaenhammer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are a diverse group of Gram-positive bacteria found in a vast array of environments including dairy products and the human gastrointestinal tract. In both niches, surface proteins play a crucial role in mediating interactions with the surrounding environment. The sortase enzyme is responsible for covalently coupling a subset of surface dependent proteins (SDPs to the cell wall of Gram-positive organisms through recognition of a conserved C-terminal LPXTG motif. Genomic sequencing of LAB and annotation has allowed for the identification of sortase and SDPs. Historically, sortase and SDPs were predominately investigated for their role in mediating pathogenesis. Identification of these proteins in LAB has shed light on their important roles in mediating nutrient acquisition through proteinase P as well as positive probiotic attributes including adhesion, mucus barrier function, and immune signaling. Furthermore, sortase expression signals in LAB have been exploited as a means to develop oral vaccines targeted to the gastrointestinal tract. In this review, we examine the collection of studies which evaluate sortase and SDPs in select species of dairy associated and health promoting LAB.

  7. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus; Lindequist Dittmer, Anders; Bjerg, Jesper Jensen; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable...... bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures and...... marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary...

  8. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus; Lindequist Dittmer, Anders; Bjerg, Jesper Jensen; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable...... bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber , Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures and...... marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary...

  9. Interactions between Diatoms and Bacteria

    Amin, Shady A.; Parker, Micaela S.; Armbrust, E. Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Diatoms and bacteria have cooccurred in common habitats for hundreds of millions of years, thus fostering specific associations and interactions with global biogeochemical consequences. Diatoms are responsible for one-fifth of the photosynthesis on Earth, while bacteria remineralize a large portion of this fixed carbon in the oceans. Through their coexistence, diatoms and bacteria cycle nutrients between oxidized and reduced states, impacting bioavailability and ultimately feeding hi...

  10. Bacteria transport under unsaturated conditions

    Gargiulo, Grazia

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the bacteria transport behaviour in different conditions using an unsaturated porous media. A column based system able to keep the unsaturated conditions was designed and developed to perform the experiments. Two bacteria strains Deinococcus radiodurans and Rhodococcus rhodochrous strongly different in hydrophobicity were employed. During the experiments the bacteria concentration in the outflow was continuously on-line measured and after the experiment the c...

  11. Active skeleton for bacteria modeling

    Jacob, Jean-Pascal; Dimiccoli, Mariella; Moisan, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of spatio-temporal dynamics of bacterial cells and their molecular components requires automated image analysis tools to track cell shape properties and molecular component locations inside the cells. In the study of bacteria aging, the molecular components of interest are protein aggregates accumulated near bacteria boundaries. This particular location makes very ambiguous the correspondence between aggregates and cells, since computing accurately bacteria boundaries in pha...

  12. Phenotypic switching in bacteria

    Merrin, Jack

    Living matter is a non-equilibrium system in which many components work in parallel to perpetuate themselves through a fluctuating environment. Physiological states or functionalities revealed by a particular environment are called phenotypes. Transitions between phenotypes may occur either spontaneously or via interaction with the environment. Even in the same environment, genetically identical bacteria can exhibit different phenotypes of a continuous or discrete nature. In this thesis, we pursued three lines of investigation into discrete phenotypic heterogeneity in bacterial populations: the quantitative characterization of the so-called bacterial persistence, a theoretical model of phenotypic switching based on those measurements, and the design of artificial genetic networks which implement this model. Persistence is the phenotype of a subpopulation of bacteria with a reduced sensitivity to antibiotics. We developed a microfluidic apparatus, which allowed us to monitor the growth rates of individual cells while applying repeated cycles of antibiotic treatments. We were able to identify distinct phenotypes (normal and persistent) and characterize the stochastic transitions between them. We also found that phenotypic heterogeneity was present prior to any environmental cue such as antibiotic exposure. Motivated by the experiments with persisters, we formulated a theoretical model describing the dynamic behavior of several discrete phenotypes in a periodically varying environment. This theoretical framework allowed us to quantitatively predict the fitness of dynamic populations and to compare survival strategies according to environmental time-symmetries. These calculations suggested that persistence is a strategy used by bacterial populations to adapt to fluctuating environments. Knowledge of the phenotypic transition rates for persistence may provide statistical information about the typical environments of bacteria. We also describe a design of artificial genetic networks that would implement a more general theoretical model of phenotypic switching. We will use a new cloning strategy in order to systematically assemble a large number of genetic features, such as site-specific recombination components from the R64 plasmid, which invert several coexisting DNA segments. The inversion of these segments would lead to discrete phenotypic transitions inside a living cell. These artificial phenotypic switches can be controlled precisely in experiments and may serve as a benchmark for their natural counterparts.

  13. Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria

    Tyutikow, F.M. (All-Union Research Inst. for Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms, Moscow, USSR); Bespalova, I.A.; Rebentish, B.A.; Aleksandrushkina, N.N.; Krivisky, A.S.

    1980-10-01

    Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria have been found in 16 out of 88 studied samples (underground waters, pond water, soil, gas and oil installation waters, fermentor cultural fluids, bacterial paste, and rumen of cattle) taken in different geographic zones of the Soviet Union. Altogether, 23 phage strains were isolated. By fine structure, the phages were divided into two types (with very short or long noncontractile tails); by host range and serological properties, they fell into three types. All phages had guanine- and cytosine-rich double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid consisting of common nitrogen bases. By all of the above-mentioned properties, all phages within each of the groups were completely identical to one another, but differed from phages of other groups.

  14. The Cyclic Antibacterial Peptide Enterocin AS-48: Isolation, Mode of Action, and Possible Food Applications

    María José Grande Burgos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Enterocin AS-48 is a circular bacteriocin produced by Enterococcus. It contains a 70 amino acid-residue chain circularized by a head-to-tail peptide bond. The conformation of enterocin AS-48 is arranged into five alpha-helices with a compact globular structure. Enterocin AS-48 has a wide inhibitory spectrum on Gram-positive bacteria. Sensitivity of Gram-negative bacteria increases in combination with outer-membrane permeabilizing treatments. Eukaryotic cells are bacteriocin-resistant. This cationic peptide inserts into bacterial membranes and causes membrane permeabilization, leading ultimately to cell death. Microarray analysis revealed sets of up-regulated and down-regulated genes in Bacillus cereus cells treated with sublethal bacteriocin concentration. Enterocin AS-48 can be purified in two steps or prepared as lyophilized powder from cultures in whey-based substrates. The potential applications of enterocin AS-48 as a food biopreservative have been corroborated against foodborne pathogens and/or toxigenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica and spoilage bacteria (Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris, Bacillus spp., Paenibacillus spp., Geobacillus stearothermophilus, Brochothrix thermosphacta, Staphylococcus carnosus, Lactobacillus sakei and other spoilage lactic acid bacteria. The efficacy of enterocin AS-48 in food systems increases greatly in combination with chemical preservatives, essential oils, phenolic compounds, and physico-chemical treatments such as sublethal heat, high-intensity pulsed-electric fields or high hydrostatic pressure.

  15. The Cyclic Antibacterial Peptide Enterocin AS-48: Isolation, Mode of Action, and Possible Food Applications.

    Grande Burgos, Mara Jos; Pulido, Rubn Prez; Del Carmen Lpez Aguayo, Mara; Glvez, Antonio; Lucas, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Enterocin AS-48 is a circular bacteriocin produced by Enterococcus. It contains a 70 amino acid-residue chain circularized by a head-to-tail peptide bond. The conformation of enterocin AS-48 is arranged into five alpha-helices with a compact globular structure. Enterocin AS-48 has a wide inhibitory spectrum on Gram-positive bacteria. Sensitivity of Gram-negative bacteria increases in combination with outer-membrane permeabilizing treatments. Eukaryotic cells are bacteriocin-resistant. This cationic peptide inserts into bacterial membranes and causes membrane permeabilization, leading ultimately to cell death. Microarray analysis revealed sets of up-regulated and down-regulated genes in Bacillus cereus cells treated with sublethal bacteriocin concentration. Enterocin AS-48 can be purified in two steps or prepared as lyophilized powder from cultures in whey-based substrates. The potential applications of enterocin AS-48 as a food biopreservative have been corroborated against foodborne pathogens and/or toxigenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica) and spoilage bacteria (Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris, Bacillus spp., Paenibacillus spp., Geobacillus stearothermophilus, Brochothrix thermosphacta, Staphylococcus carnosus, Lactobacillus sakei and other spoilage lactic acid bacteria). The efficacy of enterocin AS-48 in food systems increases greatly in combination with chemical preservatives, essential oils, phenolic compounds, and physico-chemical treatments such as sublethal heat, high-intensity pulsed-electric fields or high hydrostatic pressure. PMID:25493478

  16. Swimming bacteria in liquid crystal

    Sokolov, Andrey; Zhou, Shuang; Aranson, Igor; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    Dynamics of swimming bacteria can be very complex due to the interaction between the bacteria and the fluid, especially when the suspending fluid is non-Newtonian. Placement of swimming bacteria in lyotropic liquid crystal produces a new class of active materials by combining features of two seemingly incompatible constituents: self-propelled live bacteria and ordered liquid crystals. Here we present fundamentally new phenomena caused by the coupling between direction of bacterial swimming, bacteria-triggered flows and director orientations. Locomotion of bacteria may locally reduce the degree of order in liquid crystal or even trigger nematic-isotropic phase transition. Microscopic flows generated by bacterial flagella disturb director orientation. Emerged birefringence patterns allow direct optical observation and quantitative characterization of flagella dynamics. At high concentration of bacteria we observed the emergence of self-organized periodic texture caused by bacteria swimming. Our work sheds new light on self-organization in hybrid bio-mechanical systems and can lead to valuable biomedical applications. Was supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under the Contract No. DE AC02-06CH11357.

  17. Sewage-pollution indicator bacteria

    Ramaiah, N.; Rodrigues, V.; Alwares, E.; Rodrigues, C.; Baksh, R.; Jayan, S.; Mohandass, C.

    the native microflora. This can lead to increased levels of indicator bacteria in the water bod- ies, and the loads of human pathogenic bacteria may well exceed both ecological and human acceptable limits. Raw sewage disposal into the Mandovi and Zuari...

  18. Tetrachloroethene-dehalogenating bacteria.

    Damborsk, J

    1999-01-01

    Tetrachloroethene is a frequent groundwater contaminant often persisting in the subsurface environments. It is recalcitrant under aerobic conditions because it is in a highly oxidized state and is not readily susceptible to oxidation. Nevertheless, at least 15 organisms from different metabolic groups, viz. halorespirators (9), acetogens (2), methanogens (3) and facultative anaerobes (2), that are able to metabolize tetrachloroethene have been isolated as axenic cultures to-date. Some of these organisms couple dehalo-genation to energy conservation and utilize tetrachloroethene as the only source of energy while others dehalogenate tetrachloroethene fortuitously. Halorespiring organisms (halorespirators) utilize halogenated organic compounds as electron acceptors in an anaerobic respiratory process. Different organisms exhibit differences in the final products of tetrachloroethene dehalogenation, some strains convert tetrachloroethene to trichloroethene only, while others also carry out consecutive dehalogenation to dichloroethenes and vinyl chloride. Thus far, only a single organism, 'Dehalococcoides ethenogenes' strain 195, has been isolated which dechlorinates tetrachloroethene all the way down to ethylene. The majority of tetrachloroethene-dehalogenating organisms have been isolated only in the past few years and several of them, i.e., Dehalobacter restrictus, Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans, 'Dehalococcoides ethenogenes', 'Dehalospirillum multivorans', Desulfuromonas chloroethenica, and Desulfomonile tiedjei, are representatives of new taxonomic groups. This contribution summarizes the available information regarding the axenic cultures of the tetrachloroethene-dehalogenating bacteria. The present knowledge about the isolation of these organisms, their physiological characteristics, morphology, taxonomy and their ability to dechlorinate tetrachloroethene is presented to facilitate a comprehensive comparison. PMID:10664879

  19. Genetically modified bacteria in agriculture.

    Amarger, N

    2002-11-01

    Certain bacteria isolated from soils possess properties that allow them to exert beneficial effects on plants either by enhancing crop nutrition or by reducing damages caused by pathogens or pests. Some of them, such as rhizobia, azospirilla, and agrobacteria, have been traditionally released in fields as seed inoculants and they often lead to increases in the yield of different crops while the application of others, such as pseudomonads, often fails to give the expected results. Bacteria genetically modified to be easily traceable and/or to be improved in their expression of beneficial traits have been constructed and released with plants in a number of experimental field plots. With these releases, it has been possible to monitor the modified inoculant bacteria after their introduction in field ecosystems and to assess their impact on the resident microflora. Local environmental factors appeared as playing a crucial role in the survival and persistence of bacteria once released in fields and in the expression of the beneficial traits whether improved or not. The spread of inoculant bacteria from their point of dissemination was limited. Transient shifts in favour of the released bacteria and in disfavour of some members of the bacterial and fungal populations present in the plant rhizosphere might occur with certain released bacteria. The changes observed were, however, less important than those observed under usual agricultural practices. Gene transfer from resident population to introduced bacteria was detected in one case. The transconjugants were found only transiently in the phytosphere of plants but not in soils. No differences between the survival, spread, persistence in field and ecological impacts of genetically modified bacteria and of the corresponding unmodified parent strain could be detected. PMID:12595134

  20. Sampling bacteria with a laser

    Schwarzwälder, Kordula; Rutschmann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Water quality is a topic of high interest and it's getting more and more important due to climate change and the implementation of European Water Framework Directive (WFD). One point of interest here is the inflow of bacteria into a river caused by combined sewer overflows which lead untreated wastewater including bacteria directly into a river. These bacteria remain in the river for a certain time, they settle down and can be remobilised again. In our study we want to investigate these processes of sedimentation and resuspension and use the results for the development of a software module coupled with the software Flow3D. Thereby we should be able to simulate and therefore predict the water quality influenced by combined sewer overflows. Hence we need to get information about the bacteria transport and fate. We need to know about the size of the bacteria or of the bacteria clumps and the size of the particles the bacteria are attached to. The agglomerates lead to different characteristics and velocities of settlement. The timespan during this bacteria can be detected in the bulk phase depends on many factors like the intensity of UV light, turbidity of the water, the temperature of the water, if there are grazers and a lot more. The size, density and composition of the agglomerates is just a part of all these influencing factors, but it is extremely difficult to differ between the other effects if we have no information about the simple sedimentation in default of these basic information. However we have a big problem getting the data. The chaining between bacteria or bacteria and particles is not too strong, so filtering the water to get a sieving curve may destroy these connections. We did some experiments similar to PIV (particle image velocimetry) measurements and evaluated the pictures with a macro written for the software ImageJ. Doing so we were able to get the concentration of bacteria in the water and collect information about the size of the bacteria. We also compared these data to samples of usual collection and filtering. The results of these laser measurements are very promising.

  1. Clinical microbiology of coryneform bacteria.

    Funke, G; von Graevenitz, A; Clarridge, J E; Bernard, K A

    1997-01-01

    Coryneform bacteria are aerobically growing, asporogenous, non-partially-acid-fast, gram-positive rods of irregular morphology. Within the last few years, there has been a massive increase in the number of publications related to all aspects of their clinical microbiology. Clinical microbiologists are often confronted with making identifications within this heterogeneous group as well as with considerations of the clinical significance of such isolates. This review provides comprehensive information on the identification of coryneform bacteria and outlines recent changes in taxonomy. The following genera are covered: Corynebacterium, Turicella, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Dermabacter. Propionibacterium, Rothia, Exiguobacterium, Oerskovia, Cellulomonas, Sanguibacter, Microbacterium, Aureobacterium, "Corynebacterium aquaticum," Arcanobacterium, and Actinomyces. Case reports claiming disease associations of coryneform bacteria are critically reviewed. Minimal microbiological requirements for publications on disease associations of coryneform bacteria are proposed. PMID:8993861

  2. Environmental sources of fecal bacteria

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Ishii, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    This chapter provides a review of the research on environmental occurrences of faecal indicator bacteria in a variety of terrestrial and aquatic habitats under different geographic and climatic conditions, and discusses how these external sources may affect surface water quality.

  3. Superoxide dismutase in ruminal bacteria.

    Fulghum, R S; Worthington, J M

    1984-01-01

    Of 13 species of anaerobic ruminal bacteria examined, 11 were found to contain measurable levels of superoxide dismutase activity. Four of five other strict anaerobic species studied for comparison were found to contain superoxide dismutase activity.

  4. Anaerobic bacteria that dechlorinate perchloroethene.

    Fathepure, B Z; Nengu, J P; Boyd, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    In this study, we identified specific cultures of anaerobic bacteria that dechlorinate perchlorethene (PCE). The bacteria that significantly dechlorinated PCE were strain DCB-1, an obligate anaerobe previously shown to dechlorinate chlorobenzoate, and two strains of Methanosarcina. The rate of PCE dechlorination by DCB-1 compared favorably with reported rates of trichloroethene bio-oxidation by methanotrophs. Even higher PCE dechlorination rates were achieved when DCB-1 was grown in a methano...

  5. Thymidine kinase diversity in bacteria

    Sandrini, Michael; Clausen, A.R.; Munch-Petersen, B.; Piskur, Jure

    Thymidine kinases (TKs) appear to be almost ubiquitous and are found in nearly all prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and several viruses. They are the key enzymes in thymidine salvage and activation of several anti-cancer and antiviral drugs. We show that bacterial TKs can be subdivided into 2 groups. The...... TKs from Gram-positive bacteria are more closely related to the eukaryotic TK1 enzymes than are TKs from Gram-negative bacteria....

  6. Electrochemical Biosensors for Pathogenic Bacteria

    Saucedo, Nuvia Maria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OF THE DISSERTATIONElectrochemical Biosensors for Pathogenic BacteriabyNuvia Maria SaucedoDoctor of Philosophy, Graduate Program in ChemistryUniversity of California, Riverside, August 2015Professor Ashok Mulchandani, ChairpersonMicrobial diseases due to infections from bacteria and viruses constitute a major cause of death. Though recent technological advances have allowed for sensitive and selective detection of pathogenic bacteria, these methods are multi-step, have long assay tim...

  7. Aggregation Patterns in Stressed Bacteria

    Tsimring, Lev; Levine, Herbert; Aranson, Igor; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Cohen, Inon; Shochet, Ofer

    1995-01-01

    We study the formation of spot patterns seen in a variety of bacterial species when the bacteria are subjected to oxidative stress due to hazardous byproducts of respiration. Our approach consists of coupling the cell density field to a chemoattractant concentration as well as to nutrient and waste fields. The latter serves as a triggering field for emission of chemoattractant. Important elements in the proposed model include the propagation of a front of motile bacteria radially outward form...

  8. Electron transport chains of lactic acid bacteria

    Brooijmans, R.J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are generally considered facultative anaerobic obligate fermentative bacteria. They are unable to synthesize heme. Some lactic acid bacteria are unable to form menaquinone as well. Both these components are cofactors of respiratory (electron transport) chains of prokaryotic bacteria. Lactococcus lactis, and several other lactic acid bacteria, however respond to the addition of heme in aerobic growth conditions. This response includes increased biomass and robustness. In t...

  9. Effect of pH on Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum DSM 571 growth, spore heat resistance and recovery.

    Mtimet, Narjes; Guégan, Stéphanie; Durand, Lucile; Mathot, Anne-Gabrielle; Venaille, Laurent; Leguérinel, Ivan; Coroller, Louis; Couvert, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Thermophilic spore-forming bacteria are potential contaminants in several industrial sectors involving high temperatures (40-65 °C) in the manufacturing process. Among those thermophilic spore-forming bacteria, Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum, called "the swelling canned food spoiler", has generated interest over the last decade in the food sector. The aim of this study was to investigate and to model pH effect on growth, heat resistance and recovery abilities after a heat-treatment of T. thermosaccharolyticum DSM 571. Growth and sporulation were conducted on reinforced clostridium media and liver broth respectively. The highest spore heat resistances and the greatest recovery ability after a heat-treatment were obtained at pH condition allowing maximal growth rate. Growth and sporulation boundaries were estimated, then models using growth limits as main parameters were extended to describe and quantify the effect of pH on recovery of injured spores after a heat-treatment. So, cardinal values were used as a single set of parameters to describe growth, sporulation and recovery abilities. Besides, this work suggests that T. thermosaccharolyticum preserve its ability for germination and outgrowth after a heat-treatment at a low pH where other high resistant spore-forming bacteria like Geobacillus stearothermophilus are unable to grow. PMID:26742617

  10. Automated radiometric detection of bacteria

    A new radiometric method called BACTEC, used for the detection of bacteria in cultures or in supposedly sterile samples, was discussed from the standpoint of methodology, both automated and semi-automated. Some of the results obtained so far were reported and some future applications and development possibilities were described. In this new method, the test sample is incubated in a sealed vial with a liquid culture medium containing a 14C-labeled substrate. If bacteria are present, they break down the substrate, producing 14CO2 which is periodically extracted from the vial as a gas and is tested for radioactivity. If this gaseous radioactivity exceeds a threshold level, it is evidence of bacterial presence and growth in the test vial. The first application was for the detection of bacteria in the blood cultures of hospital patients. Data were presented showing typical results. Also discussed were future applications, such as rapid screening for bacteria in urine industrial sterility testing and the disposal of used 14C substrates. (Mukohata, S.)

  11. Programmed survival of soil bacteria

    Jensen, Lars Bogø; Molin, Søren; Sternberg, Claus; Ramos, J.L.

    Biological containment systems have been developed for Pseudomonas putida and related soil bacteria. The systems are based on combinations of lethal genes and regulated gene expression. Two types of killing function have been employed: 1) A membrane protein interfering with the membrane potential...

  12. Deodorant bacteria; Des bacteries desodorisantes

    Fanlo, J.L. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, 30 - Ales (France)

    1998-02-01

    Purifying bacteria: if this concept is not new, its application to gases cleansing has only been developed recently. This method allows to eliminate the volatile organic compounds and the gaseous effluents odors which come from industrial sites. Three bioreactors types exist at the present time. Their principles are explained. (O.M.) 6 refs.

  13. Commensal ocular bacteria degrade mucins

    Berry, M.; Harris, A.; Lumb, R; Powell, K.

    2002-01-01

    Background/aims: Antimicrobial activity in tears prevents infection while maintaining a commensal bacterial population. The relation between mucin and commensal bacteria was assessed to determine whether commensals possess mucinolytic activity, how degradation depends on mucin integrity, and whether mucins affect bacterial replication.

  14. Marine bacteria which produce tetrodotoxin.

    Simidu, U.; Noguchi, T.; Hwang, D F; Shida, Y.; Hashimoto, K.

    1987-01-01

    A number of type strains of marine bacteria, including members of the family Vibrionaceae, were cultured and examined for tetrodotoxin productivity by high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Most of the Vibrionaceae strains produced tetrodotoxin, anhydrotetrodotoxin, or both.

  15. Antagonism of Lactic Acid Bacteria against Phytopathogenic Bacteria

    Visser, Ronl; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H.; Bezuidenhout, Johannes J; Kotz, Johannes M.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of lactic acid bacteria, isolated from plant surfaces and plant-associated products, were found to be antagonistic to test strains of the phytopathogens Xanthomonas campestris, Erwinia carotovora, and Pseudomonas syringae. Effective in vitro inhibition was found both on agar plates and in broth cultures. In pot trials, treatment of bean plants with a Lactobacillus plantarum strain before inoculation with P. syringae caused a significant reduction of the disease incidence.

  16. Physico-chemical factors and bacteria in fish ponds

    Jun, X; Xiuzheng, F.; Tongbing, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of pond water and mud samples show that nitrifying bacteria (including ammonifying bacteria, nitrite bacteria, nitrobacteria and denitrifying bacteria) are in general closely correlated with various physico-chemical factors, ammonifying bacteria are mainly correlated with dissolved oxygen; denitrifying bacteria are inversely correlated with phosphorus; nitrite bacteria are closely correlated with nitrites, nitrobacteria are inversely correlated with ammoniac nitrogen. The nitrifying ...

  17. Killer Pigments in Bacteria: An Ecological Nightmare.

    Benathen, Isaiah A.; Saccardi, Marion

    2000-01-01

    Describes an alternative to teaching ecology by using bacteria to test competitor survival. Students observe a time-dependent selective killing of other unrelated bacteria by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. (SAH)

  18. Kitchen Utensils Can Spread Bacteria, Study Finds

    ... news/fullstory_155690.html Kitchen Utensils Can Spread Bacteria, Study Finds Expert advises washing knives, peelers between ... utensils such as knives and graters can spread bacteria between different types of produce, a new study ...

  19. Re-engineering bacteria for ethanol production

    Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W; Zhou, Shengde; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-05-06

    The invention provides recombinant bacteria, which comprise a full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes. Expression of the full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes causes the recombinant bacteria to produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product when grown in mineral salts medium, without the addition of complex nutrients. Methods for producing the recombinant bacteria and methods for producing ethanol using the recombinant bacteria are also disclosed.

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIA IN LATEX PAINTS

    Rojas, J.

    2008-01-01

    The bacteria are prokaryote organisms with a high capacity to colonize many types of habits. This research was developed with the object to identify extremophiles bacteria presents in latex paint. The bacteria were cultivated in culture mediums TSA, Blood Agar, Mc Conkey and finally the biochemical proof API-NF® for bacteria's isolation and identification, respectively. Characterization showed bacterial profile of Pasteurella sp. Hypothesis that could be found extremophiles bac...

  1. Genetics of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Zagorec, Monique; Anba-Mondoloni, Jamila; Coq, Anne-Marie Crutz-Le; Champomier-Vergs, Marie-Christine

    Many meat (or fish) products, obtained by the fermentation of meat originating from various animals by the flora that naturally contaminates it, are part of the human diet since millenaries. Historically, the use of bacteria as starters for the fermentation of meat, to produce dry sausages, was thus performed empirically through the endogenous micro-biota, then, by a volunteer addition of starters, often performed by back-slopping, without knowing precisely the microbial species involved. It is only since about 50 years that well defined bacterial cultures have been used as starters for the fermentation of dry sausages. Nowadays, the indigenous micro-biota of fermented meat products is well identified, and the literature is rich of reports on the identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) present in many traditional fermented products from various geographical origin, obtained without the addition of commercial starters (See Talon, Leroy, & Lebert, 2007, and references therein).

  2. Dissipative Shocks behind Bacteria Gliding

    Virga, Epifanio G

    2014-01-01

    Gliding is a means of locomotion on rigid substrates utilized by a number of bacteria includingmyxobacteria and cyanobacteria. One of the hypotheses advanced to explain this motility mechanism hinges on the role played by the slime filaments continuously extruded from gliding bacteria. This paper solves in full a non-linear mechanical theory that treats as dissipative shocks both the point where the extruded slime filament comes in contact with the substrate, called the filament's foot, and the pore on the bacterium outer surface from where the filament is ejected. We prove that kinematic compatibility for shock propagation requires that the bacterium uniform gliding velocity (relative to the substrate) and the slime ejecting velocity (relative to the bacterium) must be equal, a coincidence that seems to have already been observed.

  3. Chitin Degradation In Marine Bacteria

    Paulsen, Sara; Machado, Henrique; Gram, Lone

    Introduction: Chitin is the most abundant polymer in the marine environment and the second most abundant in nature. Chitin does not accumulate on the ocean floor, because of microbial breakdown. Chitin degrading bacteria could have potential in the utilization of chitin as a renewable carbon and...... nitrogen source in the fermentation industry.Methods: Here, whole genome sequenced marine bacteria were screened for chitin degradation using phenotypic and in silico analyses.Results: The in silico analyses revealed the presence of three to nine chitinases in each strain, however the number of chitinases...... did not correlate to chitin degrading abilities on chitin agar. Two glycosyl hydrolase (GH) groups of chitinases were identified: GH18 and GH19. Interestingly, all strains had genes coding for GH19 chitinases, which for a long time were believed to be present only in higher plants. Differences in...

  4. Aggregation Patterns in Stressed Bacteria

    Tsimring, L S; Aranson, I S; Ben-Jacob, E; Cohen, I; Shochet, O; Tsimring, Lev; Levine, Herbert; Aranson, Igor; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Cohen, Inon; Shochet, Ofer

    1995-01-01

    We study the formation of spot patterns seen in a variety of bacterial species when the bacteria are subjected to oxidative stress due to hazardous byproducts of respiration. Our approach consists of coupling the cell density field to a chemoattractant concentration as well as to nutrient and waste fields. The latter serves as a triggering field for emission of chemoattractant. Important elements in the proposed model include the propagation of a front of motile bacteria radially outward form an initial site, a Turing instability of the uniformly dense state and a reduction of motility for cells sufficiently far behind the front. The wide variety of patterns seen in the experiments is explained as being due the variation of the details of the initiation of the chemoattractant emission as well as the transition to a non-motile phase.

  5. Volatilization of Mercury By Bacteria

    Magos, L.; Tuffery, A. A.; Clarkson, T. W.

    1964-01-01

    Volatilization of mercury has been observed from various biological media (tissue homogenates, infusion broth, plasma, urine) containing mercuric chloride. That micro-organisms were responsible was indicated by the finding that the rates of volatilization were highly variable, that a latent period often preceded volatilization, that toluene inhibited the process, and that the capacity to volatilize mercury could be transferred from one biological medium to another. Two species of bacteria when isolated and cultured from these homogenates were able to volatilize mercury. Two other bacteria, one of which was isolated from the local water supply, were also highly active. The volatile mercury was identified as mercury vapour. The importance of these findings in relation to the storage of urine samples prior to mercury analysis is discussed. PMID:14249899

  6. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: PROBIOTIC APPLICATIONS

    NEENA GARG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB is a heterotrophic Gram-positive bacteria which under goes lactic acid fermentations and leads to production of lactic acid as an end product. LAB includes Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus which are grouped together in the family lactobacillaceae. LAB shows numerous antimicrobial activities due to production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds such as organic acids, bacteriocins, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide and reutrin. LAB are used as starter culture, consortium members and bioprotective agents in food industry that improve food quality, safety and shelf life. A variety of probiotic LAB species are available including Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. bulgaricus, L. lactis, L. plantarum, L. rhamnosus, L. reuteri, L. fermentum, Bifidobacterium longum, B. breve, B. bifidum, B. esselnsis, B. lactis, B. infantis that are currently recommended for development of functional food products with health-promoting capacities.

  7. Immunomodulatory properties of probiotic bacteria

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen

    2007-01-01

    Certain lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are part of the commensal intestinal flora and considered beneficial for health, as they compete with pathogens for adhesion sites in the intestine and ferment otherwise indigestible compounds. Another important property of these so-called probiotic bacteria is...... the ability to modulate the immune response. This thesis describes the immunomodulatory properties of gut-derived bacterial strains on different antigen-presenting cells, and the effector cell responses elicited by bacterially stimulated antigen-presenting cells in natural killer (NK) cells and T...... cells. Autologous NK cells and mature dendritic cells (DC) mutually activate each other and this interaction is believed to be important for NK cytotoxic activity against cancer cells and for T cell polarisation. The first study included in this thesis establishes that LAB, as potent stimulators of...

  8. Swimming bacteria power microscopic gears.

    Sokolov, A.; Apodaca, M. M.; Grzybowski, B. A.; Aranson, I. S.; Materials Science Division; Princeton Univ.; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-01-19

    Whereas the laws of thermodynamics prohibit extraction of useful work from the Brownian motion of particles in equilibrium, these motions can be 'rectified' under nonequilibrium conditions, for example, in the presence of asymmetric geometrical obstacles. Here, we describe a class of systems in which aerobic bacteria Bacillus subtilis moving randomly in a fluid film power submillimeter gears and primitive systems of gears decorated with asymmetric teeth. The directional rotation is observed only in the regime of collective bacterial swimming and the gears angular velocities depend on and can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to the bacteria. The ability to harness and control the power of collective motions appears an important requirement for further development of mechanical systems driven by microorganisms.

  9. Swimming bacteria power microscopic gears

    Sokolov, Andrey; Apodaca, Mario M.; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2010-01-19

    Whereas the laws of thermodynamics prohibit extraction of useful work from the Brownian motion of particles in equilibrium, these motions can be “rectified” under nonequilibrium conditions, for example, in the presence of asymmetric geometrical obstacles. Here, we describe a class of systems in which aerobic bacteria Bacillus subtilis moving randomly in a fluid film power submillimeter gears and primitive systems of gears decorated with asymmetric teeth. The directional rotation is observed only in the regime of collective bacterial swimming and the gears’ angular velocities depend on and can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to the bacteria. The ability to harness and control the power of collective motions appears an important requirement for further development of mechanical systems driven by microorganisms.

  10. Box-shaped halophilic bacteria.

    Javor, B; Requadt, C; Stoeckenius, W

    1982-01-01

    Three morphologically similar strains of halophilic, box-shaped procaryotes have been isolated from brines collected in the Sinai, Baja California (Mexico), and southern California (United States). Although the isolates in their morphology resemble Walsby's square bacteria, which are a dominant morphological type in the Red Sea and Baja California brines, they are probably not identical to them. The cells show the general characteristics of extreme halophiles and archaebacteria. They contain ...

  11. Genome complexity of methanogenic bacteria.

    KLEIN, A.; Schnorr, M

    1984-01-01

    The genome complexities of different methanogenic bacteria were investigated by using an optical method to study renaturation kinetics of single-stranded DNA. The observed genome sizes ranged from 1.0 X 10(9) to 1.8 X 10(9) daltons, which is a typical range for procaryotic cells. Melting profiles of the DNA of three methanogenic species from different families show fractions which have a higher A . T content than the average DNA of that species.

  12. Clinical microbiology of coryneform bacteria.

    Funke, G; von Graevenitz, A; Clarridge, J E; Bernard, K. A.

    1997-01-01

    Coryneform bacteria are aerobically growing, asporogenous, non-partially-acid-fast, gram-positive rods of irregular morphology. Within the last few years, there has been a massive increase in the number of publications related to all aspects of their clinical microbiology. Clinical microbiologists are often confronted with making identifications within this heterogeneous group as well as with considerations of the clinical significance of such isolates. This review provides comprehensive info...

  13. Taxonomy of Bacteria Nodulating Legumes

    Ral Rivas; Paula Garca-Fraile; Encarna Velzquez

    2009-01-01

    Over the years, the term rhizobia has come to be used for all the bacteria that are capable of nodulation and nitrogen fixation in association with legumes but the taxonomy of rhizobia has changed considerably over the last 30 year. Recently, several non- rhizobial species belonging to alpha and beta subgroup of Proteobacteria have been identified as nitrogen-fixing legume symbionts. Here we provide an overview of the history of the rhizobia and the widespread phylogenetic diversity of nitr...

  14. Natural products from marine bacteria

    Wael, Al-Zereini

    2006-01-01

    In this study, 27 marine bacteria were screened for production of bioactive metabolites. Two strains from the surface of the soft coral Sinularia polydactyla, collected from the Red Sea, and three strains from different habitats in the North Sea were selected as a promising candidates for isolation of antimicrobial substances. A total of 50 compounds were isolated from the selected bacterial strains. From these metabolites 25 substances were known from natural sources, 10 substances were know...

  15. R-body-producing bacteria.

    Pond, F R; Gibson, I.; Lalucat, J.; Quackenbush, R L

    1989-01-01

    Until 10 years ago, R bodies were known only as diagnostic features by which endosymbionts of paramecia were identified as kappa particles. They were thought to be limited to the cytoplasm of two species in the Paramecium aurelia species complex. Now, R bodies have been found in free-living bacteria and other Paramecium species. The organisms now known to form R bodies include the cytoplasmic kappa endosymbionts of P. biaurelia and P. tetraurelia, the macronuclear kappa endosymbionts of P. ca...

  16. Nitrifying Bacteria in Wastewater Reservoirs

    Abeliovich, Aharon

    1987-01-01

    Deep wastewater reservoirs are used throughout Israel to store domestic wastewater effluents for summer irrigation. These effluents contain high concentrations of ammonia (?5 mM) that are frequently toxic to photosynthetic microorganisms and that lead to development of anoxic conditions. Population dynamics of nitrifying bacteria and rates of nitrification were studied in two wastewater reservoirs that differed in organic load and degree of oxygenation and in the laboratory under controlled c...

  17. Swimming bacteria power microscopic gears

    Sokolov, Andrey; Apodaca, Mario M.; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.; Aranson, Igor. S.

    2009-01-01

    Whereas the laws of thermodynamics prohibit extraction of useful work from the Brownian motion of particles in equilibrium, these motions can be “rectified” under nonequilibrium conditions, for example, in the presence of asymmetric geometrical obstacles. Here, we describe a class of systems in which aerobic bacteria Bacillus subtilis moving randomly in a fluid film power submillimeter gears and primitive systems of gears decorated with asymmetric teeth. The directional rotation is observed o...

  18. EFFECT OF NITRIC OXIDE ON ANAMMOX BACTERIA

    Kartal, B.; Tan, N. C. G.; VAN BIEZEN, E; Kampschreur, M.J.; Van Loosdrecht, M. C. M.; Jetten, M. S. M.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of nitrogen oxides on anammox bacteria are not well known. Therefore, anammox bacteria were exposed to 3,500 ppm nitric oxide (NO) in the gas phase. The anammox bacteria were not inhibited by the high NO concentration but rather used it to oxidize additional ammonium to dinitrogen gas under conditions relevant to wastewater treatment.

  19. Effect of Nitric Oxide on Anammox Bacteria

    Kartal, B.; Tan, N. C. G.; VAN BIEZEN, E; Kampschreur, M.J.; Van Loosdrecht, M. C. M.; Jetten, M. S. M.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of nitrogen oxides on anammox bacteria are not well known. Therefore, anammox bacteria were exposed to 3,500 ppm nitric oxide (NO) in the gas phase. The anammox bacteria were not inhibited by the high NO concentration but rather used it to oxidize additional ammonium to dinitrogen gas under conditions relevant to wastewater treatment.

  20. Bacteria interfere with A-actinomycetemcomitans colonization

    Teughels, Wim; Haake, S. Kinder; Sliepen, Isabelle; Pauwels, Martine; Van Eldere, Johan; Cassiman, Jean-Jacques; Quirynen, Marc

    2007-01-01

    It is known that beneficial bacteria can suppress the emergence of pathogenic bacteria, particularly in the gastrointestinal tract. This study examined the potential for a similar suppression of Aggregatibacter (formerly Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans colonization of epithelial cells, due to its potential relevance in periodontal diseases. Seven presumed beneficial bacteria were examined for their ability to interfere, exclude, or displace A. actinomycetemcomitans from epithelial cells...

  1. Laser-Based Identification of Pathogenic Bacteria

    Rehse, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous in our world. From our homes, to our work environment, to our own bodies, bacteria are the omnipresent although often unobserved companions to human life. Physicists are typically untroubled professionally by the presence of these bacteria, as their study usually falls safely outside the realm of our typical domain. In the…

  2. Drosophila lifespan enhancement by exogenous bacteria

    Brummel, Ted; Ching, Alisa; Seroude, Laurent; Simon, Anne F.; Benzer, Seymour

    2004-01-01

    We researched the lifespan of Drosophila under axenic conditions compared with customary procedure. The experiments revealed that the presence of bacteria during the first week of adult life can enhance lifespan, despite unchanged food intake. Later in life, the presence of bacteria can reduce lifespan. Certain long-lived mutants react in different ways, indicating an interplay between bacteria and longevity-enhancing genes.

  3. Magnetotactic bacteria at the geomagnetic equator

    Magnetotatic bacteria are observed in freshwater and marine sediments of Fortaleza, Brazil, situated close to the geomagnetic equator. Both South-seeking and North-seeking bacteria are present in roughly equal numbers in the same samples. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that the vertical component of the geomagnetic field selects the predominant polarity type among magnetotactic bacteria in natural environments. (Author)

  4. Chemical signature of magnetotactic bacteria.

    Amor, Matthieu; Busigny, Vincent; Durand-Dubief, Mickal; Tharaud, Mickal; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Glabert, Alexandre; Alphandry, Edouard; Menguy, Nicolas; Benedetti, Marc F; Chebbi, Imne; Guyot, Franois

    2015-02-10

    There are longstanding and ongoing controversies about the abiotic or biological origin of nanocrystals of magnetite. On Earth, magnetotactic bacteria perform biomineralization of intracellular magnetite nanoparticles under a controlled pathway. These bacteria are ubiquitous in modern natural environments. However, their identification in ancient geological material remains challenging. Together with physical and mineralogical properties, the chemical composition of magnetite was proposed as a promising tracer for bacterial magnetofossil identification, but this had never been explored quantitatively and systematically for many trace elements. Here, we determine the incorporation of 34 trace elements in magnetite in both cases of abiotic aqueous precipitation and of production by the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1. We show that, in biomagnetite, most elements are at least 100 times less concentrated than in abiotic magnetite and we provide a quantitative pattern of this depletion. Furthermore, we propose a previously unidentified method based on strontium and calcium incorporation to identify magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria in the geological record. PMID:25624469

  5. AIDS: "it's the bacteria, stupid!".

    Broxmeyer, Lawrence; Cantwell, Alan

    2008-11-01

    Acid-fast tuberculous mycobacterial infections are common in AIDS and are regarded as secondary "opportunistic infections." According to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, TB is the major attributable cause of death in AIDS patients. Could such bacteria play a primary or causative role in AIDS? Certainly, In screening tests for HIV, there is frequent, up to 70%, cross-reactivity, between the gag and pol proteins of HIV and patients with mycobacterial infections such as tuberculosis. By 1972, five years before gays started dying in the U.S., Rolland wrote Genital Tuberculosis, a Forgotten Disease? And ironically, in 1979, on the eve of AIDS recognition, Gondzik and Jasiewicz showed that even in the laboratory, genitally infected tubercular male guinea pigs could infect healthy females through their semen by an HIV-compatible ratio of 1 in 6 or 17%, prompting him to warn his patients that not only was tuberculosis a sexually transmitted disease, but also the necessity of the application of suitable contraceptives, such as condoms, to avoid it. Gondzik's solution and date of publication are chilling; his findings significant. Since 1982 Cantwell et al found acid-fast bacteria closely related to tuberculosis (TB) and atypical tuberculosis in AIDS tissue. On the other hand molecular biologist and virologist Duesberg, who originally defined retroviral ultrastructure, has made it clear that HIV is not the cause of AIDS and that the so-called AIDS retrovirus has never been isolated in its pure state. Dr. Etienne de Harven, first to examine retroviruses under the electron, agrees. In 1993 HIV co-discoverer Luc Montagnier reported on cell-wall-deficient (CWD) bacteria which he called "mycoplasma" in AIDS tissue. He suspected these as a necessary "co-factor" for AIDS. Remarkably, Montagnier remained silent on Cantwell's reports of acid-fast bacteria which could simulate "mycoplasma" in AIDS tissue. Mattman makes clear that the differentiation between mycoplasma and CWD bacteria is difficult at best and cites Pachas's 1985 study wherein one mycoplasma was actually mistaken for a CWD form of a bacterium closely related to the mycobacteria. It is important to realize that the statement "HIV is the sole cause of AIDS" is just a hypothesis. There are unanswered questions and controversy concerning the role of HIV "as the sole cause of AIDS." And until they are resolved, a cure is not possible. This paper explores the possible role of acid-fast tuberculous mycobacteria as "primary agents" in AIDS. PMID:18691828

  6. Thermophilic spore-forming bacteria isolated from spoiled canned food and their heat resistance. Results of a French ten-year survey.

    André, S; Zuber, F; Remize, F

    2013-07-15

    Thermal processing of Low Acid Canned Foods (LACF), which are safe and shelf-stable at ambient temperature for several years, results in heat inactivation of all vegetative microorganisms and the partial or total inactivation of spores. Good Manufacturing Hygienic Practices include stability tests for managing the pathogen risk related to surviving mesophilic bacterial spores. LACF are also often submitted to additional incubation conditions, typically 55 °C for 7 days, to monitor spoilage by thermophiles. In this study we identified the bacterial species responsible for non-stability after prolonged at 55 °C of incubation of LACF from 455 samples collected from 122 French canneries over 10 years. Bacteria were identified by microsequencing or a recent developed tool for group-specific PCR detection (SporeTraQ™). A single species was identified for 93% of examined samples. Three genera were responsible for more than 80% of all non-stability cases: mostly Moorella (36%) and Geobacillus (35%), and less frequently Thermoanaerobacterium (10%). The other most frequent bacterial genera identified were Bacillus, Thermoanaerobacter, Caldanaerobius, Anoxybacillus, Paenibacillus and Clostridium. Species frequency was dependent on food category, i.e. vegetables, ready-made meals containing meat, seafood or other recipes, products containing fatty duck, and related to the intensity of the thermal treatment applied in these food categories. The spore heat resistance parameters (D or δ and z values) from 36 strains isolated in this study were determined. Taken together, our results single out the species most suitable for use as indicators for thermal process settings. This extensively-documented survey of the species that cause non-stability at 55 °C in LACF will help canneries to improve the management of microbial contamination. PMID:23728430

  7. Bacteria dispersal by hitchhiking on zooplankton

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Dziallas, Claudia; Leunert, Franziska; Tang, Kam W

    2010-01-01

    nonpathogenic bacteria has shown that direct association with zooplankton has significant influences on the bacteria's physiology and ecology. We used stratified migration columns to study vertical dispersal of hitchhiking bacteria through migrating zooplankton across a density gradient that was otherwise...... impenetrable for bacteria in both upward and downward directions (conveyor-belt hypothesis). The strength of our experiments is to permit quantitative estimation of transport and release of associated bacteria: vertical migration of Daphnia magna yielded an average dispersal rate of 1.3 x 10(5) x cells x...

  8. Antimicrobial activity of lysozyme against bacteria involved in food spoilage and food-borne disease.

    Hughey, V L; Johnson, E. A.

    1987-01-01

    Egg white lysozyme was demonstrated to have antibacterial activity against organisms of concern in food safety, including Listeria monocytogenes and certain strains of Clostridium botulinum. We also found that the food spoilage thermophile Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum was highly susceptible to lysozyme and confirmed that the spoilage organisms Bacillus stearothermophilus and Clostridium tyrobutyricum were also extremely sensitive. Several gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens isolate...

  9. Potential role of bacteria packaging by protozoa in the persistence and transmission of pathogenic bacteria

    SteveJCharette

    2014-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria live in close association with protozoa. These unicellular eukaryotic microorganisms are ubiquitous in various environments. A number of protozoa such as amoebae and ciliates ingest pathogenic bacteria, package them usually in membrane structures, and then release them into the environment. Packaged bacteria are more resistant to various stresses and are more apt to survive than free bacteria. New evidence indicates that protozoa and not bacteria control the packaging...

  10. Viabilidade celular de Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultivada em associação com bactérias contaminantes da fermentação alcoólica Cellular viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultivated in association with contaminant bacteria of alcoholic fermentation

    Thais de Paula Nobre

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar a influência de bactérias dos gêneros Bacillus e Lactobacillus, bem como de seus produtos metabólicos, na redução da viabilidade celular de leveduras Saccharomyces cerevisiae. As bactérias Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Lactobacillus fermentum e Lactobacillus plantarum foram cultivadas em associação com a levedura S. cerevisiae (cepa Y-904 por 72 horas a 32 °C, sob agitação. A viabilidade celular, a taxa de brotamento e a população de células de S. cerevisiae e a acidez total, a acidez volátil e o pH dos meios de cultivos foram determinados às 0, 24, 48 e 72 horas do cultivo misto. As culturas de bactérias foram tratadas através do calor, de agente antimicrobiano e de irradiação. Os resultados mostraram que apenas os meios de cultivo mais acidificados, contaminados com as bactérias ativas L. fermentum e B. subtilis, provocaram redução na viabilidade celular de S. cerevisiae. Excetuando a bactéria B. subtilis tratada com radiação gama, as demais bactérias tratadas pelos diferentes processos (calor, irradiação e antimicrobiano não causaram diminuição da viabilidade celular e da população de S. cerevisiae, indicando que a presença isolada dos metabólitos celulares dessas bactérias não foi suficiente para reduzir a porcentagem de células vivas de S. cerevisiae.The aim of this project was to study the influence of the bacteria Bacillus and Lactobacillus, as well as their metabolic products to decrease the cellular viability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus plantarum were cultivated in association with yeast S. cerevisiae (strain Y-904 for 72 hours at 32 ºC under agitation. The cellular viability, budding rate and population of S. Cerevisiae and the total acidity, volatile acidity and pH of culture medium were determined at 0, 24, 48 and 72 hours of incubation of the mixed culture. The bacteria cultures were treated by heat sterilization, antibacterial agent and irradiation. The results showed that only the more acidified culture medium, contaminated with active bacteria L. fermentum and B. subtilis, caused a reduction in the yeast cellular viability. Except for the bacteria B. subtilis treated for radiation, the other bacteria treated by the different procedures (heat, radiation and antibacterial did not cause a reduction in the cellular viability of S. cerevisiae, indicating that the isolated presence of the cellular metabolic of these bacteria was not enough to reduce the percentage of the living yeast cells.

  11. Taxonomy of Bacteria Nodulating Legumes

    Ral Rivas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, the term rhizobia has come to be used for all the bacteria that are capable of nodulation and nitrogen fixation in association with legumes but the taxonomy of rhizobia has changed considerably over the last 30 year. Recently, several non- rhizobial species belonging to alpha and beta subgroup of Proteobacteria have been identified as nitrogen-fixing legume symbionts. Here we provide an overview of the history of the rhizobia and the widespread phylogenetic diversity of nitrogen-fixing legume symbionts.

  12. Turning Bacteria Suspensions into Superfluids

    López, Héctor Matías; Gachelin, Jérémie; Douarche, Carine; Auradou, Harold; Clément, Eric

    2015-07-01

    The rheological response under simple shear of an active suspension of Escherichia coli is determined in a large range of shear rates and concentrations. The effective viscosity and the time scales characterizing the bacterial organization under shear are obtained. In the dilute regime, we bring evidence for a low-shear Newtonian plateau characterized by a shear viscosity decreasing with concentration. In the semidilute regime, for particularly active bacteria, the suspension displays a "superfluidlike" transition where the viscous resistance to shear vanishes, thus showing that, macroscopically, the activity of pusher swimmers organized by shear is able to fully overcome the dissipative effects due to viscous loss.

  13. Concentric-flow electrokinetic injector enables serial crystallography of ribosome and photosystem II.

    Sierra, Raymond G; Gati, Cornelius; Laksmono, Hartawan; Dao, E Han; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin; Kern, Jan; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Brewster, Aaron S; Young, Iris D; Michels-Clark, Tara; Aquila, Andrew; Liang, Mengning; Hunter, Mark S; Koglin, Jason E; Boutet, Sbastien; Junco, Elia A; Hayes, Brandon; Bogan, Michael J; Hampton, Christina Y; Puglisi, Elisabetta V; Sauter, Nicholas K; Stan, Claudiu A; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K; Soltis, S Michael; Puglisi, Joseph D; DeMirci, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    We describe a concentric-flow electrokinetic injector for efficiently delivering microcrystals for serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography analysis that enables studies of challenging biological systems in their unadulterated mother liquor. We used the injector to analyze microcrystals of Geobacillus stearothermophilus thermolysin (2.2- structure), Thermosynechococcus elongatus photosystem II (<3- diffraction) and Thermus thermophilus small ribosomal subunit bound to the antibiotic paromomycin at ambient temperature (3.4- structure). PMID:26619013

  14. Analytical strategy for the detection of antibiotic residues in sheep and goat’s milk

    M. Carmen Beltrán; Rafael L. Althaus; Ana Molina; M. Isabel Berruga; M. Pilar Molina

    2015-01-01

    The use of antibiotics to treat mastitis and other infectious diseases in dairy sheep and goats is a widespread practice nowadays that can, when not properly applied, result in the contamination of the milk supply. Spanish legislation establishes the control of the presence of antibiotic residues in sheep and goat’s milk using screening methods that detect, at least, beta-lactam drugs. Microbial inhibitor tests using Geobacillus stearothermophilus var. calidolactis and specific receptor-bindi...

  15. Effect of Dielectric and Liquid on Plasma Sterilization Using Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma

    Mastanaiah, Navya; Judith A. Johnson; Roy, Subrata

    2013-01-01

    Plasma sterilization offers a faster, less toxic and versatile alternative to conventional sterilization methods. Using a relatively small, low temperature, atmospheric, dielectric barrier discharge surface plasma generator, we achieved ≥6 log reduction in concentration of vegetative bacterial and yeast cells within 4 minutes and ≥6 log reduction of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores within 20 minutes. Plasma sterilization is influenced by a wide variety of factors. Two factors studied in ...

  16. DMTB: the magnetotactic bacteria database

    Pan, Y.; Lin, W.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are of interest in biogeomagnetism, rock magnetism, microbiology, biomineralization, and advanced magnetic materials because of their ability to synthesize highly ordered intracellular nano-sized magnetic minerals, magnetite or greigite. Great strides for MTB studies have been made in the past few decades. More than 600 articles concerning MTB have been published. These rapidly growing data are stimulating cross disciplinary studies in such field as biogeomagnetism. We have compiled the first online database for MTB, i.e., Database of Magnestotactic Bacteria (DMTB, http://database.biomnsl.com). It contains useful information of 16S rRNA gene sequences, oligonucleotides, and magnetic properties of MTB, and corresponding ecological metadata of sampling sites. The 16S rRNA gene sequences are collected from the GenBank database, while all other data are collected from the scientific literature. Rock magnetic properties for both uncultivated and cultivated MTB species are also included. In the DMTB database, data are accessible through four main interfaces: Site Sort, Phylo Sort, Oligonucleotides, and Magnetic Properties. References in each entry serve as links to specific pages within public databases. The online comprehensive DMTB will provide a very useful data resource for researchers from various disciplines, e.g., microbiology, rock magnetism and paleomagnetism, biogeomagnetism, magnetic material sciences and others.

  17. Probabilistic exposure assessment model to estimate aseptic-UHT product failure rate.

    Pujol, Laure; Albert, Isabelle; Magras, Catherine; Johnson, Nicholas Brian; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic-Ultra-High-Temperature (UHT) products are manufactured to be free of microorganisms capable of growing in the food at normal non-refrigerated conditions at which the food is likely to be held during manufacture, distribution and storage. Two important phases within the process are widely recognised as critical in controlling microbial contamination: the sterilisation steps and the following aseptic steps. Of the microbial hazards, the pathogen spore formers Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus cereus are deemed the most pertinent to be controlled. In addition, due to a relatively high thermal resistance, Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores are considered a concern for spoilage of low acid aseptic-UHT products. A probabilistic exposure assessment model has been developed in order to assess the aseptic-UHT product failure rate associated with these three bacteria. It was a Modular Process Risk Model, based on nine modules. They described: i) the microbial contamination introduced by the raw materials, either from the product (i.e. milk, cocoa and dextrose powders and water) or the packaging (i.e. bottle and sealing component), ii) the sterilisation processes, of either the product or the packaging material, iii) the possible recontamination during subsequent processing of both product and packaging. The Sterility Failure Rate (SFR) was defined as the sum of bottles contaminated for each batch, divided by the total number of bottles produced per process line run (10(6) batches simulated per process line). The SFR associated with the three bacteria was estimated at the last step of the process (i.e. after Module 9) but also after each module, allowing for the identification of modules, and responsible contamination pathways, with higher or lower intermediate SFR. The model contained 42 controlled settings associated with factory environment, process line or product formulation, and more than 55 probabilistic inputs corresponding to inputs with variability conditional to a mean uncertainty. It was developed in @Risk and run through Monte Carlo simulations. Overall, the highest SFR was associated with G. stearothermophilus (380000 bottles contaminated in 10(11) bottles produced) and the lowest to C. botulinum (3 bottles contaminated in 10(11) bottles produced). Unsurprisingly, SFR due to G. stearothermophilus was due to its ability to survive the UHT treatment. More interestingly, it was identified that SFR due to B. cereus (17000 bottles contaminated in 10(11) bottles produced) was due to an airborne recontamination of the aseptic tank (49%) and a post-sterilisation packaging contamination (33%). A deeper analysis (sensitivity and scenario analyses) was done to investigate how the SFR due to B. cereus could be reduced by changing the process settings related to potential air recontamination source. PMID:25440556

  18. Thermophilic bacteria from Mexican thermal environments: isolation and potential applications.

    Pinzn-Martnez, D L; Rodrguez-Gmez, C; Miana-Galbis, D; Carrillo-Chvez, J A; Valerio-Alfaro, G; Oliart-Ros, R

    2010-01-01

    Extremophiles are microorganisms that possess application possibilities in several industrial fields, including agricultural, chemical, laundry, pharmaceutical, food, petroleum and bioremediation. This work reports the isolation of 19 thermophilic, alkalitolerant and halotolerant bacterial strains from two thermal sites in Veracruz, Mxico: El Carrizal thermal pool and Los Baos hot spring. These strains belong to the Geobacillus, Anoxybacillus and Aeribacillus genera. The strains produce lipases, proteases, and amylases under thermophilic conditions. They may have good potential for application in microbial enhanced oil recovery, since they are thermophilic and halotolerant, produce exopolymers (up to 11.8 mg/mg) and acids, show emulsifying activity (E24 up to 7.5%), and are able to grow in kerosene as carbon source; these strains may also be used in biodesulphurization since they can grow in dibenzothiophene producing 2-hydroxybiphenyl under thermophilic conditions (up to 2.9 mg/L). PMID:20662384

  19. Use of extremophilic bacteria for second generation bioethanol production

    Tomás, Ana Faria; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    recalcitrance of these materials and their diverse sugar composition make the industrial yeast strains currently used unsuitable for a second generation bioethanol production process. One of the alternative strategies is the use of extreme thermophilic microorganisms. Currently, selected members from the genera...... Clostridium, Thermoanaerobacter, Geobacillus and Thermoanaerobacterium are among the best candidates. A new strain of Thermoanaerobacter, closely related to T. italicus and T. mathranii, has achieved 0.43 gethanol/gxylose, which is 83% of the theoretical yield of ethanol based on xylose and the highest value...... for a wild type strain reported so far. However, productivity and titer values comparable to a first generation process are yet to be achieved. Metabolic engineering to redirect the metabolism from mixed-product fermentation to ethanol production is one of the solutions proposed to improve the...

  20. Sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Dahl, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are characterized by oxidizing various inorganic sulfur compounds for use as electron donors in carbon dioxide fixation during anoxygenic photosynthetic growth. These bacteria are divided into the purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and the green sulfur bacteria (GSB). They...... utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate and sometimes also ferrous iron and hydrogen as electron donors. This review focuses on the dissimilatory and assimilatory metabolism of inorganic sulfur compounds in these bacteria and also briefly discusses these metabolisms in...... other types of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. The biochemistry and genetics of sulfur compound oxidation in PSB and GSB are described in detail. A variety of enzymes catalyzing sulfur oxidation reactions have been isolated from GSB and PSB (especially Allochromatium vinosum, a representative of the...

  1. QUANTATITIVE PCR ASSAY FOR MARINE BACTERIA

    Brunk, Clifford F.

    2003-01-01

    Monitoring the bacterial flora in coastal marine waters by conventional techniques has been difficult as most of the bacteria do not readily grow on culture plates and their morphologies are virtually identical in the microscope. Molecular techniques, particularly characterizing bacteria using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of their small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) genes, has dramatically improved the ability to identify bacteria from environmental samples. Identificatio...

  2. Utilization of xylooligosaccharides by selected ruminal bacteria.

    Cotta, M A

    1993-01-01

    The ability of ruminal bacteria to utilize xylooligosaccharides was examined. Xylooligosaccharides were prepared by partially hydrolyzing oat spelt xylan in phosphoric acid. This substrate solution was added (0.2%, wt/vol) to a complex medium containing yeast extract and Trypticase that was inoculated with individual species of ruminal bacteria, and growth and utilization were monitored over time. All of the xylanolytic bacteria examined were able to utilize this oligosaccharide mixture as a ...

  3. Transformation of gram positive bacteria by sonoporation

    Yang, Yunfeng; Li, Yongchao

    2014-03-11

    The present invention provides a sonoporation-based method that can be universally applied for delivery of compounds into Gram positive bacteria. Gram positive bacteria which can be transformed by sonoporation include, for example, Bacillus, Streptococcus, Acetobacterium, and Clostridium. Compounds which can be delivered into Gram positive bacteria via sonoporation include nucleic acids (DNA or RNA), proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, viruses, small organic and inorganic molecules, and nano-particles.

  4. Magnetization processes in magnetotactic bacteria systems

    In low fields, the magnetization of magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) culture is affected by chemotaxis and can be described by the Langevin function which depends on magnetic field strength and chemotaxis energy. In moderate fields, bacteria magnetization switching occurs as the second-order phase transition induced by increasing the field applied opposite the MTB magnetic moments. For bacteria containing one or two chains of magnetosomes we calculated the switching field as a function of the gap between magnetic particles

  5. Bacteria cell properties and grain size impact on bacteria transport and deposition in porous media.

    Bai, Hongjuan; Cochet, Nelly; Pauss, André; Lamy, Edvina

    2016-03-01

    The simultaneous role of bacteria cell properties and porous media grain size on bacteria transport and deposition behavior was investigated in this study. Transport column experiments and numerical HYDRUS-1D simulations of three bacteria with different cell properties (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Rhodococcus rhodochrous) were carried out on two sandy media with different grain sizes, under saturated steady state flow conditions. Each bacterium was characterized by cell size and shape, cell motility, electrophoretic mobility, zeta potential, hydrophobicity and potential of interaction with the sand surface. Cell characteristics affected bacteria transport behavior in the fine sand, but similar bacteria breakthroughs and retardation factors observed in the coarse sand, indicated that bacteria transport was more depended on grain size than on bacteria cell properties. Retention decreased with increasing hydrophobicity and increased with increasing electrophoretic mobility of bacteria for both sand. The increasing sand grain size resulted in a decrease of bacteria retention, except for the motile E. coli, indicating that retention of this strain was more dependent on cell motility than on the sand grain size. Bacteria deposition coefficients obtained from numerical simulations of the retention profiles indicated that straining was an important mechanism affecting bacteria deposition of E. coli and Klebsiella sp., in the fine sand, but the attachment had the same importance as straining for R. rhodochrous. The results obtained in the coarse sand did not permit to discriminate the predominant mechanism of bacteria deposition and the relative implication of bacteria cell properties of this process. PMID:26705829

  6. Effect of heating rate on highly heat-resistant spore-forming microorganisms.

    Gómez-Jódar, Isabel; Ros-Chumillas, María; Palop, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Highly heat-resistant spore-forming Bacillus cause nonsterility problems in canned food and reduce the shelf life of many processed foods. The aim of this research was to evaluate the thermal inactivation of Bacillus sporothermodurans IIC65, Bacillus subtilis IC9, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus T26 under isothermal and nonisothermal conditions. The data obtained showed that B. sporothermodurans and B. subtilis were more heat resistant than G. stearothermophilus. The survival curves of B. sporothermodurans and B. subtilis showed shoulders, while the survival curves of G. stearothermophilus showed tails. Under nonisothermal treatment, at heating rates of 1 and 20 ℃/min, time needed to completely inactivate G. stearothermophilus was shorter than that required for B. sporothermodurans and B. subtilis. In complex heat treatments (heating-holding-cooling), the survival curves of B. sporothermodurans and B. subtilis showed the same activation shoulders than those obtained under isothermal treatments and the activation shoulders were again absent in the case of G. stearothermophilus. Predictions fitted quite well the data obtained for B. sporothermodurans. In contrast, the data for B. subtilis showed half a log cycle more survival than expected and in the case of G. stearothermophilus, the survival curve obtained showed much higher inactivation than expected. PMID:25852134

  7. Quorum sensing in gram-negative bacteria

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.J.; Høiby, N.; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria can communicate with each other by means of signal molecules to coordinate the behavior of the entire community, and the mechanism is referred to as quorum sensing (QS). Signal systems enable bacteria to sense the size of their densities by monitoring the concentration of the signal...... molecules. Among Gram-negative bacteria N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL)-dependent quorum sensing systems are particularly widespread. These systems are used to coordinate expression of phenotypes that are fundamental to the interaction of bacteria with each other and with their environment and...

  8. Coryneform bacteria associated with canine otitis externa

    Aalbæk, Bent; Bemis, David A.; Schjærff, Mette; Kania, Stephen A.; Frank, Linda A.; Guardabassi, Luca

    This study aims to investigate the occurrence of coryneform bacteria in canine otitis externa. A combined case series and case-control study was carried out to improve the current knowledge on frequency and clinical significance of coryneform bacteria in samples from canine otitis externa. A total...... of coryneform bacteria was 16% among 55 cases of canine otitis externa examined at the Danish hospital during 2007. In contrast, detectable levels of coryneform bacteria were not demonstrated in samples from the acustic meatus of 35 dogs with apparently healthy ears, attending the hospital during the...

  9. In vitro susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria.

    Washington, J A

    1979-01-01

    In vitro susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria should be limited to isolates from persistent or recurrent infections that have been treated adequately and appropriately with antimicrobial agents and, in reference centers, to collections of isolates in order to monitor alterations in susceptibility of species to various antimicrobial agents. An agar dilution reference method is being evaluated currently; however, practicality limits sporadic testing of single isolates to disk elution or broth dilution techniques. No single disk diffusion method has yet been found to be acceptable for testing anaerobic bacteria, and the results obtained with standardized procedures for aerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria are not applicable to anaerobic bacteria. PMID:288163

  10. Fewer bacteria in warm water

    There has been many suggestions to how the ideal warm water system should be. Particularly whether warm water containers or heat exchangers in larger houses are the best solutions in order to maintain a water quality with low levels of bacteria. In an investigation made by Statens Byggeforskningsinstitutt (Denmark) regarding ''Bacterial growth in warm water installations with heat exchangers'' there were used several heat exchangers made by Gjelsted and Lund of three of which had HWAT heating cables. The bacterial content was low from these exchangers compared to exchangers with circulation. The article presents promising results from a study where the method was investigated over a longer period in two new larger warm water systems. Some energy conservation aspects are discussed

  11. Single Bacteria as Turing Machines

    Bos, Julia; Zang, Qiucen; Vyawahare, Saurabh; Austin, Robert

    2014-03-01

    In Allan Turing's famous 1950 paper on Computing Machinery and Intelligence, he started with the provocative statement: ``I propose to consider the question, `Can machines think?' This should begin with definitions of the meaning of the terms `machine' and `think'.'' In our own work on exploring the way that organisms respond to stress and evolve, it seems at times as if they come to remarkably fast solutions to problems, indicating some sort of very clever computational machinery. I'll discuss how it would appear that bacteria can indeed create a form of a Turing Machine, the first example of a computer, and how they might use this algorithm to do rapid evolution to solve a genomics problem.

  12. Aggregation Patterns in Stressed Bacteria

    We study the formation of spot patterns seen in bacterial colonies when the bacteria are subjected to oxidative stress due to hazardous by-products of respiration. The cell density is coupled to a chemoattractant concentration as well as to nutrient and waste fields. The model combines the propagation of a front of motile bacterial radially outward from an initial site, a Turing instability of the uniformly dense state, and a reduction of motility for cells sufficiently far behind the front. The wide variety of patterns seen in the experiments is reproduced by the model by varying the details of the initiation of the chemoattractant emission as well as the transition to a nonmotile phase

  13. Aggregation Patterns in Stressed Bacteria

    Tsimring, L.; Levine, H. [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0402 (United States); Aranson, I. [Deptartment of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan (Israel); Ben-Jacob, E.; Cohen, I.; Shochet, O. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond & Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Reynolds, W.N. [Complex Systems Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos New Mexico (United States)

    1995-08-28

    We study the formation of spot patterns seen in bacterial colonies when the bacteria are subjected to oxidative stress due to hazardous by-products of respiration. The cell density is coupled to a chemoattractant concentration as well as to nutrient and waste fields. The model combines the propagation of a front of motile bacterial radially outward from an initial site, a Turing instability of the uniformly dense state, and a reduction of motility for cells sufficiently far behind the front. The wide variety of patterns seen in the experiments is reproduced by the model by varying the details of the initiation of the chemoattractant emission as well as the transition to a nonmotile phase.

  14. Growth rates of bacteria in rivers

    Baker, J H

    1981-01-01

    Three different methods for determining bacterial growth rate in rivers are described. Two of the methods are for bacteria in suspension: a recirculating experimental channel method and a radioactive tracer technique using super(35)SO sub(4). The third method is for bacteria attached to surfaces and specifically considers the surface of the common duckweed Lemna minor).

  15. Association of methanogenic bacteria with rumen ciliates.

    Vogels, G.D.; Hoppe, W F; Stumm, C K

    1980-01-01

    In 11 species of rumen ciliates belonging to nine genera of the family Ophryoscolecidae (order Entodiniomorphida) an ectosymbiosis with methanogenic bacteria was found. The bacteria could be identified as methanogens on the basis of the presence of specific fluorescent coenzymes (F350 and F420). This somatic interaction may reflect a metabolic interaction in which efficient interspecies hydrogen transfer benefits both partners.

  16. Rapid methods for detection of bacteria

    Corfitzen, Charlotte B.; Andersen, B.Ø.; Miller, M.; Ursin, C.; Arvin, Erik; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    Traditional methods for detection of bacteria in drinking water e.g. Heterotrophic Plate Counts (HPC) or Most Probable Number (MNP) take 48-72 hours to give the result. New rapid methods for detection of bacteria are needed to protect the consumers against contaminations. Two rapid methods...

  17. Comparative Genomics of Green Sulfur Bacteria

    Ussery, David; Davenport, C; Tümmler, B

    Eleven completely sequenced Chlorobi genomes were compared in oligonucleotide usage, gene contents, and synteny. The green sulfur bacteria (GSB) are equipped with a core genome that sustains their anoxygenic phototrophic lifestyle by photosynthesis, sulfur oxidation, and CO(2) fixation. Whole...... weight of 10(6), and are probably instrumental for the bacteria to generate their own intimate (micro)environment....

  18. Analyzing Arthropods for the Presence of Bacteria

    Andrews, Elizabeth S.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria within arthropods can be identified using culture-independent methods. This unit describes protocols for surface sterilization of arthropods, DNA extraction of whole bodies and tissues, touchdown PCR amplification using 16S rDNA general bacteria primers and profiling the bacterial community using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

  19. HYDROCARBON-DEGRADING BACTERIA AND SURFACTANT ACTIVITY

    Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Grazyna A. Plaza, G; jacek Wypych, j

    2006-08-15

    Fate of benzene ethylbenzene toluene xylenes (BTEX) compounds through biodegradation was investigated using two different bacteria, Ralstonia picketti (BP-20) and Alcaligenes piechaudii (CZOR L-1B). These bacteria were isolated from extremely polluted petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. PCR and Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) were used to identify the isolates. Biodegradation was measured using each organism individually and in combination. Both bacteria were shown to degrade each of the BTEX compounds. Alcaligenes piechaudii biodegraded BTEXs more efficiently while mixed with BP-20 and individually. Biosurfactant production was observed by culture techniques. In addition 3-hydroxy fatty acids, important in biosurfactant production, was observed by FAME analysis. In the all experiments toluene and m+p- xylenes were better growth substrates for both bacteria than the other BTEX compounds. In addition, the test results indicate that the bacteria could contribute to bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX) pollution increase biodegradation through the action by biosurfactants.

  20. Chryseobacterium indologenes, novel mannanase-producing bacteria

    Surachai Rattanasuk

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mannanase is a mannan degrading enzyme which is produced by microorganisms, including bacteria. This enzyme can be used in many industrial processes as well as for improving the quality of animal feeds. The aim of the present study was toscreen and characterize the mannanase-producing bacteria. Two genera of bacteria were isolated from Thai soil samples,fermented coconut, and fertilizer. Screening was carried out on agar plates containing mannan stained with iodine solution.The bacteria were identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequence, biochemical test and morphology, respectively. The mannanase activity was determined by zymogram and DNS method. Two strains of bacteria with mannanase activity were identified as Bacillus and Chryseobacterium. This is the first report of mannanase-producing Chryseobacterium.

  1. Coryneform bacteria associated with canine otitis externa

    Aalbk, Bent; Bemis, David A.; Schjrff, Mette; Kania, Stephen A.; Frank, Linda A.; Guardabassi, Luca

    This study aims to investigate the occurrence of coryneform bacteria in canine otitis externa. A combined case series and case-control study was carried out to improve the current knowledge on frequency and clinical significance of coryneform bacteria in samples from canine otitis externa. A total...... of 16 cases of otitis externa with involvement of coryneform bacteria were recorded at two referral veterinary hospitals in Denmark and the US, respectively. Coryneform bacteria were identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Corynebacterium auriscanis was the most common coryneform species (10...... cases). Small colony variants of this species were also observed. Other coryneform isolates were identified as Corynebacterium amycolatum (3 cases), Corynebacterium freneyi (2 cases) and an Arcanobacterium-like species (1 case). The coryneform bacteria were in all cases isolated together with other...

  2. Identification of biogenic dimethyl selenodisulfide in the headspace gases above genetically modified Escherichia coli.

    Swearingen, Jerry W; Frankel, Danielle P; Fuentes, Derie E; Saavedra, Claudia P; Vsquez, Claudio C; Chasteen, Thomas G

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli JM109 cells were modified to express the genes encoded in a 3.8-kb chromosomal DNA fragment from a metalloid-resistant thermophile, Geobacillus stearothermophilus V. Manual headspace extraction was used to collect the gases for gas chromatography with fluorine-induced sulfur chemiluminescence analysis while solid-phase microextraction was used for sample collection in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. When grown in the presence of selenate or selenite, these bacteria produced both organo-sulfur and organo-selenium in the headspace gases above the cultures. Organo-sulfur compounds detected were methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and dimethyl trisulfide. Organo-selenium compounds detected were dimethyl selenide and dimethyl diselenide. Two mixed sulfur-selenium compounds, dimethyl selenenyl sulfide and a chromatographically late-eluting compound, were detected. Dimethyl selenodisulfide, CH(3)SeSSCH(3), and dimethyl bis(thio)selenide, CH(3)SSeSCH(3), were synthesized and analyzed by GC/MS and fluorine-induced chemiluminescence to determine which corresponded to the late-eluting compound that was bacterially produced. CH(3)SeSSCH(3) was positively identified as the compound detected in bacterial headspace above Se-amended cultures. Using GC retention times, the boiling point of CH(3)SeSSCH(3) was estimated to be approximately 192 degrees C. This is the first report of CH(3)SeSSCH(3) produced by bacterial cultures. PMID:16289446

  3. Cold Atmospheric Air Plasma Sterilization against Spores and Other Microorganisms of Clinical Interest

    Isbary, Georg; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Li, Yang-Fang; Zimmermann, Julia L.; Stolz, Wilhelm; Schlegel, Jürgen; Morfill, Gregor E.; Schmidt, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Physical cold atmospheric surface microdischarge (SMD) plasma operating in ambient air has promising properties for the sterilization of sensitive medical devices where conventional methods are not applicable. Furthermore, SMD plasma could revolutionize the field of disinfection at health care facilities. The antimicrobial effects on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria of clinical relevance, as well as the fungus Candida albicans, were tested. Thirty seconds of plasma treatment led to a 4 to 6 log10 CFU reduction on agar plates. C. albicans was the hardest to inactivate. The sterilizing effect on standard bioindicators (bacterial endospores) was evaluated on dry test specimens that were wrapped in Tyvek coupons. The experimental D23°C values for Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus atrophaeus, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus were determined as 0.3 min, 0.5 min, 0.6 min, and 0.9 min, respectively. These decimal reduction times (D values) are distinctly lower than D values obtained with other reference methods. Importantly, the high inactivation rate was independent of the material of the test specimen. Possible inactivation mechanisms for relevant microorganisms are briefly discussed, emphasizing the important role of neutral reactive plasma species and pointing to recent diagnostic methods that will contribute to a better understanding of the strong biocidal effect of SMD air plasma. PMID:22582068

  4. Cold atmospheric air plasma sterilization against spores and other microorganisms of clinical interest.

    Klmpfl, Tobias G; Isbary, Georg; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Li, Yang-Fang; Zimmermann, Julia L; Stolz, Wilhelm; Schlegel, Jrgen; Morfill, Gregor E; Schmidt, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-08-01

    Physical cold atmospheric surface microdischarge (SMD) plasma operating in ambient air has promising properties for the sterilization of sensitive medical devices where conventional methods are not applicable. Furthermore, SMD plasma could revolutionize the field of disinfection at health care facilities. The antimicrobial effects on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria of clinical relevance, as well as the fungus Candida albicans, were tested. Thirty seconds of plasma treatment led to a 4 to 6 log(10) CFU reduction on agar plates. C. albicans was the hardest to inactivate. The sterilizing effect on standard bioindicators (bacterial endospores) was evaluated on dry test specimens that were wrapped in Tyvek coupons. The experimental D(23)()(C) values for Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus atrophaeus, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus were determined as 0.3 min, 0.5 min, 0.6 min, and 0.9 min, respectively. These decimal reduction times (D values) are distinctly lower than D values obtained with other reference methods. Importantly, the high inactivation rate was independent of the material of the test specimen. Possible inactivation mechanisms for relevant microorganisms are briefly discussed, emphasizing the important role of neutral reactive plasma species and pointing to recent diagnostic methods that will contribute to a better understanding of the strong biocidal effect of SMD air plasma. PMID:22582068

  5. Therapeutic Properties of Probiotic Bacteria

    Nathanon Trachoo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of its long history, public consciousness of probiotics has shifted dramatically in recent years. This is due to a number of factors, including an increased concern about the potential generation of antibiotic resistant bacterial strains due to widespread antibacterial use, and also to the spreading realization that one`s health can be, not simply maintained, but actually improved with proper nutrition. Combined, these factors have stimulated a surge in probiotic research in the past decade, resulting in increasingly refined studies. Indeed, after Elie Metchnikov first printed his work suggesting a positive correlation between human longevity and the consumption of fermented milk, information on probiotics is leaving the realm of the anecdotal as recent, double-blind, placebo controlled randomized tests support beneficial probiotic activity. Concurrently, more is being learned about their activities in vivo. While much work remains to be done before a detailed understanding of probiotics can be achieved, there is mounting evidence that probiotics, when used in proper conditions, may indeed have prophylactic or preventative effects on a broad array of human and animal diseases. This article briefly surveys probiotic history and discusses recent research with a special emphasis on lactic acid bacteria probiotics. Finally, it discusses the inherent difficulties of their study and suggestions for standards for future work.

  6. Comparative cytotoxicity of periodontal bacteria

    The direct cytotoxicity of sonic extracts (SE) from nine periodontal bacteria for human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) was compared. Equivalent dosages (in terms of protein concentration) of SE were used to challenge HGF cultures. The cytotoxic potential of each SE was assessed by its ability to (1) inhibit HGF proliferation, as measured by direct cell counts; (2) inhibit 3H-thymidine incorporation in HGF cultures; or (3) cause morphological alterations of the cells in challenged cultures. The highest concentration (500 micrograms SE protein/ml) of any of the SEs used to challenge the cells was found to be markedly inhibitory to the HGFs by all three of the criteria of cytotoxicity. At the lowest dosage tested (50 micrograms SE protein/ml); only SE from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides gingivalis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum caused a significant effect (greater than 90% inhibition or overt morphological abnormalities) in the HGFs as determined by any of the criteria employed. SE from Capnocytophaga sputigena, Eikenella corrodens, or Wolinella recta also inhibited cell proliferation and thymidine incorporation at this dosage; however, the degree of inhibition (5-50%) was consistently, clearly less than that of the first group of three organisms named above. The SE of the three other organisms tested (Actinomyces odontolyticus, Bacteroides intermedius, and Streptococcus sanguis) had little or no effect (0-10% inhibition) at this concentration. The data suggest that the outcome of the interaction between bacterial components and normal resident cells of the periodontium is, at least in part, a function of the bacterial species

  7. Comparative cytotoxicity of periodontal bacteria

    Stevens, R.H.; Hammond, B.F.

    1988-11-01

    The direct cytotoxicity of sonic extracts (SE) from nine periodontal bacteria for human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) was compared. Equivalent dosages (in terms of protein concentration) of SE were used to challenge HGF cultures. The cytotoxic potential of each SE was assessed by its ability to (1) inhibit HGF proliferation, as measured by direct cell counts; (2) inhibit 3H-thymidine incorporation in HGF cultures; or (3) cause morphological alterations of the cells in challenged cultures. The highest concentration (500 micrograms SE protein/ml) of any of the SEs used to challenge the cells was found to be markedly inhibitory to the HGFs by all three of the criteria of cytotoxicity. At the lowest dosage tested (50 micrograms SE protein/ml); only SE from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides gingivalis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum caused a significant effect (greater than 90% inhibition or overt morphological abnormalities) in the HGFs as determined by any of the criteria employed. SE from Capnocytophaga sputigena, Eikenella corrodens, or Wolinella recta also inhibited cell proliferation and thymidine incorporation at this dosage; however, the degree of inhibition (5-50%) was consistently, clearly less than that of the first group of three organisms named above. The SE of the three other organisms tested (Actinomyces odontolyticus, Bacteroides intermedius, and Streptococcus sanguis) had little or no effect (0-10% inhibition) at this concentration. The data suggest that the outcome of the interaction between bacterial components and normal resident cells of the periodontium is, at least in part, a function of the bacterial species.

  8. Antibiotic resistance in probiotic bacteria

    AbelardoMargolles

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The main probiotic bacteria are strains belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although other representatives, such as Bacillus or Escherichia coli strains, have also been used. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are two common inhabitants of the human intestinal microbiota. Also, some species are used in food fermentation processes as starters, or as adjunct cultures in the food industry. With some exceptions, antibiotic resistance in these beneficial microbes does not constitute a safety concern in itself, when mutations or intrinsic resistance mechanisms are responsible for the resistance phenotype. In fact, some probiotic strains with intrinsic antibiotic resistance could be useful for restoring the gut microbiota after antibiotic treatment. However, specific antibiotic resistance determinants carried on mobile genetic elements, such as tetracycline resistance genes, are often detected in the typical probiotic genera, and constitute a reservoir of resistance for potential food or gut pathogens, thus representing a serious safety issue.

  9. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging of Intratumoral Bacteria.

    Cronin, Michelle; Akin, Ali R; Francis, Kevin P; Tangney, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of whole-body bioluminescent imaging (BLI) for the study of bacterial trafficking in live mice, with an emphasis on the use of bacteria in therapy of cancer. Bacteria present an attractive class of vector for cancer therapy, possessing a natural ability to grow preferentially within tumors following systemic administration. Bacteria engineered to express the lux gene cassette permit BLI detection of the bacteria and tumor sites concurrently. The location and levels of bacteria within tumors over time can be readily examined, visualized in two or three dimensions. The method is applicable to a wide range of bacterial species and tumor xenograft types. This article describes the protocol for analysis of bioluminescent bacteria within subcutaneous tumor-bearing mice. This powerful, and inexpensive, real-time imaging strategy represents an ideal method for the study of bacteria in vivo in the context of cancer research. This protocol outlines the procedure for studying lux-tagged Escherichia coli and Bifidobacterium breve in mice, demonstrating the spatial and temporal readout from 2D and 3D BLI achievable with whole-body in vivo luminescence imaging. PMID:26846803

  10. Antibacterial activity of aquatic gliding bacteria.

    Sangnoi, Yutthapong; Anantapong, Theerasak; Kanjana-Opas, Akkharawit

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to screen and isolate strains of freshwater aquatic gliding bacteria, and to investigate their antibacterial activity against seven common pathogenic bacteria. Submerged specimens were collected and isolated for aquatic gliding bacteria using four different isolation media (DW, MA, SAP2, and Vy/2). Gliding bacteria identification was performed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Crude extracts were obtained by methanol extraction. Antibacterial activity against seven pathogenic bacteria was examined by agar-well diffusion assay. Five strains of aquatic gliding bacteria including RPD001, RPD008, RPD018, RPD027 and RPD049 were isolated. Each submerged biofilm and plastic specimen provided two isolates of gliding bacteria, whereas plant debris gave only one isolate. Two strains of gliding bacteria were obtained from each DW and Vy/2 isolation medium, while one strain was obtained from the SAP2 medium. Gliding bacteria strains RPD001, RPD008 and RPD018 were identified as Flavobacterium anhuiense with 96, 82 and 96 % similarity, respectively. Strains RPD049 and RPD027 were identified as F. johnsoniae and Lysobacter brunescens, respectively, with similarity equal to 96 %. Only crude extract obtained from RPD001 inhibited growth of Listeria monocytogenes (MIC 150 µg/ml), Staphylococcus aureus (MIC 75 µg/ml) and Vibrio cholerae (MIC 300 µg/ml), but showed weak inhibitory effect on Salmonella typhimurium (MIC > 300 µg/ml). Gliding bacterium strain RPD008 should be considered to a novel genus separate from Flavobacterium due to its low similarity value. Crude extract produced by RPD001 showed potential for development as a broad antibiotic agent. PMID:26885469

  11. Bacteria classification using Cyranose 320 electronic nose

    Gardner Julian W

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An electronic nose (e-nose, the Cyrano Sciences' Cyranose 320, comprising an array of thirty-two polymer carbon black composite sensors has been used to identify six species of bacteria responsible for eye infections when present at a range of concentrations in saline solutions. Readings were taken from the headspace of the samples by manually introducing the portable e-nose system into a sterile glass containing a fixed volume of bacteria in suspension. Gathered data were a very complex mixture of different chemical compounds. Method Linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA method was able to classify four classes of bacteria out of six classes though in reality other two classes were not better evident from PCA analysis and we got 74% classification accuracy from PCA. An innovative data clustering approach was investigated for these bacteria data by combining the 3-dimensional scatter plot, Fuzzy C Means (FCM and Self Organizing Map (SOM network. Using these three data clustering algorithms simultaneously better 'classification' of six eye bacteria classes were represented. Then three supervised classifiers, namely Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP, Probabilistic Neural network (PNN and Radial basis function network (RBF, were used to classify the six bacteria classes. Results A [6 × 1] SOM network gave 96% accuracy for bacteria classification which was best accuracy. A comparative evaluation of the classifiers was conducted for this application. The best results suggest that we are able to predict six classes of bacteria with up to 98% accuracy with the application of the RBF network. Conclusion This type of bacteria data analysis and feature extraction is very difficult. But we can conclude that this combined use of three nonlinear methods can solve the feature extraction problem with very complex data and enhance the performance of Cyranose 320.

  12. Magnetotactic Bacteria from Extreme Environments

    Christopher T. Lefvre

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB represent a diverse collection of motile prokaryotes that biomineralize intracellular, membrane-bounded, tens-of-nanometer-sized crystals of a magnetic mineral called magnetosomes. Magnetosome minerals consist of either magnetite (Fe3O4 or greigite (Fe3S4 and cause cells to align along the Earths geomagnetic field lines as they swim, a trait called magnetotaxis. MTB are known to mainly inhabit the oxicanoxic interface (OAI in water columns or sediments of aquatic habitats and it is currently thought that magnetosomes function as a means of making chemotaxis more efficient in locating and maintaining an optimal position for growth and survival at the OAI. Known cultured and uncultured MTB are phylogenetically associated with the Alpha-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria classes of the phylum Proteobacteria, the Nitrospirae phylum and the candidate division OP3, part of the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae (PVC bacterial superphylum. MTB are generally thought to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments as they are cosmopolitan in distribution and have been found in every continent although for years MTB were thought to be restricted to habitats with pH values near neutral and at ambient temperature. Recently, however, moderate thermophilic and alkaliphilic MTB have been described including: an uncultured, moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacterium present in hot springs in northern Nevada with a probable upper growth limit of about 63 C; and several strains of obligately alkaliphilic MTB isolated in pure culture from different aquatic habitats in California, including the hypersaline, extremely alkaline Mono Lake, with an optimal growth pH of >9.0.

  13. Folate Production by Probiotic Bacteria

    Stefano Raimondi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Probiotic bacteria, mostly belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, confer a number of health benefits to the host, including vitamin production. With the aim to produce folate-enriched fermented products and/or develop probiotic supplements that accomplish folate biosynthesis in vivo within the colon, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli have been extensively studied for their capability to produce this vitamin. On the basis of physiological studies and genome analysis, wild-type lactobacilli cannot synthesize folate, generally require it for growth, and provide a negative contribution to folate levels in fermented dairy products. Lactobacillus plantarum constitutes an exception among lactobacilli, since it is capable of folate production in presence of para-aminobenzoic acid (pABA and deserves to be used in animal trials to validate its ability to produce the vitamin in vivo. On the other hand, several folate-producing strains have been selected within the genus Bifidobacterium, with a great variability in the extent of vitamin released in the medium. Most of them belong to the species B. adolescentis and B. pseudocatenulatum, but few folate producing strains are found in the other species as well. Rats fed a probiotic formulation of folate-producing bifidobacteria exhibited increased plasma folate level, confirming that the vitamin is produced in vivo and absorbed. In a human trial, the same supplement raised folate concentration in feces. The use of folate-producing probiotic strains can be regarded as a new perspective in the specific use of probiotics. They could more efficiently confer protection against inflammation and cancer, both exerting the beneficial effects of probiotics and preventing the folate deficiency that is associated with premalignant changes in the colonic epithelia.

  14. Stop the Spread of Superbugs: Help Fight Drug Resistant Bacteria

    ... the Spread of Superbugs Help Fight Drug-Resistant Bacteria For nearly a century, bacteria-fighting drugs known as antibiotics have helped to control and destroy many of the harmful bacteria that can make us sick. But in recent ...

  15. Birefringence Determination of Magnetic Moments of Magnetotactic Bacteria

    Rosenblatt, Charles; de Araujo, F. Flavio Torres; Frankel, Richard B

    1982-01-01

    A birefringence technique is used to determine the average magnetic moments of magnetotactic bacteria in culture. Differences in are noted between live and dead bacteria, as well as between normal density and high density samples of live bacteria.

  16. The Microworld of Marine-Bacteria

    JØRGENSEN, BB

    1995-01-01

    Microsensor studies show that the marine environment in the size scale of bacteria is physically and chemically very different from the macroenvironment. The microbial world of the sediment-water interface is thus dominated by water viscosity and steep diffusion gradients. Because of the diverse...... metabolism types, bacteria in the mostly anoxic sea floor play an important role in the major element cycles of the ocean. The communities of giant, filamentous sulfur bacteria that live in the deep-sea hydrothermal vents or along the Pacific coast of South America are presented here as examples....

  17. Acidophilic, Heterotrophic Bacteria of Acidic Mine Waters

    Wichlacz, Paul L.; Unz, Richard F.

    1981-01-01

    Obligately acidophilic, heterotrophic bacteria were isolated both from enrichment cultures developed with acidic mine water and from natural mine drainage. The bacteria were grouped by the ability to utilize a number of organic acids as sole carbon sources. None of the strains were capable of chemolithotrophic growth on inorganic reduced iron and sulfur compounds. All bacteria were rod shaped, gram negative, nonencapsulated, motile, capable of growth at pH 2.6 but not at pH 6.0, catalase and ...

  18. Presence of bacteria in dentinal tubules

    Jos Ricardo Kina

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrated that a significant number of bacteria is present in the radicular dentinal tubules of periodontally diseased human teeth. Ten periodontally diseased teeth were prepared and stained by Brown and Brenn technique for histological examination. Bacteria were detected in all teeth. It is suggested that bacteria may invade dentinal tubules exposed to periodontal pocket and are very hard to be eliminated by conventional mechanical and chemical periodontal therapy. Contaminated dentinal tubules of periodontally diseased teeth can thus act as active bacterial reservoirs to promote recolonization of mechanically treated root surfaces, which could interfere with the periodontal healing and progression of the disease.

  19. Clustering of Marine Bacteria in Seawater Enrichments

    Mitchell, J.G.; Pearson, L; Dillon, S.

    1996-01-01

    Seawater enrichments of marine bacteria clustered in 20- to 50-(mu)m-wide bands near air-water interfaces. The cells within the band travelled at up to 212 (mu)m s(sup-1) and at an average speed of 163 (mu)m s(sup-1). Mean cell speeds peaked mid-run at 187 (mu)m s(sup-1). At the end of the run, bacteria reversed direction rather than randomly reorienting. The duration of the stops during reversal was estimated at 18 ms, six to seven times shorter than that found in enteric bacteria. Cells hun...

  20. Bacteria-Triggered Release of Antimicrobial Agents

    Komnatnyy, Vitaly V.; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael Christian; Nielsen, Thomas Eiland

    2014-01-01

    Medical devices employed in healthcare practice are often susceptible to microbial contamination. Pathogenic bacteria may attach themselves to device surfaces of catheters or implants by formation of chemically complex biofilms, which may be the direct cause of device failure. Extracellular...... material is demonstrated by the bacteria?triggered release of antibiotics to control bacterial populations and signaling molecules to modulate quorum sensing. The self?regulating system provides the basis for the development of device?relevant polymeric materials, which only release antibiotics in...... dependency of the titer of bacteria surrounding the medical device....

  1. Bacteria-triggered release of antimicrobial agents

    Komnatnyy, Vitaly V; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael; Nielsen, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Medical devices employed in healthcare practice are often susceptible to microbial contamination. Pathogenic bacteria may attach themselves to device surfaces of catheters or implants by formation of chemically complex biofilms, which may be the direct cause of device failure. Extracellular...... material is demonstrated by the bacteria-triggered release of antibiotics to control bacterial populations and signaling molecules to modulate quorum sensing. The self-regulating system provides the basis for the development of device-relevant polymeric materials, which only release antibiotics in...... dependency of the titer of bacteria surrounding the medical device....

  2. Comparative genomics of the lactic acid bacteria

    Makarova, K.; Slesarev, A.; Wolf, Y.; Sorokin, A.; Mirkin, B.; Koonin, E.; Pavlov, A.; Pavlova, N.; Karamychev, V.; Polouchine, N.; Shakhova, V.; Grigoriev, I.; Lou, Y.; Rokhsar, D.; Lucas, S.; Huang, K.; Goodstein, D. M.; Hawkins, T.; Plengvidhya, V.; Welker, D.; Hughes, J.; Goh, Y.; Benson, A.; Baldwin, K.; Lee, J. -H.; Diaz-Muniz, I.; Dosti, B.; Smeianov, V; Wechter, W.; Barabote, R.; Lorca, G.; Altermann, E.; Barrangou, R.; Ganesan, B.; Xie, Y.; Rawsthorne, H.; Tamir, D.; Parker, C.; Breidt, F.; Broadbent, J.; Hutkins, R.; O' Sullivan, D.; Steele, J.; Unlu, G.; Saier, M.; Klaenhammer, T.; Richardson, P.; Kozyavkin, S.; Weimer, B.; Mills, D.

    2006-06-01

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria are associated with various plant and animal niches and play a key role in the production of fermented foods and beverages. We report nine genome sequences representing the phylogenetic and functional diversity of these bacteria. The small genomes of lactic acid bacteria encode a broad repertoire of transporters for efficient carbon and nitrogen acquisition from the nutritionally rich environments they inhabit and reflect a limited range of biosynthetic capabilities that indicate both prototrophic and auxotrophic strains. Phylogenetic analyses, comparison of gene content across the group, and reconstruction of ancestral gene sets indicate a combination of extensive gene loss and key gene acquisitions via horizontal gene transfer during the coevolution of lactic acid bacteria with their habitats.

  3. Diabetes Drug Improves Gut Bacteria, Study Finds

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_156064.html Diabetes Drug Improves Gut Bacteria, Study Finds Metformin improved ... 2015 FRIDAY, Dec. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The diabetes drug metformin appears to trigger favorable changes in ...

  4. Magnetotaxis and magnetic particles in bacteria

    Magnetotactic bacteria contain magnetic particles that constitute a permanent magnetic dipole and cause each cell to orient and migrate along geomagnetic field lines. Recent results relevant to the biomineralization process and to the function of magnetotaxis are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Protection of probiotic bacteria in synbiotic matrices

    Probiotics, like Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus reuteri, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, when encapsulated with prebiotic fibers such as fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS), inulin (I) and pectic-oligosaccharides (POS), formed a synbiotic matrix system that protected the bacteria ...

  6. Effect of leukocyte hydrolases on bacteria

    Leukocyte extracts, trypsin, and lysozyme are all capable of releasing the bulk of the LPS from S. typhi, S. typhimurium, and E. coli. Bacteria which have been killed by heat, ultraviolet irradiation, or by a variety of metabolic inhibitors and antibiotics which affect protein, DNA, RNA, and cell wall synthesis no longer yield soluble LPS following treatment with the releasing agents. On the other hand, bacteria which are resistant to certain of the antibiotics yield nearly the full amount of soluble LPS following treatment, suggesting that certain heatabile endogenous metabolic pathways collaborate with the releasing agents in the release of LPS from the bacteria. It is suggested that some of the beneficial effects of antibiotics on infections with gram-negative bacteria may be the prevention of massive release of endotoxin by leukocyte enzymes in inflammatory sites

  7. Ecology: Electrical Cable Bacteria Save Marine Life.

    Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-11

    Animals at the bottom of the sea survive oxygen depletion surprisingly often, and a new study identifies cable bacteria in the sediment as the saviors. The bacterial electrical activity creates an iron 'carpet', trapping toxic hydrogen sulfide. PMID:26766230

  8. Bacteria classification using Cyranose 320 electronic nose

    Gardner Julian W; Hines Evor L; Dutta Ritaban; Boilot Pascal

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background An electronic nose (e-nose), the Cyrano Sciences' Cyranose 320, comprising an array of thirty-two polymer carbon black composite sensors has been used to identify six species of bacteria responsible for eye infections when present at a range of concentrations in saline solutions. Readings were taken from the headspace of the samples by manually introducing the portable e-nose system into a sterile glass containing a fixed volume of bacteria in suspension. Gathered data wer...

  9. Quorum sensing mechanism in lactic acid bacteria

    Hatice Yılmaz - Yıldıran

    2015-04-01

    and detection occurs as a consecution it is hard to understand their QS mechanism. In this review, connection between QS mechanism and some characteristics of lactic acid bacteria are evaluated such as concordance with its host, inhibition of pathogen development and colonization in gastrointestinal system, bacteriocin production, acid and bile resistance, adhesion to epithelium cells. Understanding QS mechanism of lactic acid bacteria will be useful to design metabiotics which is defined as novel probiotics.

  10. Potentials of Exopolysaccharides from Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Patel, Seema; Majumder, Avishek; Goyal, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Recent research in the area of importance of microbes has revealed the immense industrial potential of exopolysaccharides and their derivative oligosaccharides from lactic acid bacteria. However, due to lack of adequate technological knowledge, the exopolysaccharides have remained largely under exploited. In the present review, the enormous potentials of different types of exopolysaccharides from lactic acid bacteria are described. This also summarizes the recent advances in the applications ...

  11. Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria

    Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria have lagged behind similar studies in aerobes. However, the current interest in biotechnology, the involvement of anaerobes in disease and the emergence of antibioticresistant strains have focused attention on the genetics of anaerobes. This article reviews molecular genetic studies in Bacteroides spp., Clostridium spp. and methanogens. Certain genetic systems in some anaerobes differ from those in aerobes and illustrate the genetic diversity among bacteria

  12. Electrical Cable Bacteria Save Marine Life

    Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Animals at the bottomof the sea survive oxygen depletion surprisingly often, and a new study identifies cable bacteria in the sediment as the saviors. The bacterial electrical activity creates an iron ‘carpet’, trapping toxic hydrogen sulfide.......Animals at the bottomof the sea survive oxygen depletion surprisingly often, and a new study identifies cable bacteria in the sediment as the saviors. The bacterial electrical activity creates an iron ‘carpet’, trapping toxic hydrogen sulfide....

  13. Bacteria dispersal by hitchhiking on zooplankton

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Dziallas, Claudia; Leunert, Franziska; Tang, Kam W.

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms and zooplankton are both important components of aquatic food webs. Although both inhabit the same environment, they are often regarded as separate functional units that are indirectly connected through nutrient cycling and trophic cascade. However, research on pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria has shown that direct association with zooplankton has significant influences on the bacteria's physiology and ecology. We used stratified migration columns to study vertical dispers...

  14. Magnetization processes in magnetotactic bacteria systems

    Polyakova, T.; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 293, - (2005), s. 365-370. ISSN 0304-8853. [International Conference on Scientific and Clinical Aplications of Magnetic Carriers. Lyon, 20.05.04-22.05.04] Grant ostatní: MCF: Nanomag-Lab(XE) N 2004-003177 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetotactic bacteria * magnetization process * chemotaxis * bacteria * magnetosomes * chain formation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.985, year: 2005

  15. Visualizing Bacteria in Nematodes using Fluorescent Microscopy

    Murfin, Kristen E.; Chaston, John; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Symbioses, the living together of two or more organisms, are widespread throughout all kingdoms of life. As two of the most ubiquitous organisms on earth, nematodes and bacteria form a wide array of symbiotic associations that range from beneficial to pathogenic 1-3. One such association is the mutually beneficial relationship between Xenorhabdus bacteria and Steinernema nematodes, which has emerged as a model system of symbiosis 4. Steinernema nematodes are entomopathogenic, using their bact...

  16. Obligate oil-degrading marine bacteria.

    Yakimov, Michail M; Timmis, Kenneth N; Peter N. Golyshin

    2007-01-01

    Over the past few years, a new and ecophysiologically unusual group of marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria - the obligate hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria (OHCB) - has been recognized and shown to play a significant role in the biological removal of petroleum hydrocarbons from polluted marine waters. The introduction of oil or oil constituents into seawater leads to successive blooms of a relatively limited number of indigenous marine bacterial genera--Alcanivorax, Marinobacter, Thallassolituus...

  17. Systemic resistance induced by rhizosphere bacteria

    Loon, L C; Bakker, P.A.H.M; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Nonpathogenic rhizobacteria can induce a systemic resistance in plants that is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR) has been demonstrated against fungi, bacteria, and viruses in Arabidopsis, bean, carnation, cucumber, radish, tobacco, and tomato under conditions in which the inducing bacteria and the challenging pathogen remained spatially separated. Bacterial strains differ in their ability to ...

  18. Horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and animals

    Dunning Hotopp, Julie C.

    2011-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is increasingly described between bacteria and animals. Such transfers that are vertically inherited have the potential to influence the evolution of animals. One classic example is the transfer of DNA from mitochondria and chloroplasts to the nucleus after the acquisition of these organelles by eukaryotes. Even today, many of the described instances of bacteria to animal transfer occur as part of intimate relationships like those of endosymbionts and their invertebra...

  19. Distribution of coliform bacteria in waste water

    Dau Lal Bohra; Vikas Modasiya; Chandan Kumar Bahura

    2012-01-01

    Biological activity of water can be apparently judged by the colonization of bacteria (microbes). In order to find out the extent of pollution and the relationship between inorganic matters and microbiota, a quantitative and qualitative analysis of bacteria in various types of sewage waters, namely sewage water by the residential colonies (group I), industrial waste water (group II), sewage treatment hub (group III), unorganized collected waste water (group IV) and old residential waste colle...

  20. Characterization of (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria

    Wolterink, A.F.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    Some bacteria can use (per)chlorateas terminal electron acceptor for growth. These bacteria convert perchlorate via chlorate and chlorite into chloride and molecular oxygen. Oxygen formation in microbial respiration is unique. In this study two chlorate-reducing strains belonging to the species Pseudomonas chloritidismutans and a (per)chlorate-reducing strain Dechloromonas hortensis were isolated. The characterization of the chlorate-reducing strain AW-1, which was isolated from a bioreactor ...

  1. Rapid identification of Actinomycetaceae and related bacteria

    Kilian, M

    1978-01-01

    Identification of new isolates belonging to the family Actinomycetaceae requires extensive numbers of biochemical tests, supplemented with gas-liquid chromatography determination of fermentation end products and, often, analysis of cell wall composition. This paper describes the results of the te...... biochemical properties of these groups of bacteria. An identification scheme based upon 13 selected tests, which allow the identification of these groups of bacteria within 4 h, is proposed....

  2. Energy transduction in lactic acid bacteria

    Poolman, Bert

    1993-01-01

    In the discovery of some general principles of energy transduction, lactic acid bacteria have played an important role. In this review, the energy transducing processes of lactic acid bacteria are discussed with the emphasis on the major developments of the past 5 years. This work not only includes the biochemistry of the enzymes and the bioenergetics of the processes, but also the genetics of the genes encoding the energy transducing proteins. The progress in the area of carbohydrate transpo...

  3. Facultatively oligotrophic bacteria in Roman mural paintings

    Laiz Trobajo, L.; Hermosín, Bernardo; Caballero, Belén; Sáiz-Jiménez, Cesáreo

    2002-01-01

    [EN]: Due to the limitation of nutrients during long periods, deteriorated monuments, and particularIy their walls, represent an interesting ecosystem where oligotrophic bacteria can be isolated. Therefore, facultatively oligotrophic bacteria, present in the deteriorated mural paintings decoratíng the Tomb of Servilia, Roman Necropolis of Carmona, 1st and 2nd century AD, were studied. The most abundant genera were Bacillus and Paenibacillus, which were also the most abundant copio...

  4. Study of Lactobacillus as Probiotic Bacteria

    J Nowroozi; Mirzaii, M; Norouzi, M

    2004-01-01

    Because of inhibitory effect, selected probiotic lactobacilli may be used as biological preservative, so, the aim of this study was to present some data on lactobacillus as probiotic bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from sausage. Each isolate of lactobacillus species was identified by biochemical tests and comparing their sugar fermentation pattern. Antibacterial activities were done by an agar spot, well diffusion and blank disk method. Enzyme sensitivity of supernatant fluid and...

  5. Peptide conversations in Gram-positive bacteria.

    Monnet, Véronique; Juillard, Vincent; Gardan, Rozenn

    2016-05-01

    Within Gram-positive bacteria, the expression of target genes is controlled at the population level via signaling peptides, also known as pheromones. Pheromones control a wide range of functions, including competence, virulence, and others that remain unknown. Until now, their role in bacterial gene regulation has probably been underestimated; indeed, bacteria are able to produce, by ribosomal synthesis or surface protein degradation, an extraordinary variety of peptides which are released outside bacteria and among which, some are pheromones that mediate cell-to-cell communication. The review aims at giving an updated overview of these peptide-dependant communication pathways. More specifically, it follows the whole peptide circuit from the peptide production and secretion in the extracellular medium to its interaction with sensors at bacterial surface or re-import into the bacteria where it plays its regulation role. In recent years, as we have accumulated more knowledge about these systems, it has become apparent that they are more complex than they first appeared. For this reason, more research on peptide-dependant pathways is needed to develop new strategies for controlling functions of interest in Gram-positive bacteria. In particular, such research could lead to alternatives to the use of antibiotics against pathogenic bacteria. In perspective, the review identifies new research questions that emerge in this field and that have to be addressed. PMID:25198780

  6. How methylglyoxal kills bacteria: An ultrastructural study.

    Rabie, Erika; Serem, June Cheptoo; Oberholzer, Hester Magdalena; Gaspar, Anabella Regina Marques; Bester, Megan Jean

    2016-01-01

    Antibacterial activity of honey is due to the presence of methylglyoxal (MGO), H2O2, bee defensin as well as polyphenols. High MGO levels in manuka honey are the main source of antibacterial activity. Manuka honey has been reported to reduce the swarming and swimming motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa due to de-flagellation. Due to the complexity of honey it is unknown if this effect is directly due to MGO. In this ultrastructural investigation the effects of MGO on the morphology of bacteria and specifically the structure of fimbriae and flagella were investigated. MGO effectively inhibited Gram positive (Bacillus subtilis; MIC 0.8 mM and Staphylococcus aureus; MIC 1.2 mM) and Gram negative (P. aeruginosa; MIC 1.0 mM and Escherichia coli; MIC 1.2 mM) bacteria growth. The ultrastructural effects of 0.5, 1.0 and 2 mM MGO on B. substilis and E. coli morphology was then evaluated. At 0.5 mM MGO, bacteria structure was unaltered. For both bacteria at 1 mM MGO fewer fimbriae were present and the flagella were less or absent. Identified structures appeared stunted and fragile. At 2 mM MGO fimbriae and flagella were absent while the bacteria were rounded with shrinkage and loss of membrane integrity. Antibacterial MGO causes alterations in the structure of bacterial fimbriae and flagella which would limit bacteria adherence and motility. PMID:26986806

  7. Study of Lactobacillus as Probiotic Bacteria

    J Nowroozi

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of inhibitory effect, selected probiotic lactobacilli may be used as biological preservative, so, the aim of this study was to present some data on lactobacillus as probiotic bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from sausage. Each isolate of lactobacillus species was identified by biochemical tests and comparing their sugar fermentation pattern. Antibacterial activities were done by an agar spot, well diffusion and blank disk method. Enzyme sensitivity of supernatant fluid and concentrated cell free culture after treatment with α-amylase, lysozyme and trypsin was determined. The isolated bacteria were Lacto. plantarum, Lacto delbruekii, Lacto. acidophilus, Lacto. brevis. The isolated bacteria had strong activity against indicator strains. The antibacterial activity was stable at 100ºC for 10 min and at 56ºC for 30 min, but activity was lost after autoclaving. The maximum production of plantaricin was obtained at 25 - 30ºC at pH 6.5. Because, lactobacilli that used to process sausage fermentation are producing antimicrobial activity with heat stability bacteriocin, so, these bacteria may be considered to be a healthy probiotic diet. Lactobacilli originally isolated from meat products are the best condidates as probiotic bacteria to improve the microbiological safety of these foods.

  8. Molecular probe technology detects bacteria without culture

    Hyman Richard W

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our ultimate goal is to detect the entire human microbiome, in health and in disease, in a single reaction tube, and employing only commercially available reagents. To that end, we adapted molecular inversion probes to detect bacteria using solely a massively multiplex molecular technology. This molecular probe technology does not require growth of the bacteria in culture. Rather, the molecular probe technology requires only a sequence of forty sequential bases unique to the genome of the bacterium of interest. In this communication, we report the first results of employing our molecular probes to detect bacteria in clinical samples. Results While the assay on Affymetrix GenFlex Tag16K arrays allows the multiplexing of the detection of the bacteria in each clinical sample, one Affymetrix GenFlex Tag16K array must be used for each clinical sample. To multiplex the clinical samples, we introduce a second, independent assay for the molecular probes employing Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection. By adding one unique oligonucleotide barcode for each clinical sample, we combine the samples after processing, but before sequencing, and sequence them together. Conclusions Overall, we have employed 192 molecular probes representing 40 bacteria to detect the bacteria in twenty-one vaginal swabs as assessed by the Affymetrix GenFlex Tag16K assay and fourteen of those by the Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection assay. The correlations among the assays were excellent.

  9. Competition for hydrogen by human faecal bacteria: evidence for the predominance of methane producing bacteria.

    Strocchi, A; Furne, J K; Ellis, C J; Levitt, M D

    1991-01-01

    Studies of sludge have shown that some species of sulphate reducing bacteria outcompete methane producing bacteria for the common substrate H2. A similar competition may exist in human faeces where the methane (CH4) producing status of an individual depends on the faecal concentration of sulphate reducing bacteria. To determine if non-methanogenic faeces outcompete CH4 producing faeces for H2, aliquots of each type of faeces were incubated alone or mixed together, with or without addition of ...

  10. Antioxidant activity of Sphaerococcus coronopifolius associated bacteria

    Ndia Fino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Associated bacteria living on macroalgae surfaces are an interesting source of new secondary metabolites with biological activities. The aim of this study was the isolation and identification of epiphytic bacteria from the marine algae Sphaerococcus coronopifolius and the evaluation of the antioxidant activity of the bacteria extracts. The identification of epiphytic bacteria was determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacteria extracts were obtained with methanol and dichloromethane (1:1 extraction. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by quantification of total phenolic content (TPC, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity and oxygen radical absorbent capacity (ORAC. The extracts with higher antioxidant activity were tested on MCF-7 and HepG-2 cell lines in oxidative stress conditions induced by H2O2 at 0.2 mM and 0.5 mM, respectively. In total were isolated 21 Sphaerococcus coronopifolius associated bacteria and identified as Vibrio sp. (28.57%, Shewanella sp. (23.81%, Pseudoalteromonas sp. (19.05%, Bacillus sp. (9.52% and Halomonas sp. (9.52%. Two (9.52% of them presented less than 90% Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST match. The epiphytic bacteria with the most antioxidant potential evaluated by ORAC and DPPH methods were Sp2, Sp12, Sp23, Sp25 and Sp27. The strain Sp4 show high antioxidant activity in all antioxidant methods (ORAC, DPPH and TPC. In oxidative stress conditions on MCF-7 cell line, the extracts of bacteria (1mg.ml-1: 24hours Sp4 (16.15%, Sp25 (17.95% and Sp27 (10.65% prevented the cell death induced by H2O2. In the HepG-2 cell line was the extracts of Sp2 (9.01%, Sp4 (11.21%, Sp12 (7.20% and Sp23 (8.81% bacteria that high prevented the oxidative stress condition induced by H2O2. In conclusion, the Sphaerococcus coronopifolius associated bacteria can be an interesting and excellent source of marine natural compounds with antioxidant activity.

  11. Magnetosome chain superstructure in uncultured magnetotactic bacteria

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce magnetosomes, which are magnetic particles enveloped by biological membranes, in a highly controlled mineralization process. Magnetosomes are used to navigate in magnetic fields by a phenomenon called magnetotaxis. Two levels of organization and control are recognized in magnetosomes. First, magnetotactic bacteria create a spatially distinct environment within vesicles defined by their membranes. In the vesicles, the bacteria control the size, composition and purity of the mineral content of the magnetic particles. Unique crystal morphologies are produced in magnetosomes as a consequence of this bacterial control. Second, magnetotactic bacteria organize the magnetosomes in chains within the cell body. It has been shown in a particular case that the chains are positioned within the cell body in specific locations defined by filamentous cytoskeleton elements. Here, we describe an additional level of organization of the magnetosome chains in uncultured magnetotactic cocci found in marine and freshwater sediments. Electron microscopy analysis of the magnetosome chains using a goniometer showed that the magnetic crystals in both types of bacteria are not oriented at random along the crystal chain. Instead, the magnetosomes have specific orientations relative to the other magnetosomes in the chain. Each crystal is rotated either 60°, 180° or 300° relative to their neighbors along the chain axis, causing the overlapping of the (1 1 1) and (1-bar 1-bar 1-bar) capping faces of neighboring crystals. We suggest that genetic determinants that are not present or active in bacteria with magnetosomes randomly rotated within a chain must be present in bacteria that organize magnetosomes so precisely. This particular organization may also be used as an indicative biosignature of magnetosomes in the study of magnetofossils in the cases where this symmetry is observed

  12. Chemically enhanced sunlight for killing bacteria

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) photocatalyzed oxidation of chemicals with titanium dioxide (TiO2) has received considerable attention. Much less recognized, however, is the ability of the same system to destroy bacteria. This study examined this phenomenon and the conditions that affect it. Bacteria in aqueous solution were given solar exposure with titanium dioxide and their survival with time was determined. Lamps with a predominantly solar ultraviolet spectrum were also used in the experiments. Without exposure to UV light, TiO2 had no deleterious effect on the bacteria. However, several common bacteria on solar exposure in the presence of TiO2 were killed in just a few minutes, whereas without TiO2 it took over an hour to destroy them. A concentration of 0.01% TiO2 was most effective in killing bacteria and 10-fold concentrations lower or higher were successively less effective. Inorganic and organic compounds in solution, even in small amounts, interfered with the efficiency of killing. Alkaline solution also reduced the bactericidal activity. Circulation and agitation provided by stirring to keep the TiO2 particles suspended reduced the time necessary to kill the bacteria. Time-intensity curves for killing bacteria were the same general shape with or without TiO2, indicating that TiO2 served merely as a catalyst to increase the rate of the reaction but that the mechanism of action was not changed. The shape of the curves show that the organisms are sensitized with a minimum intensity of radiation and that an increase doesn't greatly increase the rate of kill. Below this critical intensity, however, the time required for killing markedly increases as the intensity is decreased

  13. Nutritional Interdependence Among Rumen Bacteria During Cellulose Digestion In Vitro

    Miura, Hideki; Horiguchi, Masaaki; Ogimoto, Keiji; Matsumoto, Tatsuro

    1983-01-01

    A study has been made of the promoting effect of starch on cellulose digestion by mixed rumen bacteria in a cellulose-urea medium. Starch supplementation of the medium promoted the growth of bacteria that required neither amino acids (AA) nor branched-chain fatty acids (BrFA). The growth of these bacteria was followed by the growth of AA-dependent bacteria, AA- or BrFA-dependent bacteria, BrFA-producing bacteria, and finally, BrFA-dependent cellulolytic bacteria. Population changes of these b...

  14. Single bacteria identification by Raman spectroscopy

    Strola, Samy Andrea; Baritaux, Jean-Charles; Schultz, Emmanuelle; Simon, Anne Catherine; Allier, Cédric; Espagnon, Isabelle; Jary, Dorothée; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2014-11-01

    We report on rapid identification of single bacteria using a low-cost, compact, Raman spectroscope. We demonstrate that a 60-s procedure is sufficient to acquire a comprehensive Raman spectrum in the range of 600 to 3300. This time includes localization of small bacteria aggregates, alignment on a single individual, and spontaneous Raman scattering signal collection. Fast localization of small bacteria aggregates, typically composed of less than a dozen individuals, is achieved by lensfree imaging over a large field of view of 24. The lensfree image also allows precise alignment of a single bacteria with the probing beam without the need for a standard microscope. Raman scattered light from a 34-mW continuous laser at 532 nm was fed to a customized spectrometer (prototype Tornado Spectral Systems). Owing to the high light throughput of this spectrometer, integration times as low as 10 s were found acceptable. We have recorded a total of 1200 spectra over seven bacterial species. Using this database and an optimized preprocessing, classification rates of ˜90% were obtained. The speed and sensitivity of our Raman spectrometer pave the way for high-throughput and nondestructive real-time bacteria identification assays. This compact and low-cost technology can benefit biomedical, clinical diagnostic, and environmental applications.

  15. Bacteria and plutonium in marine environments

    Microbes are important in geochemical cycling of many elements. Recent reports emphasize biogenous particulates and bacterial exometabolites as controlling oceanic distribution of plutonium. Bacteria perform oxidation/reduction reactions on metals such as mercury, nickel, lead, copper, and cadmium. Redox transformations or uptake of Pu by marine bacteria may well proceed by similar mechanisms. Profiles of water samples and sediment cores were obtained along the continental shelf off Nova Scotia and in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Profiles of water samples, and sediment cores were obtained. Epifluorescent microscopy was used to view bacteria (from water or sediment) after concentration on membrane filters and staining with acridine orange. Radiochemical analyses measured Pu in sediments and water samples. Studies of 237Pu uptake used a strain of Leucothrix mucor isolated from a macroalga. Enumeration shows bacteria to range 104 to 105 cells/ml in seawater or 107 to 108 cells/gram of sediment. These numbers are related to the levels and distrbution of Pu in the samples. In cultures of L. mucor amended with Pu atom concentrations approximating those present in open ocean environments, bacterial cells concentrated 237Pu slower and to lower levels than did clay minerals, glass beads, or phytoplankton. These data further clarify the role of marine bacteria in Pu biogeochemistry

  16. Molecular analysis of deep subsurface bacteria

    Deep sediments samples from site C10a, in Appleton, and sites, P24, P28, and P29, at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina were studied to determine their microbial community composition, DNA homology and mol %G+C. Different geological formations with great variability in hydrogeological parameters were found across the depth profile. Phenotypic identification of deep subsurface bacteria underestimated the bacterial diversity at the three SRS sites, since bacteria with the same phenotype have different DNA composition and less than 70% DNA homology. Total DNA hybridization and mol %G+C analysis of deep sediment bacterial isolates suggested that each formation is comprised of different microbial communities. Depositional environment was more important than site and geological formation on the DNA relatedness between deep subsurface bacteria, since more 70% of bacteria with 20% or more of DNA homology came from the same depositional environments. Based on phenotypic and genotypic tests Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp.-like bacteria were identified in 85 million years old sediments. This suggests that these microbial communities might have been adapted during a long period of time to the environmental conditions of the deep subsurface

  17. Method of Detecting Coliform Bacteria and Escherichia Coli Bacteria from Reflected Light

    Vincent, Robert (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting coliform bacteria in water from reflected light and a method of detecting Eschericha Coli bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  18. Applications of Magnetosomes Synthesized by Magnetotactic Bacteria in Medicine

    EdouardAlphandéry

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria belong to a group of bacteria that synthesize iron oxide nanoparticles covered by biological material that are called magnetosomes. These bacteria use the magnetosomes as a compass to navigate in the direction of the earth’s magnetic field. This compass helps the bacteria to find the optimum conditions for their growth and survival. Here, we review several medical applications of magnetotactic bacteria and magnetosomes, such as those in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI),...

  19. Using Fluorescent Viruses for Detecting Bacteria in Water

    Tabacco, Mary Beth; Qian, Xiaohua; Russo, Jaimie A.

    2009-01-01

    A method of detecting water-borne pathogenic bacteria is based partly on established molecular-recognition and fluorescent-labeling concepts, according to which bacteria of a species of interest are labeled with fluorescent reporter molecules and the bacteria can then be detected by fluorescence spectroscopy. The novelty of the present method lies in the use of bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) to deliver the fluorescent reporter molecules to the bacteria of the species of interest.

  20. Quantification and Qualification of Bacteria Trapped in Chewed Gum

    Wessel, Stefan W.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Morando, David; Slomp, Anje M.; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Maitra, Amarnath; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and remove them from the oral cavity. To test this hypothesis, we developed two methods to quantify numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum. In the first method, known numbers of bacteria were finger-...

  1. Microgravity effects on pathogenicity of bacteria

    Ya-juan WANG

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity is one of the important environmental conditions during spaceflight. A series of studies have shown that many kinds of bacteria could be detected in space station and space shuttle. Space environment or simulated microgravity may throw a certain influence on those opportunistic pathogens and lead to some changes on their virulence, biofilm formation and drug tolerance. The mechanism of bacteria response to space environment or simulated microgravity has not been defined. However, the conserved RNA-binding protein Hfq has been identified as a likely global regulator involved in the bacteria response to this environment. In addition, microgravity effects on bacterial pathogenicity may threaten astronauts' health. The present paper will focus on microgravity-induced alterations of pathogenicity and relative mechanism in various opportunistic pathogens.

  2. Ancient bacteria show evidence of DNA repair

    Johnson, Sarah Stewart; Hebsgaard, Martin B; Christensen, Torben R; Mastepanov, Mikhail; Nielsen, Rasmus; Munch, Kasper; Brand, Tina; Gilbert, Tom; Zuber, Maria T; Bunce, Michael; Rønn, Regin; Gilichinsky, David; Froese, Duane; Willerslev, Eske

    2007-01-01

    Recent claims of cultivable ancient bacteria within sealed environments highlight our limited understanding of the mechanisms behind long-term cell survival. It remains unclear how dormancy, a favored explanation for extended cellular persistence, can cope with spontaneous genomic decay over geol...... this long-term survival is closely tied to cellular metabolic activity and DNA repair that over time proves to be superior to dormancy as a mechanism in sustaining bacteria viability.......Recent claims of cultivable ancient bacteria within sealed environments highlight our limited understanding of the mechanisms behind long-term cell survival. It remains unclear how dormancy, a favored explanation for extended cellular persistence, can cope with spontaneous genomic decay over...... geological timescales. There has been no direct evidence in ancient microbes for the most likely mechanism, active DNA repair, or for the metabolic activity necessary to sustain it. In this paper, we couple PCR and enzymatic treatment of DNA with direct respiration measurements to investigate long...

  3. Chemotaxis When Bacteria Remember: Drift versus Diffusion

    Chatterjee, Sakuntala; Kafri, Yariv

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria govern their trajectories by switching between running and tumbling modes as a function of the nutrient concentration they experienced in the past. At short time one observes a drift of the bacterial population, while at long time one observes accumulation in high-nutrient regions. Recent work has pointed to an apparent theoretical contradiction between drift toward favorable regions and accumulation in favorable regions. A number of such earlier studies assume that a bacterium resets its memory at tumbles -- a fact not borne out by experiment -- and make use of approximate coarse-grained descriptions. Here, we revisit the problem of chemotaxis without resorting to any memory resets. We find that when bacteria respond to the environment in a non-adaptive manner, chemotaxis is generally dominated by diffusion, whereas when bacteria respond in an adaptive manner, chemotaxis is dominated by a bias in the motion. In all cases, the apparent contradiction between favorable drift ...

  4. Monitoring of environmental pollutants by bioluminescent bacteria.

    Girotti, Stefano; Ferri, Elida Nora; Fumo, Maria Grazia; Maiolini, Elisabetta

    2008-02-01

    This review deals with the applications of bioluminescent bacteria to the environmental analyses, published during the years 2000-2007. The ecotoxicological assessment, by bioassays, of the environmental risks and the luminescent approaches are reported. The review includes a brief introduction to the characteristics and applications of bioassays, a description of the characteristics and applications of natural bioluminescent bacteria (BLB), and a collection of the main applications to organic and inorganic pollutants. The light-emitting genetically modified bacteria applications, as well as the bioluminescent immobilized systems and biosensors are outlined. Considerations about commercially available BLB and BLB catalogues are also reported. Most of the environmental applications, here mentioned, of luminescent organisms are on wastewater, seawater, surface and ground water, tap water, soil and sediments, air. Comparison to other bioindicators and bioassay has been also made. Various tables have been inserted, to make easier to take a rapid glance at all possible references concerning the topic of specific interest. PMID:18206990

  5. All ecosystems potentially host electrogenic bacteria.

    Chabert, Nicolas; Amin Ali, Oulfat; Achouak, Wafa

    2015-12-01

    Instead of requiring metal catalysts, MFCs utilize bacteria that oxidize organic matter and either transfer electrons to the anode or take electrons from the cathode. These devices are thus based on a wide microbial diversity that can convert a large array of organic matter components into sustainable and renewable energy. A wide variety of explored environments were found to host electrogenic bacteria, including extreme environments. In the present review, we describe how different ecosystems host electrogenic bacteria, as well as the physicochemical, electrochemical and biological parameters that control the currents from MFCs. We also report how using new molecular techniques allowed characterization of electrochemical biofilms and identification of potentially new electrogenic species. Finally we discuss these findings in the context of future research directions. PMID:26298511

  6. Ancient bacteria show evidence of DNA repair

    Johnson, Sarah Stewart; Hebsgaard, Martin B; Christensen, Torben R; Mastepanov, Mikhail; Nielsen, Rasmus; Munch, Kasper; Brand, Tina; Gilbert, Tom; Zuber, Maria T; Bunce, Michael; Rnn, Regin; Gilichinsky, David; Froese, Duane; Willerslev, Eske

    2007-01-01

    Recent claims of cultivable ancient bacteria within sealed environments highlight our limited understanding of the mechanisms behind long-term cell survival. It remains unclear how dormancy, a favored explanation for extended cellular persistence, can cope with spontaneous genomic decay over......-term survival of bacteria sealed in frozen conditions for up to one million years. Our results show evidence of bacterial survival in samples up to half a million years in age, making this the oldest independently authenticated DNA to date obtained from viable cells. Additionally, we find strong evidence that...... this long-term survival is closely tied to cellular metabolic activity and DNA repair that over time proves to be superior to dormancy as a mechanism in sustaining bacteria viability....

  7. Modeling Facilitated Contaminant Transport by Mobile Bacteria

    Corapcioglu, M. Yavuz; Kim, Seunghyun

    1995-01-01

    Introduction of exogenous biocolloids such as genetically engineered bacteria in a bioremediation operation can enhance the transport of contaminants in groundwater by reducing the retardation effects. Because of their colloidal size and favorable surface conditions, bacteria are efficient contaminant carriers. In cases where contaminants have a low mobility in porous media because of their high partition with solid matrix, facilitated contaminant transport by mobile bacteria can create high contaminant fluxes. When metabolically active mobile bacteria are present in a subsurface environment, the system can be treated as consisting of three phases: water phase, bacterial phase, and stationary solid matrix phase. In this work a mathematical model based on mass balance equations is developed to describe the facilitated transport and fate of a contaminant and bacteria in a porous medium. Bacterial partition between the bulk solution and the stationary solid matrix and contaminant partition among three phases are represented by expressions in terms of measurable quantities. Solutions were obtained to provide estimates of contaminant and bacterial concentrations. A dimensional analysis of the transport model was utilized to estimate model parameters from the experimental data and to assess the effect of several parameters on model behavior. The model results matched favorably with experimental data of Jenkins and Lion (1993). The presence of mobile bacteria enhances the contaminant transport. However, bacterial consumption of the contaminant, which serves as a bacterial nutrient, can attenuate the contaminant mobility. The work presented in this paper is the first three-phase model to include the effects of substrate metabolism on the fate of groundwater contaminants.

  8. Degradation of monomethylhydrazine by two soil bacteria

    It has been reported that three heterotrophic soil bacteria had the capacity to degrade hydrazine. One of these organisms, Achromobacter sp., degraded hydrazine to N2 gas. Furthermore, it was reported that monomethylhydrazine (MMH) in Arredondo fine sand was mineralized to CO2, and that such degradation is microbial. However, microorganisms that degrade MMH have not been reported. MMH and hydrazine are chemically similar to one another. Therefore, this study was initiated to test the capacity of the two hydrazine-degrading bacteria, Achromobacter sp. and Pseudomonas sp., to degrade MMH

  9. Coevolution of bacteria and their viruses.

    Golais, Frantiek; Holl, Jaroslav; Vtkovsk, Jana

    2013-05-01

    Coevolution between bacteria and bacteriophages can be characterized as an infinitive constant evolutionary battle (phage-host arm race), which starts during phage adsorption and penetration into host cell, continues during phage replication inside the cells, and remains preserved also during prophage lysogeny. Bacteriophage may exist inside the bacterial cells in four forms with different evolutionary strategies: as a replicating virus during the lytic cycle, in an unstable carrier state termed pseudolysogeny, as a prophage with complete genome during the lysogeny, or as a defective cryptic prophage. Some defensive mechanisms of bacteria and virus countermeasures are characterized, and some evolutionary questions concerning phage-host relationship are discussed. PMID:22993102

  10. Bacteria Provide Cleanup of Oil Spills, Wastewater

    2010-01-01

    Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Marshall Space Flight Center, Micro-Bac International Inc., of Round Rock, Texas, developed a phototrophic cell for water purification in space. Inside the cell: millions of photosynthetic bacteria. Micro-Bac proceeded to commercialize the bacterial formulation it developed for the SBIR project. The formulation is now used for the remediation of wastewater systems and waste from livestock farms and food manufacturers. Strains of the SBIR-derived bacteria also feature in microbial solutions that treat environmentally damaging oil spills, such as that resulting from the catastrophic 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico.

  11. Functional Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea

    Blow, M. J.; Deutschbauer, A. M.; Hoover, C. A.; Lamson, J.; Lamson, J.; Price, M. N.; Waters, J.; Wetmore, K. M.; Bristow, J.; Arkin, A. P.

    2013-03-20

    Bacteria and Archaea exhibit a huge diversity of metabolic capabilities with fundamental importance in the environment, and potential applications in biotechnology. However, the genetic bases of these capabilities remain unclear due largely to an absence of technologies that link DNA sequence to molecular function. To address this challenge, we are developing a pipeline for high throughput annotation of gene function using mutagenesis, growth assays and DNA sequencing. By applying this pipeline to annotate gene function in 50 diverse microbes we hope to discover thousands of new gene functions and produce a proof of principle `Functional Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea?.

  12. Manganese Oxidation by Bacteria: Biogeochemical Aspects

    Sujith, P.P.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    .3 Biogeochemistry of Manganese 1.4 Effect of Salinity on Manganese Oxidation 1.5 Toxicity of Manganese in the Presence of Other Metals 1.6 Manganese Oxidation by Marine Bacteria 1.7 Manganese Oxidation by Freshwater Bacteria 1.8 Manganese Oxidation: A Genomic... and emanations from submarine hydrothermal vents (Saager et al. 1989). This study focuses on the bacterial groups that participate in Mn oxidation and the recent advancements made in the field of metal-microbe interaction. It also delves into genomic...

  13. Bacterial biofilms. Bacteria Quorum sensing in biofilms

    E. S. Vorobey

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Data on biofilms, their structure and properties, peculiarities of formation and interaction between microorganisms in the film are presented. Information on discovery and study of biofilms, importance of biofilms in the medical and clinical microbiology are offered. The data allow to interpret biofilm as a form of existence of human normal microflora. For the exchange of information within the biofilm between the individual cells of the same or different species bacteria use the signal molecules of the Quorum sensing system. Coordination of bacterial cells activity in the biofilms gives them significant advantages: in the biofilms bacteria are protected from the influence of the host protective factors and the antibacterial drugs.

  14. Seeing green bacteria in a new light: genomics-enabled studies of the photosynthetic apparatus in green sulfur bacteria and filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Bryant, Donald A

    2004-01-01

    Based upon their photosynthetic nature and the presence of a unique light-harvesting antenna structure, the chlorosome, the photosynthetic green bacteria are defined as a distinctive group in the Bacteria. However, members of the two taxa that comprise this group, the green sulfur bacteria...

  15. Heterotrophic bacteria in drinking water distribution system: a review.

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat

    2012-10-01

    The microbiological quality of drinking water in municipal water distribution systems (WDS) depends on several factors. Free residual chlorine and/or chloramines are typically used to minimize bacterial recontamination and/or regrowth in WDS. Despite such preventive measures, regrowth of heterotrophic (HPC) and opportunistic bacteria in bulk water and biofilms has yet to be controlled completely. No approach has shown complete success in eliminating biofilms or HPC bacteria from bulk water and pipe surfaces. Biofilms can provide shelter for pathogenic bacteria and protect these bacteria from disinfectants. Some HPC bacteria may be associated with aesthetic and non-life threatening diseases. Research to date has achieved important success in understanding occurrence and regrowth of bacteria in bulk water and biofilms in WDS. To achieve comprehensive understanding and to provide efficient control against bacteria regrowth, future research on bacteria regrowth dynamics and their implications is warranted. In this study, a review was performed on the literature published in this area. The findings and limitations of these papers are summarized. Occurrences of bacteria in WDS, factors affecting bacteria regrowth in bulk water and biofilms, bacteria control strategies, sources of nutrients, human health risks from bacterial exposure, modelling of bacteria regrowth and methods of bacteria sampling and detection and quantification are investigated. Advances to date are noted, and future research needs are identified. Finally, research directions are proposed to effectively control HPC and opportunistic bacteria in bulk water and biofilms in WDS. PMID:22076103

  16. Total Counts of Marine Bacteria Include a Large Fraction of Non-Nucleoid-Containing Bacteria (Ghosts)

    Zweifel, U L; Hagstrom, A.

    1995-01-01

    Counts of heterotrophic bacteria in marine waters are usually in the order of 5 x 10(sup5) to 3 x 10(sup6) bacteria ml(sup-1). These numbers are derived from unspecific fluorescent staining techniques (J. E. Hobbie, R. J. Daley, and S. Jasper, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 33:1225-1228, 1977; K. G. Porter and Y. S. Feig, Limnol. Oceanogr. 25:943-948, 1980) and are subsequently defined as total counts of bacteria. In samples from the Baltic Sea, the North Sea (Skagerrak), and the northeastern Medi...

  17. Arylsulfatase - producing bacteria in marine sediments

    K Dhevendaran; Chandramohan, D; Natarajan, R.

    1985-01-01

    A total of 313 strains of bacteria which hydrolysed tripotassium phenolphthalein disulfate (PDS) were isolated from the sediments of three biotopes, namely, Vellar estuary, backwater and mangrove during the period of investigation. They were identified to the generic level. The following genera were encountered, namely, Vibrio, Bacillus, Alcaligenes, Micrococcus, Pseudomonas, Cytophaga-Flavobacterium, Aeromonas, Corynebacterium and members of Enterobacteriaceae. Vibrio and Bacillus were found...

  18. Why engineering lactic acid bacteria for biobutanol

    The Gram-positive Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are considered attractive biocatalysts for biomass to biofuels for several reasons. They have GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) status that are acceptable in food, feed, and medical applications. LAB are fermentative: selected strains are capable of f...

  19. Bioluminescent bacteria: lux genes as environmental biosensors

    Nunes-Halldorson Vânia da Silva; Duran Norma Letícia

    2003-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria are widespread in natural environments. Over the years, many researchers have been studying the physiology, biochemistry and genetic control of bacterial bioluminescence. These discoveries have revolutionized the area of Environmental Microbiology through the use of luminescent genes as biosensors for environmental studies. This paper will review the chronology of scientific discoveries on bacterial bioluminescence and the current applications of bioluminescence in env...

  20. STUDIES OF METHANOGENIC BACTERIA IN SLUDGE

    Methanogenic bacteria were isolated from mesophilic anaerobic digesters. The isolates were able to utilize H2 and CO2 acetate, formate and methanol, but were not able to metabolize propionate and butyrate. It was shown the propionate and butyrate are not substrates for methanogen...

  1. Distribution of polyamines in methanogenic bacteria.

    Scherer, P.; Kneifel, H

    1983-01-01

    Members of all four families of methanogenic bacteria were analyzed for polyamine concentrations. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of dansylated cell extracts revealed typical polyamine patterns for each family. Members of Methanobacteriaceae (family I) were characterized by very low polyamine concentrations; members of Methanococcaceae (family II) were characterized by putrescine and high spermidine concentrations; members of Methanomicrobiaceae (family III) were characterized...

  2. Collective Sensing-Capacity of Bacteria Populations

    Einolghozati, Arash; Fekri, Faramarz

    2012-01-01

    The design of biological networks using bacteria as the basic elements of the network is initially motivated by a phenomenon called quorum sensing. Through quorum sensing, each bacterium performs sensing the medium and communicating it to others via molecular communication. As a result, bacteria can orchestrate and act collectively and perform tasks impossible otherwise. In this paper, we consider a population of bacteria as a single node in a network. In our version of biological communication networks, such a node would communicate with one another via molecular signals. As a first step toward such networks, this paper focuses on the study of the transfer of information to the population (i.e., the node) by stimulating it with a concentration of special type of a molecules signal. These molecules trigger a chain of processes inside each bacteria that results in a final output in the form of light or fluorescence. Each stage in the process adds noise to the signal carried to the next stage. Our objective is ...

  3. Filamentous bacteria transport electrons over centimetre distances

    Pfeffer, Christian; Larsen, Steffen; Song, Jie; Dong, Mingdong; Besenbacher, Flemming; Meyer, Rikke Louise; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup; Schreiber, Lars; Gorby, Yuri A.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Leung, Kar Man; Schramm, Andreas; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2012-01-01

    across centimetre-wide zones. Here we present evidence that the native conductors are long, filamentous bacteria. They abounded in sediment zones with electric currents and along their length they contained strings with distinct properties in accordance with a function as electron transporters. Living...

  4. Transport of bacteria in unsaturated porous media

    Schfer, Anke; Ustohal, Petr; Harms, Hauke; Stauffer, Fritz; Dracos, Themistocles; Zehnder, Alexander J. B.

    1998-09-01

    Bacterial mobility in unsaturated soils plays an important role in bioremediation, biofacilitated transport of pollutants, and dispersal of pathogenic microorganisms. A sand column equipped with ports for measuring water pressure and water saturation has been used to study bacterial transport under well-defined unsaturated flow conditions. Bacterial breakthrough curves at various water saturations were obtained for two soil bacteria. Retention of hydrophobic Rhodococcus sp. C125 and mesohydrophilic Pseudomonas putida mt2 was markedly increased at lower water saturation. A mechanistic model for bacterial transport under unsaturated conditions is proposed. The model attributes stronger bacterial retention under unsaturated conditions to the accumulation of bacteria at the air-water interface. Moreover, the model takes into account changes in the available surface areas of both the solid surface and the air-water interface due to coverage by bacteria and changes in the water flow. Application of the model to our own data and data from the literature showed that short-term breakthrough experiments can be simulated, but that the model deviates from experimental observation in long-term experiments. Reasons for this deviation are discussed, and suggestions for a further model extension are made. All investigated colloidal particles had a higher affinity to the air-water interface than to the solid surface. Therefore, trapping of bacteria by air-water interfaces is an important process possibly controlling bacterial transport in unsaturated soils.

  5. Mimicking Seawater For Culturing Marine Bacteria

    Rygaard, Anita Mac; Sonnenschein, Eva; Gram, Lone; Schmidt Thøgersen, Mariane

    Only about 1% of marine bacteria have been brought into culture using traditional techniques. The purpose of this study was to investigate if mimicking the natural bacterial environment can increase culturability.We used marine substrates containing defined algal polymers or gellan gum as solidif...

  6. Magnetic properties of heterotrophic bacteria (abstract)

    Verkhovceva, Nadezda V.; Glebova, Irina N.; Romanuk, Anatoly V.

    1994-05-01

    The magnetic properties (magnetic susceptibility and saturation magnetization) of six species of heterotrophic bacteria were studied: alcaligenes faecalis 81, arthrobacter globiformis BKM 685, bacillus cereus 8, leptothrix pseudo-ochracea D-405, proteus vulgaris 14, and seliberia stellata. It has been shown that the magnetic properties of bacteria depend on (1) the peculiarity of the micro-organism (species-specific and connected with cultivation conditions); (2) the source of the iron in the media. Most of the bacteria are diamagnetic in media with a minimum of iron (??=-7.2-0.310-6 sm3/g). The spore forming species (bacillus cereus) has increased diamagnetism. Usually the bacteria are paramagnetic in iron-containing media because they concentrate into Fe compounds. The paramagnetism of the iron-concentrating species (anthrobacter globiformis -?par=2.410-6, leptothrix pseudo-ochtracea ?par=11.010-6 and seliberia stellata ?par=3.210-6 sm3/g) depends, in general, on magnetically ordered compounds. Iron compounds not accumulated by proteus vulgaris and these species are always diamagnetic .

  7. The effects of bacteria on crystalline rock

    Many reactions involving inorganic minerals at water-rock interfaces have now been recognized to be bacterially mediated; these reactions could have a significant effect in the excavation of vaults for toxic and radioactive waste disposal. To investigate the role that bacteria play in the natural aqueous environment of crystalline rock the microbial growth factors of nutrition, energy and environment are described. Microbial activity has been investigated in Atomic Energy of Canada's Underground Research Laboratory (URL), situated in the Archean granitic Lac du Bonnet Batholith, Winnipeg, Manitoba. Faults, initiated in the Early Proterozoic, and later-formed fractures, provide ground-water pathways. Planktonic bacteria, free-swimming in the groundwater, have been observed in over 100 underground borehole samples. The number of bacteria varied from 103 to 105 mL-1 and appeared to decrease with depth and with increased salinity of the water. However, in the natural environment of deep (100-500 m) crystalline rocks, where nutrition is limited, formation of biofilms by sessile bacteria is a successful survival strategy. Natural biofilms at the URL and biofilms grown in bioreactors have been studied. The biofilms can accumulate different elements, depending upon the local environment. Precipitates of iron have been found in all the biofilms studied, where they are either passively accumulated or utilized as an energy source. Within the biofilm active and extensive biogeochemical immobilization of dissolved elements is controlled by distinct bacterial activities which are sufficiently discrete for hematite and siderite to be precipitated in close proximity

  8. Molecular evolution in bacteria: cell division

    Trevors J.T.

    1998-01-01

    Molecular evolution in bacteria is examined with an emphasis on the self-assembly of cells capable of primitive division and growth during early molecular evolution. Also, the possibility that some type of encapsulation structure preceeded biochemical pathways and the assembly of genetic material is examined. These aspects will be considered from an evolutionary perspective.

  9. (Transport of subsurface bacteria in porous media)

    1992-01-01

    This report describes studies undertaken to better understand basic microbiology of deep underground regions with special reference to Savannah River Plant. The studies related herein describe studies to enhance sampling methods of deep aquifers and soil columns, to develop equipment to better understand the migration of bacteria in deep soils, and to improve methods to culturing and maintaining deep isolates.

  10. [Transport of subsurface bacteria in porous media

    1992-08-01

    This report describes studies undertaken to better understand basic microbiology of deep underground regions with special reference to Savannah River Plant. The studies related herein describe studies to enhance sampling methods of deep aquifers and soil columns, to develop equipment to better understand the migration of bacteria in deep soils, and to improve methods to culturing and maintaining deep isolates.

  11. Radiographic markers - A reservoir for bacteria?

    Tugwell, Jenna, E-mail: jenna.tugwell@googlemail.co [Department of Radiology, Ysbyty Gwynedd Hospital, Bangor, North Wales (United Kingdom); Maddison, Adele [Nuffield Health, Shrewsbury Hospital (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Introduction: Amongst the most frequently handled objects in the radiology department are radiographic markers. They are personal accessories used with every patient, and are kept in the radiographers pockets when not utilised. Upon enquiry it was discovered that many radiographers disregarded the potential of these accessories to become a vector for cross-contamination thus never or rarely clean them. The aims of this study were therefore to identify if radiographic markers are a reservoir for bacteria and to establish an effective cleaning method for decontaminating them. Methodology: 25 radiographers/student radiographers were selected for this study. Swabbing of their markers prior and post cleaning took place. The microbiology laboratory subsequently analyzed the results by quantifying and identifying the bacteria present. The participants also completed a closed questionnaire regarding their markers (e.g. frequency of cleaning and type of marker) to help specify the results gained from the swabbing procedure. Results: From the sample swabbed, 92% were contaminated with various organisms including Staphylococcus and Bacillus species, the amount of bacteria present ranged from 0 to >50 CFU. There were no significant differences between disinfectant wipes and alcohol gel in decontaminating the markers. Both successfully reduced their bacterial load, with 80% of the markers post cleaning having 0 CFU. Conclusion: The results indicated that radiographic markers can become highly contaminated with various organisms thus serve as a reservoir for bacteria. In addition, the markers need to be cleaned on a regular basis, with either disinfectant wipes or alcohol gel to reduce their bacterial load.

  12. NARMS: ENTERIC BACTERIA - ANIMAL SALMONELLA AND CAMPYLOBACTER

    Objectives: Agricultural use of antimicrobials can select for antibiotic resistance both in pathogens and in commensal organisms which may transfer resistance to humans through the food supply. Antibiotic resistance is on the increase among foodborne pathogens and other bacteria. The purpose of this...

  13. Thermally Stable Amylases from Antarctic Psychrophilic Bacteria

    Hydrolysis of starch in cold environments by psychrophilic species of bacteria is believed to be accomplished through the production of special cold-adapted amylases. These amylases are reportedly thermally labile with low (<40 deg C) temperature optima and high specific activities at 0 to 25 deg C....

  14. Radiographic markers - A reservoir for bacteria?

    Introduction: Amongst the most frequently handled objects in the radiology department are radiographic markers. They are personal accessories used with every patient, and are kept in the radiographers pockets when not utilised. Upon enquiry it was discovered that many radiographers disregarded the potential of these accessories to become a vector for cross-contamination thus never or rarely clean them. The aims of this study were therefore to identify if radiographic markers are a reservoir for bacteria and to establish an effective cleaning method for decontaminating them. Methodology: 25 radiographers/student radiographers were selected for this study. Swabbing of their markers prior and post cleaning took place. The microbiology laboratory subsequently analyzed the results by quantifying and identifying the bacteria present. The participants also completed a closed questionnaire regarding their markers (e.g. frequency of cleaning and type of marker) to help specify the results gained from the swabbing procedure. Results: From the sample swabbed, 92% were contaminated with various organisms including Staphylococcus and Bacillus species, the amount of bacteria present ranged from 0 to >50 CFU. There were no significant differences between disinfectant wipes and alcohol gel in decontaminating the markers. Both successfully reduced their bacterial load, with 80% of the markers post cleaning having 0 CFU. Conclusion: The results indicated that radiographic markers can become highly contaminated with various organisms thus serve as a reservoir for bacteria. In addition, the markers need to be cleaned on a regular basis, with either disinfectant wipes or alcohol gel to reduce their bacterial load.

  15. Bacteria Isolated from Post-Partum Infections

    Nahid Arianpour

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was undertaken with an aim to determine bacterial species involved in post partum infections and also their abundance in patients admitted to at Khanevadeh hospital. In this study out of three different kinds of postpartum infections (i.e. genital, breast and urinary tract, only genital infection is considered.Materials and Methods: Post partum infection among 6077 patients (inpatients and re-admitted patients of Khanevadeh hospital from 2003 till 2008 was studied in this descriptive study. Samples were collected from patients for laboratory diagnosis to find out the causative organisms.Results: Follow up of mothers after delivery revealed 7.59% (461 patients had post partum infection, out of which 1.03% (63 patients were re-hospitalized. Infection was more often among younger mothers. Bacteria isolated and identified were both aerobic and anaerobic cocci and bacilli, majority of which were normal flora of the site of infection. Though, some pathogenic bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus, Neisseria gonorrhea, Chlamydia trachomatis,were also the causative agents. The commonest infection was infection at the site of episiotomy. Conclusion: Puerperal infection was detected in of 7.59% mothers. Bacteria isolated were both aerobic and anaerobic cocci and bacilli, majority of which were normal flora. However; some pathogenic bacteria were isolated.

  16. Bacteria that purify sludge; Des bacteries epuratrices

    Peignen-Seraline, P.; Manem, J. [Cirsee, Lyonnaise des Eaux, 92 - Nanterre (France)

    1997-03-01

    Inherent in water purification processes, the formation of sludges is intensively studied. Recently, original bacteria have been observed by searchers: some of them purify water making ``tassels``, others separate them and some of them even participate in the elimination of the first. This research study is described into details and will probably be used in the future at the industrial scale. (O.M.)

  17. Phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis and function in bacteria.

    Geiger, Otto; Lpez-Lara, Isabel M; Sohlenkamp, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the major membrane-forming phospholipid in eukaryotes and is estimated to be present in about 15% of the domain Bacteria. Usually, PC can be synthesized in bacteria by either of two pathways, the phospholipid N-methylation (Pmt) pathway or the phosphatidylcholine synthase (Pcs) pathway. The three subsequent enzymatic methylations of phosphatidylethanolamine are performed by a single phospholipid N-methyltransferase in some bacteria whereas other bacteria possess multiple phospholipid N-methyltransferases each one performing one or several distinct methylation steps. Phosphatidylcholine synthase condenses choline directly with CDP-diacylglycerol to form CMP and PC. Like in eukaryotes, bacterial PC also functions as a biosynthetic intermediate during the formation of other biomolecules such as choline, diacylglycerol, or diacylglycerol-based phosphorus-free membrane lipids. Bacterial PC may serve as a specific recognition molecule but it affects the physicochemical properties of bacterial membranes as well. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phospholipids and Phospholipid Metabolism. PMID:22922101

  18. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria: There is Hope.

    Offner, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Argues that reduction in the use of antibiotics would enable antibiotic-sensitive bacteria to flourish. Presents an activity designed to show students how a small, seemingly unimportant difference in doubling time can, over a period of time, make an enormous difference in population size. (DDR)

  19. Biotechnological potential of sponge-associated bacteria.

    Santos-Gandelman, Juliana F; Giambiagi-deMarval, Marcia; Oelemann, Walter M R; Laport, Marinella S

    2014-01-01

    As sessile and filter-feeding metazoans, marine sponges represent an ecologically important and highly diverse component of marine benthic communities throughout the world. It has been suggested that marine sponges are hosts to many microorganisms which can constitute up to 40-60% of its biomass. Recently, sponges have attracted a high interest from scientific community because two important factors. First there is the fact that sponges have a wide range of associated bacteria; and, second, they are a rich source of bioactive substances. Since 1950, a number of bioactive substances with various pharmacological functions have been isolated from marine sponges. However, many of these substances were subsequently shown to be actually synthesized by sponge-associated bacteria. Bacteria associated with marine sponges constitute an interesting source of novel bioactive compounds with biotechnological potential such as antimicrobial substances, enzymes and surfactants. In addition, these bacteria may be biofilm forming and can act as bioindicators in bioremediation processes of environmental pollution caused by oil and heavy metals. This review focuses on the biotechnological applications of these microorganisms. PMID:25022270

  20. Chitinolytic bacteria of the mammal digestive tract

    Šimůnek, Jiří; Hodrová, Blanka; Bartoňová, H.; Kopečný, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2001), s. 76-78. ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/00/0984; GA AV ČR KSK5052113 Keywords : chitinolytic bacteria Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.776, year: 2001

  1. Probiotic Bacteria May Become Dormant during Storage

    Lahtinen, Sampo J.; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ouwehand, Arthur C; Reinikainen, Johanna P.; Salminen, Seppo J.

    2005-01-01

    The determination of bacterial viability in probiotic products is of economic, technological, and clinical significance. We compared four methods to enumerate three Bifidobacterium strains in fermented oat products during storage. A subpopulation of nonculturable cells retained a functional cell membrane typical of viable cells, indicating that probiotic bacteria become dormant during storage.

  2. Freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria.

    Fonseca, Fernanda; Cenard, Stéphanie; Passot, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are of great importance for the food and biotechnology industry. They are widely used as starters for manufacturing food (e.g., yogurt, cheese, fermented meats, and vegetables) and probiotic products, as well as for green chemistry applications. Freeze-drying or lyophilization is a convenient method for preservation of bacteria. By reducing water activity to values below 0.2, it allows long-term storage and low-cost distribution at suprazero temperatures, while minimizing losses in viability and functionality. Stabilization of bacteria via freeze-drying starts with the addition of a protectant solution to the bacterial suspension. Freeze-drying includes three steps, namely, (1) freezing of the concentrated and protected cell suspension, (2) primary drying to remove ice by sublimation, and (3) secondary drying to remove unfrozen water by desorption. In this chapter we describe a method for freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria at a pilot scale, thus allowing control of the process parameters for maximal survival and functionality recovery. PMID:25428024

  3. The interaction of bacteria and metal surfaces

    This review discusses different examples for the interaction of bacteria and metal surfaces based on work reported previously by various authors and work performed by the author with colleagues at other institutions and with his graduate students at CEEL. Traditionally it has been assumed that the interaction of bacteria with metal surfaces always causes increased corrosion rates ('microbiologically influenced corrosion' (MIC)). However, more recently it has been observed that many bacteria can reduce corrosion rates of different metals and alloys in many corrosive environments. For example, it has been found that certain strains of Shewanella can prevent pitting of Al 2024 in artificial seawater, tarnishing of brass and rusting of mild steel. It has been observed that corrosion started again when the biofilm was killed by adding antibiotics. The mechanism of corrosion protection seems to be different for different bacteria since it has been found that the corrosion potential Ecorr became more negative in the presence of Shewanella ana and algae, but more positive in the presence of Bacillus subtilis. These findings have been used in an initial study of the bacterial battery in which Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was added to a cell containing Al 2024 and Cu in a growth medium. It was found that the power output of this cell continuously increased with time. In the microbial fuel cell (MFC) bacteria oxidize the fuel and transfer electrons directly to the anode. In initial studies EIS has been used to characterize the anode, cathode and membrane properties for different operating conditions of a MFC that contained Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Cell voltage (V)-current density (i) curves were obtained using potentiodynamic sweeps. The current output of a MFC has been monitored for different experimental conditions

  4. The interaction of bacteria and metal surfaces

    Mansfeld, Florian [Corrosion and Environmental Effects Laboratory (CEEL), The Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0241 (United States)

    2007-10-10

    This review discusses different examples for the interaction of bacteria and metal surfaces based on work reported previously by various authors and work performed by the author with colleagues at other institutions and with his graduate students at CEEL. Traditionally it has been assumed that the interaction of bacteria with metal surfaces always causes increased corrosion rates ('microbiologically influenced corrosion' (MIC)). However, more recently it has been observed that many bacteria can reduce corrosion rates of different metals and alloys in many corrosive environments. For example, it has been found that certain strains of Shewanella can prevent pitting of Al 2024 in artificial seawater, tarnishing of brass and rusting of mild steel. It has been observed that corrosion started again when the biofilm was killed by adding antibiotics. The mechanism of corrosion protection seems to be different for different bacteria since it has been found that the corrosion potential E{sub corr} became more negative in the presence of Shewanella ana and algae, but more positive in the presence of Bacillus subtilis. These findings have been used in an initial study of the bacterial battery in which Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was added to a cell containing Al 2024 and Cu in a growth medium. It was found that the power output of this cell continuously increased with time. In the microbial fuel cell (MFC) bacteria oxidize the fuel and transfer electrons directly to the anode. In initial studies EIS has been used to characterize the anode, cathode and membrane properties for different operating conditions of a MFC that contained Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Cell voltage (V) - current density (i) curves were obtained using potentiodynamic sweeps. The current output of a MFC has been monitored for different experimental conditions. (author)

  5. Antibacterial activity of silver-killed bacteria: the "zombies" effect

    Wakshlak, Racheli Ben-Knaz; Pedahzur, Rami; Avnir, David

    2015-04-01

    We report a previously unrecognized mechanism for the prolonged action of biocidal agents, which we denote as the zombies effect: biocidally-killed bacteria are capable of killing living bacteria. The concept is demonstrated by first killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 with silver nitrate and then challenging, with the dead bacteria, a viable culture of the same bacterium: Efficient antibacterial activity of the killed bacteria is observed. A mechanism is suggested in terms of the action of the dead bacteria as a reservoir of silver, which, due to Le-Chatelier's principle, is re-targeted to the living bacteria. Langmuirian behavior, as well as deviations from it, support the proposed mechanism.

  6. Lactic acid bacteria from fresh fruit and vegetables as biocontrol agents of phytopathogenic bacteria and fungi

    Trias Mansilla, Rosalia; Bañeras Vives, Lluís; Montesinos Seguí, Emilio; Badosa Romañó, Esther

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from fresh fruits and vegetables as biocontrol agents against the phytopathogenic and spoilage bacteria and fungi, Xanthomonas campestris, Erwinia carotovora, Penicillium expansum, Monilinia laxa, and Botrytis cinerea. The antagonistic activity of 496 LAB strains was tested in vitro and all tested microorganisms except P. expansum were inhibited by at least one isolate. The 496 isolates were also analyzed for the inhibit...

  7. Bacteria in Crude Oil Survived Autoclaving and Stimulated Differentially by Exogenous Bacteria

    Gong, Xiao-Cui; Liu, Ze-Shen; Guo, Peng; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Chen, Jian; Wang, Xing-Biao; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Chun-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Autoclaving of crude oil is often used to evaluate the hydrocarbon-degrading abilities of bacteria. This may be potentially useful for bioaugmentation and microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). However, it is not entirely clear if “endogenous” bacteria (e.g., spores) in/on crude oil survive the autoclaving process, or influence subsequent evaluation of the hydrocarbon-degradation abilities of the “exogenous” bacterial strains. To test this, we inoculated autoclaved crude oil medium with six ...

  8. Incidence of methanogenic bacteria in a sigmoidoscopy population: an association of methanogenic bacteria and diverticulosis.

    Weaver, G A; Krause, J A; Miller, T. L.; Wolin, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    This study determined the incidence and concentration of methane-producing bacteria in tap water enema samples of 130 individuals taken before sigmoidoscopy. The number of subjects classified in five major colonic groups were as follows: normal colon 36, diverticulosis 57, inflammatory bowel disease 11, colon polyps 34, and colon cancer 11. Some patients were placed in more than one category. Ninety four of the subjects or 72% had methanogenic bacteria ranging in concentration from 6 to about...

  9. Spray drying of dairy bacteria: New opportunities to improve the viability of bacteria powders

    Dolivet, Anne; Mejean, Serge; Hervé, C.; Jeantet, Romain

    2013-01-01

    The most frequently used technique for dehydration of dairy bacteria is freeze drying. Of the other possible preservation techniques used in the dairy industry to produce large amounts of dairy ingredients at commercially viable processing costs, spray drying is one of the main processing tools and the cost is 10 times lower than that of freeze drying. In this work, some examples are presented for different species of dairy bacteria with respect to spray-drying processes (as an alternative ap...

  10. Environmental pollution detection and bioremediation by marine bacteria

    Ramaiah, N.; De, J.; Iyer, S.R.

    Microorganisms, in particular bacteria, play far more important ecological roles in natural environments than their small sizes would suggest. The environment for bacteria is everything that surrounds and sustains them including air, plant, animal...

  11. Oh What a Tangled Biofilm Web Bacteria Weave

    ... Home Page Oh What a Tangled Biofilm Web Bacteria Weave By Elia Ben-Ari Posted May 1, ... a suitable surface, some water and nutrients, and bacteria will likely put down stakes and form biofilms. ...

  12. Bacteria Experiment May Point Way to Slow Zika's Spread

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158661.html Bacteria Experiment May Point Way to Slow Zika's Spread ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Experiments in mosquitoes suggest that bacteria may help curb the spread of the Zika ...

  13. The Effect of Bacteria Penetration on Chalk Permeability

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Shapiro, Alexander; Nielsen, Sidsel Marie; Eliasson Lantz, Anna

    Bacteria selective plugging is one of the mechanisms through which microorganisms can be applied for enhanced oil recovery. Bacteria can plug the water-bearing zones of a reservoir, thus altering the flow paths and improving sweep efficiency. It is known that the bacteria can penetrate deeply into...... reservoirs, however, a complete understanding of the penetration behavior of bacteria is lacking, especially in chalk formations where the pore throat sizes are almost comparable with the sizes of bacteria vegetative cells. This study investigates the penetration of bacteria into chalk. Two bacteria types......, the spore forming Bacillus licheniformis 421 and the non-spore forming Pseudomonas putida K12, were used. The core plugs were Stevns Klint outcrop with initial permeability at 2-4 mD. The results revealed that bacteria were able to penetrate and to be transported through the chalk. Furthermore, a...

  14. Frequency of Resistance and Susceptible Bacteria Isolated from Houseflies

    B Davari

    2010-12-01

    Conclusion: Houseflies collected from hospitals and slaughterhouse may be involved in the spread of drug resistant bacteria and may increase the potential of human exposure to drug resistant bacteria.

  15. New Lyme Disease Bacteria Discovered in Upper Midwest: CDC

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_157157.html New Lyme Disease Bacteria Discovered in Upper Midwest: CDC Infection may trigger ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new Lyme disease-causing bacteria has been identified in the United States, and ...

  16. Population dynamics of bacteria introduced into bentonite amended soil.

    Heijnen, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    Bacteria have frequently been introduced into the soil environment, e.g. for increasing crop production or for biological control purposes. Many applications require high numbers of surviving organisms in order to be effective. However, survival of bacteria after introduction into soil is generally poor, and numbers of introduced bacteria have been known to decrease from 10 9to approximately 10 3cells/g soil in 25 days. Thus, if bacteria are to be used as effective microbial inoculants to, a ...

  17. Probiotic bacteria in prevention and treatment of diarrhea

    Jasmina Havranek; Šimun Zamberlin; Iva Dolenčić Špehar; Tamara Prtilo; Milna Tudor; Dubravka Samaržija

    2009-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria have beneficial effects in prevention and treatment of different diseases. The results of preventive and therapeutic effect of probiotic bacteria on diarrhea during last ten years are shown in this paper. The greatest preventive and therapeutic effect of probiotic bacteria was identified for acute diarrhea in children caused by rotaviruses. Significant, but slightly lower effect of probiotic bacteria was proved for antibiotic associated diarrhea. Positive effect in preventi...

  18. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in environmental technology.

    Pokorna, Dana; Zabranska, Jana

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is widely known as the most undesirable component of biogas that caused not only serious sensoric and toxic problems, but also corrosion of concrete and steel structures. Many agricultural and industrial waste used in biogas production, may contain a large amount of substances that serve as direct precursors to the formation of sulfide sulfur-sources of hydrogen sulfide in the biogas. Biological desulfurization methods are currently promoted to abiotic methods because they are less expensive and do not produce undesirable materials which must be disposed of. The final products of oxidation of sulfides are no longer hazardous. Biological removal of sulfide from a liquid or gaseous phase is based on the activity of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. They need an oxidizing agent such as an acceptor of electrons released during the oxidation of sulfides-atmospheric oxygen or oxidized forms of nitrogen. Different genera of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and their technological application are discussed. PMID:25701621

  19. Horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and animals.

    Dunning Hotopp, Julie C

    2011-04-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is increasingly described between bacteria and animals. Such transfers that are vertically inherited have the potential to influence the evolution of animals. One classic example is the transfer of DNA from mitochondria and chloroplasts to the nucleus after the acquisition of these organelles by eukaryotes. Even today, many of the described instances of bacteria-to-animal transfer occur as part of intimate relationships such as those of endosymbionts and their invertebrate hosts, particularly insects and nematodes, while numerous transfers are also found in asexual animals. Both of these observations are consistent with modern evolutionary theory, in particular the serial endosymbiotic theory and Muller's ratchet. Although it is tempting to suggest that these particular lifestyles promote horizontal gene transfer, it is difficult to ascertain given the nonrandom sampling of animal genome sequencing projects and the lack of a systematic analysis of animal genomes for such transfers. PMID:21334091

  20. In situ soil remediation: Bacteria or fungi?

    Contamination of the environment is not a new problem. For most of recorded history, the unwanted byproducts of industrial and residential processes have been dumped into unlined pits or nearby streams. Although disposal techniques have greatly improved, significant quantities of hazardous materials are still being released to the environment via accidental spills and leaking underground storage tanks. One particular group of contaminants of critical environmental concern is polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAH-contaminated sites typically cover large areas; therefore, the development of in situ remediation techniques such as bioremediation is strongly emphasized. In situations when inherent microorganisms are not capable of degrading the contaminants, foreign strains must be used. Bioremediation experiments were conducted to compare the remediation efficiencies of a bacteria and a fungus for an industrially PAH contaminated soil. Specifically, the use of three supplemental nutrient solutions were investigated in conjunction with the bacteria Achromobacter sp. and fungus Cunninghamella echinulata var. elegans

  1. Emerging roles of RNA modifications in bacteria.

    Marbaniang, Carmelita Nora; Vogel, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    RNA modifications are known to abound in stable tRNA and rRNA, where they cluster around functionally important regions. However, RNA-seq based techniques profiling entire transcriptomes are now uncovering an abundance of modified ribonucleotides in mRNAs and noncoding RNAs, too. While most of the recent progress in understanding the regulatory influence of these new RNA modifications stems from eukaryotes, there is growing evidence in bacteria for modified nucleotides beyond the stable RNA species, including modifications of small regulatory RNAs. Given their small genome size, good genetic tractability, and ample knowledge of modification enzymes, bacteria offer excellent model systems to decipher cellular functions of RNA modifications in many diverse physiological contexts. This review highlights how new global approaches combining classic analysis with new sequencing techniques may usher in an era of bacterial epitranscriptomics. PMID:26803287

  2. Effect of Essential Oils on Pathogenic Bacteria

    Filomena Nazzaro

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The increasing resistance of microorganisms to conventional chemicals and drugs is a serious and evident worldwide problem that has prompted research into the identification of new biocides with broad activity. Plants and their derivatives, such as essential oils, are often used in folk medicine. In nature, essential oils play an important role in the protection of plants. Essential oils contain a wide variety of secondary metabolites that are capable of inhibiting or slowing the growth of bacteria, yeasts and moulds. Essential oils and their components have activity against a variety of targets, particularly the membrane and cytoplasm, and in some cases, they completely change the morphology of the cells. This brief review describes the activity of essential oils against pathogenic bacteria.

  3. Resistant bacteria in stem cell transplant recipients

    Nucci Marcio

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections account for most infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. While early mortality reduced dramatically with the introduction of the concept of empirical antibiotic therapy in neutropenic patients, no effect of prophylaxis on the mortality was observed in many studies. On the other hand, antibiotic prophylaxis has resulted in the emergence of resistance among bacteria. In addition, the choice of the antibiotic regimen for empirical therapy and the practices of antibiotic therapy during neutropenia may result in a significant shift in the pattern of bacterial infections. The use of quinolones and vancomycin as prophylaxis, and of carbapenems and vancomycin in the empirical antibiotic therapy, are associated with the appearance of resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Therefore, hematologists must be aware of the impact of these practices on the emergence of infections due to multi-resistant pathogens, since these infections may be associated with increased mortality.

  4. On Ants, Bacteria and Dynamic Environments

    Ramos, V; Rosa, A C; Ramos, Vitorino; Fernandes, Carlos; Rosa, Agostinho C.

    2005-01-01

    Wasps, bees, ants and termites all make effective use of their environment and resources by displaying collective swarm intelligence. Termite colonies - for instance - build nests with a complexity far beyond the comprehension of the individual termite, while ant colonies dynamically allocate labor to various vital tasks such as foraging or defense without any central decision-making ability. Recent research suggests that microbial life can be even richer: highly social, intricately networked, and teeming with interactions, as found in bacteria. What strikes from these observations is that both ant colonies and bacteria have similar natural mechanisms based on Stigmergy and Self-Organization in order to emerge coherent and sophisticated patterns of global behaviour. Keeping in mind the above characteristics we will present a simple model to tackle the collective adaptation of a social swarm based on real ant colony behaviors (SSA algorithm) for tracking extrema in dynamic environments and highly multimodal co...

  5. Alkaliphilic bacteria: applications in industrial biotechnology.

    Sarethy, Indira P; Saxena, Yashi; Kapoor, Aditi; Sharma, Manisha; Sharma, Sanjeev K; Gupta, Vandana; Gupta, Sanjay

    2011-07-01

    Alkaliphiles are interesting groups of extremophilic organisms that thrive at pH of 9.0 and above. Many of their products, in particular enzymes, have found widespread applications in industry, primarily in the detergent and laundry industries. While the enzymes have been a runaway success from the industrial point of view, many more products have been reported from alkaliphiles such as antibiotics and carotenoids. Less known are their potential for degradation of xenobiotics. They also play a key role in biogeocycling of important inorganic compounds. This review provides an insight into the huge diversity of alkaliphilic bacteria, the varied products obtained from them, and the need for further investigations on these interesting bacteria. PMID:21479938

  6. Turning bacteria suspensions into a "superfluid"

    López, Héctor Matías; Gachelin, Jérémie; Douarche, Carine; Auradou, Harold; Clément, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The rheological response under simple shear of an active suspension of Escherichia coli is determined in a large range of shear rates and concentrations. The effective viscosity and the time scales characterizing the bacterial organization under shear are obtained. In the dilute regime, we bring evidences for a low shear Newtonian plateau characterized by a shear viscosity decreasing with concentration. In the semi-dilute regime, for particularly active bacteria, the suspension display a "sup...

  7. Food preservation using antifungal lactic acid bacteria

    Crowley, Sarah Catherine Mary

    2013-01-01

    Fungal spoilage of food and feed prevails as a major problem for the food industry. The use antifungal-producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB) may represent a safer, natural alternative to the use of chemical preservatives in foods. A large scale screen was undertaken to identify a variety of LAB with antifungal properties from plant, animal and human sources. A total of 6,720 LAB colonies were isolated and screened for antifungal activity against the indicator Penicillium expansum. 94 broad-spe...

  8. RNA-Seq for Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

    Kimbrel, Jeffrey A.; Yanming Di; Cumbie, Jason S.; Chang, Jeff H.

    2011-01-01

    The throughput and single-base resolution of RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) have contributed to a dramatic change in transcriptomic-based inquiries and resulted in many new insights into the complexities of bacterial transcriptomes. RNA-Seq could contribute to similar advances in our understanding of plant pathogenic bacteria but it is still a technology under development with limitations and unknowns that need to be considered. Here, we review some new developments for RNA-Seq and highlight recent...

  9. Antibody analysis of relationships among methanogenic bacteria.

    Conway de Macario, E.; Wolin, M. J.; Macario, A J

    1982-01-01

    A bank of antisera to the majority of methanogenic bacteria is now available. Three antibody probes, R, S, and T, were derived from each antiserum in the bank and used for analysis of antigenic relatedness among methanogens by immunofluorescence. The T probe reacted only with the immunizing (or homologous) strain, the S probe gave strong cross-reactions with strains of the same species, and the R probe revealed some interspecies relationships. The results were confirmed and extended by enzyme...

  10. Methanogenic bacteria from human dental plaque.

    Belay, N.; Johnson, R; Rajagopal, B. S.; De Macario, E C; Daniels, L

    1988-01-01

    Samples of human dental plaque were examined for the presence of methanogenic bacteria. Of 54 samples from 36 patients, 20 yielded H2/CO2-using methanogenic enrichment cultures. All methanogen-positive samples were from patients with some degree of periodontal disease. The predominant populations in the enrichments had morphologies characteristic of Methanobrevibacter spp. In six enrichments derived from three patients, the common methanogen was antigenically similar to Methanobrevibacter smi...

  11. Engineering bacteria for the degradation of halopropanes

    Bosma, Tjibbe,

    2002-01-01

    Bacteria can consume an enormous large variety of organic chemicals as carbon and energy source. Exposure to natural organic compounds has provided the selective pressure to drive the evolution of catabolic enzymes and pathways over millions of years, yielding organisms capable of degrading or modifying many unpalatable, yet natural, chemicals. However, over the past 100 years human activities have introduced many xenobiotic halogenated organics into the environment.

  12. Quorum Sensing in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    BO?GELMEZ-TINAZ, Glgn

    2003-01-01

    It has become increasingly and widely recognised that bacteria do not live as isolated entities but instead exist as communities that exploit elaborate systems of intercellular communication to facilitate their adaptation to changing environmental conditions. A well-characterised example of such intercellular communication is quorum sensing. Quorum sensing depends on the production of diffusible signal molecules termed autoinducers or pheromones, which enable a bacterium to monitor its own ce...

  13. Separation and Purification of Bacteria from Soil

    Bakken, Lars R.

    1985-01-01

    Bacteria were released and separated from soil by a simple blending-centrifugation procedure. The percent yield of bacterial cells (microscopic counts) in the supernatants varied over a wide range depending on the soil type. The superantants contained large amounts of noncellular organic material and clay particles. Further purification of the bacterial cells was obtained by centrifugation in density gradients, whereby the clay particles and part of the organic materials sedimented. A large p...

  14. Macrophage defense mechanisms against intracellular bacteria.

    Weiss, Gnter; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2015-03-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils play a decisive role in host responses to intracellular bacteria including the agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis as they represent the forefront of innate immune defense against bacterial invaders. At the same time, these phagocytes are also primary targets of intracellular bacteria to be abused as host cells. Their efficacy to contain and eliminate intracellular M. tuberculosis decides whether a patient initially becomes infected or not. However, when the infection becomes chronic or even latent (as in the case of TB) despite development of specific immune activation, phagocytes have also important effector functions. Macrophages have evolved a myriad of defense strategies to combat infection with intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. These include induction of toxic anti-microbial effectors such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen intermediates, the stimulation of microbe intoxication mechanisms via acidification or metal accumulation in the phagolysosome, the restriction of the microbe's access to essential nutrients such as iron, fatty acids, or amino acids, the production of anti-microbial peptides and cytokines, along with induction of autophagy and efferocytosis to eliminate the pathogen. On the other hand, M. tuberculosis, as a prime example of a well-adapted facultative intracellular bacterium, has learned during evolution to counter-balance the host's immune defense strategies to secure survival or multiplication within this otherwise hostile environment. This review provides an overview of innate immune defense of macrophages directed against intracellular bacteria with a focus on M. tuberculosis. Gaining more insights and knowledge into this complex network of host-pathogen interaction will identify novel target sites of intervention to successfully clear infection at a time of rapidly emerging multi-resistance of M. tuberculosis against conventional antibiotics. PMID:25703560

  15. Study of fatty acid-bacteria interactions

    Complete text of publication follows. During our work we investigated fatty acid-bacteria interactions. The antibacterial property of fatty acids was reported by several authors. Despite of them there is not reassuring explanation about the mechanism of the antibacterial activity of these compounds. An effect can considerably change in case of different structured fatty acids. Our earlier studies conduct that small changes in the structures can modify changes in their behavior towards bacteria. The stearic acid does not cause any antibacterial effects during the first few hours of the investigation, may even help the bacterial growth. However, linolic acid (C18:2) shows a strong antibacterial effect during the first hours. After 24 hours this effect wears out and the bacteria have adapted to the stress. We studied the antibacterial activity using direct bioautography. This method has the advantage to allow examining lipophilic compounds. The linoleic acid decomposes in time under different physiological conditions creating numerous oxidized molecules. This may be the reason of its antimicrobial effect. For studying this phenomenon we used infrared and mass spectroscopic methods. We applied infrared spectroscopy for indicating any changes in the spectra of the fatty acids after the interaction of fatty acids with bacteria. So we are able to deduct on what could happen during these process. We paid great attention towards the changes of double bonds, on methylation and demethylation processes. Using mass spectroscopy we searched for oxidized products that may play important role in this process. These studies are only part of our more widespreading investigations, dealing with the antimicrobial properties of fatty acids.

  16. Genetics of lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in enteric bacteria.

    Schnaitman, C A; Klena, J D

    1993-01-01

    From a historical perspective, the study of both the biochemistry and the genetics of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis began with the enteric bacteria. These organisms have again come to the forefront as the blocks of genes involved in LPS synthesis have been sequenced and analyzed. A number of new and unanticipated genes were found in these clusters, indicating a complexity of the biochemical pathways which was not predicted from the older studies. One of the most dramatic areas of LPS res...

  17. Catecholate Siderophores Protect Bacteria from Pyochelin Toxicity

    Adler, Conrado; Corbalán, Natalia S.; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad; Pomares, María Fernanda; de Cristóbal, Ricardo E.; Clardy, Jon C.; Kolter, Roberto Guillermo; Vincent, Paula A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bacteria produce small molecule iron chelators, known as siderophores, to facilitate the acquisition of iron from the environment. The synthesis of more than one siderophore and the production of multiple siderophore uptake systems by a single bacterial species are common place. The selective advantages conferred by the multiplicity of siderophore synthesis remains poorly understood. However, there is growing evidence suggesting that siderophores may have other physiological roles...

  18. Bacteria Foraging Algorithm in Antenna Design

    Biswa Binayak Mangaraj; Manas Ranjan Jena; Saumendra Kumar Mohanty

    2016-01-01

    A simple design procedure to realize an optimum antenna using bacteria foraging algorithm (BFA) is proposed in this paper. The first antenna considered is imaginary. This antenna is optimized using the BFA along with a suitable fitness function formulated by considering some performance parameters and their best values. To justify the optimum design approach, one 12-element Yagi-Uda antenna is considered for an experiment. The optimized result of this antenna obtained using the optimization a...

  19. Electron microscopy of frozen-hydrated bacteria.

    1983-01-01

    Amorphous, unstained, frozen-hydrated sections of bacteria provide a faithful high-resolution image of procaryotic cells. Conventional preparation artifacts due to fixation, staining, and dehydration are nonexistent. Freezing damage is avoided by using glucose as a cryoprotectant. Cutting damage on frozen material is severe, but sectioning artifacts, being always related to the cutting direction, can be systematically recognized and thus taken into consideration. Geometry and density distribu...

  20. Bacteria viability assessment after photocatalytic treatment

    Cai, Yanling; Strömme, Maria; Welch, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate several methods for analyzing the viability of bacteria after antibacterial photocatalytic treatment. Colony-forming unit (CFU) counting, metabolic activity assays based on resazurin and phenol red and the Live/Dead® BacLight™ bacterial viability assay (Live/Dead staining) were employed to assess photocatalytically treated Staphylococcus epidermidis and Streptococcus mutans. The results showed conformity between CFU counting and the metabolic activ...

  1. Electromagnetic low-frequency fields and bacteria

    Foltýn, D.; Čermáková, E.; Kolářová, M.; Bartušek, Karel

    Košice : RVS VLA Košice, 2002 - (Džunda, M.; Brůnová, B.), s. 133 - 137 ISBN 80-7166-034-5. [New trends of development in aviation. Košice (SK), 01.09.2002] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : low-frequency fields * bacteria Staphylococcus aureus * low-frequency ELM fields Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  2. Flow cytometry, fluorescent probes, and flashing bacteria

    Bunthof, C.J.

    2002-01-01

     Key words: fluorescent probes, flow cytometry, CSLM, viability, survival, microbial physiology, lactic acid bacteria, Lactococcus lactis , Lactobacillus plantarum , cheese, milk, probiotic In food industry there is a perceived need for rapid methods for detection and viability assessment of microbes. Fluorescent staining and flow cytometry provide excellent tools for microbial analysis. This thesis describes fluorescent techniques for assessment of the physiological state of lactic acid bact...

  3. Cellulose biosynthesis and function in bacteria.

    Ross, P.; Mayer, R; Benziman, M

    1991-01-01

    The current model of cellulose biogenesis in plants, as well as bacteria, holds that the membranous cellulose synthase complex polymerizes glucose moieties from UDP-Glc into beta-1,4-glucan chains which give rise to rigid crystalline fibrils upon extrusion at the outer surface of the cell. The distinct arrangement and degree of association of the polymerizing enzyme units presumably govern extracellular chain assembly in addition to the pattern and width of cellulose fibril deposition. Most e...

  4. Tumour targeting with systemically administered bacteria.

    Morrissey, David

    2012-01-31

    Challenges for oncology practitioners and researchers include specific treatment and detection of tumours. The ideal anti-cancer therapy would selectively eradicate tumour cells, whilst minimising side effects to normal tissue. Bacteria have emerged as biological gene vectors with natural tumour specificity, capable of homing to tumours and replicating locally to high levels when systemically administered. This property enables targeting of both the primary tumour and secondary metastases. In the case of invasive pathogenic species, this targeting strategy can be used to deliver genes intracellularly for tumour cell expression, while non-invasive species transformed with plasmids suitable for bacterial expression of heterologous genes can secrete therapeutic proteins locally within the tumour environment (cell therapy approach). Many bacterial genera have been demonstrated to localise to and replicate to high levels within tumour tissue when intravenously (IV) administered in rodent models and reporter gene tagging of bacteria has permitted real-time visualisation of this phenomenon. Live imaging of tumour colonising bacteria also presents diagnostic potential for this approach. The nature of tumour selective bacterial colonisation appears to be tumour origin- and bacterial species- independent. While originally a correlation was drawn between anaerobic bacterial colonisation and the hypoxic nature of solid tumours, it is recently becoming apparent that other elements of the unique microenvironment within solid tumours, including aberrant neovasculature and local immune suppression, may be responsible. Here, we consider the pre-clinical data supporting the use of bacteria as a tumour-targeting tool, recent advances in the area, and future work required to develop it into a beneficial clinical tool.

  5. Revolutionizing membrane protein overexpression in bacteria

    Schlegel, Susan; Klepsch, Mirjam; Gialama, Dimitra; Wickström, David; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; De Gier, Jan‐Willem

    2010-01-01

    Summary The bacterium Escherichia coli is the most widely used expression host for overexpression trials of membrane proteins. Usually, different strains, culture conditions and expression regimes are screened for to identify the optimal overexpression strategy. However, yields are often not satisfactory, especially for eukaryotic membrane proteins. This has initiated a revolution of membrane protein overexpression in bacteria. Recent studies have shown that it is feasible to (i) engineer or ...

  6. Replication-transcription conflicts in bacteria

    Merrikh, Houra; Zhang, Yan; Grossman, Alan D.; Wang, Jue D

    2012-01-01

    DNA replication and transcription use the same template and occur concurrently in bacteria. The lack of temporal and spatial separation of these two processes leads to their conflict, and failure to deal with this conflict can result in genome alterations and reduced fitness. In recent years major advances have been made in understanding how cells avoid conflicts between replication and transcription and how such conflicts are resolved when they do occur. In this Review, we summarize these fi...

  7. Bacterial biofilms. Bacteria Quorum sensing in biofilms

    E. S. Vorobey; O. S. Voronkova; A. I. Vinnikov

    2012-01-01

    Data on biofilms, their structure and properties, peculiarities of formation and interaction between microorganisms in the film are presented. Information on discovery and study of biofilms, importance of biofilms in the medical and clinical microbiology are offered. The data allow to interpret biofilm as a form of existence of human normal microflora. For the exchange of information within the biofilm between the individual cells of the same or different species bacteria use the signal molec...

  8. SOLUTE TRANSPORT AND ENERGY TRANSDUCTION IN BACTERIA

    KONINGS, WN; Poolman, B; VANVEEN, HW

    1994-01-01

    In bacteria two forms of metabolic energy are usually present, i.e. ATP and transmembrane ion-gradients, that can be used to drive the various endergonic reactions associated with cellular growth. ATP can be formed directly in substrate level phosphorylation reactions whereas primary transport processes can generate the ion-gradients across the cytoplasmic membrane. The two forms of metabolic energy can be interconverted by the action of ion-translocating ATPases. For fermentative organisms i...

  9. Types of Bacterias Found on Catfish Injury

    Lubis, Yudha Perdana Putra

    2014-01-01

    YUDHA PERDANA PUTRA LUBIS, Types of Bacterias found on catfish injury. This research was suvervised by YUNASFI and RUDSI LEIDONALD. One of the various forms of business which produces fish optimally and do not damage fish populations and environment is a good freshwater fish farming. Currently catfish become one of the leading commodity in the fishery. Bacterial diseases arising from injury affecting the outcome of catfish farming. This research had been conducted on Septemb...

  10. Beneficial Bacteria Helpful to Restore Water Bodies

    Sarfraz Hashim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Population increases by two people in urban cities. In fact, the majority of urban population is blighted and slums due to unsafe and optimal facilities for the community. Here we need to improve the existing sewage facilities with advance, reliable and affordable technologies. The objective of this paper is to introduce some beneficial bacteria that have to restore the water bodies and also helpful to produce an Eco friendly environment.

  11. Origins of individual swimming behavior in bacteria.

    Levin, M D; Morton-Firth, C J; Abouhamad, W N; Bourret, R B; Bray, D.

    1998-01-01

    Cells in a cloned population of coliform bacteria exhibit a wide range of swimming behaviors--a form of non-genetic individuality. We used computer models to examine the proposition that these variations are due to differences in the number of chemotaxis signaling molecules from one cell to the next. Simulations were run in which the concentrations of seven gene products in the chemotaxis pathway were changed either deterministically or stochastically, with the changes derived from independen...

  12. Dynamics of swimming bacteria at complex interfaces

    Lopez, Diego; Lauga, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Flagellated bacteria exploiting helical propulsion are known to swim along circular trajectories near surfaces. Fluid dynamics predicts this circular motion to be clockwise (CW) above a rigid surface (when viewed from inside the fluid) and counter-clockwise (CCW) below a free surface. Recent experimental investigations showed that complex physicochemical processes at the nearby surface could lead to a change in the direction of rotation, both at solid surfaces absorbing slip-inducing polymers...

  13. TMDLs (Total Maximum Daily Loads) for Bacteria Impairments

    Benham, Brian Leslie, 1960-; Zeckoski, Sara C.

    2009-01-01

    When the concentration of bacteria exceeds the state-specified water-quality criteria, the water is deemed to have a bacteria or pathogen impairment. This publication explains how bacteria impairments are determined and how this relates to the TMDL process.

  14. Calculations of magnetic susceptibility of magnetoactic bacteria culture

    Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Yurchenko, Vitaliy; Kamysa, Y.; Chelombetskaya, M.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 234, - (2001), s. 575-583. ISSN 0304-8853 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : magnetotactic bacteria * magnetic susceptibility of magnetotactic bacteria * magnetic moment of magnetotactic bacteria Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.329, year: 2001

  15. Metabolism in bacteria at low temperature: A recent report

    Dipanwita Sengupta; Madhab K Chattopadhyay

    2013-06-01

    The adaptability of bacteria to extreme cold environments has been demonstrated from time to time by various investigators. Metabolic activity of bacteria at subzero temperatures is also evidenced. Recent studies indicate that bacteria continue both catabolic and anabolic activities at subzero temperatures. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  16. The role of bacteria in oral cancer

    Chocolatewala Noureen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the widening interest in the possible association between bacteria and different stages of cancer development, our knowledge in its relation to oral cancers remains inadequate. The aim of this review article is to derive a better understanding on the role of various micro-organisms in the etiogenesis of oral cancers through all the available data on the pubmed. Different bacteria have been proposed to induce carcinogenesis either through induction of chronic inflammation or by interference, either directly or indirectly, with eukaryotic cell cycle and signaling pathways, or by metabolism of potentially carcinogenic substances like acetaldehyde causing mutagenesis. Studies have shown diversity of isolated bacterial taxa between the oral cancer tissue specimens and the control, with Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans, Prevotella melaninogenica, Staphylococcus aureus and Veillonella parvula being specific for tumorogenic tissues. Most isolates are saccharolytic and acid tolerant. Streptococcus anginosus, commonly linked with esophageal and pharyngeal cancers, is not of significance in oral cancers. Similarly, significant salivary specificity is noted for three bacteria, namely, Capnocytophaga gingivalis, P. melaninogenica, and Streptococcus mitis in oral cancer patients, making these species salivary markers for the early detection of oral cancers and thus improving the survival rate significantly. Also, such high degree of bacterial specificity in oral cancers has also provoked the designing of new treatment options for cancer prevention by way of vaccine delivery. However, for the success of these steps, a deeper exploration into this subject with a greater understanding is warranted.

  17. Bacteria-powered battery on paper.

    Fraiwan, Arwa; Choi, Seokheun

    2014-12-21

    Paper-based devices have recently emerged as simple and low-cost paradigms for fluid manipulation and analytical/clinical testing. However, there are significant challenges in developing paper-based devices at the system level, which contain integrated paper-based power sources. Here, we report a microfabricated paper-based bacteria-powered battery that is capable of generating power from microbial metabolism. The battery on paper showed a very short start-up time relative to conventional microbial fuel cells (MFCs); paper substrates eliminated the time traditional MFCs required to accumulate and acclimate bacteria on the anode. Only four batteries connected in series provided desired values of current and potential to power an LED for more than 30 minutes. The battery featured (i) a low-cost paper-based proton exchange membrane directly patterned on commercially available parchment paper and (ii) paper reservoirs for holding the anolyte and the catholyte for an extended period of time. Based on this concept, we also demonstrate the use of paper-based test platforms for the rapid characterization of electricity-generating bacteria. This paper-based microbial screening tool does not require external pumps/tubings and represents the most rapid test platform (<50 min) compared with the time needed by using traditional screening tools (up to 103 days) and even recently proposed MEMS arrays (< 2 days). PMID:25363848

  18. Diversity and ecology of oxalotrophic bacteria.

    Hervé, Vincent; Junier, Thomas; Bindschedler, Saskia; Verrecchia, Eric; Junier, Pilar

    2016-02-01

    Oxalate is present in environments as diverse as soils or gastrointestinal tracts. This organic acid can be found as free acid or forming metal salts (e.g. calcium, magnesium). Oxalotrophy, the ability to use oxalate as carbon and energy sources, is mainly the result of bacterial catabolism, which can be either aerobic or anaerobic. Although some oxalotrophic bacterial strains are commonly used as probiotics, little is known about the diversity and ecology of this functional group. This review aims at exploring the taxonomic distribution and the phylogenetic diversity of oxalotrophic bacteria across biomes. In silico analyses were conducted using the two key enzymes involved in oxalotrophy: formyl-coenzyme A (CoA) transferase (EC 2.8.3.16) and oxalyl-CoA decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.8), encoded by the frc and oxc genes, respectively. Our analyses revealed that oxalate-degrading bacteria are restricted to three phyla, namely Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria and originated from terrestrial, aquatic and clinical environments. Diversity analyses at the protein level suggest that total Oxc diversity is more constrained than Frc diversity and that bacterial oxalotrophic diversity is not yet fully described. Finally, the contribution of oxalotrophic bacteria to ecosystem functioning as well as to the carbon cycle is discussed. PMID:26748805

  19. Distribution of coliform bacteria in waste water

    Dau Lal Bohra

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Biological activity of water can be apparently judged by the colonization of bacteria (microbes. In order to find out the extent of pollution and the relationship between inorganic matters and microbiota, a quantitative and qualitative analysis of bacteria in various types of sewage waters, namely sewage water by the residential colonies (group I, industrial waste water (group II, sewage treatment hub (group III, unorganized collected waste water (group IV and old residential waste collection center (group V, of Bikaner city (Rajasthan, India was carried out from February, 2010 to May, 2010. Water samples were taken from surface only owing to low depth and investigated for various abiotic factors (viz. transparency, pH, carbonate, bicarbonate, total alkalinity, total hardness, salinity, chloride, calcium, magnesium, sulphate, nitrate, silica, and inorganic phosphorous and biotic factors (viz. number and diversity of bacteria. The domestic sewage water causes major water borne diseases basing upon Total Bacterial Count (TBC and coliform Count (CC. The coliform count in the present study ranged from 2.5 to 5.12 MPN/mL. Comparision of microbial population in sewage water from all different Groups was done and the higher values of TBC and CC were recorded only in Sewage treatement hub (Group III.

  20. Anhydrobiosis in bacteria: From physiology to applications

    Armando Hernández García

    2011-12-01

    Anhydrobiosis is a phenomenon related to the partial or total desiccation of living organisms, keeping their vital functions after rehydration. The desiccated state in prokaryotes has been widely studied, mainly due to the broad spectrum of the anhydrobiosis applications. In this review, we present the basic theoretical concepts related to anhydrobiosis, focusing on bacterial species. An update about desiccation tolerance in bacteria is given; and the general mechanisms of desiccation tolerance and desiccation damage are described. In addition, we show how the study of anhydrobiosis in prokaryotes has established the theoretical and practical basis for the development of the drying technologies. With regard to the desiccation tolerance in bacteria, although many mechanisms remain undiscovered at the molecular level, important research about the physiology of the anhydrobiotic state and its applications has been performed, and here we provide the most recent information about this subject. On the other hand, the most widely used drying technologies and their particular applications in several fields are described (e.g. medicine, agriculture and food industry). Finally, topics on the stability of desiccated bacterial cells are treated, concluding with the necessity of focusing the research on the mathematical modelling of the desiccated state in bacteria.

  1. Bacteria as transporters of phosphorus through soil

    Glæsner, N.; Bælum, Jacob; Jacobsen, C. S.; Ritz, C.; Rubæk, G. H.; Kjaergaard, C.; Magid, J.

    2016-01-01

    The transport of phosphorus (P) from agricultural land has led to the eutrophication of surface waters worldwide, especially in areas with intensive animal production. In this research, we investigated the role of bacteria in the leaching of P through three agricultural soils with different......RNA genes cell−1. Leaching of bacteria was in the range of 2.5–4.5 × 105 cells ml−1 prior to application of slurry to the three soil textures. After slurry application, leaching increased to 1.1 × 106 cells ml−1 in the loamy sand, 4.9 × 106 cells ml−1 in the sandy loam and 5.0 × 106 cells ml−1 in the loam....... Based on the reported P content of soil bacteria, 0.3–1.8% of the total P leached was present in the bacterial biomass when no slurry was applied, whereas slurry application increased the leaching of P from the bacterial biomass to 3−7.9% of total P leached. Bacterial leaching was related to the...

  2. Soil bacteria for remediation of polluted soils

    Springael, D.; Bastiaens, L.; Carpels, M.; Mergaey, M.; Diels, L.

    1996-09-18

    Soil bacteria, specifically adapted to contaminated soils, may be used for the remediation of polluted soils. The Flemish research institute VITO has established a collection of bacteria, which were isolated from contaminated areas. This collection includes microbacteria degrading mineral oils (Pseudomonas sp., Acinetobacter sp. and others), microbacteria degrading polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (genera Sphingomonas and Mycobacterium), microbacteria degrading polychlorobiphenyls (genus Ralstonia and strains related to beta-Proteobacteria), and metal resistant bacteria with plasmid borne resistances to Cd, Zn, Ni, Co, Cu, Hg, and Cr. Bench-scale reactors were developed to investigate the industrial feasibility of bioremediation. Batch Stirred Tank Reactors were used to evaluate the efficiency of oil degraders. Soils, contaminated with non-ferrous metals, were treated using a Bacterial Metal Slurry Reactor. It was found that the reduction of the Cd concentration may vary strongly from sample to sample: reduction factors vary from 95 to 50%. Is was shown that Cd contained in metallic sinter and biologically unavailable Cd could not be removed.

  3. Soil bacteria for remediation of polluted soils

    Soil bacteria, specifically adapted to contaminated soils, may be used for the remediation of polluted soils. The Flemish research institute VITO has established a collection of bacteria, which were isolated from contaminated areas. This collection includes microbacteria degrading mineral oils (Pseudomonas sp., Acinetobacter sp. and others), microbacteria degrading polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (genera Sphingomonas and Mycobacterium), microbacteria degrading polychlorobiphenyls (genus Ralstonia and strains related to beta-Proteobacteria), and metal resistant bacteria with plasmid borne resistances to Cd, Zn, Ni, Co, Cu, Hg, and Cr. Bench-scale reactors were developed to investigate the industrial feasibility of bioremediation. Batch Stirred Tank Reactors were used to evaluate the efficiency of oil degraders. Soils, contaminated with non-ferrous metals, were treated using a Bacterial Metal Slurry Reactor. It was found that the reduction of the Cd concentration may vary strongly from sample to sample: reduction factors vary from 95 to 50%. Is was shown that Cd contained in metallic sinter and biologically unavailable Cd could not be removed

  4. Bacteria associated with Amblyomma cajennense tick eggs.

    Machado-Ferreira, Erik; Vizzoni, Vinicius Figueiredo; Piesman, Joseph; Gazeta, Gilberto Salles; Soares, Carlos Augusto Gomes

    2015-12-01

    Ticks represent a large group of pathogen vectors that blood feed on a diversity of hosts. In the Americas, the Ixodidae ticks Amblyomma cajennense are responsible for severe impact on livestock and public health. In the present work, we present the isolation and molecular identification of a group of culturable bacteria associated with A. cajennense eggs from females sampled in distinct geographical sites in southeastern Brazil. Additional comparative analysis of the culturable bacteria from Anocentor nitens, Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Ixodes scapularis tick eggs were also performed. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses identified 17 different bacterial types identified as Serratia marcescens, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Enterobacter spp., Micrococcus luteus, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus spp., distributed in 12 phylogroups. Staphylococcus spp., especially S. sciuri, was the most prevalent bacteria associated with A. cajennense eggs, occurring in 65% of the samples and also frequently observed infecting A. nitens eggs. S. maltophilia, S. marcescens and B. cereus occurred infecting eggs derived from specific sampling sites, but in all cases rising almost as pure cultures from infected A. cajennense eggs. The potential role of these bacterial associations is discussed and they possibly represent new targets for biological control strategies of ticks and tick borne diseases. PMID:26537602

  5. Bacteria associated with Amblyomma cajennense tick eggs

    Erik Machado-Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractTicks represent a large group of pathogen vectors that blood feed on a diversity of hosts. In the Americas, the Ixodidae ticks Amblyomma cajennense are responsible for severe impact on livestock and public health. In the present work, we present the isolation and molecular identification of a group of culturable bacteria associated with A. cajennense eggs from females sampled in distinct geographical sites in southeastern Brazil. Additional comparative analysis of the culturable bacteria from Anocentor nitens, Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Ixodes scapularis tick eggs were also performed. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses identified 17 different bacterial types identified as Serratia marcescens, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Enterobacter spp., Micrococcus luteus, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus spp., distributed in 12 phylogroups. Staphylococcus spp., especially S. sciuri,was the most prevalent bacteria associated with A. cajennenseeggs, occurring in 65% of the samples and also frequently observed infecting A. nitens eggs. S. maltophilia, S. marcescens and B. cereus occurred infecting eggs derived from specific sampling sites, but in all cases rising almost as pure cultures from infected A. cajennense eggs. The potential role of these bacterial associations is discussed and they possibly represent new targets for biological control strategies of ticks and tick borne diseases.

  6. Enteric Bacteria and Cancer Stem Cells

    Jun Sun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal bacteria can contribute to cell proliferation and cancer development, particularly in chronic infectious diseases in which bacteria and/or bacterial components might interfere with cell function. The number of microbial cells within the gut lumen is estimated to be 100 trillion, which is about 10-times larger than the number of eukaryotic cells in the human body. Because of the complexity of the gut flora, identifying the specific microbial agents related to human diseases remains challenging. Recent studies have demonstrated that the stemness of colon cancer cells is, in part, orchestrated by the microenvironment and is defined by high Wnt activity. In this review article, we will discuss recent progress with respect to intestinal stem cells, cancer stem cells, and the molecular mechanisms of enteric bacteria in the activation of the Wnt pathway. We will also discuss the roles of other pathways, including JAK-STAT, JNK, and Notch, in regulating stem cell niches during bacterial infections using Drosophila models. Insights gained from understanding how host-bacterial interaction during inflammation and cancer may serve as a paradigm for understanding the nature of self-renewal signals.

  7. [Metabolism of naringin produced by intestinal bacteria].

    Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Shu; Qian, Da-Wei; Shang, Er-Xin; Qian, Ye-Fei; Ren, Hao; Guan, Han-Liang; Duan, Jin-Ao

    2013-12-01

    Naringin has been reported to possess a wild range of biological activities. However, the route and metabolites of naringin produced by intestinal bacteria are not well understood. In this paper, different bacteria were isolated from human feces and their abilities to convert naringin to different metabolites were studied. Ultra performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS) with automated data analysis software (MetaboLynx) was applied to fast analysis of naringin metabolites. Using MSE and mass defect filter techniques, three metabolites were detected and tentatively identified. The results indicated that acetylation, hydrolyzation and hydrolyzation with hydrogenation were the major metabolic pathways of naringin in vitro. Then, we studied the gene sequence of the 16S rRNA of the bacteria by extraction of genomic DNA of the strain, PCR amplification and clone of the 16S rRNA. The consequence proved that Enterococcus sp.30, Bacillus sp.46, Escherichia sp.54 and Escherichia sp.63 have the peculiar metabolism characteristic of naringin. PMID:24689240

  8. Enumeration of indicator bacteria exposed to chlorine.

    McFeters, G A; Camper, A K

    1983-01-01

    Stress resulting from a variety of chemical and physical environments has been recognized in indicator bacteria. A review by Busta (1976) summarizes the extensive work that has been carried out to describe indicator microorganisms sublethally impaired due to a variety of causes associated with foods. Workers in the area of water microbiology are also gaining an appreciation of the importance of these stressed cells in the assessment of water quality using bacterial indicators. Chemical agents, including chlorine, that are employed in water disinfection processes are important causes of bacterial stress injury. As a result, a significant portion of the total population of indicator bacteria in water might not be enumerated (using the selective procedures that are currently employed) and inaccurate water quality determinations could result. Alternative water disinfection agents that are being suggested, such as ozone, chlorine dioxide, and ultraviolet irradiation, will also probably lead to the same result. In addition, heat from thermal pollution and interactions with other microorganisms or chemicals (including disinfectants and metals) also exert stress that could further debilitate indicator bacteria in various waters and effluents. A need for improved enumeration procedures has accompanied the recognition of injured indicator bacteria in chlorinated waters and wastewaters. This movement has also stimulated interest in the underlying mechanism of cellular damage that is responsible for the submaximal recovery of coliforms from disinfected waters. Various groups have reported that a number of biochemical, genetic, and physiological processes are impaired by chlorine exposure under differing conditions. Evidence from our laboratory and elsewhere implicates functions associated with the cell envelope, i.e., the uptake of extracellular organic substrates, as the primary cellular target of chlorine under conditions that are similar to those in the field. Additional data from our group indicate that sublethal damage from chlorine can be reversed under suitable nonselective conditions. Recent efforts have led to the development of new methods to enumerate injured fecal streptococcus, total and fecal coliform bacteria from chlorinated waters and wastewater. These procedures each yield data that are comparable with that obtained using the more cumbersome MPN method. As a result, the best characteristics of both methods may now be found in three relatively simple MF procedures. Some of these advances have been described in a new section (#921) of the fifteenth edition of "Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater" entitled "Stressed Organisms" (APHA, 1981). However, it is anticipated that new and better water quality assessment methodologies will emerge from the growing literature concerning the physiological and biochemical behavior of indicator microorganisms in water and wastewater.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:6650262

  9. Bacteria-Targeting Nanoparticles for Managing Infections

    Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar Filip

    Bacterial infections continue to be a significant concern particularly in healthcare settings and in the developing world. Current challenges include the increasing spread of drug resistant (DR) organisms, the side effects of antibiotic therapy, the negative consequences of clearing the commensal bacterial flora, and difficulties in developing prophylactic vaccines. This thesis was an investigation of the potential of a class of polymeric nanoparticles (NP) to contribute to the management of bacterial infections. More specifically, steps were taken towards using these NPs (1) to achieve greater spatiotemporal control over drug therapy by more targeted antibiotic delivery to bacteria, and (2) to develop a prophylactic vaccine formulation against the common bacterial sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by Chlamydia trachomatis. In the first part, we synthesized polymeric NPs containing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-block-poly(L-histidine)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PLH-PEG). We show that these NPs are able to bind to bacteria under model acidic infection conditions and are able to encapsulate and deliver vancomycin to inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria in vitro. Further work showed that the PLGA-PLH-PEG-based NPs demonstrated the potential for competition for binding bacteria at a site of infection from soluble protein and model phagocytic and tissue-resident cells in a NP composition dependent manner. The NPs demonstrated low toxicity in vitro, were well tolerated by mice in vivo, and circulated in the blood on timescales comparable to control PLGA-PEG NPs. In the second part, we used PLGA-PLH-PEG-based NPs to design a prophylactic vaccine against the obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis, the most common cause of bacterial STD in the world. Currently, no vaccines against this pathogen are approved for use in humans. We first formulated NPs encapsulating the TLR7 agonist R848 conjugated to poly(lactic acid) (R848-PLA) in PLGA-PLH-PEG-based NPs, then incubated these R848-NPs with UV-inactivated C. trachomatis bacteria in acidity, forming a construct. Mice immunized with this vaccine via genital or intranasal routes demonstrated protection from genital infection post immunization in a primarily CD4+ T cell-dependent manner. These results may suggest avenues for future work in designing and developing more targeted drug therapies or vaccine formulations for managing bacterial infections using polymeric nanoparticles. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs mit.edu)

  10. Bacteria-Mineral Interactions on the Surfaces of Metal-Resistant Bacteria

    The extraordinary ability of indigenous microorganisms, like metal-resistant bacteria, for biotransformation of toxic compounds is of considerable interest for the emerging area of environmental bioremediation. However, the underlying mechanisms by which metal-resistant bacteria transform toxic compounds are currently unknown and await elucidation. The project's objective was to study stress-induced responses of metal-resistant bacteria to environmental changes and chemical stimulants. This project involved a multi-institutional collaboration of our LLNL group with the group of Dr. H.-Y. Holman (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). In this project, we have utilized metal-resistant bacteria Arthrobacter oxydans as a model bacterial system. We have utilized atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize for the first time at the nanometer scale formation of stress-induced structures on bacterial surfaces in response to Cr (VI) exposure. We have demonstrated that structure, assembly, and composition of these stress-induced structures are dependent on Cr (VI) concentrations. Our AFM observations of the appearance and development of stress-induced layers on the surfaces of Arthrobacter oxydans bacteria exposed to Cr (VI) were confirmed by Dr. Holman's biochemical, electron microscopy, and synchrotron infrared spectromicroscopy studies. In general, in vitro imaging of live microbial and cellular systems represents one of the most challenging issues in application of AFM. Various approaches for immobilization of bacteria on the substrate for in vitro imaging were tested in this project. Imaging of live bacteria was achieved, however further optimization of experimental methods are needed for high-resolution visualization of the cellular environmental structural dynamics by AFM. This project enhanced the current insight into molecular architecture, structural and environmental variability of bacterial systems. The project partially funded research for two book chapters (1,2), and we anticipate one more publication (3). The publications describe development of methods and results of studies of structural dynamics of metal-resistant bacteria that contribute to more comprehensive understanding of the architecture, function, and environmental dynamics of bacterial and cellular systems. The results of this LDRD were presented in invited talks and contributed presentations at five national and international conferences and five seminar presentations at the external institutions. These included invited talks at the conferences of Gordon Research, Materials Research and American Chemical Societies. Our scientific results and methodologies developed in this project enabled us to receive new funding for the multiyear project 'Chromium transformation pathways in metal-reducing bacteria' funded by the University of California Lab Fees Program ($500,000, 5/1/09 - 4/30/2012), with our proposal being ranked 1st from a total of 138 in the Earth, Energy, Environmental and Space Sciences panel.

  11. Probiotic bacteria in prevention and treatment of diarrhea

    Jasmina Havranek

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Probiotic bacteria have beneficial effects in prevention and treatment of different diseases. The results of preventive and therapeutic effect of probiotic bacteria on diarrhea during last ten years are shown in this paper. The greatest preventive and therapeutic effect of probiotic bacteria was identified for acute diarrhea in children caused by rotaviruses. Significant, but slightly lower effect of probiotic bacteria was proved for antibiotic associated diarrhea. Positive effect in prevention of travellers diarrhea and radiation-induced diarrhea is not significant. Preventive and therapeutic effect on diarrhea is not dependent on the way of probiotic bacteria consumption, by fermented milk, capsule or oral rehydration solution.

  12. Population of Nitrifying Bacteria and Nitrification in Ammonium Saturated Clinoptilolite

    McGilloway, R. L.; Weaver, R. W.; Ming, Douglas W.; Gruener, J.

    1999-01-01

    As humans begin to spend longer periods of time in space, plants will be incorporated into life support systems. Ammonium saturated clinoptilolite is one plant growth substrate but a balance between ammonium and nitrate is needed. A laboratory study was conducted to determine effects of nitrifying bacteria on ammonium concentrations and kinetics of nitrification. Columns containing clinoptilolite substrate amended with nitrifying bacteria obtained from soil enrichment were analyzed weekly for a 90 day period. The enrichment culture initially contained 1 x 10(exp 5) ammonium oxidizing bacteria and 1 x 10(exp 2) nitrite oxidizing bacteria per gram of substrate. Populations of ammonium oxidizing bacteria increased to 1 x 10(exp 6) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria increased to 1 x 10(exp 3) per gram of substrate. The nitrification rate was approximately 0.25mg NO3(-)-N/kg.hr. Experiments were also conducted to enumerate nitrifying bacteria in a clinoptilolite substrate used to grow wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Seventy days following the initial inoculation with an unknown number of commercial nitrifying bacteria, 1 x 10(exp 5) ammonium oxidizing bacteria per gram of substrate were present. The number of nitrite oxidizing bacteria was between 1 x 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 4) per gram of substrate as measured by the most probable number method. Nitrification rates were approximately 0.20mg NO3(-)-N/kg.hr. Clinoptilolite readily exchanged sufficient concentrations of ammonium to support nitrifying bacteria and they survived well in this medium.

  13. Hessian fly-associated bacteria: transmission, essentiality, and composition.

    Bansal, Raman; Hulbert, Scot; Schemerhorn, Brandi; Reese, John C; Whitworth, R Jeff; Stuart, Jeffrey J; Chen, Ming-Shun

    2011-01-01

    Plant-feeding insects have been recently found to use microbes to manipulate host plant physiology and morphology. Gall midges are one of the largest groups of insects that manipulate host plants extensively. Hessian fly (HF, Mayetiola destructor) is an important pest of wheat and a model system for studying gall midges. To examine the role of bacteria in parasitism, a systematic analysis of bacteria associated with HF was performed for the first time. Diverse bacteria were found in different developmental HF stages. Fluorescent in situ hybridization detected a bacteriocyte-like structure in developing eggs. Bacterial DNA was also detected in eggs by PCR using primers targeted to different bacterial groups. These results indicated that HF hosted different types of bacteria that were maternally transmitted to the next generation. Eliminating bacteria from the insect with antibiotics resulted in high mortality of HF larvae, indicating that symbiotic bacteria are essential for the insect to survive on wheat seedlings. A preliminary survey identified various types of bacteria associated with different HF stages, including the genera Enterobacter, Pantoea, Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Ochrobactrum, Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, Nitrosomonas, Arcanobacterium, Microbacterium, Paenibacillus, and Klebsiella. Similar bacteria were also found specifically in HF-infested susceptible wheat, suggesting that HF larvae had either transmitted bacteria into plant tissue or brought secondary infection of bacteria to the wheat host. The bacteria associated with wheat seedlings may play an essential role in the wheat-HF interaction. PMID:21858016

  14. Clay-Bacteria Systems and Biofilm Production

    Steiner, J.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Steiner, N.; Rudolph, E.; Gottlieb, P.

    2007-12-01

    Soil clots and the aerosol transport of bacteria and spores are promoted by the formation of biofilms (bacteria cells in an extracellular polymeric matrix). Biofilms protect microorganisms by promoting adhesion to both organic and inorganic surfaces. Time series experiments on bacteria-clay suspensions demonstrate that biofilm growth is catalyzed by the presence of hectorite in minimal growth media for the studied species: Gram negatives (Pseudomonas syringae and Escherichia coli,) and Gram positives (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis). Soil organisms (P. syringae, B. subtilis) and organisms found in the human population (E. coli, S. aureus) are both used to demonstrate the general applicability of clay involvement. Fluorescent images of the biofilms are acquired by staining with propidium iodide, a component of the BacLightTM Live/Dead bacterial viability staining kit (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR). The evolving polysaccharide-rich biofilm reacts with the clay interlayer site causing a complex substitution of the two-water hectorite interlayer with polysaccharide. The result is often a three-peak composite of the (001) x-ray diffraction maxima resulting from polysaccharide-expanded clays and an organic-driven contraction of a subset of the clays in the reaction medium. X-ray diffractograms reveal that the expanded set creates a broad maximum with clay subsets at 1.84 nm and 1.41 nm interlayer spacings as approximated by a least squares double Lorentzian fit, and a smaller shoulder at larger 2q, deriving from a contraction of the interlayer spacing. Washing with chlorox removes organic material from the contracted clay and creates a 1-water hectorite single peak in place of the double peak. The clay response can be used as an indirect indicator of biofilm in an environmental system.

  15. Freeing Water from Viruses and Bacteria

    2004-01-01

    Four years ago, Argonide Corporation, a company focused on the research, production, and marketing of specialty nano materials, was seeking to develop applications for its NanoCeram[R] fibers. Only 2 nanometers in diameter, these nano aluminum oxide fibers possessed unusual bio-adhesive properties. When formulated into a filter material, the electropositive fibers attracted and retained electro-negative particles such as bacteria and viruses in water-based solutions. This technology caught the interest of NASA as a possible solution for improved water filtration in space cabins. NASA's Johnson Space Center awarded Sanford, Florida-based Argonide a Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract to determine the feasibility of using the company's filter for purifying recycled space cabin water. Since viruses and bacteria can be carried aboard space cabins by space crews, the ability to detect and remove these harmful substances is a concern for NASA. The Space Agency also desired an improved filter to polish the effluent from condensed and waste water, producing potable drinking water. During its Phase I partnership with NASA, Argonide developed a laboratory-size filter capable of removing greater than 99.9999 percent of bacteria and viruses from water at flow rates more than 200 times faster than virus-rated membranes that remove particles by sieving. Since the new filter s pore size is rather large compared to other membranes, it is also less susceptible to clogging by small particles. In September 2002, Argonide began a Phase II SBIR project with Johnson to develop a full-size cartridge capable of serving a full space crew. This effort, which is still ongoing, enabled the company to demonstrate that its filter media is an efficient absorbent for DNA and RNA.

  16. Genetics in methylotrophic bacteria: Appendix. Final report

    Lidstrom, M.E.

    1998-09-01

    This research has focused primarily on promoters in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 and in methanotrophic bacteria. In Methylobacterium extorquens work continued on the moxF promoter. The author constructed chromosomal lacZ fusions of this promoter to avoid the regulation problems of plasmid-borne fragments and has shown that this is regulated normally in the chromosome. She has constructed lacZ fusions to some of the mox genes involved in the synthesis of the cofactor, PQQ, in order to carry out similar analysis of transcription of PQQ genes. The author has continued to isolate mox genes in methanotrophs for the purpose of studying their promoters and transcriptional regulation.

  17. Electroactive biofilms of sulphate reducing bacteria

    Cordas, Cristina M.; Guerra, L. Tiago; Xavier, Catarina [Requimte-CQFB, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Moura, Jose J.G. [Requimte-CQFB, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)], E-mail: jose.moura@dq.fct.unl.pt

    2008-12-01

    Biofilms formed from a pure strain of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans 27774 on stainless steel and graphite polarised surfaces were studied. The polarisation conditions applied were -0.4 V vs. SCE for different times. A cathodic current related with the biofilms growth was observed with a maximum intensity of -270 mA m{sup -2} that remained stable for several days using graphite electrodes. These sulphate reducing bacteria biofilms present electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen and oxygen reduction reactions. Electrode polarisation has a selective effect on the catalytic activity. The biofilms were also observed by scanning electronic microscopy revealing the formation of homogeneous films on the surfaces.

  18. Are Bacteria more dangerous in space?

    With a mission to Mars and a permanent base on the moon as the ultimate dream, space travel is continually pushing back the frontiers. But long space missions present great challenges for science, for example in the field of microbiology. Together with the European Space Agency (ESA), SCK-CEN is studying the effects of space travel conditions on the behaviour of bacteria. In 2009 the SCK-CEN experts completed four innovative research projects at the cutting edge of microbiology, radiation sciences and space travel.

  19. Turning bacteria suspensions into a "superfluid"

    López, Héctor Matías; Douarche, Carine; Auradou, Harold; Clément, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The rheological response under simple shear of an active suspension of Escherichia coli is determined in a large range of shear rates and concentrations. The effective viscosity and the time scales characterizing the bacterial organization under shear are obtained. In the dilute regime, we bring evidences for a low shear Newtonian plateau characterized by a shear viscosity decreasing with concentration. In the semi-dilute regime, for particularly active bacteria, the suspension display a "super-fluid" like transition where the viscous resistance to shear vanishes, thus showing that macroscopically, the activity of pusher swimmers organized by shear, is able to fully overcome the dissipative effects due to viscous loss.

  20. Lipid Peroxide Degradation by Intestinal Bacteria

    Suzuki, Kunio

    2011-01-01

    Lipid peroxide degradation by intestinal bacteria was investigated. Methyl linoleate hydroperoxide (MLHPO) with a peroxide value of 1000 mEq/kg, which was prepared by autoxidation of methyl linoleate, was added to modified M10 medium at a concentration of 2000 p.p.m. After inoculation of a test bacterium, incubation was carried out with shaking at 37°C for 4 days in an anaerobic atmosphere. The residual MLHPO was measured by the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) reaction. Of the 140 strains (52 s...

  1. Sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Dahl, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate and sometimes also ferrous iron and hydrogen as electron donors. This review focuses on the dissimilatory and assimilatory metabolism of inorganic sulfur compounds in these bacteria and also briefly discusses these metabolisms in...... in these strains. It is evident from biochemical and genetic analyses that the dissimilatory sulfur metabolism of these organisms is very complex and incompletely understood. This metabolism is modular in the sense that individual steps in the metabolism may be performed by different enzymes in...

  2. Application of Pulsed Electric Field on Bacteria

    Kadlec, Tomáš; Babický, Václav; Člupek, Martin; Vrbová, M.

    Prague : Czech Technical University in Prague, 2011 - (Pospíšilová, M.; Vrbová, M.; Macháň, R.), s. 161-164 ISBN 978-80-01-04915-0. [Instruments and Methods for Biology and Medicine 2011. Kladno (CZ), 02.06.2011-02.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00430802; GA ČR(CZ) GD104/09/H080 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Pulsed Electric Field * Bacteria Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  3. Dynamic Clustering in Suspension of Motile Bacteria

    Chen, Xiao; Yang, Mingcheng; Zhang, Hepeng

    2015-01-01

    A bacteria suspension exhibits a wide range of collective phenomena arsing from interactions between individual cells. Here we show that Serratia marcescens cells near an air-liquid interface spontaneously aggregate into dynamic clusters through surface-mediated hydrodynamic interactions. These long-lived clusters translate randomly and rotate in the counter-clockwise direction; they continuously evolve, merge with others and split into smaller ones. The observed cluster dynamics is qualitatively reproduced by a numerical model of self-propelled particles that interact via pair-wise forces extracted from hydrodynamic calculations. Bacterial clusters change material and fluid transport near the interface and hence may have environmental and biological consequences.

  4. Isolation of acetic acid bacteria from honey

    Wasu Pathom-aree

    2009-01-01

    Four thermotolerant acetic acid bacteria designated as CMU1, CMU2, CMU3 and CMU4 were isolated from six honey samples produced by three native bee species in northern Thailand, namely the dwarf honey bee (Apis florea), Asian honey bee (A. cerena) and giant honey bee (A. dorsata). All isolates were tested for their tolerance to acetic acid and ethanol at 30C and 37C. It was found that they grew only in a medium containing 1% (v/v) acetic acid at 30C. However, isolate CMU4 showed the ...

  5. Electroactive biofilms of sulphate reducing bacteria

    Biofilms formed from a pure strain of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans 27774 on stainless steel and graphite polarised surfaces were studied. The polarisation conditions applied were -0.4 V vs. SCE for different times. A cathodic current related with the biofilms growth was observed with a maximum intensity of -270 mA m-2 that remained stable for several days using graphite electrodes. These sulphate reducing bacteria biofilms present electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen and oxygen reduction reactions. Electrode polarisation has a selective effect on the catalytic activity. The biofilms were also observed by scanning electronic microscopy revealing the formation of homogeneous films on the surfaces

  6. Bacteriophage Infection of Model Metal Reducing Bacteria

    Weber, K. A.; Bender, K. S.; Gandhi, K.; Coates, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Microbially-mediated metal reduction plays a significant role controlling contaminant mobility in aqueous, soil, and sedimentary environments. From among environmentally relevant microorganisms mediating metal reduction, Geobacter spp. have been identified as predominant metal-reducing bacteria under acetate- oxidizing conditions. Due to the significance of these bacteria in environmental systems, it is necessary to understand factors influencing their metabolic physiology. Examination of the annotated finished genome sequence of G. sulfurreducens PCA, G. uraniumreducens Rf4, G. metallireduceans GS-15 as well as a draft genome sequence of Geobacter sp. FRC-32 have identified gene sequences of putative bacteriophage origin. Presence of these sequences indicates that these bacteria are susceptible to phage infection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer sets designed tested for the presence of 12 of 25 annotated phage-like sequences in G. sulfurreducens PCA and 9 of 17 phage-like sequences in FRC- 32. The following genes were successfully amplified in G. sulfurreducens PCA: prophage type transcription regulator, phage-induced endonuclease, phage tail sheath, 2 phage tail proteins, phage protein D, phage base plate protein, phage-related DNA polymerase, integrase, phage transcriptional regulator, and Cro-like transcription regulator. Nine of the following sequences were present in FRC-32: 4 separate phage- related proteins, phage-related tail component, viron core protein, phage Mu protein, phage base plate, and phage tail sheath. In addition to the bioinformatics evidence, incubation of G. sulfurreducens PCA with 1 μg mL-1 mytomycin C (mutagen stimulating prophage induction) during mid-log phase resulted in significant cell lysis relative to cultures that remained unamended. Cell lysis was concurrent with an increase in viral like particles enumerated using epifluorescent microscopy. In addition, samples collected following this lytic event (~44hours) were filtered through a 0.22 μ m sterile nylon filter, stained with phosphotungstic acid (PTA), and examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM revealed the presence of viral like particles in the culture exposed to mytomycin C. Together these results suggest an active infection with a lysogenic bacteriophage in the model metal reducing bacteria, Geobacter spp., which could affect metabolic physiology and subsequently metal reduction in environmental systems.

  7. Bacteria-Triggered Release of Antimicrobial Agents

    Komnatnyy, Vitaly V.; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael Christian; Nielsen, Thomas Eiland

    2014-01-01

    Medical devices employed in healthcare practice are often susceptible to microbial contamination. Pathogenic bacteria may attach themselves to device surfaces of catheters or implants by formation of chemically complex biofilms, which may be the direct cause of device failure. Extracellular...... bacterial lipases are particularly abundant at sites of infection. Herein it is shown how active or proactive compounds attached to polymeric surfaces using lipase‐sensitive linkages, such as fatty acid esters or anhydrides, may be released in response to infection. Proof‐of‐concept of the responsive...

  8. Bacteria pattern spontaneously on periodic nanostructure arrays.

    Hochbaum, Allon I; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2010-09-01

    Surface-associated bacteria typically form self-organizing communities called biofilms. Spatial segregation is important for various bacterial processes associated with cellular and community development. Here, we demonstrate bacterial ordering and oriented attachment on the single-cell level induced by nanometer-scale periodic surface features. These surfaces cause spontaneous and distinct patterning phases, depending on their periodicity, which is observed for several strains, both gram positive and negative. This patterning is a general phenomenon that can control natural biofilm organization on the cellular level. PMID:20687595

  9. The effect of lactic acid bacteria on cocoa bean fermentation.

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2015-07-16

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao L.) are the raw material for chocolate production. Fermentation of cocoa pulp by microorganisms is crucial for developing chocolate flavor precursors. Yeasts conduct an alcoholic fermentation within the bean pulp that is essential for the production of good quality beans, giving typical chocolate characters. However, the roles of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria in contributing to the quality of cocoa bean and chocolate are not fully understood. Using controlled laboratory fermentations, this study investigated the contribution of lactic acid bacteria to cocoa bean fermentation. Cocoa beans were fermented under conditions where the growth of lactic acid bacteria was restricted by the use of nisin and lysozyme. The resultant microbial ecology, chemistry and chocolate quality of beans from these fermentations were compared with those of indigenous (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in control fermentations. In fermentations with the presence of nisin and lysozyme, the same species of yeasts and acetic acid bacteria grew but the growth of lactic acid bacteria was prevented or restricted. These beans underwent characteristic alcoholic fermentation where the utilization of sugars and the production of ethanol, organic acids and volatile compounds in the bean pulp and nibs were similar for beans fermented in the presence of lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid was produced during both fermentations but more so when lactic acid bacteria grew. Beans fermented in the presence or absence of lactic acid bacteria were fully fermented, had similar shell weights and gave acceptable chocolates with no differences in sensory rankings. It was concluded that lactic acid bacteria may not be necessary for successful cocoa fermentation. PMID:25889523

  10. Inoculation of sugarcane with diazotrophic bacteria

    Nivaldo Schultz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The sugarcane industry, a strategic crop in Brazil, requires technological improvements in production efficiency to increase the crop energy balance. Among the various currently studied alternatives, inoculation with diazotrophic bacteria proved to be a technology with great potential. In this context, the efficiency of a mixture of bacterial inoculant was evaluated with regard to the agronomic performance and N nutrition of sugarcane. The experiment was carried out on an experimental field of Embrapa Agrobiologia, in Seropédica, Rio de Janeiro, using a randomized block, 2 × 3 factorial design (two varieties and three treatments with four replications, totaling 24 plots. The varieties RB867515 and RB72454 were tested in treatments consisting of: inoculation with diazotrophic bacteria, N-fertilized control with 120 kg ha-1 N and absolute control (no inoculation and no N fertilizer. The inoculum was composed of five strains of five diazotrophic species. The yield, dry matter accumulation, total N in the shoot dry matter and the contribution of N by biological fixation were evaluated, using the natural 15N abundance in non-inoculated sugarcane as reference. The bacterial inoculant increased the stalk yield of variety RB72454 similarly to fertilization with 120 kg ha-1 N in the harvests of plant-cane and first ratoon crops, however the contribution of biological N fixation was unchanged by inoculation, indicating that the benefits of the inoculant in sugarcane may have resulted from plant growth promotion.

  11. Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria

    Wise, Arlene A.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2007-12-04

    Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria. A biosensor can be created by placing a reporter gene under control of an inducible promoter. The reporter gene produces a signal when a cognate transcriptional activator senses the inducing chemical. Creation of bacterial biosensors is currently restricted by limited knowledge of the genetic systems of bacteria that catabolize xenobiotics. By using mutagenic PCR to change the chemical specificity of the Pseudomonas species CF600 DmpR protein, the potential for engineering novel biosensors for detection of phenols has been demonstrated. DmpR, a well-characterized transcriptional activator of the P. CF600's dmp operon mediates growth on simple phenols. Transcription from Po, the promoter heading the dmp operon, is activated when the sensor domain of DmpR interacts with phenol and mono-substituted phenols. By altering the sensor domain of the DmpR, a group of DmpR derivatives that activate transcription of a Po-lacZ fusion in response to eight of the EPA's eleven priority pollutant phenols has been created. The assays and the sensor domain mutations that alter the chemical specificity of DmpR is described.

  12. [Bacteria-killing viruses, Stalinists and "superbugs"].

    Olsen, I; Handal, T; Løkken, P

    2001-11-10

    In June 2000, the WHO warned that the level of resistance to drugs used to treat common infectious diseases is now reaching a crisis point. If world governments do not control infections better in order to slow down the development of drug resistance, entire populations could be wiped out by superbugs against which there is no efficient treatment. Development of resistance is due to both underuse and overuse of drugs, and strategies have been worked out, to slow down the development of resistance for instance by the Norwegian Ministry of Health and Social Affairs. The present article deals with an old principle, mainly developed behind the Iron Curtain, which is now attracting renewed attention in the west: the application of bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) in the fight against bacteria. According to clinical trials in Eastern Europe, mostly uncontrolled, phages have been used successfully in treatments against antibiotic-resistant bacteria, for instance in suppurative wound infections, gastroenteritis, sepsis, osteomyelitis and pneumonia. These encouraging data are supported by recent findings in well-controlled animal models demonstrating that phages can rescue animals from a variety of fatal infections. The present review discusses possible advantages and limitations of phage treatment in humans. PMID:11876146

  13. Rapid detection of bacteria in water

    Deininger, Rolf A.; Lee, Ji Y.

    2002-06-01

    A rapid detection of bacteria in water is essential for a timely response. This applies primarily to drinking water, be it bottled water or water from a public supply system, but is equally important for the analysis of water from swimming pools and beaches, and ballast water from oceangoing ships discharging into coastal or inland waters of the US. There are several methods available today for a rapid test including PCR based methods, flow cytometry, and electro chemiluminescence, to name a few. All of the above methods work, but are complicated and/or require expensive equipment and highly trained analysts in a laboratory. The method described here is based on lysing the bacteria after capture on a membrane filter, and measuring the ATP in a luminometer after the addition of luciferin/luciferase. This bioluminescence test can be done onsite, in less than 5 minutes, with equipment that fits onto a clipboard. It is a fast screening test that indicates if there is enough biologically active material in the same to pose a threat to the consumer. If this is the case, an additional step using immunomagnetic separation may be used to identify the responsible organisms. Tests have been done with E. coli 0157:H7, pseudomonas, and logionella. These tests take about 30 minutes each, and allow a quick determination of bacterial threats in a field situation.

  14. Accumulation of swimming bacteria near an interface

    Tang, Jay; Li, Guanglai

    2012-11-01

    Microbes inhabit planet earth over billions of years and have adapted to diverse physical environment of water, soil, and particularly at or near interfaces. We focused our attention on the locomotion of Caulobacter crescentus, a singly flagellated bacterium, at the interface of water/solid or water/air. We measured the distribution of a forward swimming strain of C. crescentus near a surface using a three-dimensional tracking technique based on dark field microscopy and found that the swimming bacteria accumulate heavily within a micrometer from the surface. We attribute this accumulation to frequent collisions of the swimming cells with the surface, causing them to align parallel to the surface as they continually move forward. The extent of accumulation at the steady state is accounted for by balancing alignment caused by these collisions with rotational Brownian motion of the micrometer-sized bacteria. We performed a simulation based on this model, which reproduced the measured results. Additional simulations demonstrate the dependence of accumulation on swimming speed and cell size, showing that longer and faster cells accumulate more near a surface than shorter and slower ones do. The overarching goal of our study is to describe interfacial microbial behavior through detailed analysis of their motion. We acknowledge support by NSF PHY 1058375.

  15. Magnetotactic Bacteria from Pavilion Lake, British Columbia

    BrianH.Lower

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pavilion Lake is a slightly alkaline, freshwater lake located in British Columbia, Canada (50o51 N, 121o44W. It is known for unusual organosedimentary structures, called microbialites that are found along the lake basin. These deposits are complex associations of fossilized microbial communities and detrital- or chemical-sedimentary rocks. During the summer, a sediment sample was collected from near the lakes shore, approximately 25-50 cm below the water surface. Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB were isolated from this sample using a simple magnetic enrichment protocol. The MTB isolated from Pavilion Lake belonged to the Alphaproteobacteria class as determined by nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA genes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM revealed that the bacteria were spirillum-shaped and contained a single chain of cuboctahedral-shaped magnetite (Fe3O4 crystals that were approximately 40 nm in diameter. This discovery of MTB in Pavilion Lake offers an opportunity to better understand the diversity of MTB habitats, the geobiological function of MTB in unique freshwater ecosystems, and search for magnetofossils contained within the lakes microbialites.

  16. Dysbiotic bacteria translocate in progressive SIV infection.

    Klase, Z; Ortiz, A; Deleage, C; Mudd, J C; Quiones, M; Schwartzman, E; Klatt, N R; Canary, L; Estes, J D; Brenchley, J M

    2015-09-01

    Infection of gut-resident CD4(+) memory T cells during acute human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection is associated with rapid loss of these cells and damage to the epithelial barrier. Damage to the epithelial barrier allows translocation of microbial products from the intestinal lumen into the body. Immune activation caused by these microbial products has been associated with disease progression. Although microbial translocation has been demonstrated in SIV-infected nonhuman primates, the identity of translocating bacteria has not been determined. In this study we examined the communities of bacteria both within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and systemic tissues of both healthy and experimentally SIV-infected Asian macaques. Although there were only modest changes in the GI tract-associated microbiome resulting from infection, there is substantial dysbiosis after administration of antiretrovirals. Analysis of bacterial DNA isolated from tissues of infected animals revealed a preference for the phylum Proteobacteria, suggesting that they preferentially translocate. Consistent with this finding, we observed increased metabolic activity of Proteobacterial species within the colonic lumen of SIV-infected animals. Overall, these data provide insights into disease progression and suggest that therapies aimed at altering the composition and metabolic activity of the GI tract microbiome could benefit chronically HIV-infected individuals, particularly those on antiretroviral therapies. PMID:25586559

  17. Thermophile bacteria in permafrost: model for astrobiology

    Gilichinsky, D.; Rivkina, E.; Shcherbakova, V.; Laurinavichius, K.; Kholodov, A.; Abramov, A.

    2003-04-01

    According the NASA point of view, one way to have liquid water on Mars at shallow depths would be through subglacial volcanism. Such volcano-ice interactions could be going on beneath the polar caps of Mars today, or even within the adjacent permafrost around the margins of the ice caps. This is why one of the Earth's models, close to extraterrestrial environment, represented by active volcanoes in permafrost areas and the main question is - does such econishes as volcanoes and associated environment contain recently microbial communities? The first step of this study was carried out on volcano Stromboli (Italy), using the marine water samples extracted from the borehole near the island marine coast, surrounding the volcano. According the temperatures (45^oC), this thermal water has the hydraulic connection with volcano. Microscopy analyses of studied water shown the presence of different morphological types of microorganisms: small mobile roads, coccoid and sarcina-like organisms and long fixed roads, as well as rest forms (spores and cysts). To separate this community on marine and volcano microorganisms, the common mineral media with added CO_2, acetate or glucose-peptone as a source of carbon were used for culturing, and Fe3+, S^o, SO_42- were added as a electron acceptors. We attempt to isolate thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms of different metabolic groups - methanogens, acetogens, iron-, sulfur- and sulfate-reducers, and to test each group of microorganisms on the presence of halophilic forms. After 24 hours of incubation at temperatures varied 55 to 85^o, the grow relatively the control media was observed at CO_2+H_2 and glucose-peptone media. Microscopy study of preparations showed small coccus of irregular shape that was unable to reduce S^o or SO_42-. During the subsequent re-seeding were obtained the enrichment cultures of themophilic bacteria, genetically closed to genera Thermococcus: heterotrophic, growing up to 95^oC with the growth optimum at 87^oC and acetogenic, growing up to 92^oC with the optimum at 80^oC. Both isolated bacteria were non-halophiles. Using these data, one can conclude that isolated thermophiles are associated with volcano. The next step of this study was carried out on volcano Tolbachik, south border of permafrost zone, Kamchatka peninsula (Russia). During the volcano eruption in 1975-76 the thick (12 to 16 m) layer of interstratify volcano ash, sand and scoria was accumulated on the elevation 1100 m and to the moment this horizon is complete freeze, t=(-1)-(-2)^oC. The analyses showed that frozen samples extracted from the borehole, crossing these young volcano deposits, contain viable microorganisms and among them, thermophilic anaerobic bacteria. Moreover, biogenic methane (up to 1100-1900 μlCH_4/kg soil) was also found in these samples. Thermophiles were never found before in permafrost thickness and this is why this study demonstrate that there are only one way for thermophilic bacteria to appear within frozen volcanic horizon - during the eruption, from volcano or surrounding associated subsurface geological strata. The most important conclusion is that thermophilic bacteria might survive in permafrost and even produce the biogenic gases. This is why the terrestrial volcano microbial community might serve as an exobiological model for hypothesis of existing ancient microbiocenoses, i. e. extraterrestrial habitats that probably might be found around Martian or other planet volcano in the absence of oxygen.

  18. Identification, characterization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the rolling-circle replication initiator protein from plasmid pSTK1

    A proteolytically stable fragment of a plasmid replication initiation protein from the thermophile G. stearothermophilus has been biochemically characterized, crystallized and diffraction data collected to a resolution of 2.5 Å. Antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens poses an ever-increasing risk to human health. In antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus this resistance often resides in extra-chromosomal plasmids, such as those of the pT181 family, which replicate via a rolling-circle mechanism mediated by a plasmid-encoded replication initiation protein. Currently, there is no structural information available for the pT181-family Rep proteins. Here, the crystallization of a catalytically active fragment of a homologous replication initiation protein from the thermophile Geobacillus stearothermophilus responsible for the replication of plasmid pSTK1 is reported. Crystals of the RepSTK1 fragment diffracted to a resolution of 2.5 Å and belonged to space group P212121

  19. Gating mechanosensitive channels in bacteria with an atomic force microscope

    Garces, Renata; Miller, Samantha; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Third Institute of Physics Team; School of Medical Sciences Collaboration

    The regulation of growth and integrity of bacteria is critically linked to mechanical stress. Bacteria typically maintain a high difference of osmotic pressure (turgor pressure) with respect to the environment. This pressure difference (on the order of 1 atm) is supported by the cell envelope, a composite of lipid membranes and a rigid cell wall. Turgor pressure is controlled by the ratio of osmolytes inside and outside bacteria and thus, can abruptly increase upon osmotic downshock. For structural integrity bacteria rely on the mechanical stability of the cell wall and on the action of mechanosensitive (MS) channels: membrane proteins that release solutes in response to stress in the cell envelope. We here present experimental data on MS channels gating. We activate channels by indenting living bacteria with the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM). We compare responses of wild-type and mutant bacteria in which some or all MS channels have been eliminated.

  20. [Ferrous-manganese oxidizing bacteria from the nature water].

    Qin, Song-yan; Ma, Fang; Huang, Peng

    2008-06-01

    Glass slides were hanged into a canal to acquire the ferrous-manganese oxidizing bacteria settled bio-film. Two isolated methods for ferrous-manganese oxidizing bacteria with special iron-manganese oxidizing matrix from the bio-film were tested. Element component of bacteria product and sheath structure of bacteria were analyzed. With two methods, plate cultivation and the novel semi-solid in situ cultivation method, strains belong to Family Leptothrix were isolated. XRF showed that the amorphous iron and manganese were two major metal elements of the precipitation formed by one strain of Leptothrix spp.. Through the microscope observation, one strain of Family Leptothrix was determined to form branch-like structured sheath, while another strain formed spider web-like structured sheath. Those isolated bacteria provide model strains for future testing of FISH probe and PCR primer of ferrous-manganese oxidizing bacteria. PMID:18763517

  1. THE AVAILABILITY OF Mytilus galloprovincialis FOR MONITORING ENTERIC BACTERIA

    Nüket SĐVRĐ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the usage of Mediterranean Mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis Lamarck, 1819 as monitoring organism on enteric bacteria concentrations in heavily polluted marine environments and its use possibilities as water quality improving tool were investigated. The ability of the Mediterranean Mussel to accumulate and purge fecal coliform bacteria investigated in laboratory experiments. First, increase on bacteria concentration was observed on 1,5th hour and sharp decrease rate lasted until 10th hours after that period slow but steady declining bacteria concentration rate was observed and beginning bacteria concentration rate was reached within next 30- 50 hours. Time dependent bacteria concentration reduction has found statistically significant at p<0.001 (r-sq = 0.81. The investigation has also revealed that mussel farming could be established in the over polluted area which is the case only in the different discharge points in the sea.

  2. Fluctuations of Bacteria-laden Microbeads in a Liquid

    Kara, Vural; Lissandrello, Charles; O'Connor, Joan; Romero Rodriguez, Jose Alberto; Li, Le; Ekinci, Kamil

    2015-11-01

    The motion of bacteria adhered on surfaces may lead to powerful approaches for novel diagnostic tests. Examples were recently shown using microcantilevers on which bacteria were adhered using surface chemistry. In these experiments, the presence of bacteria led to an increase in the fluctuations of the microcantilevers in the frequency range 1-100 Hz. After administering antibiotics, the fluctuations returned to their control value. Here, we build on these studies by monitoring the fluctuations of micro-beads with bacteria adhered on their surfaces. We coat the micro-beads with Poly D Lysine (PDL) in order to attach Escherichia coli. We measure the fluctuations of the beads in motility buffer media using an optical microscope with and without bacteria. We calculate the diffusion coefficients from the mean square displacements (MSD) and correlate these with the presence of bacteria on the beads. These studies lay the foundation for the development of a rapid antibiotic susceptibility test based on bacterial activity.

  3. Virulence of Entomopathogenic Fungi and Bacteria against Stored Product Pests

    Sevim, Ali; Sevim, Elif; Demirci, Meryem

    2015-01-01

    Virulence of Entomopathogenic Fungi and Bacteria against Stored Product PestsEntomopathogenic microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes and protozoa play an important role for regulation of insect pest populations and, this leads to use these microorganisms as biological control agents against pest species as an alternative to chemicals insecticides. In this study, we tested different bacteria originated from stored product pests and fungi isolated from different sources agai...

  4. Biogeography of anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria

    JoshDavidNeufeld

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria are able to oxidize ammonia and reduce nitrite to produce N2 gas. After being discovered in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), anammox bacteria were subsequently characterized in natural environments, including marine, estuary, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats. Anammox bacteria play an important role in removing fixed N from both engineered and natural ecosystems, but broad scale anammox bacterial distributions, based on available data, hav...

  5. Isolation and identification of marine fish tumour (odontoma) associated bacteria

    Ramalingam Vijayakumar; Kuzhanthaivel Raja; Vijayapoopathi Singaravel; Ayyaru Gopalakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify fish tumour associated bacteria. Methods: The marine fish Sphyraena jello with odontoma was collected from in Tamil Nadu (Southeast India), and tumour associated bacteria were isolated. Then the isolated bacteria were identified based on molecular characters. Results: A total of 4 different bacterial species were isolated from tumour tissue. The bacterial species were Bacillus sp., Pontibacter sp., Burkholderia sp. and Macrococcus sp., and the se...

  6. Validity of susceptibility testing of uropathogenic bacteria in general practice.

    Bjerrum, L.; Grinsted, P.; Hyltoft Petersen, P.; Sgaard, P

    1999-01-01

    Resistance of uropathogenic bacteria to antibiotics is an increasing problem in primary health care. The aim of this study was to evaluate antibacterial susceptibility testing of uropathogenic bacteria when performed in general practice. Urine specimens with a known quantity of typically uropathogenic bacteria were sent to 25 general practices. The predictive values of testing a bacterial strain as susceptible ranged from 0.89 (nitrofurantoin) to 1.00 (sulphamethizole), and the predictive val...

  7. Susceptibility and resistance of ruminal bacteria to antimicrobial feed additives.

    Nagaraja, T. G.; Taylor, M.B.

    1987-01-01

    Susceptibility and resistance of ruminal bacterial species to avoparcin, narasin, salinomycin, thiopeptin, tylosin, virginiamycin, and two new ionophore antibiotics, RO22-6924/004 and RO21-6447/009, were determined. Generally, antimicrobial compounds were inhibitory to gram-positive bacteria and those bacteria that have gram-positive-like cell wall structure. MICs ranged from 0.09 to 24.0 micrograms/ml. Gram-negative bacteria were resistant at the highest concentration tested (48.0 micrograms...

  8. Hessian Fly-Associated Bacteria: Transmission, Essentiality, and Composition.

    Bansal, Raman; Hulbert, Scot; Schemerhorn, Brandi; Reese, John C.; Whitworth, R Jeff; Stuart, Jeffrey J.; Chen, Ming-Shun

    2011-01-01

    Plant-feeding insects have been recently found to use microbes to manipulate host plant physiology and morphology. Gall midges are one of the largest groups of insects that manipulate host plants extensively. Hessian fly (HF, Mayetiola destructor) is an important pest of wheat and a model system for studying gall midges. To examine the role of bacteria in parasitism, a systematic analysis of bacteria associated with HF was performed for the first time. Diverse bacteria were found in different...

  9. Exploration of the core metabolism of symbiotic bacteria

    Klein Cecilia Coimbra; Cottret Ludovic; Kielbassa Janice; Charles Hubert; Gautier Christian; Ribeiro de Vasconcelos Ana Tereza; Lacroix Vincent; Sagot Marie-France

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background A large number of genome-scale metabolic networks is now available for many organisms, mostly bacteria. Previous works on minimal gene sets, when analysing host-dependent bacteria, found small common sets of metabolic genes. When such analyses are restricted to bacteria with similar lifestyles, larger portions of metabolism are expected to be shared and their composition is worth investigating. Here we report a comparative analysis of the small molecule metabolism of symbi...

  10. A Microfluidic Platform for Profiling Biomechanical Properties of Bacteria

    Sun, Xuanhao; Weinlandt, William D; Patel, Harsh; WU, Mingming; Hernandez, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to resist mechanical forces is necessary for the survival and division of bacteria and has traditionally been probed using specialized, low-throughput techniques such as atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers. Here we demonstrate a microfluidic technique to profile the stiffness of individual bacteria and populations of bacteria. The approach is similar to micropipette aspiration used to characterize the biomechanical performance of eukaryotic cells. However, the small size ...

  11. The Sorption of Hydrophobic Organic Chemicals to Bacteria

    Lunsman, Tamara

    2004-01-01

    The toxicity and time-dependent sorption of three hydrophobic organic chemicals to Rhodococcus rhodochrous bacteria were investigated. In experiments, environmentally relevant concentrations of pentachlorophenol (PCP), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and dichlorobiphenyl (DPCB) were applied to living (both growing and non-growing) bacteria as well as to dead bacteria. For PCP (an ionizing chemical), bacterial growth decreased and death increased as the PCP concentration increased. In sorption exp...

  12. Structural diversity among methanofurans from different methanogenic bacteria.

    White, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    An examination of the methanofurans isolated from a wide range of methanogenic bacteria and from Archaeoglobus fulgidus has revealed at least five chromatographically distinct methanofurans. Bacteria from each major genus of methanogenic bacteria have been found to contain a chemically different methanofuran. The nature of the differences in the methanofurans appears to lie in the modification of the side chain attached to the basic core structure of 4-[N-(gamma-L-glutamyl-gamma-L-glutamyl)-p...

  13. Transmission of Nephridial Bacteria of the Earthworm Eisenia fetida

    Davidson, Seana K.; Stahl, David A.

    2006-01-01

    The lumbricid earthworms (annelid family Lumbricidae) harbor gram-negative bacteria in their excretory organs, the nephridia. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing of bacteria associated with the nephridia of several earthworm species has shown that each species of worm harbors a distinct bacterial species and that the bacteria from different species form a monophyletic cluster within the genus Acidovorax, suggesting that there is a specific association resulting from radiation from a common b...

  14. Bacteria homologus to Aeromonas capable of microcystin degradation

    Mankiewicz-Boczek J.; Gągała I.; Jurczak T.; Jaskulska A.; Pawełczyk J.; Dziadek J.

    2015-01-01

    Water blooms dominated by cyanobacteria are capable of producing hepatotoxins known as microcystins. These toxins are dangerous to people and to the environment. Therefore, for a better understanding of the biological termination of this increasingly common phenomenon, bacteria with the potential to degrade cyanobacteria-derived hepatotoxins and the degradative activity of culturable bacteria were studied. Based on the presence of the mlrA gene, bacteria with a homo...

  15. Isolation of Fucosyltransferase-Producing Bacteria from Marine Environments

    Kajiwara, Hitomi; Toda, Munetoyo; Mine, Toshiki; Nakada, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Fucose-containing oligosaccharides on the cell surface of some pathogenic bacteria are thought to be important for host-microbe interactions and to play a major role in the pathogenicity of bacterial pathogens. Here, we screened marine bacteria for glycosyltransferases using two methods: a one-pot glycosyltransferase assay method and a lectin-staining method. Using this approach, we isolated marine bacteria with fucosyltransferase activity. There have been no previous reports of marine bacter...

  16. SCREENING OF PLANT EXTRACTS FOR ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY AGAINST BACTERIA

    Alexander Vatľák; Adriana Kolesárová; Nenad Vukovič; Katarína Rovná; Jana Petrová; Viktória Vimmerová; Lukáš Hleba; Martin Mellen; Miroslava Kačániová

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was antimicrobial action of the methanolic extracts of Equisetum arvense L. and Urtica dioica L. against gramnegative and grampositive bacteria. The antimicrobial activities of the extracts against gramnegative bacteria: Escherichia coli CCM 3988, Listeria ivanovii CCM 5884, Listeria innocua CCM 4030, Pseudomonas aeruginosa CCM 1960, Serratia rubidaea CCM 4684 and grampositive bacteria: Brochothrix thermosphacta CCM 4769, Enterococcus raffinosus CCM 4216, Lactobacillus r...

  17. ?-Lactamase-producing bacteria How can I resist you?

    Tiersma, Y.

    2013-01-01

    In 1945 Alexander Fleming won the Nobel Prize for his discovery of the first antibiotic, penicillin, which is a natural ?-lactam antibiotic. In an interview with the New York Times in the same year, he warned that misuse of the drug could result in selection of resistant bacteria. Shortly after this prediction, a significant number of strains of bacteria had become resistant to penicillin. Since the discovery of penicillin, a lot of other antibiotics have been discovered. For decades bacteria...

  18. THE AVAILABILITY OF Mytilus galloprovincialis FOR MONITORING ENTERIC BACTERIA

    Nüket SĐVRĐ; Đbrahim OKUMUS; Seyma UYSAL

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the usage of Mediterranean Mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis Lamarck, 1819) as monitoring organism on enteric bacteria concentrations in heavily polluted marine environments and its use possibilities as water quality improving tool were investigated. The ability of the Mediterranean Mussel to accumulate and purge fecal coliform bacteria investigated in laboratory experiments. First, increase on bacteria concentration was observed on 1,5th hour and sharp decrease rat...

  19. Characterization of Bacteria Associated with Pinewood Nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus

    Vicente, Claudia S. L.; Nascimento, Francisco; Espada, Margarida; Barbosa, Pedro; Mota, Manuel; Glick, Bernard R; Oliveira, Solange

    2012-01-01

    Pine wilt disease (PWD) is a complex disease integrating three major agents: the pathogenic agent, the pinewood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus; the insect-vector Monochamus spp.; and the host pine tree, Pinus sp. Since the early 80's, the notion that another pathogenic agent, namely bacteria, may play a role in PWD has been gaining traction, however the role of bacteria in PWD is still unknown. The present work supports the possibility that some B. xylophilus-associated bacteria may play...

  20. Conspicuous Veils Formed by Vibrioid Bacteria on Sulfidic Marine Sediment

    Thar, Roland; Kühl, Michael

    2002-01-01

    We describe the morphology and behavior of a hitherto unknown bacterial species that forms conspicuous veils (typical dimensions, 30 by 30 mm) on sulfidic marine sediment. The new bacteria were enriched on complex sulfidic medium within a benthic gradient chamber in oxygen-sulfide countergradients, but the bacteria have so far not been isolated in pure culture, and a detailed characterization of their metabolism is still lacking. The bacteria are colorless, gram-negative, and vibrioid-shaped ...